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Sample records for bone collagen matrix

  1. Demineralized dentin matrix composite collagen material for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianan; Yang, Juan; Zhong, Xiaozhong; He, Fengrong; Wu, Xiongwen; Shen, Guanxin

    2013-01-01

    Demineralized dentin matrix (DDM) had been successfully used in clinics as bone repair biomaterial for many years. However, particle morphology of DDM limited it further applications. In this study, DDM and collagen were prepared to DDM composite collagen material. The surface morphology of the material was studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). MC3T3-E1 cells responses in vitro and tissue responses in vivo by implantation of DDM composite collagen material in bone defect of rabbits were also investigated. SEM analysis showed that DDM composite collagen material evenly distributed and formed a porous scaffold. Cell culture and animal models results indicated that DDM composite collagen material was biocompatible and could support cell proliferation and differentiation. Histological evaluation showed that DDM composite collagen material exhibited good biocompatibility, biodegradability and osteoconductivity with host bone in vivo. The results suggested that DDM composite collagen material might have a significant clinical advantage and potential to be applied in bone and orthopedic surgery.

  2. Computational segmentation of collagen fibers in bone matrix indicates bone quality in ovariectomized rat spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghma, Diaa Eldin S; Malhan, Deeksha; Simon, Paul; Stötzel, Sabine; Kern, Stefanie; Hassan, Fathi; Lips, Katrin Susanne; Heiss, Christian; El Khassawna, Thaqif

    2018-05-01

    Bone loss varies according to disease and age and these variations affect bone cells and extracellular matrix. Osteoporosis rat models are widely investigated to assess mechanical and structural properties of bone; however, bone matrix proteins and their discrepant regulation of diseased and aged bone are often overlooked. The current study considered the spine matrix properties of ovariectomized rats (OVX) against control rats (Sham) at 16 months of age. Diseased bone showed less compact structure with inhomogeneous distribution of type 1 collagen (Col1) and changes in osteocyte morphology. Intriguingly, demineralization patches were noticed in the vicinity of blood vessels in the OVX spine. The organic matrix structure was investigated using computational segmentation of collagen fibril properties. In contrast to the aged bone, diseased bone showed longer fibrils and smaller orientation angles. The study shows the potential of quantifying transmission electron microscopy images to predict the mechanical properties of bone tissue.

  3. Response of induced bone defects in horses to collagen matrix containing the human parathyroid hormone gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backstrom, Kristin C; Bertone, Alicia L; Wisner, Erik R; Weisbrode, Stephen E

    2004-09-01

    To determine whether human parathyroid hormone (hPTH) gene in collagen matrix could safely promote bone formation in diaphyseal or subchondral bones of horses. 8 clinically normal adult horses. Amount, rate, and quality of bone healing for 13 weeks were determined by use of radiography, quantitative computed tomography, and histomorphometric analysis. Diaphyseal cortex and subchondral bone defects of metacarpi were filled with hPTH(1-34) gene-activated matrix (GAM) or remained untreated. Joints were assessed on the basis of circumference, synovial fluid analysis, pain on flexion, lameness, and gross and histologic examination. Bone volume index was greater for cortical defects treated with hPTH(1-34) GAM, compared with untreated defects. Bone production in cortical defects treated with hPTH(1-34) GAM positively correlated with native bone formation in untreated defects. In contrast, less bone was detected in hPTH(1-34) GAM-treated subchondral bone defects, compared with untreated defects, and histology confirmed poorer healing and residual collagen sponge. Use of hPTH(1-34) GAM induced greater total bone, specifically periosteal bone, after 13 weeks of healing in cortical defects of horses. The hPTH(1-34) GAM impeded healing of subchondral bone but was biocompatible with joint tissues. Promotion of periosteal bone formation may be beneficial for healing of cortical fractures in horses, but the delay in onset of bone formation may negate benefits. The hPTH(1-34) GAM used in this study should not be placed in articular subchondral bone defects, but contact with articular surfaces is unlikely to cause short-term adverse effects.

  4. Changes in subchondral bone mineral density and collagen matrix organization in growing horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holopainen, Jaakko T; Brama, Pieter A J; Halmesmäki, Esa; Harjula, Terhi; Tuukkanen, Juha; van Weeren, P René; Helminen, Heikki J; Hyttinen, Mika M

    2008-12-01

    The effects of growth and maturation on the mineral deposition and the collagen framework of equine subchondral bone (SCB) were studied. Osteochondral specimens (diameter 6 mm) from the left metacarpophalangeal joint of 5-(n=8), 11-(n=8) and 18-month-old (n=6) horses were investigated at two differently loaded sites (Site 1 (S1): intermittent peak loading; Site 2 (S2): habitual loading). The SCB mineral density (BMD) was measured with peripheral quantitative computer tomography (pQCT), and the data were adjusted against the volume fraction (Vv) of the bone extracellular matrix (ECM). Polarised light microscopy (PLM) was used to analyze the Vv, the collagen fibril parallelism index and the orientation angle distribution in two fractions (1 mm/fraction) beneath the osteochondral junction of the SCB. PLM analysis was made along two randomly selected perpendicularly oriented vertical sections to measure the tissue anisotropy in the x-, y-, and z-directions. The BMD of SCB at S1 and S2 increased significantly during maturation. At the same time, the Vv of the ECM increased even more. This meant that the Vv-adjusted BMD decreased. There were no significant differences between sites. The basic collagen fibril framework of SCB seems to be established already at the age of 5 months. During maturation, the extracellular matrix underwent a decrease in collagen fibril parallelism but no changes in collagen orientation. The variation was negligible in the collagen network estimates in the two section planes. Growth and maturation induce significant changes in the equine SCB. The BMD increase in SCB is primarily due to the growth of bone volume and not to any increase in mineral deposition. An increase in weight-bearing appears to greatly affect the BMD and the volume of the extracellular matrix. Growth and maturation induce a striking change in collagen fibril parallelism but not in fibril orientation. The structural anisotropy of the subchondral bone is significant along the

  5. Effects of increased collagen-matrix density on the mechanical properties and in vivo absorbability of hydroxyapatite-collagen composites as artificial bone materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunoki, Shunji [Life Science Group, Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute, 2-11-1 Fukasawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-0081 (Japan); Sugiura, Hiroaki; Kondo, Eiji; Yasuda, Kazunori [Department of Sports Medicine and Joint Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-15 Nishi-7, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638 Japan (Japan); Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo, E-mail: yunoki.shunji@iri-tokyo.jp [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, 2-12-1-S7-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increased collagen-matrix density on the mechanical properties and in vivo absorbability of porous hydroxyapatite (HAp)-collagen composites as artificial bone materials. Seven types of porous HAp-collagen composites were prepared from HAp nanocrystals and dense collagen fibrils. Their densities and HAp/collagen weight ratios ranged from 122 to 331 mg cm{sup -3} and from 20/80 to 80/20, respectively. The flexural modulus and strength increased with an increase in density, reaching 2.46 {+-} 0.48 and 0.651 {+-} 0.103 MPa, respectively. The porous composites with a higher collagen-matrix density exhibited much higher mechanical properties at the same densities, suggesting that increasing the collagen-matrix density is an effective way of improving the mechanical properties. It was also suggested that other structural factors in addition to collagen-matrix density are required to achieve bone-like mechanical properties. The in vivo absorbability of the composites was investigated in bone defects of rabbit femurs, demonstrating that the absorption rate decreased with increases in the composite density. An exhaustive increase in density is probably limited by decreases in absorbability as artificial bones.

  6. Effects of increased collagen-matrix density on the mechanical properties and in vivo absorbability of hydroxyapatite-collagen composites as artificial bone materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunoki, Shunji; Sugiura, Hiroaki; Kondo, Eiji; Yasuda, Kazunori; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increased collagen-matrix density on the mechanical properties and in vivo absorbability of porous hydroxyapatite (HAp)-collagen composites as artificial bone materials. Seven types of porous HAp-collagen composites were prepared from HAp nanocrystals and dense collagen fibrils. Their densities and HAp/collagen weight ratios ranged from 122 to 331 mg cm -3 and from 20/80 to 80/20, respectively. The flexural modulus and strength increased with an increase in density, reaching 2.46 ± 0.48 and 0.651 ± 0.103 MPa, respectively. The porous composites with a higher collagen-matrix density exhibited much higher mechanical properties at the same densities, suggesting that increasing the collagen-matrix density is an effective way of improving the mechanical properties. It was also suggested that other structural factors in addition to collagen-matrix density are required to achieve bone-like mechanical properties. The in vivo absorbability of the composites was investigated in bone defects of rabbit femurs, demonstrating that the absorption rate decreased with increases in the composite density. An exhaustive increase in density is probably limited by decreases in absorbability as artificial bones.

  7. Scaffolds for bone regeneration made of hydroxyapatite microspheres in a collagen matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cholas, Rahmatullah, E-mail: rahmat.cholas@gmail.com; Kunjalukkal Padmanabhan, Sanosh, E-mail: sanosh2001@gmail.com; Gervaso, Francesca; Udayan, Gayatri; Monaco, Graziana; Sannino, Alessandro; Licciulli, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Biomimetic scaffolds with a structural and chemical composition similar to native bone tissue may be promising for bone tissue regeneration. In the present work hydroxyapatite mesoporous microspheres (mHA) were incorporated into collagen scaffolds containing an ordered interconnected macroporosity. The mHA were obtained by spray drying of a nano hydroxyapatite slurry prepared by the precipitation technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that the microspheres were composed only of hydroxyapatite (HA) phase, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed the Ca/P ratio to be 1.69 which is near the value for pure HA. The obtained microspheres had an average diameter of 6 μm, a specific surface area of 40 m{sup 2}/g as measured by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis, and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) analysis showed a mesoporous structure with an average pore diameter of 16 nm. Collagen/HA-microsphere (Col/mHA) composite scaffolds were prepared by freeze-drying followed by dehydrothermal crosslinking. SEM observations of Col/mHA scaffolds revealed HA microspheres embedded within a porous collagen matrix with a pore size ranging from a few microns up to 200 μm, which was also confirmed by histological staining of sections of paraffin embedded scaffolds. The compressive modulus of the composite scaffold at low and high strain values was 1.7 and 2.8 times, respectively, that of pure collagen scaffolds. Cell proliferation measured by the MTT assay showed more than a 3-fold increase in cell number within the scaffolds after 15 days of culture for both pure collagen scaffolds and Col/mHA composite scaffolds. Attractive properties of this composite scaffold include the potential to load the microspheres for drug delivery and the controllability of the pore structure at various length scales. - Highlights: • Mesoporous hydroxyapatite microsphere(mHA) synthesized by spray drying method • Porous collagen/mHA composite scaffold made by freeze

  8. When size matters: differences in demineralized bone matrix particles affect collagen structure, mesenchymal stem cell behavior, and osteogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozza, B; Lesci, I G; Duchi, S; Della Bella, E; Martini, L; Salamanna, F; Falconi, M; Cinotti, S; Fini, M; Lucarelli, E; Donati, D

    2017-04-01

    Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) is a natural, collagen-based, osteoinductive biomaterial. Nevertheless, there are conflicting reports on the efficacy of this product. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether DBM collagen structure is affected by particle size and can influence DBM cytocompatibility and osteoinductivity. Sheep cortical bone was ground and particles were divided in three fractions with different sizes, defined as large (L, 1-2 mm), medium (M, 0.5-1 mm), and small (S, structure, with DBM-M being altered but not as much as DBM-S. DBM-M displayed a preferable trend in almost all biological characteristics tested, although all DBM particles revealed an optimal cytocompatibility. Subcutaneous implantation of DBM particles into immunocompromised mice resulted in bone induction only for DBM-M. When sheep MSC were seeded onto particles before implantation, all DBM particles were able to induce new bone formation with the best incidence for DBM-M and DBM-S. In conclusion, the collagen alteration in DBM-M is likely the best condition to promote bone induction in vivo. Furthermore, the choice of 0.5-1 mm particles may enable to obtain more efficient and consistent results among different research groups in bone tissue-engineering applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1019-1033, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Experimental Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Demineralized Bone Matrix and Collagenated Heterologous Bone Grafts Used Alone or in Combination with Platelet-Rich Fibrin on Bone Healing in Sinus Floor Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peker, Elif; Karaca, Inci Rana; Yildirim, Benay

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was an experimental evaluation of the effectiveness of demineralized bone matrix (DBM) and collagenated heterologous bone graft (CHBG) used alone or in combination with platelet-rich fibrin on bone healing in sinus floor augmentation procedures. In this study, 36 New Zealand rabbits were used. The bilateral sinus elevation was performed, and 72 defects were obtained. The rabbit maxillary sinuses were divided into four groups according to the augmentation biomaterials obtained: demineralized bone matrix (Grafton DBM Putty, Osteotech; DBM group), DBM combined with platelet-rich fibrin (PRF; DBM + PRF group), collagenated heterologous bone graft (CHBG; Apatos Mix, OsteoBiol, Tecnoss; CHBG group), CHBG combined with PRF (CHBG + PRF group). All groups were sacrificed at 2, 4, and 8 weeks after surgery for histologic, histomorphometric, and immunohistochemical analyses. The inflammatory reaction was moderate to intense at the second week in all groups and declined from 2 to 8 weeks. New bone formation was started at the second week and increased from 2 to 8 weeks in all groups. There was no significant difference in bone formation between the experimental groups that used PRF mixed graft material and control groups that used only graft material. The percentage of new bone formation showed a significant difference in DBM groups and DBM + PRF groups compared with other groups. There were osteoclasts around all the bone graft materials used, but the percentage of residual graft particles was significantly higher in CHBG groups and CHBG + PRF groups at the eighth week. There is no beneficial effect of the application of PRF in combination with demineralized bone matrix or collagenated heterologous bone graft on bone formation in sinus floor augmentation. The results of this study showed that both collagenated heterologous bone graft and demineralized bone matrix have osteoconductive properties, but demineralized bone matrix showed more bone formation

  10. Reconstitution of bone-like matrix in osteogenically differentiated mesenchymal stem cell–collagen constructs: A three-dimensional in vitro model to study hematopoietic stem cell niche

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    WY Lai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs and osteoblasts are important niche cells for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in bone marrow osteoblastic niche. Here, we aim to partially reconstitute the bone marrow HSC niche in vitro using collagen microencapsulation for investigation of the interactions between HSCs and MSCs. Mouse MSCs (mMSCs microencapsulated in collagen were osteogenically differentiated to derive a bone-like matrix consisting of osteocalcin, osteopontin, and calcium deposits and secreted bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2. Decellularized bone-like matrix was seeded with fluorescence-labeled human MSCs and HSCs. Comparing with pure collagen scaffold, significantly more HSCs and HSC–MSC pairs per unit area were found in the decellularized bone-like matrix. Moreover, incubation with excess neutralizing antibody of BMP2 resulted in a significantly higher number of HSC per unit area than that without in the decellularized matrix. This work suggests that the osteogenic differentiated MSC–collagen microsphere is a valuable three-dimensional in vitro model to elucidate cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions in HSC niche.

  11. Effects of cell-attachment and extracellular matrix on bone formation in vivo in collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

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    Villa, Max M; Wang, Liping; Rowe, David W; Wei, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based tissue engineering can be used to replace missing or damaged bone, but the optimal methods for delivering therapeutic cells to a bony defect have not yet been established. Using transgenic reporter cells as a donor source, two different collagen-hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds, and a critical-size calvarial defect model, we investigated the effect of a cell-attachment period prior to implantation, with or without an extracellular matrix-based seeding suspension, on cell engraftment and osteogenesis. When quantitatively compared, the in-house scaffold implanted immediately had a higher mean radiopacity than in-house scaffolds incubated overnight. Both scaffold types implanted immediately had significantly higher area fractions of donor cells, while the in-house collagen-HA scaffolds implanted immediately had higher area fractions of the mineralization label compared with groups incubated overnight. When the cell loading was compared in vitro for each delivery method using the in-house scaffold, immediate loading led to higher numbers of delivered cells. Immediate loading may be preferable in order to ensure robust bone formation in vivo. The use of a secondary ECM carrier improved the distribution of donor cells only when a pre-attachment period was applied. These results have improved our understanding of cell delivery to bony defects in the context of in vivo outcomes.

  12. Biomimetic soluble collagen purified from bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ana Marina; Gentile, Piergiorgio; Sartori, Susanna; Pagliano, Cristina; Cabrele, Chiara; Chiono, Valeria; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2012-11-01

    Type I collagen has been extensively exploited as a biomaterial for biomedical applications and drug delivery; however, small molecular alterations occurring during the isolation procedure and its interaction with residual bone extracellular matrix molecules or proteins might affect the overall material biocompatibility and performance. The aim of the current work is to study the potential alterations in collagen properties and organization associated with the absence of proteoglycans, which mimic pathological conditions associated with age-related diseases. A new approach for evaluating the effect of proteoglycans on the properties of isolated type I collagen from the bone matrix is described. Additional treatment with guanidine hydrochloride was introduced to remove residual proteoglycans from the collagen matrix. The properties of the isolated collagen with/without guanidine hydrochloride treatment were investigated and compared with a commercial rabbit collagen as control. We demonstrate that the absence of proteoglycans in the isolated type I collagen affects its thermal properties, the extraction into its native structure, and its ability to hydrate and self-assemble into fibers. The fine control and tuning of all these features, linked to the absence of non-collagenous proteins as proteoglycans, offer the possibility of designing new strategies and biomaterials with advanced biomimetic properties aimed at regenerating bone tissue in the case of fragility and/or defects. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Distinct characteristics of mandibular bone collagen relative to long bone collagen: relevance to clinical dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Takashi; Tokutomi, Kentaro; Sasaki, Michiko; Katafuchi, Michitsuna; Mizumachi, Emiri; Sato, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Bone undergoes constant remodeling throughout life. The cellular and biochemical mechanisms of bone remodeling vary in a region-specific manner. There are a number of notable differences between the mandible and long bones, including developmental origin, osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells, and the rate of bone turnover. Collagen, the most abundant matrix protein in bone, is responsible for determining the relative strength of particular bones. Posttranslational modifications of collagen, such as intermolecular crosslinking and lysine hydroxylation, are the most essential determinants of bone strength, although the amount of collagen is also important. In comparison to long bones, the mandible has greater collagen content, a lower amount of mature crosslinks, and a lower extent of lysine hydroxylation. The great abundance of immature crosslinks in mandibular collagen suggests that there is a lower rate of cross-link maturation. This means that mandibular collagen is relatively immature and thus more readily undergoes degradation and turnover. The greater rate of remodeling in mandibular collagen likely renders more flexibility to the bone and leaves it more suited to constant exercise. As reviewed here, it is important in clinical dentistry to understand the distinctive features of the bones of the jaw.

  14. Distinct Characteristics of Mandibular Bone Collagen Relative to Long Bone Collagen: Relevance to Clinical Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Matsuura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone undergoes constant remodeling throughout life. The cellular and biochemical mechanisms of bone remodeling vary in a region-specific manner. There are a number of notable differences between the mandible and long bones, including developmental origin, osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells, and the rate of bone turnover. Collagen, the most abundant matrix protein in bone, is responsible for determining the relative strength of particular bones. Posttranslational modifications of collagen, such as intermolecular crosslinking and lysine hydroxylation, are the most essential determinants of bone strength, although the amount of collagen is also important. In comparison to long bones, the mandible has greater collagen content, a lower amount of mature crosslinks, and a lower extent of lysine hydroxylation. The great abundance of immature crosslinks in mandibular collagen suggests that there is a lower rate of cross-link maturation. This means that mandibular collagen is relatively immature and thus more readily undergoes degradation and turnover. The greater rate of remodeling in mandibular collagen likely renders more flexibility to the bone and leaves it more suited to constant exercise. As reviewed here, it is important in clinical dentistry to understand the distinctive features of the bones of the jaw.

  15. The Mineral–Collagen Interface in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The interface between collagen and the mineral reinforcement phase, carbonated hydroxyapatite (cAp), is essential for bone’s remarkable functionality as a biological composite material. The very small dimensions of the cAp phase and the disparate natures of the reinforcement and matrix are essential to the material’s performance but also complicate study of this interface. This article summarizes what is known about the cAp-collagen interface in bone and begins with descriptions of the matrix and reinforcement roles in composites, of the phases bounding the interface, of growth of cAp growing within the collagen matrix, and of the effect of intra- and extrafibrilar mineral on determinations of interfacial properties. Different observed interfacial interactions with cAp (collagen, water, non-collagenous proteins) are reviewed; experimental results on interface interactions during loading are reported as are their influence on macroscopic mechanical properties; conclusions of numerical modeling of interfacial interactions are also presented. The data suggest interfacial interlocking (bending of collagen molecules around cAp nanoplatelets) and water-mediated bonding between collagen and cAp are essential to load transfer. The review concludes with descriptions of areas where new research is needed to improve understanding of how the interface functions. PMID:25824581

  16. High-strength mineralized collagen artificial bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Tao, Chun-Sheng; Cui, Helen; Wang, Chang-Ming; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2014-03-01

    Mineralized collagen (MC) is a biomimetic material that mimics natural bone matrix in terms of both chemical composition and microstructure. The biomimetic MC possesses good biocompatibility and osteogenic activity, and is capable of guiding bone regeneration as being used for bone defect repair. However, mechanical strength of existing MC artificial bone is too low to provide effective support at human load-bearing sites, so it can only be used for the repair at non-load-bearing sites, such as bone defect filling, bone graft augmentation, and so on. In the present study, a high strength MC artificial bone material was developed by using collagen as the template for the biomimetic mineralization of the calcium phosphate, and then followed by a cold compression molding process with a certain pressure. The appearance and density of the dense MC were similar to those of natural cortical bone, and the phase composition was in conformity with that of animal's cortical bone demonstrated by XRD. Mechanical properties were tested and results showed that the compressive strength was comparable to human cortical bone, while the compressive modulus was as low as human cancellous bone. Such high strength was able to provide effective mechanical support for bone defect repair at human load-bearing sites, and the low compressive modulus can help avoid stress shielding in the application of bone regeneration. Both in vitro cell experiments and in vivo implantation assay demonstrated good biocompatibility of the material, and in vivo stability evaluation indicated that this high-strength MC artificial bone could provide long-term effective mechanical support at human load-bearing sites.

  17. Enhanced hyaline cartilage matrix synthesis in collagen sponge scaffolds by using siRNA to stabilize chondrocytes phenotype cultured with bone morphogenetic protein-2 under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Florence; Ollitrault, David; Hervieu, Magalie; Baugé, Catherine; Maneix, Laure; Goux, Didier; Chajra, Hanane; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Boumediene, Karim; Galera, Philippe; Demoor, Magali

    2013-07-01

    Cartilage healing by tissue engineering is an alternative strategy to reconstitute functional tissue after trauma or age-related degeneration. However, chondrocytes, the major player in cartilage homeostasis, do not self-regenerate efficiently and lose their phenotype during osteoarthritis. This process is called dedifferentiation and also occurs during the first expansion step of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). To ensure successful ACI therapy, chondrocytes must be differentiated and capable of synthesizing hyaline cartilage matrix molecules. We therefore developed a safe procedure for redifferentiating human chondrocytes by combining appropriate physicochemical factors: hypoxic conditions, collagen scaffolds, chondrogenic factors (bone morphogenetic protein-2 [BMP-2], and insulin-like growth factor I [IGF-I]) and RNA interference targeting the COL1A1 gene. Redifferentiation of dedifferentiated chondrocytes was evaluated using gene/protein analyses to identify the chondrocyte phenotypic profile. In our conditions, under BMP-2 treatment, redifferentiated and metabolically active chondrocytes synthesized a hyaline-like cartilage matrix characterized by type IIB collagen and aggrecan molecules without any sign of hypertrophy or osteogenesis. In contrast, IGF-I increased both specific and noncharacteristic markers (collagens I and X) of chondrocytes. The specific increase in COL2A1 gene expression observed in the BMP-2 treatment was shown to involve the specific enhancer region of COL2A1 that binds the trans-activators Sox9/L-Sox5/Sox6 and Sp1, which are associated with a decrease in the trans-inhibitors of COL2A1, c-Krox, and p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. Our procedure in which BMP-2 treatment under hypoxia is associated with a COL1A1 siRNA, significantly increased the differentiation index of chondrocytes, and should offer the opportunity to develop new ACI-based therapies in humans.

  18. Regenerative surgical therapy for peri-implantitis using deproteinized bovine bone mineral with 10% collagen, enamel matrix derivative and Doxycycline-A prospective 3-year cohort study.

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    Mercado, Faustino; Hamlet, Stephen; Ivanovski, Saso

    2018-05-16

    There is limited evidence regarding the long-term efficacy of regenerative treatment for peri-implantitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate a combination therapy of deproteinized bovine bone mineral with 10% collagen (DBBMC), enamel matrix derivative (EMD) and Doxycycline in the regeneration of bone defects associated with peri-implantitis. Thirty patients diagnosed with peri-implantitis (BoP/suppuration, probing depth greater than 4 mm, minimum radiographic bone loss of 20%, at least 2 years in function) were enrolled in the study. Clinical measurements included probing depths, recession, radiographic bone fill, gingival inflammation and bleeding on probing/suppuration. Following surgical access and debridement, the implant surfaces were decontaminated with 24% EDTA for 2 min, and the bone defects were filled with a combined mixture of DBBMC, EMD and Doxycycline powder. The defects were covered with connective tissue grafts where necessary. Clinical measurements were recorded after 12, 24 and 36 months. The mean probing depth and bone loss at the initial visit was 8.9 mm (±1.9) and 6.92 mm (±1.26), respectively. Both mean probing depth and bone loss reduced significantly from baseline to 3.55 mm (±0.50) and 2.85 mm (±0.73) at 12 months, 3.50 (±0.50) and 2.62 mm (±0.80) at 24 months and 3.50 mm (±0.50) and 2.60 mm (±0.73) at 36 months. 56.6% of the implants were considered successfully treated (according to Successful Treatment Outcome Criterion: PD 10%, no BoP/suppuration, no recession >0.5 mm for anterior implants and >1.5 mm for posterior implants) after 36 months. Regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis using a combined mixture of DBBMC, EMD and Doxycycline achieved promising results. The benefits of this protocol incorporating EMD should be tested in randomized clinical trials. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells on Hydrogel Scaffolds Derived from Decellularized Bone Extracellular Matrix and Collagen Type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduano, Francesco; Marrelli, Massimo; White, Lisa J; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on hydrogel scaffolds derived from bone extracellular matrix (bECM) in comparison to those seeded on collagen I (Col-I), one of the main components of dental pulp ECM. DPSCs isolated from human third molars were characterized for surface marker expression and odontogenic potential prior to seeding into bECM or Col-I hydrogel scaffolds. The cells were then seeded onto bECM and Col-I hydrogel scaffolds and cultured under basal conditions or with odontogenic and growth factor (GF) supplements. DPSCs cultivated on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) with and without supplements were used as controls. Gene expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1) and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and mineral deposition was observed by Von Kossa staining. When DPSCs were cultured on bECM hydrogels, the mRNA expression levels of DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE genes were significantly upregulated with respect to those cultured on Col-I scaffolds or TCPS in the absence of extra odontogenic inducers. In addition, more mineral deposition was observed on bECM hydrogel scaffolds as demonstrated by Von Kossa staining. Moreover, DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE mRNA expressions of DPSCs cultured on bECM hydrogels were further upregulated by the addition of GFs or osteo/odontogenic medium compared to Col-I treated cells in the same culture conditions. These results demonstrate the potential of the bECM hydrogel scaffolds to stimulate odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs.

  20. In vitro mesenchymal trilineage differentiation and extracellular matrix production by adipose and bone marrow derived adult equine multipotent stromal cells on a collagen scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lin; Zhang, Nan; Marsano, Anna; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Zhang, Yanru; Lopez, Mandi J

    2013-12-01

    Directed differentiation of adult multipotent stromal cells (MSC) is critical for effective treatment strategies. This study was designed to evaluate the capability of equine MSC from bone marrow (BMSC) and adipose tissue (ASC) on a type I collagen (COLI) scaffold to undergo chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation and form extracellular matrix (ECM) in vitro. Following determination of surface antigen expression, MSC were loaded into scaffolds in a perfusion bioreactor and loading efficiency was quantified. Cell-scaffold constructs were assessed after loading and 7, 14 and 21 days of culture in stromal or induction medium. Cell number was determined with DNA content, cell viability and spatial uniformity with confocal laser microscopy and cell phenotype and matrix production with light and scanning electron microscopy and mRNA levels. The MSC were positive for CD29 (>90 %), CD44 (>99 %), and CD105 (>60 %). Loading efficiencies were >70 %. The ASC and BMSC cell numbers on scaffolds were affected by culture in induction medium differently. Viable cells remained uniformly distributed in scaffolds for up to 21 days and could be directed to differentiate or to maintain an MSC phenotype. Micro- and ultrastructure showed lineage-specific cell and ECM changes. Lineage-specific mRNA levels differed between ASC and BMSC with induction and changed with time. Based on these results, equine ASC and BMSC differentiate into chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic lineages and form ECM similarly on COLI scaffolds. The collected data supports the potential for equine MSC-COLI constructs to support diverse equine tissue formation for controlled biological studies.

  1. Effect of modifications in mineralized collagen fibril and extra-fibrillar matrix material properties on submicroscale mechanical behavior of cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaohui; Ural, Ani

    2018-06-01

    A key length scale of interest in assessing the fracture resistance of bone is the submicroscale which is composed of mineralized collagen fibrils (MCF) and extra-fibrillar matrix (EFM). Although the processes through which the submicroscale constituents of bone contribute to the fracture resistance in bone have been identified, the extent of the modifications in submicroscale mechanical response due to the changes in individual properties of MCFs and EFM has not been determined. As a result, this study aims to quantify the influence of individual MCF and EFM material property modifications on the mechanical behavior (elastic modulus, ultimate strength, and resistance to failure) of bone at the submicroscale using a novel finite element modeling approach that incorporate 3D networks of MCFs with three different orientations as well as explicit representation of EFM. The models were evaluated under tensile loading in transverse (representing MCF separation) and longitudinal (representing MCF rupture) directions. The results showed that the apparent elastic modulus at the submicroscale under both loading directions for all orientations was only affected by the change in the elastic modulus of MCFs. MCF separation and rupture strengths were mainly dependent on the ultimate strength of EFM and MCFs, respectively, with minimal influence of other material properties. The extent of damage during MCF separation increased with increasing ultimate strength of EFM and decreased with increasing fracture energy of EFM with minimal contribution from elastic modulus of MCFs. For MCF rupture, there was an almost one-to-one linear relationship between the percent change in fracture energy of MCFs and the percent change in the apparent submicroscale fracture energy. The ultimate strength and elastic modulus of MCFs had moderate to limited influence on the MCF rupture fracture energy. The results of this study quantified the extent of changes that may be seen in the energy

  2. Biological effect of hydrolyzed collagen on bone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneault, Audrey; Prawitt, Janne; Fabien Soulé, Véronique; Coxam, Véronique; Wittrant, Yohann

    2017-06-13

    Osteoporosis is a chronic and asymptomatic disease characterized by low bone mass and skeletal microarchitectural deterioration, increased risk of fracture, and associated comorbidities most prevalent in the elderly. Due to an increasingly aging population, osteoporosis has become a major health issue requiring innovative disease management. Proteins are important for bone by providing building blocks and by exerting specific regulatory function. This is why adequate protein intake plays a considerable role in both bone development and bone maintenance. More specifically, since an increase in the overall metabolism of collagen can lead to severe dysfunctions and a more fragile bone matrix and because orally administered collagen can be digested in the gut, cross the intestinal barrier, enter the circulation, and become available for metabolic processes in the target tissues, one may speculate that a collagen-enriched diet provides benefits for the skeleton. Collagen-derived products such as gelatin or hydrolyzed collagen (HC) are well acknowledged for their safety from a nutritional point of view; however, what is their impact on bone biology? In this manuscript, we critically review the evidence from literature for an effect of HC on bone tissues in order to determine whether HC may represent a relevant alternative in the design of future nutritional approaches to manage osteoporosis prevention.

  3. A biocomposite of collagen nanofibers and nanohydroxyapatite for bone regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, N.; Sousa, S.R.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo; Monteiro, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    This work aims to design a synthetic construct that mimics the natural bone extracellular matrix through innovative approaches based on simultaneous type I collagen electrospinning and nanophased hydroxyapatite (nanoHA) electrospraying using non-denaturating conditions and non-toxic reagents. The

  4. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Liang; Xiaoran Li; Bin Wang; Bing Chen; Yannan Zhao; Jie Sun; Yan Zhuang; Jiajia Shi; He Shen; Zhijun Zhang; Jianwu Dai

    2016-01-01

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of ...

  5. Does collagen trigger the recruitment of osteoblasts into vacated bone resorption lacunae during bone remodeling?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdelgawad, Mohamed Essameldin; Søe, Kent; Andersen, Thomas Levin

    2014-01-01

    matrix molecules, collagen's potency was superior and only equaled by fibronectin. Next, the majority of the newly recruited osteoblast lineage cells positioned immediately next to the osteoclasts exhibit uPARAP/Endo180, an endocytic collagen receptor reported to be involved in collagen internalization......Osteoblast recruitment during bone remodeling is obligatory to re-construct the bone resorbed by the osteoclast. This recruitment is believed to be triggered by osteoclast products and is therefore likely to start early during the remodeling cycle. Several osteoclast products with osteoblast...... recruitment potential are already known. Here we draw the attention on the osteoblast recruitment potential of the collagen that is freshly demineralized by the osteoclast. Our evidence is based on observations on adult human cancellous bone, combined with in vitro assays. First, freshly eroded surfaces where...

  6. Peroxidase enzymes regulate collagen extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Rayner, Timothy E; Borowicz, Romana A; Greenwood, John E; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase are heme-containing enzymes often physically associated with fibrotic tissue and cancer in various organs, without any direct involvement in promoting fibroblast recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) biosynthesis at these sites. We report herein novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes possess a well-conserved profibrogenic capacity to stimulate the migration of fibroblastic cells and promote their ability to secrete collagenous proteins to generate a functional ECM both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured fibroblasts show that these cells are capable of rapidly binding and internalizing both myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase. Peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl 4-hydroxylase-dependent manner that does not require ascorbic acid. This response was blocked by the irreversible myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-amino-benzoic acid hydrazide, indicating peroxidase catalytic activity is essential for collagen biosynthesis. These results suggest that peroxidase enzymes, such as myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase, may play a fundamental role in regulating the recruitment of fibroblast and the biosynthesis of collagen ECM at sites of normal tissue repair and fibrosis, with enormous implications for many disease states where infiltrating inflammatory cells deposit peroxidases. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Collagen and mineral deposition in rabbit cortical bone during maturation and growth: effects on tissue properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Hanna; Harjula, Terhi; Koistinen, Arto; Iivarinen, Jarkko; Seppänen, Kari; Arokoski, Jari P A; Brama, Pieter A; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Helminen, Heikki J

    2010-12-01

    We characterized the composition and mechanical properties of cortical bone during maturation and growth and in adult life in the rabbit. We hypothesized that the collagen network develops earlier than the mineralized matrix. Growth was monitored, and the rabbits were euthanized at birth (newborn), and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 18 months of age. The collagen network was assessed biochemically (collagen content, enzymatic and non-enzymatic cross-links) in specimens from the mid-diaphysis of the tibia and femur and biomechanically (tensile testing) from decalcified whole tibia specimens. The mineralized matrix was analyzed using pQCT and 3-point bend tests from intact femur specimens. The collagen content and the Young's modulus of the collagen matrix increased significantly until the rabbits were 3 months old, and thereafter remained stable. The amount of HP and LP collagen cross-links increased continuously from newborn to 18 months of age, whereas PEN cross-links increased after 6 months of age. Bone mineral density and the Young's modulus of the mineralized bone increased until the rabbits were at least 6 months old. We concluded that substantial changes take place during the normal process of development in both the biochemical and biomechanical properties of rabbit cortical bone. In cortical bone, the collagen network reaches its mature composition and mechanical strength prior to the mineralized matrix. © 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Collagen Fiber Orientation in Primate Long Bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshaw, Johanna; Bromage, Timothy G; Terranova, Carl J; Enlow, Donald H

    2017-07-01

    Studies of variation in orientation of collagen fibers within bone have lead to the proposition that these are preferentially aligned to accommodate different kinds of load, with tension best resisted by fibers aligned longitudinally relative to the load, and compression best resisted by transversely aligned fibers. However, previous studies have often neglected to consider the effect of developmental processes, including constraints on collagen fiber orientation (CFO), particularly in primary bone. Here we use circularly polarized light microscopy to examine patterns of CFO in cross-sections from the midshaft femur, humerus, tibia, radius, and ulna in a range of living primate taxa with varied body sizes, phylogenetic relationships and positional behaviors. We find that a preponderance of longitudinally oriented collagen is characteristic of both periosteal primary and intracortically remodeled bone. Where variation does occur among groups, it is not simply understood via interpretations of mechanical loads, although prioritized adaptations to tension and/or shear are considered. While there is some suggestion that CFO may correlate with body size, this relationship is neither consistent nor easily explicable through consideration of size-related changes in mechanical adaptation. The results of our study indicate that there is no clear relationship between CFO and phylogenetic status. One of the principle factors accounting for the range of variation that does exist is primary tissue type, where slower depositing bone is more likely to comprise a larger proportion of oblique to transverse collagen fibers. Anat Rec, 300:1189-1207, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Hydroxyapatite/collagen bone-like nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    Our group has succeeded to synthesize material with bone-like nanostructure and bone-like inorganic and organic composition via self-organization mechanism between them using simultaneous titration method under controlled pH and temperature. The hydroxyapatite/collagen (HAp/Col) bone-like nanocomposite completely incorporated into bone remodeling process to be substituted by new bone. Cells cultured on the HAp/Col revealed very interesting reactions. Osteoblast-like MG63 cells showed upregulation of alkaline phosphatase >3 times greater than MG63 cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). MG63 cells 3-dimensionally cultured in a "HAp/Col sponge," a porous HAp/Col having sponge-like viscoelasticity, accumulated calcium phosphate nodules on extracellular matrices they secreted. Bone marrow cells co-cultured with osteoblasts on HAp/Col differentiated to osteoclasts without differentiation supplements. This phenomenon is not found in cells cultured on hydroxyapatite ceramics and TCPS, and rarely in cells cultured on dentin. These results suggest that HAp/Col is a good candidate for tissue engineering of bone as well as bone filler. In a clinical test as a bone filler, the HAp/Col sponge was significantly better than porous β-tricalcium phosphate. The HAp/Col sponge has been approved by the Japanese government and will be used as greatly needed bone filler in patients. In addition to the above, HAp/Col coating on titanium revealed higher osteo-conductivity than HAp-coated titanium and bare titanium and improved direct bonding between titanium and newly formed bone. The HAp/Col coating may be used for metal devices requiring osseointegration.

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis of normal and collagen IX null mouse cartilage reveals altered extracellular matrix composition and novel components of the collagen IX interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachvogel, Bent; Zaucke, Frank; Dave, Keyur; Norris, Emma L; Stermann, Jacek; Dayakli, Münire; Koch, Manuel; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Bateman, John F; Wilson, Richard

    2013-05-10

    Collagen IX is an integral cartilage extracellular matrix component important in skeletal development and joint function. Proteomic analysis and validation studies revealed novel alterations in collagen IX null cartilage. Matrilin-4, collagen XII, thrombospondin-4, fibronectin, βig-h3, and epiphycan are components of the in vivo collagen IX interactome. We applied a proteomics approach to advance our understanding of collagen IX ablation in cartilage. The cartilage extracellular matrix is essential for endochondral bone development and joint function. In addition to the major aggrecan/collagen II framework, the interacting complex of collagen IX, matrilin-3, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is essential for cartilage matrix stability, as mutations in Col9a1, Col9a2, Col9a3, Comp, and Matn3 genes cause multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, in which patients develop early onset osteoarthritis. In mice, collagen IX ablation results in severely disturbed growth plate organization, hypocellular regions, and abnormal chondrocyte shape. This abnormal differentiation is likely to involve altered cell-matrix interactions but the mechanism is not known. To investigate the molecular basis of the collagen IX null phenotype we analyzed global differences in protein abundance between wild-type and knock-out femoral head cartilage by capillary HPLC tandem mass spectrometry. We identified 297 proteins in 3-day cartilage and 397 proteins in 21-day cartilage. Components that were differentially abundant between wild-type and collagen IX-deficient cartilage included 15 extracellular matrix proteins. Collagen IX ablation was associated with dramatically reduced COMP and matrilin-3, consistent with known interactions. Matrilin-1, matrilin-4, epiphycan, and thrombospondin-4 levels were reduced in collagen IX null cartilage, providing the first in vivo evidence for these proteins belonging to the collagen IX interactome. Thrombospondin-4 expression was reduced at the mRNA level

  11. Microfibrous {beta}-TCP/collagen scaffolds mimic woven bone in structure and composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Shen; Zhang Xin; Cai Qing; Yang Xiaoping [Key Laboratory of Beijing City on Preparation and Processing of Novel Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang Bo; Deng Xuliang, E-mail: yangxp@mail.buct.edu.c [Department of VIP Dental Service, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Woven bone, as the initial form of bone tissue, is always found in developing and repairing bone. It is thought of as a temporary scaffold for the deposition of osteogenic cells and the laying down of lamellar bone. Thus, we hypothesize that a matrix which resembles the architecture and components of woven bone can provide an osteoblastic microenvironment for bone cell growth and new bone formation. In this study, woven-bone-like beta-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP)/collagen scaffolds were fabricated by sol-gel electrospinning and impregnating methods. Optimization studies on sol-gel synthesis and electrospinning process were conducted respectively to prepare pure {beta}-TCP fibers with dimensions close to mineralized collagen fibrils in woven bone. The collagen-coating layer prepared by impregnation had an adhesive role that held the {beta}-TCP fibers together, and resulted in rapid degradation and matrix mineralization in in vitro tests. MG63 osteoblast-like cells seeded on the resultant scaffolds showed three-dimensional (3D) morphologies, and merged into multicellular layers after 7 days culture. Cytotoxicity test further revealed that extracts from the resultant scaffolds could promote the proliferation of MG63 cells. Therefore, the woven-bone-like matrix that we constructed favored the attachment and proliferation of MG63 cells in three dimensions. It has great potential ability to shorten the time of formation of new bone.

  12. Microfibrous β-TCP/collagen scaffolds mimic woven bone in structure and composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shen; Zhang Xin; Cai Qing; Yang Xiaoping; Wang Bo; Deng Xuliang

    2010-01-01

    Woven bone, as the initial form of bone tissue, is always found in developing and repairing bone. It is thought of as a temporary scaffold for the deposition of osteogenic cells and the laying down of lamellar bone. Thus, we hypothesize that a matrix which resembles the architecture and components of woven bone can provide an osteoblastic microenvironment for bone cell growth and new bone formation. In this study, woven-bone-like beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP)/collagen scaffolds were fabricated by sol-gel electrospinning and impregnating methods. Optimization studies on sol-gel synthesis and electrospinning process were conducted respectively to prepare pure β-TCP fibers with dimensions close to mineralized collagen fibrils in woven bone. The collagen-coating layer prepared by impregnation had an adhesive role that held the β-TCP fibers together, and resulted in rapid degradation and matrix mineralization in in vitro tests. MG63 osteoblast-like cells seeded on the resultant scaffolds showed three-dimensional (3D) morphologies, and merged into multicellular layers after 7 days culture. Cytotoxicity test further revealed that extracts from the resultant scaffolds could promote the proliferation of MG63 cells. Therefore, the woven-bone-like matrix that we constructed favored the attachment and proliferation of MG63 cells in three dimensions. It has great potential ability to shorten the time of formation of new bone.

  13. Second-harmonic generation imaging of collagen in ancient bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, B; McIntosh, D; Fildes, T; Smith, L; Hargrave, F; Islam, M; Thompson, T; Layfield, R; Scott, D; Shaw, B; Burrell, C L; Gonzalez, S; Taylor, S

    2017-12-01

    Second-harmonic generation imaging (SHG) captures triple helical collagen molecules near tissue surfaces. Biomedical research routinely utilizes various imaging software packages to quantify SHG signals for collagen content and distribution estimates in modern tissue samples including bone. For the first time using SHG, samples of modern, medieval, and ice age bones were imaged to test the applicability of SHG to ancient bone from a variety of ages, settings, and taxa. Four independent techniques including Raman spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, radiocarbon dating protocols, and mass spectrometry-based protein sequencing, confirm the presence of protein, consistent with the hypothesis that SHG imaging detects ancient bone collagen. These results suggest that future studies have the potential to use SHG imaging to provide new insights into the composition of ancient bone, to characterize ancient bone disorders, to investigate collagen preservation within and between various taxa, and to monitor collagen decay regimes in different depositional environments.

  14. Second-harmonic generation imaging of collagen in ancient bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Second-harmonic generation imaging (SHG captures triple helical collagen molecules near tissue surfaces. Biomedical research routinely utilizes various imaging software packages to quantify SHG signals for collagen content and distribution estimates in modern tissue samples including bone. For the first time using SHG, samples of modern, medieval, and ice age bones were imaged to test the applicability of SHG to ancient bone from a variety of ages, settings, and taxa. Four independent techniques including Raman spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, radiocarbon dating protocols, and mass spectrometry-based protein sequencing, confirm the presence of protein, consistent with the hypothesis that SHG imaging detects ancient bone collagen. These results suggest that future studies have the potential to use SHG imaging to provide new insights into the composition of ancient bone, to characterize ancient bone disorders, to investigate collagen preservation within and between various taxa, and to monitor collagen decay regimes in different depositional environments.

  15. Matrix remodeling between cells and cellular interactions with collagen bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihan; Sun, Bo

    When cells are surrounded by complex environment, they continuously probe and interact with it by applying cellular traction forces. As cells apply traction forces, they can sense rigidity of their local environment and remodel the matrix microstructure simultaneously. Previous study shows that single human carcinoma cell (MDA-MB-231) remodeled its surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) and the matrix remodeling was reversible. In this study we examined the matrix microstructure between cells and cellular interaction between them using quantitative confocal microscopy. The result shows that the matrix microstructure is the most significantly remodeled between cells consisting of aligned, and densified collagen fibers (collagen bundle)., the result shows that collagen bundle is irreversible and significantly change micromechanics of ECM around the bundle. We further examined cellular interaction with collagen bundle by analyzing dynamics of actin and talin formation along with the direction of bundle. Lastly, we analyzed dynamics of cellular protrusion and migrating direction of cells along the bundle.

  16. Collagen matrix as a tool in studying fibroblastic cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanta, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is a fibrillar protein, a member of a large family of collagen proteins. It is present in most body tissues, usually in combination with other collagens and other components of extracellular matrix. Its synthesis is increased in various pathological situations, in healing wounds, in fibrotic tissues and in many tumors. After extraction from collagen-rich tissues it is widely used in studies of cell behavior, especially those of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Cells cultured in a classical way, on planar plastic dishes, lack the third dimension that is characteristic of body tissues. Collagen I forms gel at neutral pH and may become a basis of a 3D matrix that better mimics conditions in tissue than plastic dishes.

  17. Glycation Contributes to Interaction Between Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase and Collagen Type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halling Linder, Cecilia; Enander, Karin; Magnusson, Per

    2016-03-01

    Bone is a biological composite material comprised primarily of collagen type I and mineral crystals of calcium and phosphate in the form of hydroxyapatite (HA), which together provide its mechanical properties. Bone alkaline phosphatase (ALP), produced by osteoblasts, plays a pivotal role in the mineralization process. Affinity contacts between collagen, mainly type II, and the crown domain of various ALP isozymes were reported in a few in vitro studies in the 1980s and 1990s, but have not attracted much attention since, although such interactions may have important implications for the bone mineralization process. The objective of this study was to investigate the binding properties of human collagen type I to human bone ALP, including the two bone ALP isoforms B1 and B2. ALP from human liver, human placenta and E. coli were also studied. A surface plasmon resonance-based analysis, supported by electrophoresis and blotting, showed that bone ALP binds stronger to collagen type I in comparison with ALPs expressed in non-mineralizing tissues. Further, the B2 isoform binds significantly stronger to collagen type I in comparison with the B1 isoform. Human bone and liver ALP (with identical amino acid composition) displayed pronounced differences in binding, revealing that post-translational glycosylation properties govern these interactions to a large extent. In conclusion, this study presents the first evidence that glycosylation differences in human ALPs are of crucial importance for protein-protein interactions with collagen type I, although the presence of the ALP crown domain may also be necessary. Different binding affinities among the bone ALP isoforms may influence the mineral-collagen interface, mineralization kinetics, and degree of bone matrix mineralization, which are important factors determining the material properties of bone.

  18. Hyaluronan in aged collagen matrix increases prostate epithelial cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodarasamy, Mamatha; Vernon, Robert B.; Chan, Christina K.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Wight, Thomas N.

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the prostate, which is comprised primarily of collagen, becomes increasingly disorganized with age, a property that may influence the development of hyperplasia and cancer. Collageous ECM extracted from the tails of aged mice exhibits many characteristics of collagen in aged tissues, including the prostate. When polymerized into a 3-dimensional (3D) gel, these collagen extracts can serve as models for the study of specific cell-ECM interactions. In the present study, we examined the behaviors of human prostatic epithelial cell lines representing normal prostate epithelial cells (PEC), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH-1), and adenocarcinoma (LNCaP) cultured in contact with 3D gels made from collagen extracts of young and aged mice. We found that proliferation of PEC, BPH-1, and LNCaP cells were all increased by culture on aged collagen gels relative to young collagen gels. In examining age-associated differences in the composition of the collagen extracts, we found that aged and young collagen had a similar amount of several collagen-associated ECM components, but aged collagen had a much greater content of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) than young collagen. The addition of HA (of similar size and concentration to that found in aged collagen extracts) to cells placed in young collagen elicited significantly increased proliferation in BPH-1 cells, but not in PEC or LNCaP cells, relative to controls not exposed to HA. Of note, histochemical analyses of human prostatic tissues showed significantly higher expression of HA in BPH and prostate cancer stroma relative to stroma of normal prostate. Collectively, these results suggest that changes in ECM involving increased levels of HA contribute to the growth of prostatic epithelium with aging. PMID:25124870

  19. Engineering a collagen matrix that replicates the biological properties of native extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kwangwoo; Sakai, Yuuki; Funamoto, Seiichi; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Kishida, Akio

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to replicate the function of native tissues that can be used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The key to such replication is the preparation of an artificial collagen matrix that possesses a structure resembling that of the extracellular matrix. We, therefore, prepared a collagen matrix by fibrillogenesis in a NaCl/Na(2)HPO(4) aqueous solution using a dialysis cassette and investigated its biological behavior in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro cell adhesion and proliferation did not show any significant differences. The degradation rate in the living body could be controlled according to the preparation condition, where the collagen matrix with high water content (F-collagen matrix, >98%) showed fast degradation and collagen matrix with lower water content (T-collagen matrix, >80%) showed no degradation for 8 weeks. The degradation did not affect the inflammatory response at all and relatively faster wound healing response was observed. Comparing this result with that of collagen gel and decellularized cornea, it can be concluded that the structural factor is very important and no cell abnormal behavior would be observed for quaternary structured collagen matrix.

  20. [Polarized microscopic observation of the collagen change in bone healing during bone lengthening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Pei; Li, Junhui; Li, Zhuyi

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the feature and regularity of the collagen change in bone healing during bone lengthening. Bone lengthening model was made in the middle segment of the rabbit tibia. Five days after the model was established, the bone was lengthened 1.5 mm per day for 14 days. The rabbits were put to death after elongation, 7, 14, 21, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 days after elongation. The distracted area of the bone was imbedded with paraffin. After being stained by the picric acid-sirius red staining, the slice was observed under polarized microscope. The features of the collagen change in the distracted bone were as follows: (1) In the fibrous tissue of the distracted area during lengthening period and the early stage after lengthening, there was not only collagen III but also much collagen I. (2) Collagen I , II and III were observed in the cartilage. (3) Collagen I, II and III were also observed in the pseudo-growth plate. (4) Collagen I took the dominance during lengthening period and the late stage after lengthening. New bone formation in bone lengthening is under the distracted force, so the collagen changes have different features compared with that in fracture healing. Collagen I, II and III can be identified by picric acid-sirius red staining and polarized microscope, so a new method for studying the collagen typing in bone repairing is provided.

  1. The biochemical changes of bone collagen after high-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajiri, Ken

    1980-01-01

    In our clinic, patients with malignant bone tumors have been treated by high-dose irradiation therapy, 10,000-20,000 rads, for primary lesions. In order to study the biochemical changes of normal bone around tumor tissue, especially bone collagen, after high-dose irradiation, the author performed the following experiments. The right knee joint of rabbits was irradiated with either 6,000, 10,000, or 15,000 rads by 60 Co-γ ray. The cortical bone of the right tibial metaphysis was used for analyses and compared with the left tibia of the same rabbit. These studies were followed for one year after the final irradiation. The calcium, phosphorous and collagen contents of irradiated bone were remarkably changed. These data indicate that collagen biosynthesis of irradiated bone was decreased and the calcification was disturbed. An increase in the amount of total soluble collagen and a decrease in the amount of hydroxylysine bound sugar were observed. The ratio of β to α chains of the collagen molecule was also changed by the irradiation. The amount of reducible cross-links per hydroxyproline residue was strikingly increased three months after the final irradiation. These changes were remarkable especially in the 10,000 and 15,000 rads irradiated group and found to be recovered approximately six months to one year after the final irradiation. These findings indicate that high-dose irradiation reduces the stability of bone collagen both with the destruction of sugar bonds of hydroxylysine residues and the replacement of matured collagen matrix to immatured one which contain mostly labile reducible cross-links. (author)

  2. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui; Li, Xiaoran; Wang, Bin; Chen, Bing; Zhao, Yannan; Sun, Jie; Zhuang, Yan; Shi, Jiajia; Shen, He; Zhang, Zhijun; Dai, Jianwu

    2016-02-17

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of cetuximab was fused with CBD (CBD-Fab) and expressed in Pichia pastoris. CBD-Fab maintained antigen binding and anti-tumor activity of cetuximab and obtained a collagen-binding ability in vitro. The results also showed CBD-Fab was mainly enriched in tumors and had longer retention time in tumors in A431 s.c. xenografts. Furthermore, CBD-Fab showed a similar therapeutic efficacy as cetuximab in A431 xenografts. Although CBD-Fab hasn't showed better therapeutic effects than cetuximab, its smaller molecular and special target may be applicable as antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) or immunotoxins.

  3. Enhancing amine terminals in an amine-deprived collagen matrix.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tiong, William H C

    2008-10-21

    Collagen, though widely used as a core biomaterial in many clinical applications, is often limited by its rapid degradability which prevents full exploitation of its potential in vivo. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer, a highly branched macromolecule, possesses versatile multiterminal amine surface groups that enable them to be tethered to collagen molecules and enhance their potential. In this study, we hypothesized that incorporation of PAMAM dendrimer in a collagen matrix through cross-linking will result in a durable, cross-linked collagen biomaterial with free -NH 2 groups available for further multi-biomolecular tethering. The aim of this study was to assess the physicochemical properties of a G1 PAMAM cross-linked collagen matrix and its cellular sustainability in vitro. Different amounts of G1 PAMAM dendrimer (5 or 10 mg) were integrated into bovine-derived collagen matrices through a cross-linking process, mediated by 5 or 25 mM 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) in 5 mM N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) and 50 mM 2-morpholinoethane sulfonic acid buffer at pH 5.5. The physicochemical properties of resultant matrices were investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), collagenase degradation assay, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, and ninhydrin assay. Cellular sustainability of the matrices was assessed with Alamar Blue assay and SEM. There was no significant difference in cellular behavior between the treated and nontreated groups. However, the benefit of incorporating PAMAM in the cross-linking reaction was limited when higher concentrations of either agent were used. These results confirm the hypothesis that PAMAM dendrimer can be incorporated in the collagen cross-linking process in order to modulate the properties of the resulting cross-linked collagen biomaterial with free -NH 2 groups available for multi-biomolecular tethering.

  4. Beneath the Minerals, a Layer of Round Lipid Particles Was Identified to Mediate Collagen Calcification in Compact Bone Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Shaohua; Yu, Jianqing J.

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts lose 1–2% of their bone minerals per month during space flights. A systematic search for a countermeasure relies on a good understanding of the mechanism of bone formation at the molecular level. How collagen fibers, the dominant matrix protein in bones, are mineralized remains mysterious. Atomic force microscopy was carried out, in combination with immunostaining and Western blotting, on bovine tibia to identify unrecognized building blocks involved in bone formation and for an el...

  5. Effects of collagen matrix and bioreactor cultivation on cartilage regeneration of a full-thickness critical-size knee joint cartilage defects with subchondral bone damage in a rabbit model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hwa Wang

    Full Text Available Cartilage has limited self-repair ability. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different species of collagen-engineered neocartilage for the treatment of critical-size defects in the articular joint in a rabbit model. Type II and I collagen obtained from rabbits and rats was mixed to form a scaffold. The type II/I collagen scaffold was then mixed with rabbit chondrocytes to biofabricate neocartilage constructs using a rotating cell culture system [three-dimensional (3D-bioreactor]. The rabbit chondrocytes were mixed with rabbit collagen scaffold and rat collagen scaffold to form neoRBT (neo-rabbit cartilage and neoRAT (neo-rat cartilage constructs, respectively. The neocartilage matrix constructs were implanted into surgically created defects in rabbit knee chondyles, and histological examinations were performed after 2 and 3 months. Cartilage-like lacunae formation surrounding the chondrocytes was noted in the cell cultures. After 3 months, both the neoRBT and neoRAT groups showed cartilage-like repair tissue covering the 5-mm circular, 4-mm-deep defects that were created in the rabbit condyle and filled with neocartilage plugs. Reparative chondrocytes were aligned as apparent clusters in both the neoRAT and neoRBT groups. Both neoRBT and neoRAT cartilage repair demonstrated integration with healthy adjacent tissue; however, more integration was obtained using the neoRAT cartilage. Our data indicate that different species of type II/I collagen matrix and 3D bioreactor cultivation can facilitate cartilage engineering in vitro for the repair of critical-size defect.

  6. Collagen-derived markers of bone metabolism in osteogenesis imperfecta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, A M; Hansen, M; Kollerup, Gina Birgitte

    1998-01-01

    )] were measured in 78 osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) patients to investigate bone metabolism in vivo and relate marker concentrations to phenotype and in vitro collagen I defects, as shown by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). PICP and PINP were generally low....... The in vivo findings correlated with in vitro results of collagen I SDS-PAGE. Bone turnover is reduced in OI children and mildly affected OI adults, whereas bone resorption is elevated in severely affected adults. These findings may prove helpful for diagnosis and decision-making regarding therapy in OI....

  7. Polycaprolactone nanofiber interspersed collagen type-I scaffold for bone regeneration: a unique injectable osteogenic scaffold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baylan, Nuray; Ditto, Maggie; Lawrence, Joseph G; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Bhat, Samerna; Lecka-Czernik, Beata

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for an injectable cell coupled three-dimensional (3D) scaffold to be used as bone fracture augmentation material. To address this demand, a novel injectable osteogenic scaffold called PN-COL was developed using cells, a natural polymer (collagen type-I), and a synthetic polymer (polycaprolactone (PCL)). The injectable nanofibrous PN-COL is created by interspersing PCL nanofibers within pre-osteoblast cell embedded collagen type-I. This simple yet novel and powerful approach provides a great benefit as an injectable bone scaffold over other non-living bone fracture stabilization polymers, such as polymethylmethacrylate and calcium content resin-based materials. The advantages of injectability and the biomimicry of collagen was coupled with the structural support of PCL nanofibers, to create cell encapsulated injectable 3D bone scaffolds with intricate porous internal architecture and high osteoconductivity. The effects of PCL nanofiber inclusion within the cell encapsulated collagen matrix has been evaluated for scaffold size retention and osteocompatibility, as well as for MC3T3-E1 cells osteogenic activity. The structural analysis of novel bioactive material proved that the material is chemically stable enough in an aqueous solution for an extended period of time without using crosslinking reagents, but it is also viscous enough to be injected through a syringe needle. Data from long-term in vitro proliferation and differentiation data suggests that novel PN-COL scaffolds promote the osteoblast proliferation, phenotype expression, and formation of mineralized matrix. This study demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of creating a structurally competent, injectable, cell embedded bone tissue scaffold. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the advantages of mimicking the hierarchical architecture of native bone with nano- and micro-size formation through introducing PCL nanofibers within macron-size collagen fibers and in

  8. Structure of collagen-glycosaminoglycan matrix and the influence to its integrity and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yuying; Patra, Prabir; Faezipour, Miad

    2014-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) is a chain-like disaccharide that is linked to polypeptide core to connect two collagen fibrils/fibers and provide the intermolecular force in Collagen-GAG matrix (C-G matrix). Thus, the distribution of GAG in C-G matrix contributes to the integrity and mechanical properties of the matrix and related tissue. This paper analyzes the transverse isotropic distribution of GAG in C-G matrix. The angle of GAGs related to collagen fibrils is used as parameters to qualify the GAGs isotropic characteristic in both 3D and 2D rendering. Statistical results included that over one third of GAGs were perpendicular directed to collagen fibril with symmetrical distribution for both 3D matrix and 2D plane cross through collagen fibrils. The three factors tested in this paper: collagen radius, collagen distribution, and GAGs density, were not statistically significant for the strength of Collagen-GAG matrix in 3D rendering. However in 2D rendering, a significant factor found was the radius of collagen in matrix for the GAGs directed to orthogonal plane of Collagen-GAG matrix. Between two cross-section selected from Collagen-GAG matrix model, the plane cross through collagen fibrils was symmetrically distributed but the total percentage of perpendicular directed GAG was deducted by decreasing collagen radius. There were some symmetry features of GAGs angle distribution in selected 2D plane that passed through space between collagen fibrils, but most models showed multiple peaks in GAGs angle distribution. With less GAGs directed to perpendicular of collagen fibril, strength in collagen cross-section weakened. Collagen distribution was also a factor that influences GAGs angle distribution in 2D rendering. True hexagonal collagen packaging is reported in this paper to have less strength at collagen cross-section compared to quasi-hexagonal collagen arrangement. In this work focus is on GAGs matrix within the collagen and its relevance to anisotropy.

  9. Glyoxal Crosslinking of Cell-Seeded Chitosan/Collagen Hydrogels for Bone Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limin; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2011-01-01

    Chitosan and collagen are natural biomaterials that have been used extensively in tissue engineering, both separately and as composite materials. Most methods to fabricate chitosan/collagen composites use freeze drying and chemical crosslinking to create stable porous scaffolds, which subsequently can be seeded with cells. In this study, we directly embedded human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSC) in chitosan/collagen materials by initiating gelation using β-glycerophosphate at physiological temperature and pH. We further examined the use of glyoxal, a dialdehyde with relatively low toxicity, to crosslink these materials and characterized the resulting changes in matrix and cell properties. The cytocompatibility of glyoxal and the crosslinked gels were investigated in terms of hBMSC metabolic activity, viability, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation. These studies revealed that glyoxal was cytocompatible at concentrations below about 1 mM for periods of exposure up to 15 h, though the degree of cell spreading and proliferation were dependent on matrix composition. Glyoxal-crosslinked matrices were stiffer and compacted less than uncrosslinked controls. It was further demonstrated that hBMSC can attach and proliferate in 3D matrices composed of 50/50 chitosan/collagen, and that these materials supported osteogenic differentiation in response to stimulation. Such glyoxal-crosslinked chitosan/collagen composite materials may find utility as cell delivery vehicles for enhancing the repair of bone defects. PMID:21345389

  10. Cyclophilin B Deficiency Causes Abnormal Dentin Collagen Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terajima, Masahiko; Taga, Yuki; Cabral, Wayne A; Nagasawa, Masako; Sumida, Noriko; Hattori, Shunji; Marini, Joan C; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2017-08-04

    Cyclophilin B (CypB) is an endoplasmic reticulum-resident protein that regulates collagen folding, and also contributes to prolyl 3-hydroxylation (P3H) and lysine (Lys) hydroxylation of collagen. In this study, we characterized dentin type I collagen in CypB null (KO) mice, a model of recessive osteogenesis imperfecta type IX, and compared to those of wild-type (WT) and heterozygous (Het) mice. Mass spectrometric analysis demonstrated that the extent of P3H in KO collagen was significantly diminished compared to WT/Het. Lys hydroxylation in KO was significantly diminished at the helical cross-linking sites, α1/α2(I) Lys-87 and α1(I) Lys-930, leading to a significant increase in the under-hydroxylated cross-links and a decrease in fully hydroxylated cross-links. The extent of glycosylation of hydroxylysine residues was, except α1(I) Lys-87, generally higher in KO than WT/Het. Some of these molecular phenotypes were distinct from other KO tissues reported previously, indicating the dentin-specific control mechanism through CypB. Histological analysis revealed that the width of predentin was greater and irregular, and collagen fibrils were sparse and significantly smaller in KO than WT/Het. These results indicate a critical role of CypB in dentin matrix formation, suggesting a possible association between recessive osteogenesis imperfecta and dentin defects that have not been clinically detected.

  11. Collagenous Extracellular Matrix Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering: Lessons from the Common Sea Urchin Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Kheng Lim; Holmes, David F

    2017-04-25

    Scaffolds for tissue engineering application may be made from a collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) of connective tissues because the ECM can mimic the functions of the target tissue. The primary sources of collagenous ECM material are calf skin and bone. However, these sources are associated with the risk of having bovine spongiform encephalopathy or transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. Alternative sources for collagenous ECM materials may be derived from livestock, e.g., pigs, and from marine animals, e.g., sea urchins. Collagenous ECM of the sea urchin possesses structural features and mechanical properties that are similar to those of mammalian ones. However, even more intriguing is that some tissues such as the ligamentous catch apparatus can exhibit mutability, namely rapid reversible changes in the tissue mechanical properties. These tissues are known as mutable collagenous tissues (MCTs). The mutability of these tissues has been the subject of on-going investigations, covering the biochemistry, structural biology and mechanical properties of the collagenous components. Recent studies point to a nerve-control system for regulating the ECM macromolecules that are involved in the sliding action of collagen fibrils in the MCT. This review discusses the key attributes of the structure and function of the ECM of the sea urchin ligaments that are related to the fibril-fibril sliding action-the focus is on the respective components within the hierarchical architecture of the tissue. In this context, structure refers to size, shape and separation distance of the ECM components while function is associated with mechanical properties e.g., strength and stiffness. For simplicity, the components that address the different length scale from the largest to the smallest are as follows: collagen fibres, collagen fibrils, interfibrillar matrix and collagen molecules. Application of recent theories of stress transfer and fracture mechanisms in fibre reinforced

  12. Collagenous Extracellular Matrix Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering: Lessons from the Common Sea Urchin Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheng Lim Goh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Scaffolds for tissue engineering application may be made from a collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM of connective tissues because the ECM can mimic the functions of the target tissue. The primary sources of collagenous ECM material are calf skin and bone. However, these sources are associated with the risk of having bovine spongiform encephalopathy or transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. Alternative sources for collagenous ECM materials may be derived from livestock, e.g., pigs, and from marine animals, e.g., sea urchins. Collagenous ECM of the sea urchin possesses structural features and mechanical properties that are similar to those of mammalian ones. However, even more intriguing is that some tissues such as the ligamentous catch apparatus can exhibit mutability, namely rapid reversible changes in the tissue mechanical properties. These tissues are known as mutable collagenous tissues (MCTs. The mutability of these tissues has been the subject of on-going investigations, covering the biochemistry, structural biology and mechanical properties of the collagenous components. Recent studies point to a nerve-control system for regulating the ECM macromolecules that are involved in the sliding action of collagen fibrils in the MCT. This review discusses the key attributes of the structure and function of the ECM of the sea urchin ligaments that are related to the fibril-fibril sliding action—the focus is on the respective components within the hierarchical architecture of the tissue. In this context, structure refers to size, shape and separation distance of the ECM components while function is associated with mechanical properties e.g., strength and stiffness. For simplicity, the components that address the different length scale from the largest to the smallest are as follows: collagen fibres, collagen fibrils, interfibrillar matrix and collagen molecules. Application of recent theories of stress transfer and fracture mechanisms in fibre

  13. Collagenous Extracellular Matrix Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering: Lessons from the Common Sea Urchin Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Kheng Lim; Holmes, David F.

    2017-01-01

    Scaffolds for tissue engineering application may be made from a collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) of connective tissues because the ECM can mimic the functions of the target tissue. The primary sources of collagenous ECM material are calf skin and bone. However, these sources are associated with the risk of having bovine spongiform encephalopathy or transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. Alternative sources for collagenous ECM materials may be derived from livestock, e.g., pigs, and from marine animals, e.g., sea urchins. Collagenous ECM of the sea urchin possesses structural features and mechanical properties that are similar to those of mammalian ones. However, even more intriguing is that some tissues such as the ligamentous catch apparatus can exhibit mutability, namely rapid reversible changes in the tissue mechanical properties. These tissues are known as mutable collagenous tissues (MCTs). The mutability of these tissues has been the subject of on-going investigations, covering the biochemistry, structural biology and mechanical properties of the collagenous components. Recent studies point to a nerve-control system for regulating the ECM macromolecules that are involved in the sliding action of collagen fibrils in the MCT. This review discusses the key attributes of the structure and function of the ECM of the sea urchin ligaments that are related to the fibril-fibril sliding action—the focus is on the respective components within the hierarchical architecture of the tissue. In this context, structure refers to size, shape and separation distance of the ECM components while function is associated with mechanical properties e.g., strength and stiffness. For simplicity, the components that address the different length scale from the largest to the smallest are as follows: collagen fibres, collagen fibrils, interfibrillar matrix and collagen molecules. Application of recent theories of stress transfer and fracture mechanisms in fibre reinforced

  14. LIQUID SOAP CHARACTERISTIC WITH THE ADDITION OF FISH BONE COLLAGEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauli A.P.

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Doublewhip Threadfin Bream (Nemipterus nematophorus fish is one of the low-cost economical sea fish that can be utilized which is expected to increase its selling value. The utilization of Doublewhip threadfin bream fish can be done with the waste management of the bones in order to have a selling value. Based on the research, other than its skin, bone is also one of the collagen producers in the body of a fish that can be used to increase the amount of collagen in the human body and slowing the aging process caused by damage skin cells that exposed to free radical. Fish bones are also an alternative to the mammals bones such as cows and pigs as collagen production materials that have been damaged by certain diseases. The method used in this research was laboratory experimental using Completely Randomized Design (RAL design. This research aims to analyze the characteristics of fish bone collagen that is applied to the liquid soap, which is done by physic and high. Based on the result of the test, the stability of foam is 84.90%; viscosity 922.83; cPs; pH 10.77 and free alkali 0.031% which meets the requirements of liquid quality based on SNI 06-4085-1996 so it is safe to apply on human skin.

  15. The effects of bone marrow aspirate, bone graft, and collagen composites on fixation of titanium implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan; Ding, Ming; Sandri, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Replacement of extensive local bone loss especially in revision joint arthroplasty and spine fusion is a significant clinical challenge. Allograft and autograft have been considered as gold standards for bone replacement. However, there are several disadvantages such as donor site pain, bacterial...... contamination, and non union as well as the potential risk of disease transmission. Hydroxyapatite and collagen composites (HA/Collagen) have the potential in mimicking and replacing skeletal bones. This study attempted to determine the effects of newly developed HA/Collagen-composites with and without bone...... marrow aspirate (BMA) on enhancement of bone implant fixation. Method: Titanium alloy implants were inserted into bilateral femoral condyles of eight skeletally mature sheep, four implants per sheep. The implant had a circumferential gap of 2 mm. The gap was filled with: HA/Collagen; HA...

  16. Abnormal bone collagen morphology and decreased bone strength in growth hormone-deficient rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Martin; Qvortrup, Klaus; Svendsen, Ole Lander

    2004-01-01

    collagen morphology and bone mineralisation in cortical bone as well as bone strength in GHD rats to try to clarify the explanation for the increased fracture rate. The Dw-4 rat was used as a model for GHD. This strain of rats has an autosomal recessive disorder, reducing GH synthesis to approximately 10...

  17. Dynamic culture of a thermosensitive collagen hydrogel as an extracellular matrix improves the construction of tissue-engineered peripheral nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lanfeng; Li, Rui; Liu, Wanguo; Dai, Jin; Du, Zhenwu; Wang, Xiaonan; Ma, Jianchao; Zhao, Jinsong

    2014-07-15

    Tissue engineering technologies offer new treatment strategies for the repair of peripheral nerve injury, but cell loss between seeding and adhesion to the scaffold remains inevitable. A thermosensitive collagen hydrogel was used as an extracellular matrix in this study and combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to construct tissue-engineered peripheral nerve composites in vitro. Dynamic culture was performed at an oscillating frequency of 0.5 Hz and 35° swing angle above and below the horizontal plane. The results demonstrated that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells formed membrane-like structures around the poly-L-lactic acid scaffolds and exhibited regular alignment on the composite surface. Collagen was used to fill in the pores, and seeded cells adhered onto the poly-L-lactic acid fibers. The DNA content of the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was higher in the composites constructed with a thermosensitive collagen hydrogel compared with that in collagen I scaffold controls. The cellular DNA content was also higher in the thermosensitive collagen hydrogel composites constructed with the thermosensitive collagen hydrogel in dynamic culture than that in static culture. These results indicate that tissue-engineered composites formed with thermosensitive collagen hydrogel in dynamic culture can maintain larger numbers of seeded cells by avoiding cell loss during the initial adhesion stage. Moreover, seeded cells were distributed throughout the material.

  18. Collagen-derived markers of bone metabolism in osteogenesis imperfecta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, A M; Hansen, M; Kollerup, Gina Birgitte

    1998-01-01

    )] were measured in 78 osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) patients to investigate bone metabolism in vivo and relate marker concentrations to phenotype and in vitro collagen I defects, as shown by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). PICP and PINP were generally low...

  19. Effect of water on piezoelectricity in bone and collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, T G; Zimmerman, R L

    1975-01-01

    Interferometric measurements of bovine bone and tendon show that the values of the piezoelectric strain constant d14 decrease with hydration from the dry values of 0.2 X 10(-14) and 2.0 X 10(-14) m/V, respectively. The decrease of piezoelectricity in tendon is exponential with a characteristic hydration of 7% by weight from which an upper limit of the average molecular weight of the responsible electric dipole moments is deduced. The piezoelectricity in bone decreases relatively slowly with hydration indicating that the electric dipoles in bone collagen are subject to a different cancelling mechanism. PMID:1148359

  20. Rapid biomimetic mineralization of collagen fibrils and combining with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells for bone defects healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Bihua; Luo, Xueshi; Li, Zhiwen [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zhuang, Caiping [Department of Anesthesiology, Huizhou Central People' s Hospital, Huizhou 516001 (China); Li, Lihua, E-mail: tlihuali@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Lu, Lu; Ding, Shan; Tian, Jinhuan [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zhou, Changren, E-mail: tcrz9@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Collagen biomineralization is regulated by complicated interactions between the collagen matrix and non-collagenous extracellular proteins. Here, the use of sodium tripolyphosphate to simulate the templating functional motif of the C-terminal fragment of non-collagenous proteins is reported, and a low molecular weight polyacrylic acid served as a sequestration agent to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate into nanoprecursors. Self-assembled collagen fibrils served as a fixed template for achieving rapid biomimetic mineralization in vitro. Results demonstrated that, during the mineralization process, intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar hydroxyapatite mineral with collagen fibrils formed and did so via bottom-up nanoparticle assembly based on the non-classical crystallization approach in the presence of these dual biomimetic functional analogues. In vitro human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (hUCMSC) culture found that the mineralized scaffolds have a better cytocompatibility in terms of cell viability, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation into osteoblasts. A rabbit femoral condyle defect model was established to confirm the ability of the n-HA/collagen scaffolds to facilitate bone regeneration and repair. The images of gross anatomy, MRI, CT and histomorphology taken 6 and 12 weeks after surgery showed that the biomimetic mineralized collagen scaffolds with hUCMSCs can promote the healing speed of bone defects in vivo, and both of the scaffolds groups performing better than the bone defect control group. As new bone tissue formed, the scaffolds degraded and were gradually absorbed. All these results demonstrated that both of the scaffolds and cells have better histocompatibility. - Highlights: • A rapid and facile biomimetic mineralization approach is proposed. • Intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar mineralization of collagen fibrils was achieved. • HA/COL scaffolds promote hUCMSCs adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. • Feasibility of h

  1. Rapid biomimetic mineralization of collagen fibrils and combining with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells for bone defects healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Bihua; Luo, Xueshi; Li, Zhiwen; Zhuang, Caiping; Li, Lihua; Lu, Lu; Ding, Shan; Tian, Jinhuan; Zhou, Changren

    2016-01-01

    Collagen biomineralization is regulated by complicated interactions between the collagen matrix and non-collagenous extracellular proteins. Here, the use of sodium tripolyphosphate to simulate the templating functional motif of the C-terminal fragment of non-collagenous proteins is reported, and a low molecular weight polyacrylic acid served as a sequestration agent to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate into nanoprecursors. Self-assembled collagen fibrils served as a fixed template for achieving rapid biomimetic mineralization in vitro. Results demonstrated that, during the mineralization process, intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar hydroxyapatite mineral with collagen fibrils formed and did so via bottom-up nanoparticle assembly based on the non-classical crystallization approach in the presence of these dual biomimetic functional analogues. In vitro human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (hUCMSC) culture found that the mineralized scaffolds have a better cytocompatibility in terms of cell viability, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation into osteoblasts. A rabbit femoral condyle defect model was established to confirm the ability of the n-HA/collagen scaffolds to facilitate bone regeneration and repair. The images of gross anatomy, MRI, CT and histomorphology taken 6 and 12 weeks after surgery showed that the biomimetic mineralized collagen scaffolds with hUCMSCs can promote the healing speed of bone defects in vivo, and both of the scaffolds groups performing better than the bone defect control group. As new bone tissue formed, the scaffolds degraded and were gradually absorbed. All these results demonstrated that both of the scaffolds and cells have better histocompatibility. - Highlights: • A rapid and facile biomimetic mineralization approach is proposed. • Intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar mineralization of collagen fibrils was achieved. • HA/COL scaffolds promote hUCMSCs adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. • Feasibility of h

  2. Synthesis of collagen by bovine chondrocytes cultured in alginate; posttranslational modifications and cell-matrix interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, B.; Verzijl, N.; Bank, R.A.; Von Der Mark, K.; TeKoppele, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The extracellular matrix synthesized by articular chondrocytes cultured in alginate beads was investigated. Collagen levels increased sigmoidally with time and remained constant after 2 weeks of culture. The presence of cartilage-specific type II collagen was confirmed immunohistochemically.

  3. Anabolic action of parathyroid hormone (PTH) does not compromise bone matrix mineral composition or maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrahnas, Christina; Pearson, Thomas A; Brunt, Athena R; Forwood, Mark R; Bambery, Keith R; Tobin, Mark J; Martin, T John; Sims, Natalie A

    2016-12-01

    Intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) is used to stimulate bone formation in patients with osteoporosis. A reduction in the degree of matrix mineralisation has been reported during treatment, which may reflect either production of undermineralised matrix or a greater proportion of new matrix within the bone samples assessed. To explore these alternatives, high resolution synchrotron-based Fourier Transform Infrared Microspectroscopy (sFTIRM) coupled with calcein labelling was used in a region of non-remodelling cortical bone to determine bone composition during anabolic PTH treatment compared with region-matched samples from controls. 8week old male C57BL/6 mice were treated with vehicle or 50μg/kg PTH, 5 times/week for 4weeks (n=7-9/group). Histomorphometry confirmed greater trabecular and periosteal bone formation and 3-point bending tests confirmed greater femoral strength in PTH-treated mice. Dual calcein labels were used to match bone regions by time-since-mineralisation (bone age) and composition was measured by sFTIRM in six 15μm 2 regions at increasing depth perpendicular to the most immature bone on the medial periosteal edge; this allowed in situ measurement of progressive changes in bone matrix during its maturation. The sFTIRM method was validated in vehicle-treated bones where the expected progressive increases in mineral:matrix ratio and collagen crosslink type ratio were detected with increasing bone maturity. We also observed a gradual increase in carbonate content that strongly correlated with an increase in longitudinal stretch of the collagen triple helix (amide I:amide II ratio). PTH treatment did not alter the progressive changes in any of these parameters from the periosteal edge through to the more mature bone. These data provide new information about how the bone matrix matures in situ and confirm that bone deposited during PTH treatment undergoes normal collagen maturation and normal mineral accrual. Copyright © 2016

  4. Biomarkers of the extracellular matrix and of collagen fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalikias, Georgios K; Tziakas, Dimitrios N

    2015-03-30

    A great body of evidence has shown that extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations are present in the major types of cardiac diseases: ischemic heart disease, heart disease associated with pressure overload, heart disease associated with volume overload, and intrinsic myocardial disease or cardiomyopathy. Collagen, type I and III, is the principal structural protein found in the myocardium and its pro- or telopeptides are released into the circulation during the course of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, these peptides may reflect collagen synthesis and break-down and also represent a much more useful tool to address ECM changes from a distance. Clinical trials have been performed during recent years to examine the usage of these peptides as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers in heart failure (HF) patients. This review aims to summarize published data concerning cardiac ECM and its circulating biomarkers. Studies that focused on collagen metabolism related biomarkers in patients with HF are analyzed. Finally, limitations associated with the clinical use of the aforementioned biomarkers are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Dextran derivatives modulate collagen matrix organization in dermal equivalent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Laetitia; Lebreton-Decoster, Corinne; Godeau, Gaston; Coulomb, Bernard; Jozefonvicz, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    Dextran derivatives can protect heparin binding growth factor implied in wound healing, such as transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2). The first aim of this study was to investigate the effect of these compounds on human dermal fibroblasts in culture with or without TGF-beta1. Several dextran derivatives obtained by substitution of methylcarboxylate (MC), benzylamide (B) and sulphate (Su) groups were used to determine the effects of each compound on fibroblast growth in vitro. The data indicate that sulphate groups are essential to act on the fibroblast proliferation. The dextran derivative LS21 DMCBSu has been chosen to investigate its effect on dermal wound healing process. Fibroblasts cultured in collagenous matrices named dermal equivalent were treated with the bioactive polymer alone or associated to TGF-beta1 or FGF-2. Cross-sections of dermal equivalent observed by histology or immunohistochemistry, demonstrated that the bioactive polymer accelerates the collagen matrices organization and stimulates the human type-III collagen expression. This bioactive polymer induces apoptosis of myofibroblast, property which may be beneficial in treatment of hypertrophic scar. Culture media analyzed by zymography and Western blot showed that this polymer significantly increases the secretion of zymogen and active form of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), involved in granulation tissue formation. These data suggest that this bioactive polymer has properties which may be beneficial in the treatment of wound healing.

  6. Elastic properties of woven bone: effect of mineral content and collagen fibrils orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, J; Martínez-Reina, J

    2017-02-01

    Woven bone is a type of tissue that forms mainly during fracture healing or fetal bone development. Its microstructure can be modeled as a composite with a matrix of mineral (hydroxyapatite) and inclusions of collagen fibrils with a more or less random orientation. In the present study, its elastic properties were estimated as a function of composition (degree of mineralization) and fibril orientation. A self-consistent homogenization scheme considering randomness of inclusions' orientation was used for this purpose. Lacuno-canalicular porosity in the form of periodically distributed void inclusions was also considered. Assuming collagen fibrils to be uniformly oriented in all directions led to an isotropic tissue with a Young's modulus [Formula: see text] GPa, which is of the same order of magnitude as that of woven bone in fracture calluses. By contrast, assuming fibrils to have a preferential orientation resulted in a Young's modulus in the preferential direction of 9-16 GPa depending on the mineral content of the tissue. These results are consistent with experimental evidence for woven bone in foetuses, where collagen fibrils are aligned to a certain extent.

  7. Greener synthesis of electrospun collagen/hydroxyapatite composite fibers with an excellent microstructure for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuanyuan; Yao, Hongchang; Wang, Jianshe; Wang, Dalu; Liu, Qian; Li, Zhongjun

    2015-01-01

    In bone tissue engineering, collagen/hydroxyapatite (HAP) fibrous composite obtained via electrospinning method has been demonstrated to support the cells’ adhesion and bone regeneration. However, electrospinning of natural collagen often requires the use of cytotoxic organic solvents, and the HAP crystals were usually aggregated and randomly distributed within a fibrous matrix of collagen, limiting their clinical potential. Here, an effective and greener method for the preparation of collagen/HAP composite fibers was developed for the first time, and this green product not only had 40 times higher mechanical properties than that previously reported, but also had an excellent microstructure similar to that of natural bone. By dissolving type I collagen in environmentally friendly phosphate buffered saline/ethanol solution instead of the frequently-used cytotoxic organic solvents, followed with the key step of desalination, co-electrospinning the collagen solution with the HAP sol, generates a collagen/HAP composite with a uniform and continuous fibrous morphology. Interestingly, the nano-HAP needles were found to preferentially orient along the longitudinal direction of the collagen fibers, which mimicked the nanostructure of natural bones. Based on the characterization of the related products, the formation mechanism for this novel phenomenon was proposed. After cross-linking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl-aminopropyl)-1-carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide, the obtained composite exhibited a significant enhancement in mechanical properties. In addition, the biocompatibility of the obtained composite fibers was evaluated by in vitro culture of the human myeloma cells (U2-OS). Taken together, the process outlined herein provides an effective, non-toxic approach for the fabrication of collagen/HAP composite nanofibers that could be good candidates for bone tissue engineering. PMID:25995630

  8. Collagen and related extracellular matrix proteins in atherosclerotic plaque development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shami, Annelie; Gonçalves, Isabel; Hultgårdh-Nilsson, Anna

    2014-10-01

    The structure, composition and turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM) as well as cell-matrix interactions are crucial in the developing atherosclerotic plaque. There is a need for further insight into specific proteins in the ECM and their functions in the developing plaque, and during the last few years a number of publications have highlighted this very important field of research. These novel findings will be addressed in the present review. This review covers literature focused on collagen and ECM proteins interacting with collagen, and what their roles may be in plaque development. Acute myocardial infarction and stroke are common diseases that cause disability and mortality, and the underlying mechanism is often the rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque. The vascular ECM and the tissue repair in the atherosclerotic lesion are important players in plaque progression. Understanding how specific proteins in the ECM interact with cells in the plaque and affect the fate of the plaque can lead to new treatments for cardiovascular disease.

  9. On the role of type IX collagen in the extracellular matrix of cartilage: type IX collagen is localized to intersections of collagen fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The tissue distribution of type II and type IX collagen in 17-d-old chicken embryo was studied by immunofluorescence using polyclonal antibodies against type II collagen and a peptic fragment of type IX collagen (HMW), respectively. Both proteins were found only in cartilage where they were co-distributed. They occurred uniformly throughout the extracellular matrix, i.e., without distinction between pericellular, territorial, and interterritorial matrices. Tissues that undergo endochondral bo...

  10. [Three-dimensional parallel collagen scaffold promotes tendon extracellular matrix formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zefeng; Shen, Weiliang; Le, Huihui; Dai, Xuesong; Ouyang, Hongwei; Chen, Weishan

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the effects of three-dimensional parallel collagen scaffold on the cell shape, arrangement and extracellular matrix formation of tendon stem cells. Parallel collagen scaffold was fabricated by unidirectional freezing technique, while random collagen scaffold was fabricated by freeze-drying technique. The effects of two scaffolds on cell shape and extracellular matrix formation were investigated in vitro by seeding tendon stem/progenitor cells and in vivo by ectopic implantation. Parallel and random collagen scaffolds were produced successfully. Parallel collagen scaffold was more akin to tendon than random collagen scaffold. Tendon stem/progenitor cells were spindle-shaped and unified orientated in parallel collagen scaffold, while cells on random collagen scaffold had disorder orientation. Two weeks after ectopic implantation, cells had nearly the same orientation with the collagen substance. In parallel collagen scaffold, cells had parallel arrangement, and more spindly cells were observed. By contrast, cells in random collagen scaffold were disorder. Parallel collagen scaffold can induce cells to be in spindly and parallel arrangement, and promote parallel extracellular matrix formation; while random collagen scaffold can induce cells in random arrangement. The results indicate that parallel collagen scaffold is an ideal structure to promote tendon repairing.

  11. Collagenous matrix supported by a 3D-printed scaffold for osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahimipour, Farahnaz; Dashtimoghadam, Erfan; Rasoulianboroujeni, Morteza; Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Khoshroo, Kimia; Tahriri, Mohammadreza; Yadegari, Amir; Gonzalez, Jose A; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Lobner, Douglas C; Jafarzadeh Kashi, Tahereh S; Tayebi, Lobat

    2018-02-01

    A systematic characterization of hybrid scaffolds, fabricated based on combinatorial additive manufacturing technique and freeze-drying method, is presented as a new platform for osteoblastic differentiation of dental pulp cells (DPCs). The scaffolds were consisted of a collagenous matrix embedded in a 3D-printed beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) as the mineral phase. The developed construct design was intended to achieve mechanical robustness owing to 3D-printed β-TCP scaffold, and biologically active 3D cell culture matrix pertaining to the Collagen extracellular matrix. The β-TCP precursor formulations were investigated for their flow-ability at various temperatures, which optimized for fabrication of 3D printed scaffolds with interconnected porosity. The hybrid constructs were characterized by 3D laser scanning microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and compressive strength testing. The in vitro characterization of scaffolds revealed that the hybrid β-TCP/Collagen constructs offer superior DPCs proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity compared to the 3D-printed β-TCP scaffold over three weeks. Moreover, it was found that the incorporation of TCP into the Collagen matrix improves the ALP activity. The presented results converge to suggest the developed 3D-printed β-TCP/Collagen hybrid constructs as a new platform for osteoblastic differentiation of DPCs for craniomaxillofacial bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Calcified cartilage or bone? Collagens in the tessellated endoskeletons of cartilaginous fish (sharks and rays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Ronald; Blumer, Michael; Pechriggl, Elisabeth-Judith; Lyons, Kady; Hall, Brian K; Fratzl, Peter; Weaver, James C; Dean, Mason N

    2017-10-01

    The primary skeletal tissue in elasmobranchs -sharks, rays and relatives- is cartilage, forming both embryonic and adult endoskeletons. Only the skeletal surface calcifies, exhibiting mineralized tiles (tesserae) sandwiched between a cartilage core and overlying fibrous perichondrium. These two tissues are based on different collagens (Coll II and I, respectively), fueling a long-standing debate as to whether tesserae are more like calcified cartilage or bone (Coll 1-based) in their matrix composition. We demonstrate that stingray (Urobatis halleri) tesserae are bipartite, having an upper Coll I-based 'cap' that merges into a lower Coll II-based 'body' zone, although tesserae are surrounded by cartilage. We identify a 'supratesseral' unmineralized cartilage layer, between tesserae and perichondrium, distinguished from the cartilage core in containing Coll I and X (a common marker for mammalian mineralization), in addition to Coll II. Chondrocytes within tesserae appear intact and sit in lacunae filled with Coll II-based matrix, suggesting tesserae originate in cartilage, despite comprising a diversity of collagens. Intertesseral joints are also complex in their collagenous composition, being similar to supratesseral cartilage closer to the perichondrium, but containing unidentified fibrils nearer the cartilage core. Our results indicate a unique potential for tessellated cartilage in skeletal biology research, since it lacks features believed diagnostic for vertebrate cartilage mineralization (e.g. hypertrophic and apoptotic chondrocytes), while offering morphologies amenable for investigating the regulation of complex mineralized ultrastructure and tissues patterned on multiple collagens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Osteoblast Differentiation and Bone Matrix Formation In Vivo and In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Harry C; Larrouture, Quitterie C; Li, Yanan; Lin, Hang; Beer-Stoltz, Donna; Liu, Li; Tuan, Rocky S; Robinson, Lisa J; Schlesinger, Paul H; Nelson, Deborah J

    2017-06-01

    We review the characteristics of osteoblast differentiation and bone matrix synthesis. Bone in air breathing vertebrates is a specialized tissue that developmentally replaces simpler solid tissues, usually cartilage. Bone is a living organ bounded by a layer of osteoblasts that, because of transport and compartmentalization requirements, produce bone matrix exclusively as an organized tight epithelium. With matrix growth, osteoblasts are reorganized and incorporated into the matrix as living cells, osteocytes, which communicate with each other and surface epithelium by cell processes within canaliculi in the matrix. The osteoblasts secrete the organic matrix, which are dense collagen layers that alternate parallel and orthogonal to the axis of stress loading. Into this matrix is deposited extremely dense hydroxyapatite-based mineral driven by both active and passive transport and pH control. As the matrix matures, hydroxyapatite microcrystals are organized into a sophisticated composite in the collagen layer by nucleation in the protein lattice. Recent studies on differentiating osteoblast precursors revealed a sophisticated proton export network driving mineralization, a gene expression program organized with the compartmentalization of the osteoblast epithelium that produces the mature bone matrix composite, despite varying serum calcium and phosphate. Key issues not well defined include how new osteoblasts are incorporated in the epithelial layer, replacing those incorporated in the accumulating matrix. Development of bone in vitro is the subject of numerous projects using various matrices and mesenchymal stem cell-derived preparations in bioreactors. These preparations reflect the structure of bone to variable extents, and include cells at many different stages of differentiation. Major challenges are production of bone matrix approaching the in vivo density and support for trabecular bone formation. In vitro differentiation is limited by the organization and

  14. Altered distributions of bone tissue mineral and collagen properties in women with fragility fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen Xiang; Lloyd, Ashley A; Burket, Jayme C; Gourion-Arsiquaud, Samuel; Donnelly, Eve

    2016-03-01

    Heterogeneity of bone tissue properties is emerging as a potential indicator of altered bone quality in pathologic tissue. The objective of this study was to compare the distributions of tissue properties in women with and without histories of fragility fractures using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) imaging. We extended a prior study that examined the relationship of the mean FTIR properties to fracture risk by analyzing in detail the widths and the tails of the distributions of FTIR properties in biopsies from fracture and non-fracture cohorts. The mineral and matrix properties of cortical and trabecular iliac crest tissue were compared in biopsies from women with a history of fragility fracture (+Fx; n=21, age: mean 54±SD 15y) and with no history of fragility fracture (-Fx; n=12, age: 57±5y). A subset of the patients included in the -Fx group were taking estrogen-plus-progestin hormone replacement therapy (HRT) (-Fx+HRT n=8, age: 58±5y) and were analyzed separately from patients with no history of HRT (-Fx-HRT n=4, age: 56±7y). When the FTIR parameter mean values were examined by treatment group, the trabecular tissue of -Fx-HRT patients had a lower mineral:matrix ratio (M:M) and collagen maturity (XLR) than that of -Fx+HRT patients (-22% M:M, -18% XLR) and +Fx patients (-17% M:M, -18% XLR). Across multiple FTIR parameters, tissue from the -Fx-HRT group had smaller low-tail (5th percentile) values than that from the -Fx+HRT or +Fx groups. In trabecular collagen maturity and crystallinity (XST), the -Fx-HRT group had smaller low-tail values than those in the -Fx+HRT group (-16% XLR, -5% XST) and the +Fx group (-17% XLR, -7% XST). The relatively low values of trabecular mineral:matrix ratio and collagen maturity and smaller low-tail values of collagen maturity and crystallinity observed in the -Fx-HRT group are characteristic of younger tissue. Taken together, our data suggest that the presence of newly formed tissue that includes small/imperfect crystals

  15. Inelastic behaviour of collagen networks in cell–matrix interactions and mechanosensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hamid; Arora, Pamma D.; Simmons, Craig A.; Janmey, Paul A.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of extracellular matrix proteins strongly influence cell-induced tension in the matrix, which in turn influences cell function. Despite progress on the impact of elastic behaviour of matrix proteins on cell–matrix interactions, little is known about the influence of inelastic behaviour, especially at the large and slow deformations that characterize cell-induced matrix remodelling. We found that collagen matrices exhibit deformation rate-dependent behaviour, which leads to a transition from pronounced elastic behaviour at fast deformations to substantially inelastic behaviour at slow deformations (1 μm min−1, similar to cell-mediated deformation). With slow deformations, the inelastic behaviour of floating gels was sensitive to collagen concentration, whereas attached gels exhibited similar inelastic behaviour independent of collagen concentration. The presence of an underlying rigid support had a similar effect on cell–matrix interactions: cell-induced deformation and remodelling were similar on 1 or 3 mg ml−1 attached collagen gels while deformations were two- to fourfold smaller in floating gels of high compared with low collagen concentration. In cross-linked collagen matrices, which did not exhibit inelastic behaviour, cells did not respond to the presence of the underlying rigid foundation. These data indicate that at the slow rates of collagen compaction generated by fibroblasts, the inelastic responses of collagen gels, which are influenced by collagen concentration and the presence of an underlying rigid foundation, are important determinants of cell–matrix interactions and mechanosensation. PMID:25392399

  16. Angiogenic Type I Collagen Extracellular Matrix Integrated with Recombinant Bacteriophages Displaying Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Junghyo; Korkmaz Zirpel, Nuriye; Park, Hyun-Ji; Han, Sewoon; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Shin, Jisoo; Cho, Seung-Woo; Nam, Chang-Hoon; Chung, Seok

    2016-01-21

    Here, a growth-factor-integrated natural extracellular matrix of type I collagen is presented that induces angiogenesis. The developed matrix adapts type I collagen nanofibers integrated with synthetic colloidal particles of recombinant bacteriophages that display vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The integration is achieved during or after gelation of the type I collagen and the matrix enables spatial delivery of VEGF into a desired region. Endothelial cells that contact the VEGF are found to invade into the matrix to form tube-like structures both in vitro and in vivo, proving the angiogenic potential of the matrix. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Non-enzymatic glycosylation of a type I collagen matrix: effects on osteoblastic development and oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrio Daniel A

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue accumulation of protein-bound advanced glycation endproducts (AGE may be involved in the etiology of diabetic chronic complications, including osteopenia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an AGE-modified type I collagen substratum on the adhesion, spreading, proliferation and differentiation of rat osteosarcoma UMR106 and mouse non-transformed MC3T3E1 osteoblastic cells. We also studied the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide synthase (NOS expression on these AGE-collagen mediated effects. Results AGE-collagen decreased the adhesion of UMR106 cells, but had no effect on the attachment of MC3T3E1 cells. In the UMR106 cell line, AGE-collagen also inhibited cellular proliferation, spreading and alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity. In preosteoblastic MC3T3E1 cells (24-hour culture, proliferation and spreading were significantly increased by AGE-collagen. After one week of culture (differentiated MC3T3E1 osteoblasts AGE-collagen inhibited ALP activity, but had no effect on cell number. In mineralizing MC3T3E1 cells (3-week culture AGE-collagen induced a decrease in the number of surviving cells and of extracellular nodules of mineralization, without modifying their ALP activity. Intracellular ROS production, measured after a 48-hour culture, was decreased by AGE-collagen in MC3T3E1 cells, but was increased by AGE-collagen in UMR106 cells. After a 24-hour culture, AGE-collagen increased the expression of endothelial and inducible NOS, in both osteoblastic cell lines. Conclusions These results suggest that the accumulation of AGE on bone extracellular matrix could regulate the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic cells. These effects appear to depend on the stage of osteoblastic development, and possibly involve the modulation of NOS expression and intracellular ROS pathways.

  18. Combined role of type IX collagen and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in cartilage matrix assembly: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein counteracts type IX collagen-induced limitation of cartilage collagen fibril growth in mouse chondrocyte cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blumbach, K.; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y.M.; Groot, J. de; Paulsson, M.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Zaucke, F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Defects in the assembly and composition of cartilage extracellular matrix are likely to result in impaired matrix integrity and increased susceptibility to cartilage degeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the functional interaction of the collagen fibril-associated proteins

  19. Investigation of the collagen-mineral-relation in bone with special respect to bone diseases with collagen defects by small-angle X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, S. A.

    1996-06-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was used to study the structure of the collagen/mineral composite of bone in the nanometer range. The most important results were: - In horse radius, the angular distribution of mineral crystals as measured by SAXS agreed well with previous measurements of collagen orientation using circularly polarized light microscopy. This shows that the crystals are parallel to the collagen fibrils. - The effect of sodium fluoride, which stimulates bone formation, and bisphosphonates, which reduce bone resorption, were analyzed. A slight increase in the average thickness of the mineral crystals as well as changes in the structure of the mineral/collagen composite were found in the case of fluoride treated animals. No differences were found between alendronate treated animals and controls. The changes with NaF correlate with bone weakening found in an earlier study with the same animals. - In cortical bone from 9 patients with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (brittle bone disease) the mean thickness of the mineral crystals was found approximately constant around 2.4 nm, while in control bones it constantly increased with age up to about 3.5 nm. In addition, the parallel alignment of the mineral crystals was less in OI-bone than in normal controls. Hence, despite the great variability of this genetic collagen defect, smaller and less well aligned mineral crystals seem to characterize the collagen/mineral composite in OI-bone. (author)

  20. Effect of Simvastatin collagen graft on wound healing of defective bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jun Ho; Kim, Gyu Tae [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong Suk; Lee, Hyeon Woo; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Institute of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    To observe and evaluate the effects of Simvastatin-induced osteogenesis on the wound healing of defective bone. 64 defective bones were created in the parietal bone of 32 New Zealand White rabbits. The defects were grafted with collagen matrix carriers mixed with Simvastatin solution in the experimental group of 16 rabbits and with collagen matrix carriers mixed with water in the controlled group. The rabbits were terminated at an interval of 3, 5, 7, and 9 days, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after the formation of defective bone. The wound healing was evaluated by soft X-ray radiography. The tissues within defective bones were evaluated through the analysis of flow cytometry for the manifestation of Runx2 and Osteocalcin, and observed histopathologically by using H-E stain and Masson's trichrome stain. Results : 1. In the experimental group, flow cytometry revealed more manifestation of Runx2 at 5, 7, and 9 days and Osteocalcin at 2 weeks than in the controlled groups, but there was few difference in comparison with the controlled group. 2. In the experimental group, flow cytometry revealed considerably more cells and erythrocytes at 5, 7, and 9 days in comparison with the controlled group. 3. In the experimental group, soft x-ray radiography revealed the extended formation of trabeculation at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks. 4. Histopathological features of the experimental group showed more fibroblasts and newly formed vessels at 5 and 7 days, and the formation of osteoid tissues at 9 days, and the newly formed trabeculations at 4 and 6 weeks. As the induced osteogenesis by Simvastatin, there was few contrast of the manifestation between Runx2 and Osteocalcin based on the differentiation of osteoblasts. But it was considered that the more formation of cells and erythrocytes depending on newly formed vessels in the experimental group obviously had an effect on the bone regeneration.

  1. Effect of Simvastatin collagen graft on wound healing of defective bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jun Ho; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Lee, Hyeon Woo; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2008-01-01

    To observe and evaluate the effects of Simvastatin-induced osteogenesis on the wound healing of defective bone. 64 defective bones were created in the parietal bone of 32 New Zealand White rabbits. The defects were grafted with collagen matrix carriers mixed with Simvastatin solution in the experimental group of 16 rabbits and with collagen matrix carriers mixed with water in the controlled group. The rabbits were terminated at an interval of 3, 5, 7, and 9 days, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after the formation of defective bone. The wound healing was evaluated by soft X-ray radiography. The tissues within defective bones were evaluated through the analysis of flow cytometry for the manifestation of Runx2 and Osteocalcin, and observed histopathologically by using H-E stain and Masson's trichrome stain. Results : 1. In the experimental group, flow cytometry revealed more manifestation of Runx2 at 5, 7, and 9 days and Osteocalcin at 2 weeks than in the controlled groups, but there was few difference in comparison with the controlled group. 2. In the experimental group, flow cytometry revealed considerably more cells and erythrocytes at 5, 7, and 9 days in comparison with the controlled group. 3. In the experimental group, soft x-ray radiography revealed the extended formation of trabeculation at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks. 4. Histopathological features of the experimental group showed more fibroblasts and newly formed vessels at 5 and 7 days, and the formation of osteoid tissues at 9 days, and the newly formed trabeculations at 4 and 6 weeks. As the induced osteogenesis by Simvastatin, there was few contrast of the manifestation between Runx2 and Osteocalcin based on the differentiation of osteoblasts. But it was considered that the more formation of cells and erythrocytes depending on newly formed vessels in the experimental group obviously had an effect on the bone regeneration.

  2. Enhancement of tendon–bone healing via the combination of biodegradable collagen-loaded nanofibrous membranes and a three-dimensional printed bone-anchoring bolt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou YC

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ying-Chao Chou,1,2 Wen-Lin Yeh,2 Chien-Lin Chao,1 Yung-Heng Hsu,1,2 Yi-Hsun Yu,1,2 Jan-Kan Chen,3 Shih-Jung Liu1,2 1Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chang Gung University, 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 3Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan Abstract: A composite biodegradable polymeric model was developed to enhance tendon graft healing. This model included a biodegradable polylactide (PLA bolt as the bone anchor and a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA nanofibrous membrane embedded with collagen as a biomimic patch to promote tendon–bone interface integration. Degradation rate and compressive strength of the PLA bolt were measured after immersion in a buffer solution for 3 months. In vitro biochemical characteristics and the nanofibrous matrix were assessed using a water contact angle analyzer, pH meter, and tetrazolium reduction assay. In vivo efficacies of PLGA/collagen nanofibers and PLA bolts for tendon–bone healing were investigated on a rabbit bone tunnel model with histological and tendon pullout tests. The PLGA/collagen-blended nanofibrous membrane was a hydrophilic, stable, and biocompatible scaffold. The PLA bolt was durable for tendon–bone anchoring. Histology showed adequate biocompatibility of the PLA bolt on a medial cortex with progressive bone ingrowth and without tissue overreaction. PLGA nanofibers within the bone tunnel also decreased the tunnel enlargement phenomenon and enhanced tendon–bone integration. Composite polymers of the PLA bolt and PLGA/collagen nanofibrous membrane can effectively promote outcomes of tendon reconstruction in a rabbit model. The composite biodegradable polymeric system may be useful in humans for tendon reconstruction. Keywords: polylactide–polyglycolide nanofibers, PLGA, collagen, 3D printing, polylactide, PLA, bone-anchoring bolts, tendon healing

  3. The effect of bone marrow aspirate, bone graft and collagen composites on fixation of bone implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan; Ding, Ming; Overgaard, Søren

    2007-01-01

     Introduction: Replacement of extensive local bone loss especially in revision joint arthroplasties is a significant clinical challenge. Autogenous and allogenic cancellous bone grafts have been the gold standard in reconstructive orthopaedic surgery, but it is well known that there is morbidity...... associated with harvesting of autogenous bone graft and limitations in the quantity of bone available. Disadvantages of allograft include the risk of bacterial or viral contamination and non union as well as the potential risk of disease transmission. Alternative options are attractive and continue...... to be sought. Hydroxyapatite and collagen composites have the potential in mimicking and replacing skeletal bones. Aim: This study attempted to determine the effect of hydroxyapatite/collagen composites in the fixation of bone implants. The composites used in this study is produced by Institute of Science...

  4. Guided Bone Regeneration in Long-Bone Defects with a Structural Hydroxyapatite Graft and Collagen Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Original Articles Guided Bone Regeneration in Long-Bone Defects with a Structural Hydroxyapatite Graft and Collagen Membrane Teja Guda, PhD,1,2 John...Joint Surg Br 90-B, 1617, 2008. 6. Carlo Reis, E.C., Borges AaPB, Araujo, M.V.F., Mendes, V.C., Guan, L., and Davies, J.E. Periodontal regeneration...Regeneration of periodontal tissues: combinations of barrier membranes and grafting materials–biological foundation and preclinical evi- dence: a

  5. Extraskeletal and intraskeletal new bone formation induced by demineralized bone matrix combined with bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, T.S.; Nilsson, O.S.; Lindholm, T.C.

    1982-01-01

    Dilutions of fresh autogenous bone marrow cells in combination with allogeneic demineralized cortical bone matrix were tested extraskeletally in rats using roentgenographic, histologic, and 45 Ca techniques. Suspensions of bone marrow cells (especially diluted 1:2 with culture media) combined with demineralized cortical bone seemed to induce significantly more new bone than did demineralized bone, bone marrow, or composite grafts with whole bone marrow, respectively. In a short-term spinal fusion experiment, demineralized cortical bone combined with fresh bone marrow produced new bone and bridged the interspace between the spinous processes faster than other transplantation procedures. The induction of undifferentiated host cells by demineralized bone matrix is further complemented by addition of autogenous, especially slightly diluted, bone marrow cells

  6. A collagen-based scaffold delivering exogenous microrna-29B to modulate extracellular matrix remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Michael; Browne, Shane; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Pandit, Abhay

    2014-04-01

    Directing appropriate extracellular matrix remodeling is a key aim of regenerative medicine strategies. Thus, antifibrotic interfering RNA (RNAi) therapy with exogenous microRNA (miR)-29B was proposed as a method to modulate extracellular matrix remodeling following cutaneous injury. It was hypothesized that delivery of miR-29B from a collagen scaffold will efficiently modulate the extracellular matrix remodeling response and reduce maladaptive remodeling such as aggressive deposition of collagen type I after injury. The release of RNA from the scaffold was assessed and its ability to silence collagen type I and collagen type III expression was evaluated in vitro. When primary fibroblasts were cultured with scaffolds doped with miR-29B, reduced levels of collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA expression were observed for up to 2 weeks of culture. When the scaffolds were applied to full thickness wounds in vivo, reduced wound contraction, improved collagen type III/I ratios and a significantly higher matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8: tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 ratio were detected when the scaffolds were functionalized with miR-29B. Furthermore, these effects were significantly influenced by the dose of miR-29B in the collagen scaffold (0.5 versus 5 μg). This study shows a potential of combining exogenous miRs with collagen scaffolds to improve extracellular matrix remodeling following injury.

  7. Quantitative mapping of matrix content and distribution across the ligament-to-bone insertion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey P Spalazzi

    Full Text Available The interface between bone and connective tissues such as the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL constitutes a complex transition traversing multiple tissue regions, including non-calcified and calcified fibrocartilage, which integrates and enables load transfer between otherwise structurally and functionally distinct tissue types. The objective of this study was to investigate region-dependent changes in collagen, proteoglycan and mineral distribution, as well as collagen orientation, across the ligament-to-bone insertion site using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIR-I. Insertion site-related differences in matrix content were also evaluated by comparing tibial and femoral entheses. Both region- and site-related changes were observed. Collagen content was higher in the ligament and bone regions, while decreasing across the fibrocartilage interface. Moreover, interfacial collagen fibrils were aligned parallel to the ligament-bone interface near the ligament region, assuming a more random orientation through the bulk of the interface. Proteoglycan content was uniform on average across the insertion, while its distribution was relatively less variable at the tibial compared to the femoral insertion. Mineral was only detected in the calcified interface region, and its content increased exponentially across the mineralized fibrocartilage region toward bone. In addition to new insights into matrix composition and organization across the complex multi-tissue junction, findings from this study provide critical benchmarks for the regeneration of soft tissue-to-bone interfaces and integrative soft tissue repair.

  8. Quantitative Mapping of Matrix Content and Distribution across the Ligament-to-Bone Insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalazzi, Jeffrey P.; Boskey, Adele L.; Pleshko, Nancy; Lu, Helen H.

    2013-01-01

    The interface between bone and connective tissues such as the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) constitutes a complex transition traversing multiple tissue regions, including non-calcified and calcified fibrocartilage, which integrates and enables load transfer between otherwise structurally and functionally distinct tissue types. The objective of this study was to investigate region-dependent changes in collagen, proteoglycan and mineral distribution, as well as collagen orientation, across the ligament-to-bone insertion site using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIR-I). Insertion site-related differences in matrix content were also evaluated by comparing tibial and femoral entheses. Both region- and site-related changes were observed. Collagen content was higher in the ligament and bone regions, while decreasing across the fibrocartilage interface. Moreover, interfacial collagen fibrils were aligned parallel to the ligament-bone interface near the ligament region, assuming a more random orientation through the bulk of the interface. Proteoglycan content was uniform on average across the insertion, while its distribution was relatively less variable at the tibial compared to the femoral insertion. Mineral was only detected in the calcified interface region, and its content increased exponentially across the mineralized fibrocartilage region toward bone. In addition to new insights into matrix composition and organization across the complex multi-tissue junction, findings from this study provide critical benchmarks for the regeneration of soft tissue-to-bone interfaces and integrative soft tissue repair. PMID:24019964

  9. Nanoporous Structure of Bone Matrix at Osteoporosis from Data of Atomic Force Microscopy and IR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Gaidash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It was found that in an osteoporotic bone the fraction of nanosized pores decreases, the mineral phase amorphizes, hydrated shells around mineralized particles of the bone matrix thicken, and adhesion forces increase. This contributes to the formation of water clusters similar to bulk water clusters compared to the healthy bone tissue and leads to the accumulation of more viscous liquid with increased intermolecular interaction forces in the pores of the bone matrix. Given this, the rates of chemical reactions proceeding in the water phase of ultrathin channels of general parts of collagen fibrils decrease. Ultimately, nanopores of collagen-apatite interfaces lose, to a certain extent, the capability of catalyzing the hydroxyapatite crystallization.

  10. In Vitro Expression of the Extracellular Matrix Components Aggrecan, Collagen Types I and II by Articular Cartilage-Derived Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneevoigt, J; Fabian, C; Leovsky, C; Seeger, J; Bahramsoltani, M

    2017-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of hyaline cartilage is perfectly suited to transmit articular pressure load to the subchondral bone. Pressure is transferred by a high amount of aggrecan-based proteoglycans and collagen type II fibres in particular. After any injury, the hyaline cartilage is replaced by fibrocartilage, which is low in proteoglycans and contains collagen type I predominantly. Until now, long-term results of therapeutic procedures including cell-based therapies like autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) lead to a replacement tissue meeting the composition of fibrocartilage. Therefore, it is of particular interest to discover how and to what extent isolation and in vitro cultivation of chondrocytes affect the cells and their expression of ECM components. Hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes were cultivated in vitro and observed microscopically over a time period of 35 days. The expression of collagen type I, collagen type II and aggrecan was analysed using RT-qPCR and Western blot at several days of cultivation. Chondrocytes presented a longitudinal shape for the entire cultivation period. While expression of collagen type I prevailed within the first days, only prolonged cultivation led to an increase in collagen type II and aggrecan expression. The results indicate that chondrocyte isolation and in vitro cultivation lead to a dedifferentiation at least to the stage of chondroprogenitor cells. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Intracellular Calreticulin Regulates Multiple Steps in Fibrillar Collagen Expression, Trafficking, and Processing into the Extracellular Matrix*

    OpenAIRE

    Van Duyn Graham, Lauren; Sweetwyne, Mariya T.; Pallero, Manuel A.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.

    2009-01-01

    Calreticulin (CRT), a chaperone and Ca2+ regulator, enhances wound healing, and its expression correlates with fibrosis in animal models, suggesting that CRT regulates production of the extracellular matrix. However, direct regulation of collagen matrix by CRT has not been previously demonstrated. We investigated the role of CRT in the regulation of fibrillar collagen expression, secretion, processing, and deposition in the extracellular matrix by fibroblasts. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts defi...

  12. COLOSTRUM-COLLAGEN-HYDROXYAPATITE COMPOSITE, AN EXCELLENT CANDIDATE BIOMATERIAL FOR BONE REPAIR AND BONE INFECTION MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dio Nurdin Setiawan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the case ofbone fracture or defect after surgery, which is common in patients with bone cancer (osteosarcoma, it takes a long time for closure and it may cause an infection problem. The use ofcollagen-hydroxyapatite composite with a blend ofcolostrum as a scaffold is aimed to accelerate the process of osteoblast growth, inhibite the emergence of infections, and act as bone tissue repair material. The method used was the hydrogel formation process and freeze dry process to remove the solvent and to form pores. The composition of scaffold composite manufactured was 15% collagen, 75% hydroxyapatite and 10% colostrum. Combination ofscaffold collagen-hydroxyapatite-colostrum has quite reliable properties because SEM test showed that scaffold could bind to both and could bind to both and could form sufficient pores to provide enough place for bone cells (osteoblats to grow. The results of MTT assay revealed percentage of above 60%, which indicates that the material is not toxic. In conclusion, collagen-hydroxyapatite-colostrum combination is an excellent biomaterial candidate for bone repair and bone infection management.

  13. Neuroprotective effects of collagen matrix in rats after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Samuel S; Grandhi, Ramesh; Henchir, Jeremy; Yan, Hong Q; Badylak, Stephen F; Dixon, C Edward

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies, collagen based matrices have been implanted into the site of lesion in different models of brain injury. We hypothesized that semisynthetic collagen matrix can have neuroprotective function in the setting of traumatic brain injury. Rats were subjected to sham injury or controlled cortical impact. They either received extracellular matrix graft (DuraGen) over the injury site or did not receive any graft and underwent beam balance/beam walking test at post injury days 1-5 and Morris water maze at post injury days 14-18. Animals were sacrificed at day 18 for tissue analysis. Collagen matrix implantation in injured rats did not affect motor function (beam balance test: p = 0.627, beam walking test: p = 0.921). However, injured group with collagen matrix had significantly better spatial memory acquisition (p < 0.05). There was a significant reduction in lesion volume, as well as neuronal loss in CA1 (p < 0.001) and CA3 (p < 0.05) regions of the hippocampus in injured group with collagen matrix (p < 0.05). Collagen matrix reduces contusional lesion volume, neuronal loss, and cognitive deficit after traumatic brain injury. Further studies are needed to demonstrate the mechanisms of neuroprotection by collagen matrix.

  14. Effect of protein malnutrition on the metabolism of bone collagen in albino rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, J S; Rao, V H [Central Leather Research Inst., Madras (India)

    1981-01-01

    The effect of protein malnutrition on the metabolism of collagen in bone was studied in young female albino rats after a single injection of /sup 3/H-proline. Both specific and total radioactivities of hydroxyproline in the total collagen of the bone were found to decrease in the protein-deficient animals, indicating decreased rate of collagen synthesis. In the urine the amount of hydroxyproline excreted and total radioactivity of /sup 3/H-hydroxyproline were greatly decreased. The results of the present investigation therefore clearly indicate decreased synthesis and catabolism of collagen in bones of protein deficient animals compared to controls.

  15. Endocytosis of collagen by hepatic stellate cells regulates extracellular matrix dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yan; Mukhopadhyay, Dhriti; Drinane, Mary; Ji, Baoan; Li, Xing; Cao, Sheng; Shah, Vijay H

    2014-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) generate matrix, which in turn may also regulate HSCs function during liver fibrosis. We hypothesized that HSCs may endocytose matrix proteins to sense and respond to changes in microenvironment. Primary human HSCs, LX2, or mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) [wild-type; c-abl(-/-); or Yes, Src, and Fyn knockout mice (YSF(-/-))] were incubated with fluorescent-labeled collagen or gelatin. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and confocal microscopy were used for measuring cellular internalization of matrix proteins. Targeted PCR array and quantitative real-time PCR were used to evaluate gene expression changes. HSCs and LX2 cells endocytose collagens in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Endocytosed collagen colocalized with Dextran 10K, a marker of macropinocytosis, and 5-ethylisopropyl amiloride, an inhibitor of macropinocytosis, reduced collagen internalization by 46%. Cytochalasin D and ML7 blocked collagen internalization by 47% and 45%, respectively, indicating that actin and myosin are critical for collagen endocytosis. Wortmannin and AKT inhibitor blocked collagen internalization by 70% and 89%, respectively, indicating that matrix macropinocytosis requires phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling. Overexpression of dominant-negative dynamin-2 K44A blocked matrix internalization by 77%, indicating a role for dynamin-2 in matrix macropinocytosis. Whereas c-abl(-/-) MEF showed impaired matrix endocytosis, YSF(-/-) MEF surprisingly showed increased matrix endocytosis. It was also associated with complex gene regulations that related with matrix dynamics, including increased matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) mRNA levels and zymographic activity. HSCs endocytose matrix proteins through macropinocytosis that requires a signaling network composed of PI3K/AKT, dynamin-2, and c-abl. Interaction with extracellular matrix regulates matrix dynamics through modulating multiple gene expressions including MMP-9

  16. Repair of rabbit radial bone defects using true bone ceramics combined with BMP-2-related peptide and type I collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jingfeng; Lin Zhenyu; Zheng Qixin; Guo Xiaodong; Lan Shenghui; Liu Sunan; Yang Shuhua

    2010-01-01

    An ideal bone graft material is the one characterized with good biocompatibility, biodegradation, osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity. In this study, a novel synthetic BMP-2-related peptide (designated P24) corresponding to residues of the knuckle epitope of BMP-2 was introduced into a biomimetic scaffold based on sintered bovine bone or true bone ceramics (TBC) and type I collagen (TBC/collagen I) using a simulated body fluid (SBF). Hydroxylapatite crystal mineralization with a Ca/P molar ratio of 1.63 was observed on the surface of P24/TBC/collagen I composite by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Cell adhesion rate evaluation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) seeded on materials in vitro showed that the percentage of cells attached to P24/TBC/collagen I composite was significantly higher than that of the TBC/collagen I composite. A 10 mm unilateral segmental bone defect was created in the radius of New Zealand white rabbits and randomly implanted with three groups of biomaterials (Group A: P24/TBC/collagen I composite; Group B: TBC/collagen I composite and Group C: TBC alone). Based on radiographic evaluation and histological examination, the implants of P24/TBC/collagen I composite significantly stimulated bone growth, thereby confirming the enhanced rate of bone healing compared with that of TBC/collagen I composite and TBC alone. It was concluded that BMP-2-related peptide P24 could induce nucleation of calcium phosphate crystals on the surface of TBC/collagen I composite. The TBC/collagen I composite loaded with the synthetic BMP-2-related peptide is a promising scaffold biomaterial for bone tissue engineering.

  17. Greener synthesis of electrospun collagen/hydroxyapatite composite fibers with an excellent microstructure for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou YY

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Yuanyuan Zhou,1,2 Hongchang Yao,1 Jianshe Wang,1 Dalu Wang,1 Qian Liu,1 Zhongjun Li11College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Institute of Enviromental and Municipal Engineering, North China University of Water Resources and Electric Power, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: In bone tissue engineering, collagen/hydroxyapatite (HAP fibrous composite obtained via electrospinning method has been demonstrated to support the cells’ adhesion and bone regeneration. However, electrospinning of natural collagen often requires the use of cytotoxic organic solvents, and the HAP crystals were usually aggregated and randomly distributed within a fibrous matrix of collagen, limiting their clinical potential. Here, an effective and greener method for the preparation of collagen/HAP composite fibers was developed for the first time, and this green product not only had 40 times higher mechanical properties than that previously reported, but also had an excellent microstructure similar to that of natural bone. By dissolving type I collagen in environmentally friendly phosphate buffered saline/ethanol solution instead of the frequently-used cytotoxic organic solvents, followed with the key step of desalination, co-electrospinning the collagen solution with the HAP sol, generates a collagen/HAP composite with a uniform and continuous fibrous morphology. Interestingly, the nano-HAP needles were found to preferentially orient along the longitudinal direction of the collagen fibers, which mimicked the nanostructure of natural bones. Based on the characterization of the related products, the formation mechanism for this novel phenomenon was proposed. After cross-linking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl-aminopropyl-1-carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide, the obtained composite exhibited a significant enhancement in mechanical properties. In addition, the biocompatibility of the

  18. Targeting a novel bone degradation pathway in primary bone cancer by inactivation of the collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelholm, Lars H; Carlsen Melander, Eva Maria; Hald, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    metastases of carcinoma origin. This opened the possibility that sarcoma cells might directly mediate bone degeneration. To examine this question, we utilized a syngeneic, osteolytic bone tumour model with transplanted NCTC-2472 sarcoma cells in mice. When analysed in vitro, these cells were capable......In osteosarcoma, a primary mesenchymal bone cancer occurring predominantly in younger patients, invasive tumour growth leads to extensive bone destruction. This process is insufficiently understood, cannot be efficiently counteracted and calls for novel means of treatment. The endocytic collagen...... receptor, uPARAP/Endo180, is expressed on various mesenchymal cell types and is involved in bone matrix turnover during normal bone growth. Human osteosarcoma specimens showed strong expression of this receptor on tumour cells, along with the collagenolytic metalloprotease, MT1-MMP. In advanced tumours...

  19. Kinetics of gene expression and bone remodelling in the clinical phase of collagen induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denninger, Katja Caroline Marie; Litman, Thomas; Marstrand, Troels

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pathological bone changes differ considerably between inflammatory arthritic diseases and most studies have focused on bone erosion. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a model for rheumatoid arthritis, which, in addition to bone erosion, demonstrates bone formation at the time...

  20. Manipulation of in vitro collagen matrix architecture for scaffolds of improved physiological relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapach, Lauren A.; VanderBurgh, Jacob A.; Miller, Joseph P.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2015-12-01

    Type I collagen is a versatile biomaterial that is widely used in medical applications due to its weak antigenicity, robust biocompatibility, and its ability to be modified for a wide array of applications. As such, collagen has become a major component of many tissue engineering scaffolds, drug delivery platforms, and substrates for in vitro cell culture. In these applications, collagen constructs are fabricated to recapitulate a diverse set of conditions. Collagen fibrils can be aligned during or post-fabrication, cross-linked via numerous techniques, polymerized to create various fibril sizes and densities, and copolymerized into a wide array of composite scaffolds. Here, we review approaches that have been used to tune collagen to better recapitulate physiological environments for use in tissue engineering applications and studies of basic cell behavior. We discuss techniques to control fibril alignment, methods for cross-linking collagen constructs to modulate stiffness, and composite collagen constructs to better mimic physiological extracellular matrix.

  1. Optimization of a Multi-Step Procedure for Isolation of Chicken Bone Collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Cansu, ?mran; Boran, G?khan

    2015-01-01

    Chicken bone is not adequately utilized despite its high nutritional value and protein content. Although not a common raw material, chicken bone can be used in many different ways besides manufacturing of collagen products. In this study, a multi-step procedure was optimized to isolate chicken bone collagen for higher yield and quality for manufacture of collagen products. The chemical composition of chicken bone was 2.9% nitrogen corresponding to about 15.6% protein, 9.5% fat, 14.7% mineral ...

  2. Biomimetic mineralization of recombinant collagen type I derived protein to obtain hybrid matrices for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Rodríguez, Gloria Belén; Delgado-López, José Manuel; Iafisco, Michele; Montesi, Monica; Sandri, Monica; Sprio, Simone; Tampieri, Anna

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the mineralization mechanism of synthetic protein has recently aroused great interest especially in the development of advanced materials for bone regeneration. Herein, we propose the synthesis of composite materials through the mineralization of a recombinant collagen type I derived protein (RCP) enriched with RGD sequences in the presence of magnesium ions (Mg) to closer mimic bone composition. The role of both RCP and Mg ions in controlling the precipitation of the mineral phase is in depth evaluated. TEM and X-ray powder diffraction reveal the crystallization of nanocrystalline apatite (Ap) in all the evaluated conditions. However, Raman spectra point out also the precipitation of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP). This amorphous phase is more evident when RCP and Mg are at work, indicating the synergistic role of both in stabilizing the amorphous precursor. In addition, hybrid matrices are prepared to tentatively address their effectiveness as scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. SEM and AFM imaging show an homogeneous mineral distribution on the RCP matrix mineralized in presence of Mg, which provides a surface roughness similar to that found in bone. Preliminary in vitro tests with pre-osteoblast cell line show good cell-material interaction on the matrices prepared in the presence of Mg. To the best of our knowledge this work represents the first attempt to mineralize recombinant collagen type I derived protein proving the simultaneous effect of the organic phase (RCP) and Mg on ACP stabilization. This study opens the possibility to engineer, through biomineralization process, advanced hybrid matrices for bone regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cross-linking in collagen by nonenzymatic glycation increases the matrix stiffness in rabbit achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, G Kesava

    2004-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of connective tissue matrix proteins is a major contributor to the pathology of diabetes and aging. Previously the author and colleagues have shown that nonenzymatic glycation significantly enhances the matrix stability in the Achilles tendon (Reddy et al., 2002, Arch. Biochem. Biophys., 399, 174-180). The present study was designed to gain further insight into glycation-induced collagen cross-linking and its relationship to matrix stiffness in the rabbit Achilles tendon. The glycation process was initiated by incubating the Achilles tendons (n = 6) in phosphate-buffered saline containing ribose, whereas control tendons (n = 6) were incubated in phosphate-buffered saline without ribose. Eight weeks following glycation, the biomechanical attributes as well as the degree of collagen cross-linking were determined to examine the potential associations between matrix stiffness and molecular properties of collagen. Compared to nonglycated tendons, the glycated tendons showed increased maximum load, stress, strain, Young's modulus of elasticity, and toughness indicating that glycation increases the matrix stiffness in the tendons. Glycation of tendons resulted in a considerable decrease in soluble collagen content and a significant increase in insoluble collagen and pentosidine. Analysis of potential associations between the matrix stiffness and degree of collagen cross-linking showed that both insoluble collagen and pentosidine exhibited a significant positive correlation with the maximum load, stress, and strain, Young's modulus of elasticity, and toughness (r values ranging from.61 to.94) in the Achilles tendons. However, the soluble collagen content present in neutral salt buffer, acetate buffer, and acetate buffer containing pepsin showed an inverse relation with the various biomechanical attributes tested (r values ranging from.22 to.84) in the Achilles tendons. The results of the study demonstrate that glycation-induced collagen cross

  4. Local effect of zoledronic acid on new bone formation in posterolateral spinal fusion with demineralized bone matrix in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolak, Pawel; Farei-Campagna, Jan; Jentzsch, Thorsten; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Werner, Clément M

    2018-01-01

    Posterolateral spinal fusion is a common orthopaedic surgery performed to treat degenerative and traumatic deformities of the spinal column. In posteriolateral spinal fusion, different osteoinductive demineralized bone matrix products have been previously investigated. We evaluated the effect of locally applied zoledronic acid in combination with commercially available demineralized bone matrix putty on new bone formation in posterolateral spinal fusion in a murine in vivo model. A posterolateral sacral spine fusion in murine model was used to evaluate the new bone formation. We used the sacral spine fusion model to model the clinical situation in which a bone graft or demineralized bone matrix is applied after dorsal instrumentation of the spine. In our study, group 1 received decortications only (n = 10), group 2 received decortication, and absorbable collagen sponge carrier, group 3 received decortication and absorbable collagen sponge carrier with zoledronic acid in dose 10 µg, group 4 received demineralized bone matrix putty (DBM putty) plus decortication (n = 10), and group 5 received DBM putty, decortication and locally applied zoledronic acid in dose 10 µg. Imaging was performed using MicroCT for new bone formation assessment. Also, murine spines were harvested for histopathological analysis 10 weeks after surgery. The surgery performed through midline posterior approach was reproducible. In group with decortication alone there was no new bone formation. Application of demineralized bone matrix putty alone produced new bone formation which bridged the S1-S4 laminae. Local application of zoledronic acid to demineralized bone matrix putty resulted in significant increase of new bone formation as compared to demineralized bone matrix putty group alone. A single local application of zoledronic acid with DBM putty during posterolateral fusion in sacral murine spine model increased significantly new bone formation in situ in our model. Therefore, our

  5. Diffusion and Binding of Laponite Clay Nanoparticles into Collagen Fibers for the Formation of Leather Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiabo; Wang, Chunhua; Ngai, To; Lin, Wei

    2018-06-13

    Understanding accessibility and interactions of clay nanoparticles with collagen fibers is an important fundamental issue for the conversion of collagen to leather matrix. In this study, we have investigated the diffusion and binding of Laponite into the collagen fiber network. Our results indicate that the diffusion behaviors of Laponite into the collagen exhibit the Langmuir adsorption, verifying its affinity for collagen. The introduction of Laponite leads to a shift in the isoelectric point of collagen from ∼6.8 to ∼4.5, indicating the ionic bonding between the positively charged amino groups of the collagen and negatively charged Laponite under the tanning conditions. Fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and wide-angle X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that Laponite nanoparticles can penetrate into collagen microstructure and evenly distributed onto collagen fibrils, not altering native D-periodic banding patterns of collagen fibrils. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy detections further demonstrate the presence of noncovalent interactions, namely, ionic and hydrogen bonding, between Laponite and collagen. These findings provide a theoretical basis for the use of Laponite as an emerging tanning agent in leather manufacture.

  6. Collagen XII and XIV, New Partners of Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein in the Skin Extracellular Matrix Suprastructure*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pallavi; Zwolanek, Daniela; Keene, Douglas R.; Schulz, Jan-Niklas; Blumbach, Katrin; Heinegård, Dick; Zaucke, Frank; Paulsson, Mats; Krieg, Thomas; Koch, Manuel; Eckes, Beate

    2012-01-01

    The tensile and scaffolding properties of skin rely on the complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds cells, vasculature, nerves, and adnexus structures and supports the epidermis. In the skin, collagen I fibrils are the major structural component of the dermal ECM, decorated by proteoglycans and by fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices such as collagens XII and XIV. Here we show that the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), an abundant component of cartilage ECM, is expressed in healthy human skin. COMP expression is detected in the dermal compartment of skin and in cultured fibroblasts, whereas epidermis and HaCaT cells are negative. In addition to binding collagen I, COMP binds to collagens XII and XIV via their C-terminal collagenous domains. All three proteins codistribute in a characteristic narrow zone in the superficial papillary dermis of healthy human skin. Ultrastructural analysis by immunogold labeling confirmed colocalization and further revealed the presence of COMP along with collagens XII and XIV in anchoring plaques. On the basis of these observations, we postulate that COMP functions as an adapter protein in human skin, similar to its function in cartilage ECM, by organizing collagen I fibrils into a suprastructure, mainly in the vicinity of anchoring plaques that stabilize the cohesion between the upper dermis and the basement membrane zone. PMID:22573329

  7. Collagen XII and XIV, new partners of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in the skin extracellular matrix suprastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pallavi; Zwolanek, Daniela; Keene, Douglas R; Schulz, Jan-Niklas; Blumbach, Katrin; Heinegård, Dick; Zaucke, Frank; Paulsson, Mats; Krieg, Thomas; Koch, Manuel; Eckes, Beate

    2012-06-29

    The tensile and scaffolding properties of skin rely on the complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds cells, vasculature, nerves, and adnexus structures and supports the epidermis. In the skin, collagen I fibrils are the major structural component of the dermal ECM, decorated by proteoglycans and by fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices such as collagens XII and XIV. Here we show that the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), an abundant component of cartilage ECM, is expressed in healthy human skin. COMP expression is detected in the dermal compartment of skin and in cultured fibroblasts, whereas epidermis and HaCaT cells are negative. In addition to binding collagen I, COMP binds to collagens XII and XIV via their C-terminal collagenous domains. All three proteins codistribute in a characteristic narrow zone in the superficial papillary dermis of healthy human skin. Ultrastructural analysis by immunogold labeling confirmed colocalization and further revealed the presence of COMP along with collagens XII and XIV in anchoring plaques. On the basis of these observations, we postulate that COMP functions as an adapter protein in human skin, similar to its function in cartilage ECM, by organizing collagen I fibrils into a suprastructure, mainly in the vicinity of anchoring plaques that stabilize the cohesion between the upper dermis and the basement membrane zone.

  8. Changes in chemical composition of bone matrix in ovariectomized (OVX) rats detected by Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Yusuke; Iimura, Tadahiro; Saitou, Takashi; Imamura, Takeshi

    2015-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a major bone disease that connotes the risk of fragility fractures resulting from alterations to bone quantity and/or quality to mechanical competence. Bone strength arises from both bone quantity and quality. Assessment of bone quality and bone quantity is important for prediction of fracture risk. In spite of the two factors contribute to maintain the bone strength, only one factor, bone mineral density is used to determine the bone strength in the current diagnosis of osteoporosis. On the other hand, there is no practical method to measure chemical composition of bone tissue including hydroxyapatite and collagen non-invasively. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique to analyze chemical composition and material properties of bone matrix non-invasively. Here we demonstrated Raman spectroscopic analysis of the bone matrix in osteoporosis model rat. Ovariectomized (OVX) rat was made and the decalcified sections of tibias were analyzed by a Raman microscope. In the results, Raman bands of typical collagen appeared in the obtained spectra. Although the typical mineral bands at 960 cm-1 (Phosphate) was absent due to decalcified processing, we found that Raman peak intensities of amide I and C-C stretching bands were significantly different between OVX and sham-operated specimens. These differences on the Raman spectra were statistically compared by multivariate analyses, principal component analysis (PCA) and liner discrimination analysis (LDA). Our analyses suggest that amide I and C-C stretching bands can be related to stability of bone matrix which reflects bone quality.

  9. Collagen VI disorders: Insights on form and function in the extracellular matrix and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamandé, Shireen R; Bateman, John F

    2017-12-22

    Mutations in the three canonical collagen VI genes, COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3, cause a spectrum of muscle disease from Bethlem myopathy at the mild end to the severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. Mutations can be either dominant or recessive and the resulting clinical severity is influenced by the way mutations impact the complex collagen VI assembly process. Most mutations are found towards the N-terminus of the triple helical collagenous domain and compromise extracellular microfibril assembly. Outside the triple helix collagen VI is highly polymorphic and discriminating mutations from rare benign changes remains a major diagnostic challenge. Collagen VI deficiency alters extracellular matrix structure and biomechanical properties and leads to increased apoptosis and oxidative stress, decreased autophagy, and impaired muscle regeneration. Therapies that target these downstream consequences have been tested in a collagen VI null mouse and also in small human trials where they show modest clinical efficacy. An important role for collagen VI in obesity, cancer and diabetes is emerging. A major barrier to developing effective therapies is the paucity of information about how collagen VI deficiency in the extracellular matrix signals the final downstream consequences - the receptors involved and the intracellular messengers await further characterization. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Acceleration of bone union after structural bone grafts with a collagen-binding basic fibroblast growth factor anchored-collagen sheet for critical-size bone defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Masaki; Uchida, Kentaro; Saito, Wataru; Inoue, Gen; Takahira, Naonobu; Takaso, Masashi; Matsushita, Osamu; Yogoro, Mizuki; Nishi, Nozomu; Ogura, Takayuki; Hattori, Shunji; Tanaka, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    Bone allografts are commonly used for the repair of critical-size bone defects. However, the loss of cellular activity in processed grafts markedly reduces their healing potential compared with autografts. To overcome this obstacle, we developed a healing system for critical-size bone defects that consists of overlaying an implanted bone graft with a collagen sheet (CS) loaded with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) fused to the collagen-binding domain derived from a Clostridium histolyticum collagenase (CB-bFGF). In a murine femoral defect model, defect sites treated with CS/CB-bFGF had a significantly larger callus volume than those treated with CS/native bFGF. In addition, treatment with CS/CB-bFGF resulted in the rapid formation of a hard callus bridge and a larger total callus volume at the host–graft junction than treatment with CS/bFGF. Our results suggest that the combined use of CS and CB-bFGF helps accelerate the union of allogenic bone grafts. (paper)

  11. Use of Mueller matrix colposcopy in the characterization of cervical collagen anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montejo, Karla A.; Chue-Sang, Joseph; Bai, Yuqiang; Stoff, Susan; Holness, Nola; Gonzalez, Mariacarla; Gomes, Jefferson; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Chernomordik, Viktor V.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2017-02-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) presents a serious medical heath concern in both economically developed and developing nations, with incidence rate from 15%-11% respectively. Changes in cervical collagen bundle orientation and distribution may prove to be a predictor of PTB. Polarization imaging is an effective means to measure optical anisotropy in birefringent biological tissue such as those rich in collagen. Non-invasive, full-field Mueller Matrix polarimetry (MMP) imaging methodologies, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy were used to assess cervical collagen content and structure in non-pregnant cervices. In vivo studies using a Mueller Matrix colposcope are underway. Further studies of cervical collagen orientation throughout pregnancy are needed to understand if Mueller matrix polarimetry can effectively identify at-risk conditions for PTB.

  12. Effects of dynamic matrix remodelling on en masse migration of fibroblasts on collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcelikkale, Altug; Dutton, J Craig; Grinnell, Frederick; Han, Bumsoo

    2017-10-01

    Fibroblast migration plays a key role during various physiological and pathological processes. Although migration of individual fibroblasts has been well studied, migration in vivo often involves simultaneous locomotion of fibroblasts sited in close proximity, so-called ' en masse migration', during which intensive cell-cell interactions occur. This study aims to understand the effects of matrix mechanical environments on the cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions during en masse migration of fibroblasts on collagen matrices. Specifically, we hypothesized that a group of migrating cells can significantly deform the matrix, whose mechanical microenvironment dramatically changes compared with the undeformed state, and the alteration of the matrix microenvironment reciprocally affects cell migration. This hypothesis was tested by time-resolved measurements of cell and extracellular matrix movement during en masse migration on collagen hydrogels with varying concentrations. The results illustrated that a group of cells generates significant spatio-temporal deformation of the matrix before and during the migration. Cells on soft collagen hydrogels migrate along tortuous paths, but, as the matrix stiffness increases, cell migration patterns become aligned with each other and show coordinated migration paths. As cells migrate, the matrix is locally compressed, resulting in a locally stiffened and dense matrix across the collagen concentration range studied. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Arterial extracellular matrix: a mechanobiological study of the contributions and interactions of elastin and collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ming-Jay; Turcotte, Raphaël; Lin, Charles P; Zhang, Yanhang

    2014-06-17

    The complex network structure of elastin and collagen extracellular matrix (ECM) forms the primary load bearing components in the arterial wall. The structural and mechanobiological interactions between elastin and collagen are important for properly functioning arteries. Here, we examined the elastin and collagen organization, realignment, and recruitment by coupling mechanical loading and multiphoton imaging. Two-photon excitation fluorescence and second harmonic generation methods were performed with a multiphoton video-rate microscope to capture real time changes to the elastin and collagen structure during biaxial deformation. Enzymatic removal of elastin was performed to assess the structural changes of the remaining collagen structure. Quantitative analysis of the structural changes to elastin and collagen was made using a combination of two-dimensional fast Fourier transform and fractal analysis, which allows for a more complete understanding of structural changes. Our study provides new quantitative evidence, to our knowledge on the sequential engagement of different arterial ECM components in response to mechanical loading. The adventitial collagen exists as large wavy bundles of fibers that exhibit fiber engagement after 20% strain. The medial collagen is engaged throughout the stretching process, and prominent elastic fiber engagement is observed up to 20% strain after which the engagement plateaus. The fiber orientation distribution functions show remarkably different changes in the ECM structure in response to mechanical loading. The medial collagen shows an evident preferred circumferential distribution, however the fiber families of adventitial collagen are obscured by their waviness at no or low mechanical strains. Collagen fibers in both layers exhibit significant realignment in response to unequal biaxial loading. The elastic fibers are much more uniformly distributed and remained relatively unchanged due to loading. Removal of elastin produces

  14. Bone Collagen: New Clues to its Mineralization Mechanism From Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, David R.; Ann Weis, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Until 2006 the only mutations known to cause osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) were in the two genes coding for type I collagen chains. These dominant mutations affecting the expression or primary sequence of collagen α1(I) and α2(I) chains account for over 90% of OI cases. Since then a growing list of mutant genes causing the 5–10% of recessive cases has rapidly emerged. They include CRTAP, LEPRE1 and PPIB, which encode three proteins forming the prolyl 3-hydroxylase complex; PLOD2 and FKBP10, which encode respectively lysyl hydroxylase 2 and a foldase required for its activity in forming mature cross-links in bone collagen; SERPIN H1, which encodes the collagen chaperone HSP47; SERPIN F1, which encodes pigment epithelium-derived factor required for osteoid mineralization; and BMP1, which encodes the type I procollagen C-propeptidase. All cause fragile bone in infancy, which can include over-mineralization or under-mineralization defects as well as abnormal collagen post-translational modifications. Consistently both dominant and recessive variants lead to abnormal cross-linking chemistry in bone collagen. These recent discoveries strengthen the potential for a common pathogenic mechanism of misassembled collagen fibrils. Of the new genes identified, eight encode proteins required for collagen post-translational modification, chaperoning of newly synthesized collagen chains into native molecules or transport through the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi for polymerization, cross-linking and mineralization. In reviewing these findings, we conclude that a common theme is emerging in the pathogenesis of brittle bone disease of mishandled collagen assembly with important insights on post-translational features of bone collagen that have evolved to optimize it as a biomineral template. PMID:23508630

  15. Propolis Modifies Collagen Types I and III Accumulation in the Matrix of Burnt Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Olczyk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing represents an interactive process which requires highly organized activity of various cells, synthesizing cytokines, growth factors, and collagen. Collagen types I and III, serving as structural and regulatory molecules, play pivotal roles during wound healing. The aim of this study was to compare the propolis and silver sulfadiazine therapeutic efficacy throughout the quantitative and qualitative assessment of collagen types I and III accumulation in the matrix of burnt tissues. Burn wounds were inflicted on pigs, chosen for the evaluation of wound repair because of many similarities between pig and human skin. Isolated collagen types I and III were estimated by the surface plasmon resonance method with a subsequent collagenous quantification using electrophoretic and densitometric analyses. Propolis burn treatment led to enhanced collagens and its components expression, especially during the initial stage of the study. Less expressed changes were observed after silver sulfadiazine (AgSD application. AgSD and, with a smaller intensity, propolis stimulated accumulation of collagenous degradation products. The assessed propolis therapeutic efficacy, throughout quantitatively and qualitatively analyses of collagen types I and III expression and degradation in wounds matrix, may indicate that apitherapeutic agent can generate favorable biochemical environment supporting reepithelization.

  16. Chondrogenic properties of collagen type XI, a component of cartilage extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ang; Wei, Yiyong; Hung, Clark; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2018-08-01

    Cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) has been used for promoting tissue engineering. However, the exact effects of ECM on chondrogenesis and the acting mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the chondrogenic effects of cartilage ECM on human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and identified the contributing molecular components. To this end, a preparation of articular cartilage ECM was supplemented to pellets of chondrogenically differentiating MSCs, pellets of human chondrocytes, and bovine articular cartilage explants to evaluate the effects on cell proliferation and the production of cartilaginous matrix. Selective enzymatic digestion and screening of ECM components were conducted to identify matrix molecules with chondrogenic properties. Cartilage ECM promoted MSC proliferation, production of cartilaginous matrix, and maturity of chondrogenic differentiation, and inhibited the hypertrophic differentiation of MSC-derived chondrocytes. Selective digestion of ECM components revealed a contributory role of collagens in promoting chondrogenesis. The screening of various collagen subtypes revealed strong chondrogenic effect of collagen type XI. Finally, collagen XI was found to promote production and inhibit degradation of cartilage matrix in human articular chondrocyte pellets and bovine articular cartilage explants. Our results indicate that cartilage ECM promotes chondrogenesis and inhibits hypertrophic differentiation in MSCs. Collagen type XI is the ECM component that has the strongest effects on enhancing the production and inhibiting the degradation of cartilage matrix. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nanorod mediated collagen scaffolds as extra cellular matrix mimics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedhanayagam, Mohan; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan; Mohan, Ranganathan

    2015-01-01

    Creating collagen scaffolds that mimic extracellular matrices without using toxic exogenous materials remains a big challenge. A new strategy to create scaffolds through end-to-end crosslinking through functionalized nanorods leading to well-designed architecture is presented here. Self-assembled scaffolds with a denaturation temperature of 110 °C, porosity of 70%, pore size of 0.32 μm and Young’s modulus of 231 MPa were developed largely driven by imine bonding between 3-mercapto-1-propanal (MPA) functionalized ZnO nanorods and collagen. The mechanical properties obtained were much higher than that of native collagen, collagen—MPA, collagen—3-mercapto-1-propanol (3MPOH) or collagen- 3-MPOH-ZnO, clearly bringing out the relevance of nanorod mediated assembly of fibrous networks. This new strategy has led to scaffolds with mechanical properties much higher than earlier reports and can provide support for cell growth and facilitation of cell attachment. (paper)

  18. FK506 protects against articular cartilage collagenous extra-cellular matrix degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebelt, M; van der Windt, A E; Groen, H C; Sandker, M; Waarsing, J H; Müller, C; de Jong, M; Jahr, H; Weinans, H

    2014-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a non-rheumatologic joint disease characterized by progressive degeneration of the cartilage extra-cellular matrix (ECM), enhanced subchondral bone remodeling, activation of synovial macrophages and osteophyte growth. Inhibition of calcineurin (Cn) activity through tacrolimus (FK506) in in vitro monolayer chondrocytes exerts positive effects on ECM marker expression. This study therefore investigated the effects of FK506 on anabolic and catabolic markers of osteoarthritic chondrocytes in 2D and 3D in vitro cultures, and its therapeutic effects in an in vivo rat model of OA. Effects of high and low doses of FK506 on anabolic (QPCR/histochemistry) and catabolic (QPCR) markers were evaluated in vitro on isolated (2D) and ECM-embedded chondrocytes (explants, 3D pellets). Severe cartilage damage was induced unilaterally in rat knees using papain injections in combination with a moderate running protocol. Twenty rats were treated with FK506 orally and compared to twenty untreated controls. Subchondral cortical and trabecular bone changes (longitudinal microCT) and macrophage activation (SPECT/CT) were measured. Articular cartilage was analyzed ex vivo using contrast enhanced microCT and histology. FK506 treatment of osteoarthritic chondrocytes in vitro induced anabolic (mainly collagens) and reduced catabolic ECM marker expression. In line with this, FK506 treatment clearly protected ECM integrity in vivo by markedly decreasing subchondral sclerosis, less development of subchondral pores, depletion of synovial macrophage activation and lower osteophyte growth. FK506 protected cartilage matrix integrity in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, FK506 treatment in vivo reduced OA-like responses in different articular joint tissues and thereby makes Cn an interesting target for therapeutic intervention of OA. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ribose mediated crosslinking of collagen-hydroxyapatite hybrid scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration using biomimetic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, Gopal Shankar; Gostynska, Natalia; Campodoni, Elisabetta; Dapporto, Massimiliano; Montesi, Monica; Panseri, Silvia; Tampieri, Anna; Kon, Elizaveta; Marcacci, Maurilio; Sprio, Simone; Sandri, Monica

    2017-08-01

    This study explores for the first time the application of ribose as a highly biocompatible agent for the crosslinking of hybrid mineralized constructs, obtained by bio-inspired mineralization of self-assembling Type I collagen matrix with magnesium-doped-hydroxyapatite nanophase, towards a biomimetic mineralized 3D scaffolds (MgHA/Coll) with excellent compositional and structural mimicry of bone tissue. To this aim, two different crosslinking mechanisms in terms of pre-ribose glycation (before freeze drying) and post-ribose glycation (after freeze drying) were investigated. The obtained results explicate that with controlled freeze-drying, highly anisotropic porous structures with opportune macro-micro porosity are obtained. The physical-chemical features of the scaffolds characterized by XRD, FTIR, ICP and TGA demonstrated structural mimicry analogous to the native bone. The influence of ribose greatly assisted in decreasing solubility and increased enzymatic resistivity of the scaffolds. In addition, enhanced mechanical behaviour in response to compressive forces was achieved. Preliminary cell culture experiments reported good cytocompatibility with extensive cell adhesion, proliferation and colonization. Overall, scaffolds developed by pre-ribose glycation process are preferred, as the related crosslinking technique is more facile and robust to obtain functional scaffolds. As a proof of concept, we have demonstrated that ribose crosslinking is cost-effective, safe and functionally effective. This study also offers new insights and opportunities in developing promising scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Collageneous matrix coatings on titanium implants modified with decorin and chondroitin sulfate: characterization and influence on osteoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, Susanne; Douglas, Timothy; Hanke, Thomas; Scharnweber, Dieter; Tippelt, Sonja; Monsees, Thomas K; Funk, Richard H W; Worch, Hartmut

    2006-06-01

    Studies in developmental and cell biology have established the fact that responses of cells are influenced to a large degree by morphology and composition of the extracellular matrix. Goal of this work is to use this basic principle to improve the biological acceptance of implants by modifying the surfaces with components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), utilizing the natural self-assembly potential of collagen in combination with further ECM components in close analogy to the situation in vivo. Aiming at load-bearing applications in bone contact, collagen type I in combination with the proteoglycan decorin and the glycosaminoglycan chondroitin sulfate (CS) was used; fibrillogenesis, fibril morphology, and adsorption of differently composed fibrils onto titanium were assessed. Both decorin and CS could be integrated into the fibrils during fibrillogenesis, the amount bound respectively desorbed depending on the ionic strength of fibrillogenesis buffer. Including decorin always resulted in a significant decrease of fibril diameter, CS in only a slight decrease or even increase, depending on the collagen preparation used. No significant changes in adsorption to titanium could be detected. Osteoblastic cells showed different reactions for cytoskeletal arrangement and osteopontin expression depending on the composition of the ECM, with CS enhancing the osteoblast phenotype.

  1. Cross-Linking in Collagen by Nonenzymatic Glycation Increases the Matrix Stiffness in Rabbit Achilles Tendon

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, G. Kesava

    2004-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of connective tissue matrix proteins is a major contributor to the pathology of diabetes and aging. Previously the author and colleagues have shown that nonenzymatic glycation significantly enhances the matrix stability in the Achilles tendon (Reddy et al., 2002, Arch. Biochem. Biophys., 399, 174–180). The present study was designed to gain further insight into glycation-induced collagen cross-linking and its relationship to matrix stiffness in the rabbit Achilles tendo...

  2. Mechanical forces regulate the interactions of fibronectin and collagen I in extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubow, Kristopher E; Vukmirovic, Radmila; Zhe, Lin; Klotzsch, Enrico; Smith, Michael L; Gourdon, Delphine; Luna, Sheila; Vogel, Viola

    2015-08-14

    Despite the crucial role of extracellular matrix (ECM) in directing cell fate in healthy and diseased tissues--particularly in development, wound healing, tissue regeneration and cancer--the mechanisms that direct the assembly and regulate hierarchical architectures of ECM are poorly understood. Collagen I matrix assembly in vivo requires active fibronectin (Fn) fibrillogenesis by cells. Here we exploit Fn-FRET probes as mechanical strain sensors and demonstrate that collagen I fibres preferentially co-localize with more-relaxed Fn fibrils in the ECM of fibroblasts in cell culture. Fibre stretch-assay studies reveal that collagen I's Fn-binding domain is responsible for the mechano-regulated interaction. Furthermore, we show that Fn-collagen interactions are reciprocal: relaxed Fn fibrils act as multivalent templates for collagen assembly, but once assembled, collagen fibres shield Fn fibres from being stretched by cellular traction forces. Thus, in addition to the well-recognized, force-regulated, cell-matrix interactions, forces also tune the interactions between different structural ECM components.

  3. Deficiency of CRTAP in non-lethal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta reduces collagen deposition into matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, M; Barnes, A M; Gallanti, A; Cabral, W A; Viglio, S; Weis, M A; Makareeva, E; Eyre, D; Leikin, S; Antoniazzi, F; Marini, J C; Mottes, M

    2012-11-01

    Deficiency of any component of the ER-resident collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex causes recessive osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The complex modifies the α1(I)Pro986 residue and contains cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP), prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1) and cyclophilin B (CyPB). Fibroblasts normally secrete about 10% of CRTAP. Most CRTAP mutations cause a null allele and lethal type VII OI. We identified a 7-year-old Egyptian boy with non-lethal type VII OI and investigated the effects of his null CRTAP mutation on collagen biochemistry, the prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex, and collagen in extracellular matrix. The proband is homozygous for an insertion/deletion in CRTAP (c.118_133del16insTACCC). His dermal fibroblasts synthesize fully overmodified type I collagen, and 3-hydroxylate only 5% of α1(I)Pro986. CRTAP transcripts are 10% of control. CRTAP protein is absent from proband cells, with residual P3H1 and normal CyPB levels. Dermal collagen fibril diameters are significantly increased. By immunofluorescence of long-term cultures, we identified a severe deficiency (10-15% of control) of collagen deposited in extracellular matrix, with disorganization of the minimal fibrillar network. Quantitative pulse-chase experiments corroborate deficiency of matrix deposition, rather than increased matrix turnover. We conclude that defects of extracellular matrix, as well as intracellular defects in collagen modification, contribute to the pathology of type VII OI. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Bony defect repair in rabbit using hybrid rapid prototyping polylactic co glycolic acid/β tricalciumphosphate collagen I/apatite scaffold and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Pang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In bone tissue engineering, extracellular matrix exerts critical influence on cellular interaction with porous biomaterial and the apatite playing an important role in the bonding process of biomaterial to bone tissue. The aim of this study was to observe the therapeutic effects of hybrid rapid prototyping (RP scaffolds comprising polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, β-tricalciumphosphate (β-TCP, collagen I and apatite (PLGA/β-TCP-collagen I/apatite on segmental bone defects in conjunction with combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs. Materials and Methods: BMSCs were seeded into the hybrid RP scaffolds to repair 15 mm defect in the radius of rabbits. Radiograph, microcomputed tomography and histology were used to evaluate new bone formation. Results: Radiographic analysis done from 12 to 36 weeks postoperative period demonstrated that new bone formed at the radial defect site and continues to increase until the medullary cavity is recanalized and remodelling is complete. The bone defect remained unconnected in the original RP scaffolds (PLGA/β-TCP during the whole study. Histological observations conformed to the radiographic images. In hybrid RP scaffold group, woven bone united the radial defect at 12 weeks and consecutively remodeled into lamellar bone 24 weeks postoperation and finally matured into cortical bone with normal marrow cavity after another 12 weeks. No bone formation but connective tissue has been detected in RP scaffold at the same time. Conclusion: Collagen I/apatite sponge composite coating could improve new bone formation in vivo. The hybrid RP scaffold of PLGA/β-TCP skeleton with collagen I/apatite sponge composite coating is a promising candidate for bone tissue engineering.

  5. Increasing extracellular matrix collagen level and MMP activity induces cyst development in polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Li, Chenghai; Liu, Zijuan; Dai, Zonghan; Tao, Yunxia

    2012-09-11

    Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) kidneys exhibit increased extracellular matrix (ECM) collagen expression and metalloproteinases (MMPs) activity. We investigated the role of these increases on cystic disease progression in PKD kidneys. We examined the role of type I collagen (collagen I) and membrane bound type 1 MMP (MT1-MMP) on cyst development using both in vitro 3 dimensional (3D) collagen gel culture and in vivo PCK rat model of PKD. We found that collagen concentration is critical in controlling the morphogenesis of MDCK cells cultured in 3D gels. MDCK cells did not form 3D structures at collagen I concentrations lower than 1 mg/ml but began forming tubules when the concentration reaches 1 mg/ml. Significantly, these cells began to form cyst when collagen I concentration reached to 1.2 mg/ml, and the ratios of cyst to tubule structures increased as the collagen I concentration increased. These cells exclusively formed cyst structures at a collagen I concentration of 1.8 mg/ml or higher. Overexpression of MT1-MMP in MDCK cells significantly induced cyst growth in 3D collagen gel culture. Conversely, inhibition of MMPs activity with doxycycline, a FDA approved pan-MMPs inhibitor, dramatically slowed cyst growth. More importantly, the treatment of PCK rats with doxycycline significantly decreased renal tubule cell proliferation and markedly inhibited the cystic disease progression. Our data suggest that increased collagen expression and MMP activity in PKD kidneys may induce cyst formation and expansion. Our findings also suggest that MMPs may serve as a therapeutic target for the treatment of human PKD.

  6. Increasing extracellular matrix collagen level and MMP activity induces cyst development in polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Bin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD kidneys exhibit increased extracellular matrix (ECM collagen expression and metalloproteinases (MMPs activity. We investigated the role of these increases on cystic disease progression in PKD kidneys. Methods We examined the role of type I collagen (collagen I and membrane bound type 1 MMP (MT1-MMP on cyst development using both in vitro 3 dimensional (3D collagen gel culture and in vivo PCK rat model of PKD. Results We found that collagen concentration is critical in controlling the morphogenesis of MDCK cells cultured in 3D gels. MDCK cells did not form 3D structures at collagen I concentrations lower than 1 mg/ml but began forming tubules when the concentration reaches 1 mg/ml. Significantly, these cells began to form cyst when collagen I concentration reached to 1.2 mg/ml, and the ratios of cyst to tubule structures increased as the collagen I concentration increased. These cells exclusively formed cyst structures at a collagen I concentration of 1.8 mg/ml or higher. Overexpression of MT1-MMP in MDCK cells significantly induced cyst growth in 3D collagen gel culture. Conversely, inhibition of MMPs activity with doxycycline, a FDA approved pan-MMPs inhibitor, dramatically slowed cyst growth. More importantly, the treatment of PCK rats with doxycycline significantly decreased renal tubule cell proliferation and markedly inhibited the cystic disease progression. Conclusions Our data suggest that increased collagen expression and MMP activity in PKD kidneys may induce cyst formation and expansion. Our findings also suggest that MMPs may serve as a therapeutic target for the treatment of human PKD.

  7. Fluorescent Labeling of Collagen Production by Cells for Noninvasive Imaging of Extracellular Matrix Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardsley, Katie; Yang, Ying; El Haj, Alicia J

    2017-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is an essential component of tissues and provides both integrity and biological cues for cells. Collagen is one of the major proteins found within the ECM and therefore is an essential component of all engineered tissues. Therefore, in this article, we present a method for the online real-time monitoring of collagen deposition in three-dimensional engineered constructs. This method revolves around modification of collagen through the addition of azide-L-proline to cell culture media. The incorporation of azide-L-proline into the neocollagen produced by cells can then be detected by reaction with 10 mM of a Click-IT Alexa Fluor 488 DIBO Alkyne. The reaction was shown as being specific to the collagen as little background staining was observed in cultures, which did not contain the modified proline, and the staining was also depleted after treatment with collagenase and colocalization of collagen type I staining by immunochemistry assay. Real-time online staining of collagen deposition was observed under different culture conditions without affecting proliferation. Collagen deposition was observed to be increased under mechanical stimulation; however, the localization varied across stimulation regimes. This is a new technique for real-time monitoring of cell-produced collagen and will be a valuable addition to the tissue engineering field.

  8. Nanofibrous yet injectable polycaprolactone-collagen bone tissue scaffold with osteoprogenitor cells and controlled release of bone morphogenetic protein-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Gayathri; Bialorucki, Callan [Department of Bioengineering, College of Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Yildirim-Ayan, Eda, E-mail: eda.yildirimayan@utoledo.edu [Department of Bioengineering, College of Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we developed a nanofibrous, yet injectable orthobiologic tissue scaffold that is capable of hosting osteoprogenitor cells and controlling kinetic release profile of the encapsulated pro-osteogenic factor without diminishing its bioactivity over 21 days. This innovative injectable scaffold was synthesized by incorporating electrospun and subsequently O{sub 2} plasma-functionalized polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers within the collagen type-I solution along with MC3T3-E1 cells (pre-osteoblasts) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2). Through changing the PCL nanofiber concentration within the injectable scaffolds, we were able to tailor the mechanical strength, protein retention capacity, bioactivity preservation, and osteoinductive potential of the scaffolds. The nanofibrous internal structure of the scaffold allowed us to use a low dose of BMP2 (200 ng/ml) to achieve osteoblastic differentiation in in vitro culture. The osteogenesis capacity of the injectable scaffolds were evaluated though measuring MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation, ALP activity, matrix mineralization, and early- and late-osteoblast specific gene expression profiles over 21 days. The results demonstrated that the nanofibrous injectable scaffold provides not only an osteoinductive environment for osteoprogenitor cells to differentiate, but also a suitable biomechanical and biochemical environment to act as a reservoir for osteogenic factors with controlled release profile. - Highlights: • Injectable nanofibrous scaffold with osteoprogenitor cells and BMP2 was synthesized. • PCL nanofiber concentration within collagen scaffold affected the BMP2 retention and bioactivity. • Optimal PCL concentration was identified for mechanical stability, injectability, and osteogenic activity. • Scaffolds exhibited long-term osteoinductive capacity for bone repair and regeneration.

  9. Rheological, biocompatibility and osteogenesis assessment of fish collagen scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elango, Jeevithan; Zhang, Jingyi; Bao, Bin; Palaniyandi, Krishnamoorthy; Wang, Shujun; Wenhui, Wu; Robinson, Jeya Shakila

    2016-10-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt was made to find an alternative to mammalian collagen with better osteogenesis ability. Three types of collagen scaffolds - collagen, collagen-chitosan (CCH), and collagen-hydroxyapatite (CHA) - were prepared from the cartilage of Blue shark and investigated for their physico-functional and mechanical properties in relation to biocompatibility and osteogenesis. CCH scaffold was superior with pH 4.5-4.9 and viscosity 9.7-10.9cP. Notably, addition of chitosan and HA (hydroxyapatite) improved the stiffness (11-23MPa) and degradation rate but lowered the water binding capacity and porosity of the scaffold. Interestingly, CCH scaffolds remained for 3days before complete in-vitro biodegradation. The decreased amount of viable T-cells and higher level of FAS/APO-1 were substantiated the biocompatibility properties of prepared collagen scaffolds. Osteogenesis study revealed that the addition of CH and HA in both fish and mammalian collagen scaffolds could efficiently promote osteoblast cell formation. The ALP activity was significantly high in CHA scaffold-treated osteoblast cells, which suggests an enhanced bone-healing process. Therefore, the present study concludes that the composite scaffolds prepared from fish collagen with higher stiffness, lower biodegradation rate, better biocompatible, and osteogenesis properties were suitable biomaterial for a bone tissue engineering application as an alternative to mammalian collagen scaffolds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Extracellular matrix of smooth muscle cells: interaction of collagen type V with heparan sulfate proteoglycan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, S.; Hoeoek, M.; Gay, R.E.; Magargal, W.W.; Reynertson, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    Alteration in the extracellular matrix produced by smooth muscle cells may play a role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Consequently the authors have initiated studies on the structural organization of the extracellular matrix produced by cultured smooth muscle cells. Immunohisotological examination of this matrix using well-characterized mono- and polyclonal antibodies showed a partial codistribution of heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans with a number of different matrix components including collagen types I, III, IV, V and VI, laminin and fibronectin. Subsequent binding studies between isolated matrix proteins and HS showed that the polysaccharide interacts strongly with type V collagen and to a lesser extent with fibronectin as well as collagen types III and VI. The interaction between type V and HS was readily inhibited by heparin and highly sulfated HS but not be dermatan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate or HS with a low sulfate content. Furthermore, [ 35 S]-HS proteoglycans isolated from cultured smooth muscle cells could be adsorbed on a column of sepharose conjugated with native type V collagen and eluted in a salt gradient. Hence, the interaction between type V and HS may play a major part in stabilizing the extracellular matrix of the vessel wall

  11. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells induce collagen production and tongue cancer invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirpa Salo

    Full Text Available Tumor microenvironment (TME is an active player in carcinogenesis and changes in its composition modify cancer growth. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs, and inflammatory cells can all affect the composition of TME leading to changes in proliferation, invasion and metastasis formation of carcinoma cells. In this study, we confirmed an interaction between BMMSCs and oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC cells by analyzing the invasion progression and gene expression pattern. In a 3-dimensional myoma organotypic invasion model the presence of BMMSCs inhibited the proliferation but increased the invasion of OTSCC cells. Furthermore, the signals originating from OTSCC cells up-regulated the expression of inflammatory chemokines by BMMSCs, whereas BMMSC products induced the expression of known invasion linked molecules by carcinoma cells. Particularly, after the cell-cell interactions, the chemokine CCL5 was abundantly secreted from BMMSCs and a function blocking antibody against CCL5 inhibited BMMSC enhanced cancer invasion area. However, CCL5 blocking antibody did not inhibit the depth of invasion. Additionally, after exposure to BMMSCs, the expression of type I collagen mRNA in OTSCC cells was markedly up-regulated. Interestingly, also high expression of type I collagen N-terminal propeptide (PINP in vivo correlated with the cancer-specific mortality of OTSCC patients, whereas there was no association between cancer tissue CCL5 levels and the clinical parameters. In conclusion, our results suggest that the interaction between BMMSC and carcinoma cells induce cytokine and matrix molecule expression, of which high level of type I collagen production correlates with the prognosis of OTSCC patients.

  12. Preparation and structure characterization of soluble bone collagen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, G-25 gel chromatography, X-diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyze soluble collagen peptides chelating calcium. Collagen peptide hydrolysis can be divided into four components using G-25 gel chromatography.

  13. Fibroblast Cluster Formation on 3D Collagen Matrices Requires Cell Contraction-Dependent Fibronectin Matrix Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Ho, Chin-Han; Grinnell, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblasts incubated on 3D collagen matrices in serum or lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-containing medium self-organize into clusters through a mechanism that requires cell contraction. However, in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-containing medium, cells migrate as individuals and do not form clusters even though they constantly encounter each other. Here, we present evidence that a required function of cell contraction in clustering is formation of fibronectin fibrillar matrix. We found that in serum or LPA but not in PDGF or basal medium, cells organized FN (both serum and cellular) into a fibrillar, detergent-insoluble matrix. Cell clusters developed concomitant with FN matrix formation. FN fibrils accumulated beneath cells and along the borders of cell clusters in regions of cell-matrix tension. Blocking Rho kinase or myosin II activity prevented FN matrix assembly and cell clustering. Using siRNA silencing and function-blocking antibodies and peptides, we found that cell clustering and FN matrix assembly required α5β1 integrins and fibronectin. Cells were still able to exert contractile force and compact the collagen matrix under the latter conditions, which showed that contraction was not sufficient for cell clustering to occur. Our findings provide new insights into how procontractile (serum/LPA) and promigratory (PDGF) growth factor environments can differentially regulate FN matrix assembly by fibroblasts interacting with collagen matrices and thereby influence mesenchymal cell morphogenetic behavior under physiologic circumstances such as wound repair, morphogenesis and malignancy. PMID:23117111

  14. Fibroblast cluster formation on 3D collagen matrices requires cell contraction dependent fibronectin matrix organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Ho, Chin-Han; Grinnell, Frederick

    2013-02-15

    Fibroblasts incubated on 3D collagen matrices in serum or lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-containing medium self-organize into clusters through a mechanism that requires cell contraction. However, in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-containing medium, cells migrate as individuals and do not form clusters even though they constantly encounter each other. Here, we present evidence that a required function of cell contraction in clustering is formation of fibronectin (FN) fibrillar matrix. We found that in serum or LPA but not in PDGF or basal medium, cells organized FN (both serum and cellular) into a fibrillar, detergent-insoluble matrix. Cell clusters developed concomitant with FN matrix formation. FN fibrils accumulated beneath cells and along the borders of cell clusters in regions of cell-matrix tension. Blocking Rho kinase or myosin II activity prevented FN matrix assembly and cell clustering. Using siRNA silencing and function-blocking antibodies and peptides, we found that cell clustering and FN matrix assembly required α5β1 integrins and fibronectin. Cells were still able to exert contractile force and compact the collagen matrix under the latter conditions, which showed that contraction was not sufficient for cell clustering to occur. Our findings provide new insights into how procontractile (serum/LPA) and promigratory (PDGF) growth factor environments can differentially regulate FN matrix assembly by fibroblasts interacting with collagen matrices and thereby influence mesenchymal cell morphogenetic behavior under physiologic circumstances such as wound repair, morphogenesis and malignancy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Design of nano- and microfiber combined scaffolds by electrospinning of collagen onto starch-based fiber meshes: a man-made equivalent of natural extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzlakoglu, Kadriye; Santos, Marina I; Neves, Nuno; Reis, Rui L

    2011-02-01

    Mimicking the structural organization and biologic function of natural extracellular matrix has been one of the main goals of tissue engineering. Nevertheless, the majority of scaffolding materials for bone regeneration highlights biochemical functionality in detriment of mechanical properties. In this work we present a rather innovative construct that combines in the same structure electrospun type I collagen nanofibers with starch-based microfibers. These combined structures were obtained by a two-step methodology and structurally consist in a type I collagen nano-network incorporated on a macro starch-based support. The morphology of the developed structures was assessed by several microscopy techniques and the collagenous nature of the nano-network was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In addition, and especially regarding the requirements of large bone defects, we also successfully introduced the concept of layer by layer, as a way to produce thicker structures. In an attempt to recreate bone microenvironment, the design and biochemical composition of the combined structures also envisioned bone-forming cells and endothelial cells (ECs). The inclusion of a type I collagen nano-network induced a stretched morphology and improved the metabolic activity of osteoblasts. Regarding ECs, the presence of type I collagen on the combined structures provided adhesive support and obviated the need of precoating with fibronectin. It was also importantly observed that ECs on the nano-network organized into circular structures, a three-dimensional arrangement distinct from that observed for osteoblasts and resembling the microcappillary-like organizations formed during angiogenesis. By providing simultaneously physical and chemical cues for cells, the herein-proposed combined structures hold a great potential in bone regeneration as a man-made equivalent of extracellular matrix.

  16. Distribution of Type I Collagen Morphologies in Bone: Relation to Estrogen Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Joseph M.; Erickson, Blake; Les, Clifford M.; Orr, Bradford G.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak

    2009-01-01

    Bone is an amazing material evolved by nature to elegantly balance structural and metabolic needs in the body. Bone health is an integral part of overall health, but our lack of understanding of the ultrastructure of healthy bone precludes us from knowing how disease may impact nanoscale properties in this biological material. Here, we show that quantitative assessments of a distribution of Type I collagen fibril morphologies can be made using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We demonstrate that normal bone contains a distribution of collagen fibril morphologies and that changes in this distribution can be directly related to disease state. Specifically, by monitoring changes in the collagen fibril distribution of sham-operated and estrogen-depleted sheep, we have shown the ability to detect estrogen-deficiency-induced changes in Type I collagen in bone. This discovery provides new insight into the ultrastructure of bone as a tissue and the role of material structure in bone disease. The observation offers the possibility of a much-needed in vitro procedure to complement the current methods used to diagnose osteoporosis and other bone disease. PMID:19932773

  17. In Vitro and In Vivo Study of a Novel Porcine Collagen Membrane for Guided Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisner Salamanca

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available For years, in order to improve bone regeneration and prevent the need of a second stage surgery to remove non-resorbable membranes, biological absorbable membranes have gradually been developed and applied in guided tissue regeneration (GTR. The present study’s main objective was to achieve space maintenance and bone regeneration using a new freeze-dried developed porcine collagen membrane, and compare it with an already commercial collagen membrane, when both were used with a bovine xenograft in prepared alveolar ridge bone defects. Prior to surgery, the membrane’s vitality analysis showed statistically significant higher cell proliferation in the test membrane over the commercial one. In six beagle dogs, commercial bone xenograft was packed in lateral ridge bone defects prepared in the left and right side and then covered with test porcine collagen membrane or commercial collagen membrane. Alveolar height changes were measured. Histomorphometric results, in vitro and in vivo properties indicated that the new porcine collagen membrane is biocompatible, enhances bone xenograft osteoconduction, and reduces the alveolar ridge height reabsorption rate.

  18. Development of a nanofiltration method for bone collagen {sup 14}C AMS dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudin, Mathieu, E-mail: mathieu.boudin@ugent.be [Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Jubelpark 1, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Ghent University, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Laboratory of Applied Physical Chemistry, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Boeckx, Pascal [Ghent University, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Laboratory of Applied Physical Chemistry, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Buekenhoudt, Anita [Flemish Institute for Technological Research, Separation and Conversion Technology, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Vandenabeele, Peter [Ghent University, Department of Archaeology, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 35, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Strydonck, Mark [Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Jubelpark 1, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-01-15

    Radiocarbon dating of bones is usually performed on the collagen fraction. However, this collagen can contain exogenous molecules, including humic substances (HSs) and/or other soil components that may have a different age than the bone. Incomplete removal can result in biased {sup 14}C dates. Ultrafiltration of collagen, dissolved as gelatin (molecular weight (MW) {approx}100,000 Dalton), has received considerable attention to obtain more reliable dates. Ultrafiltration is an effective method of removal of low-molecular weight contaminants from bone collagen but it does not remove high-molecular weight contaminants, such as cross-linked humic collagen complexes. However, comparative dating studies have raised the question whether this cleaning step itself may introduce contamination with carbon from the filters used. In this study, a nanofiltration method was developed using a ceramic filter to avoid a possible extraneous carbon contamination introduced by the filter. This method should be applicable to various protein materials e.g. collagen, silk, wool, leather and should be able to remove low-molecular and high molecular weight HSs. In this study bone collagen was hot acid hydrolyzed to amino acids and nanofiltrated. A filter with a molecular weight cutoff (MWCO) of 450 Dalton was chosen in order to collect the amino acids in the permeate and the HSs in the retentate. Two pilot studies were set up. Two nanofiltration types were tested in pilot study 1: dead end and cross flow filtration. Humic substance (HS)-solutions with fossil carbon and modern hydrolyzed collagen contaminated with HSs were filtrated and analyzed with spectrofluorescence to determine the HS removal. Cross flow nanofiltration showed the most efficient HS removal. A second pilot study based upon these results was set up wherein only cross flow filtration was performed. {sup 14}C measurements of the permeates of hydrolyzed modern collagen contaminated with fossil HSs demonstrate a significant

  19. Connective matrix organization in human pulmonary fibrosis. Collagen polymorphism analysis in fibrotic deposits by immunohistological methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiya, C; Peyrol, S; Cordier, J F; Grimaud, J A

    1983-01-01

    In the interstitium of the alveolar septa in the peripheral parts of the lung, four molecular types of collagen (I, III, IV and V) each with different morphological appearances, can be identified. The structural integrity of collagens accounts for the physiological efficiency of the lung. Fibrous thickening of alveolar septa is an invariable result of various diseases affecting the interstitium of the lung. The light and electron microscopic findings, and the immunological typing of collagens in six cases of fibrotic alveolar disease, are described. In the alveolar septa, two different compartments (the alveolo-capillary junction and the supportive axis) were affected by fibrosis: the alveolo-capillary junction was widened by the addition of interstitial collagens to basement membranes. In the axis, the increase of interstitial (types I and III) collagen gave rise to different patterns of connective matrix organization, graded as Loose or Dense depending on quantitative alterations of the type I/III ratio. The mode of organization of the fibrotic lung connective matrix, which depends on the quality of deposits in the matrix, may be correlated with the evolution of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, in terms of its stability, remodelling ability and reversibility.

  20. Collagen cross-linking: insights on the evolution of metazoan extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Pascual, Fernando; Slatter, David Anthony

    2016-11-23

    Collagens constitute a large family of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that play a fundamental role in supporting the structure of various tissues in multicellular animals. The mechanical strength of fibrillar collagens is highly dependent on the formation of covalent cross-links between individual fibrils, a process initiated by the enzymatic action of members of the lysyl oxidase (LOX) family. Fibrillar collagens are present in a wide variety of animals, therefore often being associated with metazoan evolution, where the emergence of an ancestral collagen chain has been proposed to lead to the formation of different clades. While LOX-generated collagen cross-linking metabolites have been detected in different metazoan families, there is limited information about when and how collagen acquired this particular modification. By analyzing telopeptide and helical sequences, we identified highly conserved, potential cross-linking sites throughout the metazoan tree of life. Based on this analysis, we propose that they have importantly contributed to the formation and further expansion of fibrillar collagens.

  1. Accelerated craniofacial bone regeneration through dense collagen gel scaffolds seeded with dental pulp stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamieh, Frédéric; Collignon, Anne-Margaux; Coyac, Benjamin R.; Lesieur, Julie; Ribes, Sandy; Sadoine, Jérémy; Llorens, Annie; Nicoletti, Antonino; Letourneur, Didier; Colombier, Marie-Laure; Nazhat, Showan N.; Bouchard, Philippe; Chaussain, Catherine; Rochefort, Gael Y.

    2016-12-01

    Therapies using mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) seeded scaffolds may be applicable to various fields of regenerative medicine, including craniomaxillofacial surgery. Plastic compression of collagen scaffolds seeded with MSC has been shown to enhance the osteogenic differentiation of MSC as it increases the collagen fibrillary density. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the osteogenic effects of dense collagen gel scaffolds seeded with mesenchymal dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) on bone regeneration in a rat critical-size calvarial defect model. Two symmetrical full-thickness defects were created (5 mm diameter) and filled with either a rat DPSC-containing dense collagen gel scaffold (n = 15), or an acellular scaffold (n = 15). Animals were imaged in vivo by microcomputer tomography (Micro-CT) once a week during 5 weeks, whereas some animals were sacrificed each week for histology and histomorphometry analysis. Bone mineral density and bone micro-architectural parameters were significantly increased when DPSC-seeded scaffolds were used. Histological and histomorphometrical data also revealed significant increases in fibrous connective and mineralized tissue volume when DPSC-seeded scaffolds were used, associated with expression of type I collagen, osteoblast-associated alkaline phosphatase and osteoclastic-related tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. Results demonstrate the potential of DPSC-loaded-dense collagen gel scaffolds to benefit of bone healing process.

  2. Probabilistic failure analysis of bone using a finite element model of mineral-collagen composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X Neil; Guda, Teja; Millwater, Harry R; Wang, Xiaodu

    2009-02-09

    Microdamage accumulation is a major pathway for energy dissipation during the post-yield deformation of bone. In this study, a two-dimensional probabilistic finite element model of a mineral-collagen composite was developed to investigate the influence of the tissue and ultrastructural properties of bone on the evolution of microdamage from an initial defect in tension. The probabilistic failure analyses indicated that the microdamage progression would be along the plane of the initial defect when the debonding at mineral-collagen interfaces was either absent or limited in the vicinity of the defect. In this case, the formation of a linear microcrack would be facilitated. However, the microdamage progression would be scattered away from the initial defect plane if interfacial debonding takes place at a large scale. This would suggest the possible formation of diffuse damage. In addition to interfacial debonding, the sensitivity analyses indicated that the microdamage progression was also dependent on the other material and ultrastructural properties of bone. The intensity of stress concentration accompanied with microdamage progression was more sensitive to the elastic modulus of the mineral phase and the nonlinearity of the collagen phase, whereas the scattering of failure location was largely dependent on the mineral to collagen ratio and the nonlinearity of the collagen phase. The findings of this study may help understanding the post-yield behavior of bone at the ultrastructural level and shed light on the underlying mechanism of bone fractures.

  3. Nitrogen and carbon isotopic composition of bone collagen from marine and terrestrial animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoeninger, M.J.; DeNiro, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The stable nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios of bone collagen prepared from more than 100 animals representing 66 species of birds, fish, and mammals are presented. The delta 15 N values of bone collagen from animals that fed exclusively in the marine environment are, on average, 9 per mille more positive than those from animals that fed exclusively in the terrestrial environment: ranges for the two groups overlap by less than 1 per mille. Bone collagen delta 15 N values also serve to separate marine fish from the small number of freshwater fish we analyzed. The bone collagen delta 15 N values of birds and fish that spent part of their life cycles feeding in the marine environment and part in the freshwater environment are intermediate between those of animals that fed exclusively in one or the other system. Further, animals that fed at successive trophic levels in the marine and terrestrial environment are separated, on average, by a 3 per mille difference in the delta 15 N values of their bone collagen. Results are given and discussed. (author)

  4. Collagen fiber alignment and biaxial mechanical behavior of porcine urinary bladder derived extracellular matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert, Thomas W.; Wognum, Silvia; Joyce, Erinn M.; Freytes, Donald O.; Sacks, Michael S.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2008-01-01

    The collagen fiber alignment and biomechanical behavior of naturally occurring extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds are important considerations for the design of medical devices from these materials. Both should be considered in order to produce a device to meet tissue specific mechanical

  5. Leg ulcer treatment outcomes with new ovine collagen extracellular matrix dressing: a retrospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Gregory A; Gass, Kimberly

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the rate of closure observed in venous leg ulcers during treatment with ovine collagen extracellular matrix dressings and compression. Fourteen patients with 23 wounds were retrospectively evaluated with respect to healing rates, time to closure, and weekly facility charge fees.

  6. Iron nanoparticles from blood coated with collagen as a matrix for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A simple wet precipitation technique was used to prepare nanobiocomposite containing iron nanoparticles coated with collagen. This nanobiocomposite was used as matrix for the synthesis of nanohydroxyapatite. The physicochemical characteristic studies of the nanohydroxyapatite thus formed were carried out using ...

  7. Modulation of hematopoietic progenitor cell fate in vitro by varying collagen oligomer matrix stiffness in the presence or absence of osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitteti, Brahmananda Reddy; Kacena, Melissa A; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Srour, Edward F

    2015-10-01

    To recreate the in vivo hematopoietic cell microenvironment or niche and to study the impact of extracellular matrix (ECM) biophysical properties on hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) proliferation and function, mouse bone-marrow derived HPC (Lin-Sca1+cKit+/(LSK) were cultured within three-dimensional (3D) type I collagen oligomer matrices. To generate a more physiologic milieu, 3D cultures were established in both the presence and absence of calvariae-derived osteoblasts (OB). Collagen oligomers were polymerized at varying concentration to give rise to matrices of different fibril densities and therefore matrix stiffness (shear storage modulus, 50-800 Pa). Decreased proliferation and increased clonogenicity of LSK cells was associated with increase of matrix stiffness regardless of whether OB were present or absent from the 3D culture system. Also, regardless of whether OB were or were not added to the 3D co-culture system, LSK within 800 Pa collagen oligomer matrices maintained the highest percentage of Lin-Sca1+ cells as well as higher percentage of cells in quiescent state (G0/G1) compared to 50 Pa or 200Pa matrices. Collectively, these data illustrate that biophysical features of collagen oligomer matrices, specifically fibril density-induced modulation of matrix stiffness, provide important guidance cues in terms of LSK expansion and differentiation and therefore maintenance of progenitor cell function. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Biochemical studies of the macromolecular matrix of long bones in the Op/Orl mutant rat strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moczar, E; Berenholc, S; Phan-Dinh-Tuy, B; Robert, A M

    1978-01-01

    The long bones of normal and Op/Orl mutant rats were incubated with /sup 14/C-glucose and fractionated by EDTA and urea extraction. The analytical results of the various extracts suggested an increase in structural glycoprotein content and a decrease in collagen solubility in the long bones of mutants. Significant differences were found in the organic matrix composition of male and female bones of the two strains. /sup 14/C-glucose incorporation was stronger in males than in females. The presence of a glycosaminoglycan different from the chondroitinesulfate was shown in males. Basic amino acid content (lysine, arginine, histidine) was clearly higher in the insoluble residue of male bones .

  9. Biochemical studies of the macromolecular matrix of long bones in the Op/Orl mutant rat strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moczar, E.; Berenholc, S.; Phan-Dinh-Tuy, B.; Robert, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    The long bones of normal and Op/Orl mutant rats were incubated with 14 C-glucose and fractionated by EDTA and urea extraction. The analytical results of the various extracts suggested an increase in structural glycoprotein content and a decrease in collagen solubility in the long bones of mutants. Significant differences were found in the organic matrix composition of male and female bones of the two strains. 14 C-glucose incorporation was stronger in males than in females. The presence of a glycosaminoglycan different from the chondroitinesulfate was shown in males. Basic amino acid content (lysine, arginine, histidine) was clearly higher in the insoluble residue of male bones

  10. Changes in tissue morphology and collagen composition during the repair of cortical bone in the adult chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glimcher, M J; Shapiro, F; Ellis, R D; Eyre, D R

    1980-09-01

    An animal model was developed to study the histology and collagen chemistry of healing cortical bone. A hole was cut through the cortex of the mid-shaft of the humerus of the adult chicken, which allowed for repair at a mechanically stable site. After one to two weeks the collagen of the repair tissue, which consisted principally of woven bone, contained almost three times as much hydroxylysine as the collagen of normal adult bone and thus resembled the collagen of embryonic long bones. By eight weeks, when lamellar one predominated, the hydroxylysine content had fallen to normal levels. Type I was the major genetic type of collagen present throughout. No type-II collagen, characteristic of cartilage, was detected; this was consistent with the histological findings. The results established that hydroxylysine-rich type-I collagen can be made by osteoblasts of adult animals as well as by those of embryos and early postnates. In order to understand the biological characteristics of fracture healing, it is vital to study not only the macroscopic organization of the repair tissue but also the chemical properties of its molecular components. The strength of healing fractured bone, and indeed of normal bone, depends largely on the properties of the structural protein collagen. To date, it is not known whether the collagen in healing fractures is the same as that in normal bone, or whether it has distinct chemical features that may suit it for bone repair.

  11. Patch Grafting Using an Ologen Collagen Matrix to Manage Tubal Exposure in Glaucoma Tube Shunt Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Tanito

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the results using an ologen Collagen Matrix as a patch graft in eyes with tubal exposure after tube shunt surgery. Case Reports: Case 1 was an 82-year-old man with tubal exposure in his right eye 26 months after receiving a Baerveldt glaucoma implant. The tube was covered by surrounding conjunctival tissue combined with subconjunctival placement of an ologen Collagen Matrix as a patch graft. Two years after implantation, the tube was not exposed. Anterior-segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT showed dense conjunctival tissue over the tube. Case 2 was an 82-year-old man with peripheral keratitis, anterior scleritis, and secondary glaucoma in the right eye who underwent tube shunt surgery using an Ahmed glaucoma valve and cataract surgery. Intraoperatively, scleritis-related scleral thinning prevented the tube from being covered fully by an autologous scleral flap. An ologen Collagen Matrix was placed over the scleral flap as a patch graft. Seventeen months after implantation, the tube was not exposed. Case 3 was a 52-year-old man with diabetic maculopathy and steroid-induced glaucoma in the right eye who underwent tube shunt surgery using an Ahmed glaucoma valve. Intraoperatively, a flap defect prevented the tube from being covered fully by an autologous scleral flap. An ologen Collagen Matrix was placed over the scleral flap as a patch graft. Three weeks postoperatively, AS-OCT showed thick subconjunctival tissue over the tube. Three months after implantation, the tube was not exposed. Conclusions: The ologen Collagen Matrix can be used successfully as a patch graft to prevent and treat tubal exposure after tube shunt surgery.

  12. Comparative Efficacies of Collagen-Based 3D Printed PCL/PLGA/?-TCP Composite Block Bone Grafts and Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Bone Substitute for Bone Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Kyoung-Sub; Choi, Jae-Won; Kim, Jae-Hun; Chung, Ho Yun; Jin, Songwan; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Yun, Won-Soo; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare bone regeneration and space maintaining ability of three-dimensional (3D) printed bone grafts with conventional biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP). After mixing polycaprolactone (PCL), poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and ?-tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP) in a 4:4:2 ratio, PCL/PLGA/?-TCP particulate bone grafts were fabricated using 3D printing technology. Fabricated particulate bone grafts were mixed with atelocollagen to produce collagen-based PCL/P...

  13. Determination of osteogenic or adipogenic lineages in muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) by a collagen-binding peptide (CBP) derived from bone sialoprotein (BSP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Jung [Dental Regenerative Biotechnology Major, School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jue Yeon [Research Institute, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Jin [Department of Industrial Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chong-Pyoung, E-mail: ccpperio@snu.ac.kr [Research Institute, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yoon Jeong, E-mail: parkyj@snu.ac.kr [Dental Regenerative Biotechnology Major, School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CBP sequence is identified from BSP and has collagen binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CBP directly activates the MAPK signaling, especially ERK1/2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CBP increase osteoblastic differentiation by the activation of Runx2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CBP decrease adipogenic differentiation by the inhibition of PPAR{gamma}. -- Abstract: Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a mineralized, tissue-specific, non-collagenous protein that is normally expressed only in mineralized tissues such as bone, dentin, cementum, and calcified cartilage, and at sites of new mineral formation. The binding of BSP to collagen is thought to be important for initiating bone mineralization and bone cell adhesion to the mineralized matrix. Several recent studies have isolated stem cells from muscle tissue, but their functional properties are still unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of a synthetic collagen-binding peptide (CBP) on the differentiation efficiency of muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs). The CBP sequence (NGVFKYRPRYYLYKHAYFYPHLKRFPVQ) corresponds to residues 35-62 of bone sialoprotein (BSP), which are located within the collagen-binding domain in BSP. Interestingly, this synthetic CBP inhibited adipogenic differentiation but increased osteogenic differentiation in MDSCs. The CBP also induced expression of osteoblastic marker proteins, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), type I collagen, Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), and osteocalcin; prevented adipogenic differentiation in MDSCs; and down-regulated adipose-specific mRNAs, such as adipocyte protein 2 (aP2) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}. The CBP increased Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 protein phosphorylation, which is important in lineage determination. These observations suggest that this CBP determines the osteogenic or adipogenic lineage in MDSCs by activating ERK1/2. Taken together, a

  14. Disorganized collagen scaffold interferes with fibroblast mediated deposition of organized extracellular matrix in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi, Nima; Guo, Xiaoqing; Hutcheon, Audrey E K; Sander, Edward A; Bale, Shyam Sundar; Melotti, Suzanna A; Zieske, James D; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2012-10-01

    Many tissue engineering applications require the remodeling of a degradable scaffold either in vitro or in situ. Although inefficient remodeling or failure to fully remodel the temporary matrix can result in a poor clinical outcome, very few investigations have examined in detail, the interaction of regenerative cells with temporary scaffoldings. In a recent series of investigations, randomly oriented collagen gels were directly implanted into human corneal pockets and followed for 24 months. The resulting remodeling response exhibited a high degree of variability which likely reflects differing regenerative/synthetic capacity across patients. Given this variability, we hypothesize that a disorganized, degradable provisional scaffold could be disruptive to a uniform, organized reconstruction of stromal matrix. In this investigation, two established corneal stroma tissue engineering culture systems (collagen scaffold-based and scaffold-free) were compared to determine if the presence of the disorganized collagen gel influenced matrix production and organizational control exerted by primary human corneal fibroblast cells (PHCFCs). PHCFCs were cultured on thin disorganized reconstituted collagen substrate (RCS--five donors: average age 34.4) or on a bare polycarbonate membrane (five donors: average age 32.4 controls). The organization and morphology of the two culture systems were compared over the long-term at 4, 8, and 11/12 weeks. Construct thickness and extracellular matrix organization/alignment was tracked optically with bright field and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The details of cell/matrix morphology and cell/matrix interaction were examined with standard transmission, cuprolinic blue and quick-freeze/deep-etch electron microscopy. Both the scaffold-free and the collagen-based scaffold cultures produced organized arrays of collagen fibrils. However, at all time points, the amount of organized cell-derived matrix in the scaffold

  15. Collagen Matrix Density Drives the Metabolic Shift in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A. Morris

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased breast density attributed to collagen I deposition is associated with a 4–6 fold increased risk of developing breast cancer. Here, we assessed cellular metabolic reprogramming of mammary carcinoma cells in response to increased collagen matrix density using an in vitro 3D model. Our initial observations demonstrated changes in functional metabolism in both normal mammary epithelial cells and mammary carcinoma cells in response to changes in matrix density. Further, mammary carcinoma cells grown in high density collagen matrices displayed decreased oxygen consumption and glucose metabolism via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle compared to cells cultured in low density matrices. Despite decreased glucose entry into the TCA cycle, levels of glucose uptake, cell viability, and ROS were not different between high and low density matrices. Interestingly, under high density conditions the contribution of glutamine as a fuel source to drive the TCA cycle was significantly enhanced. These alterations in functional metabolism mirrored significant changes in the expression of metabolic genes involved in glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and the serine synthesis pathway. This study highlights the broad importance of the collagen microenvironment to cellular expression profiles, and shows that changes in density of the collagen microenvironment can modulate metabolic shifts of cancer cells.

  16. Osteogenic Matrix Cell Sheets Facilitate Osteogenesis in Irradiated Rat Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Uchihara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of large bone defects after resection of malignant musculoskeletal tumors is a significant challenge in orthopedic surgery. Extracorporeal autogenous irradiated bone grafting is a treatment option for bone reconstruction. However, nonunion often occurs because the osteogenic capacity is lost by irradiation. In the present study, we established an autogenous irradiated bone graft model in the rat femur to assess whether osteogenic matrix cell sheets improve osteogenesis of the irradiated bone. Osteogenic matrix cell sheets were prepared from bone marrow-derived stromal cells and co-transplanted with irradiated bone. X-ray images at 4 weeks after transplantation showed bridging callus formation around the irradiated bone. Micro-computed tomography images at 12 weeks postoperatively showed abundant callus formation in the whole circumference of the irradiated bone. Histology showed bone union between the irradiated bone and host femur. Mechanical testing showed that the failure force at the irradiated bone site was significantly higher than in the control group. Our study indicates that osteogenic matrix cell sheet transplantation might be a powerful method to facilitate osteogenesis in irradiated bones, which may become a treatment option for reconstruction of bone defects after resection of malignant musculoskeletal tumors.

  17. Multiscale, Converging Defects of Macro-Porosity, Microstructure and Matrix Mineralization Impact Long Bone Fragility in NF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnisch, Jirko; Seto, Jong; Lange, Claudia; Schrof, Susanne; Stumpp, Sabine; Kobus, Karolina; Grohmann, Julia; Kossler, Nadine; Varga, Peter; Osswald, Monika; Emmerich, Denise; Tinschert, Sigrid; Thielemann, Falk; Duda, Georg; Seifert, Wenke; el Khassawna, Thaqif; Stevenson, David A.; Elefteriou, Florent; Kornak, Uwe; Raum, Kay; Fratzl, Peter; Mundlos, Stefan; Kolanczyk, Mateusz

    2014-01-01

    Bone fragility due to osteopenia, osteoporosis or debilitating focal skeletal dysplasias is a frequent observation in the Mendelian disease Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). To determine the mechanisms underlying bone fragility in NF1 we analyzed two conditional mouse models, Nf1Prx1 (limb knock-out) and Nf1Col1 (osteoblast specific knock-out), as well as cortical bone samples from individuals with NF1. We examined mouse bone tissue with micro-computed tomography, qualitative and quantitative histology, mechanical tensile analysis, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). In cortical bone of Nf1Prx1 mice we detected ectopic blood vessels that were associated with diaphyseal mineralization defects. Defective mineral binding in the proximity of blood vessels was most likely due to impaired bone collagen formation, as these areas were completely devoid of acidic matrix proteins and contained thin collagen fibers. Additionally, we found significantly reduced mechanical strength of the bone material, which was partially caused by increased osteocyte volume. Consistent with these observations, bone samples from individuals with NF1 and tibial dysplasia showed increased osteocyte lacuna volume. Reduced mechanical properties were associated with diminished matrix stiffness, as determined by SAM. In line with these observations, bone tissue from individuals with NF1 and tibial dysplasia showed heterogeneous mineralization and reduced collagen fiber thickness and packaging. Collectively, the data indicate that bone fragility in NF1 tibial dysplasia is partly due to an increased osteocyte-related micro-porosity, hypomineralization, a generalized defect of organic matrix formation, exacerbated in the regions of tensional and bending force integration, and finally persistence of ectopic blood vessels associated with localized macro-porotic bone lesions. PMID:24465906

  18. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), the main extracellular matrix (ECM) enzymes in collagen degradation, as a target for anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłońska-Trypuć, Agata; Matejczyk, Marzena; Rosochacki, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    The main group of enzymes responsible for the collagen and other protein degradation in extracellular matrix (ECM) are matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Collagen is the main structural component of connective tissue and its degradation is a very important process in the development, morphogenesis, tissue remodeling, and repair. Typical structure of MMPs consists of several distinct domains. MMP family can be divided into six groups: collagenases, gelatinases, stromelysins, matrilysins, membrane-type MMPs, and other non-classified MMPs. MMPs and their inhibitors have multiple biological functions in all stages of cancer development: from initiation to outgrowth of clinically relevant metastases and likewise in apoptosis and angiogenesis. MMPs and their inhibitors are extensively examined as potential anticancer drugs. MMP inhibitors can be divided into two main groups: synthetic and natural inhibitors. Selected synthetic inhibitors are in clinical trials on humans, e.g. synthetic peptides, non-peptidic molecules, chemically modified tetracyclines, and bisphosphonates. Natural MMP inhibitors are mainly isoflavonoids and shark cartilage.

  19. The spatial-temporal characteristics of type I collagen-based extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher Allen Rucksack; Liang, Long; Lin, Daniel; Jiao, Yang; Sun, Bo

    2014-11-28

    Type I collagen abounds in mammalian extracellular matrix (ECM) and is crucial to many biophysical processes. While previous studies have mostly focused on bulk averaged properties, here we provide a comprehensive and quantitative spatial-temporal characterization of the microstructure of type I collagen-based ECM as the gelation temperature varies. The structural characteristics including the density and nematic correlation functions are obtained by analyzing confocal images of collagen gels prepared at a wide range of gelation temperatures (from 16 °C to 36 °C). As temperature increases, the gel microstructure varies from a "bundled" network with strong orientational correlation between the fibers to an isotropic homogeneous network with no significant orientational correlation, as manifested by the decaying of length scales in the correlation functions. We develop a kinetic Monte-Carlo collagen growth model to better understand how ECM microstructure depends on various environmental or kinetic factors. We show that the nucleation rate, growth rate, and an effective hydrodynamic alignment of collagen fibers fully determines the spatiotemporal fluctuations of the density and orientational order of collagen gel microstructure. Also the temperature dependence of the growth rate and nucleation rate follow the prediction of classical nucleation theory.

  20. Experimental resin cements containing bioactive fillers reduce matrix metalloproteinase-mediated dentin collagen degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Raquel; Yamauti, Monica; Sauro, Salvatore; Watson, Thimoty F; Toledano, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    Collagen dentin matrix may represent a suitable scaffold to be remineralized in the presence of bioactive materials. The purpose of this study was to determine if experimental resin cements containing bioactive fillers may modulate matrix metalloproteinase-mediated collagen degradation of etched dentin. Human dentin beams demineralized using 10% phosphoric acid or 0.5 mol/L EDTA were infiltrated with the following experimental resins: (1) unfilled resin, (2) resin with Bioglass 45S5 particles (Sylc; OSspray Ltd, London, UK), and (3) resin with β-tricalcium phosphate-modified calcium silicate cement (HCAT-β) particles. The filler/resin ratio was 40/60 wt%. The specimens were stored in artificial saliva, and the determination of C-terminal telopeptide (ICTP) was performed by radioimmunoassay after 24 hours, 1 week, and 4 weeks. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of dentin surfaces after 4 weeks of storage was also executed. Collagen degradation was prominent both in phosphoric acid and EDTA-treated dentin. Resin infiltration strongly reduced the MMP activity in demineralized dentin. Resin-containing Bioglass 45S5 particles exerted higher and more stable protection of collagen at all tested dentin states and time points. HCAT-β induced collagen protection from MMPs only in EDTA-treated specimens. Dentin remineralization was achieved when dentin was infiltrated with the resin cements containing bioactive fillers. MMP degradation of dentin collagen is strongly reduced in resin-infiltrated dentin. The inclusion of Bioglass 45S5 particles exerted an additional protection of collagen during dentin remineralization. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative effectiveness of using resorbable membranes of polylactic acid and collagen in regeneration of bone defects in patients with periimplantitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudaryan A.A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of comparative study of effectiveness of usage of separation membranes from polylactic acid (PLA and collagen in carrying out targeted regeneration of bone tissue in 22 patients with periimplantitis. Purpose: To conduct a comparative clinico-radiological efficiency of PLA membrane and collagen membranes in removing bone defects of the alveolar bone in patients with periimplantitis in clinic. It was found that depending on the type of membrane, bone tissue growth occurs not in the same way. Surgery in treatment of periimplantitis using osteo-inducing agent «Bio-Oss» and PLA membranes allows to reach full recovery of bone in bone defects in 90.9 % of patients versus 63.63 % of cases with collagen membranes. Thus, reconstitution of bone in bone defects in periimplantitis is more of full value in using PLA membranes than with membranes from collagen.

  2. FK506 protects against articular cartilage collagenous extra-cellular matrix degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Siebelt (Michiel); A.E. van der Windt (Anna); H.C. Groen (Harald); M. Sandker (Marjan); J.H. Waarsing (Jan); C. Müller (Cristina); M. de Jong (Marcel); H. Jahr (Holger); H.H. Weinans (Harrie)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a non-rheumatologic joint disease characterized by progressive degeneration of the cartilage extra-cellular matrix (ECM), enhanced subchondral bone remodeling, activation of synovial macrophages and osteophyte growth. Inhibition of calcineurin (Cn)

  3. Bioengineering vascularized tissue constructs using an injectable cell-laden enzymatically crosslinked collagen hydrogel derived from dermal extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Kuan-Chih; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Tien, Han-Wen; Wu, Pei-Yun; Li, Yen-Cheng; Melero-Martin, Juan M; Chen, Ying-Chieh

    2015-11-01

    Tissue engineering promises to restore or replace diseased or damaged tissue by creating functional and transplantable artificial tissues. The development of artificial tissues with large dimensions that exceed the diffusion limitation will require nutrients and oxygen to be delivered via perfusion instead of diffusion alone over a short time period. One approach to perfusion is to vascularize engineered tissues, creating a de novo three-dimensional (3D) microvascular network within the tissue construct. This significantly shortens the time of in vivo anastomosis, perfusion and graft integration with the host. In this study, we aimed to develop injectable allogeneic collagen-phenolic hydroxyl (collagen-Ph) hydrogels that are capable of controlling a wide range of physicochemical properties, including stiffness, water absorption and degradability. We tested whether collagen-Ph hydrogels could support the formation of vascularized engineered tissue graft by human blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in vivo. First, we studied the growth of adherent ECFCs and MSCs on or in the hydrogels. To examine the potential formation of functional vascular networks in vivo, a liquid pre-polymer solution of collagen-Ph containing human ECFCs and MSCs, horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide was injected into the subcutaneous space or abdominal muscle defect of an immunodeficient mouse before gelation, to form a 3D cell-laden polymerized construct. These results showed that extensive human ECFC-lined vascular networks can be generated within 7 days, the engineered vascular density inside collagen-Ph hydrogel constructs can be manipulated through refinable mechanical properties and proteolytic degradability, and these networks can form functional anastomoses with the existing vasculature to further support the survival of host muscle tissues. Finally, optimized conditions of the cell-laden collagen

  4. Towards Tuning the Mechanical Properties of Three-Dimensional Collagen Scaffolds Using a Coupled Fiber-Matrix Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengmao Lin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Scaffold mechanical properties are essential in regulating the microenvironment of three-dimensional cell culture. A coupled fiber-matrix numerical model was developed in this work for predicting the mechanical response of collagen scaffolds subjected to various levels of non-enzymatic glycation and collagen concentrations. The scaffold was simulated by a Voronoi network embedded in a matrix. The computational model was validated using published experimental data. Results indicate that both non-enzymatic glycation-induced matrix stiffening and fiber network density, as regulated by collagen concentration, influence scaffold behavior. The heterogeneous stress patterns of the scaffold were induced by the interfacial mechanics between the collagen fiber network and the matrix. The knowledge obtained in this work could help to fine-tune the mechanical properties of collagen scaffolds for improved tissue regeneration applications.

  5. The extracellular matrix of Gadus morhua muscle contains types III, V, VI and IV collagens in addition to type I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline; Lawson, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Confocal microscopy and immuno‐histochemistry were used to examine collagens in the extracellular matrix of cod Gadus morhua swimming muscle. In addition to the well known presence of type I fibrous collagen, types III and VI were also found in the myocommata and the endomysium. The beaded collagen......, type VI, was found in the endomysium and the network forming collagen, type IV, was found in the basement membrane. This is the first report of type V collagen in cod muscle and of types II, IV and VI in the muscle of a teleost....

  6. Ultra-structural defects cause low bone matrix stiffness despite high mineralization in osteogenesis imperfecta mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanleene, Maximilien; Porter, Alexandra; Guillot, Pascale-Valerie; Boyde, Alan; Oyen, Michelle; Shefelbine, Sandra

    2012-06-01

    Bone is a complex material with a hierarchical multi-scale organization from the molecule to the organ scale. The genetic bone disease, osteogenesis imperfecta, is primarily caused by mutations in the collagen type I genes, resulting in bone fragility. Because the basis of the disease is molecular with ramifications at the whole bone level, it provides a platform for investigating the relationship between structure, composition, and mechanics throughout the hierarchy. Prior studies have individually shown that OI leads to: 1. increased bone mineralization, 2. decreased elastic modulus, and 3. smaller apatite crystal size. However, these have not been studied together and the mechanism for how mineral structure influences tissue mechanics has not been identified. This lack of understanding inhibits the development of more accurate models and therapies. To address this research gap, we used a mouse model of the disease (oim) to measure these outcomes together in order to propose an underlying mechanism for the changes in properties. Our main finding was that despite increased mineralization, oim bones have lower stiffness that may result from the poorly organized mineral matrix with significantly smaller, highly packed and disoriented apatite crystals. Using a composite framework, we interpret the lower oim bone matrix elasticity observed as the result of a change in the aspect ratio of apatite crystals and a disruption of the crystal connectivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Study on de novo collagen biosynthesis and degradation markers of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, L.S.; Matta, T.F.; Ibrahim, I.; Meky, N.H.

    2003-01-01

    This investigation was carried out to study the performance of de novo biochemical markers of serum pro collagen type-1 amino terminal extension (PINP), as a marker of collagen biosynthesis, and urinary collagen crosslink free deoxypyridinoline (DPD) as a marker of collagen degradation. Moreover, urinary calcium C Ca) and inorganic phosphorus (P), as markers of bone demineralization, in addition to urinary creatinine (Cr), to reflect status of renal function, were also studied in order to assess the activity of bone turnover in osteoporotic (OST), postmenopausal (POST), peri menopausal(PERI), premenopausal (PRE) women and also in young adult (YON) ones. The obtained results showed that urinary creatinine levels were within the normal ranges in all women even in the elderly osteoporotic and postmenopausal women. Serum PINP did not reflect osteoblastic activity. Urinary DPD proved to be a good marker in monitoring the postmenopausal bone resorption and urinary Ca was a reliable marker for bone loss in osteoporosis and bone turnover in the postmenopausal status

  8. Differential actions of the endocytic collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180 and the collagenase MMP-2 in bone homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H; Jürgensen, Henrik J; Ingvarsen, Signe

    2013-01-01

    A well-coordinated remodeling of uncalcified collagen matrices is a pre-requisite for bone development and homeostasis. Collagen turnover proceeds through different pathways, either involving extracellular reactions exclusively, or being dependent on endocytic processes. Extracellular collagen...... degradation requires the action of secreted or membrane attached collagenolytic proteases, whereas the alternative collagen degradation pathway proceeds intracellularly after receptor-mediated uptake and delivery to the lysosomes. In this study we have examined the functional interplay between...

  9. Preparation of a biomimetic composite scaffold from gelatin/collagen and bioactive glass fibers for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharifi, Esmaeel; Azami, Mahmoud [Department of Tissue Engineering and Applied Cell Sciences, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad [Department of Tissue Engineering and Applied Cell Sciences, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pediatric Urology Research Center, Section of Tissue Engineering and Stem Cells Therapy, Department of Pediatric Urology, Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Tehran, Iran (IRI) (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moztarzadeh, Fatollah [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faridi-Majidi, Reza [Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamousi, Atefeh; Karimi, Roya [Department of Tissue Engineering and Applied Cell Sciences, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ai, Jafar, E-mail: jafar_ai@tums.ac.ir [Department of Tissue Engineering and Applied Cell Sciences, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Brain and Spinal Injury Research Center (BASIR), Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-01

    Bone tissue is a composite material made of organic and inorganic components. Bone tissue engineering requires scaffolds that mimic bone nature in chemical and mechanical properties. This study proposes a novel method for preparing composite scaffolds that uses sub-micron bioglass fibers as the organic phase and gelatin/collagen as the inorganic phase. The scaffolds were constructed by using freeze drying and electro spinning methods and their mechanical properties were enhanced by using genipin crosslinking agent. Electron microscopy micrographs showed that the structure of composite scaffolds were porous with pore diameters of approximately 70–200 μm, this was again confirmed by mercury porosimetery. These pores are suitable for osteoblast growth. The diameters of the fibers were approximately 150–450 nm. Structural analysis confirmed the formation of desirable phases of sub-micron bioglass fibers. Cellular biocompatibility tests illustrated that scaffolds containing copper ion in the bioglass structure had more cell growth and osteoblast attachment in comparison to copper-free scaffolds. - Highlights: • Fabrication of 45S5 sub-micron bioglass fiber using electrospinning method. • Production of copper doped submicron bioglass fibers on 45S5 bioglass base by electrospinning sol gel route method. • Incorporation of bioglass/Cu-bioglass sub-micron fibers into gelatin/collagen matrix to form biomimetic composite scaffold which were non-cytotoxic according to MTT assay. • Discovering that copper can decrease the glass transition temperatures and enhance osteoblast cell adhesion and viability.

  10. Preparation of a biomimetic composite scaffold from gelatin/collagen and bioactive glass fibers for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifi, Esmaeel; Azami, Mahmoud; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Moztarzadeh, Fatollah; Faridi-Majidi, Reza; Shamousi, Atefeh; Karimi, Roya; Ai, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Bone tissue is a composite material made of organic and inorganic components. Bone tissue engineering requires scaffolds that mimic bone nature in chemical and mechanical properties. This study proposes a novel method for preparing composite scaffolds that uses sub-micron bioglass fibers as the organic phase and gelatin/collagen as the inorganic phase. The scaffolds were constructed by using freeze drying and electro spinning methods and their mechanical properties were enhanced by using genipin crosslinking agent. Electron microscopy micrographs showed that the structure of composite scaffolds were porous with pore diameters of approximately 70–200 μm, this was again confirmed by mercury porosimetery. These pores are suitable for osteoblast growth. The diameters of the fibers were approximately 150–450 nm. Structural analysis confirmed the formation of desirable phases of sub-micron bioglass fibers. Cellular biocompatibility tests illustrated that scaffolds containing copper ion in the bioglass structure had more cell growth and osteoblast attachment in comparison to copper-free scaffolds. - Highlights: • Fabrication of 45S5 sub-micron bioglass fiber using electrospinning method. • Production of copper doped submicron bioglass fibers on 45S5 bioglass base by electrospinning sol gel route method. • Incorporation of bioglass/Cu-bioglass sub-micron fibers into gelatin/collagen matrix to form biomimetic composite scaffold which were non-cytotoxic according to MTT assay. • Discovering that copper can decrease the glass transition temperatures and enhance osteoblast cell adhesion and viability.

  11. The Use of Injectable Chitosan/Nanohydroxyapatite/Collagen Composites with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Promote Ectopic Bone Formation In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate ectopic in vivo bone formation with or without rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs of an injectable Chitosan/Nanohydroxyapatite/Collagen (CS/nHAC composite. The CS/nHAC composites were injected subcutaneously into the backs of Wistar rats with freshly loaded rBMSCs at a density of 10×106 cells/mL, and the CS/nHAC composites without cells were used as negative controls. New bone formation, degradation of composites, and degree of calcification were evaluated by Computed Tomography (CT and three-dimensional (3D CT reconstruction. Histological evaluations were performed to further assess bone structure and extracellular matrix by HE and Masson staining. The inflammatory reactions related to osteogenesis were also investigated in the present study. In comparison with the CS/nHAC composites, this study revealed that CS/nHAC/rBMSCs composites showed relatively higher percentage of calcification, better establishment of ECM, and less degradation rate. Meanwhile, different extents of inflammatory reactions were also observed in the CS/nHAC and CS/nHAC/rBMSCs explants at 2 and 4 weeks after implantation. Altogether, CS/nHAC/rBMSCs composites are superior to CS/nHAC composites in ectopic bone formation. In conclusion, the rBMSCs-seeded CS/nHAC composites may be beneficial to enhancing ectopic bone formation in vivo.

  12. Bioactive glass-ceramic bone repair associated or not with autogenous bone: a study of organic bone matrix organization in a rabbit critical-sized calvarial model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Cavalla, Franco; Tim, Carla Roberta; Saraiva, Patrícia Pinto; Orcini, Wilson; De Andrade Holgado, Leandro; Rennó, Ana Claudia Muniz; Matsumoto, Mariza Akemi

    2018-04-26

    The aim of the study was to analyze bone matrix (BMX) organization after bone grafting and repair using a new bioactive glass-ceramic (Biosilicate ® ) associated or not with particulate autogenous bone graft. Thirty rabbits underwent surgical bilateral parietal defects and divided into groups according to the materials used: (C) control-blood clot, (BG) particulate autogenous bone, (BS) bioactive glass-ceramic, and BG + BS. After 7, 14, and 30 days post-surgery, a fragment of each specimen was fixed in - 80 °C liquid nitrogen for zymographic evaluation, while the remaining was fixed in 10% formalin for histological birefringence analysis. The results of this study demonstrated that matrix organization in experimental groups was significantly improved compared to C considering collagenous organization. Zymographic analysis revealed pro-MMP-2, pro-MMP-9, and active (a)-MMP-2 in all groups, showing gradual decrease of total gelatinolytic activity during the periods. At day 7, BG presented more prominent gelatinolytic activity for pro-MMP-2 and 9 and a-MMP-2, when compared to the other groups. In addition, at day 7, a 53% activation ratio (active form/[active form + latent form]) was evident in C group, 33% in BS group, and 31% in BG group. In general, BS allowed the production of a BMX similar to BG, with organized collagen deposition and MMP-2 and MMP-9 disponibility, permitting satisfactory bone remodeling at the late period. The evaluation of new bone substitute, with favorable biological properties, opens the possibility for its use as a viable and efficient alternative to autologous bone graft.

  13. In vitro deposition of hydroxyapatite on cortical bone collagen stimulated by deformation-induced piezoelectricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noris-Suárez, Karem; Lira-Olivares, Joaquin; Ferreira, Ana Marina; Feijoo, José Luis; Suárez, Nery; Hernández, Maria C; Barrios, Esteban

    2007-03-01

    In the present work, we have studied the effect of the piezoelectricity of elastically deformed cortical bone collagen on surface using a biomimetic approach. The mineralization process induced as a consequence of the piezoelectricity effect was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). SEM micrographs showed that mineralization occurred predominantly over the compressed side of bone collagen, due to the effect of piezoelectricity, when the sample was immersed in the simulated body fluid (SBF) in a cell-free system. The TSDC method was used to examine the complex collagen dielectric response. The dielectric spectra of deformed and undeformed collagen samples with different hydration levels were compared and correlated with the mineralization process followed by SEM. The dielectric measurements showed that the mineralization induced significant changes in the dielectric spectra of the deformed sample. DSC and TSDC results demonstrated a reduction of the collagen glass transition as the mineralization process advanced. The combined use of SEM, TSDC, and DSC showed that, even without osteoblasts present, the piezoelectric dipoles produced by deformed collagen can produce the precipitation of hydroxyapatite by electrochemical means, without a catalytic converter as occurs in classical biomimetic deposition.

  14. Novel Vanadium-Loaded Ordered Collagen Scaffold Promotes Osteochondral Differentiation of Bone Marrow Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Cortizo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone and cartilage regeneration can be improved by designing a functionalized biomaterial that includes bioactive drugs in a biocompatible and biodegradable scaffold. Based on our previous studies, we designed a vanadium-loaded collagen scaffold for osteochondral tissue engineering. Collagen-vanadium loaded scaffolds were characterized by SEM, FTIR, and permeability studies. Rat bone marrow progenitor cells were plated on collagen or vanadium-loaded membranes to evaluate differences in cell attachment, growth and osteogenic or chondrocytic differentiation. The potential cytotoxicity of the scaffolds was assessed by the MTT assay and by evaluation of morphological changes in cultured RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our results show that loading of VOAsc did not alter the grooved ordered structure of the collagen membrane although it increased membrane permeability, suggesting a more open structure. The VOAsc was released to the media, suggesting diffusion-controlled drug release. Vanadium-loaded membranes proved to be a better substratum than C0 for all evaluated aspects of BMPC biocompatibility (adhesion, growth, and osteoblastic and chondrocytic differentiation. In addition, there was no detectable effect of collagen or vanadium-loaded scaffolds on macrophage viability or cytotoxicity. Based on these findings, we have developed a new ordered collagen scaffold loaded with VOAsc that shows potential for osteochondral tissue engineering.

  15. A new procedure for extraction of collagen from modern and archaeological bones for 14C dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maspero, F; Sala, S; Fedi, M E; Martini, M; Papagni, A

    2011-10-01

    Bones are potentially the best age indicators in a stratigraphic study, because they are closely related to the layer in which they are found. Collagen is the most suitable fraction and is the material normally used in radiocarbon dating. Bone contaminants can strongly alter the carbon isotopic fraction values of the samples, so chemical pretreatment for (14)C dating by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is essential. The most widespread method for collagen extraction is based on the Longin procedure, which consists in HCl demineralization to dissolve the inorganic phase of the samples, followed by dissolution of collagen in a weak acid solution. In this work the possible side effects of this procedure on a modern bone are presented; the extracted collagen was analyzed by ATR-IR spectroscopy. An alternative procedure, based on use of HF instead of HCl, to minimize unwanted degradation of the organic fraction, is also given. A study by ATR-IR spectroscopic analysis of collagen collected after different demineralization times and with different acid volumes, and a study of an archaeological sample, are also presented.

  16. Influence of Nano-HA Coated Bone Collagen to Acrylic (Polymethylmethacrylate Bone Cement on Mechanical Properties and Bioactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Li

    Full Text Available This research investigated the mechanical properties and bioactivity of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA bone cement after addition of the nano-hydroxyapatite(HA coated bone collagen (mineralized collagen, MC.The MC in different proportions were added to the PMMA bone cement to detect the compressive strength, compression modulus, coagulation properties and biosafety. The MC-PMMA was embedded into rabbits and co-cultured with MG 63 cells to exam bone tissue compatibility and gene expression of osteogenesis.15.0%(wt impregnated MC-PMMA significantly lowered compressive modulus while little affected compressive strength and solidification. MC-PMMA bone cement was biologically safe and indicated excellent bone tissue compatibility. The bone-cement interface crosslinking was significantly higher in MC-PMMA than control after 6 months implantation in the femur of rabbits. The genes of osteogenesis exhibited significantly higher expression level in MC-PMMA.MC-PMMA presented perfect mechanical properties, good biosafety and excellent biocompatibility with bone tissues, which has profoundly clinical values.

  17. Probabilistic Failure Analysis of Bone Using a Finite Element Model of Mineral-Collagen Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, X. Neil; Guda, Teja; Millwater, Harry R.; Wang, Xiaodu

    2008-01-01

    Microdamage accumulation is a major pathway for energy dissipation during the post-yield deformation of bone. In this study, a two-dimensional probabilistic finite element model of a mineral-collagen composite was developed to investigate the influence of the tissue and ultrastructural properties of bone on the evolution of microdamage from an initial defect in tension. The probabilistic failure analyses indicated that the microdamage progression would be along the plane of the initial defect...

  18. Functional grading of mineral and collagen in the attachment of tendon to bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genin, Guy M; Kent, Alistair; Birman, Victor; Wopenka, Brigitte; Pasteris, Jill D; Marquez, Pablo J; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2009-08-19

    Attachment of dissimilar materials is a major challenge because high levels of localized stress may develop at their interfaces. An effective biologic solution to this problem exists at one of nature's most extreme interfaces: the attachment of tendon (a compliant, structural "soft tissue") to bone (a stiff, structural "hard tissue"). The goal of our study was to develop biomechanical models to describe how the tendon-to-bone insertion derives its mechanical properties. We examined the tendon-to-bone insertion and found two factors that give the tendon-to-bone transition a unique grading in mechanical properties: 1), a gradation in mineral concentration, measured by Raman spectroscopy; and 2), a gradation in collagen fiber orientation, measured by polarized light microscopy. Our measurements motivate a new physiological picture of the tissue that achieves this transition, the tendon-to-bone insertion, as a continuous, functionally graded material. Our biomechanical model suggests that the experimentally observed increase in mineral accumulation within collagen fibers can provide significant stiffening of the partially mineralized fibers, but only for concentrations of mineral above a "percolation threshold" corresponding to formation of a mechanically continuous mineral network within each collagen fiber (e.g., the case of mineral connectivity extending from one end of the fiber to the other). Increasing dispersion in the orientation distribution of collagen fibers from tendon to bone is a second major determinant of tissue stiffness. The combination of these two factors may explain the nonmonotonic variation of stiffness over the length of the tendon-to-bone insertion reported previously. Our models explain how tendon-to-bone attachment is achieved through a functionally graded material composition, and provide targets for tissue engineered surgical interventions and biomimetic material interfaces.

  19. The effect of Hydroxyapatite/collagen I composites, bone marrow aspirate and bone graft on fixation of bone implants in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan

      The effect of Hydroxyapatite/collagen I composites, bone marrow aspirate and bone graft on fixation of bone implants IN SHEEP   Ph.D. Student, Hassan Babiker; Associate Professor, Ph.D. Ming Ding; Professor, dr.med., Soren Overgaard. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Odense University Hospital......, Odense, Denmark   Background: Hydroxyapatite and collagen composites (HA/coll) have the potential in mimicking and replacing skeletal bones. This study attempted to determine the effect of newly developed HA/coll-composites with and without bone marrow aspirate (BMA) in order to enhance the fixation...... of bone implants.   Materials and Methods: Titanium alloy implants were inserted into bilateral femoral condyles of 8 skeletally mature sheep, four in each sheep. The implant has a circumferential gap of 2 mm. The gap was filled with: HA/coll; HA/coll-BMA; autograft or allograft. Allograft was served...

  20. Collagen Fingerprinting: A New Screening Technique for Radiocarbon Dating Ancient Bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia L Harvey

    Full Text Available Collagen is the dominant organic component of bone and is intimately locked within the hydroxyapatite structure of this ubiquitous biomaterial that dominates archaeological and palaeontological assemblages. Radiocarbon analysis of extracted collagen is one of the most common approaches to dating bone from late Pleistocene or Holocene deposits, but dating is relatively expensive compared to other biochemical techniques. Numerous analytical methods have previously been investigated for the purpose of screening out samples that are unlikely to yield reliable dates including histological analysis, UV-stimulated fluorescence and, most commonly, the measurement of percentage nitrogen (%N and ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C:N. Here we propose the use of collagen fingerprinting (also known as Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry, or ZooMS, when applied to species identification as an alternative screening method for radiocarbon dating, due to its ability to provide information on collagen presence and quality, alongside species identification. The method was tested on a series of sub-fossil bone specimens from cave systems on Cayman Brac (Cayman Islands, chosen due to the observable range in diagenetic alteration, and in particular, the extent of mineralisation. Six (14C dates, of 18 initial attempts, were obtained from remains of extinct hutia, Capromys sp. (Rodentia; Capromyidae, recovered from five distinct caves on Cayman Brac, and ranging from 393 ± 25 to 1588 ± 26 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP. All of the bone samples that yielded radiocarbon dates generated excellent collagen fingerprints, and conversely those that gave poor fingerprints also failed dating. Additionally, two successfully fingerprinted bone samples were screened out from a set of 81. Both subsequently generated (14C dates, demonstrating successful utilisation of ZooMS as an alternative screening mechanism to identify bone samples that are suitable for 1(4C analysis.

  1. Collagen Fingerprinting: A New Screening Technique for Radiocarbon Dating Ancient Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Virginia L; Egerton, Victoria M; Chamberlain, Andrew T; Manning, Phillip L; Buckley, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is the dominant organic component of bone and is intimately locked within the hydroxyapatite structure of this ubiquitous biomaterial that dominates archaeological and palaeontological assemblages. Radiocarbon analysis of extracted collagen is one of the most common approaches to dating bone from late Pleistocene or Holocene deposits, but dating is relatively expensive compared to other biochemical techniques. Numerous analytical methods have previously been investigated for the purpose of screening out samples that are unlikely to yield reliable dates including histological analysis, UV-stimulated fluorescence and, most commonly, the measurement of percentage nitrogen (%N) and ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C:N). Here we propose the use of collagen fingerprinting (also known as Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry, or ZooMS, when applied to species identification) as an alternative screening method for radiocarbon dating, due to its ability to provide information on collagen presence and quality, alongside species identification. The method was tested on a series of sub-fossil bone specimens from cave systems on Cayman Brac (Cayman Islands), chosen due to the observable range in diagenetic alteration, and in particular, the extent of mineralisation. Six (14)C dates, of 18 initial attempts, were obtained from remains of extinct hutia, Capromys sp. (Rodentia; Capromyidae), recovered from five distinct caves on Cayman Brac, and ranging from 393 ± 25 to 1588 ± 26 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP). All of the bone samples that yielded radiocarbon dates generated excellent collagen fingerprints, and conversely those that gave poor fingerprints also failed dating. Additionally, two successfully fingerprinted bone samples were screened out from a set of 81. Both subsequently generated (14)C dates, demonstrating successful utilisation of ZooMS as an alternative screening mechanism to identify bone samples that are suitable for 1(4)C analysis.

  2. Influence of hyperbaric oxygen on biomechanics and structural bone matrix in type 1 diabetes mellitus rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Henrique Justino Oliveira Limirio

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanics and structural bone matrix in diabetic rats subjected to hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO.Twenty-four male rats were divided into the following groups: Control; Control + HBO; Diabetic, and Diabetic + HBO. Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin (STZ in the diabetic Groups. After 30 days, HBO was performed every 48h in HBO groups and all animals were euthanized 60 days after diabetic induction. The femur was submitted to a biomechanical (maximum strength, energy-to-failure and stiffness and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR analyses (crosslink ratio, crystallinity index, matrix-to-mineral ratio: Amide I + II/Hydroxyapatite (M:MI and Amide III + Collagen/HA (M:MIII.In biomechanical analysis, diabetic animals showed lower values of maximum strength, energy and stiffness than non-diabetic animals. However, structural strength and stiffness were increased in groups with HBO compared with non-HBO. ATR-FTIR analysis showed decreased collagen maturity in the ratio of crosslink peaks in diabetic compared with the other groups. The bone from the diabetic groups showed decreased crystallinity compared with non-diabetic groups. M:MI showed no statistical difference between groups. However, M:MIII showed an increased matrix mineral ratio in diabetic+HBO and control+HBO compared with control and diabetic groups. Correlations between mechanical and ATR-FTIR analyses showed significant positive correlation between collagen maturity and stiffness.Diabetes decreased collagen maturation and the mineral deposition process, thus reducing biomechanical properties. Moreover, the study showed that HBO improved crosslink maturation and increased maximum strength and stiffness in the femur of T1DM animals.

  3. Influence of hyperbaric oxygen on biomechanics and structural bone matrix in type 1 diabetes mellitus rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limirio, Pedro Henrique Justino Oliveira; da Rocha Junior, Huberth Alexandre; Morais, Richarlisson Borges de; Hiraki, Karen Renata Nakamura; Balbi, Ana Paula Coelho; Soares, Priscilla Barbosa Ferreira; Dechichi, Paula

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanics and structural bone matrix in diabetic rats subjected to hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO). Twenty-four male rats were divided into the following groups: Control; Control + HBO; Diabetic, and Diabetic + HBO. Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin (STZ) in the diabetic Groups. After 30 days, HBO was performed every 48h in HBO groups and all animals were euthanized 60 days after diabetic induction. The femur was submitted to a biomechanical (maximum strength, energy-to-failure and stiffness) and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) analyses (crosslink ratio, crystallinity index, matrix-to-mineral ratio: Amide I + II/Hydroxyapatite (M:MI) and Amide III + Collagen/HA (M:MIII)). In biomechanical analysis, diabetic animals showed lower values of maximum strength, energy and stiffness than non-diabetic animals. However, structural strength and stiffness were increased in groups with HBO compared with non-HBO. ATR-FTIR analysis showed decreased collagen maturity in the ratio of crosslink peaks in diabetic compared with the other groups. The bone from the diabetic groups showed decreased crystallinity compared with non-diabetic groups. M:MI showed no statistical difference between groups. However, M:MIII showed an increased matrix mineral ratio in diabetic+HBO and control+HBO compared with control and diabetic groups. Correlations between mechanical and ATR-FTIR analyses showed significant positive correlation between collagen maturity and stiffness. Diabetes decreased collagen maturation and the mineral deposition process, thus reducing biomechanical properties. Moreover, the study showed that HBO improved crosslink maturation and increased maximum strength and stiffness in the femur of T1DM animals.

  4. Absence of FKBP10 in recessive type XI osteogenesis imperfecta leads to diminished collagen cross-linking and reduced collagen deposition in extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Aileen M; Cabral, Wayne A; Weis, MaryAnn; Makareeva, Elena; Mertz, Edward L; Leikin, Sergey; Eyre, David; Trujillo, Carlos; Marini, Joan C

    2012-11-01

    Recessive osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is caused by defects in genes whose products interact with type I collagen for modification and/or folding. We identified a Palestinian pedigree with moderate and lethal forms of recessive OI caused by mutations in FKBP10 or PPIB, which encode endoplasmic reticulum resident chaperone/isomerases FKBP65 and CyPB, respectively. In one pedigree branch, both parents carry a deletion in PPIB (c.563_566delACAG), causing lethal type IX OI in their two children. In another branch, a child with moderate type XI OI has a homozygous FKBP10 mutation (c.1271_1272delCCinsA). Proband FKBP10 transcripts are 4% of control and FKBP65 protein is absent from proband cells. Proband collagen electrophoresis reveals slight band broadening, compatible with ≈10% over-modification. Normal chain incorporation, helix folding, and collagen T(m) support a minimal general collagen chaperone role for FKBP65. However, there is a dramatic decrease in collagen deposited in culture despite normal collagen secretion. Mass spectrometry reveals absence of hydroxylation of the collagen telopeptide lysine involved in cross-linking, suggesting that FKBP65 is required for lysyl hydroxylase activity or access to type I collagen telopeptide lysines, perhaps through its function as a peptidylprolyl isomerase. Proband collagen to organics ratio in matrix is approximately 30% of normal in Raman spectra. Immunofluorescence shows sparse, disorganized collagen fibrils in proband matrix. Published 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.*This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain of the United States of America.

  5. Age-related collagen turnover of the interstitial matrix and basement membrane: Implications of age- and sex-dependent remodeling of the extracellular matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Stephanie N.; Willumsen, Nicholas; Armbrecht, Gabriele

    2018-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a vital role in maintaining normal tissue function. Collagens are major components of the ECM and there is a tight equilibrium between degradation and formation of these proteins ensuring tissue health and homeostasis. As a consequence of tissue turnover, small...... collagen fragments are released into the circulation, which act as important biomarkers in the study of certain tissue-related remodeling factors in health and disease. The aim of this study was to establish an age-related collagen turnover profile of the main collagens of the interstitial matrix (type I...... an increased turnover. In summary, collagen turnover is affected by age and sex with the interstitial matrix and the basement membrane being differently regulated. The observed changes needs to be accounted for when measuring ECM related biomarkers in clinical studies....

  6. [Bio-Oss collagen bone grafting in the treatment of endodontic-periodontic lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiang; Liu, Qiong

    2009-09-01

    To study the effect of Bio-Oss collagen for bone grafting in the treatment of endodontic-periodontic lesion. Thirty patients (37 teeth) with endodontic-periodontic lesions received root canal therapy and periodontal treatment. Four weeks after the treatment, Bio-Oss collagen was grafted in these teeth. Clinical examinations were performed 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the surgery. The mobility of these teeth improved 1 month after the surgery. At 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the surgery, the pocket depth reduced obviously good attachment and further improvement of the tooth mobility. Bio-Oss collagen for bone grafting can achieve good therapeutic effect for endodontic-periodontic lesions.

  7. Use of Mueller matrix polarimetry and optical coherence tomography in the characterization of cervical collagen anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chue-Sang, Joseph; Bai, Yuqiang; Stoff, Susan; Gonzalez, Mariacarla; Holness, Nola; Gomes, Jefferson; Jung, Ranu; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Chernomordik, Viktor V; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C

    2017-08-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) presents a serious medical health concern throughout the world. There is a high incidence of PTB in both developed and developing countries ranging from 11% to 15%, respectively. Recent research has shown that cervical collagen orientation and distribution changes during pregnancy may be useful in predicting PTB. Polarization imaging is an effective means to measure optical anisotropy in birefringent materials, such as the cervix's extracellular matrix. Noninvasive, full-field Mueller matrix polarimetry (MMP) imaging methodologies, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging were used to assess cervical collagen content and structure in nonpregnant porcine cervices. We demonstrate that the highly ordered structure of the nonpregnant porcine cervix can be observed with MMP. Furthermore, when utilized ex vivo, OCT and MMP yield very similar results with a mean error of 3.46% between the two modalities. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  8. Use of Mueller matrix polarimetry and optical coherence tomography in the characterization of cervical collagen anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chue-Sang, Joseph; Bai, Yuqiang; Stoff, Susan; Gonzalez, Mariacarla; Holness, Nola; Gomes, Jefferson; Jung, Ranu; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Chernomordik, Viktor V.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2017-08-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) presents a serious medical health concern throughout the world. There is a high incidence of PTB in both developed and developing countries ranging from 11% to 15%, respectively. Recent research has shown that cervical collagen orientation and distribution changes during pregnancy may be useful in predicting PTB. Polarization imaging is an effective means to measure optical anisotropy in birefringent materials, such as the cervix's extracellular matrix. Noninvasive, full-field Mueller matrix polarimetry (MMP) imaging methodologies, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging were used to assess cervical collagen content and structure in nonpregnant porcine cervices. We demonstrate that the highly ordered structure of the nonpregnant porcine cervix can be observed with MMP. Furthermore, when utilized ex vivo, OCT and MMP yield very similar results with a mean error of 3.46% between the two modalities.

  9. Thermal and electron stimulated luminescence of natural bones, commercial hydroxyapatite and collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Lopez, J; Correcher, V; Garcia-Guinea, J; Rivera, T; Lozano, I B

    2014-01-01

    The luminescence (cathodoluminescence and thermoluminescence) properties of natural bones (Siberian mammoth and adult elephant), commercial hydroxyapatite and collagen were analyzed. Chemical analyses of the natural bones were determined using by Electron Probe Micro-Analysis (EMPA). Structural, molecular and thermal characteristics were determined by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and Differential Thermal and Thermogravimetric analysis (DTA-TG). Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra of natural bones and collagen showed similar intense broad bands at 440 and 490 nm related to luminescence of the tetrahedral anion [Formula: see text] or structural defects. A weaker luminescence exhibited at 310 nm could be attributed to small amount of rare earth elements (REEs). Four luminescent bands at 378, 424, 468 and 576 nm were observed in the commercial hydroxyapatite (HAP). Both natural bones and collagen samples exhibited natural thermoluminescence (NTL) with well-defined glow curves whereas that the induced thermoluminescence (ITL) only appears in the samples of commercial hydroxyapatite and collagen. Additional explanations for the TL anomalous fading of apatite, as a crucial difficulty performing dosimetry and dating, are also considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Type II collagen peptide is able to accelerate embryonic chondrocyte differentiation: an association with articular cartilage matrix resorption in osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vasil'evna Chetina

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. The effect of CP on gene expression and collagen decomposition activity depends on the morphotype of embryonic chondrocytes. Lack of effect of CP on collagen decomposition activity in both the embryonic hypertrophic chondrocytes and the cartilage explants from OA patients supports the hypothesis that the hypertrophic morphotype is a dominant morphotype of articular chondrocytes in OA. Moreover, collagen decomposition products can be involved in the resorption of matrix in OA and in the maintenance of chronic nature of the pathology.

  11. IMMUNE RESPONSE TO EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX COLLAGEN IN CHRONIC HEPATITIS C INDUCED LIVER FIBROSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Borg, Brian B.; Seetharam, Anil; Subramanian, Vijay; Ilias, Haseeb; Lisker–Melman, Mauricio; Korenblat, Kevin; Anderson, Christopher; Shenoy, Surendra; Chapman, William C.; Crippin, Jeffrey S.; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection and recurrence post-transplant (OLT) is associated with extracellular matrix (ECM) components remodeling, particularly collagen (Col), leading to fibrosis. Our aim was to determine whether development of antibodies (Abs) to self antigen Col in HCV infection correlates with fibrosis stage and peripheral cytokine response. Chronic HCV patients, those with recurrence after OLT undergoing biopsy and healthy control subjects were enrolled. HCV subjects (n=70) were...

  12. Clinical Usage of an Extracellular, Collagen-rich Matrix: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbouIssa, Abdelfatah; Mari, Walid; Simman, Richard

    2015-11-01

    OASIS Ultra (Smith and Nephew, St. Petersburg, FL) is an extracellular, collagen-rich matrix derived from submucosa of porcine intestine. It is composed of collagen type I, glycosaminoglycan, and proteoglycans. This extracellular matrix (ECM) differs from the single layer in thickness and offers ease of handling and application. It also stimulates cell migration and structural support, provides moisture environment, decreases inflammation, and induces cell proliferation and cellular attachments. In this case series, the authors present their experience with this product in various clinical scenarios. The authors used the product in a variety of wounds with different etiologies to test the clinical outcome of the ECM. This was an observational case series with prospective review of 6 different patients with different types of wounds who received treatment with the ECM during their treatment. The product was applied on the following types of wounds: chronic venous ulcer, nonhealing Achilles tendon vasculitic wound, Marjolin's ulcer, posttraumatic wound, stage IV sacral-coccygeal pressure wound, and complicated transmetatarsal amputation of gangrenous left forefoot diabetic wound. All of these wounds healed within the expected time periods and without complications. In general, healing was achieved in 4-16 weeks using 1-12 applications of the ECM. Wounds with different etiologies were successfully treated with an extracellular, collagen-rich matrix. By replacing the lost ECM to guide cellular growth and migration, this product did ultimately hasten the healing process.

  13. A Novel HA/β-TCP-Collagen Composite Enhanced New Bone Formation for Dental Extraction Socket Preservation in Beagle Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko-Ning Ho

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Past studies in humans have demonstrated horizontal and vertical bone loss after six months following tooth extraction. Many biomaterials have been developed to preserve bone volume after tooth extraction. Type I collagen serves as an excellent delivery system for growth factors and promotes angiogenesis. Calcium phosphate ceramics have also been investigated because their mineral chemistry resembles human bone. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of a novel bioresorbable purified fibrillar collagen and hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP ceramic composite versus collagen alone and a bovine xenograft-collagen composite in beagles. Collagen plugs, bovine graft-collagen composite and HA/β-TCP-collagen composite were implanted into the left and right first, second and third mandibular premolars, and the fourth molar was left empty for natural healing. In total, 20 male beagle dogs were used, and quantitative and histological analyses of the extraction ridge was done. The smallest width reduction was 19.09% ± 8.81% with the HA/β-TCP-collagen composite at Week 8, accompanied by new bone formation at Weeks 4 and 8. The HA/β-TCP-collagen composite performed well, as a new osteoconductive and biomimetic composite biomaterial, for socket bone preservation after tooth extraction.

  14. The effects of glucocorticoid on microarchitecture, collagen, mineral and mechanical properties of sheep femur cortical bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, Carl Christian; Overgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    of 3 months without treatment. Group 3 was left untreated and served as controls. All sheep received a restricted diet with low calcium and phosphorus. At sacrifice, cortical bone samples from the femur midshaft of each sheep were harvested, micro-CT scanned and subjected to three-point bending...... and tensile strength testing. Bone collagen and mineral were determined. Cortical porosity was significantly increased in the glucocorticoid-2 compared with the glucocorticoid-1 and control groups. Apparent density was significantly decreased in the glucocorticoid-2 compared with the glucocorticoid-1 group....... Collagen content was significantly increased in the glucocorticoid-2 compared with the glucocorticoid-1 and control groups. Bone mineral content did not differ between the groups. Neither the three-point bending mechanical properties nor the tensile mechanical properties differed significantly between...

  15. Weft-knitted silk-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) mesh scaffold combined with collagen matrix and seeded with mesenchymal stem cells for rabbit Achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyuan; Yang, Yadong; Zhang, Keji; Li, Ying; Fang, Guojian

    2015-02-01

    Natural silk fibroin fiber scaffolds have excellent mechanical properties, but degrade slowly. In this study, we used poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA, 10:90) fibers to adjust the overall degradation rate of the scaffolds and filled them with collagen to reserve space for cell growth. Silk fibroin-PLGA (36:64) mesh scaffolds were prepared using weft-knitting, filled with type I collagen, and incubated with rabbit autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). These scaffold-cells composites were implanted into rabbit Achilles tendon defects. At 16 weeks after implantation, morphological and histological observations showed formation of tendon-like tissues that expressed type I collagen mRNA and a uniformly dense distribution of collagen fibers. The maximum load of the regenerated Achilles tendon was 58.32% of normal Achilles tendon, which was significantly higher than control group without MSCs. These findings suggest that it is feasible to construct tissue engineered tendon using weft-knitted silk fibroin-PLGA fiber mesh/collagen matrix seeded with MSCs for rabbit Achilles tendon defect repair.

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase-9-mediated type III collagen degradation as a novel serological biochemical marker for liver fibrogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veidal, Sanne S; Vassiliadis, Efstathios; Barascuk, Natasha

    2010-01-01

    During fibrogenesis in the liver, in which excessive remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) occurs, both the quantity of type III collagen (CO3) and levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-9, increase significantly. MMPs play major roles in ECM remodelling, via...... their activity in the proteolytic degradation of extracellular macromolecules such as collagens, resulting in the generation of specific cleavage fragments. These neo-epitopes may be used as markers of fibrosis....

  17. Collagen-grafted porous HDPE/PEAA scaffolds for bone reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Shik; Jung, Kyung-Hye; Kim, Hun; Kim, Chan-Bong; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    After tumor resection, bone reconstruction such as skull base reconstruction using interconnected porous structure is absolutely necessary. In this study, porous scaffolds for bone reconstruction were prepared using heat-pressing and salt-leaching methods. High-density polyethylene (HDPE) and poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) (PEAA) were chosen as the polymer composites for producing a porous scaffold of high mechanical strength and having high reactivity with biomaterials such as collagen, respectively. The porous structure was observed through surface images, and its intrusion volume and porosity were measured. Owing to the carboxylic acids on PEAA, collagen was successfully grafted onto the porous HDPE/PEAA scaffold, which was confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Osteoblasts were cultured on the collagen-grafted porous scaffold, and their adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation were investigated. The high viability and growth of the osteoblasts suggest that the collagen-grafted porous HDPE/PEAA is a promising scaffold material for bone generation.

  18. Abnormal arrangement of a collagen/apatite extracellular matrix orthogonal to osteoblast alignment is constructed by a nanoscale periodic surface structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsugaki, Aira; Aramoto, Gento; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Sawada, Hiroshi; Hata, Satoshi; Nakano, Takayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Morphological and directional alteration of cells is essential for structurally appropriate construction of tissues and organs. In particular, osteoblast alignment is crucial for the realization of anisotropic bone tissue microstructure. In this article, the orientation of a collagen/apatite extracellular matrix (ECM) was established by controlling osteoblast alignment using a surface geometry with nanometer-sized periodicity induced by laser ablation. Laser irradiation induced self-organized periodic structures (laser-induced periodic surface structures; LIPSS) with a spatial period equal to the wavelength of the incident laser on the surface of biomedical alloys of Ti-6Al-4V and Co-Cr-Mo. Osteoblast orientation was successfully induced parallel to the grating structure. Notably, both the fibrous orientation of the secreted collagen matrix and the c-axis of the produced apatite crystals were orientated orthogonal to the cell direction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that bone tissue anisotropy is controllable, including the characteristic organization of a collagen/apatite composite orthogonal to the osteoblast orientation, by controlling the cell alignment using periodic surface geometry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High-resolution study of the 3D collagen fibrillary matrix of Achilles tendons without tissue labelling and dehydrating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-Ping; Swift, Benjamin John; Becker, Thomas; Squelch, Andrew; Wang, Allan; Zheng, Yong-Chang; Zhao, Xuelin; Xu, Jiake; Xue, Wei; Zheng, Minghao; Lloyd, David; Kirk, Thomas Brett

    2017-06-01

    Knowledge of the collagen structure of an Achilles tendon is critical to comprehend the physiology, biomechanics, homeostasis and remodelling of the tissue. Despite intensive studies, there are still uncertainties regarding the microstructure. The majority of studies have examined the longitudinally arranged collagen fibrils as they are primarily attributed to the principal tensile strength of the tendon. Few studies have considered the structural integrity of the entire three-dimensional (3D) collagen meshwork, and how the longitudinal collagen fibrils are integrated as a strong unit in a 3D domain to provide the tendons with the essential tensile properties. Using second harmonic generation imaging, a 3D imaging technique was developed and used to study the 3D collagen matrix in the midportion of Achilles tendons without tissue labelling and dehydration. Therefore, the 3D collagen structure is presented in a condition closely representative of the in vivo status. Atomic force microscopy studies have confirmed that second harmonic generation reveals the internal collagen matrix of tendons in 3D at a fibril level. Achilles tendons primarily contain longitudinal collagen fibrils that braid spatially into a dense rope-like collagen meshwork and are encapsulated or wound tightly by the oblique collagen fibrils emanating from the epitenon region. The arrangement of the collagen fibrils provides the longitudinal fibrils with essential structural integrity and endows the tendon with the unique mechanical function for withstanding tensile stresses. A novel 3D microscopic method has been developed to examine the 3D collagen microstructure of tendons without tissue dehydrating and labelling. The study also provides new knowledge about the collagen microstructure in an Achilles tendon, which enables understanding of the function of the tissue. The knowledge may be important for applying surgical and tissue engineering techniques to tendon reconstruction. © 2017 The Authors

  20. Raman spectral markers of collagen denaturation and hydration in human cortical bone tissue are affected by radiation sterilization and high cycle fatigue damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Christopher D; Unal, Mustafa; Akkus, Ozan; Rimnac, Clare M

    2017-11-01

    Thermal denaturation and monotonic mechanical damage alter the organic and water-related compartments of cortical bone. These changes can be detected using Raman spectroscopy. However, less is known regarding Raman sensitivity to detect the effects of cyclic fatigue damage and allograft sterilization doses of gamma radiation. To determine if Raman spectroscopic biomarkers of collagen denaturation and hydration are sensitive to the effects of (a) high cycle fatigue damage and (b) 25kGy irradiation. Unirradiated and gamma-radiation sterilized human cortical bone specimens previously tested in vitro under high-cycle (> 100,000 cycles) fatigue conditions at 15MPa, 25MPa, 35MPa, 45MPa, and 55MPa cyclic stress levels were studied. Cortical bone Raman spectral profiles from wavenumber ranges of 800-1750cm -1 and 2700-3800cm -1 were obtained and compared from: a) non-fatigue vs fatigue fracture sites and b) radiated vs. unirradiated states. Raman biomarker ratios 1670/1640 and 3220/2949, which reflect collagen denaturation and organic matrix (mainly collagen)-bound water, respectively, were assessed. One- and two-way ANOVA analyses were utilized to identify differences between groups along with interaction effects between cyclic fatigue and radiation-induced damage. Cyclic fatigue damage resulted in increases in collagen denaturation (1670/1640: 1.517 ± 0.043 vs 1.579 ± 0.021, p Raman spectroscopy can detect the effects of cyclic fatigue damage and 25kGy irradiation via increases in organic matrix (mainly collagen)-bound water. A Raman measure of collagen denaturation was sensitive to cyclic fatigue damage but not 25kGy irradiation. Collagen denaturation was correlated with organic matrix-bound water, suggesting that denaturation of collagen to gelatinous form may expose more binding sites to water by unwinding the triple alpha chains. This research may eventually be useful to help identify allograft quality and more appropriately match donors to recipients. Copyright

  1. Slow Muscle Precursors Lay Down a Collagen XV Matrix Fingerprint to Guide Motor Axon Navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Emilie; Bretaud, Sandrine; Ruggiero, Florence

    2016-03-02

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides local positional information to guide motoneuron axons toward their muscle target. Collagen XV is a basement membrane component mainly expressed in skeletal muscle. We have identified two zebrafish paralogs of the human COL15A1 gene, col15a1a and col15a1b, which display distinct expression patterns. Here we show that col15a1b is expressed and deposited in the motor path ECM by slow muscle precursors also called adaxial cells. We further demonstrate that collagen XV-B deposition is both temporally and spatially regulated before motor axon extension from the spinal cord in such a way that it remains in this region after the adaxial cells have migrated toward the periphery of the myotome. Loss- and gain-of-function experiments in zebrafish embryos demonstrate that col15a1b expression and subsequent collagen XV-B deposition and organization in the motor path ECM depend on a previously undescribed two-step mechanism involving Hedgehog/Gli and unplugged/MuSK signaling pathways. In silico analysis predicts a putative Gli binding site in the col15a1b proximal promoter. Using col15a1b promoter-reporter constructs, we demonstrate that col15a1b participates in the slow muscle genetic program as a direct target of Hedgehog/Gli signaling. Loss and gain of col15a1b function provoke pathfinding errors in primary and secondary motoneuron axons both at and beyond the choice point where axon pathway selection takes place. These defects result in muscle atrophy and compromised swimming behavior, a phenotype partially rescued by injection of a smyhc1:col15a1b construct. These reveal an unexpected and novel role for collagen XV in motor axon pathfinding and neuromuscular development. In addition to the archetypal axon guidance cues, the extracellular matrix provides local information that guides motor axons from the spinal cord to their muscle targets. Many of the proteins involved are unknown. Using the zebrafish model, we identified an

  2. Vinculin is required for cell polarization, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling in 3D collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thievessen, Ingo; Fakhri, Nikta; Steinwachs, Julian; Kraus, Viola; McIsaac, R Scott; Gao, Liang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Waterman, Clare M; Fabry, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Vinculin is filamentous (F)-actin-binding protein enriched in integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Whereas studies in 2-dimensional (2D) tissue culture models have suggested that vinculin negatively regulates cell migration by promoting cytoskeleton-ECM coupling to strengthen and stabilize adhesions, its role in regulating cell migration in more physiologic, 3-dimensional (3D) environments is unclear. To address the role of vinculin in 3D cell migration, we analyzed the morphodynamics, migration, and ECM remodeling of primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with cre/loxP-mediated vinculin gene disruption in 3D collagen I cultures. We found that vinculin promoted 3D cell migration by increasing directional persistence. Vinculin was necessary for persistent cell protrusion, cell elongation, and stable cell orientation in 3D collagen, but was dispensable for lamellipodia formation, suggesting that vinculin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM is needed to convert actin-based cell protrusion into persistent cell shape change and migration. Consistent with this finding, vinculin was necessary for efficient traction force generation in 3D collagen without affecting myosin II activity and promoted 3D collagen fiber alignment and macroscopical gel contraction. Our results suggest that vinculin promotes directionally persistent cell migration and tension-dependent ECM remodeling in complex 3D environments by increasing cell-ECM adhesion and traction force generation. © FASEB.

  3. Localized ridge defect augmentation using human pericardium membrane and demineralized bone matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyadharan, Arun Kumar; Ravindran, Anjana

    2014-01-01

    Patient wanted to restore her lost teeth with implants in the lower left first molar and second premolar region. Cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) revealed inadequate bone width and height around future implant sites. The extraction socket of second premolar area revealed inadequate socket healing with sparse bone fill after 4 months of extraction. To evaluate the clinical feasibility of using a collagen physical resorbable barrier made of human pericardium (HP) to augment localized alveolar ridge defects for the subsequent placement of dental implants. Ridge augmentation was done in the compromised area using Puros® demineralized bone matrix (DBM) Putty with chips and an HP allograft membrane. Horizontal (width) and vertical hard tissue measurements with CBCT were recorded on the day of ridge augmentation surgery, 4 month and 7 months follow-up. Intra oral periapical taken 1 year after implant installation showed minimal crestal bone loss. Bone volume achieved through guided bone regeneration was a gain of 4.8 mm horizontally (width) and 6.8 mm vertically in the deficient ridge within a period of 7 months following the procedure. The results suggested that HP Allograft membrane may be a suitable component for augmentation of localized alveolar ridge defects in conjunction with DBM with bone chips.

  4. Exercise and Regulation of Bone and Collagen Tissue Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Michael; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Heinemeier, Katja

    2015-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system and its connective tissue include the intramuscular connective tissue, the myotendinous junction, the tendon, the joints with their cartilage and ligaments, and the bone; they all together play a crucial role in maintaining the architecture of the skeletal muscle, ensur...

  5. Injection of demineralized bone matrix with bone marrow concentrate improves healing in unicameral bone cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bella, Claudia; Dozza, Barbara; Frisoni, Tommaso; Cevolani, Luca; Donati, Davide

    2010-11-01

    Unicameral bone cysts are benign lesions that usually spontaneously regress with skeletal maturity; however, the high risk of pathologic fractures often justifies treatment that could reinforce a weakened bone cortex. Various treatments have been proposed but there is no consensus regarding the best procedure. We compared the healing rates and failures of two methods of cure based on multiple injections of corticosteroid or a single injection of demineralized bone matrix (DBM) in association with bone marrow concentrate (BMC). We retrospectively reviewed 184 patients who had one of the two treatments for unicameral bone cysts with cortical erosion. Clinical records were reviewed for treatment failures and radiographs for healing in all patients. The minimum followup was 12 months for the Steroids Group (mean, 48 months; range, 12-120 months) and 12 months for the DBM + BMC Group (mean, 20 months; range, 12-28 months). After one treatment we observed a lower healing rate of cysts treated with multiple injections of steroids compared with the healing after the first injection of DBM + BMC (21% versus 58%, respectively). At last followup, 38% healed with steroids and 71% with DBM + BMC. The rate of failure after one steroid injection was higher than after a single injection of BDM + BMC (63% versus 24%, respectively). We observed no difference in fracture rates after treatment between the two groups. A single injection of DBM added with autologous bone marrow concentrate appears to provide a higher healing rate with a lower number of failures compared with a single injection of steroids.

  6. Osteoblasts extracellular matrix induces vessel like structures through glycosylated collagen I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, D.; Valli, M.; Viglio, S.; Ferrari, N.; Ledda, B.; Volta, C.; Manduca, P.

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a fundamental role in angiogenesis affecting endothelial cells proliferation, migration and differentiation. Vessels-like network formation in vitro is a reliable test to study the inductive effects of ECM on angiogenesis. Here we utilized matrix deposed by osteoblasts as substrate where the molecular and structural complexity of the endogenous ECM is preserved, to test if it induces vessel-like network formation by endothelial cells in vitro. ECM is more similar to the physiological substrate in vivo than other substrates previously utilized for these studies in vitro. Osteogenic ECM, prepared in vitro from mature osteoblasts at the phase of maximal deposition and glycosylation of collagen I, induces EAhy926, HUVEC, and HDMEC endothelial cells to form vessels-like structures and promotes the activation of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2); the functionality of the p-38/MAPK signaling pathway is required. Osteogenic ECM also induces a transient increase of CXCL12 and a decrease of the receptor CXCR4. The induction of vessel-like networks is dependent from proper glycosylation of collagens and does not occur on osteogenic ECMs if deglycosylated by -galactosidase or on less glycosylated ECMs derived from preosteoblasts and normal fibroblasts, while is sustained on ECM from osteogenesis imperfecta fibroblasts only when their mutation is associated with over-glycosylation of collagen type I. These data support that post-translational glycosylation has a role in the induction in endothelial cells in vitro of molecules conductive to self-organization in vessels-like structures.

  7. Osteoblasts extracellular matrix induces vessel like structures through glycosylated collagen I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmieri, D. [Genetics, DIBIO, University of Genova, Corso Europa 26, 16132 Genova (Italy); Valli, M.; Viglio, S. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Pavia (Italy); Ferrari, N. [Istituto Nazionale per la ricerca sul Cancro, Genova (Italy); Ledda, B.; Volta, C. [Genetics, DIBIO, University of Genova, Corso Europa 26, 16132 Genova (Italy); Manduca, P., E-mail: man-via@unige.it [Genetics, DIBIO, University of Genova, Corso Europa 26, 16132 Genova (Italy)

    2010-03-10

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a fundamental role in angiogenesis affecting endothelial cells proliferation, migration and differentiation. Vessels-like network formation in vitro is a reliable test to study the inductive effects of ECM on angiogenesis. Here we utilized matrix deposed by osteoblasts as substrate where the molecular and structural complexity of the endogenous ECM is preserved, to test if it induces vessel-like network formation by endothelial cells in vitro. ECM is more similar to the physiological substrate in vivo than other substrates previously utilized for these studies in vitro. Osteogenic ECM, prepared in vitro from mature osteoblasts at the phase of maximal deposition and glycosylation of collagen I, induces EAhy926, HUVEC, and HDMEC endothelial cells to form vessels-like structures and promotes the activation of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2); the functionality of the p-38/MAPK signaling pathway is required. Osteogenic ECM also induces a transient increase of CXCL12 and a decrease of the receptor CXCR4. The induction of vessel-like networks is dependent from proper glycosylation of collagens and does not occur on osteogenic ECMs if deglycosylated by -galactosidase or on less glycosylated ECMs derived from preosteoblasts and normal fibroblasts, while is sustained on ECM from osteogenesis imperfecta fibroblasts only when their mutation is associated with over-glycosylation of collagen type I. These data support that post-translational glycosylation has a role in the induction in endothelial cells in vitro of molecules conductive to self-organization in vessels-like structures.

  8. The endogenous fluorescence of fibroblast in collagen gels as indicator of stiffness of the extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Martinez, J. P.; Ortega-Martinez, A.; Franco, W.

    2016-03-01

    The stiffness or rigidity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cell response. Established mechanical tests to measure stiffness, such as indentation and tensile tests, are invasive and destructive to the sample. Endogenous or native molecules to cells and ECM components, like tryptophan and cross-links of collagen, display fluorescence upon irradiation with ultraviolet light. Most likely, the concentration of these endogenous fluorophores changes as the stiffness of the ECM changes. In this work we investigate the endogenous fluorescence of collagen gels containing fibroblasts as a non-invasive non-destructive method to measure stiffness of the ECM. Human fibroblast cells were cultured in three-dimensional gels of type I collagen (50,000 cells/ml). This construct is a simple model of tissue contraction. During contraction, changes in the excitation-emission matrix (a fluorescence map in the 240-520/290-530 nm range) of constructs were measured with a spectrofluoremeter, and changes in stiffness were measured with a standard indentation test over 16 days. Results show that a progressive increase in fluorescence of the 290/340 nm excitation-emission pair correlates with a progressive increase in stiffness (r=0.9, α=0.5). The fluorescence of this excitation-emission pair is ascribed to tryptophan and variations in the fluorescence of this pair correlate with cellular proliferation. In this tissue model, the endogenous functional fluorescence of proliferating fibroblast cells is a biomechanical marker of stiffness of the ECM.

  9. Aging and the cardiac collagen matrix: Novel mediators of fibrotic remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Margaux A; Trafford, Andrew W

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide and there is a pressing need for new therapeutic strategies to treat such conditions. The risk of developing cardiovascular disease increases dramatically with age, yet the majority of experimental research is executed using young animals. The cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM), consisting predominantly of fibrillar collagen, preserves myocardial integrity, provides a means of force transmission and supports myocyte geometry. Disruptions to the finely balanced control of collagen synthesis, post-synthetic deposition, post-translational modification and degradation may have detrimental effects on myocardial functionality. It is now well established that the aged heart is characterized by fibrotic remodelling, but the mechanisms responsible for this are incompletely understood. Furthermore, studies using aged animal models suggest that interstitial remodelling with disease may be age-dependent. Thus with the identification of new therapeutic strategies targeting fibrotic remodelling, it may be necessary to consider age-dependent mechanisms. In this review, we discuss remodelling of the cardiac collagen matrix as a function of age, whilst highlighting potential novel mediators of age-dependent fibrotic pathways. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Construction of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived oriented bone matrix microstructure by using in vitro engineered anisotropic culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozasa, Ryosuke; Matsugaki, Aira; Isobe, Yoshihiro; Saku, Taro; Yun, Hui-Suk; Nakano, Takayoshi

    2018-02-01

    Bone tissue has anisotropic microstructure based on collagen/biological apatite orientation, which plays essential roles in the mechanical and biological functions of bone. However, obtaining an appropriate anisotropic microstructure during the bone regeneration process remains a great challenging. A powerful strategy for the control of both differentiation and structural development of newly-formed bone is required in bone tissue engineering, in order to realize functional bone tissue regeneration. In this study, we developed a novel anisotropic culture model by combining human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and artificially-controlled oriented collagen scaffold. The oriented collagen scaffold allowed hiPSCs-derived osteoblast alignment and further construction of anisotropic bone matrix which mimics the bone tissue microstructure. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing the construction of bone mimetic anisotropic bone matrix microstructure from hiPSCs. Moreover, we demonstrated for the first time that the hiPSCs-derived osteoblasts possess a high level of intact functionality to regulate cell alignment. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 360-369, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Age-related collagen turnover of the interstitial matrix and basement membrane: Implications of age- and sex-dependent remodeling of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehlet, Stephanie N; Willumsen, Nicholas; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Dietzel, Roswitha; Brix, Susanne; Henriksen, Kim; Karsdal, Morten A

    2018-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a vital role in maintaining normal tissue function. Collagens are major components of the ECM and there is a tight equilibrium between degradation and formation of these proteins ensuring tissue health and homeostasis. As a consequence of tissue turnover, small collagen fragments are released into the circulation, which act as important biomarkers in the study of certain tissue-related remodeling factors in health and disease. The aim of this study was to establish an age-related collagen turnover profile of the main collagens of the interstitial matrix (type I and III collagen) and basement membrane (type IV collagen) in healthy men and women. By using well-characterized competitive ELISA-assays, we assessed specific fragments of degraded (C1M, C3M, C4M) and formed (PINP, Pro-C3, P4NP7S) type I, III and IV collagen in serum from 617 healthy men and women ranging in ages from 22 to 86. Subjects were divided into 5-year age groups according to their sex and age. Groups were compared using Kruskal-Wallis adjusted for Dunn's multiple comparisons test and Mann-Whitney t-test. Age-specific changes in collagen turnover was most profound for type I collagen. PINP levels decreased in men with advancing age, whereas in women, the level decreased in early adulthood followed by an increase around the age of menopause (age 40-60). Sex-specific changes in type I, III and IV collagen turnover was present at the age around menopause (age 40-60) with women having an increased turnover. In summary, collagen turnover is affected by age and sex with the interstitial matrix and the basement membrane being differently regulated. The observed changes needs to be accounted for when measuring ECM related biomarkers in clinical studies.

  12. In vivo bone regeneration with injectable chitosan/hydroxyapatite/collagen composites and mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi; Chen, Yan; Feng, Qing-Ling; Zhao, Wei; Yu, Bo; Tian, Jing; Li, Song-Jian; Lin, Bo-Miao

    2011-09-01

    For reconstruction of irregular bone defects, injectable biomaterials are more appropriate than the preformed biomaterials. We herein develop a biomimetic in situ-forming composite consisting of chitosan (CS) and mineralized collagen fibrils (nHAC), which has a complex hierarchical structure similar to natural bone. The CS/nHAC composites with or without mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are injected into cancellous bone defects at the distal end of rabbit femurs. Defects are assessed by radiographic, histological diagnosis and Raman microscopy until 12 weeks. The results show that MSCs improve the biocompatibility of CS/nHAC composites and enhance new bone formation in vivo at 12 weeks. It can be concluded that the injectable CS/nHAC composites combined with MSCs may be a novel method for reconstruction of irregular bone defects.

  13. Evaluating adhesion reduction efficacy of type I/III collagen membrane and collagen-GAG resorbable matrix in primary flexor tendon repair in a chicken model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, John B; Corazzini, Rubina L; Butler, Timothy J; Garlick, David S; Rinker, Brian D

    2015-09-01

    Reduction of peritendinous adhesions after injury and repair has been the subject of extensive prior investigation. The application of a circumferential barrier at the repair site may limit the quantity of peritendinous adhesions while preserving the tendon's innate ability to heal. The authors compare the effectiveness of a type I/III collagen membrane and a collagen-glycosaminoglycan (GAG) resorbable matrix in reducing tendon adhesions in an experimental chicken model of a "zone II" tendon laceration and repair. In Leghorn chickens, flexor tendons were sharply divided using a scalpel and underwent repair in a standard fashion (54 total repairs). The sites were treated with a type I/III collagen membrane, collagen-GAG resorbable matrix, or saline in a randomized fashion. After 3 weeks, qualitative and semiquantitative histological analysis was performed to evaluate the "extent of peritendinous adhesions" and "nature of tendon healing." The data was evaluated with chi-square analysis and unpaired Student's t test. For both collagen materials, there was a statistically significant improvement in the degree of both extent of peritendinous adhesions and nature of tendon healing relative to the control group. There was no significant difference seen between the two materials. There was one tendon rupture observed in each treatment group. Surgical handling characteristics were subjectively favored for type I/III collagen membrane over the collagen-GAG resorbable matrix. The ideal method of reducing clinically significant tendon adhesions after injury remains elusive. Both materials in this study demonstrate promise in reducing tendon adhesions after flexor tendon repair without impeding tendon healing in this model.

  14. Design and characterization of 3D hybrid collagen matrixes as a dermal substitute in skin tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanathan, Giriprasath; Singaravelu, Sivakumar [Bioproducts Lab, CSIR-Central Leather Research Institute, Chennai 600020, Tamilnadu (India); Muthukumar, Thangavelu [Department of Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonbuk National University, 79 Gobong-ro, Iksan-city, Jeollabuk-Do 570-752 (Korea, Republic of); Thyagarajan, Sitalakshmi [Bioproducts Lab, CSIR-Central Leather Research Institute, Chennai 600020, Tamilnadu (India); Perumal, Paramasivan Thirumalai [Organic Chemistry Division, CSIR-Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai, 600020, Tamilnadu (India); Sivagnanam, Uma Tiruchirapalli, E-mail: suma67@gmail.com [Bioproducts Lab, CSIR-Central Leather Research Institute, Chennai 600020, Tamilnadu (India)

    2017-03-01

    The highly interconnected porous dressing material was fabricated with the utilization of novel collagen (COL-SPG) for the efficient healing of the wound. Herein, we report the fabrication of 3D collagen impregnated with bioactive extract (COL-SPG-CPE) to get rid of infection at the wound site. The resultant 3D collagen matrix was characterized physiochemically using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mechanical property. The dressing substrate possesses the high swelling ability, increase in the porosity, in vitro enzymatic degradability and antibacterial property. The in vitro biocompatibility and fluorescence activity of the collagen scaffold against both NIH 3T3 fibroblast and Human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cell lines assisted in excellent cell adhesion and proliferation over the collagen matrix. Furthermore, the in vivo evaluation of the COL-SPG-CPE 3D sponge exhibited with enhanced collagen synthesis and aids in faster reepithelialization. However, the rate of wound healing was influenced by the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF-β) growth factors promotes the collagen synthesis, thereby increases the healing efficiency. Based on the results, COL-SPG-CPE has a potential ability in the remodeling of the wound with the 3D collagen as wound dressing material. - Highlights: • Fabrication of highly interconnected 3D collagen scaffold as a wound construct • The 3D collagen matrix mimics the function of the extra cellular matrix. • Biocompatibility was assessed with fibroblast and keratinocytes by MTT assay. • Bioactive extract aides good mechanical properties and antimicrobial activity. • In vivo evaluation exhibited efficient wound construct for rapid wound healing.

  15. Design and characterization of 3D hybrid collagen matrixes as a dermal substitute in skin tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, Giriprasath; Singaravelu, Sivakumar; Muthukumar, Thangavelu; Thyagarajan, Sitalakshmi; Perumal, Paramasivan Thirumalai; Sivagnanam, Uma Tiruchirapalli

    2017-01-01

    The highly interconnected porous dressing material was fabricated with the utilization of novel collagen (COL-SPG) for the efficient healing of the wound. Herein, we report the fabrication of 3D collagen impregnated with bioactive extract (COL-SPG-CPE) to get rid of infection at the wound site. The resultant 3D collagen matrix was characterized physiochemically using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mechanical property. The dressing substrate possesses the high swelling ability, increase in the porosity, in vitro enzymatic degradability and antibacterial property. The in vitro biocompatibility and fluorescence activity of the collagen scaffold against both NIH 3T3 fibroblast and Human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cell lines assisted in excellent cell adhesion and proliferation over the collagen matrix. Furthermore, the in vivo evaluation of the COL-SPG-CPE 3D sponge exhibited with enhanced collagen synthesis and aids in faster reepithelialization. However, the rate of wound healing was influenced by the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF-β) growth factors promotes the collagen synthesis, thereby increases the healing efficiency. Based on the results, COL-SPG-CPE has a potential ability in the remodeling of the wound with the 3D collagen as wound dressing material. - Highlights: • Fabrication of highly interconnected 3D collagen scaffold as a wound construct • The 3D collagen matrix mimics the function of the extra cellular matrix. • Biocompatibility was assessed with fibroblast and keratinocytes by MTT assay. • Bioactive extract aides good mechanical properties and antimicrobial activity. • In vivo evaluation exhibited efficient wound construct for rapid wound healing.

  16. Type XII and XIV collagens mediate interactions between banded collagen fibers in vitro and may modulate extracellular matrix deformability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, T; McDonough, A M; Bruns, R R; Burgeson, R E

    1994-11-11

    Type XII and XIV collagens are very large molecules containing three extended globular domains derived from the amino terminus of each alpha chain and an interrupted triple helix. Both collagens are genetically and immunologically unique and have distinct distributions in many tissues. These collagens localize near the surface of banded collagen fibrils. The function of the molecules is unknown. We have prepared a mixture of native type XII and XIV collagens that is free of contaminating proteins by electrophoretic criteria. In addition, we have purified the collagenase-resistant globular domains of type XII or XIV collagens (XII-NC-3 or XIV-NC-3). In this study, we have investigated the effect of intact type XII and XIV and XII-NC-3 or XIV-NC-3 on the interactions between fibroblasts and type I collagen fibrils. We find that both type XII and XIV collagens promote collagen gel contraction mediated by fibroblasts, even in the absence of serum. The activity is present in the NC-3 domains. The effect is dose-dependent and is inhibited by denaturation. The effect of type XII NC-3 is inhibited by the addition of anti-XII antiserum. To elucidate the mechanism underlying this phenomenon, we examined the effect of XII-NC-3 or XIV-NC-3 on deformability of collagen gels by centrifugal force. XII-NC-3 or XIV-NC-3 markedly promotes gel compression after centrifugation. The effect is also inhibited by denaturation, and the activity of type XII-NC3 is inhibited by the addition of anti-XII antiserum. The results indicate that the effect of XII-NC-3 or XIV-NC-3 on collagen gel contraction by fibroblasts is not due to activation of cellular events but rather results from the increase in mobility of hydrated collagen fibrils within the gel. These studies suggest that collagen types XII and XIV may modulate the biomechanical properties of tissues.

  17. Determination of the relationship between collagen cross-links and the bone-tissue stiffness in the porcine mandibular condyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, N.M.B.K.; Mulder, L.; Bank, R.A.; Grünheid, T.; Toonder, J.M.J. den; Zentner, A.; Langenbach, G.E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Although bone-tissue stiffness is closely related to the degree to which bone has been mineralized, other determinants are yet to be identified. We, therefore, examined the extent to which the mineralization degree, collagen, and its cross-links are related to bone-tissue stiffness. A total of 50

  18. Mutations in the collagen XII gene define a new form of extracellular matrix-related myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Debbie; Farsani, Golara Torabi; Laval, Steven; Collins, James; Sarkozy, Anna; Martoni, Elena; Shah, Ashoke; Zou, Yaqun; Koch, Manuel; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Roberts, Mark; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Bethlem myopathy (BM) [MIM 158810] is a slowly progressive muscle disease characterized by contractures and proximal weakness, which can be caused by mutations in one of the collagen VI genes (COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3). However, there may be additional causal genes to identify as in ∼50% of BM cases no mutations in the COL6 genes are identified. In a cohort of -24 patients with a BM-like phenotype, we first sequenced 12 candidate genes based on their function, including genes for known binding partners of collagen VI, and those enzymes involved in its correct post-translational modification, assembly and secretion. Proceeding to whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified mutations in the COL12A1 gene, a member of the FACIT collagens (fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices) in five individuals from two families. Both families showed dominant inheritance with a clinical phenotype resembling classical BM. Family 1 had a single-base substitution that led to the replacement of one glycine residue in the triple-helical domain, breaking the Gly-X-Y repeating pattern, and Family 2 had a missense mutation, which created a mutant protein with an unpaired cysteine residue. Abnormality at the protein level was confirmed in both families by the intracellular retention of collagen XII in patient dermal fibroblasts. The mutation in Family 2 leads to the up-regulation of genes associated with the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and swollen, dysmorphic rough-ER. We conclude that the spectrum of causative genes in extracellular matrix (ECM)-related myopathies be extended to include COL12A1.

  19. The potential of chitosan combined with chicken shank collagen as scaffold on bone defect regeneration process in Rattus norvegicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitria Rahmitasari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the field of dentistry, alveolar bone damage can be caused by periodontal disease, traumatic injury due to tooth extraction, cyst enucleation, and tumor surgery. One of the ways to regenerate the bone defect is using graft scaffold. Thus, combination of chitosan and collagen can stimulate osteogenesis. Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the potential of chitosan combined with chicken shank collagen on bone defect regeneration process. Method: Twelve Rattus norvegicus were prepared as animal models in this research. A bone defect was intentionally created at both of the right and left femoral bones of the models. Next, 24 samples were divided into four groups, namely Group 1 using chitosan – collagen scaffold (50:50, Group 2 using chitosan collagen-scaffold (80:20, Group 3 using chitosan scaffold only, and Control Group using 3% CMC-Na. On 14th day, those animals were sacrificed, and histopathological anatomy examination was conducted to observe osteoclast cells. In addition, immunohistochemistry examination was also performed to observe RANKL expressions. Result: There was a significant difference in RANKL expressions among the groups, except between Group 3 using chitosan scaffold only and control group (p value > 0.05. The highest expression of RANKL was found in Group 1 with chitosan – collagen scaffold (50:50, followed by Group 2 with chitosan-collagen scaffold (80:20. Moreover, there was also a significant difference in osteoclast generation, except between Group 1 using chitosan – collagen scaffold (50:50 and Group 2 using chitosan-collagen scaffold (80:20, p value 0.05. Less osteoclast was found in the groups using chitosan – collagen scaffold (Group 1 and Group 2. Conclusion: Combination of chitosan and chicken shank collagen scaffold can improve regeneration process of bone defect in Rattus novergicus animals through increasing of RANKL expressions, and decreasing of osteoclast.

  20. Heterotopic new bone formation causes resorption of the inductive bone matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, O.S.; Persson, P.E.; Ekelund, A.

    1990-01-01

    The bone matrix of growing rats was labeled by multiple injections of 3H-proline, and demineralized bone matrix (DBM) was prepared. The DBM was allotransplanted heterotopically into growing rats. New bone formation was induced in and around the implants. The new bone formation was accompanied by a decrease in the content of 3H; 20 and 30 days after implantation, 72% and 46%, respectively, of the activity remained in the implants. Daily injections of indomethacin (2 mg/kg) inhibited calcium uptake by about 20% at 20 and 30 days and inhibited the release of 3H from the DBM to a similar degree. Heterotopic bone induction by DBM is accompanied by matrix resorption, and inhibition of the new bone formation decreases the resorption of DBM

  1. Combined oral administration of bovine collagen peptides with calcium citrate inhibits bone loss in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, JunLi; Wang, YiHu; Song, ShuJun; Wang, XiJie; Qin, YaYa; Si, ShaoYan; Guo, YanChuan

    2015-01-01

    Collagen peptides (CPs) and calcium citrate are commonly used as bone health supplements for treating osteoporosis. However, it remains unknown whether the combination of oral bovine CPs with calcium citrate is more effective than administration of either agent alone. Forty 12-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups (n = 8) for once-daily intragastric administration of different treatments for 3 months at 3 months after ovariectomy (OVX) as follows: sham + vehicle; OVX + vehicle; OVX + 750 mg/kg CP; OVX + CP-calcium citrate (75 mg/kg); OVX + calcium citrate (75 mg/kg). After euthanasia, the femurs were removed and analyzed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and micro-computed tomography, and serum samples were analyzed for bone metabolic markers. OVX rats supplemented with CPs or CP-calcium citrate showed osteoprotective effects, with reductions in the OVX-induced decreases in their femoral bone mineral density. Moreover, CP-calcium citrate prevented trabecular bone loss, improved the microarchitecture of the distal femur, and significantly inhibited bone loss with increased bone volume, connectivity density, and trabecular number compared with OVX control rats. CP or CP-calcium citrate administration significantly increased serum procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide levels and reduced serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide of type I collagen levels. Our data indicate that combined oral administration of bovine CPs with calcium citrate inhibits bone loss in OVX rats. The present findings suggest that combined oral administration of bovine CPs with calcium citrate is a promising alternative for reducing bone loss in osteopenic postmenopausal women.

  2. Combined oral administration of bovine collagen peptides with calcium citrate inhibits bone loss in ovariectomized rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JunLi Liu

    Full Text Available Collagen peptides (CPs and calcium citrate are commonly used as bone health supplements for treating osteoporosis. However, it remains unknown whether the combination of oral bovine CPs with calcium citrate is more effective than administration of either agent alone.Forty 12-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups (n = 8 for once-daily intragastric administration of different treatments for 3 months at 3 months after ovariectomy (OVX as follows: sham + vehicle; OVX + vehicle; OVX + 750 mg/kg CP; OVX + CP-calcium citrate (75 mg/kg; OVX + calcium citrate (75 mg/kg. After euthanasia, the femurs were removed and analyzed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and micro-computed tomography, and serum samples were analyzed for bone metabolic markers.OVX rats supplemented with CPs or CP-calcium citrate showed osteoprotective effects, with reductions in the OVX-induced decreases in their femoral bone mineral density. Moreover, CP-calcium citrate prevented trabecular bone loss, improved the microarchitecture of the distal femur, and significantly inhibited bone loss with increased bone volume, connectivity density, and trabecular number compared with OVX control rats. CP or CP-calcium citrate administration significantly increased serum procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide levels and reduced serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide of type I collagen levels.Our data indicate that combined oral administration of bovine CPs with calcium citrate inhibits bone loss in OVX rats. The present findings suggest that combined oral administration of bovine CPs with calcium citrate is a promising alternative for reducing bone loss in osteopenic postmenopausal women.

  3. In vitro cartilage tissue engineering using cancellous bone matrix gelatin as a biodegradable scaffold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Bo; Yin Zhanhai; Cao Junling; Shi Zhongli; Zhang Zengtie; Liu Fuqiang; Song Hongxing; Caterson, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we constructed tissue-engineered cartilage using allogeneic cancellous bone matrix gelatin (BMG) as a scaffold. Allogeneic BMG was prepared by sequential defatting, demineralization and denaturation. Isolated rabbit chondrocytes were seeded onto allogeneic cancellous BMG, and cell-BMG constructs were harvested after 1, 3 and 6 weeks for evaluation by hematoxylin and eosin staining for overall morphology, toluidine blue for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteoglycans, immunohistochemical staining for collagen type II and a transmission electron microscope for examining cellular microstructure on BMG. The prepared BMG was highly porous with mechanical strength adjustable by duration of demineralization and was easily trimmed for tissue repair. Cancellous BMG showed favorable porosity for cell habitation and metabolism material exchange with larger pore sizes (100-500 μm) than in cortical BMG (5-15 μm), allowing cell penetration. Cancellous BMG also showed good biocompatibility, which supported chondrocyte proliferation and sustained their differentiated phenotype in culture for up to 6 weeks. Rich and evenly distributed cartilage ECM proteoglycans and collagen type II were observed around chondrocytes on the surface and inside the pores throughout the cancellous BMG. Considering the large supply of banked bone allografts and relatively convenient preparation, our study suggests that allogeneic cancellous BMG is a promising scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

  4. In vitro cartilage tissue engineering using cancellous bone matrix gelatin as a biodegradable scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Bo; Yin Zhanhai; Cao Junling; Shi Zhongli; Zhang Zengtie; Liu Fuqiang [College of Medicine, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Yanta West Road, No 76, Yanta District, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province 710061 (China); Song Hongxing [Department of Orthopedics, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Caterson, Bruce, E-mail: caojl@mail.xjtu.edu.c [Connective Tissue Biology Laboratories, Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Biomedical Building, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, CF10 3US (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we constructed tissue-engineered cartilage using allogeneic cancellous bone matrix gelatin (BMG) as a scaffold. Allogeneic BMG was prepared by sequential defatting, demineralization and denaturation. Isolated rabbit chondrocytes were seeded onto allogeneic cancellous BMG, and cell-BMG constructs were harvested after 1, 3 and 6 weeks for evaluation by hematoxylin and eosin staining for overall morphology, toluidine blue for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteoglycans, immunohistochemical staining for collagen type II and a transmission electron microscope for examining cellular microstructure on BMG. The prepared BMG was highly porous with mechanical strength adjustable by duration of demineralization and was easily trimmed for tissue repair. Cancellous BMG showed favorable porosity for cell habitation and metabolism material exchange with larger pore sizes (100-500 {mu}m) than in cortical BMG (5-15 {mu}m), allowing cell penetration. Cancellous BMG also showed good biocompatibility, which supported chondrocyte proliferation and sustained their differentiated phenotype in culture for up to 6 weeks. Rich and evenly distributed cartilage ECM proteoglycans and collagen type II were observed around chondrocytes on the surface and inside the pores throughout the cancellous BMG. Considering the large supply of banked bone allografts and relatively convenient preparation, our study suggests that allogeneic cancellous BMG is a promising scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

  5. Coherent scattering and matrix correction in bone-lead measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    The technique of K-shell x-ray fluorescence of lead in bone has been used in many studies of the health effects of lead. This paper addresses one aspect of the technique, namely the coherent conversion factor (CCF) which converts between the matrix of the calibration standards and those of human bone. The CCF is conventionally considered a constant but is a function of scattering angle, energy and the elemental composition of the matrices. The aims of this study were to quantify the effect on the CCF of several assumptions which may not have been tested adequately and to compare the CCFs for plaster of Paris (the present matrix of calibration standards) and a synthetic apatite matrix. The CCF was calculated, using relativistic form factors, for published compositions of bone, both assumed and assessed compositions of plaster, and the synthetic apatite. The main findings of the study were, first, that impurities in plaster, lead in the plaster or bone matrices, coherent scatter from non-bone tissues and the individual subject's measurement geometry are all minor or negligible effects; and, second, that the synthetic apatite matrix is more representative of bone mineral than is plaster of Paris. (author)

  6. The Structure and Function of Non-Collagenous Bone Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Magnus

    1997-01-01

    The long-term goal for this program is to determine the structural and functional relationships of bone proteins and proteins that interact with bone. This information will used to design useful pharmacological compounds that will have a beneficial effect in osteoporotic patients and in the osteoporotic-like effects experienced on long duration space missions. The first phase of this program, funded under a cooperative research agreement with NASA through the Texas Medical Center, aimed to develop powerful recombinant expression systems and purification methods for production of large amounts of target proteins. Proteins expressed in sufficient'amount and purity would be characterized by a variety of structural methods, and made available for crystallization studies. In order to increase the likelihood of crystallization and subsequent high resolution solution of structures, we undertook to develop expression of normal and mutant forms of proteins by bacterial and mammalian cells. In addition to the main goals of this program, we would also be able to provide reagents for other related studies, including development of anti-fibrotic and anti-metastatic therapeutics.

  7. Uncovering nanoscale electromechanical heterogeneity in the subfibrillar structure of collagen fibrils responsible for the piezoelectricity of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Yu, Min-Feng

    2009-07-28

    Understanding piezoelectricity, the linear electromechanical transduction, in bone and tendon and its potential role in mechanoelectric transduction leading to their growth and remodeling remains a challenging subject. With high-resolution piezoresponse force microscopy, we probed piezoelectric behavior in relevant biological samples at different scale levels: from the subfibrillar structures of single isolated collagen fibrils to bone. We revealed that, beyond the general understanding of collagen fibril being a piezoelectric material, there existed an intrinsic piezoelectric heterogeneity within a collagen fibril coinciding with the periodic variation of its gap and overlap regions. This piezoelectric heterogeneity persisted even for the collagen fibrils embedded in bone, bringing about new implications for its possible roles in structural formation and remodeling of bone.

  8. Chemical structure, biosynthesis and synthesis of free and glycosylated pyridinolines formed by cross-link of bone and synovium collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasia, Luigi; Rota, Paola; Anastasia, Mario; Allevi, Pietro

    2013-09-21

    This review focuses on the chemical structure, biosynthesis and synthesis of free and glycosylated pyridinolines (Pyds), fluorescent collagen cross-links, with a pyridinium salt structure. Pyds derive from the degradation of bone collagen and have attracted attention for their use as biochemical markers of bone resorption and to assess fracture risk prediction in persons suffering from osteoporosis, bone cancer and other bone or collagen diseases. We consider and critically discuss all reported syntheses of free and glycosylated Pyds evidencing an unrevised chemistry, original and of general utility, analysis of which allows us to also support a previously suggested non-enzymatic formation of Pyds in collagen better rationalizing and justifying the chemical events.

  9. Coating of Biomaterial Scaffolds with the Collagen-Mimetic Peptide GFOGER for Bone Defect Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Wojtowicz, Abigail M.; Shekaran, Asha; Oest, Megan E.; Dupont, Kenneth M.; Templeman, Kellie L.; Hutmacher, Dietmar W.; Guldberg, Robert E.; García, Andrés J.

    2009-01-01

    Healing large bone defects and non-unions remains a significant clinical problem. Current treatments, consisting of auto- and allografts, are limited by donor supply and morbidity, insufficient bioactivity and risk of infection. Biotherapeutics, including cells, genes and proteins, represent promising alternative therapies, but these strategies are limited by technical roadblocks to biotherapeutic delivery, cell sourcing, high cost, and regulatory hurdles. In the present study, the collagen-m...

  10. Autologous bone graft versus demineralized bone matrix in internal fixation of ununited long bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieske, Oliver; Wittmann, Alexandra; Zaspel, Johannes; Löffler, Thomas; Rubenbauer, Bianka; Trentzsch, Heiko; Piltz, Stefan

    2009-12-15

    Non-unions are severe complications in orthopaedic trauma care and occur in 10% of all fractures. The golden standard for the treatment of ununited fractures includes open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) as well as augmentation with autologous-bone-grafting. However, there is morbidity associated with the bone-graft donor site and some patients offer limited quantity or quality of autologous-bone graft material. Since allogene bone-grafts are introduced on the market, this comparative study aims to evaluate healing characteristics of ununited bones treated with ORIF combined with either iliac-crest-autologous-bone-grafting (ICABG) or demineralized-bone-matrix (DBM). From 2000 to 2006 out of sixty-two consecutive patients with non-unions presenting at our Level I Trauma Center, twenty patients had ununited diaphyseal fractures of long bones and were treated by ORIF combined either by ICABG- (n = 10) or DBM-augmentation (n = 10). At the time of index-operation, patients of the DBM-group had a higher level of comorbidity (ASA-value: p = 0.014). Mean duration of follow-up was 56.6 months (ICABG-group) and 41.2 months (DBM-group). All patients were clinically and radiographically assessed and adverse effects related to bone grafting were documented. The results showed that two non-unions augmented with ICABG failed osseous healing (20%) whereas all non-unions grafted by DBM showed successful consolidation during the first year after the index operation (p = 0.146). No early complications were documented in both groups but two patients of the ICABG-group suffered long-term problems at the donor site (20%) (p = 0.146). Pain intensity were comparable in both groups (p = 0.326). However, patients treated with DBM were more satisfied with the surgical procedure (p = 0.031). With the use of DBM, the costs for augmentation of the non-union-site are more expensive compared to ICABG (calculated difference: 160 euro/case). Nevertheless, this study demonstrated that the

  11. Low‑dose halofuginone inhibits the synthesis of type I collagen without influencing type II collagen in the extracellular matrix of chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zeng; Fei, Hao; Wang, Zhen; Zhu, Tianyi

    2017-09-01

    Full‑thickness and large area defects of articular cartilage are unable to completely repair themselves and require surgical intervention, including microfracture, autologous or allogeneic osteochondral grafts, and autologous chondrocyte implantation. A large proportion of regenerative cartilage exists as fibrocartilage, which is unable to withstand impacts in the same way as native hyaline cartilage, owing to excess synthesis of type I collagen in the matrix. The present study demonstrated that low‑dose halofuginone (HF), a plant alkaloid isolated from Dichroa febrifuga, may inhibit the synthesis of type I collagen without influencing type II collagen in the extracellular matrix of chondrocytes. In addition, HF was revealed to inhibit the phosphorylation of mothers against decapentaplegic homolog (Smad)2/3 and promoted Smad7 expression, as well as decrease the synthesis of type I collagen synthesis. Results from the present study indicated that HF treatment suppressed the synthesis of type I collagen by inhibiting the transforming growth factor‑β signaling pathway in chondrocytes. These results may provide an alternative solution to the problems associated with fibrocartilage, and convert fibrocartilage into hyaline cartilage at the mid‑early stages of cartilage regeneration. HF may additionally be used to improve monolayer expansion or 3D cultures of seed cells for the tissue engineering of cartilage.

  12. Bone conditioned media (BCM) improves osteoblast adhesion and differentiation on collagen barrier membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka-Kobayashi, Masako; Caballé-Serrano, Jordi; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Gruber, Reinhard; Buser, Daniel; Miron, Richard J

    2016-07-04

    The use of autogenous bone chips during guided bone regeneration procedures has remained the gold standard for bone grafting due to its excellent combination of osteoconduction, osteoinduction and osteogenesis. Recent protocols established by our group have characterized specific growth factors and cytokines released from autogenous bone that have the potential to be harvested and isolated into bone conditioned media (BCM). Due to the advantageous osteo-promotive properties of BCM, the aims of the present study was to pre-coat collagen barrier membranes with BCM and investigate its effect on osteoblast adhesion, proliferation and differentiation for possible future clinical use. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was first used to qualitative assess BCM protein accumulation on the surface of collagen membranes. Thereafter, undifferentiated mouse ST2 stromal bone marrow cells were seeded onto BioGide porcine derived collagen barrier membranes (control) or barrier membranes pre-coated with BCM (test group). Control and BCM samples were compared for cell adhesion at 8 h, cell proliferation at 1, 3 and 5 days and real-time PCR at 5 days for osteoblast differentiation markers including Runx2, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OCN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP). Mineralization was further assessed with alizarin red staining at 14 days post seeding. SEM images demonstrated evidence of accumulated proteins found on the surface of collagen membranes following coating with BCM. Analysis of total cell numbers revealed that the additional pre-coating with BCM markedly increased cell attachment over 4 fold when compared to cells seeded on barrier membranes alone. No significant difference could be observed for cell proliferation at all time points. BCM significantly increased mRNA levels of osteoblast differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and BSP at 5 days post seeding. Furthermore, barrier membranes pre-coated with BCM demonstrated a 5-fold increase in alizarin

  13. Matrix metalloproteinase-9-mediated type III collagen degradation as a novel serological biochemical marker for liver fibrogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veidal, Sanne S; Vassiliadis, Efstathios; Barascuk, Natasha

    2010-01-01

    During fibrogenesis in the liver, in which excessive remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) occurs, both the quantity of type III collagen (CO3) and levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-9, increase significantly. MMPs play major roles in ECM remodelling, via...

  14. Normal Collagen and Bone Production by Gene-targeted Human Osteogenesis Imperfecta iPSCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyle, David R; Khan, Iram F; Ren, Gaoying; Wang, Pei-Rong; Kho, Jordan; Schwarze, Ulrike; Russell, David W

    2012-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is caused by dominant mutations in the type I collagen genes. In principle, the skeletal abnormalities of OI could be treated by transplantation of patient-specific, bone-forming cells that no longer express the mutant gene. Here, we develop this approach by isolating mesenchymal cells from OI patients, inactivating their mutant collagen genes by adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene targeting, and deriving induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that were expanded and differentiated into mesenchymal stem cells (iMSCs). Gene-targeted iMSCs produced normal collagen and formed bone in vivo, but were less senescent and proliferated more than bone-derived MSCs. To generate iPSCs that would be more appropriate for clinical use, the reprogramming and selectable marker transgenes were removed by Cre recombinase. These results demonstrate that the combination of gene targeting and iPSC derivation can be used to produce potentially therapeutic cells from patients with genetic disease. PMID:22031238

  15. Bone induction by composites of bioresorbable carriers and demineralized bone in rats: a comparative study of fibrin-collagen paste, fibrin sealant, and polyorthoester with gentamicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Solheim, E; Bang, G

    1992-01-01

    fibrin-collagen paste and fibrin sealant inhibited bone induction and produced a chronic inflammation; part of the fibrin-collagen paste was still present at 4 weeks. Polyorthoester with gentamicin was almost completely absorbed, induced minimal tissue reaction, and did not inhibit osteoinduction....

  16. Collagen type I from bovine bone. Effect of animal age, bone anatomy and drying methodology on extraction yield, self-assembly, thermal behaviour and electrokinetic potential

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraro, Vincenza; Gaillard-Martinie, Brigitte; Sayd, Thierry; Chambon, Christophe; Anton, Marc; Sante-Lhoutellier, Veronique

    2017-01-01

    Natural collagen is easily available from animal tissues such as bones. Main limitations reported in the use of natural collagen are heterogeneity and loss of integrity during recovery. However, its natural complexity, functionality and bioactivity still remain to be achieved through synthetic and recombinant ways. Variability of physicochemical prope...

  17. Hydroxychloroquine induces inhibition of collagen type II and oligomeric matrix protein COMP expression in chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hydroxychloroquine on the level of collagen type II and oligomeric matrix protein COMP expression in chondrocytes of knee osteoarthritis. The rate of growth in cartilage cells was analyzed using MTT assay whereas the Col-2 and COMP expression levels were detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses. For the determination of MMP-13 expression, ELISA test was used. The results revealed no significant change in the rate of cartilage cell proliferation in hydroxychloroquine-treated compared to untreated cells. Hydroxychloro-quine treatment exhibited concentration- and time-dependent effect on the inhibition of collagen type II and COMP expression in chondrocytes. However, its treatment caused a significant enhancement in the expression levels of MMP-13 compared to the untreated cells. Therefore, hydroxychloro-quine promotes expression of MMP-13 and reduces collagen type II and COMP expression levels in chondrocytes without any significant change in the growth of cells.

  18. Physiological regulation of extracellular matrix collagen and elastin in the arterial wall of rats by noradrenergic tone and angiotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dab, Houcine; Kacem, Kamel; Hachani, Rafik; Dhaouadi, Nadra; Hodroj, Wassim; Sakly, Mohsen; Randon, Jacques; Bricca, Giampiero

    2012-03-01

    The interactions between the effects of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and angiotensin II (ANG II) on vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis were determined in rats. The mRNA and protein content of collagen I, collagen III and elastin in the abdominal aorta (AA) and femoral artery (FA) was investigated in Wistar-Kyoto rats treated for 5 weeks with guanethidine, a sympathoplegic, losartan, an ANG II AT1 receptor (AT1R) blocker, or both. The effects of noradrenaline (NE) and ANG II on collagen III and elastin mRNA, and the receptor involved, were tested in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Guanethidine increased collagen types I and III and decreased elastin, while losartan had an opposite effect, although without effect on collagen III. The combination of treatments abrogated changes induced by simple treatment with collagen I and elastin, but increased collagen III mRNA in AA and not in FA. NE stimulated collagen III mRNA via β receptors and elastin via α1 and α2 receptors. ANG II stimulated collagen III but inhibited elastin mRNA via AT1R. Overall, SNS and ANG II exert opposite and antagonistic effects on major components of ECM in the vascular wall. This may be of relevance for the choice of a therapeutic strategy in vascular diseases.

  19. Analysis of Enzymatic Activity of Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP) by Collagen Zymography in Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Vijay; Samuels, Yardena

    2018-01-01

    Protein zymography is the most commonly used technique to study the enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors. MMPs are proteolytic enzymes that promote extracellular matrix degradation. MMPs are frequently mutated in malignant melanomas as well as other cancers and are linked to increasing incidence of tumor metastasis. Substrate zymography characterizes MMP activity by their ability to degrade preferred substrates. Here we describe the collagen zymography technique to measure the active or latent form of MMPs using MMP-8 as an example, which is a frequently mutated MMP family member in malignant melanomas. The same technique can be used with the modification of substrate to detect metalloproteinase activity of other MMPs. Both wild-type and mutated forms of MMPs can be analyzed using a single gel using this method.

  20. Exercise and Regulation of Bone and Collagen Tissue Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaer, Michael; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Heinemeier, Katja; Magnusson, S Peter

    2015-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system and its connective tissue include the intramuscular connective tissue, the myotendinous junction, the tendon, the joints with their cartilage and ligaments, and the bone; they all together play a crucial role in maintaining the architecture of the skeletal muscle, ensuring force transmission, storing energy, protecting joint surface and stability, and ensuring the transfer of muscular forces into resulting limb movement. The musculoskeletal connective tissue structure is relatively stable, but mechanical loading and subsequent mechanotransduction and molecular anabolic signaling can result in some adaptation of the connective tissue, its size, its strength, and its mechanical properties, whereby it can improve its capacity by 5-20% with regular physical activity. For several of the mechanically loaded connective tissues, only limited information regarding molecular and cellular signaling pathways and their adaptation to exercise is available. In contrast to tissue responses with exercise, lack of mechanical tissue loading through inactivity or immobilization of the human body will result in a dramatic loss of connective tissue content, structure, and tolerable load within weeks, to a degree (30-40%) that mimics that of contractile skeletal musculature. This illustrates the importance of regular mechanical load in order to preserve the stabilizing role of the connective tissue for the overall function of the musculoskeletal system in both daily activity and exercise. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein deficiency promotes early onset and the chronic development of collagen-induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Carlsen, Stefan; Nandakumar, Kutty

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a homopentameric protein in cartilage. The development of arthritis, like collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), involves cartilage as a target tissue. We have investigated the development of CIA in COMP-deficient mice. METHODS: COMP......-deficient mice in the 129/Sv background were backcrossed for 10 generations against B10.Q mice, which are susceptible to chronic CIA. COMP-deficient and wild-type mice were tested for onset, incidence, and severity of arthritis in both the collagen and collagen antibody-induced arthritis models. Serum anti......-collagen II and anti-COMP antibodies as well as serum COMP levels in arthritic and wild-type mice were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: COMP-deficient mice showed a significant early onset and increase in the severity of CIA in the chronic phase, whereas collagen II-antibody titers were...

  2. Cytocompatibility and biologic characteristics of synthetic scaffold materials of rabbit acellular vascular matrix combining with human-like collagen I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuqian; Wang, Jie; Dong, Fusheng; Song, Peng; Tian, Songbo; Li, Hexiang; Hou, Yali

    2017-10-01

    Scaffold material provides a three-dimensional growing environment for seed cells in the research field of tissue engineering. In the present study, rabbit arterial blood vessel cells were chemically removed with trypsin and Triton X-100 to prepare rabbit acellular vascular matrix scaffold material. Observation by He&Masson staining revealed that no cellular components or nuclei existed in the vascular intima and media after decellularization. Human-like collagen I was combined with acellular vascular matrix by freeze-drying to prepare an acellular vascular matrix-0.25% human-like collagen I scaffold to compensate for the extracellular matrix loss during the decellularization process. We next performed a series of experiments to test the water absorbing quality, biomechanics, pressure resistance, cytotoxicity, and ultra-micro structure of the acellular vascular matrix composite material and natural rabbit artery and found that the acellular vascular matrix-0.25% human-like collagen I material behaved similarly to natural rabbit artery. In conclusion, the acellular vascular matrix-0.25% human-like collagen I composite material provides a new approach and lays the foundation for novel scaffold material research into tissue engineering of blood vessels.

  3. Hyriopsis cumingii Hic52-A novel nacreous layer matrix protein with a collagen-like structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojun; Pu, Jingwen; Zeng, Shimei; Jin, Can; Dong, Shaojian; Li, Jiale

    2017-09-01

    Nacre is a product of a precisely regulated biomineralization process and a major contributor to the luster of pearls. Nacre is composed of calcium carbonate and an organic matrix of proteins that is secreted from mollusc mantle tissue and is exclusively associated with shell formation. In this study, hic52, a novel matrix protein gene from mantle of Hyriopsis cumingii, was cloned and functionally analyzed. The full-length cDNA of hic52 encoded 542 amino acids and contained a signal peptide of 18 amino acids. Excluding the signal peptide, the theoretical molecular mass of the polypeptide was 52.2kDa. The predicted isoelectric point was 10.37, indicating a basic shell protein. The amino acid sequence of hic52 featured high proportion of Gly (28.8%) and Gln (12.4%) residues. The predicted tertiary structure was characterized as having similarities to collagen I, alpha 1 and alpha 2 in the structure. The polypeptide sequence shared no homology with collagen. The hic52 expression pattern by quantitative real-time PCR and in situ hybridization exhibits at the dorsal epithelial cells of the mantle. Expression increased during the stages of pearl sac development. The data showed that hic52 is probably a framework shell protein that mediates and controls the nacreous biomineralization process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Enalapril alters the formation of the collagen matrix in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo de Souza Bomfim

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of the inhibition of the angiotensin-converting enzyme on the collagen matrix (CM of the heart of newborn spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR during embryonic development. METHODS: The study comprised the 2 following groups of SHR (n=5 each: treated group - rats conceived from SHR females treated with enalapril maleate (15 mg. kg-1.day-1 during gestation; and nontreated group - offspring of nontreated females. The newborns were euthanized within the first 24 hours after birth and their hearts were removed and processed for histological study. Three fields per animal were considered for computer-assisted digital analysis and determination of the volume densities (Vv of the nuclei and CM. The images were segmented with the aid of Image Pro Plus® 4.5.029 software (Media Cybernetics. RESULTS: No difference was observed between the treated and nontreated groups in regard to body mass, cardiac mass, and the relation between cardiac and body mass. A significant reduction in the Vv[matrix] and a concomitant increase in the Vv[nuclei] were observed in the treated group as compared with those in the nontreated group. CONCLUSION: The treatment with enalapril of hypertensive rats during pregnancy alters the collagen content and structure of the myocardium of newborns.

  5. Degradability of injectable calcium sulfate/mineralized collagen-based bone repair material and its effect on bone tissue regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zonggang; Kang, Lingzhi; Meng, Qing-Yuan; Liu, Huanye; Wang, Zhaoliang; Guo, Zhongwu; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2014-01-01

    The nHAC/CSH composite is an injectable bone repair material with controllable injectability and self-setting properties prepared by introducing calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) into mineralized collagen (nHAC). When mixed with water, the nHAC/CSH composites can be transformed into mineralized collagen/calcium sulfate dihydrate (nHAC/CSD) composites. The nHAC/CSD composites have good biocompatibility and osteogenic capability. Considering that the degradation behavior of bone repair material is another important factor for its clinical applications, the degradability of nHAC/CSD composites was studied. The results showed that the degradation ratio of the nHAC/CSD composites with lower nHAC content increased with the L/S ratio increase of injectable materials, but the variety of L/S ratio had no significant effect on the degradation ratio of the nHAC/CSD composites with higher nHAC content. Increasing nHAC content in the composites could slow down the degradation of nHAC/CSD composite. Setting accelerator had no significant effect on the degradability of nHAC/CSD composites. In vivo histological analysis suggests that the degradation rate of materials can match the growth rate of new mandibular bone tissues in the implanted site of rabbit. The regulable degradability of materials resulting from the special prescriptions of injectable nHAC/CSH composites will further improve the workability of nHAC/CSD composites. - Highlights: • The nHAC/CSH composite can be as an injectable bone repair material. • The L/S ratio and nHAC content have a significant effect on material degradability. • The degradability of bone materials can be regulated to match tissue repair. • The regulable degradability will further improve the workability of bone materials

  6. Degradability of injectable calcium sulfate/mineralized collagen-based bone repair material and its effect on bone tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zonggang, E-mail: chenzg@sdu.edu.cn [National Glycoengineering Research Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Kang, Lingzhi [National Glycoengineering Research Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Meng, Qing-Yuan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Huanye [Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Wang, Zhaoliang [Jinan Military General Hospital of PLA, Jinan 250031 (China); Guo, Zhongwu, E-mail: zwguo@sdu.edu.cn [National Glycoengineering Research Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Cui, Fu-Zhai, E-mail: cuifz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-12-01

    The nHAC/CSH composite is an injectable bone repair material with controllable injectability and self-setting properties prepared by introducing calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) into mineralized collagen (nHAC). When mixed with water, the nHAC/CSH composites can be transformed into mineralized collagen/calcium sulfate dihydrate (nHAC/CSD) composites. The nHAC/CSD composites have good biocompatibility and osteogenic capability. Considering that the degradation behavior of bone repair material is another important factor for its clinical applications, the degradability of nHAC/CSD composites was studied. The results showed that the degradation ratio of the nHAC/CSD composites with lower nHAC content increased with the L/S ratio increase of injectable materials, but the variety of L/S ratio had no significant effect on the degradation ratio of the nHAC/CSD composites with higher nHAC content. Increasing nHAC content in the composites could slow down the degradation of nHAC/CSD composite. Setting accelerator had no significant effect on the degradability of nHAC/CSD composites. In vivo histological analysis suggests that the degradation rate of materials can match the growth rate of new mandibular bone tissues in the implanted site of rabbit. The regulable degradability of materials resulting from the special prescriptions of injectable nHAC/CSH composites will further improve the workability of nHAC/CSD composites. - Highlights: • The nHAC/CSH composite can be as an injectable bone repair material. • The L/S ratio and nHAC content have a significant effect on material degradability. • The degradability of bone materials can be regulated to match tissue repair. • The regulable degradability will further improve the workability of bone materials.

  7. A Collagen-based Scaffold Delivering Exogenous MicroRNA-29B to Modulate Extracellular Matrix Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Monaghan, Michael; Browne, Shane; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Pandit, Abhay

    2014-01-01

    Directing appropriate extracellular matrix remodeling is a key aim of regenerative medicine strategies. Thus, antifibrotic interfering RNA (RNAi) therapy with exogenous microRNA (miR)-29B was proposed as a method to modulate extracellular matrix remodeling following cutaneous injury. It was hypothesized that delivery of miR-29B from a collagen scaffold will efficiently modulate the extracellular matrix remodeling response and reduce maladaptive remodeling such as aggressive deposition of coll...

  8. Bone induction by composite of bioerodible polyorthoester and demineralized bone matrix in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Solheim, E; Bang, G

    1991-01-01

    A composite of a local, sustained, drug-release system, Alzamer bioerodible polyorthoester, and demineralized bone-matrix (DBM) particles implanted in the abdominal muscle of 89 Wistar rats induced cartilage and bone formation at the same rate as DBM when evaluated histologically and by 85Sr uptake....... The composite implant was technically easier to use than DBM alone....

  9. Bone induction by composite of bioerodible polyorthoester and deminiralized bone matrix in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinholt, E.M.; Solheim, E.; Bang, G.; Sudmann, E.

    1991-01-01

    A composite of a local, sustained, drug-release system, Alzamer bioerodible polyorthoester, and demineralized bone-matrix (DBM) particles implanted in the abdominal muscle of 89 Wistar rats induced cartilage and bone formation at the same rate as DBM when evaluated histologically and by 85 Sr uptake. The composite implant was technically easier to use than DBM alone. (author)

  10. Development of Collagen/Demineralized Bone Powder Scaffolds and Periosteum-Derived Cells for Bone Tissue Engineering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilairat Leeanansaksiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate physical and biological properties of collagen (COL and demineralized bone powder (DBP scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. DBP was prepared and divided into three groups, based on various particle sizes: 75–125 µm, 125–250 µm, and 250–500 µm. DBP was homogeneously mixed with type I collagen and three-dimensional scaffolds were constructed, applying chemical crosslinking and lyophilization. Upon culture with human periosteum-derived cells (PD cells, osteogenic differentiation of PD cells was investigated using alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and calcium assay kits. The physical properties of the COL/DBP scaffolds were obviously different from COL scaffolds, irrespective of the size of DBP. In addition, PD cells cultured with COL scaffolds showed significantly higher cell adhesion and proliferation than those with COL/DBP scaffolds. In contrast, COL/DBP scaffolds exhibited greater osteoinductive potential than COL scaffolds. The PD cells with COL/DBP scaffolds possessed higher ALP activity than those with COL scaffolds. PD cells cultured with COL/DBP scaffolds with 250–500 mm particle size yielded the maximum calcium deposition. In conclusion, PD cells cultured on the scaffolds could exhibit osteoinductive potential. The composite scaffold of COL/DBP with 250–500 mm particle size could be considered a potential bone tissue engineering implant.

  11. Mimicking the extracellular matrix with functionalized, metal-assembled collagen peptide scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Gordillo, Victor; Chmielewski, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Natural and synthetic three-dimensional (3-D) scaffolds that mimic the microenvironment of the extracellular matrix (ECM), with growth factor storage/release and the display of cell adhesion signals, offer numerous advantages for regenerative medicine and in vitro morphogenesis and oncogenesis modeling. Here we report the design of collagen mimetic peptides (CMPs) that assemble into a highly crosslinked 3-D matrix in response to metal ion stimuli, that may be functionalized with His-tagged cargoes, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP-His8) and human epidermal growth factor (hEGF-His6). The bound hEGF-His6 was found to gradually release from the matrix in vitro and induce cell proliferation in the EGF-dependent cell line MCF10A. The additional incorporation of a cell adhesion sequence (RGDS) at the N-terminus of the CMP creates an environment that facilitated the organization of matrix-encapsulated MCF10A cells into spheroid structures, thus mimicking the ECM environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fibronectin- and collagen-mimetic ligands regulate bone marrow stromal cell chondrogenesis in three-dimensional hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JT Connelly

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Modification of tissue engineering scaffolds with bioactive molecules is a potential strategy for modulating cell behavior and guiding tissue regeneration. While adhesion to RGD peptides has been shown to inhibit in vitro chondrogenesis, the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM-mimetic ligands with complex secondary and tertiary structures are unknown. This study aimed to determine whether collagen- and fibronectin-mimetic ligands would retain biologic functionality in three-dimensional (3D hydrogels, whether different ECM-mimetic ligands differentially influence in vitro chondrogenesis, and if effects of ligands on differentiation depend on soluble biochemical stimuli. A linear RGD peptide, a recombinant fibronectin fragment containing the seven to ten Type III repeats (FnIII7-10 and a triple helical, collagen mimetic peptide with the GFOGER motif were covalently coupled to agarose gels using the sulfo-SANPAH crosslinker, and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs were cultured within the 3D hydrogels. The ligands retained biologic functionality within the agarose gels and promoted density-dependent BMSC spreading. Interactions with all adhesive ligands inhibited stimulation by chondrogenic factors of collagen Type II and aggrecan mRNA levels and deposition of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. In medium containing fetal bovine serum, interactions with the GFOGER peptide enhanced mRNA expression of the osteogenic gene osteocalcin whereas FnIII7-10 inhibited osteocalcin expression. In conclusion, modification of agarose hydrogels with ECM-mimetic ligands can influence the differentiation of BMSCs in a manner that depends strongly on the presence and nature of soluble biochemical stimuli.

  13. Onlay bone augmentation on mouse calvarial bone using a hydroxyapatite/collagen composite material with total blood or platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Seigo; Sumita, Yoshinori; Umebayashi, Mayumi; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Hisato; Matsuda, Shinpei; Kimura, Hideki; Asahina, Izumi; Sano, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess newly formed onlay bone on mouse calvarial bone using a new artificial bone material, a hydroxyapatite/collagen composite, with total blood or platelet-rich plasma. The hydroxyapatite/collagen composite material with normal saline, total blood or platelet-rich plasma was transplanted on mouse calvarial bone. The mice were sacrificed and the specimens were harvested four weeks after surgery. The newly formed bone area was measured on hematoxylin and eosin stained specimens using Image J software. The hydroxyapatite/collagen composite materials with total blood or platelet-rich plasma induced a significantly greater amount of newly formed bone than that with normal saline. Moreover, bone marrow was observed four weeks after surgery in the transplanted materials with total blood or platelet-rich plasma but not with normal saline. However, there were no significant differences in the amount of newly formed bone between materials used with total blood versus platelet-rich plasma. The hydroxyapatite/collagen composite material was valid for onlay bone augmentation and this material should be soaked in total blood or platelet-rich plasma prior to transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Osteogenesis imperfecta due to mutations in non-collagenous genes: lessons in the biology of bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Joan C; Reich, Adi; Smith, Simone M

    2014-08-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta or 'brittle bone disease' has mainly been considered a bone disorder caused by collagen mutations. Within the last decade, however, a surge of genetic discoveries has created a new paradigm for osteogenesis imperfecta as a collagen-related disorder, where most cases are due to autosomal dominant type I collagen defects, while rare, mostly recessive, forms are due to defects in genes whose protein products interact with collagen protein. This review is both timely and relevant in outlining the genesis, development, and future of this paradigm shift in the understanding of osteogenesis imperfecta. Bone-restricted interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM)-like protein (BRIL) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) defects cause types V and VI osteogenesis imperfecta via defective bone mineralization, while defects in cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP), prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1), and cyclophilin B (CYPB) cause types VII-IX osteogenesis imperfecta via defective collagen post-translational modification. Heat shock protein 47 (HSP47) and FK506-binding protein-65 (FKBP65) defects cause types X and XI osteogenesis imperfecta via aberrant collagen crosslinking, folding, and chaperoning, while defects in SP7 transcription factor, wingless-type MMTV integration site family member 1 (WNT1), trimeric intracellular cation channel type b (TRIC-B), and old astrocyte specifically induced substance (OASIS) disrupt osteoblast development. Finally, absence of the type I collagen C-propeptidase bone morphogenetic protein 1 (BMP1) causes type XII osteogenesis imperfecta due to altered collagen maturation/processing. Identification of these multiple causative defects has provided crucial information for accurate genetic counseling, inspired a recently proposed functional grouping of osteogenesis imperfecta types by shared mechanism to simplify current nosology, and has prodded investigations into common pathways in osteogenesis imperfecta. Such

  15. The effects of glucocorticoid on microarchitecture, collagen, mineral and mechanical properties of sheep femur cortical bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, Carl C; Overgaard, Søren

    2010-01-01

    The effects of glucocorticoid on microarchitecture, collagen, mineral and mechanical properties of sheep femur cortical bone – Validation of large animal model for tissue engineering and biomaterial research Ming Ding,1* Carl Christian Danielsen,2 Søren Overgaard1 1Orthopaedic Research Laboratory......, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense C, Denmark 2Department of Connective Tissue Biology, Institute of Anatomy, University of Aarhus, Aarhus C, Denmark Osteopenia in sheep has been successfully induced...... by glucocorticoid treatment and the changes in properties of cancellous bone were comparable with those observed in humans after long-term glucocorticoid treatment. However, the influence on cortical bone has not been thoroughly elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the influence of glucocorticoid on sheep...

  16. Effect of Collagen Matrix Saturation on the Surface Free Energy of Dentin using Different Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Leopoldina de Fátima Dantas; Souza, Samilly Evangelista; Sampaio, Aline Araújo; Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; da Silva, Wander José; Del Bel Cur, Altair A; Hebling, Josimeri

    2015-07-01

    The surface free energy of conditioned-dentin is one of the factors that interfere with monomeric infiltration of the interfibrillar spaces. Saturation of the tooth matrix with different substances may modulate this energy and, consequently, the wettability of the dentin. To evaluate the influence of different substances used to saturate conditioned-dentin on surface free energy (SFE) of this substrate. Dentin blocks (4 × 7 × 1 mm, n = 6/ group), obtained from the roots of bovine incisors, were etched using phosphoric acid for 15 seconds, rinsed and gently dried. The surfaces were treated for 60 seconds with: ultra-purified water (H20-control); ethanol (EtOH), acetone (ACT), chlorhexidine (CHX), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA); or sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The tooth surfaces were once again dried with absorbent paper and prepared for SFE evaluation using three standards: water, formamide and bromonaphthalene. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Dunnet's tests (a = 0.05) were applied to the data. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was the only substance that caused a change to the contact angle for the standards water and formamide, while only EtOH influenced the angles formed between formamide and the dentin surface. None of the substances exerted a significant effect for bromonaphtha-lene. In comparison to the control, only EDTA and NaOCl altered both polar components of the SFE. Total SFE was increased by saturation of the collagen matrix by EDTA and reduced when NaOCl was used. Saturation of the collagen matrix by EDTA and EtOH changed the surface free energy of the dentin. In addition, the use of NaOCl negatively interfered with the properties evaluated. The increase of surface free energy and wettability of the dentin surface would allow higher penetration of the the adhesive system, which would be of importance to the clinical success of resin-dentin union.

  17. [Effect of electroacupuncture intervention on expression of extracellular matrix collagen and metabolic enzymes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jun; Zhang, Le; Ke, Mei-gui; Xu, Teng

    2013-12-01

    To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) at "Dazhui" (GV 14) on the contents of extracellular matrix (ECM), collagen type II (COL-II), collagen type V (COL-V), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 in rats with cervicovertebral disc degeneration so as to explore its mechanism underlying relief of intervertebral disc degeneration. A total of 28 SD rats were randomly divided into sham group (n = 7), model group (n = 7), EA group (n = 7) and medication group (n = 7). The model of cervical intervertebral disc degeneration was established by trans-section of the deep neck splenius, the longest muscles of head, neck costocervicalis, head semi-spinatus muscle, supraspinous ligament and interspinal ligaments of cervical 2-7 segments, etc. to produce imbalance between the dynamic and static force. EA was applied to "Dazhui" (GV 14) for 30 min, once daily for 28 days, with a 2 days' interval between two courses. Animals of the medication group were treated by oral administration of meloxicam tablets (0.75 mg/kg) once daily for 28 days, with a 2 days' interval between two courses. Immunohistochemistry was used to measure the expression of ECM, COL- II, COL-V, MMP-13 and TIMP-1 in the cervicovertebral disc tissue. Compared with the sham group, the expression levels of ECM and COL-II proteins in the cervicovertebral disc tissue were significantly decreased in the model group (P 0.05). EA of "Dazhui" (GV 14) can effectively regulate extracellular matrix system in rats with cervical intervertebral disc degeneration, which is possibly related to its effect in relieving cervical spondylosis.

  18. An extracellular-matrix-specific GEF-GAP interaction regulates Rho GTPase crosstalk for 3D collagen migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutys, Matthew L; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2014-09-01

    Rho-family GTPases govern distinct types of cell migration on different extracellular matrix proteins in tissue culture or three-dimensional (3D) matrices. We searched for mechanisms selectively regulating 3D cell migration in different matrix environments and discovered a form of Cdc42-RhoA crosstalk governing cell migration through a specific pair of GTPase activator and inhibitor molecules. We first identified βPix, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), as a specific regulator of migration in 3D collagen using an affinity-precipitation-based GEF screen. Knockdown of βPix specifically blocks cell migration in fibrillar collagen microenvironments, leading to hyperactive cellular protrusion accompanied by increased collagen matrix contraction. Live FRET imaging and RNAi knockdown linked this βPix knockdown phenotype to loss of polarized Cdc42 but not Rac1 activity, accompanied by enhanced, de-localized RhoA activity. Mechanistically, collagen phospho-regulates βPix, leading to its association with srGAP1, a GTPase-activating protein (GAP), needed to suppress RhoA activity. Our results reveal a matrix-specific pathway controlling migration involving a GEF-GAP interaction of βPix with srGAP1 that is critical for maintaining suppressive crosstalk between Cdc42 and RhoA during 3D collagen migration.

  19. Extracellular matrix collagen alters cell proliferation and cell cycle progression of human uterine leiomyoma smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohestani, Faezeh; Braundmeier, Andrea G; Mahdian, Arash; Seo, Jane; Bi, JiaJia; Nowak, Romana A

    2013-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas (ULs) are benign tumors occurring in the majority of reproductive aged women. Despite the high prevalence of these tumors, little is known about their etiology. A hallmark of ULs is the excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM), primarily collagens. Collagens are known to modulate cell behavior and function singularly or through interactions with integrins and growth factor-mediated mitogenic pathways. To better understand the pathogenesis of ULs and the role of ECM collagens in their growth, we investigated the interaction of leiomyoma smooth muscle cells (LSMCs) with two different forms of collagen, non-polymerized collagen (monomeric) and polymerized collagen (fibrillar), in the absence or presence of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), an abundant growth factor in ULs. Primary cultures of human LSMCS from symptomatic patients were grown on these two different collagen matrices and their morphology, cytoskeletal organization, cellular proliferation, and signaling pathways were evaluated. Our results showed that LSMCs had distinct morphologies on the different collagen matrices and their basal as well as PDGF-stimulated proliferation varied on these matrices. These differences in proliferation were accompanied by changes in cell cycle progression and p21, an inhibitory cell cycle protein. In addition we found alterations in the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, cytoskeletal reorganization, and activation of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. In conclusion, our results demonstrate a direct effect of ECM on the proliferation of LSMCs through interplay between the collagen matrix and the PDGF-stimulated MAPK pathway. In addition, these findings will pave the way for identifying novel therapeutic approaches for ULs that target ECM proteins and their signaling pathways in ULs.

  20. Guided bone regeneration with asymmetric collagen-chitosan membranes containing aspirin-loaded chitosan nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang J

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Jiayu Zhang,1 Shiqing Ma,1 Zihao Liu,1 Hongjuan Geng,1 Xin Lu,1 Xi Zhang,1 Hongjie Li,1 Chenyuan Gao,2 Xu Zhang,1 Ping Gao1 1School of Dentistry, Hospital of Stomatology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 2Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Introduction: Membranes allowing the sustained release of drugs that can achieve cell adhesion are very promising for guided bone regeneration. Previous studies have suggested that aspirin has the potential to promote bone regeneration. The purpose of this study was to prepare a local drug delivery system with aspirin-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (ACS contained in an asymmetric collagen-chitosan membrane (CCM. Methods: In this study, the ACS were fabricated using different concentrations of aspirin (5 mg, 25 mg, 50 mg, and 75 mg. The drug release behavior of ACS was studied. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were used to examine the micromorphology of ACS and aspirin-loaded chitosan nanoparticles contained in chitosan-collagen membranes (ACS-CCM. In vitro bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs were cultured and critical-sized cranial defects on Sprague-Dawley rats were made to evaluate the effect of the ACS-CCM on bone regeneration.Results: Drug release behavior results of ACS showed that the nanoparticles fabricated in this study could successfully sustain the release of the drug. TEM showed the morphology of the nanoparticles. SEM images indicated that the asymmetric membrane comprised a loose collagen layer and a dense chitosan layer. In vitro studies showed that ACS-CCM could promote the proliferation of BMSCs, and that the degree of differentiated BMSCs seeded on CCMs containing 50 mg of ACS was higher than that of other membranes. Micro-computed tomography showed that 50 mg of ACS-CCM resulted in enhanced bone regeneration compared with the control group.Conclusion: This

  1. MT1-MMP and type II collagen specify skeletal stem cells and their bone and cartilage progeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabova, L.; Yamada, S.S.; Wimer, H.

    2009-01-01

    -expressing cells of the skeleton rescues not only diminished chondrocyte proliferation, but surprisingly, also results in amelioration of the severe skeletal dysplasia associated with MT1-MMP deficiency through enhanced bone formation. Consistent with this increased bone formation, type II collagen was identified...... from nontransgenic MT1-MMP-deficient littermates. These observations show that type II collagen is not stringently confined to the chondrocyte but is expressed in skeletal stem/progenitor cells (able to regenerate bone, cartilage, myelosupportive stroma, marrow adipocytes) and in the chondrogenic...

  2. Mechanical Loading Improves Tendon-Bone Healing in a Rabbit Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Model by Promoting Proliferation and Matrix Formation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Tendon Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanglong Song

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study investigated the effect of mechanical stress on tendon-bone healing in a rabbit anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction model as well as cell proliferation and matrix formation in co-culture of bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs and tendon cells (TCs. Methods: The effect of continuous passive motion (CPM therapy on tendon-bone healing in a rabbit ACL reconstruction model was evaluated by histological analysis, biomechanical testing and gene expressions at the tendon-bone interface. Furthermore, the effect of mechanical stretch on cell proliferation and matrix synthesis in BMSC/TC co-culture was also examined. Results: Postoperative CPM therapy significantly enhanced tendon-bone healing, as evidenced by increased amount of fibrocartilage, elevated ultimate load to failure levels, and up-regulated gene expressions of Collagen I, alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, Tenascin C and tenomodulin at the tendon-bone junction. In addition, BMSC/TC co-culture treated with mechanical stretch showed a higher rate of cell proliferation and enhanced expressions of Collagen I, Collagen III, alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, Tenascin C and tenomodulin than that of controls. Conclusion: These results demonstrated that proliferation and differentiation of local precursor cells could be enhanced by mechanical stimulation, which results in enhanced regenerative potential of BMSCs and TCs in tendon-bone healing.

  3. Amino acid δ13C analysis of hair proteins and bone collagen using liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raghavan, Maanasa; McCullagh, James S. O.; Lynnerup, Niels

    2010-01-01

    We report a novel method for the chromatographic separation and measurement of stable carbon isotope ratios (delta(13)C) of individual amino acids in hair proteins and bone collagen using the LC-IsoLink system, which interfaces liquid chromatography (LC) with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS......). This paper provides baseline separation of 15 and 13 of the 18 amino acids in bone collagen and hair proteins, respectively. We also describe an approach to analysing small hair samples for compound-specific analysis of segmental hair sections. The LC/IRMS method is applied in a historical context...... by the delta(13)C analysis of hair proteins and bone collagen recovered from six individuals from Uummannaq in Greenland. The analysis of hair and bone amino acids from the same individual, compared for the first time in this study, is of importance in palaeodietary reconstruction. If hair proteins can be used...

  4. Treatment of active unicameral bone cysts with percutaneous injection of demineralized bone matrix and autogenous bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougraff, Bruce T; Kling, Thomas J

    2002-06-01

    The treatment of unicameral bone cysts varies from open bone-grafting procedures to percutaneous injection of corticosteroids or bone marrow. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of percutaneous injection of a mixture of demineralized bone matrix and autogenous bone marrow for the treatment of simple bone cysts. Twenty-three patients with an active unicameral bone cyst were treated with trephination and injection of allogeneic demineralized bone matrix and autogenous bone marrow. The patients were followed for an average of fifty months (range, thirty to eighty-one months), at which time pain, function, and radiographic signs of resolution of the cyst were assessed. The average time until the patients had pain relief was five weeks, and the average time until the patients returned to full, unrestricted activities was six weeks. Bone-healing at the site of the injection was first seen radiographically at three to six months. No patient had a pathologic fracture during this early bone-healing stage. Cortical remodeling was seen radiographically by six to nine months, and after one year the response was usually complete, changing very little from then on. Five patients required a second injection because of recurrence of the cyst, and all five had a clinically and radiographically quiescent cyst after an average of thirty-six additional months of follow-up. Seven of the twenty-three patients had incomplete healing manifested by small, persistent radiolucent areas within the original cyst. None of these cysts increased in size or resulted in pain or fracture. Percutaneous injection of allogeneic demineralized bone matrix and autogenous bone marrow is an effective treatment for unicameral bone cysts.

  5. Collagen degradation in the abdominal aneurysm: A conspiracy of matrix metalloproteinase and cysteine collagenases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdul-Hussien, H.; Soekhoe, R.G.V.; Weber, E.; Thüsen, J.H. von der; Kleemann, R.; Mulder, A.; Hajo Van Bockel, J.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Lindeman, J.H.N.

    2007-01-01

    Growth and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) result from increased collagen turnover. Collagen turnover critically depends on specific collagenases that cleave the triple helical region of fibrillar collagen. As yet, the collagenases responsible for collagen degradation in AAAs have not

  6. Increased cartilage type II collagen degradation in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta used as a human model of bone type I collagen alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Jean-Charles; Chevrel, Guillaume; Schott, Anne-Marie; Garnero, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    We investigated whether cartilage degradation is altered in adult patients with mild osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) used as a human model of bone type I collagen-related osteoarthritis (OA). Sixty-four adult patients with OI (39% women, mean age+/-SD: 37+/-12 years) and 64 healthy age-matched controls (54% women, 39+/-7 years) were included. We also compared data in 87 patients with knee OA (73% women, 63+/-8 years, mean disease duration: 6 years) and 291 age-matched controls (80% women, 62+/-10 years). Urinary C-terminal cross-linked telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II), a marker of cartilage degradation, urinary helical peptide of type I collagen (Helix-I), a marker of bone resorption, and the urinary ratio between non-isomerised/isomerised (alpha/beta CTX-I) type I collagen C-telopeptide, a marker of type I collagen maturation, were measured. Patients with OI had CTX-II levels similar to those of subjects with knee OA (p=0.89; mean+/-SEM; 460+/-57 ng/mmol Cr for OI group and 547+/-32 ng/mmol Cr for OA group) and significantly higher than both young (144+/-7.8 ng/mmol Cr, p<0.0001) and old controls (247+/-7 ng/mmol Cr, p<0.0001). In patients with OI, increased Helix-I (p<0.0001) and alpha/beta CTX-I (p=0.0067) were independently associated with increased CTX-II and together explained 26% of its variance (p< 0.0001). In patients with knee OA, increased levels of alpha/beta CTX-I ratio were also associated with higher CTX-II levels. Adult patients with OI or knee OA are characterized by increased cartilage type II collagen degradation, which is associated with increased type I collagen degradation for OI and lower type I collagen maturation for both OI and OA. These data suggest that both quantitative and qualitative alterations of bone type I collagen metabolism are involved in increased cartilage degradation in patients with OI or knee OA. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Targeting Heparin to Collagen within Extracellular Matrix Significantly Reduces Thrombogenicity and Improves Endothelialization of Decellularized Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Suen, Rachel; Wertheim, Jason A; Ameer, Guillermo A

    2016-12-12

    Thrombosis within small-diameter vascular grafts limits the development of bioartificial, engineered vascular conduits, especially those derived from extracellular matrix (ECM). Here we describe an easy-to-implement strategy to chemically modify vascular ECM by covalently linking a collagen binding peptide (CBP) to heparin to form a heparin derivative (CBP-heparin) that selectively binds a subset of collagens. Modification of ECM with CBP-heparin leads to increased deposition of functional heparin (by ∼7.2-fold measured by glycosaminoglycan composition) and a corresponding reduction in platelet binding (>70%) and whole blood clotting (>80%) onto the ECM. Furthermore, addition of CBP-heparin to the ECM stabilizes long-term endothelial cell attachment to the lumen of ECM-derived vascular conduits, potentially through recruitment of heparin-binding growth factors that ultimately improve the durability of endothelialization in vitro. Overall, our findings provide a simple yet effective method to increase deposition of functional heparin on the surface of ECM-based vascular grafts and thereby minimize thrombogenicity of decellularized tissue, overcoming a significant challenge in tissue engineering of bioartificial vessels and vascularized organs.

  8. Influence of short-term aluminum exposure on demineralized bone matrix induced bone formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severson, A.R. (Minnesota Univ., Duluth, MN (United States). Dept. of Anatomy and Cell Biology); Haut, C.F.; Firling, C.E. (Minnesota Univ., Duluth, MN (United States). Dept. of Biology); Huntley, T.E. (Minnesota Univ., Duluth, MN (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology)

    1992-12-01

    The effects of aluminum exposure on bone formation employing the demineralized bone matrix (DBM) induced bone development model were studied using 4-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats injected with a saline (control) or an aluminum chloride (experimental) solution. After 2 weeks of aluminum treatment, 20-mg portions of rat DBM were implanted subcutaneously on each side in the thoracic region of the control and experimental rats. Animals were killed 7, 12, or 21 days after implantation of the DBM and the developing plaques removed. No morphological, histochemical, or biochemical differences were apparent between plaques from day 7 control and experimental rats. Plaques from day 12 control and experimental rats exhibited cartilage formation and alkaline phosphatase activity localized in osteochondrogenic cells, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and extracellular matrix. Unlike the plaques from control rats that contained many osteoblastic mineralizing fronts, the plaques from the 12-day experimental group had a preponderance of cartilaginous tissue, no evidence of mineralization, increased levels of alkaline phosphatase activity, and a reduced calcium content. Plaques developing for 21 days in control animals demonstrated extensive new bone formation and bone marrow development, while those in the experimental rats demonstrated unmineralized osteoid-like matrix with poorly developed bone marrow. Alkaline phosphatase activity of the plaques continued to remain high on day 21 for the control and experimental groups. Calcium levels were significantly reduced in the experimental group. These biochemical changes correlated with histochemical reductions in bone calcification. Thus, aluminum administration to rats appears to alter the differentiation and calcification of developing cartilage and bone in the DBM-induced bone formation model and suggests that aluminum by some mechanism alters the matrix calcification in growing bones. (orig.).

  9. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy to Quantify Collagen and Elastin in an In Vitro Model of Extracellular Matrix Degradation in Aorta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheheltani, Rabee; McGoverin, Cushla M.; Rao, Jayashree; Vorp, David A.; Kiani, Mohammad F.; Pleshko, N.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key component and regulator of many biological tissues including aorta. Several aortic pathologies are associated with significant changes in the composition of the matrix, especially in the content, quality and type of aortic structural proteins, collagen and elastin. The purpose of this study was to develop an infrared spectroscopic methodology that is comparable to biochemical assays to quantify collagen and elastin in aorta. Enzymatically degraded porcine aorta samples were used as a model of ECM degradation in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). After enzymatic treatment, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of the aortic tissue were acquired by an infrared fiber optic probe (IFOP) and FTIR imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS). Collagen and elastin content were quantified biochemically and partial least squares (PLS) models were developed to predict collagen and elastin content in aorta based on FTIR spectra. PLS models developed from FT-IRIS spectra were able to predict elastin and collagen content of the samples with strong correlations (RMSE of validation = 8.4% and 11.1% of the range respectively), and IFOP spectra were successfully used to predict elastin content (RMSE = 11.3% of the range). The PLS regression coefficients from the FT-IRIS models were used to map collagen and elastin in tissue sections of degraded porcine aortic tissue as well as a human AAA biopsy tissue, creating a similar map of each component compared to histology. These results support further application of FTIR spectroscopic techniques for evaluation of AAA tissues. PMID:24761431

  10. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to quantify collagen and elastin in an in vitro model of extracellular matrix degradation in aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheheltani, Rabee; McGoverin, Cushla M; Rao, Jayashree; Vorp, David A; Kiani, Mohammad F; Pleshko, Nancy

    2014-06-21

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key component and regulator of many biological tissues including aorta. Several aortic pathologies are associated with significant changes in the composition of the matrix, especially in the content, quality and type of aortic structural proteins, collagen and elastin. The purpose of this study was to develop an infrared spectroscopic methodology that is comparable to biochemical assays to quantify collagen and elastin in aorta. Enzymatically degraded porcine aorta samples were used as a model of ECM degradation in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). After enzymatic treatment, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of the aortic tissue were acquired by an infrared fiber optic probe (IFOP) and FTIR imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS). Collagen and elastin content were quantified biochemically and partial least squares (PLS) models were developed to predict collagen and elastin content in aorta based on FTIR spectra. PLS models developed from FT-IRIS spectra were able to predict elastin and collagen content of the samples with strong correlations (RMSE of validation = 8.4% and 11.1% of the range respectively), and IFOP spectra were successfully used to predict elastin content (RMSE = 11.3% of the range). The PLS regression coefficients from the FT-IRIS models were used to map collagen and elastin in tissue sections of degraded porcine aortic tissue as well as a human AAA biopsy tissue, creating a similar map of each component compared to histology. These results support further application of FTIR spectroscopic techniques for evaluation of AAA tissues.

  11. Tumor Cell Invasion Can Be Blocked by Modulators of Collagen Fibril Alignment That Control Assembly of the Extracellular Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Moran; Ben-Chetrit, Nir; Zhuravlev, Alina; Afik, Ran; Bassat, Elad; Solomonov, Inna; Yarden, Yosef; Sagi, Irit

    2016-07-15

    Abnormal architectures of collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix (ECM) are hallmarks of many invasive diseases, including cancer. Targeting specific stages of collagen assembly in vivo presents a great challenge due to the involvement of various crosslinking enzymes in the multistep, hierarchical process of ECM build-up. Using advanced microscopic tools, we monitored stages of fibrillary collagen assembly in a native fibroblast-derived 3D matrix system and identified anti-lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) antibodies that alter the natural alignment and width of endogenic fibrillary collagens without affecting ECM composition. The disrupted collagen morphologies interfered with the adhesion and invasion properties of human breast cancer cells. Treatment of mice bearing breast cancer xenografts with the inhibitory antibodies resulted in disruption of the tumorigenic collagen superstructure and in reduction of primary tumor growth. Our approach could serve as a general methodology to identify novel therapeutics targeting fibrillary protein organization to treat ECM-associated pathologies. Cancer Res; 76(14); 4249-58. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Calcium-phosphate matrix with or without TGF-β3 improves tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, David; Fox, Alice J; Bedi, Asheesh; Ying, Liang; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Warren, Russell F; Rodeo, Scott A

    2011-04-01

    Rotator cuff tendon heals by formation of an interposed zone of fibrovascular scar tissue. Recent studies demonstrate that transforming growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-β(3)) is associated with tissue regeneration and "scarless" healing, in contrast to scar-mediated healing that occurs with TGF-β(1). Delivery of TGF-β(3) in an injectable calcium-phosphate matrix to the healing tendon-bone interface after rotator cuff repair will result in increased attachment strength secondary to improved bone formation and collagen organization and reduced scar formation of the healing enthesis. Controlled laboratory study. Ninety-six male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent unilateral detachment of the supraspinatus tendon followed by acute repair using transosseous suture fixation. Animals were allocated into 1 of 3 groups: (1) repair alone (controls, n = 32), (2) repair augmented by application of an osteoconductive calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) matrix only (n = 32), or (3) repair augmented with Ca-P matrix + TGF-β(3) (2.75 µg) at the tendon-bone interface (n = 32). Animals were euthanized at either 2 weeks or 4 weeks postoperatively. Biomechanical testing of the supraspinatus tendon-bone complex was performed at 2 and 4 weeks (n = 8 per group). Microcomputed tomography was utilized to quantitate bone microstructure at the repair site. The healing tendon-bone interface was evaluated with histomorphometry and immunohistochemical localization of collagen types I (COLI) and III (COLIII). Statistical analysis was performed using 2-way analysis of variance with significance set at P repair site is associated with new bone formation, increased fibrocartilage, and improved collagen organization at the healing tendon-bone interface in the early postoperative period after rotator cuff repair. The addition of TGF-β(3) significantly improved strength of the repair at 4 weeks postoperatively and resulted in a more favorable COLI/COLIII ratio. The delivery of TGF-β(3) with an injectable Ca-P matrix

  13. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of carbonate apatite-collagen scaffolds with some cytokines for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman Salim

    2015-01-01

    Results and Conclusion: By histological observation and measurement of bone area ratio, CA-CS with cytokines showed higher bone formation ability (bFGF/CA-CS: 50.7 ± 7.3%, rh-BMP2/CA-CS: 54.2 ± 5.0% than other groups. From the limited results of this study, it is suggested that CA collagen scaffolds with some cytokines may become an attractive scaffold for bone regeneration.

  14. Decorin-transforming growth factor- interaction regulates matrix organization and mechanical characteristics of three-dimensional collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdous, Zannatul; Wei, Victoria Mariko; Iozzo, Renato; Höök, Magnus; Grande-Allen, Kathryn Jane

    2007-12-07

    The small leucine-rich proteoglycan decorin has been demonstrated to be a key regulator of collagen fibrillogenesis; decorin deficiencies lead to irregularly shaped collagen fibrils and weakened material behavior in postnatal murine connective tissues. In an in vitro investigation of the contributions of decorin to tissue organization and material behavior, model tissues were engineered by seeding embryonic fibroblasts, harvested from 12.5-13.5 days gestational aged decorin null (Dcn(-/-)) or wild-type mice, within type I collagen gels. The resulting three-dimensional collagen matrices were cultured for 4 weeks under static tension. The collagen matrices seeded with Dcn(-/-) cells exhibited greater contraction, cell density, ultimate tensile strength, and elastic modulus than those seeded with wild-type cells. Ultrastructurally, the matrices seeded with Dcn(-/-) cells contained a greater density of collagen. The decorin-null tissues contained more biglycan than control tissues, suggesting that this related proteoglycan compensated for the absence of decorin. The effect of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), which is normally sequestered by decorin, was also investigated in this study. The addition of TGF-beta1 to the matrices seeded with wild-type cells improved their contraction and mechanical strength, whereas blocking TGF-beta1 in the Dcn(-/-) cell-seeded matrices significantly reduced the collagen gel contraction. These results indicate that the inhibitory interaction between decorin and TGF-beta1 significantly influenced the matrix organization and material behavior of these in vitro model tissues.

  15. Collagen type I from bovine bone. Effect of animal age, bone anatomy and drying methodology on extraction yield, self-assembly, thermal behaviour and electrokinetic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Vincenza; Gaillard-Martinie, Brigitte; Sayd, Thierry; Chambon, Christophe; Anton, Marc; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique

    2017-04-01

    Natural collagen is easily available from animal tissues such as bones. Main limitations reported in the use of natural collagen are heterogeneity and loss of integrity during recovery. However, its natural complexity, functionality and bioactivity still remain to be achieved through synthetic and recombinant ways. Variability of physicochemical properties of collagen extracted from bovine bone by acetic acid was then investigated taking into account endogenous and exogenous factors. Endogenous: bovine's bones age (4 and 7 years) and anatomy (femur and tibia); exogenous: thermal treatments (spray-drying and lyophilisation). Scanning electron microscopy, spectroscopy (EDS, FTIR, UV/Vis and CD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), centesimal composition, mass spectrometry, amino acids and zeta-potential analysis were used for the purpose. Age correlated negatively with yield of recovery and positively with minerals and proteoglycans content. Comparing the anatomy, higher yields were found for tibias, and higher stability of tibias collagen in solution was noticed. Whatever the age and the anatomy, collagens were able to renature and to self-assemble into tri-dimensional structures. Nonetheless thermal stability and kinetics of renaturation were different. Variability of natural collagen with bone age and anatomy, and drying methodology, may be a crucial advantage to conceive tailor-made applications in either the biological or technical sector. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The effects of orbital spaceflight on bone histomorphometry and messenger ribonucleic acid levels for bone matrix proteins and skeletal signaling peptides in ovariectomized growing rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavolina, J. M.; Evans, G. L.; Harris, S. A.; Zhang, M.; Westerlind, K. C.; Turner, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    A 14-day orbital spaceflight was performed using ovariectomized Fisher 344 rats to determine the combined effects of estrogen deficiency and near weightlessness on tibia radial bone growth and cancellous bone turnover. Twelve ovariectomized rats with established cancellous osteopenia were flown aboard the space shuttle Columbia (STS-62). Thirty ovariectomized rats were housed on earth as ground controls: 12 in animal enclosure modules, 12 in vivarium cages, and 6 killed the day of launch for baseline measurements. An additional 18 ovary-intact rats were housed in vivarium cages as ground controls: 8 rats were killed as baseline controls and the remaining 10 rats were killed 14 days later. Ovariectomy increased periosteal bone formation at the tibia-fibula synostosis; cancellous bone resorption and formation in the secondary spongiosa of the proximal tibial metaphysis; and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for the prepro-alpha2(1) subunit of type 1 collagen, osteocalcin, transforming growth factor-beta, and insulin-like growth factor I in the contralateral proximal tibial metaphysis and for the collagen subunit in periosteum pooled from tibiae and femora and decreased cancellous bone area. Compared to ovariectomized weight-bearing rats, the flight group experienced decreases in periosteal bone formation, collagen subunit mRNA levels, and cancellous bone area. The flight rats had a small decrease in the cancellous mineral apposition rate, but no change in the calculated bone formation rate. Also, spaceflight had no effect on cancellous osteoblast and osteoclast perimeters or on mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins and signaling peptides. On the other hand, spaceflight resulted in an increase in bone resorption, as ascertained from the diminished retention of a preflight fluorochrome label. This latter finding suggests that osteoclast activity was increased. In a follow-up ground-based experiment, unilateral sciatic neurotomy of ovariectomized rats resulted in cancellous

  17. Bone Healing in Extraction Sockets Covered With Collagen Membrane Alone or Associated With Porcine-Derived Bone Graft: a Comparative Histological and Histomorphometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Renzo; Testarelli, Luca; Stefanelli, Luigi; De Angelis, Francesca; Mencio, Francesca; Pompa, Giorgio; Di Carlo, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The present paper reports data of a randomized study aimed to analyse and compare the histologic and histomorphometric aspects of bone healing in extraction sites covered with collagen membrane alone or associated with porcine-derived bone graft. Thirty patients, with single extraction sockets without severe bone wall defects in the premolar/molar region, were included. Ten extraction sockets were grafted with porcine-derived bone and covered with collagen membrane (group 1), 10 sites were covered with collagen membrane alone (group 2), and 10 sites healed spontaneously (group 3). After 4 months of healing, 26 (8 in group 1, 9 in group 2, and 9 in group 3) bone core specimens were harvested for histologic evaluation, then dental implants were placed. Sites in the group 1 and in the group 2 showed similar histologic and histomorphometric results without significantly differences in the percentage of vital bone (57.43% [SD 4.8] vs. 60.01% [SD 3.2]), and non-mineralized connective tissue 22.99% (SD 5.3) vs. 18.53% (SD 6.2). In group 1 a 16.57% (SD 3.8) of residual material was found. Results showed that the use of collagen membrane alone or associated to porcine-derived bone improves the healing bone process compared to that of extraction sites spontaneously healed. Moreover, histomorphometric data related to bone quality, indicated that extraction sites without severe walls defects and with a vestibular bone thickness > 1.5 mm, treated with a low resorbtion rate collagen membrane alone, do not need more than 4 months for dental implant insertion.

  18. Preparation of dexamethasone-loaded biphasic calcium phosphate nanoparticles/collagen porous composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2018-02-01

    Although bone is regenerative, its regeneration capacity is limited. For bone defects beyond a critical size, further intervention is required. As an attractive strategy, bone tissue engineering (bone TE) has been widely investigated to repair bone defects. However, the rapid and effective bone regeneration of large non-healing defects is still a great challenge. Multifunctional scaffolds having osteoinductivity and osteoconductivity are desirable to fasten functional bone tissue regeneration. In the present study, biomimetic composite scaffolds of collagen and biphasic calcium phosphate nanoparticles (BCP NPs) with a controlled release of dexamethasone (DEX) and the controlled pore structures were prepared for bone TE. DEX was introduced in the BCP NPs during preparation of the BCP NPs and hybridized with collagen scaffolds, which pore structures were controlled by using pre-prepared ice particulates as a porogen material. The composite scaffolds had well controlled and interconnected pore structures, high mechanical strength and a sustained release of DEX. The composite scaffolds showed good biocompatibility and promoted osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs when used for three-dimensional culture of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Subcutaneous implantation of the composite scaffolds at the dorsa of athymic nude mice demonstrated that they facilitated the ectopic bone tissue regeneration. The results indicated the DEX-loaded BCP NPs/collagen composite scaffolds had high potential for bone TE. Scaffolds play a crucial role for regeneration of large bone defects. Biomimetic scaffolds having the same composition of natural bone and a controlled release of osteoinductive factors are desirable for promotion of bone regeneration. In this study, composite scaffolds of collagen and biphasic CaP nanoparticles (BCP NPs) with a controlled release nature of dexamethasone (DEX) were prepared and their porous structures were controlled by using ice particulates

  19. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide nanofibers coated with collagen and nano-hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Tavakoli-Darestani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Please cite this article as: Tavakoli-Darestani R, Kazemian GH, Emami M, Kamrani-Rad A. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide nanofibers coated with collagen and nano-hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering. Novel Biomed 2013;1:8-15.Background: A combination of polymeric nanofibrous scaffold and bioactive materials is potentially useful in bone regeneration applications.Materials and Methods: In the present study, Poly (lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA nanofibrous scaffolds, fabricated via electrospinning, were initially coated with Type I collagen and then with nano-hydroxyapatite. The prepared scaffolds were then characterized using SEM and their ability for bone regeneration was investigated in a rat critical size bone defect using digital mammography, multislice spiral-computed tomography (MSCT imaging, and histological analysis.Results: Electrospun scaffolds had nanofibrous structure with homogenous distribution of n-HA on collagen-grafted PLGA. After 8 weeks of implantation, no sign of inflammation or complication was observed at the site of surgery. According to digital mammography and MSCT, PLGA nanofibers coated simultaneously with collagen and HA showed the highest regeneration in rat calvarium. In addition, no significant difference was observed in bone repair in the group which received PLGA and the untreated control. This amount was lower than that observed in the group implanted with collagen-coated PLGA. Histological studies confirmed these data and showed osteointegration to the surrounding tissue.Conclusion: Taking all together, it was demonstrated that nanofibrous structures can be used as appropriate support for tissue-engineered scaffolds, and coating them with bioactive materials will provide ideal synthetic grafts. Fabricated PLGA coated with Type I collagen and HA can be used as new bone graft substitutes in orthopaedic surgery and is capable of enhancing bone regeneration via characteristics such as osteoconductivity and

  20. Studies on collagen-tannic acid-collagenase ternary system: Inhibition of collagenase against collagenolytic degradation of extracellular matrix component of collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Ganesan; Sehgal, Praveen Kumar; Mandal, Asit Baran; Sadulla, Sayeed

    2012-06-01

    We report the detailed studies on the inhibitory effect of tannic acid (TA) on Clostridium histolyticum collagenase (ChC) activity against degradation of extracellular matrix component of collagen. The TA treated collagen exhibited 64% resistance against collagenolytic hydrolysis by ChC, whereas direct interaction of TA with ChC exhibited 99% inhibition against degradation of collagen and the inhibition was found to be concentration dependant. The kinetic inhibition of ChC has been deduced from the extent of hydrolysis of N-[3-(2-furyl) acryloyl]-Leu-Gly-Pro-Ala (FALGPA). This data provides a selective competitive mode of inhibition on ChC activity seems to be influenced strongly by the nature and structure of TA. TA showed inhibitor activity against the ChC by molecular docking method. This result demonstrated that TA containing digalloyl radical possess the ability to inhibit the ChC. The inhibition of ChC in gaining new insight into the mechanism of stabilization of collagen by TA is discussed.

  1. Osteogenesis Imperfecta due to Mutations in Non-Collagenous Genes-Lessons in the Biology of Bone Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Joan C.; Reich, Adi; Smith, Simone M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), or “brittle bone disease”, has mainly been considered a bone disorder caused by collagen mutations. Within the last decade, however, a surge of genetic discoveries has created a new paradigm for OI as a collagen-related disorder, where autosomal dominant type I collagen defects cause most cases, while rare, mostly recessive forms are due to defects in genes whose protein products interact with collagen protein. This review is both timely and relevant in outlining the genesis, development and future of this paradigm shift in the understanding of OI. Recent Findings BRIL and PEDF defects cause types V and VI OI via defective bone mineralization, while defects in CRTAP, P3H1 and CyPB cause types VII-IX via defective collagen post-translational modification. Hsp47 and FKBP65 defects cause types X and XI OI via aberrant collagen crosslinking, folding and chaperoning, while defects in SP7, WNT1, TRIC-B and OASIS disrupt osteoblast development. Finally, absence of the type I collagen C-propeptidase BMP1 causes type XII OI due to altered collagen maturation/processing. Summary Identification of these multiple causative defects has provided crucial information for accurate genetic counseling, inspired a recently proposed functional grouping of OI types by shared mechanism to simplify current nosology, and should prod investigations into common pathways in OI. Such investigations could yield critical information on cellular and bone tissue mechanisms and translate to new mechanistic insight into clinical therapies for patients. PMID:25007323

  2. Osteoclastic bone degradation and the role of different cysteine proteinases and matrix metalloproteinases: differences between calvaria and long bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, Vincent; Korper, Wolf; Hoeben, Kees A.; Jansen, Ineke D. C.; Bromme, Dieter; Cleutjens, Kitty B. J. M.; Heeneman, Sylvia; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas; Saftig, Paul; Beertsen, Wouter

    2006-01-01

    Osteoclastic bone degradation involves the activity of cathepsin K. We found that in addition to this enzyme other, yet unknown, cysteine proteinases participate in digestion. The results support the notion that osteoclasts from different bone sites use different enzymes to degrade the collagenous

  3. The effects of collagen-rich extracellular matrix on the intracellular delivery of glycol chitosan nanoparticles in human lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yhee, Ji Young; Yoon, Hong Yeol; Kim, Hyunjoon; Jeon, Sangmin; Hergert, Polla; Im, Jintaek; Panyam, Jayanth; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Nho, Richard Seonghun

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in nanomedicine has shown a strong possibility of targeted therapy for obstinate chronic lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). IPF is a fatal lung disease characterized by persistent fibrotic fibroblasts in response to type I collagen-rich extracellular matrix. As a pathological microenvironment is important in understanding the biological behavior of nanoparticles, in vitro cellular uptake of glycol chitosan nanoparticles (CNPs) in human lung fibroblasts was comparatively studied in the presence or absence of type I collagen matrix. Primary human lung fibroblasts from non-IPF and IPF patients (n=6/group) showed significantly increased cellular uptake of CNPs (>33.6-78.1 times) when they were cultured on collagen matrix. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of enhanced cellular delivery of CNPs in lung fibroblasts on collagen, cells were pretreated with chlorpromazine, genistein, and amiloride to inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis, caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and macropinocytosis, respectively. Amiloride pretreatment remarkably reduced the cellular uptake of CNPs, suggesting that lung fibroblasts mainly utilize the macropinocytosis-dependent mechanism when interacted with collagen. In addition, the internalization of CNPs was predominantly suppressed by a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor in IPF fibroblasts, indicating that enhanced PI3K activity associated with late-stage macropinocytosis can be particularly important for the enhanced cellular delivery of CNPs in IPF fibroblasts. Our study strongly supports the concept that a pathological microenvironment which surrounds lung fibroblasts has a significant impact on the intracellular delivery of nanoparticles. Based on the property of enhanced intracellular delivery of CNPs when fibroblasts are made to interact with a collagen-rich matrix, we suggest that CNPs may have great potential as a drug-carrier system for targeting fibrotic lung fibroblasts.

  4. Disentangling the multifactorial contributions of fibronectin, collagen and cyclic strain on MMP expression and extracellular matrix remodeling by fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Lin, Z.; Foolen, J.; Schoen, I.; Santoro, A.; Zenobi-Wong, M.; Vogel, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Early wound healing is associated with fibroblasts assembling a provisional fibronectin-rich extracellular matrix (ECM), which is subsequently remodeled and interlaced by type I collagen. This exposes fibroblasts to time-variant sets of matrices during different stages of wound healing. Our goal was

  5. Ductile sliding between mineral crystals followed by rupture of collagen crosslinks: experimentally supported micromechanical explanation of bone strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Andreas; Hellmich, Christian; Dormieux, Luc

    2009-09-21

    There is an ongoing discussion on how bone strength could be explained from its internal structure and composition. Reviewing recent experimental and molecular dynamics studies, we here propose a new vision on bone material failure: mutual ductile sliding of hydroxyapatite mineral crystals along layered water films is followed by rupture of collagen crosslinks. In order to cast this vision into a mathematical form, a multiscale continuum micromechanics theory for upscaling of elastoplastic properties is developed, based on the concept of concentration and influence tensors for eigenstressed microheterogeneous materials. The model reflects bone's hierarchical organization, in terms of representative volume elements for cortical bone, for extravascular and extracellular bone material, for mineralized fibrils and the extrafibrillar space, and for wet collagen. In order to get access to the stress states at the interfaces between crystals, the extrafibrillar mineral is resolved into an infinite amount of cylindrical material phases oriented in all directions in space. The multiscale micromechanics model is shown to be able to satisfactorily predict the strength characteristics of different bones from different species, on the basis of their mineral/collagen content, their intercrystalline, intermolecular, lacunar, and vascular porosities, and the elastic and strength properties of hydroxyapatite and (molecular) collagen.

  6. "Repair of cranial bone defects using endochondral bone matrix gelatin in rat "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Sobhani A

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone matrix gelatin (BMG has been used for bone induction intramuscularly and subcutaneously by many investigators since 1965. More recently, some of the researchers have used BMG particles for bone repair and reported various results. In present study for evaluation of bone induction and new bone formation in parital defects, BMG particles were used in five groups of rats. The BMG was prepared as previously described using urist method. The defects wee produced with 5 –mm diameter in pariteal bones and filled by BMG particles. No BMG was used in control group.For evaluation of new bone formation and repair, the specimens were harvested on days 7 , 14 , 21 and 28 after operation. The samples were processed histologically, stained by H& E, alizarin red S staining, and Alcian blue, and studied by a light microscope.The results are as follows:In control group: Twenty-eight days after operation a narrow rim of new bone was detectable attached to the edge of defect.In BMG groups: At day 7 after operation young chondroblast cells appeared in whole area of defect. At 14th day after operation hypertrophic chondrocytes showed by Alcian blue staining and calcified cartilage were detectable by Alizarin red S staining. The numerous trabeculae spicules, early adult osteocytes and highly proliferated red bone marrow well developed on dayd 21 . finally typic bone trabeculae with regulated osteoblast cells and some osteoclast cells were detectable at day 28 after operation. In conclusion,BMG could stimulate bone induction and new bone formation in bony defects. So, it seems that BMG could be a godd biomaterial substance for new bone inducation in bone defects

  7. Overhydroxylation of Lysine of Collagen Increases Uterine Fibroids Proliferation: Roles of Lysyl Hydroxylases, Lysyl Oxidases, and Matrix Metalloproteinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Kamel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the extracellular matrix (ECM in uterine fibroids (UF has recently been appreciated. Overhydroxylation of lysine residues and the subsequent formation of hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP and lysylpyridinoline (LP cross-links underlie the ECM stiffness and profoundly affect tumor progression. The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between ECM of UF, collagen and collagen cross-linking enzymes [lysyl hydroxylases (LH and lysyl oxidases (LOX], and the development and progression of UF. Our results indicated that hydroxyl lysine (Hyl and HP cross-links are significantly higher in UF compared to the normal myometrial tissues accompanied by increased expression of LH (LH2b and LOX. Also, increased resistance to matrix metalloproteinases (MMP proteolytic degradation activity was observed. Furthermore, the extent of collagen cross-links was positively correlated with the expression of myofibroblast marker (α-SMA, growth-promoting markers (PCNA; pERK1/2; FAKpY397; Ki-67; and Cyclin D1, and the size of UF. In conclusion, our study defines the role of overhydroxylation of collagen and collagen cross-linking enzymes in modulating UF cell proliferation, differentiation, and resistance to MMP. These effects can establish microenvironment conducive for UF progression and thus represent potential target treatment options of UF.

  8. Quantum dots as mineral- and matrix-specific strain gages for bone biomechanical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Peizhi; Xu, Jiadi; Morris, Michael; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Sahar, Nadder; Kohn, David

    2009-02-01

    We report the use of quantum dots (Qdots) as strain gages in the study of bone biomechanics using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We have developed solid state NMR sample cells for investigation of deformations of bone tissue components at loads up to several Mega Pascal. The size constraints of the NMR instrumentation limit the bone specimen diameter and length to be no greater than 2-3 mm and 30 mm respectively. Further, magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state NMR experiments require the use of non-metallic apparatus that can be rotated at kilohertz rates. These experimental constraints preclude the use of standard biomechanical measurement systems. In this paper we explore the use of quantum dot center of gravity measurement as a strain gage technology consistent with the constraints of solid state NMR. We use Qdots that bind calcium (625 nm emission) and collagen (705 nm emission) for measurement of strain in these components. Compressive loads are applied to a specimen in a cell through a fine pitch screw turned with a mini-torque wrench. Displacement is measured as changes in the positions of arrays of quantum dots on the surface of a specimen. Arrays are created by spotting the specimen with dilute suspensions of Qdots. Mineral labeling is achieved with 705 nm carboxylated dots and matrix labeling with 565 nm quantum dots conjugated to collagen I antibodies. After each load increment the new positions of the quantum dots are measured by fluorescence microscopy. Changes in Qdot center of gravity as a function of applied load can be measured with submicron accuracy.

  9. A role for topographic cues in the organization of collagenous matrix by corneal fibroblasts and stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Karamichos

    Full Text Available Human corneal fibroblasts (HCF and corneal stromal stem cells (CSSC each secrete and organize a thick stroma-like extracellular matrix in response to different substrata, but neither cell type organizes matrix on tissue-culture polystyrene. This study compared cell differentiation and extracellular matrix secreted by these two cell types when they were cultured on identical substrata, polycarbonate Transwell filters. After 4 weeks in culture, both cell types upregulated expression of genes marking differentiated keratocytes (KERA, CHST6, AQP1, B3GNT7. Absolute expression levels of these genes and secretion of keratan sulfate proteoglycans were significantly greater in CSSC than HCF. Both cultures produced extensive extracellular matrix of aligned collagen fibrils types I and V, exhibiting cornea-like lamellar structure. Unlike HCF, CSSC produced little matrix in the presence of serum. Construct thickness and collagen organization was enhanced by TGF-ß3. Scanning electron microscopic examination of the polycarbonate membrane revealed shallow parallel grooves with spacing of 200-300 nm, similar to the topography of aligned nanofiber substratum which we previously showed to induce matrix organization by CSSC. These results demonstrate that both corneal fibroblasts and stromal stem cells respond to a specific pattern of topographical cues by secreting highly organized extracellular matrix typical of corneal stroma. The data also suggest that the potential for matrix secretion and organization may not be directly related to the expression of molecular markers used to identify differentiated keratocytes.

  10. Fourier transform infrared imaging microspectroscopy and tissue-level mechanical testing reveal intraspecies variation in mouse bone mineral and matrix composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtland, Hayden-William; Nasser, Philip; Goldstone, Andrew B; Spevak, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L; Jepsen, Karl J

    2008-11-01

    Fracture susceptibility is heritable and dependent upon bone morphology and quality. However, studies of bone quality are typically overshadowed by emphasis on bone geometry and bone mineral density. Given that differences in mineral and matrix composition exist in a variety of species, we hypothesized that genetic variation in bone quality and tissue-level mechanical properties would also exist within species. Sixteen-week-old female A/J, C57BL/6J (B6), and C3H/HeJ (C3H) inbred mouse femora were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared imaging and tissue-level mechanical testing for variation in mineral composition, mineral maturity, collagen cross-link ratio, and tissue-level mechanical properties. A/J femora had an increased mineral-to-matrix ratio compared to B6. The C3H mineral-to-matrix ratio was intermediate of A/J and B6. C3H femora had reduced acid phosphate and carbonate levels and an increased collagen cross-link ratio compared to A/J and B6. Modulus values paralleled mineral-to-matrix values, with A/J femora being the most stiff, B6 being the least stiff, and C3H having intermediate stiffness. In addition, work-to-failure varied among the strains, with the highly mineralized and brittle A/J femora performing the least amount of work-to-failure. Inbred mice are therefore able to differentially modulate the composition of their bone mineral and the maturity of their bone matrix in conjunction with tissue-level mechanical properties. These results suggest that specific combinations of bone quality and morphological traits are genetically regulated such that mechanically functional bones can be constructed in different ways.

  11. Biodegradation, biocompatibility, and osteoconduction evaluation of collagen-nanohydroxyapatite cryogels for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Christiane Laranjo; Grenho, Liliana; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Colaço, Bruno Jorge; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Designing biomimetic biomaterials inspired by the natural complex structure of bone and other hard tissues is still a challenge nowadays. The control of the biomineralization process onto biomaterials should be evaluated before clinical application. Aiming at bone regeneration applications, this work evaluated the in vitro biodegradation and interaction between human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSC) cultured on different collagen/nanohydroxyapatite cryogels. Cell proliferation, differentiation, morphology, and metabolic activity were assessed through different protocols. All the biocomposite materials allowed physiologic apatite deposition after incubation in simulated body fluid and the cryogel with the highest nanoHA content showed to have the highest mechanical strength (DMA). The study clearly showed that the highest concentration of nanoHA granules on the cryogels were able to support cell type's survival, proliferation, and individual functionality in a monoculture system, for 21 days. In fact, the biocomposites were also able to differentiate HBMSCs into osteoblastic phenotype. The composites behavior was also assessed in vivo through subcutaneous and bone implantation in rats to evaluate its tissue-forming ability and degradation rate. The cryogels Coll/nanoHA (30 : 70) promoted tissue regeneration and adverse reactions were not observed on subcutaneous and bone implants. The results achieved suggest that scaffolds of Coll/nanoHA (30 : 70) should be considered promising implants for bone defects that present a grotto like appearance with a relatively small access but a wider hollow inside. This material could adjust to small dimensions and when entering into the defect, it could expand inside and remain in close contact with the defect walls, thus ensuring adequate osteoconductivity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Enhanced release of bone morphogenetic proteins from demineralized bone matrix by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Choi, Jong-il

    2015-01-01

    Gamma irradiation is a useful method for sterilizing demineralized bone matrix (DBM), but its effect on the osteoinductivity of DBM is still controversial. In this study, the osteoinductive activity of gamma-irradiated DBM was examined using a mouse myoblastic cell line (C2C12). DBM was extracted from adult bovine bone and was irradiated at a dose of 25 kGy using a 60 cobalt gamma-irradiator. Cell proliferation with DBM was not affected by gamma-irradiation, but alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin productions were significantly increased in C2C12 cell groups treated with gamma-irradiated DBM. It was reasoned that bone morphogenetic proteins were more efficiently released from gamma-irradiated DBM than from the non-irradiated control. This result suggests the effectiveness of radiation sterilization of bone implants - Highlights: • Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) was gamma-irradiated for sterilization. • Irradiated DBM had higher alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin production. • It was reasoned the more released bone morphogenetic proteins by irradiation. • This result supports the application of radiation sterilization for bone implants

  13. BONE REGENERATION AFTER DEMINERALIZED BONE MATRIX AND CASTOR OIL (RICINUS COMMUNIS) POLYURETHANE IMPLANTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Fábio Renato Manzolli; Ramalho, Lizeti Toledo de Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Innocuous biocompatible materials have been searched to repair or reconstruct bone defects. Their goal is to restore the function of live or dead tissues. This study compared connective tissue and bone reaction when exposed to demineralized bovine bone matrix and a polyurethane resin derived from castor bean (Ricinus communis). Forty-five rats were assigned to 3 groups of 15 animals (control, bovine bone and polyurethane). A cylindrical defect was created on mandible base and filled with bovine bone matrix and the polyurethane. Control group received no treatment. Analyses were performed after 15, 45 and 60 days (5 animals each). Histological analysis revealed connective tissue tolerance to bovine bone with local inflammatory response similar to that of the control group. After 15 days, all groups demonstrated similar outcomes, with mild inflammatory reaction, probably due to the surgical procedure rather than to the material. In the polymer group, after 60 days, scarce multinucleated cells could still be observed. In general, all groups showed good stability and osteogenic connective tissue with blood vessels into the surgical area. The results suggest biocompatibility of both materials, seen by their integration into rat mandible. Moreover, the polyurethane seems to be an alternative in bone reconstruction and it is an inexhaustible source of biomaterial. PMID:19089203

  14. Bone collagen stable carbon and nitrogen isotope variability in modern South Australian mammals: A baseline for palaeoecological inferences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pate, F.D.; Anson, T.J.; Noble, A.H.; Schoeninger, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Cortical bone samples were collected from a range of modern mammals at four field sites along a 1225 km north-south transect from temperate coastal to arid interior South Australia in order to address variability in stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition. Collection sites were located along the eastern border of the state and included Mount Gambier, Karte, Plumbago and Innamincka. Mean annual rainfall along the transect ranges from 700-800 mm at Mount Gambier to 150-200 mm at Innamincka. Bone collagen carbon and nitrogen isotope values become more positive toward the arid north in relation to increasing quantities of C-4 plants and decreasing amounts of rainfall. respectively. In addition, carnivores and herbivores can be differentiated by stable nitrogen isotope values. On average, carnivore bone collagen is approximately 6 per mil more positive than that of rabbits at Mount Gambier but only 2.6 - 3.4 per mil more positive at the three arid collection sites. In general, the large eutherian herbivores have mean bone collagen δ15N values that are 1.4 - 2.3 per mil more positive than those of the marsupial herbivores. Eutherian and marsupial bone collagen δ15N differences only disappear at the most arid collection site, Innamincka

  15. Bone collagen stable carbon and nitrogen isotope variability in modern South Australian mammals: A baseline for palaeoecological inferences.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pate, F.D.; Anson, T.J.; Noble, A.H. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Bedford Park, SA (Australia). Department of Archaeology; Schoeninger, M.J. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Department of Anthropology

    1997-12-31

    Cortical bone samples were collected from a range of modern mammals at four field sites along a 1225 km north-south transect from temperate coastal to arid interior South Australia in order to address variability in stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition. Collection sites were located along the eastern border of the state and included Mount Gambier, Karte, Plumbago and Innamincka. Mean annual rainfall along the transect ranges from 700-800 mm at Mount Gambier to 150-200 mm at Innamincka. Bone collagen carbon and nitrogen isotope values become more positive toward the arid north in relation to increasing quantities of C-4 plants and decreasing amounts of rainfall. respectively. In addition, carnivores and herbivores can be differentiated by stable nitrogen isotope values. On average, carnivore bone collagen is approximately 6 per mil more positive than that of rabbits at Mount Gambier but only 2.6 - 3.4 per mil more positive at the three arid collection sites. In general, the large eutherian herbivores have mean bone collagen {delta}15N values that are 1.4 - 2.3 per mil more positive than those of the marsupial herbivores. Eutherian and marsupial bone collagen {delta}15N differences only disappear at the most arid collection site, Innamincka.

  16. Synergistic intrafibrillar/extrafibrillar mineralization of collagen scaffolds based on a biomimetic strategy to promote the regeneration of bone defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yao Wang,1 Ngo Van Manh,1,2 Haorong Wang,1 Xue Zhong,1 Xu Zhang,1 Changyi Li1 1School of Dentistry, Hospital of Stomatology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China; 2Thaibinh University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thaibinh, Vietnam Abstract: The mineralization of collagen scaffolds can improve their mechanical properties and biocompatibility, thereby providing an appropriate microenvironment for bone regeneration. The primary purpose of the present study is to fabricate a synergistically intra- and extrafibrillar mineralized collagen scaffold, which has many advantages in terms of biocompatibility, biomechanical properties, and further osteogenic potential. In this study, mineralized collagen scaffolds were fabricated using a traditional mineralization method (ie, immersed in simulated body fluid as a control group and using a biomimetic method based on the polymer-induced liquid precursor process as an experimental group. In the polymer-induced liquid precursor process, a negatively charged polymer, carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC, was used to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP to form nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP. Collagen scaffolds mineralized based on the polymer-induced liquid precursor process were in gel form such that nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP can easily be drawn into the interstices of the collagen fibrils. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the porous micromorphology and synergistic mineralization pattern of the collagen scaffolds. Compared with simulated body fluid, nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP significantly increased the modulus of the collagen scaffolds. The results of in vitro experiments showed that the cell count and differentiated degrees in the experimental group were higher than those in the control group. Histological staining and micro-computed tomography showed that the amount of new bone regenerated in the experimental group was larger than that in the

  17. Fabrication method, structure, mechanical, and biological properties of decellularized extracellular matrix for replacement of wide bone tissue defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimova, N Y; Kiselevsky, M V; Sukhorukova, I V; Shvindina, N V; Shtansky, D V

    2015-09-01

    The present paper was focused on the development of a new method of decellularized extracellular matrix (DECM) fabrication via a chemical treatment of a native bone tissue. Particular attention was paid to the influence of chemical treatment on the mechanical properties of native bones, sterility, and biological performance in vivo using the syngeneic heterotopic and orthotopic implantation models. The obtained data indicated that after a chemical decellularization treatment in 4% aqueous sodium chlorite, no noticeable signs of the erosion of compact cortical bone surface or destruction of trabeculae of spongy bone in spinal channel were observed. The histological studies showed that the chemical treatment resulted in the decellularization of both bone and cartilage tissues. The DECM samples demonstrated no signs of chemical and biological degradation in vivo. Thorough structural characterization revealed that after decellularization, the mineral frame retained its integrity with the organic phase; however clotting and destruction of organic molecules and fibers were observed. FTIR studies revealed several structural changes associated with the destruction of organic molecules, although all organic components typical of intact bone were preserved. The decellularization-induced structural changes in the collagen constituent resulted changed the deformation under compression mechanism: from the major fracture by crack propagation throughout the sample to the predominantly brittle fracture. Although the mechanical properties of radius bones subjected to decellularization were observed to degrade, the mechanical properties of ulna bones in compression and humerus bones in bending remained unchanged. The compressive strength of both the intact and decellularized ulna bones was 125-130 MPa and the flexural strength of humerus bones was 156 and 145 MPa for the intact and decellularized samples, respectively. These results open new avenues for the use of DECM samples as

  18. Effect of Extracellular Matrix Membrane on Bone Formation in a Rabbit Tibial Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wook Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Absorbable extracellular matrix (ECM membrane has recently been used as a barrier membrane (BM in guided tissue regeneration (GTR and guided bone regeneration (GBR. Absorbable BMs are mostly based on collagen, which is more biocompatible than synthetic materials. However, implanted absorbable BMs can be rapidly degraded by enzymes in vivo. In a previous study, to delay degradation time, collagen fibers were treated with cross-linking agents. These compounds prevented the enzymatic degradation of BMs. However, cross-linked BMs can exhibit delayed tissue integration. In addition, the remaining cross-linker could induce inflammation. Here, we attempted to overcome these problems using a natural ECM membrane. The membrane consisted of freshly harvested porcine pericardium that was stripped from cells and immunoreagents by a cleaning process. Acellular porcine pericardium (APP showed a bilayer structure with a smooth upper surface and a significantly coarser bottom layer. APP is an ECM with a thin layer (0.18–0.35 mm but with excellent mechanical properties. Tensile strength of APP was 14.15±2.24 MPa. In in vivo experiments, APP was transplanted into rabbit tibia. The biocompatible material was retained for up to 3 months without the need for cross-linking. Therefore, we conclude that APP could support osteogenesis as a BM for up to 3 months.

  19. Identification of a new hominin bone from Denisova Cave, Siberia using collagen fingerprinting and mitochondrial DNA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Samantha; Higham, Thomas; Slon, Viviane; Pääbo, Svante; Meyer, Matthias; Douka, Katerina; Brock, Fiona; Comeskey, Daniel; Procopio, Noemi; Shunkov, Michael; Derevianko, Anatoly; Buckley, Michael

    2016-03-01

    DNA sequencing has revolutionised our understanding of archaic humans during the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic. Unfortunately, while many Palaeolithic sites contain large numbers of bones, the majority of these lack the diagnostic features necessary for traditional morphological identification. As a result the recovery of Pleistocene-age human remains is extremely rare. To circumvent this problem we have applied a method of collagen fingerprinting to more than 2000 fragmented bones from the site of Denisova Cave, Russia, in order to facilitate the discovery of human remains. As a result of our analysis a single hominin bone (Denisova 11) was identified, supported through in-depth peptide sequencing analysis, and found to carry mitochondrial DNA of the Neandertal type. Subsequent radiocarbon dating revealed the bone to be >50,000 years old. Here we demonstrate the huge potential collagen fingerprinting has for identifying hominin remains in highly fragmentary archaeological assemblages, improving the resources available for wider studies into human evolution.

  20. Sika Deer Antler Collagen Type I-Accelerated Osteogenesis in Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells via the Smad Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deer antler preparations have been used to strengthen bones for centuries. It is particularly rich in collagen type I. This study aimed to unravel part of the purported bioremedial effect of Sika deer antler collagen type I (SDA-Col I on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The results suggest that SDA-Col I might be used to promote and regulate osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. SDA-Col I might potentially provide the basis for novel therapeutic strategies in the treatment of bone injury and/or in scaffolds for bone replacement strategies. Finally, isolation of SDA-Col I from deer antler represents a renewable, green, and uncomplicated way to obtain a biomedically valuable therapeutic.

  1. Quantitative proteomics reveals altered expression of extracellular matrix related proteins of human primary dermal fibroblasts in response to sulfated hyaluronan and collagen applied as artificial extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stephan A; van der Smissen, Anja; von Feilitzsch, Margarete; Anderegg, Ulf; Kalkhof, Stefan; von Bergen, Martin

    2012-12-01

    Fibroblasts are the main matrix producing cells of the dermis and are also strongly regulated by their matrix environment which can be used to improve and guide skin wound healing processes. Here, we systematically investigated the molecular effects on primary dermal fibroblasts in response to high-sulfated hyaluronan [HA] (hsHA) by quantitative proteomics. The comparison of non- and high-sulfated HA revealed regulation of 84 of more than 1,200 quantified proteins. Based on gene enrichment we found that sulfation of HA alters extracellular matrix remodeling. The collagen degrading enzymes cathepsin K, matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -14 were found to be down-regulated on hsHA. Additionally protein expression of thrombospondin-1, decorin, collagen types I and XII were reduced, whereas the expression of trophoblast glycoprotein and collagen type VI were slightly increased. This study demonstrates that global proteomics provides a valuable tool for revealing proteins involved in molecular effects of growth substrates for further material optimization.

  2. A new procedure for extraction of collagen from modern and archaeological bones for {sup 14}C dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maspero, F. [CUDaM, University of Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Sala, S.; Papagni, A. [University of Milano Bicocca, Materials Science Department, Milano (Italy); Fedi, M.E. [INFN sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Martini, M. [CUDaM, University of Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); University of Milano Bicocca, Materials Science Department, Milano (Italy); INFN sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Bones are potentially the best age indicators in a stratigraphic study, because they are closely related to the layer in which they are found. Collagen is the most suitable fraction and is the material normally used in radiocarbon dating. Bone contaminants can strongly alter the carbon isotopic fraction values of the samples, so chemical pretreatment for {sup 14} C dating by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is essential. The most widespread method for collagen extraction is based on the Longin procedure, which consists in HCl demineralization to dissolve the inorganic phase of the samples, followed by dissolution of collagen in a weak acid solution. In this work the possible side effects of this procedure on a modern bone are presented; the extracted collagen was analyzed by ATR-IR spectroscopy. An alternative procedure, based on use of HF instead of HCl, to minimize unwanted degradation of the organic fraction, is also given. A study by ATR-IR spectroscopic analysis of collagen collected after different demineralization times and with different acid volumes, and a study of an archaeological sample, are also presented. (orig.)

  3. The effect of carrier type on bone regeneration of demineralized bone matrix in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakol, Shima; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Azami, Mahmoud; Kashani, Iraj Ragerdi; Tavakol, Hani; Yazdanifar, Mahbube; Sorkhabadi, Seyed Mahdi Rezayat

    2013-11-01

    Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) is a bone substitute biomaterial used as an excellent grafting material. Some factors such as carrier type might affect the healing potential of this material. The background data discuss the present status of the field: Albumin as a main protein in blood and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were applied frequently in the DBM gels. We investigated the bone-repairing properties of 2 DBMs with different carriers. Bone regeneration in 3 groups of rat calvaria treated with DBM from the Iranian Tissue Bank Research and Preparation Center, DBM from Hans Biomed Corporation, and an empty cavity was studied. Albumin and CMC as carriers were used. The results of bone regeneration in the samples after 1, 4, and 8 weeks of implantation were compared. The block of the histologic samples was stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and the percentage area of bone formation was calculated using the histomorphometry method. The results of in vivo tests showed a significantly stronger new regenerated bone occupation in the DBM with albumin carrier compared with the one with CMC 8 weeks after the implantation. The 2 types of DBM had a significant difference in bone regeneration. This difference is attributed to the type of carriers. Albumin could improve mineralization and bioactivity compared with CMC.

  4. Inhibition of microRNA-214-5p promotes cell survival and extracellular matrix formation by targeting collagen type IV alpha 1 in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q S; Meng, F Y; Zhao, Y H; Jin, C L; Tian, J; Yi, X J

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the functional effects of microRNA (miR)-214-5p on osteoblastic cells, which might provide a potential role of miR-214-5p in bone fracture healing. Blood samples were obtained from patients with hand fracture or intra-articular calcaneal fracture and from healthy controls (HCs). Expression of miR-214-5p was monitored by qRT-PCR at day 7, 14 and 21 post-surgery. Mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were transfected with antisense oligonucleotides (ASO)-miR-214-5p, collagen type IV alpha 1 (COL4A1) vector or their controls; thereafter, cell viability, apoptotic rate, and the expression of collagen type I alpha 1 (COL1A1), type II collagen (COL-II), and type X collagen (COL-X) were determined. Luciferase reporter assay, qRT-PCR, and Western blot were performed to ascertain whether COL4A1 was a target of miR-214-5p. Plasma miR-214-5p was highly expressed in patients with bone fracture compared with HCs after fracture (p extracellular matrix (ECM) formation of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells by targeting COL4A1. Cite this article: Q. S. Li, F. Y. Meng, Y. H. Zhao, C. L. Jin, J. Tian, X. J. Yi. Inhibition of microRNA-214-5p promotes cell survival and extracellular matrix formation by targeting collagen type IV alpha 1 in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:464-471. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.68.BJR-2016-0208.R2. © 2017 Yi et al.

  5. Calcium phosphate fibers coated with collagen: In vivo evaluation of the effects on bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Fabio Roberto; Kido, Hueliton Wilian; Granito, Renata Neves; Gabbai-Armelin, Paulo Roberto; Magri, Angela Maria Paiva; Fernandes, Kelly Rosseti; da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Braga, Francisco José Correa; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2016-08-12

    The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of the CaP/Col composites, in powder and fiber form, via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), pH and calcium release evaluation after immersion in SBF and to evaluate the performance of these materials on the bone repair process in a tibial bone defect model. For this, four different formulations (CaP powder - CaPp, CaP powder with collagen - CaPp/Col, CaP fibers - CaPf and CaP fibers with collagen - CaPf/Col) were developed. SEM images indicated that both material forms were successfully coated with collagen and that CaPp and CaPf presented HCA precursor crystals on their surface. Although presenting different forms, FTIR analysis indicated that CaPp and CaPf maintained the characteristic peaks for this class of material. Additionally, the calcium assay study demonstrated a higher Ca uptake for CaPp compared to CaPf for up to 5 days. Furthermore, pH measurements revealed that the collagen coating prevented the acidification of the medium, leading to higher pH values for CaPp/Col and CaPf/Col. The histological analysis showed that CaPf/Col demonstrated a higher amount of newly formed bone in the region of the defect and a reduced presence of material. In summary, the results indicated that the fibrous CaP enriched with the organic part (collagen) glassy scaffold presented good degradability and bone-forming properties and also supported Runx2 and RANKL expression. These results show that the present CaP/Col fibrous composite may be used as a bone graft for inducing bone repair.

  6. A Novel Matrix Protein Hic31 from the Prismatic Layer of Hyriopsis Cumingii Displays a Collagen-Like Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojun; Zeng, Shimei; Dong, Shaojian; Jin, Can; Li, Jiale

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we clone and characterize a novel matrix protein, hic31, from the mantle of Hyriopsis cumingii. The amino acid composition of hic31 consists of a high proportion of Glycine residues (26.67%). Tissue expression detection by RT-PCR indicates that hic31 is expressed specifically at the mantle edge. In situ hybridization results reveals strong signals from the dorsal epithelial cells of the outer fold at the mantle edge, and weak signals from inner epithelial cells of the same fold, indicating that hic31 is a prismatic-layer matrix protein. Although BLASTP results identify no shared homology with other shell-matrix proteins or any other known proteins, the hic31 tertiary structure is similar to that of collagen I, alpha 1 and alpha 2. It has been well proved that collagen forms the basic organic frameworks in way of collagen fibrils and minerals present within or outside of these fibrils. Therefore, hic31 might be a framework-matrix protein involved in the prismatic-layer biomineralization. Besides, the gene expression of hic31 increase in the early stages of pearl sac development, indicating that hic31 may play important roles in biomineralization of the pearl prismatic layer.

  7. A Novel Matrix Protein Hic31 from the Prismatic Layer of Hyriopsis Cumingii Displays a Collagen-Like Structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Liu

    Full Text Available In this study, we clone and characterize a novel matrix protein, hic31, from the mantle of Hyriopsis cumingii. The amino acid composition of hic31 consists of a high proportion of Glycine residues (26.67%. Tissue expression detection by RT-PCR indicates that hic31 is expressed specifically at the mantle edge. In situ hybridization results reveals strong signals from the dorsal epithelial cells of the outer fold at the mantle edge, and weak signals from inner epithelial cells of the same fold, indicating that hic31 is a prismatic-layer matrix protein. Although BLASTP results identify no shared homology with other shell-matrix proteins or any other known proteins, the hic31 tertiary structure is similar to that of collagen I, alpha 1 and alpha 2. It has been well proved that collagen forms the basic organic frameworks in way of collagen fibrils and minerals present within or outside of these fibrils. Therefore, hic31 might be a framework-matrix protein involved in the prismatic-layer biomineralization. Besides, the gene expression of hic31 increase in the early stages of pearl sac development, indicating that hic31 may play important roles in biomineralization of the pearl prismatic layer.

  8. Checking collagen preservation in archaeological bone by non-destructive studies (Micro-CT and IBA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, L.; Cuif, J.-P.; Pichon, L.; Vaubaillon, S.; Dambricourt Malassé, A.; Abel, R. L.

    2012-02-01

    The material to be studied is a piece of human skull discovered (1999) in Pleistocene sediments from the Orsang river (Gujarat state, India). From anatomical view point, this skull is highly composite: modern Homo sapiens characters are associated to undoubtedly more ancient features. Absolute dating by 14C is critical to understand this discovery. Prior to dating measurements, non-destructive studies have been carried out. Micro-CT reconstruction (X-ray microtomography) and Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) have been undertaken to check the structural preservation of the fossil and the collagen preservation. PIXE elemental map was used to select well-preserved bone area. RBS/EBS and NRA were used for light element quantification, in particular C, N and O contents. We also demonstrate that the PIXE-RBS/EBS combination is a effective tool for the whole characterization of archaeological and recent bones by analysing in one experiment both mineral and organic fractions. We have shown that the archaeological bone, a fragment of the potentially oldest modern Indian, is enough preserved for radiocarbon dating. We propose that Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) using 3 MeV protons could be a good non destructive alternative to conventional CHN method using Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen analyzer for measuring C and N before 14C dating.

  9. Checking collagen preservation in archaeological bone by non-destructive studies (Micro-CT and IBA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, L., E-mail: lucile.beck@cea.fr [C2RMF - UMR171 CNRS, Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, Palais du Louvre, Porte des Lions, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cuif, J.-P. [UMR IDES 8148, Universite Paris XI-Orsay, 91405 Orsay cedex (France); Pichon, L. [C2RMF - UMR171 CNRS, Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, Palais du Louvre, Porte des Lions, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Vaubaillon, S. [CEA, INSTN, Laboratoire JANNUS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dambricourt Malasse, A. [Departement de Prehistoire, Museum national d' Histoire naturelle, UMR 7194 - CNRS, Institut de Paleontologie Humaine, 1, rue Rene Panhard, 75013 Paris (France); Abel, R.L. [The Natural History Museum, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    The material to be studied is a piece of human skull discovered (1999) in Pleistocene sediments from the Orsang river (Gujarat state, India). From anatomical view point, this skull is highly composite: modern Homo sapiens characters are associated to undoubtedly more ancient features. Absolute dating by {sup 14}C is critical to understand this discovery. Prior to dating measurements, non-destructive studies have been carried out. Micro-CT reconstruction (X-ray microtomography) and Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) have been undertaken to check the structural preservation of the fossil and the collagen preservation. PIXE elemental map was used to select well-preserved bone area. RBS/EBS and NRA were used for light element quantification, in particular C, N and O contents. We also demonstrate that the PIXE-RBS/EBS combination is a effective tool for the whole characterization of archaeological and recent bones by analysing in one experiment both mineral and organic fractions. We have shown that the archaeological bone, a fragment of the potentially oldest modern Indian, is enough preserved for radiocarbon dating. We propose that Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) using 3 MeV protons could be a good non destructive alternative to conventional CHN method using Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen analyzer for measuring C and N before {sup 14}C dating.

  10. Checking collagen preservation in archaeological bone by non-destructive studies (Micro-CT and IBA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, L.; Cuif, J.-P.; Pichon, L.; Vaubaillon, S.; Dambricourt Malassé, A.; Abel, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    The material to be studied is a piece of human skull discovered (1999) in Pleistocene sediments from the Orsang river (Gujarat state, India). From anatomical view point, this skull is highly composite: modern Homo sapiens characters are associated to undoubtedly more ancient features. Absolute dating by 14 C is critical to understand this discovery. Prior to dating measurements, non-destructive studies have been carried out. Micro-CT reconstruction (X-ray microtomography) and Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) have been undertaken to check the structural preservation of the fossil and the collagen preservation. PIXE elemental map was used to select well-preserved bone area. RBS/EBS and NRA were used for light element quantification, in particular C, N and O contents. We also demonstrate that the PIXE-RBS/EBS combination is a effective tool for the whole characterization of archaeological and recent bones by analysing in one experiment both mineral and organic fractions. We have shown that the archaeological bone, a fragment of the potentially oldest modern Indian, is enough preserved for radiocarbon dating. We propose that Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) using 3 MeV protons could be a good non destructive alternative to conventional CHN method using Carbon–Hydrogen–Nitrogen analyzer for measuring C and N before 14 C dating.

  11. Large proteoglycan complexes and disturbed collagen architecture in the corneal extracellular matrix of mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (Sly syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert D; Liskova, Petra; Pinali, Christian; Palka, Barbara P; Palos, Michalis; Jirsova, Katerina; Hrdlickova, Enkela; Tesarova, Marketa; Elleder, Milan; Zeman, Jiri; Meek, Keith M; Knupp, Carlo; Quantock, Andrew J

    2011-08-24

    Deficiencies in enzymes involved in proteoglycan (PG) turnover underlie a number of rare mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS), investigations of which can considerably aid understanding of the roles of PGs in corneal matrix biology. Here, the authors analyze novel pathologic changes in MPS VII (Sly syndrome) to determine the nature of PG-collagen associations in stromal ultrastructure. Transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography were used to investigate PG-collagen architectures and interactions in a cornea obtained at keratoplasty from a 22-year-old man with MPS VII, which was caused by a compound heterozygous mutation in the GUSB gene. Transmission electron microscopy showed atypical morphology of the epithelial basement membrane and Bowman's layer in MPS VII. Keratocytes were packed with cytoplasmic vacuoles containing abnormal glycosaminoglycan (GAG) material, and collagen fibrils were thinner than in normal cornea and varied considerably throughout anterior (14-32 nm), mid (13-42 nm), and posterior (17-39 nm) regions of the MPS VII stroma. PGs viewed in three dimensions were striking in appearance in that they were significantly larger than PGs in normal cornea and formed highly extended linkages with multiple collagen fibrils. Cellular changes in the MPS VII cornea resemble those in other MPS. However, the wide range of collagen fibril diameters throughout the stroma and the extensive matrix presence of supranormal-sized PG structures appear to be unique features of this disorder. The findings suggest that the accumulation of stromal chondroitin-, dermatan-, and heparan-sulfate glycosaminoglycans in the absence of β-glucuronidase-mediated degradation can modulate collagen fibrillogenesis.

  12. Computational Characterization of Type I collagen-based Extra-cellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher Allen Rucksack; Lin, Daniel; Jiao, Yang; Sun, Bo

    2015-03-01

    A model of extracellular matrix (ECM) of collagen fibers has been built, in which cells could communicate with distant partners via fiber-mediated long-range-transmitted stress states. The ECM is modeled as a spring-like fiber network derived from skeletonized confocal microscopy data. Different local and global perturbations have been performed on the network, each followed by an optimized global Monte-Carlo (MC) energy minimization leading to the deformed network in response to the perturbations. In the optimization, a highly efficient local energy update procedure is employed and force-directed MC moves are used, which results in a convergence to the energy minimum state 20 times faster than the commonly used random displacement trial moves in MC. Further analysis and visualization of the distribution and correlation of the resulting force network reveal that local perturbations can give rise to global impacts: the force chains formed with a linear extent much further than the characteristic length scale associated with the perturbation sites and average fiber length. This behavior provides a strong evidence for our hypothesis of fiber-mediated long-range force transmission in ECM networks and the resulting long-range cell-cell mechanical signaling. ASU Seed Grant.

  13. A Comparative Study of Collagen Matrix Density Effect on Endothelial Sprout Formation Using Experimental and Computational Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir; Mohammadaliha, Negar; Heilshorn, Sarah C; Bauer, Amy L

    2016-04-01

    A thorough understanding of determining factors in angiogenesis is a necessary step to control the development of new blood vessels. Extracellular matrix density is known to have a significant influence on cellular behaviors and consequently can regulate vessel formation. The utilization of experimental platforms in combination with numerical models can be a powerful method to explore the mechanisms of new capillary sprout formation. In this study, using an integrative method, the interplay between the matrix density and angiogenesis was investigated. Owing the fact that the extracellular matrix density is a global parameter that can affect other parameters such as pore size, stiffness, cell-matrix adhesion and cross-linking, deeper understanding of the most important biomechanical or biochemical properties of the ECM causing changes in sprout morphogenesis is crucial. Here, we implemented both computational and experimental methods to analyze the mechanisms responsible for the influence of ECM density on the sprout formation that is difficult to be investigated comprehensively using each of these single methods. For this purpose, we first utilized an innovative approach to quantify the correspondence of the simulated collagen fibril density to the collagen density in the experimental part. Comparing the results of the experimental study and computational model led to some considerable achievements. First, we verified the results of the computational model using the experimental results. Then, we reported parameters such as the ratio of proliferating cells to migrating cells that was difficult to obtain from experimental study. Finally, this integrative system led to gain an understanding of the possible mechanisms responsible for the effect of ECM density on angiogenesis. The results showed that stable and long sprouts were observed at an intermediate collagen matrix density of 1.2 and 1.9 mg/ml due to a balance between the number of migrating and proliferating

  14. Ectopic bone formation in nude rats using human osteoblasts seeded poly(3)hydroxybutyrate embroidery and hydroxyapatite-collagen tapes constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Ronald; Hagedorn, Manolo Gunnar; Gelinsky, Michael; Werner, Carsten; Turhani, Dritan; Späth, Heike; Gedrange, Tomas; Lauer, Günter

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ectopic bone formation using tissue engineered cell-seeded constructs with two different scaffolds and primary human maxillary osteoblasts in nude rats over an implantation period of up to 96 days. Collagen I-coated Poly(3)hydroxybutyrate (PHB) embroidery and hydroxyapatite (HAP) collagen tapes were seeded with primary human maxillary osteoblasts (hOB) and implanted into athymic rnu/run rats. A total of 72 implants were placed into the back muscles of 18 rats. 24, 48 and 96 days after implantation, histological and histomorphometric analyses were made. The osteoblastic character of the cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR for osteocalcin. Histological analysis demonstrated that all cell-seeded constructs induced ectopic bone formation after 24, 48 and 96 days of implantation. There was more mineralized tissue in PHB constructs than in HAP-collagen tapes (at day 24; p embroidery or HAP-collagen tapes can induce ectopic bone formation. However, the amount of bone formed decreased with increasing length of implantation.

  15. Co-culture of chondrons and mesenchymal stromal cells reduces the loss of collagen VI and improves extracellular matrix production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owida, H A; De Las Heras Ruiz, T; Dhillon, A; Yang, Y; Kuiper, N J

    2017-12-01

    Adult articular chondrocytes are surrounded by a pericellular matrix (PCM) to form a chondron. The PCM is rich in hyaluronan, proteoglycans, and collagen II, and it is the exclusive location of collagen VI in articular cartilage. Collagen VI anchors the chondrocyte to the PCM. It has been suggested that co-culture of chondrons with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) might enhance extracellular matrix (ECM) production. This co-culture study investigates whether MSCs help to preserve the PCM and increase ECM production. Primary bovine chondrons or chondrocytes or rat MSCs were cultured alone to establish a baseline level for ECM production. A xenogeneic co-culture monolayer model using rat MSCs (20, 50, and 80%) was established. PCM maintenance and ECM production were assessed by biochemical assays, immunofluorescence, and histological staining. Co-culture of MSCs with chondrons enhanced ECM matrix production, as compared to chondrocyte or chondron only cultures. The ratio 50:50 co-culture of MSCs and chondrons resulted in the highest increase in GAG production (18.5 ± 0.54 pg/cell at day 1 and 11 ± 0.38 pg/cell at day 7 in 50:50 co-culture versus 16.8 ± 0.61 pg/cell at day 1 and 10 ± 0.45 pg/cell at day 7 in chondron monoculture). The co-culture of MSCs with chondrons appeared to decelerate the loss of the PCM as determined by collagen VI expression, whilst the expression of high-temperature requirement serine protease A1 (HtrA1) demonstrated an inverse relationship to that of the collagen VI. Together, this implies that MSCs directly or indirectly inhibited HtrA1 activity and the co-culture of MSCs with chondrons enhanced ECM synthesis and the preservation of the PCM.

  16. Design and characterization of microcapsules-integrated collagen matrixes as multifunctional three-dimensional scaffolds for soft tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Mercato, Loretta L; Passione, Laura Gioia; Izzo, Daniela; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Sannino, Alessandro; Gervaso, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds based on collagen are promising candidates for soft tissue engineering applications. The addition of stimuli-responsive carriers (nano- and microparticles) in the current approaches to tissue reconstruction and repair brings about novel challenges in the design and conception of carrier-integrated polymer scaffolds. In this study, a facile method was developed to functionalize 3D collagen porous scaffolds with biodegradable multilayer microcapsules. The effects of the capsule charge as well as the influence of the functionalization methods on the binding efficiency to the scaffolds were studied. It was found that the binding of cationic microcapsules was higher than that of anionic ones, and application of vacuum during scaffolds functionalization significantly hindered the attachment of the microcapsules to the collagen matrix. The physical properties of microcapsules-integrated scaffolds were compared to pristine scaffolds. The modified scaffolds showed swelling ratios, weight losses and mechanical properties similar to those of unmodified scaffolds. Finally, in vitro diffusional tests proved that the collagen scaffolds could stably retain the microcapsules over long incubation time in Tris-HCl buffer at 37°C without undergoing morphological changes, thus confirming their suitability for tissue engineering applications. The obtained results indicate that by tuning the charge of the microcapsules and by varying the fabrication conditions, collagen scaffolds patterned with high or low number of microcapsules can be obtained, and that the microcapsules-integrated scaffolds fully retain their original physical properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prediction of equibiaxial loading stress in collagen-based extracellular matrix using a three-dimensional unit cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilo, Monica E; Bell, Brett J; Roeder, Blayne A; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Kokini, Klod; Nauman, Eric A

    2013-03-01

    Mechanical signals are important factors in determining cell fate. Therefore, insights as to how mechanical signals are transferred between the cell and its surrounding three-dimensional collagen fibril network will provide a basis for designing the optimum extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment for tissue regeneration. Previously we described a cellular solid model to predict fibril microstructure-mechanical relationships of reconstituted collagen matrices due to unidirectional loads (Acta Biomater 2010;6:1471-86). The model consisted of representative volume elements made up of an interconnected network of flexible struts. The present study extends this work by adapting the model to account for microstructural anisotropy of the collagen fibrils and a biaxial loading environment. The model was calibrated based on uniaxial tensile data and used to predict the equibiaxial tensile stress-stretch relationship. Modifications to the model significantly improved its predictive capacity for equibiaxial loading data. With a comparable fibril length (model 5.9-8μm, measured 7.5μm) and appropriate fibril anisotropy the anisotropic model provides a better representation of the collagen fibril microstructure. Such models are important tools for tissue engineering because they facilitate prediction of microstructure-mechanical relationships for collagen matrices over a wide range of microstructures and provide a framework for predicting cell-ECM interactions. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Filamin A Mediates Wound Closure by Promoting Elastic Deformation and Maintenance of Tension in the Collagen Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hamid; Pinto, Vanessa I.; Wang, Yongqiang; Hinz, Boris; Janmey, Paul A.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-mediated remodeling and wound closure are critical for efficient wound healing, but the contribution of actin-binding proteins to contraction of the extracellular matrix is not defined. We examined the role of filamin A (FLNa), an actin filament cross-linking protein, in wound contraction and maintenance of matrix tension. Conditional deletion of FLNa in fibroblasts in mice was associated with ~ 4 day delay of full-thickness skin wound contraction compared with wild-type (WT) mice. We modeled the healing wound matrix using cultured fibroblasts plated on grid-supported collagen gels that create lateral boundaries, which are analogues to wound margins. In contrast to WT cells, FLNa knockdown (KD) cells could not completely maintain tension when matrix compaction was resisted by boundaries, which manifested as relaxed matrix tension. Similarly, WT cells on cross-linked collagen, which requires higher levels of sustained tension, exhibited approximately fivefold larger deformation fields and approximately twofold greater fiber alignment compared with FLNa KD cells. Maintenance of boundary-resisted tension markedly influenced the elongation of cell extensions: in WT cells, the number (~50%) and length (~300%) of cell extensions were greater than FLNa KD cells. We conclude that FLNa is required for wound contraction, in part by enabling elastic deformation and maintenance of tension in the matrix. PMID:26134946

  19. Matrix density alters zyxin phosphorylation, which limits peripheral process formation and extension in endothelial cells invading 3D collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Colette A; Bayless, Kayla J

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to determine the optimal conditions required for known pro-angiogenic stimuli to elicit successful endothelial sprouting responses. We used an established, quantifiable model of endothelial cell (EC) sprout initiation where ECs were tested for invasion in low (1 mg/mL) and high density (5 mg/mL) 3D collagen matrices. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) alone, or S1P combined with stromal derived factor-1α (SDF) and phorbol ester (TPA), elicited robust sprouting responses. The ability of these factors to stimulate sprouting was more effective in higher density collagen matrices. S1P stimulation resulted in a significant increase in invasion distance, and with the exception of treatment groups containing phorbol ester, invasion distance was longer in 1mg/mL compared to 5mg/mL collagen matrices. Closer examination of cell morphology revealed that increasing matrix density and supplementing with SDF and TPA enhanced the formation of multicellular structures more closely resembling capillaries. TPA enhanced the frequency and size of lumen formation and correlated with a robust increase in phosphorylation of p42/p44 Erk kinase, while S1P and SDF did not. Also, a higher number of significantly longer extended processes formed in 5mg/mL compared to 1mg/mL collagen matrices. Because collagen matrices at higher density have been reported to be stiffer, we tested for changes in the mechanosensitive protein, zyxin. Interestingly, zyxin phosphorylation levels inversely correlated with matrix density, while levels of total zyxin did not change significantly. Immunofluorescence and localization studies revealed that total zyxin was distributed evenly throughout invading structures, while phosphorylated zyxin was slightly more intense in extended peripheral processes. Silencing zyxin expression increased extended process length and number of processes, while increasing zyxin levels decreased extended process length. Altogether these data indicate that ECs

  20. Histone deacetylase 3 supports endochondral bone formation by controlling cytokine signaling and matrix remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpio, Lomeli R.; Bradley, Elizabeth W.; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Weivoda, Megan M.; Poston, Daniel D.; Dudakovic, Amel; Xu, Ming; Tchkonia, Tamar; Kirkland, James L.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Oursler, Merry Jo; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2017-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are efficacious epigenetic-based therapies for some cancers and neurological disorders; however, each of these drugs inhibits multiple HDACs and has detrimental effects on the skeleton. To better understand how HDAC inhibitors affect endochondral bone formation, we conditionally deleted one of their targets, Hdac3, pre- and postnatally in type II collagen α1 (Col2α1)–expressing chondrocytes. Embryonic deletion was lethal, but postnatal deletion of Hdac3 delayed secondary ossification center formation, altered maturation of growth plate chondrocytes, and increased osteoclast activity in the primary spongiosa. HDAC3-deficient chondrocytes exhibited increased expression of cytokine and matrix-degrading genes (Il-6, Mmp3, Mmp13, and Saa3) and a reduced abundance of genes related to extracellular matrix production, bone development, and ossification (Acan, Col2a1, Ihh, and Col10a1). Histone acetylation increased at and near genes that had increased expression. The acetylation and activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) were also increased in HDAC3-deficient chondrocytes. Increased cytokine signaling promoted autocrine activation of Janus kinase (JAK)–signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) and NF-κB pathways to suppress chondrocyte maturation, as well as paracrine activation of osteoclasts and bone resorption. Blockade of interleukin-6 (IL-6)–JAK–STAT signaling, NF-κB signaling, and bromodomain extraterminal proteins, which recognize acetylated lysines and promote transcriptional elongation, significantly reduced Il-6 and Mmp13 expression in HDAC3-deficient chondrocytes and secondary activation in osteoclasts. The JAK inhibitor ruxolitinib also reduced osteoclast activity in Hdac3 conditional knockout mice. Thus, HDAC3 controls the temporal and spatial expression of tissue-remodeling genes and inflammatory responses in chondrocytes to ensure proper endochondral ossification during development. PMID

  1. Time domain optical coherence tomography investigation of bone matrix interface in rat femurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Laura-Cristina; Negruá¹±iu, Meda-Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; Hoinoiu, Bogdan; Topala, Florin-Ionel; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2013-08-01

    The materials used to fabricate scaffolds for tissue engineering are derived from synthetic polymers, mainly from the polyester family, or from natural materials (e.g., collagen and chitosan). The mechanical properties and the structural properties of these materials can be tailored by adjusting the molecular weight, the crystalline state, and the ratio of monomers in the copolymers. Quality control and adjustment of the scaffold manufacturing process are essential to achieve high standard scaffolds. Most scaffolds are made from highly crystalline polymers, which inevitably result in their opaque appearance. Their 3-D opaque structure prevents the observation of internal uneven surface structures of the scaffolds under normal optical instruments, such as the traditional light microscope. The inability to easily monitor the inner structure of scaffolds as well as the interface with the old bone poses a major challenge for tissue engineering: it impedes the precise control and adjustment of the parameters that affect the cell growth in response to various mimicked culture conditions. The aim of this paper is to investigate the interface between the femur rat bone and the new bone that is obtained using a method of tissue engineering that is based on different artificial matrixes inserted in previously artificially induced defects. For this study, 15 rats were used in conformity with ethical procedures. In all the femurs a round defect was induced by drilling with a 1 mm spherical Co-Cr surgical drill. The matrixes used were Bioss and 4bone. These materials were inserted into the induced defects. The femurs were investigated at 1 week, 1 month, 2 month and three month after the surgical procedures. The interfaces were examined using Time Domain (TD) Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) combined with Confocal Microscopy (CM). The optical configuration uses two single mode directional couplers with a superluminiscent diode as the source centered at 1300 nm. The scanning

  2. Type VII Collagen is Enriched in the Enamel Organic Matrix Associated with the Dentin-Enamel Junction of Mature Human Teeth

    OpenAIRE

    McGuire, Jacob D.; Walker, Mary P.; Mousa, Ahmad; Wang, Yong; Gorski, Jeff P.

    2014-01-01

    The inner enamel region of erupted teeth is known to exhibit higher fracture toughness and crack growth resistance than bulk phase enamel. However, an explanation for this behavior has been hampered by the lack of compositional information for the residual enamel organic matrix. Since enamel-forming ameloblasts are known to express type VII collagen and type VII collagen null mice display abnormal amelogenesis, the aim of this study was to determine whether type VII collagen is a component of...

  3. Assessing the extent of bone degradation using glutamine deamidation in collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Julie; van Doorn, Nienke L; Collins, Matthew J

    2012-11-06

    Collagen peptides are analyzed using a low-cost, high-throughput method for assessing deamidation using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). For each chosen peptide, the theoretical distribution is calculated and the measured distribution for each sample compared with this to determine the extent of glutamine deamidation. The deamidation of glutamine (Q) to glutamic acid (E) results in a mass shift of +0.984 Da. Thus, from the resolution of our data, the second peak in the isotope distribution for a peptide containing one glutamine residue coincides with the first peak of the isotope distribution for the peptide in which the residue is deamidated. A genetic algorithm is used to determine the extent of deamidation that gives the best fit to the measured distribution. The method can be extended to peptides containing more than one glutamine residue. The extent of protein degradation assessed in this way could be used, for example, to assess the damage of collagen, and screen samples for radiocarbon dating and DNA analysis.

  4. Estrogen depletion and drug treatment alter the microstructure of type I collagen in bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meagan A. Cauble

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The impact of estrogen depletion and drug treatment on type I collagen fibril nanomorphology and collagen fibril packing (microstructure was evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM using an ovariectomized (OVX rabbit model of estrogen deficiency induced bone loss. Nine month-old New Zealand white female rabbits were treated as follows: sham-operated (Sham; n = 11, OVX + vehicle (OVX + Veh; n = 12, OVX + alendronate (ALN, 600 μg/kg/wk., s.c.; n = 12, and OVX + cathepsin-K inhibitor L-235 (CatKI, 10 mg/kg, daily, p.o.; n = 13 in prevention mode for 27 weeks. Samples from the cortical femur and trabecular lumbar vertebrae were polished, demineralized, and imaged using AFM. Auto-correlation of image patches was used to generate a vector field for each image that mathematically approximated the collagen fibril alignment. This vector field was used to compute an information-theoretic entropy that was employed as a quantitative fibril alignment parameter (FAP to allow image-to-image and sample-to-sample comparison. For all samples, no change was observed in the average FAP values; however significant differences in the distribution of FAP values were observed. In particular, OVX + Veh lumbar vertebrae samples contained a tail of lower FAP values representing regions of greater fibril alignment. OVX + ALN treatment resulted in a FAP distribution with a tail indicating greater alignment for cortical femur and less alignment for trabecular lumbar vertebrae. OVX + CatKI treatment gave a distribution of FAP values with a tail indicating less alignment for cortical femur and no change for trabecular lumbar vertebrae. Fibril alignment was also evaluated by considering when a fibril was part of discrete bundles or sheets (classified as parallel or not (classified as oblique. For this analysis, the percentage of parallel fibrils in cortical femur for the OVX group was 17% lower than the Sham group. OVX + ALN treatment partially

  5. Disentangling the multifactorial contributions of fibronectin, collagen and cyclic strain on MMP expression and extracellular matrix remodeling by fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Lin, Zhe; Foolen, Jasper; Schoen, Ingmar; Santoro, Alberto; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Vogel, Viola

    2014-11-01

    Early wound healing is associated with fibroblasts assembling a provisional fibronectin-rich extracellular matrix (ECM), which is subsequently remodeled and interlaced by type I collagen. This exposes fibroblasts to time-variant sets of matrices during different stages of wound healing. Our goal was thus to gain insight into the ECM-driven functional regulation of human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) being either anchored to a fibronectin (Fn) or to a collagen-decorated matrix, in the absence or presence of cyclic mechanical strain. While the cells reoriented in response to the onset of uniaxial cyclic strain, cells assembled exogenously added Fn with a preferential Fn-fiber alignment along their new orientation. Exposure of HFFs to exogenous Fn resulted in an increase in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression levels, i.e. MMP-15 (RT-qPCR), and MMP-9 activity (zymography), while subsequent exposure to collagen slightly reduced MMP-15 expression and MMP-9 activity compared to Fn-exposure alone. Cyclic strain upregulated Fn fibrillogenesis and actin stress fiber formation, but had comparatively little effect on MMP activity. We thus propose that the appearance of collagen might start to steer HFFs towards homeostasis, as it decreased both MMP secretion and the tension of Fn matrix fibrils as assessed by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer. These results suggest that HFFs might have a high ECM remodeling or repair capacity in contact with Fn alone (early event), which is reduced in the presence of Col1 (later event), thereby down-tuning HFF activity, a processes which would be required in a tissue repair process to finally reach tissue homeostasis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Characterization of fibrillar collagens and extracellular matrix of glandular benign prostatic hyperplasia nodules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler M Bauman

    Full Text Available Recent studies have associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS in men with prostatic fibrosis, but a definitive link between collagen deposition and LUTS has yet to be demonstrated. The objective of this study was to evaluate ECM and collagen content within normal glandular prostate tissue and glandular BPH, and to evaluate the association of clinical parameters of LUTS with collagen content.Fibrillar collagen and ECM content was assessed in normal prostate (48 patients and glandular BPH nodules (24 patients using Masson's trichrome stain and Picrosirius red stain. Second harmonic generation (SHG imaging was used to evaluate collagen content. Additional BPH tissues (n = 47 were stained with Picrosirius red and the association between clinical parameters of BPH/LUTS and collagen content was assessed.ECM was similar in normal prostate and BPH (p = 0.44. Total collagen content between normal prostate and glandular BPH was similar (p = 0.27, but a significant increase in thicker collagen bundles was observed in BPH (p = 0.045. Using SHG imaging, collagen content in BPH (mean intensity = 62.52; SEM = 2.74 was significantly higher than in normal prostate (51.77±3.49; p = 0.02. Total collagen content was not associated with treatment with finasteride (p = 0.47 or α-blockers (p = 0.52, pre-TURP AUA symptom index (p = 0.90, prostate-specific antigen (p = 0.86, post-void residual (PVR; p = 0.32, prostate size (p = 0.21, or post-TURP PVR (p = 0.51. Collagen content was not associated with patient age in patients with BPH, however as men aged normal prostatic tissue had a decreased proportion of thick collagen bundles.The proportion of larger bundles of collagen, but not total collagen, is increased in BPH nodules, suggesting that these large fibers may play a role in BPH/LUTS. Total collagen content is independent of clinical parameters of BPH and LUTS. If fibrosis and overall ECM deposition are

  7. Injectable calcium sulfate/mineralized collagen-based bone repair materials with regulable self-setting properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zonggang; Liu, Huanye; Liu, Xi; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2011-12-15

    An injectable and self-setting bone repair materials (nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/calcium sulfate hemihydrate, nHAC/CSH) was developed in this study. The nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen (nHAC) composite, which is the mineralized fibril by self-assembly of nano-hydrocyapatite and collagen, has the same features as natural bone in both main hierarchical microstructure and composition. It is a bioactive osteoconductor due to its high level of biocompatibility and appropriate degradation rate. However, this material lacks handling characteristics because of its particle or solid-preformed block shape. Herein, calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) was introduced into nHAC to prepare an injectable and self-setting in situ bone repair materials. The morphology of materials was observed using SEM. Most important and interesting of all, calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD), which is not only the reactant of preparing CSH but also the final solidified product of CSH, was introduced into nHAC as setting accelerator to regulate self-setting properties of injectable nHAC/CSH composite, and thus the self-setting time of nHAC/CSH composite can be regulated from more than 100 min to about 30 min and even less than 20 min by adding various amount of setting accelerator. The compressive properties of bone graft substitute after final setting are similar to those of cancellous bone. CSD as an excellent setting accelerator has no significant effect on the mechanical property and degradability of bone repair materials. In vitro biocompatibility and in vivo histology studies demonstrated that the nHAC/CSH composite could provide more adequate stimulus for cell adhesion and proliferation, embodying favorable cell biocompatibility and a strong ability to accelerate bone formation. It can offer a satisfactory biological environment for growing new bone in the implants and for stimulating bone formation. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. D-Glucose as a modifying agent in gelatin/collagen matrix and reservoir nanoparticles for Calendula officinalis delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, P-L; Kok, S H-L; Bian, Z-X; Lam, K-H; Tang, J C-O; Lee, K K-H; Gambari, R; Chui, C-H

    2014-05-01

    Gelatin/Collagen-based matrix and reservoir nanoparticles require crosslinkers to stabilize the formed nanosuspensions, considering that physical instability is the main challenge of nanoparticulate systems. The use of crosslinkers improves the physical integrity of nanoformulations under the-host environment. Aldehyde-based fixatives, such as formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde, have been widely applied to the crosslinking process of polymeric nanoparticles. However, their potential toxicity towards human beings has been demonstrated in many previous studies. In order to tackle this problem, D-glucose was used during nanoparticle formation to stabilize the gelatin/collagen-based matrix wall and reservoir wall for the deliveries of Calendula officinalis powder and oil, respectively. In addition, therapeutic selectivity between malignant and normal cells could be observed. The C. officinalis powder loaded nanoparticles significantly strengthened the anti-cancer effect towards human breast adenocarcinoma MCF7 cells and human hepatoma SKHep1 cells when compared with the free powder. On the contrary, the nanoparticles did not show significant cytotoxicity towards normal esophageal epithelial NE3 cells and human skin keratinocyte HaCaT cells. On the basis of these evidences, D-glucose modified gelatin/collagen matrix nanoparticles containing C. officinalis powder might be proposed as a safer alternative vehicle for anti-cancer treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dermal regeneration in native non-cross-linked collagen sponges with different extracellular matrix molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, H. J.; Middelkoop, E.; Mekkes, J. R.; Dutrieux, R. P.; Wildevuur, C. H.; Westerhof, H.

    1994-01-01

    Collagenous dermal templates can prevent scarring and wound contraction in the healing of full-thickness defects. In a porcine wound model, full-thickness wounds were substituted by reconstituted and native collagen sponges in combination with autologous split-skin mesh grafts and covered with a

  10. Lysyl oxidases in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: A key participant in collagen I matrix remodelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjin, Gavin; Mahar, Annabelle; Kable, Eleanor; Burgess, Janette

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The fibrotic element in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is a key feature and is associated with Usual Interstitial Pneumonia (UIP) pattern. Fibrillar collagen I (COL1) has second harmonic generation (SHG) properties, with signals both in the forward (F) (organized collagen) &

  11. Absence of muscle regeneration after implantation of a collagen matrix seeded with myoblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wachem, PB; Brouwer, LA; van Luyn, MJA

    Collagens are widely used as biomaterials for e.g. soft tissue reconstruction. The present study was aimed at reconstruction of abdominal wall muscle using processed dermal sheep collagen (DSC) and myoblast seeding. Myoblasts were harvested from foetal quadriceps muscle of an inbred rat strain,

  12. Marginal zinc deficiency in pregnant rats impairs bone matrix formation and bone mineralization in their neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Masashi; Kayanoma, Megumu; Takahashi, Takeshi; Kaneko, Tetsuo; Hara, Hiroshi

    2011-08-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency during pregnancy may result in a variety of defects in the offspring. We evaluated the influence of marginal Zn deficiency during pregnancy on neonatal bone status. Nine-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups and fed AIN-93G-based experimental diets containing 35 mg Zn/kg (Zn adequately supplied, N) or 7 mg Zn/kg (low level of Zn, L) from 14-day preconception to 20 days of gestation, that is, 1 day before normal delivery. Neonates were delivered by cesarean section. Litter size and neonate weight were not different between the two groups. However, in the L-diet-fed dam group, bone matrix formation in isolated neonatal calvaria culture was clearly impaired and was not recovered by the addition of Zn into the culture media. Additionally, serum concentration of osteocalcin, as a bone formation parameter, was lower in neonates from the L-diet-fed dam group. Impaired bone mineralization was observed with a significantly lower content of phosphorus in neonate femurs from L-diet-fed dams compared with those from N-diet-fed dams. Moreover, Zn content in the femur and calvaria of neonates from the L-diet group was lower than that of the N-diet-fed group. In the marginally Zn-deficient dams, femoral Zn content, serum concentrations of Zn, and osteocalcin were reduced when compared with control dams. We conclude that maternal Zn deficiency causes impairment of bone matrix formation and bone mineralization in neonates, implying the importance of Zn intake during pregnancy for proper bone development of offspring.

  13. Pathologic fracture through a unicameral bone cyst of the pelvis: CT-guided percutaneous curettage, biopsy, and bone matrix injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, Jennifer R; Schachar, Norman S; Marshall, Geoffrey B; Gray, Robin R

    2005-02-01

    Unicameral bone cysts of the pelvis are extremely rare. A 19-year old man presented with a pathologic fracture through a pelvic unicameral bone cyst. He was treated with computed tomography-guided percutaneous curettage, biopsy, and demineralized bone matrix injection. Treatment has proven successful in short-term follow-up.

  14. The collagen microfibril model, a tool for biomaterials scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animal hides, a major byproduct of the meat industry, are a rich source of collagen, a structural protein of the extracellular matrix that gives strength and form to the skin, tendons and bones of mammals. The structure of fibrous collagen, a long triple helix that self-associates in a staggered arr...

  15. Age-related effect on the concentration of collagen crosslinks in human osteonal and interstitial bone tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Jeffry S; Roy, Anuradha; Acuna, Rae L; Gayle, Heather J; Reyes, Michael J; Tyler, Jerrod H; Dean, David D; Wang, Xiaodu

    2006-12-01

    Collagen crosslinks are important to the quality of bone and may be contributors to the age-related increase in bone fracture. This study was performed to investigate whether age and gender effects on collagen crosslinks are similar in osteonal and interstitial bone tissues. Forty human cadaveric femurs were collected and divided into two age groups: middle-aged (42-63 years of age) and elderly (69-90 years of age) with ten males and ten females in each group (n = 10). Micro-cores of bone tissue from both secondary osteons and interstitial regions in the medial quadrant of the diaphysis were extracted using a custom-modified, computer-controlled milling machine. The bone specimens were then analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography to determine the effects of age and gender on the concentration of mature, enzymatic crosslinks (hydroxylysyl-pyridinoline-HP and lysyl-pyridinoline-LP) and a non-enzymatic crosslink (pentosidine-PE) at these two microstructural sites. The results indicate that age has a significant effect on the concentration of LP and PE, while gender has a significant effect on HP and LP. In addition, the concentration of the crosslinks in the secondary osteons is significantly different from that in the interstitial bone regions. These results suggest that the amount of non-enzymatic crosslinking may increase while that of mature enzymatic crosslinking may decrease with age. Such changes could potentially reduce the inherent quality of the bone tissue in the elderly skeleton.

  16. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddon, M.; Burrows, M.; Ferreira, S. A.; Dazzi, F.; Apperley, J. F.; Bradshaw, A.; Brand, D. D.; Czernuszka, J.; Gentleman, E.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS - which was released from scaffolds quickly - significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

  17. Laminated electrospun nHA/PHB-composite scaffolds mimicking bone extracellular matrix for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhuoyue [Lab of Tissue Engineering, Faculty of Life Science, Northwest University, 229 TaiBai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province 710069 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory of Biotechnology of Shaanxi, Northwest University, 229 TaiBai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province 710069 (China); Song, Yue [Lab of Tissue Engineering, Faculty of Life Science, Northwest University, 229 TaiBai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province 710069 (China); Zhang, Jing [Lab of Tissue Engineering, Faculty of Life Science, Northwest University, 229 TaiBai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province 710069 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory of Biotechnology of Shaanxi, Northwest University, 229 TaiBai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province 710069 (China); Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Modern Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, Northwest University, 229 TaiBai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province, 710069 (China); Liu, Wei [Lab of Tissue Engineering, Faculty of Life Science, Northwest University, 229 TaiBai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province 710069 (China); Cui, Jihong, E-mail: cjh@nwu.edu.cn [Lab of Tissue Engineering, Faculty of Life Science, Northwest University, 229 TaiBai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province 710069 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory of Biotechnology of Shaanxi, Northwest University, 229 TaiBai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province 710069 (China); Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Modern Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, Northwest University, 229 TaiBai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province, 710069 (China); and others

    2017-03-01

    Electrospinning is an effective means to generate nano- to micro-scale polymer fibers resembling native extracellular matrix for tissue engineering. However, a major problem of electrospun materials is that limited pore size and porosity may prevent adequate cellular infiltration and tissue ingrowth. In this study, we first prepared thin layers of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle (nHA)/poly-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) via electrospinning. We then laminated the nHA/PHB thin layers to obtain a scaffold for cell seeding and bone tissue engineering. The results demonstrated that the laminated scaffold possessed optimized cell-loading capacity. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibited better adherence, proliferation and osteogenic phenotypes on nHA/PHB scaffolds than on PHB scaffolds. Thereafter, we seeded MSCs onto nHA/PHB scaffolds to fabricate bone grafts. Histological observation showed osteoid tissue formation throughout the scaffold, with most of the scaffold absorbed in the specimens 2 months after implantation, and blood vessels ingrowth into the graft could be observed in the graft. We concluded that electrospun and laminated nanoscaled biocomposite scaffolds hold great therapeutic potential for bone regeneration. - Highlights: • We laminated the nHA/PHB layers to obtain a scaffold for bone tissue engineering. • The laminated scaffold performed optimized cell-loading capacity. • MSCs exhibited osteogenic phenotypes on the laminated scaffold. • Osteoid tissue formed throughout the laminated scaffold after 2 months in vivo. The laminated bio-composite scaffolds can be applied to bone regeneration.

  18. Laminated electrospun nHA/PHB-composite scaffolds mimicking bone extracellular matrix for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhuoyue; Song, Yue; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Wei; Cui, Jihong

    2017-01-01

    Electrospinning is an effective means to generate nano- to micro-scale polymer fibers resembling native extracellular matrix for tissue engineering. However, a major problem of electrospun materials is that limited pore size and porosity may prevent adequate cellular infiltration and tissue ingrowth. In this study, we first prepared thin layers of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle (nHA)/poly-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) via electrospinning. We then laminated the nHA/PHB thin layers to obtain a scaffold for cell seeding and bone tissue engineering. The results demonstrated that the laminated scaffold possessed optimized cell-loading capacity. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibited better adherence, proliferation and osteogenic phenotypes on nHA/PHB scaffolds than on PHB scaffolds. Thereafter, we seeded MSCs onto nHA/PHB scaffolds to fabricate bone grafts. Histological observation showed osteoid tissue formation throughout the scaffold, with most of the scaffold absorbed in the specimens 2 months after implantation, and blood vessels ingrowth into the graft could be observed in the graft. We concluded that electrospun and laminated nanoscaled biocomposite scaffolds hold great therapeutic potential for bone regeneration. - Highlights: • We laminated the nHA/PHB layers to obtain a scaffold for bone tissue engineering. • The laminated scaffold performed optimized cell-loading capacity. • MSCs exhibited osteogenic phenotypes on the laminated scaffold. • Osteoid tissue formed throughout the laminated scaffold after 2 months in vivo. The laminated bio-composite scaffolds can be applied to bone regeneration.

  19. Effect of local hemostatics on bone induction in rats: a comparative study of bone wax, fibrin-collagen paste, and bioerodible polyorthoester with and without gentamicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solheim, E; Pinholt, E M; Bang, G

    1992-01-01

    Local hemostatics for osseous tissue should preferably be absorbable and biocompatible and should not inhibit osteogenesis. The tissue response and effect on demineralized bone-induced heterotopic osteogenesis in the abdominal muscle of 120 male Wistar rats by different local hemostatics were...... evaluated by light microscopy and 85Sr uptake analyses. Non-absorbable bone wax of 88% beeswax and absorbable bovine fibrin-collagen paste both significantly inhibited osteoinduction, whereas a bioerodible polyorthoester drug delivery system with or without 4% gentamicin did not. Bone wax was not absorbed...

  20. Proportion of collagen type II in the extracellular matrix promotes the differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells into nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yiqing; Zhou, Xiaopeng; Liu, Dongyu; Li, Hao; Liang, Chengzhen; Li, Fangcai; Chen, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    During degeneration process, the catabolism of collagen type II and anabolism of collagen type I in nucleus pulposus (NP) may influence the bioactivity of transplanted cells. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) were cultured as a micromass or in a series of gradual proportion hydrogels of a mix of collagen types I and II. Cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were detected using CCK-8 and LDH assays respectively. The expression of differentiation-related genes and proteins, including SOX9, aggrecan, collagen type I, and collagen type II, was examined using RT-qPCR and Western blotting. Novel phenotypic genes were also detected by RT-qPCR and western blotting. Alcian blue and dimethylmethylene blue assays were used to investigate sulfate proteoglycan expression, and PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK, and Smad signaling pathways were examined by Western blotting. The results showed collagen hydrogels have good biocompatibility, and cell proliferation increased after collagen type II treatment. Expressions of SOX9, aggrecan, and collagen type II were increased in a collagen type II dependent manner. Sulfate proteoglycan synthesis increased in proportion to collagen type II concentration. Only hADMSCs highly expressed NP cell marker KRT19 in collagen type II culture. Additionally, phosphorylated Smad3, which is associated with phosphorylated ERK, was increased after collagen type II-stimulation. The concentration and type of collagen affect hADMSC differentiation into NP cells. Collagen type II significantly ameliorates hADMSC differentiation into NP cells and promotes extracellular matrix synthesis. Therefore, anabolism of collagen type I and catabolism of type II may attenuate the differentiation and biosynthesis of transplanted stem cells. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. Type VII collagen is enriched in the enamel organic matrix associated with the dentin-enamel junction of mature human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Jacob D; Walker, Mary P; Mousa, Ahmad; Wang, Yong; Gorski, Jeff P

    2014-06-01

    The inner enamel region of erupted teeth is known to exhibit higher fracture toughness and crack growth resistance than bulk phase enamel. However, an explanation for this behavior has been hampered by the lack of compositional information for the residual enamel organic matrix. Since enamel-forming ameloblasts are known to express type VII collagen and type VII collagen null mice display abnormal amelogenesis, the aim of this study was to determine whether type VII collagen is a component of the enamel organic matrix at the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) of mature human teeth. Immunofluorescent confocal microscopy of demineralized tooth sections localized type VII collagen to the organic matrix surrounding individual enamel rods near the DEJ. Morphologically, immunoreactive type VII collagen helical-bundles resembled the gnarled-pattern of enamel rods detected by Coomassie Blue staining. Western blotting of whole crown or enamel matrix extracts also identified characteristic Mr=280 and 230 kDa type VII dimeric forms, which resolved into 75 and 25 kDa bands upon reduction. As expected, the collagenous domain of type VII collagen was resistant to pepsin digestion, but was susceptible to purified bacterial collagenase. These results demonstrate the inner enamel organic matrix in mature teeth contains macromolecular type VII collagen. Based on its physical association with the DEJ and its well-appreciated capacity to complex with other collagens, we hypothesize that enamel embedded type VII collagen fibrils may contribute not only to the structural resilience of enamel, but may also play a role in bonding enamel to dentin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Preparation and Characterization of a Collagen-Liposome-Chondroitin Sulfate Matrix with Potential Application for Inflammatory Disorders Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Craciunescu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Smart drug delivery systems with controllable properties play an important role in targeted therapy and tissue regeneration. The aim of our study was the preparation and in vitro evaluation of a collagen (Col matrix embedding a liposomal formulation of chondroitin sulfate (L-CS for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Structural studies using Oil Red O specific staining for lipids and scanning electron microscopy showed an alveolar network of nanosized Col fibrils decorated with deposits of L-CS at both periphery and inner of the matrix. The porosity and density of Col-L-CS matrix were similar to those of Col matrix, while its mean pore size and biodegradability had significantly higher and lower values (P<0.05, respectively. In vitro cytotoxicity assays showed that the matrix system induced high cell viability and stimulated cell metabolism in L929 fibroblast cell culture. Light and electron micrographs of the cell-matrix construct showed that cells clustered into the porous structure at 72 h of cultivation. In vitro diffusion test indicated that the quantity of released CS was significantly lower (P<0.05 after embedment of L-CS within Col matrix. All these results indicated that the biocompatible and biodegradable Col-L-CS matrix might be a promising delivery system for local treatment of inflamed site.

  3. Composite porous scaffold of PEG/PLA support improved bone matrix deposition in vitro compared to PLA-only scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Birru; Owen, Robert; Bahmaee, Hossein; Wally, Zena; Sreenivasa Rao, Parcha; Reilly, Gwendolen C

    2018-05-01

    Controllable pore size and architecture are essential properties for tissue-engineering scaffolds to support cell ingrowth colonization. To investigate the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG) addition on porosity and bone-cell behavior, porous polylactic acid (PLA)-PEG scaffolds were developed with varied weight ratios of PLA-PEG (100/0, 90/10, 75/25) using solvent casting and porogen leaching. Sugar 200-300 µm in size was used as a porogen. To assess scaffold suitability for bone tissue engineering, MLO-A5 murine osteoblast cells were cultured and cell metabolic activity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and bone-matrix production determined using (alizarin red S staining for calcium and direct red 80 staining for collagen). It was found that metabolic activity was significantly higher over time on scaffolds containing PEG, ALP activity and mineralized matrix production were also significantly higher on scaffolds containing 25% PEG. Porous architecture and cell distribution and penetration into the scaffold were analyzed using SEM and confocal microscopy, revealing that inclusion of PEG increased pore interconnectivity and therefore cell ingrowth in comparison to pure PLA scaffolds. The results of this study confirmed that PLA-PEG porous scaffolds support mineralizing osteoblasts better than pure PLA scaffolds, indicating they have a high potential for use in bone tissue engineering applications. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 1334-1340, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Reconstruction of irradiated bone segmental defects with a biomaterial associating MBCP+(R), microstructured collagen membrane and total bone marrow grafting: an experimental study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jégoux, Franck; Goyenvalle, Eric; Cognet, Ronan; Malard, Olivier; Moreau, Francoise; Daculsi, Guy; Aguado, Eric

    2009-12-15

    The bone tissue engineering models used today are still a long way from any oncologic application as immediate postimplantation irradiation would decrease their osteoinductive potential. The aim of this study was to reconstruct a segmental critical size defect in a weight-bearing bone irradiated after implantation. Six white New Zealand rabbits were immediately implanted with a biomaterial associating resorbable collagen membrane EZ(R) filled and micro-macroporous biphasic calcium phosphate granules (MBCP+(R)). After a daily schedule of radiation delivery, and within 4 weeks, a total autologous bone marrow (BM) graft was injected percutaneously into the center of the implant. All the animals were sacrificed at 16 weeks. Successful osseous colonization was found to have bridged the entire length of the defects. Identical distribution of bone ingrowth and residual ceramics at the different levels of the implant suggests that the BM graft plays an osteoinductive role in the center of the defect. Periosteum-like formation was observed at the periphery, with the collagen membrane most likely playing a role. This model succeeded in bridging a large segmental defect in weight-bearing bone with immediate postimplantation fractionated radiation delivery. This has significant implications for the bone tissue engineering approach to patients with cancer-related bone defects.

  5. Minimal invasive surgery for unicameral bone cyst using demineralized bone matrix: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Hwan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various treatments for unicameral bone cyst have been proposed. Recent concern focuses on the effectiveness of closed methods. This study evaluated the effectiveness of demineralized bone matrix as a graft material after intramedullary decompression for the treatment of unicameral bone cysts. Methods Between October 2008 and June 2010, twenty-five patients with a unicameral bone cyst were treated with intramedullary decompression followed by grafting of demineralized bone matrix. There were 21 males and 4 female patients with mean age of 11.1 years (range, 3–19 years. The proximal metaphysis of the humerus was affected in 12 patients, the proximal femur in five, the calcaneum in three, the distal femur in two, the tibia in two, and the radius in one. There were 17 active cysts and 8 latent cysts. Radiologic change was evaluated according to a modified Neer classification. Time to healing was defined as the period required achieving cortical thickening on the anteroposterior and lateral plain radiographs, as well as consolidation of the cyst. The patients were followed up for mean period of 23.9 months (range, 15–36 months. Results Nineteen of 25 cysts had completely consolidated after a single procedure. The mean time to healing was 6.6 months (range, 3–12 months. Four had incomplete healing radiographically but had no clinical symptom with enough cortical thickness to prevent fracture. None of these four cysts needed a second intervention until the last follow-up. Two of 25 patients required a second intervention because of cyst recurrence. All of the two had a radiographical healing of cyst after mean of 10 additional months of follow-up. Conclusions A minimal invasive technique including the injection of DBM could serve as an excellent treatment method for unicameral bone cysts.

  6. Minimal invasive surgery for unicameral bone cyst using demineralized bone matrix: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hwan Seong; Seo, Sung Hwa; Park, So Hyun; Park, Jong Hoon; Shin, Duk Seop; Park, Il Hyung

    2012-07-29

    Various treatments for unicameral bone cyst have been proposed. Recent concern focuses on the effectiveness of closed methods. This study evaluated the effectiveness of demineralized bone matrix as a graft material after intramedullary decompression for the treatment of unicameral bone cysts. Between October 2008 and June 2010, twenty-five patients with a unicameral bone cyst were treated with intramedullary decompression followed by grafting of demineralized bone matrix. There were 21 males and 4 female patients with mean age of 11.1  years (range, 3-19 years). The proximal metaphysis of the humerus was affected in 12 patients, the proximal femur in five, the calcaneum in three, the distal femur in two, the tibia in two, and the radius in one. There were 17 active cysts and 8 latent cysts. Radiologic change was evaluated according to a modified Neer classification. Time to healing was defined as the period required achieving cortical thickening on the anteroposterior and lateral plain radiographs, as well as consolidation of the cyst. The patients were followed up for mean period of 23.9 months (range, 15-36 months). Nineteen of 25 cysts had completely consolidated after a single procedure. The mean time to healing was 6.6 months (range, 3-12 months). Four had incomplete healing radiographically but had no clinical symptom with enough cortical thickness to prevent fracture. None of these four cysts needed a second intervention until the last follow-up. Two of 25 patients required a second intervention because of cyst recurrence. All of the two had a radiographical healing of cyst after mean of 10 additional months of follow-up. A minimal invasive technique including the injection of DBM could serve as an excellent treatment method for unicameral bone cysts.

  7. An Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell–Derived Extracellular Matrix Scaffold Applied with Bone Marrow Stimulation for Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Jin, Chengzhe; Du, Xiaotao; Yan, Chao; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Xu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: It is well known that implanting a bioactive scaffold into a cartilage defect site can enhance cartilage repair after bone marrow stimulation (BMS). However, most of the current scaffolds are derived from xenogenous tissue and/or artificial polymers. The implantation of these scaffolds adds risks of pathogen transmission, undesirable inflammation, and other immunological reactions, as well as ethical issues in clinical practice. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of implanting autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell–derived extracellular matrix (aBMSC-dECM) scaffolds after BMS for cartilage repair. Methods: Full osteochondral defects were performed on the trochlear groove of both knees in 24 rabbits. One group underwent BMS only in the right knee (the BMS group), and the other group was treated by implantation of the aBMSC-dECM scaffold after BMS in the left knee (the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group). Results: Better repair of cartilage defects was observed in the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group than in the BMS group according to gross observation, histological assessments, immunohistochemistry, and chemical assay. The glycosaminoglycan and DNA content, the distribution of proteoglycan, and the distribution and arrangement of type II and I collagen fibers in the repaired tissue in the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group at 12 weeks after surgery were similar to that surrounding normal hyaline cartilage. Conclusions: Implanting aBMSC-dECM scaffolds can enhance the therapeutic effect of BMS on articular cartilage repair, and this combination treatment is a potential method for successful articular cartilage repair. PMID:24666429

  8. Ionic liquid as a potential solvent for preparation of collagen-alginate-hydroxyapatite beads as bone filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Bushra; Sarfaraz, Zenab; Muhammad, Nawshad; Ahmad, Pervaiz; Iqbal, Jibran; Khan, Zia Ul Haq; Gonfa, Girma; Iqbal, Farasat; Jamal, Arshad; Rahim, Abdur

    2018-07-01

    In this study, collagen/alginate/hydroxyapatite beads having different proportions were prepared as bone fillers for the restoration of osteological defects. Ionic liquid was used to dissolve the collagen and subsequently the solution was mixed with sodium alginate solution. Hydroxyapatite was added in different proportions, with the rationale to enhance mechanical as well as biological properties. The prepared solutions were given characteristic bead shapes by dropwise addition into calcium chloride solution. The prepared beads were characterized using FTIR, XRD, TGA and SEM analysis. Microhardness testing was used to evaluate the mechanical properties. The prepared beads were investigated for water adsorption behavior to ascertain its ability for body fluid uptake and adjusted accordingly to the bone cavity. Drug loading and subsequently the antibacterial activity was investigated for the prepared beads. The biocompatibility was assessed using the hemolysis testing and cell proliferation assay. The prepared collagen-alginate-HA beads, having biocompatibility and good mechanical properties, have showed an option of promising biologically active bone fillers for bone regeneration.

  9. Bone Mineral 31P and Matrix-Bound Water Densities Measured by Solid-State 1H and 31P MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Alan C.; Li, Cheng; Rajapakse, Chamith S.; Bashoor- Zadeh, Mahdieh; Bhagat, Yusuf A.; Wright, Alexander C.; Zemel, Babette S.; Zavaliangos, Antonios; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2014-01-01

    Bone is a composite material consisting of mineral and hydrated collagen fractions. MRI of bone is challenging due to extremely short transverse relaxation times, but solid-state imaging sequences exist that can acquire the short-lived signal from bone tissue. Previous work to quantify bone density via MRI used powerful experimental scanners. This work seeks to establish the feasibility of MRI-based measurement on clinical scanners of bone mineral and collagen-bound water densities, the latter as a surrogate of matrix density, and to examine the associations of these parameters with porosity and donors’ age. Mineral and matrix-bound water images of reference phantoms and cortical bone from 16 human donors, ages 27-97 years, were acquired by zero-echo-time 31P and 1H MRI on whole body 7T and 3T scanners, respectively. Images were corrected for relaxation and RF inhomogeneity to obtain density maps. Cortical porosity was measured by micro-CT, and apparent mineral density by pQCT. MRI-derived densities were compared to x-ray-based measurements by least-squares regression. Mean bone mineral 31P density was 6.74±1.22 mol/L (corresponding to 1129±204 mg/cc mineral), and mean bound water 1H density was 31.3±4.2 mol/L (corresponding to 28.3±3.7 %v/v). Both 31P and bound water (BW) densities were correlated negatively with porosity (31P: R2 = 0.32, p bone mineralization ratio (expressed here as the ratio of 31P density to bound water density), which is proportional to true bone mineralization, was found to be uncorrelated with porosity, age, or pQCT density. This work establishes the feasibility of image-based quantification of bone mineral and bound water densities using clinical hardware. PMID:24846186

  10. Human mandible bone defect repair by the grafting of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells and collagen sponge biocomplexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R d’Aquino

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study we used a biocomplex constructed from dental pulp stem/progenitor cells (DPCs and a collagen sponge scaffold for oro-maxillo-facial (OMF bone tissue repair in patients requiring extraction of their third molars. The experiments were carried out according to our Internal Ethical Committee Guidelines and written informed consent was obtained from the patients. The patients presented with bilateral bone reabsorption of the alveolar ridge distal to the second molar secondary to impaction of the third molar on the cortical alveolar lamina, producing a defect without walls, of at least 1.5 cm in height. This clinical condition does not permit spontaneous bone repair after extraction of the third molar, and eventually leads to loss also of the adjacent second molar. Maxillary third molars were extracted first for DPC isolation and expansion. The cells were then seeded onto a collagen sponge scaffold and the obtained biocomplex was used to fill in the injury site left by extraction of the mandibular third molars. Three months after autologous DPC grafting, alveolar bone of patients had optimal vertical repair and complete restoration of periodontal tissue back to the second molars, as assessed by clinical probing and X-rays. Histological observations clearly demonstrated the complete regeneration of bone at the injury site. Optimal bone regeneration was evident one year after grafting. This clinical study demonstrates that a DPC/collagen sponge biocomplex can completely restore human mandible bone defects and indicates that this cell population could be used for the repair and/or regeneration of tissues and organs.

  11. Extracellular matrix of collagen modulates arrhythmogenic activity of pulmonary veins through p38 MAPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yen-Yu; Chen, Yao-Chang; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2013-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia. Cardiac fibrosis with enhanced extracellular collagen plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of AF through structural and electrical remodeling. Pulmonary veins (PVs) are important foci for AF genesis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether collagen can directly modulate PV arrhythmogenesis. Action potentials and ionic currents were investigated in isolated male New Zealand rabbit PV cardiomyocytes with and without collagen incubation (10μg/ml, 5-7h) using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Compared to control PV cardiomyocytes (n=25), collagen-treated PV cardiomyocytes (n=22) had a faster beating rate (3.2±04 vs. 1.9±0.2Hz, pcollagen-treated PV cardiomyocytes showed a larger transient outward potassium current, small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) current, inward rectifier potassium current, pacemaker current, and late sodium current than control PV cardiomyocytes, but amplitudes of the sodium current, sustained outward potassium current, and L-type calcium current were similar. Collagen increased the p38 MAPK phosphorylation in PV cardiomyocytes as compared to control. The change of the spontaneous activity and action potential morphology were ameliorated by SB203580 (the p38 MAPK catalytic activity inhibitor), indicating that collagen can directly increase PV cardiomyocyte arrhythmogenesis through p38 MAPK activation, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of AF. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A biomimetic approach toward artificial bone-like materials

    OpenAIRE

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2001-01-01

    Bone consists of microcrystalline hydroxyapatite and collagen, an elastic protein matrix that is decorated with mineral-nucleating phosphoproteins. Our rational design of artificial bone-like material uses natural bone as a guide. Hydrogel and self-assembling polymers that possess anionic groups suitably positioned for nucleating biominerals, and therefore mimic the natural function of the collagen-phosphoprotein matrix in bone, were designed to direct template-driven biomimetic mineralizatio...

  13. Carnivore specific bone bioapatite and collagen carbon isotope fractionations: Case studies of modern and fossil grey wolf populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Dobbs, K.; Wheatley, P. V.; Koch, P. L.

    2006-12-01

    Stable isotope analyses of modern and fossil biogenic tissues are routinely used to reconstruct present and past vertebrate foodwebs. Accurate isotopic dietary reconstructions require a consumer and tissue specific understanding of how isotopes are sorted, or fractionated, between trophic levels. In this project we address the need for carnivore specific isotope variables derived from populations that are ecologically well- characterized. Specifically, we investigate the trophic difference in carbon isotope values between mammalian carnivore (wolf) bone bioapatite and herbivore (prey) bone bioapatite. We also compare bone bioapatite and collagen carbon isotope values collected from the same individuals. We analyzed bone specimens from two modern North American grey wolf (Canis lupus) populations (Isle Royale National Park, Michigan and Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming), and the ungulate herbivores that are their primary prey (moose and elk, respectively). Because the diets of both wolf populations are essentially restricted to a single prey species, there were no confounding effects due to carnivore diet variability. We measured a trophic difference of approximately -1.3 permil between carnivore (lower value) and herbivore (higher value) bone bioapatite carbon isotope values, and an average inter-tissue difference of 5.1 permil between carnivore bone collagen (lower value) and bioapatite (higher value) carbon isotope values. Both of these isotopic differences differ from previous estimates derived from a suite of African carnivores; our carnivore-herbivore bone bioapatite carbon isotope spacing is smaller (-1.3 vs. -4.0 permil), and our carnivore collagen-bioapatite carbon difference is larger (5.1 vs. 3.0 permil). These discrepancies likely result from comparing values measured from a single hypercarnivore (wolf) to average values calculated from several carnivore species, some of which are insectivorous or partly omnivorous. The trophic and inter

  14. Three-dimensional poly (ε-caprolactone)/hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffolds incorporating bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of bone defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Xin; Huang, Yinjun; Zhang, Jieyuan; Cao, Jiaqing; Jin, Xiangyun; Huang, Jinghuan; Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Ting; Han, Dan

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that three-dimensional (3D) hydroxyapatite (HAP)-collagen (COL)-coated poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds (HAP-COL-PCL) possess appropriate nano-structures, surface roughness, and nutrients, providing a favorable environment for osteogenesis. However, the effect of using 3D HAP-COL-PCL scaffolds incorporating BMSCs for the repair of bone defects in rats has been not evaluated. 3D PCL scaffolds coated with HAP, collagen or HAP/COL and incorporating BMSCs were implanted into calvarial defects. At 12 weeks after surgery, the rats were sacrificed and crania were harvested to assess the bone defect repair using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), histology, immunohistochemistry and sequential fluorescent labeling analysis. 3D micro-CT reconstructed images and quantitative analysis showed that HAP-COL-PCL groups possessed better bone-forming capacity than HAP-PCL groups or COL-PCL groups. Fluorescent labeling analysis revealed the percentage of tetracycline labeling, alizarin red labeling, and calcein labeling in HAP-COL-PCL groups were all greater than in the other two groups (P  <  0.05), and the result was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining and histological analysis of bone regeneration. This study demonstrates that 3D HAP-COL-PCL scaffolds incorporating BMSCs markedly enhance bone regeneration of bone defects in rats. (paper)

  15. Toward guided tissue and bone regeneration: morphology, attachment, proliferation, and migration of cells cultured on collagen barrier membranes. A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behring, J.; Junker, R.; Walboomers, X.F.; Chessnut, B.; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Collagen barrier membranes are frequently used in both guided tissue regeneration (GTR) and guided bone regeneration (GBR). Collagen used for these devices is available from different species and is often processed to alter the properties of the final product. This is necessary because unprocessed

  16. In vitro evaluation of demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft in combination with enamel matrix derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Richard J; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Laugisch, Oliver; Dard, Michel; Gemperli, Anja C; Buser, Daniel; Gruber, Reinhard; Sculean, Anton

    2013-11-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that a combination of enamel matrix derivative (EMD) with demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) may improve periodontal wound healing and regeneration. To date, no single study has characterized the effects of this combination on in vitro cell behavior. The aim of this study is to test the ability of EMD to adsorb to the surface of DFDBA particles and determine the effect of EMD coating on downstream cellular pathways such as adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of primary human osteoblasts and periodontal ligament (PDL) cells. DFDBA particles were precoated with EMD or human blood and analyzed for protein adsorption patterns via scanning electron microscopy. Cell attachment and proliferation were quantified using a commercial assay. Cell differentiation was analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction for genes encoding Runx2, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and collagen 1α1, and mineralization was assessed using alizarinred staining. Analysis of cell attachment revealed no significant differences among control, blood-coated, and EMD-coated DFDBA particles. EMD significantly increased cell proliferation at 3 and 5 days after seeding for both osteoblasts and PDL cells compared to control and blood-coated samples. Moreover, there were significantly higher messenger ribonucleic acid levels of osteogenic differentiation markers, including collagen 1α1, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin, in osteoblasts and PDL cells cultured on EMD-coated DFDBA particles at 3, 7, and 14 days. The results suggest that the addition of EMD to DFDBA particles may influence periodontal regeneration by stimulating PDL cell and osteoblast proliferation and differentiation.

  17. The effect of a collagen-elastin matrix on adhesion formation after flexor tendon repair in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichelhaus, Dagmar Alice; Beyersdoerfer, Sascha Tobias; Gierer, Philip; Vollmar, Brigitte; Mittlmeier, Th

    2016-07-01

    The outcome of flexor tendon surgery is negatively affected by the formation of adhesions which can occur during the healing of the tendon repair. In this experimental study, we sought to prevent adhesion formation by wrapping a collagen-elastin scaffold around the repaired tendon segment. In 28 rabbit hind legs, the flexor tendons of the third and fourth digits were cut and then repaired using a two-strand suture technique on the fourth digit and a four-strand technique on the third digit. Rabbits were randomly assigned to study and control groups. In the control group, the operation ended by closing the tendon sheath and the skin. In the study group, a collagen-elastin scaffold was wrapped around the repaired tendon segment in both digits. After 3 and 8 weeks, the tendons were harvested and processed histologically. The range of motion of the digits and the gap formation between the repaired tendon ends were measured. The formation of adhesions, infiltration of leucocytes and extracellular inflammatory response were quantified. At the time of tendon harvesting, all joints of the operated toes showed free range of motion. Four-strand core sutures lead to significantly less diastasis between the repaired tendon ends than two-strand core suture repairs. The collagen-elastin scaffold leads to greater gapping after 3 weeks compared to the controls treated without the matrix. Within the tendons treated with the collagen-elastin matrix, a significant boost of cellular and extracellular inflammation could be stated after 3 weeks which was reflected by a higher level of CAE positive cells and more formation of myofibroblasts in the αSMA stain in the study group. The inflammatory response subsided gradually and significantly until the late stage of the study. Both the cellular and extracellular inflammatory response was emphasized with the amount of material used for the repair. The use of a collagen-elastin matrix cannot be advised for the prevention of adhesion

  18. [Development of a novel absorbable nanofiber chitosan-collagen membrane by electrospinning and the preliminary study on guided bone regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, B; Li, X J; Lin, M; Li, Y Y; Dong, Y

    2018-02-09

    Objective: To evaluate the application effect of nanofiber chitosan-collagen membrane (NCM) on guided bone regeneration (GBR). Methods: The mixture of collagen, chitosan, polyethylene oxide was used to make up the NCM by electrospinning, then the NCM was crosslinked by glutaraldehyde vapor. The physical property of the NCM was measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured on NCM to characterize the biocompatibility. The effectiveness of four groups [contrast group, Bio-gide membrane (BGM), compressed chitosan-collagen menbrane (CCM), NCM/CCM] on bone regeneration were evaluated in critical-sized defects (diameter = 5 mm) in SD rats. Results: When the mixed solution consists of 4.0% collagen, 1.0% chitosan and 3.5% polyethylene oxide, the NCM could be validly fabricated by electrospinning. After cross-linking by glutaraldehyde vapor, the tensile strength and the stability of NCM in damp was enhanced. No cytotoxicity of the NCM was detected on MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. In vivo study showed that the new bone regeneration ratio of NCM/CCM group was [(43.10±1.49)%], and this was similar to that of the group of BGM [(41.36±2.60)%] ( P> 0.05), but higher than that of the CCM group [(33.10±1.41)%] and the contrast group [(7.22±2.46)%] ( P< 0.05). Conclusions: The NCM can promote new bone regeneration effectively in GBR procedure.

  19. Generation of biologically active endostatin fragments from human collagen XVIII by distinct matrix metalloproteases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heljasvaara, Ritva; Nyberg, Pia; Luostarinen, Jani; Parikka, Mataleena; Heikkilae, Pia; Rehn, Marko; Sorsa, Timo; Salo, Tuula; Pihlajaniemi, Taina

    2005-01-01

    Endostatin, a potent inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis and tumor growth, is proteolytically cleaved from the C-terminal noncollagenous NC1 domain of type XVIII collagen. We investigated the endostatin formation from human collagen XVIII by several MMPs in vitro. The generation of endostatin fragments differing in molecular size (24-30 kDa) and in N-terminal sequences was identified in the cases of MMP-3, -7, -9, -13 and -20. The cleavage sites were located in the protease-sensitive hinge region between the trimerization and endostatin domains of NC1. MMP-1, -2, -8 and -12 did not show any significant activity against the C-terminus of collagen XVIII. The anti-proliferative effect of the 20-kDa endostatin, three longer endostatin-containing fragments generated in vitro by distinct MMPs and the entire NC1 domain, on bFGF-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells was established. The anti-migratory potential of some of these fragments was also studied. In addition, production of endostatin fragments between 24-30 kDa by human hepatoblastoma cells was shown to be due to MMP action on type XVIII collagen. Our results indicate that certain, especially cancer-related, MMP family members can generate biologically active endostatin-containing polypeptides from collagen XVIII and thus, by releasing endostatin fragments, may participate in the inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration and angiogenesis

  20. Paleoecological and climatic implications of stable isotope results from late Pleistocene bone collagen, Ziegeleigrube Coenen, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wißing, Christoph; Matzerath, Simon; Turner, Elaine; Bocherens, Hervé

    2015-07-01

    Climatic and ecological conditions during Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 are complex and the impact of cold spells on the ecosystems in Central Europe still needs to be investigated thoroughly. Ziegeleigrube Coenen (ZC) is a late Pleistocene MIS 3 locality in the Lower Rhine Embayment of Germany, radiocarbon-dated to > 34 14C ka BP. The site yielded a broad spectrum of mammal species. We investigated the carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N) and sulfur (δ34S) isotope signatures of bone collagen, since these are valuable tools in characterizing ecological niches, environmental conditions and aspects of climate and mobility. By comparison with pre- and post-Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) sites in Central Europe we show that ZC belongs in a cold event of MIS 3 and was climatically more similar to post-LGM sites than to pre-LGM sites. However, the trophic structure resembled that of typical pre-LGM sites in Belgium. This cold event in MIS 3 changed the bottom of the foodweb, but do not seem to have had a direct impact on the occurrence of the mammalian species and their ecological distribution. Apparently the (mega-) faunal community could adapt also to harsher environmental conditions during MIS 3.

  1. Collagen matrix compared with mitomycin C for treatment of primary open-angle glaucoma with trabeculectomy performed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the effectiveness and safety between trabeculectomy with collagen matrix versus trabeculectomy with mitomycin C(MMCfor patients with primary open-angle glaucoma(POAG.METHODS: In this prospective randomized comparative study from January 2015 to December 2016. Thirty-two eyes presented with POAG were included in this study, 14 eyes treated by trabeculectomy with subconjunctival implant of collagen matrix(study groupand the other 18 eyes treated by trabeculectomy with mitomycin C. Postoperative IOP, the success rate of operation, number of postoperative glaucoma medications and postoperative complications were recorded. Each patient was followed up at least 6mo. RESULTS: The mean postoperative IOP was statistically different between the study group and the control group after 1d(PP>0.05, and the mean postoperative IOP was statistically different between the two groups(PP>0.05. The IOP decreased at 1d after openations compared with before, kept stable at 1wk to 6mo. IOP of study group was lowen than control. IOP was controlled by glaucoma medications in the study group by 28% compared to control group by 33% at 6mo after operation, but there was no significant difference. There was no significant difference between the study group and the control group in complications(PCONCLUSION: Trabeculectomy with collagen matrix implant is comparable to the use of MMC with a similar success rate in open-angle glaucoma and the range in reducing intraocular pressure was significantly higher than that of MMC and it can significantly avoid the occurrence of low IOP postoperatively, transient anterior chamber, conjunctival wound leakage complications has no advantages compared with the use of MMC.

  2. Modified silk fibroin scaffolds with collagen/decellularized pulp for bone tissue engineering in cleft palate: Morphological structures and biofunctionalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangkert, Supaporn; Meesane, Jirut; Kamonmattayakul, Suttatip; Chai, Wen Lin

    2016-01-01

    Cleft palate is a congenital malformation that generates a maxillofacial bone defect around the mouth area. The creation of performance scaffolds for bone tissue engineering in cleft palate is an issue that was proposed in this research. Because of its good biocompatibility, high stability, and non-toxicity, silk fibroin was selected as the scaffold of choice in this research. Silk fibroin scaffolds were prepared by freeze-drying before immerging in a solution of collagen, decellularized pulp, and collagen/decellularized pulp. Then, the immersed scaffolds were freeze-dried. Structural organization in solution was observed by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The molecular organization of the solutions and crystal structure of the scaffolds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The weight increase of the modified scaffolds and the pore size were determined. The morphology was observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Mechanical properties were tested. Biofunctionalities were considered by seeding osteoblasts in silk fibroin scaffolds before analysis of the cell proliferation, viability, total protein assay, and histological analysis. The results demonstrated that dendrite structure of the fibrils occurred in those solutions. Molecular organization of the components in solution arranged themselves into an irregular structure. The fibrils were deposited in the pores of the modified silk fibroin scaffolds. The modified scaffolds showed a beta-sheet structure. The morphological structure affected the mechanical properties of the silk fibroin scaffolds with and without modification. Following assessment of the biofunctionalities, the modified silk fibroin scaffolds could induce cell proliferation, viability, and total protein particularly in modified silk fibroin with collagen/decellularized pulp. Furthermore, the histological analysis indicated that the cells could adhere in modified silk fibroin

  3. Laminated electrospun nHA/PHB-composite scaffolds mimicking bone extracellular matrix for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuoyue; Song, Yue; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Wei; Cui, Jihong; Li, Hongmin; Chen, Fulin

    2017-03-01

    Electrospinning is an effective means to generate nano- to micro-scale polymer fibers resembling native extracellular matrix for tissue engineering. However, a major problem of electrospun materials is that limited pore size and porosity may prevent adequate cellular infiltration and tissue ingrowth. In this study, we first prepared thin layers of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle (nHA)/poly-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) via electrospinning. We then laminated the nHA/PHB thin layers to obtain a scaffold for cell seeding and bone tissue engineering. The results demonstrated that the laminated scaffold possessed optimized cell-loading capacity. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibited better adherence, proliferation and osteogenic phenotypes on nHA/PHB scaffolds than on PHB scaffolds. Thereafter, we seeded MSCs onto nHA/PHB scaffolds to fabricate bone grafts. Histological observation showed osteoid tissue formation throughout the scaffold, with most of the scaffold absorbed in the specimens 2months after implantation, and blood vessels ingrowth into the graft could be observed in the graft. We concluded that electrospun and laminated nanoscaled biocomposite scaffolds hold great therapeutic potential for bone regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Demineralized bone matrix and human cancellous bone enhance fixation of titanium implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan; Ding, Ming; Overgaard, Søren

    Best Poster 5Demineralized bone matrix and human cancellous bone enhance fixation of titanium implants AuthorsBabiker , H.; Ding M.; Overgaard S.InstitutionOrthopaedic Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Odense University Hospital, Clinical Institute, University of Southern...... from human tissue were included (IsoTis OrthoBiologics, Inc. USA). Both materials are commercially available. Titanium alloy implants (Biomet Inc.) of 10 mm in length and 10 mm in diameter were inserted bilaterally into the femoral condyles of 8 skeletally mature sheep. Thus four implants...... with a concentric gap of 2 mm were implanted in each sheep. The gap was filled with: DBM; DBM/CB with ratio of 1/3; DBM/allograft with ratio of 1/3; or allograft (Gold standard), respectively. Standardised surgical procedure was used1. At sacrifice, 6 weeks after surgery, both distal femurs were harvested...

  5. Human alveolar bone cell proliferation, expression of osteoblastic phenotype, and matrix mineralization on porous titanium produced by powder metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Adalberto Luiz; Crippa, Grasiele Edilaine; de Oliveira, Paulo Tambasco; Taba, Mario; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; Beloti, Marcio Mateus

    2009-05-01

    This study aimed at investigating the influence of the porous titanium (Ti) structure on the osteogenic cell behaviour. Porous Ti discs were fabricated by the powder metallurgy process with the pore size typically between 50 and 400 microm and a porosity of 60%. Osteogenic cells obtained from human alveolar bone were cultured until subconfluence and subcultured on dense Ti (control) and porous Ti for periods of up to 17 days. Cultures grown on porous Ti exhibited increased cell proliferation and total protein content, and lower levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity than on dense Ti. In general, gene expression of osteoblastic markers-runt-related transcription factor 2, collagen type I, alkaline phosphatase, bone morphogenetic protein-7, and osteocalcin was lower at day 7 and higher at day 17 in cultures grown on porous Ti compared with dense Ti, a finding consistent with the enhanced growth rate for such cultures. The amount of mineralized matrix was greater on porous Ti compared with the dense one. These results indicate that the porous Ti is an appropriate substrate for osteogenic cell adhesion, proliferation, and production of a mineralized matrix. Because of the three-dimensional environment it provides, porous Ti should be considered an advantageous substrate for promoting desirable implant surface-bone interactions.

  6. Early adhesive behavior of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on collagen electrospun fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Casey K; Liao, Susan; Lareu, Ricky R; Raghunath, Michael [Division of Bioengineering, National University of Singapore, 7 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Li, Bojun; Ramakrishna, S [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Larrick, James W, E-mail: doschanc@nus.edu.s [Panorama Research Institute, 2462 Wyandotte Street, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    A bioabsorbable nanofibrous scaffold was developed for early adhesion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Collagen nanofibers with diameters of 430 +- 170 nm were fabricated by electrospinning. Over 45% of the MSC population adhered to this collagen nanofiber after 30 min at room temperature. Remarkably, collagen-coated P(LLA-CL) electrospun nanofibers were almost as efficient as collagen nanofibers whereas collagen cast film did not enhance early capture when it was applied on cover slips. The adhesive efficiency could be further increased to over 20% at 20 min and over 55% at 30 min when collagen nanofibers were grafted with monoclonal antibodies recognizing CD29 or CD49a. These data demonstrate that the early adhesive behavior is highly dependent on both the surface texture and the surface chemistry of the substrate. These findings have potential applications for early capture of MSCs in an ex vivo setting under time constraints such as in a surgical setting.

  7. Early adhesive behavior of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on collagen electrospun fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Casey K; Liao, Susan; Lareu, Ricky R; Raghunath, Michael; Li, Bojun; Ramakrishna, S; Larrick, James W

    2009-01-01

    A bioabsorbable nanofibrous scaffold was developed for early adhesion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Collagen nanofibers with diameters of 430 ± 170 nm were fabricated by electrospinning. Over 45% of the MSC population adhered to this collagen nanofiber after 30 min at room temperature. Remarkably, collagen-coated P(LLA-CL) electrospun nanofibers were almost as efficient as collagen nanofibers whereas collagen cast film did not enhance early capture when it was applied on cover slips. The adhesive efficiency could be further increased to over 20% at 20 min and over 55% at 30 min when collagen nanofibers were grafted with monoclonal antibodies recognizing CD29 or CD49a. These data demonstrate that the early adhesive behavior is highly dependent on both the surface texture and the surface chemistry of the substrate. These findings have potential applications for early capture of MSCs in an ex vivo setting under time constraints such as in a surgical setting.

  8. Severe Extracellular Matrix Abnormalities and Chondrodysplasia in Mice Lacking Collagen Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Isoenzyme II in Combination with a Reduced Amount of Isoenzyme I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aro, Ellinoora; Salo, Antti M; Khatri, Richa; Finnilä, Mikko; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Sormunen, Raija; Pakkanen, Outi; Holster, Tiina; Soininen, Raija; Prein, Carina; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Aszódi, Attila; Tuukkanen, Juha; Kivirikko, Kari I; Schipani, Ernestina; Myllyharju, Johanna

    2015-07-03

    Collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylases (C-P4H-I, C-P4H-II, and C-P4H-III) catalyze formation of 4-hydroxyproline residues required to form triple-helical collagen molecules. Vertebrate C-P4Hs are α2β2 tetramers differing in their catalytic α subunits. C-P4H-I is the major isoenzyme in most cells, and inactivation of its catalytic subunit (P4ha1(-/-)) leads to embryonic lethality in mouse, whereas P4ha1(+/-) mice have no abnormalities. To study the role of C-P4H-II, which predominates in chondrocytes, we generated P4ha2(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, they had no apparent phenotypic abnormalities. To assess possible functional complementarity, we established P4ha1(+/-);P4ha2(-/-) mice. They were smaller than their littermates, had moderate chondrodysplasia, and developed kyphosis. A transient inner cell death phenotype was detected in their developing growth plates. The columnar arrangement of proliferative chondrocytes was impaired, the amount of 4-hydroxyproline and the Tm of collagen II were reduced, and the extracellular matrix was softer in the growth plates of newborn P4ha1(+/-);P4ha2(-/-) mice. No signs of uncompensated ER stress were detected in the mutant growth plate chondrocytes. Some of these defects were also found in P4ha2(-/-) mice, although in a much milder form. Our data show that C-P4H-I can to a large extent compensate for the lack of C-P4H-II in proper endochondral bone development, but their combined partial and complete inactivation, respectively, leads to biomechanically impaired extracellular matrix, moderate chondrodysplasia, and kyphosis. Our mouse data suggest that inactivating mutations in human P4HA2 are not likely to lead to skeletal disorders, and a simultaneous decrease in P4HA1 function would most probably be required to generate such a disease phenotype. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Fibrillar collagen I matrix remodelling in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: Are lysyl oxidases responsible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjin, G.; Jegathees, T.; Mahar, A.; Kable, E.P.W.; Burgess, J.K.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The development of fibrosis in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is a key feature and challenge in the treatment of the disease. The mechanisms of collagen I (COL1) reorganisation in the development of fibrosis, which may alter the stiffness of the tissue, are not well understood.

  10. Development of a three-dimensional unit cell to model the micromechanical response of a collagen-based extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilo, Monica E; Roeder, Blayne A; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Kokini, Klod; Nauman, Eric A

    2010-04-01

    The three-dimensional microstructure and mechanical properties of the collagen fibrils within the extracellular matrix (ECM) is now being recognized as a primary factor in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, an appreciation of the mechanical aspects by which a cell interacts with its ECM is required for the development of engineered tissues. Ultimately, using these interactions to design tissue equivalents requires mathematical models with three-dimensional architecture. In this study, a three-dimensional model of a collagen fibril matrix undergoing uniaxial tensile stress was developed by making use of cellular solids. A structure consisting of thin struts was chosen to represent the arrangement of collagen fibrils within an engineered ECM. To account for the large deformation of tissues, the collagen fibrils were modeled as hyperelastic neo-Hookean or Mooney-Rivlin materials. The use of cellular solids allowed the fibril properties to be related to the ECM properties in closed form, which, in turn, allowed the estimation of fibril properties using ECM experimental data. A set of previously obtained experimental data consisting of simultaneous measures of the fibril microstructure and mechanical tests was used to evaluate the model's capability to estimate collagen fibril mechanical property when given tissue-scale data and to predict the tissue-scale mechanical properties when given estimated fibril stiffness. The fibril tangent modulus was found to be 1.26 + or - 0.70 and 1.62 + or - 0.88 MPa when the fibril was modeled as neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin material, respectively. There was no statistical significance of the estimated fibril tangent modulus among the different groups. Sensitivity analysis showed that the fibril mechanical properties and volume fraction were the two input parameters which required accurate values. While the volume fraction was easily obtained from the initial image of the gel, the fibril mechanical properties

  11. The Methoxyflavonoid Isosakuranetin Suppresses UV-B-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression and Collagen Degradation Relevant for Skin Photoaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Jung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Solar ultraviolet (UV radiation is a main extrinsic factor for skin aging. Chronic exposure of the skin to UV radiation causes the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, such as MMP-1, and consequently results in alterations of the extracellular matrix (ECM and skin photoaging. Flavonoids are considered as potent anti-photoaging agents due to their UV-absorbing and antioxidant properties and inhibitory activity against UV-mediated MMP induction. To identify anti-photoaging agents, in the present study we examined the preventative effect of methoxyflavonoids, such as sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, homoeriodictyol, genkwanin, chrysoeriol and syringetin, on UV-B-induced skin photo-damage. Of the examined methoxyflavonoids, pretreatment with isosakuranetin strongly suppressed the UV-B-mediated induction of MMP-1 in human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Isosakuranetin inhibited UV-B-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling components, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38 proteins. This result suggests that the ERK1/2 kinase pathways likely contribute to the inhibitory effects of isosakuranetin on UV-induced MMP-1 production in human keratinocytes. Isosakuranetin also prevented UV-B-induced degradation of type-1 collagen in human dermal fibroblast cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that isosakuranetin has the potential for development as a protective agent for skin photoaging through the inhibition of UV-induced MMP-1 production and collagen degradation.

  12. Ultrastructure of collagen fibers and distribution of extracellular matrix in the temporomandibular disk of the human fetus and adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H; Sato, I

    2001-12-01

    We quantitatively examined the distribution of these differences in extracellular matrices (collagen types I, III, and fibronectin) and elastic fibers under confocal laser scanning microscopy and electron scanning microscopy in terms of their contribution to the mechanics of the TMJ during development and in adults. Elastic fibers were found in the anterior and posterior bands in adults aged 40 years, and a few elastic fibers in the anterior band of the disk in adults aged 80 to 90 years. The extracellular matrix contents of the TMJ disk are shown in various detected levels in the anterior, intermediate, posterior bands of TMJ disk. During development, collagen fibers are arranged in a complex fashion from 28 weeks' gestation. These ultrastructures of the embryonic TMJ are resembled to that of adults aged the 40s, however the difference in extracellular matrix distribution found in embryonic stages and adults. They might reflect the differences in function between mastication and sucking or the changes in shape and form as results of functional disorders of the TMJ.

  13. Combined Effect of a Microporous Layer and Type I Collagen Coating on a Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mun-Hwan Lee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, type I collagen was coated onto unmodified and modified microporous biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP scaffolds. Surface characterization using a scanning electron microscope (SEM and a surface goniometer confirmed the modification of the BCP coating. The quantity of the collagen coating was investigated using Sirius Red staining, and quantitative assessment of the collagen coating showed no significant differences between the two groups. MG63 cells were used to evaluate cell proliferation and ALP activity on the modified BCP scaffolds. The modified microporous surfaces showed low contact angles and large surface areas, which enhanced cell spreading and proliferation. Coating of the BCP scaffolds with type I collagen led to enhanced cell-material interactions and improved MG63 functions, such as spreading, proliferation, and differentiation. The micropore/collagen-coated scaffold showed the highest rate of cell response. These results indicate that a combination of micropores and collagen enhances cellular function on bioengineered bone allograft tissue.

  14. Novel biocompatible polymeric blends for bone regeneration: Material and matrix design and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Meng

    characterized for miscibility, mechanical properties, degradation kinetics, and in vitro osteocompatibility. Primary rat osteoblasts (PRO) isolated from rat calvaria were used to evaluate their in vitro osteocompatibility. The blends were also characterized for in vivo biodegradability and biocompatibility using a rat subcutaneous implantation model. Successful in vivo scaffold-based tissue regeneration greatly depends on the scaffold material biocompatibility, mechanical stability, and scaffold architecture to promote tissue in-growth. The other part of the work in the dissertation is focused on the development of mechanically competent bioresorbable nano-structured three-dimensional (3D) hiomimetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. Scaffold material selection was based on achieving improved mechanical stability, in vitro osteoblast performance, and in vivo biocompatibility. A miscible PNGEGPhPh-PLAGA blend system developed and characterized in the first part of the thesis work was chosen to fabricate a nanofiber-based mechanically competent biomimetic scaffold via electrospinning. Due to its versatility, controllability and reproducibility, the technique of electrospinning was adopted to produce blend nanofibers. The polymer solution concentration and electrospinning parameters were optimized to produce blend fibers in the range of 50-500 nm to mimic dimensions of collagen fibrils present in the natural extracellular matrix of native bone. These blend nanofiber matrices supported PRO adhesion, proliferation and showed an elevated phenotype expression compared to PLAGA nanofibers. Orienting electrospun nanofibers in a concentric manner with an open central cavity created a mechanically competent 3D scaffold mimicking the bone marrow cavity, as well as, the lamellar structure of bone. The 3D biomimetic scaffold exhibited a similar characteristic mechanical behavior to that of native bone. Compressive modulus of the scaffold was found to be within the range of

  15. Proteolytic processing of lysyl oxidase-like-2 in the extracellular matrix is required for crosslinking of basement membrane collagen IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Jiménez, Alberto J; Basak, Trayambak; Vanacore, Roberto M

    2017-10-13

    Lysyl oxidase-like-2 (LOXL2) is an enzyme secreted into the extracellular matrix that crosslinks collagens by mediating oxidative deamination of lysine residues. Our previous work demonstrated that this enzyme crosslinks the 7S domain, a structural domain that stabilizes collagen IV scaffolds in the basement membrane. Despite its relevant role in extracellular matrix biosynthesis, little is known about the structural requirements of LOXL2 that enable collagen IV crosslinking. In this study, we demonstrate that LOXL2 is processed extracellularly by serine proteases, generating a 65-kDa form lacking the first two scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains. Site-specific mutagenesis to prevent proteolytic processing generated a full-length enzyme that is active in vitro toward a soluble substrate, but fails to crosslink insoluble collagen IV within the extracellular matrix. In contrast, the processed form of LOXL2 binds to collagen IV and crosslinks the 7S domain. Together, our data demonstrate that proteolytic processing is an important event that allows LOXL2-mediated crosslinking of basement membrane collagen IV. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Extraction Socket Preservation Using Porcine-Derived Collagen Membrane Alone or Associated with Porcine-Derived Bone. Clinical Results of Randomized Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo Guarnieri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of present randomized controlled clinical trial was to clinically evaluate hard tissue changes after extraction socket preservation procedures compared to natural spontaneous healing. Material and Methods: Thirty patients were enrolled in the present study and underwent single-tooth extraction in the premolar/molar areas. Ten sites were grafted with porcine-derived bone covered by collagen membrane, 10 covered by porcine-derived collagen membrane alone, and 10 underwent natural spontaneous healing. Vertical and horizontal bone changes after 3-month were evaluated at implant placement. Results: The vertical and horizontal bone changes at the extraction sockets treated with collagen membrane alone (vertical: -0.55 [SD 0.11] mm, and horizontal: -1.21 [SD 0.69] mm and collagen membrane plus porcine-derived bone (vertical: -0.37 [SD 0.7] mm, and horizontal: -0.91 [SD 0.53] mm were found significantly lower (P < 0.001, when compared to non-grafted sockets (vertical: -2.09 [SD 0.19] mm, and horizontal: -3.96 [SD 0.87] mm. In type 1 extraction sockets, in premolar sites, and in presence of vestibular bone thicknesses ≥ 1.5 mm, the use of collagen membrane alone revealed similar outcomes to those with additional graft material. Conclusions: At the re-entry surgery, extraction sockets grafted with porcine-derived bone and covered by collagen membrane, and extraction sockets covered by porcine-derived collagen membrane alone, showed significantly lower vertical and horizontal bone changes, compared to extraction sockets sites underwent natural spontaneous healing. However, a complete prevention of remodelling is not achievable, irrespective of the technique used.

  17. [Levels of bone mineral matrix organization and the mechanisms determining parameters of its formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrunin, A S; Tikhilov, R M; Abolin, A B; Shcherbak, I G

    2005-01-01

    Authors suggest to regard bone mineral matrix as the four-level structure. The first level is represented by an internal structure of a mineral, the second--by mineral morphological structure, the third--by coplanar association of minerals, and the fourth--by macroassociation of minerals in a single complex inside each bone. The most probable mechanisms determining stability of reproduction of mineral matrix parameters on each of these levels are shown. As a result of their functioning, the variants of bone mineral matrix structures are formed that are the programmed reflection of specificity of the given site of organic structures.

  18. Angiographic findings of demineralised bone matrix grafts in femoral fracture repair in canines*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.V.S.; Ramakrishna, O.

    2000-01-01

    Demineralised bone matrix implants and autogenous cancellous bone grafts were evaluated in femoral fracture repair with bone loss in canines, and compared to untreated animals. Angiograms were taken at 3,6,9 and 12 weeks post- operatively using conrary-420 as contrast medium. Early angiograms showed leakage of contrast medium into soft tissue. Grafted groups showed slight hypervascularity and enhanced capillary network. At 12 Weeks the same groups observed nearly normal persistent vascular supply. Early establishment of cortices continuity and draining of contrast medium via extraosseous veins was observed in demineralized bone matrix implanted groups

  19. Low-power laser irradiation improves histomorphometrical parameters and bone matrix organization during tibia wound healing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavello-Freitas, I; Baranauskas, V; Joazeiro, P P; Padovani, C R; Dal Pai-Silva, M; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2003-01-01

    The influence of daily energy doses of 0.03, 0.3 and 0.9 J of He-Ne laser irradiation on the repair of surgically produced tibia damage was investigated in Wistar rats. Laser treatment was initiated 24 h after the trauma and continued daily for 7 or 14 days in two groups of nine rats (n=3 per laser dose and period). Two control groups (n=9 each) with injured tibiae were used. The course of healing was monitored using morphometrical analysis of the trabecular area. The organization of collagen fibers in the bone matrix and the histology of the tissue were evaluated using Picrosirius-polarization method and Masson's trichrome. After 7 days, there was a significant increase in the area of neoformed trabeculae in tibiae irradiated with 0.3 and 0.9 J compared to the controls. At a daily dose of 0.9 J (15 min of irradiation per day) the 7-day group showed a significant increase in trabecular bone growth compared to the 14-day group. However, the laser irradiation at the daily dose of 0.3 J produced no significant decrease in the trabecular area of the 14-day group compared to the 7-day group, but there was significant increase in the trabecular area of the 15-day controls compared to the 8-day controls. Irradiation increased the number of hypertrophic osteoclasts compared to non-irradiated injured tibiae (controls) on days 8 and 15. The Picrosirius-polarization method revealed bands of parallel collagen fibers (parallel-fibered bone) at the repair site of 14-day-irradiated tibiae, regardless of the dose. This organization improved when compared to 7-day-irradiated tibiae and control tibiae. These results show that low-level laser therapy stimulated the growth of the trabecular area and the concomitant invasion of osteoclasts during the first week, and hastened the organization of matrix collagen (parallel alignment of the fibers) in a second phase not seen in control, non-irradiated tibiae at the same period. The active osteoclasts that invaded the regenerating site were

  20. Decomposition cross-correlation for analysis of collagen matrix deformation by single smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Akker, Jeroen; Pistea, Adrian; Bakker, Erik N. T. P.; VanBavel, Ed

    2008-01-01

    Microvascular remodeling is known to depend on cellular interactions with matrix tissue. However, it is difficult to study the role of specific cells or matrix elements in an in vivo setting. The aim of this study is to develop an automated technique that can be employed to obtain and analyze local

  1. Bone Quality: The Mechanical Effects of Microarchitecture and Matrix Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S. Day (Judd)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractIn this body of work we have examined some of the current concepts pertaining to the relation between bone mass, bone quality and the mechanical properties of bone. In our first series of studies we used a model of human osteoarthritis to investigate the implications of changes in the

  2. Human Bone Derived Collagen for the Development of an Artificial Corneal Endothelial Graft. In Vivo Results in a Rabbit Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Vázquez

    Full Text Available Corneal keratoplasty (penetrating or lamellar using cadaveric human tissue, is nowadays the main treatment for corneal endotelial dysfunctions. However, there is a worldwide shortage of donor corneas available for transplantation and about 53% of the world's population have no access to corneal transplantation. Generating a complete cornea by tissue engineering is still a tough goal, but an endothelial lamellar graft might be an easier task. In this study, we developed a tissue engineered corneal endothelium by culturing human corneal endothelial cells on a human purified type I collagen membrane. Human corneal endothelial cells were cultured from corneal rims after corneal penetrating keratoplasty and type I collagen was isolated from remnant cancellous bone chips. Isolated type I collagen was analyzed by western blot, liquid chromatography -mass spectrometry and quantified using the exponentially modified protein abundance index. Later on, collagen solution was casted at room temperature obtaining an optically transparent and mechanically manageable membrane that supports the growth of human and rabbit corneal endothelial cells which expressed characteristic markers of corneal endothelium: zonula ocluddens-1 and Na+/K+ ATPase. To evaluate the therapeutic efficiency of our artificial endothelial grafts, human purified type I collagen membranes cultured with rabbit corneal endothelial cells were transplanted in New Zealand white rabbits that were kept under a minimal immunosuppression regimen. Transplanted corneas maintained transparency for as long as 6 weeks without obvious edema or immune rejection and maintaining the same endothelial markers that in a healthy cornea. In conclusion, it is possible to develop an artificial human corneal endothelial graft using remnant tissues that are not employed in transplant procedures. This artificial endothelial graft can restore the integrality of corneal endothelium in an experimental model of

  3. A 3D printed nano bone matrix for characterization of breast cancer cell and osteoblast interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Castro, Nathan J.; Cui, Haitao; Zhou, Xuan; Boualam, Benchaa; McGrane, Robert; Glazer, Robert I.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-08-01

    Bone metastasis is one of the most prevalent complications of late-stage breast cancer, in which the native bone matrix components, including osteoblasts, are intimately involved in tumor progression. The development of a successful in vitro model would greatly facilitate understanding the underlying mechanism of breast cancer bone invasion as well as provide a tool for effective discovery of novel therapeutic strategies. In the current study, we fabricated a series of in vitro bone matrices composed of a polyethylene glycol hydrogel and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite of varying concentrations to mimic the native bone microenvironment for the investigation of breast cancer bone metastasis. A stereolithography-based three-dimensional (3D) printer was used to fabricate the bone matrices with precisely controlled architecture. The interaction between breast cancer cells and osteoblasts was investigated in the optimized bone matrix. Using a Transwell® system to separate the two cell lines, breast cancer cells inhibited osteoblast proliferation, while osteoblasts stimulated breast cancer cell growth, whereas, both cell lines increased IL-8 secretion. Breast cancer cells co-cultured with osteoblasts within the 3D bone matrix formed multi-cellular spheroids in comparison to two-dimensional monolayers. These findings validate the use of our 3D printed bone matrices as an in vitro metastasis model, and highlights their potential for investigating breast cancer bone metastasis.

  4. Calcitonin directly attenuates collagen type II degradation by inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase expression and activity in articular chondrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, B C; Wulf, H; Henriksen, K

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Calcitonin was recently reported to counter progression of cartilage degradation in an experimental model of osteoarthritis, and the effects were primarily suggested to be mediated by inhibition of subchondral bone resorption. We investigated direct effects of calcitonin on chondrocytes...... by assessing expression of the receptor and pharmacological effects on collagen type II degradation under ex vivo and in vivo conditions. METHODS: Localization of the calcitonin receptor on articular chondrocytes was investigated by immunohistochemistry, and the expression by reverse transcriptase polymerase.......0001-1 microM]. In vivo, cartilage degradation was investigated in ovariectomized (OVX) rats administered with oral calcitonin [2 mg/kg calcitonin] for 9 weeks. RESULTS: The calcitonin receptor was identified in articular chondrocytes by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Calcitonin concentration...

  5. Complete horizontal skin cell resurfacing and delayed vertical cell infiltration into porcine reconstructive tissue matrix compared to bovine collagen matrix and human dermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirastschijski, Ursula; Kerzel, Corinna; Schnabel, Reinhild; Strauss, Sarah; Breuing, Karl-Heinz

    2013-10-01

    Xenogenous dermal matrices are used for hernia repair and breast reconstruction. Full-thickness skin replacement is needed after burn or degloving injuries with exposure of tendons or bones. The authors used a human skin organ culture model to study whether porcine reconstructive tissue matrix (Strattice) is effective as a dermal tissue replacement. Skin cells or split-thickness skin grafts were seeded onto human deepidermized dermis, Strattice, and Matriderm. Cellular resurfacing and matrix infiltration were monitored by live fluorescence imaging, histology, and electron microscopy. Proliferation, apoptosis, cell differentiation, and adhesion were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Epithelial resurfacing and vertical proliferation were reduced and delayed with both bioartificial matrices compared with deepidermized dermis; however, no differences in apoptosis, cell differentiation, or basement membrane formation were found. Vertical penetration was greatest on Matriderm, whereas no matrix infiltration was found on Strattice in the first 12 days. Uncompromised horizontal resurfacing was greatest with Strattice but was absent with Matriderm. Strattice showed no stimulatory effect on cellular inflammation. Matrix texture and surface properties governed cellular performance on tissues. Although dense dermal compaction delayed vertical cellular ingrowth for Strattice, it allowed uncompromised horizontal resurfacing. Dense dermal compaction may slow matrix decomposition and result in prolonged biomechanical stability of the graft. Reconstructive surgeons should choose the adequate matrix substitute depending on biomechanical requirements at the recipient site. Strattice may be suitable as a dermal replacement at recipient sites with high mechanical load requirements.

  6. Evaluation of a xenogeneic acellular collagen matrix as a small-diameter vascular graft in dogs--preliminary observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemcova, S; Noel, A A; Jost, C J; Gloviczki, P; Miller, V M; Brockbank, K G

    2001-01-01

    Autogenous veins are the materials of choice for arterial reconstruction. In the absence of autogenous material, prosthetic materials are used. However, vascular prostheses of less than 0.4 cm in diameter have low long-term patency. This study was designed to determine if cells would infiltrate an engineered xenogeneic biomaterial used as a small diameter arterial graft in dogs and, if so, to determine the phenotype of the infiltrating cells. Nine acellular xenogeneic grafts (0.4 cm in diameter, 5 cm long), composed of porcine collagen derived from the submucosa of the small intestine and type I bovine collagen, were implanted as end to-end interposition grafts in femoral arteries of five male mongrel dogs (total of nine grafts). All dogs received daily aspirin (325 mg). Patency of implanted grafts was monitored weekly by Duplex ultrasonography. After 9 weeks, or earlier in case of blood flow reduction by at least 75%, grafts were explanted and prepared for light or electron microscopy to evaluate cellularization. Eight of nine grafts remained patent up to 9 weeks. At explant, diameters were 0.31 +/- 0.02 cm at the midgraft, and 0.14 +/- 0.01 and 0.19 +/- 0.01 cm at the proximal and distal anastomoses. At explant, cells of mesenchymal origin (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, myofibroblasts) were embedded in the extracellular matrix of the graft scaffold. Minimal evidence of cellular inflammatory reaction and no aneurysmal dilatation or thrombus formation was detected. Variable degrees of hyperplasia were present at proximal and distal anastomoses. This preliminary study demonstrates that a collagen-based xenogeneic biomaterial provides a scaffold for cellularization when used for arterial reconstruction in dogs.

  7. SU-F-SPS-08: Measuring the Interaction Of DDR Cell Receptors and Extracellular Matrix Collagen in Prostate Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J; Sarkar, A; Hoffmann, P [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Suhail, A; Fridman, R [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Discoidin domain receptors (DDR) have recently been recognized as important players in cancer progression. DDRs are cell receptors that interact with collagen, an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein. However the detailed mechanism of their interaction is unclear. Here we attempted to examine their interaction in terms of structural (surface topography), mechanical (rupture force), and kinetic (binding probability) information on the single molecular scale with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Methods: The Quantitative Nano-mechanical property Mapping (QNM) mode of AFM allowed to assess the cells in liquid growth media at their optimal physiological while being viable. Human benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH-1) cell line was genetically regulated to suppress DDR expression (DDR- cells) and was compared with naturally DDR expressing cells (DDR+). Results: Binding force measurements (n = 1000) were obtained before and after the two groups were treated with fibronectin (FN), an integrin-inhibiting antibody to block the binding of integrin. The quantification indicates that cells containing DDR bind with collagen at a most probable force of 80.3–83.0 ±7.6 pN. The probability of them binding is 0.167 when other interactions (mainly due to integrin-collagen binding) are minimized. Conclusion: Together with further force measurements at different pulling speeds will determine dissociation rate, binding distance and activation barrier. These parameters in benign cells provides some groundwork in understanding DDR’s behavior in various cell microenvironments such as in malignant tumor cells. Funding supported by Richard Barber Interdisciplinary Research Program of Wayne State University.

  8. SU-F-SPS-08: Measuring the Interaction Of DDR Cell Receptors and Extracellular Matrix Collagen in Prostate Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, J; Sarkar, A; Hoffmann, P; Suhail, A; Fridman, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Discoidin domain receptors (DDR) have recently been recognized as important players in cancer progression. DDRs are cell receptors that interact with collagen, an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein. However the detailed mechanism of their interaction is unclear. Here we attempted to examine their interaction in terms of structural (surface topography), mechanical (rupture force), and kinetic (binding probability) information on the single molecular scale with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Methods: The Quantitative Nano-mechanical property Mapping (QNM) mode of AFM allowed to assess the cells in liquid growth media at their optimal physiological while being viable. Human benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH-1) cell line was genetically regulated to suppress DDR expression (DDR- cells) and was compared with naturally DDR expressing cells (DDR+). Results: Binding force measurements (n = 1000) were obtained before and after the two groups were treated with fibronectin (FN), an integrin-inhibiting antibody to block the binding of integrin. The quantification indicates that cells containing DDR bind with collagen at a most probable force of 80.3–83.0 ±7.6 pN. The probability of them binding is 0.167 when other interactions (mainly due to integrin-collagen binding) are minimized. Conclusion: Together with further force measurements at different pulling speeds will determine dissociation rate, binding distance and activation barrier. These parameters in benign cells provides some groundwork in understanding DDR’s behavior in various cell microenvironments such as in malignant tumor cells. Funding supported by Richard Barber Interdisciplinary Research Program of Wayne State University

  9. Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Mineral to Matrix Ratios Correlate with Physical Chemical Properties of Model Compounds and Native Bone Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Erik A; Lloyd, Ashley A; Salazar-Lara, Carolina; Donnelly, Eve

    2017-10-01

    Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging techniques can be used to characterize bone composition. In this study, our objective was to validate the Raman mineral:matrix ratios (ν 1 PO 4 :amide III, ν 1 PO 4 :amide I, ν 1 PO 4 :Proline + hydroxyproline, ν 1 PO 4 :Phenylalanine, ν 1 PO 4 :δ CH 2 peak area ratios) by correlating them to ash fraction and the IR mineral:matrix ratio (ν 3 PO 4 :amide I peak area ratio) in chemical standards and native bone tissue. Chemical standards consisting of varying ratios of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) and collagen, as well as bone tissue from humans, sheep, and mice, were characterized with confocal Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR spectroscopy and gravimetric analysis. Raman and IR mineral:matrix ratio values from chemical standards increased reciprocally with ash fraction (Raman ν 1 PO 4 /Amide III: P Raman ν 1 PO 4 /Amide I: P Raman ν 1 PO 4 /Proline + Hydroxyproline: P Raman ν 1 PO 4 /Phenylalanine: P Raman ν 1 PO 4 /δ CH 2 : P Raman and IR mineral:matrix ratio values were strongly correlated ( P Raman mineral:matrix bone composition parameter correlates strongly to ash fraction and to its IR counterpart. Finally, the mineral:matrix ratio values of the native bone tissue are similar to those of both chemical standards and theoretical values, confirming the biological relevance of the chemical standards and the characterization techniques.

  10. Extracellular matrix of adipogenically differentiated mesenchymal stem cells reveals a network of collagen filaments, mostly interwoven by hexagonal structural units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Mujib; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is the non-cellular component of tissues, which not only provides biological shelter but also takes part in the cellular decisions for diverse functions. Every tissue has an ECM with unique composition and topology that governs the process of determination, differentiation, proliferation, migration and regeneration of cells. Little is known about the structural organization of matrix especially of MSC-derived adipogenic ECM. Here, we particularly focus on the composition and architecture of the fat ECM to understand the cellular behavior on functional bases. Thus, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were adipogenically differentiated, then, were transferred to adipogenic propagation medium, whereas they started the release of lipid droplets leaving bare network of ECM. Microarray analysis was performed, to indentify the molecular machinery of matrix. Adipogenesis was verified by Oil Red O staining of lipid droplets and by qPCR of adipogenic marker genes PPARG and FABP4. Antibody staining demonstrated the presence of collagen type I, II and IV filaments, while alkaline phosphatase activity verified the ossified nature of these filaments. In the adipogenic matrix, the hexagonal structures were abundant followed by octagonal structures, whereas they interwoven in a crisscross manner. Regarding molecular machinery of adipogenic ECM, the bioinformatics analysis revealed the upregulated expression of COL4A1, ITGA7, ITGA7, SDC2, ICAM3, ADAMTS9, TIMP4, GPC1, GPC4 and downregulated expression of COL14A1, ADAMTS5, TIMP2, TIMP3, BGN, LAMA3, ITGA2, ITGA4, ITGB1, ITGB8, CLDN11. Moreover, genes associated with integrins, glycoproteins, laminins, fibronectins, cadherins, selectins and linked signaling pathways were found. Knowledge of the interactive-language between cells and matrix could be beneficial for the artificial designing of biomaterials and bioscaffolds. © 2013.

  11. Intervariability and intravariability of bone morphogenetic proteins in commercially available demineralized bone matrix products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyun W; Zhao, Li; Kanim, Linda E A; Wong, Pamela; Delamarter, Rick B; Dawson, Edgar G

    2006-05-20

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) 2, 4, and 7 in 9 commercially available ("off the shelf") demineralized bone matrix (DBM) product formulations using 3 different manufacturer's production lots of each DBM formulation. To evaluate and compare the quantity of BMPs among several different DBM formulations (inter-product variability), as well as examine the variability of these proteins in different production lots within the same DBM formulation (intra-product variability). DBMs are commonly used to augment available bone graft in spinal fusion procedures. Surgeons are presented with an ever-increasing variety of commercially available human DBMs from which to choose. Yet, there is limited information on a specific DBM product's osteoinductive efficacy, potency, and constancy. There were protein extracts from each DBM sample separately dialyzed 4 times against distilled water at 4 degrees C for 48 hours. The amount of BMP-2, BMP-4, and BMP-7 was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS.: The concentrations of detected BMP-2 and BMP-7 were low for all DBM formulations, only nanograms of BMP were extracted from each gram of DBM (20.2-120.6 ng BMP-2/g DBM product; 54.2-226.8 ng BMP-7/g DBM). The variability of BMP concentrations among different lots of the same DBM formulation, intra-product variability, was higher than the variability of concentrations among different DBM formulations, inter-product variability (coefficient of variation range BMP-2 [16.34% to 76.01%], P DBMs are low, in the order of 1 x 10(-9) g of BMP/g of DBM. There is higher variability in concentration of BMPs among 3 different lots of the same DBM formulation than among different DBM formulations. This variability questions DBM products' reliability and, possibly, efficacy in providing consistent osteoinduction.

  12. Disruption of fibronectin matrix affects type IV collagen, fibrillin and laminin deposition into extracellular matrix of human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filla, Mark S; Dimeo, Kaylee D; Tong, Tiegang; Peters, Donna M

    2017-12-01

    Fibronectin fibrils are a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the trabecular meshwork (TM). They are a key mediator of the formation of the ECM which controls aqueous humor outflow and contributes to the pathogenesis of glaucoma. The purpose of this work was to determine if a fibronectin-binding peptide called FUD, derived from the Streptococcus pyogenes Functional Upstream Domain of the F1 adhesin protein, could be used to control fibronectin fibrillogenesis and hence ECM formation under conditions where its expression was induced by treatment with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone. FUD was very effective at preventing fibronectin fibrillogenesis in the presence or absence of steroid treatment as well as the removal of existing fibronectin fibrils. Disruption of fibronectin fibrillogenesis by FUD also disrupted the incorporation of type IV collagen, laminin and fibrillin into the ECM. The effect of FUD on these other protein matrices, however, was found to be dependent upon the maturity of the ECM when FUD was added. FUD effectively disrupted the incorporation of these other proteins into matrices when added to newly confluent cells that were forming a nascent ECM. In contrast, FUD had no effect on these other protein matrices if the cell cultures already possessed a pre-formed, mature ECM. Our studies indicate that FUD can be used to control fibronectin fibrillogenesis and that these fibrils play a role in regulating the assembly of other ECM protein into matrices involving type IV collagen, laminin, and fibrillin within the TM. This suggests that under in vivo conditions, FUD would selectively disrupt fibronectin fibrils and de novo assembly of other proteins into the ECM. Finally, our studies suggest that targeting fibronectin fibril assembly may be a viable treatment for POAG as well as other glaucomas involving excessive or abnormal matrix deposition of the ECM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bisphosphonate treatment affects trabecular bone apparent modulus through micro-architecture rather than matrix properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2004-01-01

    and trabecular architecture independently. Conventional histomorphometry and microdamage data were obtained from the second and third lumbar vertebrae of the same dogs [Bone 28 (2001) 524]. Bisphosphonate treatment resulted in an increased apparent Young's modulus, decreased bone turnover, increased calcified...... matrix density, and increased microdamage. We could not detect any change in the effective Young's modulus of the calcified matrix in the bisphosphonate treated groups. The observed increase in apparent Young's modulus was due to increased bone mass and altered trabecular architecture rather than changes...... in the calcified matrix modulus. We hypothesize that the expected increase in the Young's modulus of the calcified matrix due to the increased calcified matrix density was counteracted by the accumulation of microdamage. Udgivelsesdato: 2004 May...

  14. Alpha C-telopeptide of type I collagen is associated with subchondral bone turnover and predicts progression of joint space narrowing and osteophytes in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Janet L; Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Huffman, Kim M; He, Yi; Leeming, Diana J; McDaniel, Gary E; Karsdal, Morten A; Kraus, Virginia B

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate joint tissue remodeling using the urinary collagen biomarkers urinary α-C-telopeptide of type I collagen (α-CTX) and urinary C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) and to determine the association of these biomarkers with osteoarthritis (OA) severity, progression, and localized knee bone turnover. Participants (n = 149) with symptomatic and radiographic knee OA underwent fixed-flexion knee radiography at baseline and 3 years, and late-phase bone scintigraphy of both knees at baseline, which were scored semiquantitatively for osteophyte and joint space narrowing (JSN) severity and uptake intensity, with scores summed across knees. Urinary concentrations of α-CTX and CTX-II were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Immunohistochemical analysis of human OA knees was performed to localize the joint tissue origin of the biomarker epitopes. Urinary α-CTX concentrations correlated strongly with the intensity of bone scintigraphic uptake and with JSN progression (risk ratio 13.2) and osteophyte progression (risk ratio 3). Urinary CTX-II concentrations were strongly associated with intensity of bone scintigraphic uptake, with JSN and osteophyte severity, and with OA progression based on osteophyte score. Urinary α-CTX localized primarily to high bone turnover areas in subchondral bone. CTX-II localized to the bone-cartilage interface, the tidemark, and damaged articular cartilage. Baseline urinary α-CTX, which was localized to high turnover areas of subchondral bone, was associated with dynamic bone turnover of knees, as signified by scintigraphy, and progression of both osteophytes and JSN. Urinary CTX-II correlated with JSN and osteophyte severity and progression of osteophytes. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of serologic markers reflecting subchondral bone turnover. These collagen markers may be useful for noninvasive detection and quantification of active subchondral bone turnover and joint remodeling in knee OA

  15. Two-way regulation between cells and aligned collagen fibrils: local 3D matrix formation and accelerated neural differentiation of human decidua parietalis placental stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Zhu, Bofan; Strakova, Zuzana; Wang, Rong

    2014-08-08

    It has been well established that an aligned matrix provides structural and signaling cues to guide cell polarization and cell fate decision. However, the modulation role of cells in matrix remodeling and the feedforward effect on stem cell differentiation have not been studied extensively. In this study, we report on the concerted changes of human decidua parietalis placental stem cells (hdpPSCs) and the highly ordered collagen fibril matrix in response to cell-matrix interaction. With high-resolution imaging, we found the hdpPSCs interacted with the matrix by deforming the cell shape, harvesting the nearby collagen fibrils, and reorganizing the fibrils around the cell body to transform a 2D matrix to a localized 3D matrix. Such a unique 3D matrix prompted high expression of β-1 integrin around the cell body that mediates and facilitates the stem cell differentiation toward neural cells. The study offers insights into the coordinated, dynamic changes at the cell-matrix interface and elucidates cell modulation of its matrix to establish structural and biochemical cues for effective cell growth and differentiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of 3D printed PCL/PLGA/β-TCP versus collagen membranes for guided bone regeneration in a beagle implant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, J-Y; Park, C-Y; Bae, J-H; Ahn, G; Kim, C; Lim, D-H; Cho, D-W; Yun, W-S; Shim, J-H; Huh, J-B

    2016-10-07

    Here, we compared 3D-printed polycaprolactone/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/β-tricalcium phosphate (PCL/PLGA/β-TCP) membranes with the widely used collagen membranes for guided bone regeneration (GBR) in beagle implant models. For mechanical property comparison in dry and wet conditions and cytocompatibility determination, we analyzed the rate and pattern of cell proliferation of seeded fibroblasts and preosteoblasts using the cell counting kit-8 assay and scanning electron microscopy. Osteogenic differentiation was verified using alizarin red S staining. At 8 weeks following implantation in vivo using beagle dogs, computed tomography and histological analyses were performed after sacrifice. Cell proliferation rates in vitro indicated that early cell attachment was higher in collagen than in PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membranes; however, the difference subsided by day 7. Similar outcomes were found for osteogenic differentiation, with approximately 2.5 times greater staining in collagen than PCL/PLGA/β-TCP, but without significant difference by day 14. In vivo, bone regeneration in the defect area, represented by new bone formation and bone-to-implant contact, paralleled those associated with collagen membranes. However, tensile testing revealed that whereas the PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membrane mechanical properties were conserved in both wet and dry states, the tensile property of collagen was reduced by 99% under wet conditions. Our results demonstrate in vitro and in vivo that PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membranes have similar levels of biocompatibility and bone regeneration as collagen membranes. In particular, considering that GBR is always applied to a wet environment (e.g. blood, saliva), we demonstrated that PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membranes maintained their form more reliably than collagen membranes in a wet setting, confirming their appropriateness as a GBR membrane.

  17. Use of Collagen Extracellular Matrix Dressing for the Treatment of a Recurrent Venous Ulcer in a 52-Year-Old Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    This case study describes treatment for a 52-year-old man with a recurrent venous leg ulcer using a collagen dressing with extracellular matrix. The patient was admitted to the wound care service for a 3-week-old recurrent venous ulcer. Treatment included application of a collagen dressing with extracellular matrix twice weekly or as needed by the patient; application of a secondary dressing (4 × 4 gauze); and coverage with an expandable netting or gauze using a conforming stretch gauze bandage and latex-free dressing retention tape. The initial venous leg ulcer in this patient required 10 weeks to achieve closure. Ninety-eight percent resolution of the recurrent ulcer had occurred within 4 weeks of treatment, with complete closure at 7 weeks. The average healing time for recurrent venous ulcers is reported in the literature to be longer than initial venous ulcers. In the case provided, collagen ECM dressings promoted complete wound healing in 49 days.

  18. Function of Matrix IGF-1 in Coupling Bone Resorption and Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Janet L.; Cao, Xu

    2013-01-01

    Balancing bone resorption and formation is the quintessential component for the prevention of osteoporosis. Signals that determine the recruitment, replication, differentiation, function, and apoptosis of osteoblasts and osteoclasts direct bone remodeling and determine whether bone tissue is gained, lost, or balanced. Therefore understanding the signaling pathways involved in the coupling process will help develop further targets for osteoporosis therapy, by blocking bone resorption or enhancing bone formation in a space and time dependent manner. Insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF-1) has long been known to play a role in bone strength. It is one of the most abundant substances in the bone matrix, circulates systemically and is secreted locally, and has a direct relationship with bone mineral density. Recent data has helped further our understanding of the direct role of IGF-1 signaling in coupling bone remodeling which will be discussed in this review. The bone marrow microenvironment plays a critical role in the fate of MSCs and HSCs and thus how IGF-1 interacts with other factors in the microenvironment are equally important. While previous clinical trials with IGF-1 administration have been unsuccessful at enhancing bone formation, advances in basic science studies have provided insight into further mechanisms that should be considered for future trials. Additional basic science studies dissecting the regulation and the function of matrix IGF-1 in modeling and remodeling will continue to provide further insight for future directions for anabolic therapies for osteoporosis. PMID:24068256

  19. Function of matrix IGF-1 in coupling bone resorption and formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Janet L; Cao, Xu

    2014-02-01

    Balancing bone resorption and formation is the quintessential component for the prevention of osteoporosis. Signals that determine the recruitment, replication, differentiation, function, and apoptosis of osteoblasts and osteoclasts direct bone remodeling and determine whether bone tissue is gained, lost, or balanced. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathways involved in the coupling process will help develop further targets for osteoporosis therapy, by blocking bone resorption or enhancing bone formation in a space- and time-dependent manner. Insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF-1) has long been known to play a role in bone strength. It is one of the most abundant substances in the bone matrix, circulates systemically and is secreted locally, and has a direct relationship with bone mineral density. Recent data has helped further our understanding of the direct role of IGF-1 signaling in coupling bone remodeling which will be discussed in this review. The bone marrow microenvironment plays a critical role in the fate of mesenchymal stem cells and hematopoietic stem cells and thus how IGF-1 interacts with other factors in the microenvironment are equally important. While previous clinical trials with IGF-1 administration have been unsuccessful at enhancing bone formation, advances in basic science studies have provided insight into further mechanisms that should be considered for future trials. Additional basic science studies dissecting the regulation and the function of matrix IGF-1 in modeling and remodeling will continue to provide further insight for future directions for anabolic therapies for osteoporosis.

  20. Fabrication and Characterization of Collagen-Immobilized Porous PHBV/HA Nano composite Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin-Young, B.; Zhi-Cai, X.; Giseop, K.; Keun-Byoung, Y.; Soo-Young, P.; Lee, S.P.; Inn-Kyu, K.

    2012-01-01

    The porous composite scaffolds (PHBV/HA) consisting of poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) and hydroxyapatite (HA) were fabricated using a hot-press machine and salt-leaching. Collagen (type I) was then immobilized on the surface of the porous PHBV/HA composite scaffolds to improve tissue compatibility. The structure and morphology of the collagen-immobilized composite scaffolds (PHBV/HA/Col) were investigated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). The potential of the porous PHBV/HA/Col composite scaffolds for use as a bone scaffold was assessed by an experiment with osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) in terms of cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. The results showed that the PHBV/HA/Col composite scaffolds possess better cell adhesion and significantly higher proliferation and differentiation than the PHBV/HA composite scaffolds and the PHBV scaffolds. These results suggest that the PHBV/HA/Col composite scaffolds have a high potential for use in the field of bone regeneration and tissue engineering.

  1. Antioxidative Peptides Derived from Enzyme Hydrolysis of Bone Collagen after Microwave Assisted Acid Pre-Treatment and Nitrogen Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Sun

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the preparation method of antioxidant peptides by enzymatic hydrolysis of bone collagen after microwave assisted acid pre-treatment and nitrogen protection. Phosphoric acid showed the highest ability of hydrolysis among the four other acids tested (hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid and/or citric acid. The highest degree of hydrolysis (DH was 9.5% using 4 mol/L phosphoric acid with a ratio of 1:6 under a microwave intensity of 510 W for 240 s. Neutral proteinase gave higher DH among the four protease tested (Acid protease, neutral protease, Alcalase and papain, with an optimum condition of: (1 ratio of enzyme and substrate, 4760 U/g; (2 concentration of substrate, 4%; (3 reaction temperature, 55 °C and (4 pH 7.0. At 4 h, DH increased significantly (P < 0.01 under nitrogen protection compared with normal microwave assisted acid pre-treatment hydrolysis conditions. The antioxidant ability of the hydrolysate increased and reached its maximum value at 3 h; however DH decreased dramatically after 3 h. Microwave assisted acid pre-treatment and nitrogen protection could be a quick preparatory method for hydrolyzing bone collagen.

  2. Evaluation of nanohydroxyapaptite (nano-HA) coated epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) cross-linked collagen membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chenyu; Deng, Jia; Man, Yi; Qu, Yili

    2017-09-01

    Collagen is the main component of extracellular matrix (ECM) with desirable biological activities and low antigenicity. Collagen materials have been widely utilized in guided bone regeneration (GBR) surgery due to its abilities to maintain space for hard tissue growth. However, pure collagen lacks optimal mechanical properties. In our previous study, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) cross-linked collagen membranes, with better biological activities and enhanced mechanical properties, may promote osteoblast proliferation, but their effect on osteoblast differentiation is not very significant. Nanohydroxyapatite (nano-HA) is the main component of mineral bone, which possesses exceptional bioactivity properties including good biocompatibility, high osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity, non-immunogenicity and non-inflammatory behavior. Herein, by analyzing the physical and chemical properties as well as the effects on promoting bone regeneration, we have attempted to present a novel EGCG-modified collagen membrane with nano-HA coating, and have found evidence that the novel collagen membrane may promote bone regeneration with a better surface morphology, without destroying collagen backbone. To evaluate the surface morphologies, chemical and mechanical properties of pure collagen membranes, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) cross-linked collagen membranes, nano-HA coated collagen membranes, nano-HA coated EGCG-collagen membranes, (ii) to evaluate the bone regeneration promoted by theses membranes. In the present study, collagen membranes were divided into 4 groups: (1) untreated collagen membranes (2) EGCG cross-linked collagen membranes (3) nano-HA modified collagen membranes (4) nano-HA modified EGCG-collagen membranes. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to evaluate surface morphologies and chemical properties, respectively. Mechanical properties were determined by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC

  3. Extracellular matrix production by nucleus pulposus and bone marrow stem cells in response to altered oxygen and glucose microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Syeda M; Buckley, Conor T

    2015-12-01

    Bone marrow (BM) stem cells may be an ideal source of cells for intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration. However, the harsh biochemical microenvironment of the IVD may significantly influence the biological and metabolic vitality of injected stem cells and impair their repair potential. This study investigated the viability and production of key matrix proteins by nucleus pulposus (NP) and BM stem cells cultured in the typical biochemical microenvironment of the IVD consisting of altered oxygen and glucose concentrations. Culture-expanded NP cells and BM stem cells were encapsulated in 1.5% alginate and ionically crosslinked to form cylindrical hydrogel constructs. Hydrogel constructs were maintained under different glucose concentrations (1, 5 and 25 mM) and external oxygen concentrations (5 and 20%). Cell viability was measured using the Live/Dead® assay and the production of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG), and collagen was quantified biochemically and histologically. For BM stem cells, IVD-like micro-environmental conditions (5 mM glucose and 5% oxygen) increased the accumulation of sGAG and collagen. In contrast, low glucose conditions (1 mM glucose) combined with 5% external oxygen concentration promoted cell death, inhibiting proliferation and the accumulation of sGAG and collagen. NP-encapsulated alginate constructs were relatively insensitive to oxygen concentration or glucose condition in that they accumulated similar amounts of sGAG under all conditions. Under IVD-like microenvironmental conditions, NP cells were found to have a lower glucose consumption rate compared with BM cells and may in fact be more suitable to adapt and sustain the harsh microenvironmental conditions. Considering the highly specialised microenvironment of the central NP, these results indicate that IVD-like concentrations of low glucose and low oxygen are critical and influential for the survival and biological behaviour of stem cells. Such findings may promote and accelerate

  4. Role of fibronectin in collagen deposition: Fab' to the gelatin-binding domain of fibronectin inhibits both fibronectin and collagen organization in fibroblast extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    We report the effect of Fab' (anti-60k) to a 60,000 mol wt gelatin binding domain of fibronectin (1981, J. Biol. Chem. 256:5583) on diploid fibroblast (IMR-90) extracellular fibronectin and collagen organization. Anti-60k Fab' did not inhibit IMR-90 attachment or proliferation in fibronectin-depleted medium. Fibroblasts cultured with preimmune Fab' deposited a dense extracellular network of fibronectin and collagen detectable by immunofluorescence, while anti-60k Fab' prevented extracellular ...

  5. Cultivation of Keratinocytes and Fibroblasts in a Three-Dimensional Bovine Collagen-Elastin Matrix (Matriderm® and Application for Full Thickness Wound Coverage in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper Killat

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available New skin substitutes for burn medicine or reconstructive surgery pose an important issue in plastic surgery. Matriderm® is a clinically approved three-dimensional bovine collagen-elastin matrix which is already used as a dermal substitute of full thickness burn wounds. The drawback of an avital matrix is the limited integration in full thickness skin defects, depending on the defect size. To further optimize this process, Matriderm® has also been studied as a matrix for tissue engineering of skin albeit long-term cultivation of the matrix with cells has been difficult. Cells have generally been seeded onto the matrix with high cell loss and minimal time-consuming migration. Here we developed a cell seeded skin equivalent after microtransfer of cells directly into the matrix. First, cells were cultured, and microinjected into Matriderm®. Then, cell viability in the matrix was determined by histology in vitro. As a next step, the skin substitute was applied in vivo into a full thickness rodent wound model. The wound coverage and healing was observed over a period of two weeks followed by histological examination assessing cell viability, proliferation and integration into the host. Viable and proliferating cells could be found throughout the entire matrix. The presented skin substitute resembles healthy skin in morphology and integrity. Based on this study, future investigations are planned to examine behaviour of epidermal stem cells injected into a collagen-elastin matrix under the aspects of establishment of stem cell niches and differentiation.

  6. Biomimetic fabrication of a three-level hierarchical calcium phosphate/collagen/hydroxyapatite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Changchun; Ye, Xingjiang; Fan, Yujiang; Tan, Yanfei; Qing, Fangzu; Zhang, Xingdong; Ma, Liang

    2014-01-01

    A three-level hierarchical calcium phosphate/collagen/hydroxyapatite (CaP/Col/HAp) scaffold for bone tissue engineering was developed using biomimetic synthesis. Porous CaP ceramics were first prepared as substrate materials to mimic the porous bone structure. A second-level Col network was then composited into porous CaP ceramics by vacuum infusion. Finally, a third-level HAp layer was achieved by biomimetic mineralization. The three-level hierarchical biomimetic scaffold was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectra, x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and the mechanical properties of the scaffold were evaluated using dynamic mechanical analysis. The results show that this scaffold exhibits a similar structure and composition to natural bone tissues. Furthermore, this three-level hierarchical biomimetic scaffold showed enhanced mechanical strength compared with pure porous CaP scaffolds. The biocompatibility and osteoinductivity of the biomimetic scaffolds were evaluated using in vitro and in vivo tests. Cell culture results indicated the good biocompatibility of this biomimetic scaffold. Faster and increased bone formation was observed in these scaffolds following a six-month implantation in the dorsal muscles of rabbits, indicating that this biomimetic scaffold exhibits better osteoinductivity than common CaP scaffolds. (papers)

  7. Prdm5 Regulates Collagen Gene Transcription by Association with RNA Polymerase II in Developing Bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Giorgio Giacomo; Honnens de Lichtenberg, Kristian; Carrara, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    and fibrillogenesis by binding inside the Col1a1 gene body and maintaining RNA polymerase II occupancy. In vivo, Prdm5 loss results in delayed ossification involving a pronounced impairment in the assembly of fibrillar collagens. Collectively, our results define a novel role for Prdm5 in sustaining...

  8. A preliminary carbon and nitrogen isotopic investigation of bone collagen from skeletal remains recovered from a Pre-Columbian burial site, Matanzas Province, Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhay, W.M.; Chinique de Armas, Y.; Rodriguez Suárez, R.; Arredondo, C.; Smith, D.G.; Armstrong, S.D.; Roksandic, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Collagen isotope (carbon and nitrogen) based reconstruction of paleodiets. ► Human remains recovered from Canimar Abajo, Matanzas Province, Cuba. ► Individuals consumed marine resource diets supplemented with terrestrial plants. ► Trophic level and isotope shifts for breastfed and weaned infant/juveniles (I/J). ► I/J evidence of weaning through distinct δ 15 N enrichments and δ 13 C depletions. - Abstract: This preliminary study investigates the diet of a population of humans (n = 28) recovered from a shell-matrix site of Canimar Abajo on the Canimar River, Matanzas Province, Cuba. The site is characterized by two cemetery levels separated by a layer of occupation/ritual/midden activity that lasted 1.5 ka. Stable C (δ 13 C) and N (δ 15 N) isotope analysis of human bone collagen samples obtained from individuals (7 infant/juveniles, and 21 adults) from both cemetery levels was conducted in order to reconstruct the diet of these two populations, investigate the relative importance of marine vs. terrestrial resources, and reveal any sex- and age-related distinctions in their food sources. Initial indications suggest that individuals from both cemetery levels consumed diets that were marine resource intensive but also supplemented with varied additions of terrestrial (mostly plant) resources. This supplementation is particularly evident in the later cemetery population. Though there are no significant differences in diet according to sex, there is a trophic level and terrestrial-based shift for breastfed and weaning infant/juveniles. The infant/juveniles showed evidence of being weaned through distinct δ 15 N enrichments and δ 13 C depletions over adult females

  9. Injection of Unicameral Bone Cysts with Bone Marrow Aspirate and Demineralized Bone Matrix Avoids Open Curettage and Bone Grafting in a Retrospective Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundle, Kenneth R; Bhatt, Etasha M; Punt, Stephanie E; Bompadre, Viviana; Conrad, Ernest U

    2017-01-01

    Many treatment options exist for unicameral bone cysts (UBC), without clear evidence of superiority. Meta-analyses have been limited by small numbers of patients in specific anatomic and treatment subgroups. The purpose of this study was to report the outcomes of injecting bone marrow aspirate and demineralized bone matrix (BMA/DBM) for the treatment of proximal humerus UBC. Fifty-one patients with proximal humerus lesions treated by BMA/DBM injection were retrospectively reviewed from a single academic medical center. The mean number of injections performed per patient was 2.14 (range 1-5). Eleven patients underwent only one injection (22%), an additional 19 patients completed treatment after two injections (37%), four patients healed after three injections (8%), and one patient healed after four injections (2%). The cumulative success rate of serial BMA/DBM injections was 22% (11/51), 58% (30/51), 67% (34/51), and 69% (35/51). Eleven patients (22%) ultimately underwent open curettage and bone grafting, and five patients (10%) were treated with injection of calcium phosphate bone substitute. A BMA/DBM injection strategy avoided an open procedure in 78% of patients with a proximal humerus UBC. The majority of patients underwent at least 2 injection treatments. Level IV retrospective cohort study.

  10. Insulin-like growth factor I has independent effects on bone matrix formation and cell replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hock, J.M.; Centrella, M.; Canalis, E.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin on bone matrix synthesis and bone cell replication were studied in cultured 21-day-old fetal rat calvariae. Histomorphometry techniques were developed to measure the incorporation of [2,3- 3 H]proline and [methyl- 3 H]thymidine into bone matrix and bone cell nuclei, respectively, using autoradiographs of sagittal sections of calvariae cultured with IGF-I, insulin, or vehicle for up to 96 h. To confirm an effect on bone formation, IGF-I was also studied for its effects on [ 3 H]proline incorporation into collagenase-digestible protein (CDP) and noncollagen protein and on [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation into acid-precipitable material (DNA). IGF-I at 10(-9)-10(-7) M significantly increased the rate of bone matrix apposition and CDP after 24 h by 45-50% and increased cell labeling by 8-fold in the osteoprogenitor cell zone, by 4-fold in the osteoblast cell zone, and by 2-fold in the periosteal fibroblast zone. Insulin at 10(-9)-10(-6) M also increased matrix apposition rate and CDP by 40-50%, but increased cell labeling by 2-fold only at a concentration of 10(-7) M or higher and then only in the osteoprogenitor cell zone. When hydroxyurea was added to IGF-I-treated bones, the effects of IGF-I on DNA synthesis were abolished, but the increase in bone matrix apposition induced by IGF-I was only partly diminished. In conclusion, IGF-I stimulates matrix synthesis in calvariae, an effect that is partly, although not completely, dependent on its stimulatory effect on DNA synthesis

  11. Use of carboxymethyl cellulose and collagen carrier with equine bone lyophilisate suggests late onset bone regenerative effect in a humerus drill defect - a pilot study in six sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Jakobsen, Thomas Vestergaard

    2010-01-01

    in the other. The animals were divided into three groups of two animals and observed for 8, 12 and 16 weeks. Drill holes was evaluated using quantitative computed tomography (QCT), micro computed tomography (microCT) and histomorphometry. Mean total bone mineral density (BMD) of each implantation site...... was calculated with both QCT and microCT. Bone volume to total volume (BV/TV) was analyzed using microCT and histomorphometry. Although not statistically significant, results showed increased bone BMD after 16 weeks in microCT data and an increased BV/TV after 16 weeks in both microCT and histology. Correlation...... between QCT and microCT was R(2) = 0.804. Correlation between histomorphometry and microCT BV/TV data was R(2) = 0.8935 and with an average overrepresentation of 8.2% in histomorphometry. In conclusion the CMC-Collagen + Colloss E filler seems like a viable osteogenic bone filler mid- to long term...

  12. Influence of bone morphogenetic protein-2 on the extracellular matrix, material properties, and gene expression of long-term articular chondrocyte cultures: loss of chondrocyte stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczak, David A; Westendorf, Jennifer J; Carlson, Cathy S; Lewis, Jack L

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) on articular chondrocyte tissues grown as monolayers in vitro for up to 8 weeks. Articular chondrocytes were isolated from New Zealand White rabbits and plated in monolayer cultures. The cultures were supplemented with 100 ng/mL of BMP-2 for up to 8 weeks and the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition, material properties, and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression were analyzed. mRNA expression of cartilage-specific genes, type II collagen, and aggrecan showed that BMP-2 enhanced chondrocyte stability for up to 3 weeks. After 3 weeks in culture, there was substantially more type I collagen expression and more osteopontin and runt-related transcription factor 2 expression in 5- and 8-week cultures treated with BMP-2 than in controls. Additionally, matrix metalloproteinase-13 and ADAMTS-5 (A disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin 5) were upregulated in 5- and 8-week cultures treated with BMP-2, coinciding with a loss of ECM density, collagen, and proteoglycan. Eight-week tissue stimulated with BMP-2 was more fragile and tore more easily when removed from the culture dish as compared to controls, suggesting temporal limitations to the effectiveness of BMP-2 in monolayer systems and perhaps other models to enhance the generation of a cartilage-like tissue for tissue engineering purposes.

  13. A composite demineralized bone matrix--self assembling peptide scaffold for enhancing cell and growth factor activity in bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tianyong; Li, Zhiqiang; Luo, Fei; Xie, Zhao; Wu, Xuehui; Xing, Junchao; Dong, Shiwu; Xu, Jianzhong

    2014-07-01

    The need for suitable bone grafts is high; however, there are limitations to all current graft sources, such as limited availability, the invasive harvest procedure, insufficient osteoinductive properties, poor biocompatibility, ethical problems, and degradation properties. The lack of osteoinductive properties is a common problem. As an allogenic bone graft, demineralized bone matrix (DBM) can overcome issues such as limited sources and comorbidities caused by invasive harvest; however, DBM is not sufficiently osteoinductive. Bone marrow has been known to magnify osteoinductive components for bone reconstruction because it contains osteogenic cells and factors. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow are the gold standard for cell seeding in tissue-engineered biomaterials for bone repair, and these cells have demonstrated beneficial effects. However, the associated high cost and the complicated procedures limit the use of tissue-engineered bone constructs. To easily enrich more osteogenic cells and factors to DBM by selective cell retention technology, DBM is modified by a nanoscale self-assembling peptide (SAP) to form a composite DBM/SAP scaffold. By decreasing the pore size and increasing the charge interaction, DBM/SAP scaffolds possess a much higher enriching yield for osteogenic cells and factors compared with DBM alone scaffolds. At the same time, SAP can build a cellular microenvironment for cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation that promotes bone reconstruction. As a result, a suitable bone graft fabricated by DBM/SAP scaffolds and bone marrow represents a new strategy and product for bone transplantation in the clinic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Micro/Nano Multilayered Scaffolds of PLGA and Collagen by Alternately Electrospinning for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Sanghwa; Haider, Adnan; Gupta, Kailash Chandra; Kim, Sukyoung; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2016-07-01

    The dual extrusion electrospinning technique was used to fabricate multilayered 3D scaffolds by stacking microfibrous meshes of poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) in alternate fashion to micro/nano mixed fibrous meshes of PLGA and collagen. To fabricate the multilayered scaffold, 35 wt% solution of PLGA in THF-DMF binary solvent (3:1) and 5 wt% solution of collagen in hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) with and without hydroxyapatite nanorods (nHA) were used. The dual and individual electrospinning of PLGA and collagen were carried out at flow rates of 1.0 and 0.5 mL/h, respectively, at an applied voltage of 20 kV. The density of collagen fibers in multilayered scaffolds has controlled the adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. The homogeneous dispersion of glutamic acid-modified hydroxyapatite nanorods (nHA-GA) in collagen solution has improved the osteogenic properties of fabricated multilayered scaffolds. The fabricated multilayered scaffolds were characterized using FT-IR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to evaluate the adhesion and spreads of MC3T3-E1 cells on multilayered scaffolds. The activity of MC3T3-E1 cells on the multilayered scaffolds was evaluated by applying MTT, alkaline phosphatase, Alizarin Red, von Kossa, and cytoskeleton F-actin assaying protocols. The micro/nano fibrous PLGA-Col-HA scaffolds were found to be highly bioactive in comparison to pristine microfibrous PLGA and micro/nano mixed fibrous PLGA and Col scaffolds.

  15. The sintered microsphere matrix for bone tissue engineering: in vitro osteoconductivity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, Mark; Attawia, Mohamed; Laurencin, Cato T

    2002-09-05

    A tissue engineering approach has been used to design three-dimensional synthetic matrices for bone repair. The osteoconductivity and degradation profile of a novel polymeric bone-graft substitute was evaluated in an in vitro setting. Using the copolymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) [PLAGA], a sintering technique based on microsphere technology was used to fabricate three-dimensional porous scaffolds for bone regeneration. Osteoblasts and fibroblasts were seeded onto a 50:50 PLAGA scaffold. Morphologic evaluation through scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that both cell types attached and spread over the scaffold. Cells migrated through the matrix using cytoplasmic extensions to bridge the structure. Cross-sectional images indicated that cellular proliferation had penetrated into the matrix approximately 700 microm from the surface. Examination of the surfaces of cell/matrix constructs demonstrated that cellular proliferation had encompassed the pores of the matrix by 14 days of cell culture. With the aim of optimizing polymer composition and polymer molecular weight, a degradation study was conducted utilizing the matrix. The results demonstrate that degradation of the sintered matrix is dependent on molecular weight, copolymer ratio, and pore volume. From this data, it was determined that 75:25 PLAGA with an initial molecular weight of 100,000 has an optimal degradation profile. These studies show that the sintered microsphere matrix has an osteoconductive structure capable of functioning as a cellular scaffold with a degradation profile suitable for bone regeneration. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Osteoinduction and proliferation of bone-marrow stromal cells in three-dimensional poly (ε-caprolactone)/ hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Yang, Xiaoyan; Qi, Xin; Jiang, Chaoyin

    2015-05-08

    Osteoinduction and proliferation of bone-marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in three-dimensional (3D) poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds have not been studied throughly and are technically challenging. This study aimed to optimize nanocomposites of 3D PCL scaffolds to provide superior adhesion, proliferation and differentiation environment for BMSCs in this scenario. BMSCs were isolated and cultured in a novel 3D tissue culture poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffold coated with poly-lysine, hydroxyapatite (HAp), collagen and HAp/collagen. Cell morphology was observed and BMSC biomarkers for osteogenesis, osteoblast differentiation and activation were analyzed. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) micrographs showed that coating materials were uniformly deposited on the surface of PCL scaffolds and BMSCs grew and aggregated to form clusters during 3D culture. Both mRNA and protein levels of the key players of osteogenesis and osteoblast differentiation and activation, including runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), alkaline phosphates (ALP), osterix, osteocalcin, and RANKL, were significantly higher in BMSCs seeded in PCL scaffolds coated with HAp or HAp/collagen than those seeded in uncoated PCL scaffolds, whereas the expression levels were not significantly different in collagen or poly-lysine coated PCL scaffolds. In addition, poly-lysine, collagen, HAp/collagen, and HAp coated PCL scaffolds had significantly more viable cells than uncoated PCL scaffolds, especially scaffolds with HAp/collagen and collagen-alone coatings. That BMSCs in HAp or HAp/collagen PCL scaffolds had remarkably higher ALP activities than those in collagen-coated alone or uncoated PCL scaffolds indicating higher osteogenic differentiation levels of BMSCs in HAp or HAp/collagen PCL scaffolds. Moreover, morphological changes of BMSCs after four-week of 3D culture confirmed that BMSCs successfully differentiated into osteoblast with spread-out phenotype in HAp/collagen coated PCL scaffolds

  17. ZEB1 induces LOXL2-mediated collagen stabilization and deposition in the extracellular matrix to drive lung cancer invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, D H; Ungewiss, C; Tong, P; Byers, L A; Wang, J; Canales, J R; Villalobos, P A; Uraoka, N; Mino, B; Behrens, C; Wistuba, I I; Han, R I; Wanna, C A; Fahrenholtz, M; Grande-Allen, K J; Creighton, C J; Gibbons, D L

    2017-04-06

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths, primarily due to distant metastatic disease. Metastatic lung cancer cells can undergo an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) regulated by various transcription factors, including a double-negative feedback loop between the microRNA-200 (miR-200) family and ZEB1, but the precise mechanisms by which ZEB1-dependent EMT promotes malignancy remain largely undefined. Although the cell-intrinsic effects of EMT are important for tumor progression, the reciprocal dynamic crosstalk between mesenchymal cancer cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) is equally critical in regulating invasion and metastasis. Investigating the collaborative effect of EMT and ECM in the metastatic process reveals increased collagen deposition in metastatic tumor tissues as a direct consequence of amplified collagen gene expression in ZEB1-activated mesenchymal lung cancer cells. In addition, collagen fibers in metastatic lung tumors exhibit greater linearity and organization as a result of collagen crosslinking by the lysyl oxidase (LOX) family of enzymes. Expression of the LOX and LOXL2 isoforms is directly regulated by miR-200 and ZEB1, respectively, and their upregulation in metastatic tumors and mesenchymal cell lines is coordinated to that of collagen. Functionally, LOXL2, as opposed to LOX, is the principal isoform that crosslinks and stabilizes insoluble collagen deposition in tumor tissues. In turn, focal adhesion formation and FAK/SRC signaling is activated in mesenchymal tumor cells by crosslinked collagen in the ECM. Our study is the first to validate direct regulation of LOX and LOXL2 by the miR-200/ZEB1 axis, defines a novel mechanism driving tumor metastasis, delineates collagen as a prognostic marker, and identifies LOXL2 as a potential therapeutic target against tumor progression.

  18. Extracellular matrix scaffolds for cartilage and bone regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benders, K.E.M.; van Weeren, P.R.; Badylak, S.F.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Malda, J.

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine approaches based on decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds and tissues are rapidly expanding. The rationale for using ECM as a natural biomaterial is the presence of bioactive molecules that drive tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Moreover, appropriately

  19. A multiscale analytical approach for bone remodeling simulations : linking scales from collagen to trabeculae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colloca, M.; Blanchard, R.; Hellmich, C.; Ito, K.; Rietbergen, van B.

    2014-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic and hierarchical porous material whose spatial and temporal mechanical properties can vary considerably due to differences in its microstructure and due to remodeling. Hence, a multiscale analytical approach, which combines bone structural information at multiple scales to the

  20. In situ observation of fluoride-ion-induced hydroxyapatite-collagen detachment on bone fracture surfaces by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindt, J H; Thurner, P J; Lauer, M E; Bosma, B L; Schitter, G; Fantner, G E; Izumi, M; Weaver, J C; Morse, D E; Hansma, P K

    2007-01-01

    The topography of freshly fractured bovine and human bone surfaces was determined by the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Fracture surfaces from both kinds of samples exhibited complex landscapes formed by hydroxyapatite mineral platelets with lateral dimensions ranging from ∼90 nm x 60 nm to ∼20 nm x 20 nm. Novel AFM techniques were used to study these fracture surfaces during various chemical treatments. Significant topographical changes were observed following exposure to aqueous solutions of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or highly concentrated sodium fluoride (NaF). Both treatments resulted in the apparent loss of the hydroxyapatite mineral platelets on a timescale of a few seconds. Collagen fibrils situated beneath the overlying mineral platelets were clearly exposed and could be resolved with high spatial resolution in the acquired AFM images. Time-dependent mass loss experiments revealed that the applied agents (NaF or EDTA) had very different resulting effects. Despite the fact that the two treatments exhibited nearly identical results following examination by AFM, bulk bone samples treated with EDTA exhibited a ∼70% mass loss after 72 h, whereas for the NaF-treated samples, the mass loss was only of the order of ∼10%. These results support those obtained from previous mechanical testing experiments, suggesting that enhanced formation of superficial fluoroapatite dramatically weakens the protein-hydroxyapatite interfaces. Additionally, we discovered that treatment with aqueous solutions of NaF resulted in the effective extraction of noncollagenous proteins from bone powder

  1. THE MEASUREMENT OF BONE QUALITY USING GRAY LEVEL CO-OCCURRENCE MATRIX TEXTURAL FEATURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirvaikar, Mukul; Huang, Ning; Dong, Xuanliang Neil

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, statistical methods for the estimation of bone quality to predict the risk of fracture are reported. Bone mineral density and bone architecture properties are the main contributors of bone quality. Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) is the traditional clinical measurement technique for bone mineral density, but does not include architectural information to enhance the prediction of bone fragility. Other modalities are not practical due to cost and access considerations. This study investigates statistical parameters based on the Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) extracted from two-dimensional projection images and explores links with architectural properties and bone mechanics. Data analysis was conducted on Micro-CT images of 13 trabecular bones (with an in-plane spatial resolution of about 50μm). Ground truth data for bone volume fraction (BV/TV), bone strength and modulus were available based on complex 3D analysis and mechanical tests. Correlation between the statistical parameters and biomechanical test results was studied using regression analysis. The results showed Cluster-Shade was strongly correlated with the microarchitecture of the trabecular bone and related to mechanical properties. Once the principle thesis of utilizing second-order statistics is established, it can be extended to other modalities, providing cost and convenience advantages for patients and doctors.

  2. Collagen/hydroxyapatite scaffold enriched with polycaprolactone nanofibers, thrombocyte-rich solution and mesenchymal stem cells promotes regeneration in large bone defect in vivo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prosecká, Eva; Rampichová, Michala; Litvinec, Andrej; Tonar, Z.; Králíčková, M.; Vojtová, L.; Kochová, P.; Plencner, Martin; Buzgo, Matej; Míčková, Andrea; Jančář, J.; Amler, Evžen

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 2 (2015), s. 671-682 ISSN 1549-3296 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : bone regeneration * mesenchymal stem cells * collagen/hydroxyapatite scaffold Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 3.263, year: 2015

  3. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) immobilized collagen-coated polyetheretherketone (PEEK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ya-Wei; Zhang, Li-Nan; Ye, Xin; Nie, He-Min; Hou, Zeng-Tao; Zeng, Teng-Hui; Yan, Guo-Ping; Shang, Peng

    2015-03-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is regarded as one of the most potential candidates of biomaterials in spinal implant applications. However, as a bioinert material, PEEK plays a limited role in osteoconduction and osseointegration. In this study, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) was immobilized onto the surface of collagen-coated PEEK in order to prepare a multi-functional material. After adsorbed onto the PEEK surface by hydrophobic interaction, collagen was cross-linked with N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethyl carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). EDC/NHS system also contributed to the immobilization of rhBMP-2. Water contact angle tests, XPS and SEM clearly demonstrated the surface changes. ELISA tests quantified the amount of rhBMP-2 immobilized and the release over a period of 30 d. In vitro evaluation proved that the osteogenesis differentiation rate was higher when cells were cultured on modified PEEK discs than on regular ones. In vivo tests were conducted and positive changes of major parameters were presented. This report demonstrates that the rhBMP-2 immobilized method for PEEK modification increase bioactivity in vitro and in vivo, suggesting its practicability in orthopedic and spinal clinical applications.

  4. Effect of Uniaxial Tensile Cyclic Loading Regimes on Matrix Organization and Tenogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Encapsulated within 3D Collagen Scaffolds

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    Gayathri Subramanian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells have become a popular cell choice for tendon repair strategies due to their relative abundance, ease of isolation, and ability to differentiate into tenocytes. In this study, we investigated the solo effect of different uniaxial tensile strains and loading frequencies on the matrix directionality and tenogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells encapsulated within three-dimensional collagen scaffolds. Samples loaded at 0%, 2%, 4%, and 6% strains and 0.1 Hz and 1 Hz frequencies for 2 hours/day over a 7-day period using a custom-built uniaxial tensile strain bioreactor were characterized in terms of matrix organization, cell viability, and musculoskeletal gene expression profiles. The results displayed that the collagen fibers of the loaded samples exhibited increased matrix directionality with an increase in strain values. Gene expression analyses demonstrated that ASC-encapsulated collagen scaffolds loaded at 2% strain and 0.1 Hz frequency showed significant increases in extracellular matrix genes and tenogenic differentiation markers. Importantly, no cross-differentiation potential to osteogenic, chondrogenic, and myogenic lineages was observed at 2% strain and 0.1 Hz frequency loading condition. Thus, 2% strain and 0.1 Hz frequency were identified as the appropriate mechanical loading regime to induce tenogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells cultured in a three-dimensional environment.

  5. Effect of Uniaxial Tensile Cyclic Loading Regimes on Matrix Organization and Tenogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Encapsulated within 3D Collagen Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Gayathri; Stasuk, Alexander; Elsaadany, Mostafa; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2017-01-01

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells have become a popular cell choice for tendon repair strategies due to their relative abundance, ease of isolation, and ability to differentiate into tenocytes. In this study, we investigated the solo effect of different uniaxial tensile strains and loading frequencies on the matrix directionality and tenogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells encapsulated within three-dimensional collagen scaffolds. Samples loaded at 0%, 2%, 4%, and 6% strains and 0.1 Hz and 1 Hz frequencies for 2 hours/day over a 7-day period using a custom-built uniaxial tensile strain bioreactor were characterized in terms of matrix organization, cell viability, and musculoskeletal gene expression profiles. The results displayed that the collagen fibers of the loaded samples exhibited increased matrix directionality with an increase in strain values. Gene expression