WorldWideScience

Sample records for bonded composite doublers

  1. Full-Scale Structural and NDI Validation Tests of Bonded Composite Doublers for Commercial Aircraft Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1999-02-01

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. Most of the concerns surrounding composite doubler technology pertain to long-term survivability, especially in the presence of non-optimum installations, and the validation of appropriate inspection procedures. This report focuses on a series of full-scale structural and nondestructive inspection (NDI) tests that were conducted to investigate the performance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Full-scale tests were conducted on fuselage panels cut from retired aircraft. These full-scale tests studied stress reductions, crack mitigation, and load transfer capabilities of composite doublers using simulated flight conditions of cabin pressure and axial stress. Also, structures which modeled key aspects of aircraft structure repairs were subjected to extreme tension, shear and bending loads to examine the composite laminate's resistance to disbond and delamination flaws. Several of the structures were loaded to failure in order to determine doubler design margins. Nondestructive inspections were conducted throughout the test series in order to validate appropriate techniques on actual aircraft structure. The test results showed that a properly designed and installed composite doubler is able to enhance fatigue life, transfer load away from damaged structure, and avoid the introduction of new stress risers (i.e. eliminate global reduction in the fatigue life of the structure). Comparisons with test data obtained prior to the doubler installation revealed that stresses in the parent material can be reduced 30%--60% through the use of the composite doubler. Tests to failure demonstrated that the bondline is able to transfer plastic strains into the doubler and that

  2. Damage tolerance assessment of bonded composite doubler repairs for commercial aircraft applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, D.

    1998-08-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration has sponsored a project at its Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) to validate the use of bonded composite doublers on commercial aircraft. A specific application was chosen in order to provide a proof-of-concept driving force behind this test and analysis project. However, the data stemming from this study serves as a comprehensive evaluation of bonded composite doublers for general use. The associated documentation package provides guidance regarding the design, analysis, installation, damage tolerance, and nondestructive inspection of these doublers. This report describes a series of fatigue and strength tests which were conducted to study the damage tolerance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Tension-tension fatigue and ultimate strength tests attempted to grow engineered flaws in coupons with composite doublers bonded to aluminum skin. An array of design parameters, including various flaw scenarios, the effects of surface impact, and other off-design conditions, were studied. The structural tests were used to: (1) assess the potential for interply delaminations and disbonds between the aluminum and the laminate, and (2) determine the load transfer and crack mitigation capabilities of composite doublers in the presence of severe defects. A series of specimens were subjected to ultimate tension tests in order to determine strength values and failure modes. It was demonstrated that even in the presence of extensive damage in the original structure (cracks, material loss) and in spite of non-optimum installations (adhesive disbonds), the composite doubler allowed the structure to survive more than 144,000 cycles of fatigue loading. Installation flaws in the composite laminate did not propagate over 216,000 fatigue cycles. Furthermore, the added impediments of impact--severe enough to deform the parent aluminum skin--and hot-wet exposure did not effect the doubler`s performance. Since the tests were conducting

  3. Development and validation of bonded composite doubler repairs for commercial aircraft.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2007-07-01

    A typical aircraft can experience over 2,000 fatigue cycles (cabin pressurizations) and even greater flight hours in a single year. An unavoidable by-product of aircraft use is that crack, impact, and corrosion flaws develop throughout the aircraft's skin and substructure elements. Economic barriers to the purchase of new aircraft have placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair methods. The use of bonded composite doublers offers the airframe manufacturers and aircraft maintenance facilities a cost effective method to safely extend the lives of their aircraft. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is now possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance Center at Sandia National Labs (AANC), Boeing, and Federal Express completed a pilot program to validate and introduce composite doubler repair technology to the U.S. commercial aircraft industry. This project focused on repair of DC-10 fuselage structure and its primary goal was to demonstrate routine use of this repair technology using niche applications that streamline the design-to-installation process. As composite doubler repairs gradually appear in the commercial aircraft arena, successful flight operation data is being accumulated. These commercial aircraft repairs are not only demonstrating the engineering and economic advantages of composite doubler technology but they are also establishing the ability of commercial maintenance depots to safely adopt this repair technique. This report presents the array of engineering activities that were completed in order to make this technology available for widespread commercial aircraft use. Focused laboratory testing was conducted to compliment the field data and to address specific issues regarding damage tolerance and flaw growth in composite doubler repairs. Fatigue and strength tests were performed on a simulated wing

  4. Development of bonded composite doublers for the repair of oil recovery equipment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, David W.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2005-06-01

    An unavoidable by-product of a metallic structure's use is the appearance of crack and corrosion flaws. Economic barriers to the replacement of these structures have created an aging infrastructure and placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair methods. In the past decade, an advanced composite repair technology has made great strides in commercial aviation use. Extensive testing and analysis, through joint programs between the Sandia Labs FAA Airworthiness Assurance Center and the aviation industry, have proven that composite materials can be used to repair damaged aluminum structure. Successful pilot programs have produced flight performance history to establish the durability of bonded composite patches as a permanent repair on commercial aircraft structures. With this foundation in place, this effort is adapting bonded composite repair technology to civil structures. The use of bonded composite doublers has the potential to correct the difficulties associated with current repair techniques and the ability to be applied where there are no rehabilitation options. It promises to be cost-effective with minimal disruption to the users of the structure. This report concludes a study into the application of composite patches on thick steel structures typically used in mining operations. Extreme fatigue, temperature, erosive, and corrosive environments induce an array of equipment damage. The current weld repair techniques for these structures provide a fatigue life that is inferior to that of the original plate. Subsequent cracking must be revisited on a regular basis. The use of composite doublers, which do not have brittle fracture problems such as those inherent in welds, can help extend the structure's fatigue life and reduce the equipment downtime. Two of the main issues for adapting aircraft composite repairs to civil applications are developing an installation technique for carbon steel and accommodating large repairs on extremely thick

  5. Further Evolution of Composite Doubler Aircraft Repairs Through a Focus on Niche Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROACH,DENNIS P.

    2000-07-15

    The number of commercial airframes exceeding twenty years of service continues to grow. A typical aircraft can experience over 2,000 fatigue cycles (cabin pressurizations) and even greater flight hours in a single year. An unavoidable by-product of aircraft use is that crack and corrosion flaws develop throughout the aircraft's skin and substructure elements. Economic barriers to the purchase of new aircraft have created an aging aircraft fleet and placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair methods. The use of bonded composite doublers offers the airframe manufacturers and aircraft maintenance facilities a cost effective method to safety extend the lives of their aircraft. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is now possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance Center at Sandia National Labs (AANC) is conducting a program with Boeing and Federal Express to validate and introduce composite doubler repair technology to the US commercial aircraft industry. This project focuses on repair of DC-10 structure and builds on the foundation of the successful L-1011 door corner repair that was completed by the AANC, Lockheed-Martin, and Delta Air Lines. The L-1011 composite doubler repair was installed in 1997 and has not developed any flaws in over three years of service, As a follow-on effort, this DC-1O repair program investigated design, analysis, performance (durability, flaw containment, reliability), installation, and nondestructive inspection issues. Current activities are demonstrating regular use of composite doubler repairs on commercial aircraft. The primary goal of this program is to move the technology into niche applications and to streamline the design-to-installation process. Using the data accumulated to date, the team has designed, analyzed, and developed inspection techniques for an array of composite doubler

  6. Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.; Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.

    2012-01-01

    The present work is related to the development and application of progressive damage modeling techniques to bonded joint technology. The joint designs studied in this work include a conventional composite splice joint and a NASA-patented durable redundant joint. Both designs involve honeycomb sandwich structures with carbon/epoxy facesheets joined using adhesively bonded doublers.Progressive damage modeling allows for the prediction of the initiation and evolution of damage within a structure. For structures that include multiple material systems, such as the joint designs under consideration, the number of potential failure mechanisms that must be accounted for drastically increases the complexity of the analyses. Potential failure mechanisms include fiber fracture, intraply matrix cracking, delamination, core crushing, adhesive failure, and their interactions. The bonded joints were modeled using highly parametric, explicitly solved finite element models, with damage modeling implemented via custom user-written subroutines. Each ply was discretely meshed using three-dimensional solid elements. Layers of cohesive elements were included between each ply to account for the possibility of delaminations and were used to model the adhesive layers forming the joint. Good correlation with experimental results was achieved both in terms of load-displacement history and the predicted failure mechanism(s).

  7. Bonding in cementitious composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mindess, S. (British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada)) Shah, S.P. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA))

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings discuss the papers presented at the symposium on the subject of high performance cement composites. Some of the topics discussed were; calcium hydroxides treated ceramics microspheres and mechanical properties of high temperature light weight cements; microstructure and chemical variations of class F fly ash; microstructure and bond strength of cement and crack propagation as detected by laser holography and acoustic emission.

  8. Bonded and Stitched Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Bart F. (Inventor); Dial, William B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of forming a composite structure can include providing a plurality of composite panels of material, each composite panel having a plurality of holes extending through the panel. An adhesive layer is applied to each composite panel and a adjoining layer is applied over the adhesive layer. The method also includes stitching the composite panels, adhesive layer, and adjoining layer together by passing a length of a flexible connecting element into the plurality of holes in the composite panels of material. At least the adhesive layer is cured to bond the composite panels together and thereby form the composite structure.

  9. Method for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benatar, A.; Gutowski, T.G.

    1986-10-01

    Bonding of thermoplastic composites is a critical step in the manufacture of aerospace structures. The objective of this project is to investigate different methods for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites quickly, with a good bond strength, and without warping and deconsolidation. This is best accomplished by heating and melting the thermoplastic on the bond surface only, and then pressing the parts together for a fusion bond. For this purpose, a variety of surface heating techniques were examined for bonding of PEEK and J Polymer composites. These included: resistance heating, infrared heating, induction heating, dielectric/microwave heating, and ultrasonic welding. 20 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  10. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Pramoda; S Suresh; H S S Ramakrishna Matte; A Govindaraj

    2013-08-01

    Composites of graphene involving chemically bonded nano films of metal oxides have been prepared by reacting graphene containing surface oxygen functionalities with metal halide vapours followed by exposure to water vapour. The composites have been characterized by electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and other techniques. Magnetite particles chemically bonded to graphene dispersible in various solvents have been prepared and they exhibit fairly high magnetization.

  11. Ultrasonic Characterization of Interfaces in Composite Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.; Lobkis, O. I.; Rokhlin, S. I.; Cantrell, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    The inverse determination of imperfect interfaces from reflection spectra of normal and oblique incident ultrasonic waves in adhesive bonds of multidirectional composites is investigated. The oblique measurements are complicated by the highly dispersed nature of oblique wave spectra at frequencies above 3MHz. Different strategies for bond property reconstruction, including a modulation method, are discussed. The relation of measured interfacial spring density to the physico-chemical model of a composite interface described by polymer molecular bonds to emulate loss of molecular strength on an adhesive composite interface is discussed. This potentially relates the interfacial (adhesion) strength (number of bonds at the adhesive substrate interface) to the spring constant (stiffness) area density (flux), which is an ultrasonically measurable parameter.

  12. Bond Mechanisms in Fiber Reinforced Cement-Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    Symposium on "Cement Based Composites: Bonding in Cementitious Composites," S. Mindess and S. Shah, Editors. 44. Nilson, A. H., "Bond Stress-Slip...Society Symposium on "Cement Based Composites: Bonding in Cementitious Composites," held in Boston, December 2 to 4, 1987, S. Mindess and S. Shah, 0

  13. Test method to assess interface adhesion in composite bonding

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a new type of peel tests dedicated to composite bonding: Composite Peel Tests. This test is inspired on the standard floating roller peel test widely used for metal bonding. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of the Composite Peel Test to assess interface adhesion in composite bonded structures. To this end, peel tests were performed with nine different types of adhesives and at two environmental temperatures, room temperature and +80°C. The results we...

  14. Bond Strength of Repaired Composite Resin Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Máximo de ARAÚJO

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the bond strength of direct composite resins and composite repairs, using 3 different commercial brands - GI: Palfique Estelite Ó (Tokuyama, GII: Filtek Z350 (3M/ESPE and GIII: Te Econon (Ivoclar/Vivadent - and the use of AdperTM Single Bond 2 (3M/ESPE adhesive system at the base/repair interface. Method: Thirty conic bases (5 mm x 5 mm x 3 mm of each commercial brand of composite resin were fabricated. All bases of each group were submitted to a thermocycling regimen of 20,000 cycles (5ºC to 55ºC ± 2ºC, for 30 s. The bases of each group were randomly assigned to 3 sub-groups, in which a combination of the commercial brands was performed for the repairs. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C during 7 days and were thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC - MEM 2000 with 500 kgf load cell running at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Data in MPa were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey’s test (5%.Results: The following results were found: GI: Palfique Estelite Ó (11.22±4.00 MPa, Te Econom (12.03±3.47 MPa and Filtek Z350 (10.66±2.89 MPa; GII: Palfique Estelite Ó (8.88±2.04 MPa, Te Econom (7.77±1.64 MPa and Filtek Z350 (10.50±6.14 MPa; and GIII: Palfique Estelite Ó (8.41±2.50 MPa, Te Econom (12.33±3.18 MPa and Z350 (11.73±3.54 MPa.Conclusion: The bond strengths at the interface of the different composite resins submitted to repair were statistically similar regardless of the commercial brand.

  15. Test method to assess interface adhesion in composite bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teixeira de Freitas, S.; Sinke, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a new type of peel tests dedicated to composite bonding: Composite Peel Tests. This test is inspired on the standard floating roller peel test widely used for metal bonding. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of the Composite Peel Test to assess interface ad

  16. Adhesive bonding of composite aircraft structures: Challenges and recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelakis, Sp.; Tserpes, K. I.

    2014-01-01

    In this review paper, the challenges and some recent developments of adhesive bonding technology in composite aircraft structures are discussed. The durability of bonded joints is defined and presented for parameters that may influence bonding quality. Presented is also, a numerical design approach for composite joining profiles used to realize adhesive bonding. It is shown that environmental ageing and pre-bond contamination of bonding surfaces may degrade significantly fracture toughness of bonded joints. Moreover, it is obvious that additional research is needed in order to design joining profiles that will enable load transfer through shearing of the bondline. These findings, together with the limited capabilities of existing non-destructive testing techniques, can partially explain the confined use of adhesive bonding in primary composite aircraft structural parts.

  17. Effect of Biofilm on the Repair Bond Strengths of Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinastiti, M.; Ozcan, M.; Siswomihardjo, W.; Busscher, H. J.; van der Mei, H. C.

    2010-01-01

    Composite restorations degrade during wear, but it is unknown how wear affects the composite surface and influences composite-to-composite bonding in minimally invasive repair. Here, it is hypothesized that in vitro exposure of composites to oral biofilm yields clinically relevant degradation of com

  18. Drastic Improvements in Bonding of Fiber Reinforced Multifunctional Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Achievement of a dramatic increase in the bond strength in the composite/adhesive interfaces of existing fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite material joints and...

  19. Drastic Improvements in Bonding of Fiber Reinforced Multifunctional Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Achievement of a dramatic increase in the bond strength in the adhesive and composite/adhesive interfaces of existing fiber reinforced composite material joints and...

  20. Bond strength of composite resin to pulp capping biomaterials after application of three different bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaberi-Ansari, Zahra; Mahdilou, Maryam; Ahmadyar, Maryam; Asgary, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Bonding of composite resin filling materials to pulp protecting agents produces an adhesive joint which is important for the quality of filling as well as success of restoration. We aimed to assess the bond strength of composite resin to three pulp capping biomaterials: Pro Root mineral trioxide aggregate (PMTA), Root MTA (RMTA) and calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, using three bonding systems [a total-etch (Single Bond) and two self-etch systems (Protect bond and SE Bond)]. Materials and methods. Ninety acrylic molds, each containing a 6×2-mm hole, were divided into 3 groups and filled with PMTA, RMTA and CEM cements. The samples in each experimental group were then randomly divided into 3 sub-groups; Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond bonding systems were applied to the tested materials. Cylindrical forms of composite resin (Z100, 2×2 mm) were placed onto the samples and cured. Shear bond strength values were measured for 9 subgroups using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results. The average shear bond strengths of Z100 composite resin after application of Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond systems were as follows; PMTA: 5.1±2.42, 4.56±1.96 and 4.52±1.7; RMTA: 4.71±1.77, 4.31±0.56 and 4.79±1.88; and CEM cement: 4.75±1.1, 4.54±1.59 and 4.64±1.78 MPa, respectively. The type of pulp capping material, bonding system and their interacting effects did not have a significant effect on the bond strengths of composite resin to pulp capping biomaterials. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this in vitrostudy, bond strength of composite resin to two types of MTA as well as CEM cement were similar following application of the total-etch or self-etch bonding systems.

  1. Are Bonding Agents being Effective on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to the Composite?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Farzanegan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the clinical problems in orthodontics is the bonding of brackets tocomposite restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bondstrength of brackets bonded to composite restorations using Excite. Methods:Forty brackets were bonded to composite surfaces, which were embedded inacrylic resin. One of the following four protocols was employed for surfacepreparation of the composite: group 1 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds, group2 roughening with a diamond bur plus 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds, group3 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds and the applying Excite®, group4 roughening with diamond bur plus 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds andapplying Excite®. Maxillary central brackets were bonded onto thecomposite prepared samples with Transbond XT. Shear Bond Strength (SBS wasmeasured by a universal testing machine. The ANOVA and Tukey test was utilizedfor data analysis. Results: There was a significant difference betweenthe four groups (P

  2. Review of methods for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benatar, A.; Gutowski, T.G.

    1987-02-01

    Bonding of thermoplastic composites is a critical step in the manufacture of aerospace structures. The objective of this project is to investigate different methods for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites quickly, with a good bond strength, and without warping and deconsolidation. This is best accomplished by heating and melting the thermoplastic on the bond surface only, and then pressing the parts together for a fusion bond. For this purpose, a variety of surface heating techniques were examined for bonding of PEEK and J Polymer composites. These included: resistance heating, infrared heating, induction heating, dielectric/microwave heating, and ultrasonic welding. In resistance heating, a single prepreg ply was placed between the composites and heated by passing electric current through the graphite fibers. With induction heating, a single ply of nickel coated graphite fibers was placed between the composites and heated. Ultrasonic welding was done by molding thermoplastic-only energy directors into the composites; the ultrasonic vibration melted these energy directors thereby fusion bonding the parts. 20 references.

  3. Characterization of Dentine to Assess Bond Strength of Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Liaqat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to develop alternating dentine adhesion models that could help in the evaluation of a self-bonding dental composite. For this purpose dentine from human and ivory was characterized chemically and microscopically before and after acid etching using Raman and SEM. Mechanical properties of dentine were determined using 3 point bend test. Composite bonding to dentine, with and without use of acid pre-treatment and/or the adhesive, were assessed using a shear bond test. Furthermore, micro gap formation after restoration of 3 mm diameter cavities in dentine was assessed by SEM. Initial hydroxyapatite level in ivory was half that in human dentine. Surface hydroxyapatites decreased by approximately half with every 23 s of acid etch. The human dentine strength (56 MPa was approximately double that of ivory, while the modulus was almost comparable to that of ivory. With adhesive use, average shear bond strengths were 30 and 26 MPa with and without acid etching. With no adhesive, average bond strength was 6 MPa for conventional composites. This, however, increased to 14 MPa with a commercial flowable “self–bonding” composite or upon addition of low levels of an acidic monomer to the experimental composite. The acidic monomer additionally reduced micro-gap formation with the experimental composite. Improved bonding and mechanical properties should reduce composite failures due to recurrent caries or fracture respectively.

  4. Composite Bonding to Stainless Steel Crowns Using a New Universal Bonding and Single-Bottle Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Hattan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of nanocomposite to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding system. Material and Methods. Eighty (80 stainless steel crowns (SSCs were divided into four groups (20 each. Packable nanocomposite was bonded to the lingual surface of the crowns in the following methods: Group A without adhesive (control group, Group B using a new universal adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany, and Group C and Group D using two different brands of single-bottle adhesive systems. Shear bond strengths were calculated and the types of failure also were recorded. Results. The shear strength of Group B was significantly greater than that of other groups. No significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of Groups C and D. The control group had significantly lower shear bond strength ( to composite than the groups that utilized bonding agents. Conclusion. Composites bonding to stainless steel crowns using the new universal bonding agent (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany show significantly greater shear bond strengths and fewer adhesive failures when compared to traditional single-bottle systems.

  5. Influence of surface preparation on fusion bonding of thermoplastic composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sacchetti, F.; Grouve, W.J.B.; Warnet, L.L.; Fernandez Villegas, I.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced thermoplastic composites laminates (CFRP) meant for fusion bonding have been moulded using different release media. The potential contamination of the laminate surface by the release media and its effect on the mechanical performance of fusion bonded joints was studied. The p

  6. Bonded composite resin crowns for primary incisors: technique update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, T P

    1990-02-01

    A technique for restoration of carious primary maxillary incisors with a hybrid visible light-curing composite resin and a dentinal bonding agent is described. Careful use of this technique and the new materials can provide a restoration that is esthetic and resistant to fracture and displacement. The technique requires careful preparation of the operative field and precise handling of the restorative materials. The method is illustrated by the placement of bonded composite resin crowns in a 3-year-old boy.

  7. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength between Composite Resin and Porcelain Using Different Bonding Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Yassini

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Ceramics as in ceramo-metallic and all ceramic tooth restorations have grown popular owing to their high tissue compatibility and esthetic advantages. Such restorations have the capability to deliver valuable services over a long period of time; however, failures under intraoral conditions are not unanticipated.Purpose: The purpose of this in-vitro study was to investigate the shear bond strength of composite resin to porcelain using different bonding system materials.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study forty porcelain blocks were prepared and randomly divided into four equal groups. The porcelain surfaces were then etched with HF for 2 minutes, washed with water for 2 minutes and treated with a silane layer. The silane treated porcelain surfaces were left for one minute and then the specimens were bonded to composite resin as follow:Group 1 (control group, hybrid composite Z100 was applied and light cured from four directions for 20 seconds. Group 2, flowable composite was applied and light cured for 20 seconds. Group 3, unfilled resin was used and photo cured for 20 seconds. Group 4,(Dentin bonding agent adhesive resin was used followed by 20 seconds photo curing.Hybrid composite resin Z100 was subsequently applied on all porcelain surfaces of groups 2, 3 and 4, and light cured for 20 seconds from four directions. Specimens were then subjected to thermocycling 1000 times. Shear bond strength was determined by a Universal testing machine. The data obtained was subjected to a one-way ANOVA test.Results: The results indicate that there is a statistically significant difference between adhesive group and the other three groups of hybrid, flowable and unfilled resin (P<0.05.Conclusion: The results from this study showed that the shear bond strength of composite resin to porcelain was significantly higher for porcelain bonded surfaces using a dentin bonding agent than that of other materials tested.

  8. Laser Surface Preparation and Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical prebonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  9. Effect of thickness of bonded composite resin on compressive strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamburger, J.T.; Opdam, N.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Roeters, J.; Huysmans, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the compressive strength of composites with different physical properties bonded as a restoration to dentin in layers of varying thicknesses. METHODS: Four types of direct composite materials: a midway-filled (Tetric EvoCeram); a compact-filled (Cl

  10. Composite rebonding to stainless steel metal using different bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Shalan, T A; Till, M J; Feigal, R J

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the in vitro bond strengths of composite rebonded to stainless steel crown metal (SS) using five different bonding agents after composite to SS bond failure had been produced. The adhesive systems were applied to the failed bonds following the manufacturers' instructions and, as a control, composite was bonded to SS without using a bonding agent. Each group was then divided into two subgroups: mechanically prepared (MP), in which the SS was roughened by a diamond bur, and unprepared (NMP), in which no modification of the SS was done. ESPE VISIO-GEM composite was placed in a plastic mold and light cured to the treated SS. Samples were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 72 hr, thermocycled for 500 cycles between 5 and 55 degrees C, and mounted in an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Caulk's Adhesive System provided significantly higher rebond strength (228.97 +/- 106.9 kg/cm2) than the other materials, and mechanical surface preparation offered no significant advantages.

  11. Comparison of the microtensile bond strength of different composite core materials and bonding systems to a fiber post (DT Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lelya Sadighpour

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Retention and stability of the post and core system is the key factor for success of final restoration . The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of the different composite core materials and bonding systems to a fiber post.   Materials and Methods: To evaluate the bond strength of the composite resins to a fiber post ( DT light post 60 posts were divided into six groups : group A: Heliomolar Flow + Seal Bond, group B: Heliomolar Flow + SE Bond , group C: Valux Plus + Seal Bond , group D: Valux Plus + SE Bond , group E: Corecem + Seal Bond, group F: Corecem + SE Bond. All samples were thermocycled for 5000 cycles (5-55 0C and cut into four bars for the microtensile bond strength test. Failure modes were identified using a stereomicroscope. Data were analysed using One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post hoc test (P<0.05.   Results: The interaction between composite resin materials and bonding systems were positive. The conventional hybrid composite (Valux Plus had significantly higher bond strength compared with the core specific flowable composite (Corecem when Seal Bond was applied as bonding agent (P<0.05. However, when SE Bond was utilized hybrid composite demonstrated significantly lower bond strength than that of other two groups (P<0.05.   Conclusion: The performance of a particular composite is affected by the bonding system that is applied. A single composite resin may have different bond strength when combined with different bonding system.

  12. Metallic and intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N.; Alexander, K.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this task is to establish a framework for the development and fabrication of metallic-phase-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with improved fracture toughness and damage resistance. The incorporation of metallic phases that plastically deform in the crack tip region, and thus dissipate strain energy, will result in an increase in the fracture toughness of the composite as compared to the monolithic ceramic. It is intended that these reinforced ceramic matrix composites will be used over a temperature range from 20{degrees}C to 800-1200{degrees}C for advanced applications in the industrial sector. In order to systematically develop these materials, a combination of experimental and theoretical studies must be undertaken.

  13. Shear bond strength of indirect composite material to monolithic zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of indirect composite material (Tescera Indirect Composite System) to monolithic zirconia (inCoris TZI). MATERIALS AND METHODS Partially stabilized monolithic zirconia blocks were cut into with 2.0 mm thickness. Sintered zirconia specimens were divided into different surface treatment groups: no treatment (control), sandblasting, glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application, and sandblasting + glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application. The indirect composite material was applied to the surface of the monolithic zirconia specimens. Shear bond strength value of each specimen was evaluated after thermocycling. The fractured surface of each specimen was examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope to assess the failure types. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey LSD tests (α=.05). RESULTS Bond strength was significantly lower in untreated specimens than in sandblasted specimens (P<.05). No difference between the glaze layer and hydrofluoric acid application treated groups were observed. However, bond strength for these groups were significantly higher as compared with the other two groups (P<.05). CONCLUSION Combined use of glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application and silanization are reliable for strong and durable bonding between indirect composite material and monolithic zirconia. PMID:27555895

  14. [Dental tissue-composite bonding. SEM study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menghini, P; Piacentini, C; Marchetti, C

    1991-05-31

    The Authors investigated the different operative methods effects in the transition zone between human fresh teeth calcified tissues and a composite material. Morphological observations, done by means of standard and back scattered scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated the Gluma adhesion system efficiency towards enamel and dentin if manufacturing's applying systems are carefully followed, by showing a structure with no solutions of continuity between tooth and restoration.

  15. Microtensile bond strength of repaired indirect resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suputtamongkol, Kallaya; Angkoonsit, Duangjai; Kaewthong, Sunattha; Charoonanan, Piyanan

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of surface treatments on microtensile bond strengths (MTBSs) of two types of indirect resin composites bonded to a conventional direct resin composite. MATERIALS AND METHODS Indirect resin composite blocks of Ceramage and SR Nexco were prepared in a plastic mold having a dimension of 10 × 10 × 4 mm. These composite blocks were divided into three groups according to their surface treatments: Group1: Sandblast (SB); Group2: Sandblast and ultrasonically clean (SB+UL); Group3: Sandblast plus silane (SB+SI). After bonding with direct resin composite, indirect-direct resin composite blocks were kept in distilled water for 24 hours at 37℃ and cut into microbars with the dimension of 1 × 1 × 8 mm. Microbar specimens (n = 40 per group) were loaded using a universal testing machine. Failure modes and compositions were evaluated by SEM. The statistical analyses of MTBS were performed by two-way ANOVA and Dunnett's test at α = .05. RESULTS Surface treatments and brands had effects on the MTBS without an interaction between these two factors. For SR Nexco, the MTBSs of SB and SB+SI group were significantly higher than that of SB+UL. For Ceramage, the MTBSs of SB and SB+SI were significantly higher than that of SB+UL. The mean MTBS of the Ceramage specimens was significantly higher than that of SR Nexco for all surface treatments. CONCLUSION Sandblasting with or without silane application could improve the bond strengths of repaired indirect resin composites to a conventional direct resin composite. PMID:28243390

  16. Development of a New Cascade Voltage-Doubler for Voltage Multiplication

    OpenAIRE

    Arash Toudeshki; Norman Mariun; Hashim Hizam; Noor Izzri Abdul Wahab

    2014-01-01

    For more than eight decades, cascade voltage-doubler circuits are used as a method to produce DC output voltage higher than the input voltage. In this paper, the topological developments of cascade voltage-doublers are reviewed. A new circuit configuration for cascade voltage-doubler is presented. This circuit can produce a higher value of the DC output voltage and better output quality compared to the conventional cascade voltage-doubler circuits, with the same number of stages.

  17. Bond strength of composite resin to enamel: assessment of two ethanol wet-bonding techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol wet-bonding (EWB technique has been stated to decrease degradation of resin-dentin bond. This study evaluated the effect of two EWB techniques on composite resin-to-enamel bond strength.Silicon carbide papers were used to produce flat enamel surfaces on the buccal faces of forty-five molars. OptiBond FL (OFL adhesive was applied on enamel surfaces in three groups of 15 namely: Enamel surface and OFL (control;Protocol 1 of the EWB technique: absolute ethanol was applied to water-saturated acid-etched enamel surfaces for 1 minute before the application of ethanol-solvated hydrophobic adhesive resin of OFL 3 times;Protocol 2: progressive ethanol replacement; water was gradually removed from the enamel matrix using ascending ethanol concentrations before OFL application. Composite build-ups were made and the specimens were stored for 24 hours at 37°C and 100% relative humidity. Shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Fracture patterns were evaluated microscopically. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Fisher's exact test (α=0.05.There were no significant differences in bond strength between the groups (P=0.73. However, regarding failure patterns, the highest cohesive enamel fractures were recorded in groups 2 and 3.In this study, although both methods of EWB did not influence immediate bond strength of composite resin to enamel, the majority of failure patterns occurred cohesively in enamel.

  18. Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Enamel: Assessment of Two Ethanol Wet-Bonding Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Rafizadeh, Mojgan; Samimi, Pouran

    2014-01-01

    Objective Ethanol wet-bonding (EWB) technique has been stated to decrease degradation of resin-dentin bond. This study evaluated the effect of two EWB techniques on composite resin-to-enamel bond strength. Materials and Methods: Silicon carbide papers were used to produce flat enamel surfaces on the buccal faces of forty-five molars. OptiBond FL (OFL) adhesive was applied on enamel surfaces in three groups of 15 namely: Enamel surface and OFL (control);Protocol 1 of the EWB technique: absolute ethanol was applied to water-saturated acid-etched enamel surfaces for 1 minute before the application of ethanol-solvated hydrophobic adhesive resin of OFL 3 times;Protocol 2: progressive ethanol replacement; water was gradually removed from the enamel matrix using ascending ethanol concentrations before OFL application. Composite build-ups were made and the specimens were stored for 24 hours at 37°C and 100% relative humidity. Shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Fracture patterns were evaluated microscopically. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Fisher’s exact test (α=0.05). Results: There were no significant differences in bond strength between the groups (P=0.73). However, regarding failure patterns, the highest cohesive enamel fractures were recorded in groups 2 and 3. Conclusion: In this study, although both methods of EWB did not influence immediate bond strength of composite resin to enamel, the majority of failure patterns occurred cohesively in enamel. PMID:24910690

  19. Debonding characteristics of adhesively bonded woven Kevlar composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    The fatigue damage mechanism of an adhesively bonded joint between fabric reinforced composite adherends was investigated with cracked-lap-shear specimens. Two bonded systems were studied: fabric Kevlar 49/5208 epoxy adherends bonded together with either EC 3445 or FM-300 adhesive. For each bonded system, two specimen geometries were tested. In all specimens tested, fatigue damage occurred in the form of cyclic debonding; however, the woven Kevlar specimens gave significantly slower debond growth rates and higher fracture toughness than previously found in the nonwoven adherend specimens. The surfaces for the woven adherends were not smooth; rather, they had regular crests (high spots) and troughs (low spots) due to the weave pattern. Radiographs of the specimens and examination of their failure surfaces revealed that fiber bridging occurred between the crests of the two adherends in the debonded region. The observed improvements in debond growth resistance and static fracture toughness are attributed to this bridging.

  20. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical pre-bonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  1. Alternation and tunable composition in hydrogen bonded supramolecular copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Thorsten; de Greef, Tom F A; Nieuwenhuizen, Marko M L; Sijbesma, Rint P

    2014-03-07

    Sequence control in supramolecular copolymers is limited by the selectivity of the associating monomer end groups. Here we introduce the use of monomers with aminopyrimidinone and aminohydroxynaphthyridine quadruple hydrogen bonding end groups, which both homodimerize, but form even stronger heterodimers. These features allow the formation of supramolecular copolymers with a tunable composition and a preference for alternating sequences.

  2. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Huysmans, MC; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N

  3. Amalgam stained dentin: a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the use of dental amalgam is mostly abandoned and substituted by tooth colored resin composites that can be bonded to teeth tissues by adhesive techniques. The aim of this thesis was to find out whether dark stained dentin, as often observed after removal of amalgam restorations and attribu

  4. Bonding of ceramic insert to a laboratory particle filler composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienanen, Pietari; Alander, Pasi; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2005-10-01

    The push-out bond strength of cylindrical ceramic inserts (CI) to particulate filler resin composite (VC) was evaluated in this study. Various surface treatments to improve the adhesion of CI to resin composite were tested. Additionally, the effect of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) laminate encapsulation around CI was tested. Feldspathic porcelain CI with a diameter of 3.1 mm was bonded to VC. Adhesive resin was used for bonding. In group 1, no surface treatment of CI was done. In group 2, CI was encapsulated with a thin layer of woven glass FRC. In group 3, the surface of the CI was tribochemically silica coated and silanized. In group 4, the surface of the CI was grit-blasted with 50 microm aluminum oxide and etched with hydrofluoric acid. In group 5, the grit-blasted CI was encapsulated with a layer of FRC. The specimens (n = 6/group) were either dry stored or thermocycled in water (6000 x 5-55 degrees C). The push-out test was carried out with a universal material testing machine. The highest push-out strength was achieved in group 5 (20.4 MPa) and the lowest in group 2 (11.5 MPa). ANOVA revealed that both surface treatment and storage condition had a significant effect on push-out strength (p < 0.05). We conclude that the additional glass FRC encapsulation can be used to increase the bond strength of insert to composite.

  5. Microshear bond strength between restorative composites and resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Nazareno GARCIA

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The techniques of adhesive cementationhave been widely used in dental restoration. The purpose of this studywas to evaluate the microshear bond strength between restorativecomposites and resin cements. Material and methods: Twenty composites blocks were prepared in order to obtain a flat surface, using 600-grid sandpaper. The samples were randomly divided in four groups(n=15 according to the experimental groups: [1] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of RelyX ARC; [2] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of Panavia F; [3] Clearfil AP-X block + Clearfil SE Bond adhesive + cylinder of RelyX ARC; [4] Clearfil AP-X block + Clearfil SE Bond adhesive + cylinder of Panavia F. The adhesive systems and the resin cements were applied according to the experimental groups, using a Tygon matrix.The samples were stored in distilled water at 37±2ºC for 24 hours.Microshear bond strengths were determined using an apparatus attached to an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Results: The results obtained in MPa (SD were statistically analyzed (ANOVA and Tukey test, p<0.05, and showed the following results: [1] 39.76 (5.34; [2] 45.01 (8.53; [3] 46.39 (9.22; [4]45.78 (9.06.There was no statistically significant difference between groups [1] and [2]; and between groups [3] and [4]. However, there was statistically significant difference between groups [1] and [3]. Conclusion:When Clearfil AP-X block was used with Clearfil SE Bond adhesive or RelyX resin cement, the microshear bond strength values were higher.The results suggest that in the union of the resin cements to the restorative composites, hydrophobic adhesives are necessary.

  6. Magnetic microparticle-polydimethylsiloxane composite for reversible microchannel bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Chia-Wen; Lee, Yueh-Pu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an iron oxide magnetic microparticles and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (MMPs-PDMS) composite material was employed to demonstrate a simple high-strength reversible magnetic bonding method. This paper presents the casting of opaque-view (where optical inspection through the microchannels was impossible) and clear-view (where optical inspection through the microchannel was possible) MMPs-PDMS. The influence of the microchannel geometries on the casting of the opaque-view casting was limited, which is similar to standard PDMS casting. Clear-view casting performance was highly associated with the microchannel geometries. The effects of the microchannel layout and the gap between the PDMS cover layer and the micromold substrate were thoroughly investigated. Compared with the native PDMS bonding strength of 31 kPa, the MMPs-PDMS magnetic bonding experiments showed that the thin PDMS film with an MMPs-PDMS layer effectively reduced the surface roughness and enhanced MMPs-PDMS reversible magnetic bonding strength. A thin PDMS film-coated opaque-view MMPs-PDMS device exhibited the greatest bonding strength of 110 kPa, and a clear-view MMPs-PDMS device with a thin PDMS film attained a magnetic bonding strength of 81 kPa.

  7. Bond Strength of Composite CFRP Reinforcing Bars in Timber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Corradi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of near-surface mounted (NSM fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP bars is an interesting method for increasing the shear and flexural strength of existing timber members. This article examines the behaviour of carbon FRP (CFRP bars in timber under direct pull-out conditions. The objective of this experimental program is to investigate the bond strength between composite bars and timber: bars were epoxied into small notches made into chestnut and fir wood members using a commercially-available epoxy system. Bonded lengths varied from 150 to 300 mm. Failure modes, stress and strain distributions and the bond strength of CFRP bars have been evaluated and discussed. The pull-out capacity in NSM CFRP bars at the onset of debonding increased with bonded length up to a length of 250 mm. While CFRP bar’s pull-out was achieved only for specimens with bonded lengths of 150 and 200 mm, bar tensile failure was mainly recorded for bonded lengths of 250 and 300 mm.

  8. Effect of physicochemical aging conditions on the composite-composite repair bond strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brendeke, Johannes; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the effect of different physicochemical aging methods and surface conditioning techniques on the repair bond strength of composite. It was hypothesized that the aging conditions would decrease the repair bond strength and surface conditioning methods would perform simil

  9. Effect of different surface treatments on the composite-composite repair bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathke, Andreas; Tymina, Yana; Haller, Bernd

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different mechanical and adhesive treatments on the bond strength between pre-existing composite and repair composite using two aging times of the composite to be repaired. Standardized cylinders were made of a microhybrid composite (Spectrum TPH) and stored in saline at 37 degrees C for 24 h (n = 140) or 6 months (n = 140). Three types of mechanical roughening were selected: diamond-coated bur followed by phosphoric acid etching, mini sandblaster with 50-microm aluminum oxide powder, and 30-microm silica-coated aluminum oxide powder (CoJet Sand), respectively. Adhesive treatment was performed with the components of a multi-step bonding system (OptiBond FL) or with a one-bottle primer-adhesive (Excite). In the CoJet Sand group, the effect of a silane coupling agent (Monobond-S) was also investigated. The repair composite (Spectrum TPH) was applied into a mould in three layers of 1 mm, each separately light-cured for 40 s. Repair tensile bond strengths were determined after 24-h storage. Mechanical and adhesive treatment had significant effects on repair bond strength (P OptiBond FL Adhesive), adhesive treatments significantly increased repair bond strengths to 6-month-old composite when compared to the controls without adhesive. Adhesive treatment of the mechanically roughened composite is essential for achieving acceptable repair bond strengths. The more complicated use of silica-coated particles for sandblasting followed by a silane coupling agent had no advantage over common bonding systems.

  10. Porcelain laminate veneer restorations bonded with a three-liquid silane bonding agent and a dual-activated luting composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Hideo; Aida, Yukiko; Ishikawa, Yumi; Tanoue, Naomi

    2006-12-01

    This clinical report describes the fabrication and bonding of porcelain laminate veneer restorations in a patient with anterior open spaces. Laminate veneer restorations made of feldspathic porcelain were etched with 5% hydrofluoric acid, rinsed under tap water, ultrasonically cleaned with methanol, and primed with a chemically activated three-liquid silane bonding agent (Clearfil Porcelain Bond). The enamel surfaces were etched with 40% phosphoric acid, rinsed with water, and primed with a two-liquid bonding agent (Clearfil New Bond) that contained a hydrophobic phosphate (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate; MDP). The restorations were bonded with a dual-activated luting composite (Clapearl DC). The veneers have been functioning satisfactorily for an observation period of one year. Combined use of the Clearfil bonding agents and Clapearl DC luting composite is an alternative to conventional materials for seating porcelain laminate veneer restorations, although the system is inapplicable to dentin bonding.

  11. Molecular bonding characteristics of Self-plasticized bamboo composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qiu; Peng, Wanxi; Ohkoshi, Makoto

    2014-07-01

    Bamboo biomass fibers were gradually separated, prepared, and then self-plasticized for immune composites. The molecular bonding characteristics of the self-plasticized bamboo composites were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), and thermo gravimetric analysis (TG). The important results were as follows. (1) During self-plasticizing of bamboo biomass, the cross-linking between celluloses mainly depended on carboxylic acid anhydrides and carboxylic acid esters, that between cellulose and lignin depended on carboxylic acid esters and C=O groups of aliphatic hydrocarbons, and that of hemi cellulose had a ether bond and ester bond bridging effect between lignin and cellulose. The cross-linking effects of hemi cellulose, lignin, and cellulose could be stacked and coupled. (2) After self-plasticization, the crystallinity of the lingo cellulosic biomass, lignin cellulose, and cellulose were increased by 5.8%, 2.28%, and 11.67%, respectively. While the TG curves of all samples were basically similar in shape, the weight loss rate turning points of the self-plasticized samples were delayed compared with those of the bamboo biomass fibers. This result demonstrated that the molecular integration of the bamboo biomass was increased after self-plasticization, and confirmed that bond cross-linking between the hemi cellulose, lignin and cellulose of the bamboo biomass had occurred.

  12. Inner demagnetization factor in polymer-bonded soft magnetic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anhalt, M. [Faculty of Natural and Materials Science, Clausthal University of Technology, Robert-Koch-Str. 42, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)], E-mail: mathias.anhalt@tu-clausthal.de; Weidenfeller, B. [Faculty of Natural and Materials Science, Clausthal University of Technology, Robert-Koch-Str. 42, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Mattei, J.-L. [Laboratoire d' Electronique et des Systemes de Telecommunications (UMR CNRS 6616), UFR Sciences, 6, Avenue Le Gorgeu CS 93837, 29238 Brest (France)

    2008-10-15

    The inner demagnetization factor N{sub i} of polymer-bonded soft magnetic composites (PBSMC) varying in filler material and filler content C was measured, using a computer-controlled measurement system. For all materials the results show a decrease from an inner demagnetization factor close to the demagnetization factor of a single particle to N{sub i}{approx}0 on increasing the magnetic content C. Measurement data of a selected material were compared with a model derived from an effective medium theory using the composite's effective susceptibility and show superb accordance.

  13. Effect of Intermediate Agents and Preheated Composites on Repair Bond Strength of Silorane-Based Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Shafiei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Repairing composite restorations is a challenging procedure especially when two different types of composites are used. This study aimed to compare the repair strength of silorane-based composite (SC (Filtek P90 with that of preheated SC, methacrylate composite (MC(Z250, flowable MC (Filtek Supreme Plus and different adhesive/composite combinations.Materials and Methods: Eighty-four SC specimens were fabricated and randomly divided into seven groups (G. In the control group (G7, SC was bonded immediately to SC. The other specimens were water-aged for two months and were then roughened, etched and repaired with the following materials: G1 Silorane Adhesive Bond (SAB/SC;G2 Preheated SC; G3 SAB/MC; G4 Adper Single Bond (SB/MC; G5 Flowable MC/MC; G6 Preheated MC. After water storage and thermocycling, the repaired specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s test.Results: Preheated SC and MC, flowable MC and SAB/SC resulted in bond strength comparable to that of the control group. Preheated SC showed significantly higher bond strength when compared to SAB/MC (P=0.04 and SB/MC (P<0.001. Bond strength of SB/MC was significantly lower than that of the other groups (P<0.05, except for SAB/SC and SAB/MC.Conclusion: All repairing materials except for SB/MC resulted in bond strength values comparable to that of the control group. Repair with preheated SC yielded the highest bond strength. 

  14. A Novel Multiscale Design of Interfaces for Polymeric Composites and Bonded Joints using Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-13

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0317 A Novel Multiscale Design of Interfaces for Polymeric Composites and Bonded Joints using Additive Manufacturing Pavana...Composites and Bonded Joints using Additive Manufacturing AWARD NO.: FA9550-15-1-0216 AGENCY NAME: The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), Ar...20 3 Additive Manufacturing for Bonded Composite Joints 21 3.1 Introduction

  15. Immediate repair bond strengths of microhybrid, nanohybrid and nanofilled composites after different surface treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinastiti, Margareta; Siswomihardjo, Widowati; Busscher, Henk J.; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate immediate repair bond strengths and failure types of resin composites with and without surface conditioning and characterize the interacting composite surfaces by their surface composition and roughness. Methods: Microhybrid, nanohybrid and nanofilled resin composites were ph

  16. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to glass-ionomer cement using self-etching bonding agents with different pH: In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deivanayagam Kandaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the bonding ability of composite to unset glass-ionomer cement (GIC using different self-etching bonding systems. Materials and Methods: One hundred samples of composite bonded to unset GIC were prepared and were divided into four groups. In Group A, composite was bonded to unset GIC employing a strong (pH 1 self-etch primer was used. In Group B, intermediary strong (pH 1.4 self-etch primer was employed. In Group C and D, mild (pH 2 and (pH 2.2 self-etch primer was employed. Shear bond strength analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: Statistical analysis performed with one way analysis of variance and Tukey′s test showed that the bond strength of composite to unset GIC was significantly higher for the mild self-etch primer group. In addition, energy dispersive x-ray (EDX analysis was used to determine the composition of various structural phases identified by FE-SEM along the GIC-bonding agent interfaces. Conclusion: Hence this present study concludes that clinically the use of mild self-etching bonding agent over unset GIC has improved bond strength compared to the use of strong and intermediate self-etching bonding agent.

  17. Evaluation of micro-shear bond strength of resin modified glass-ionomer to composite resins using various bonding systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Kasraie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to compare the micro-shear bond strength between composite and resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI by different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 discs of RMGI with a diameter of 15 mm and a thickness of 2 mm were randomly divided into four groups (n = 4. Four cylinders of composite resin (z250 were bonded to the RMGI discs with Single Bond, Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond in Groups 1-3, respectively. The fourth group was the control. Samples were tested by a mechanical testing machine with a strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. Failure mode was assessed under a stereo-microscope. Results: The means of micro-shear bond strength values for Groups 1-4 were 14.45, 23.49, 16.23 and 5.46 MPa, respectively. Using a bonding agent significantly increased micro-shear bond strength (P = 0.0001. Conclusion: Micro-shear bond strength of RMGI to composite increased significantly with the use of adhesive resin. The bond strength of RMGI to composite resin could vary depending upon the type of adhesive system used.

  18. Numerical Characterization of a Composite Bonded Wing-Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Satyanarayana, Arunkumar

    2008-01-01

    The development of composite wing structures has focused on the use of mechanical fasteners to join heavily-loaded areas, while bonded joints have been used only for select locations. The focus of this paper is the examination of the adhesive layer in a generic bonded wing box that represents a "fastenerless" or unitized structure in order to characterize the general behavior and failure mechanisms. A global/local approach was applied to study the response of the adhesive layer using a global shell model and a local shell/solid model. The wing box was analyzed under load to represent a high-g up-bending condition such that the strains in the composite sandwich face sheets are comparable to an expected design allowable. The global/local analysis indicates that at these wing load levels the strains in the adhesive layer are well within the adhesive's elastic region, such that yielding would not be expected in the adhesive layer. The global/local methodology appears to be a promising approach to evaluate the structural integrity of the adhesively bonded structures.

  19. Shear bond strength of composite veneers and acrylic veneer bonded to ni-cr alloy: a laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyayan, Manish; Katyayan, Preeti; Ravishankar, K

    2011-06-01

    A growing number of composite materials are being used as an alternative for veneering cast restorations. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of UDMA based composite, restorative composite, and heat cure acrylic when veneered to Ni-Cr alloy and to evaluate the type of bond failure. Three different veneering materials were used: heat cure acrylic, UDMA based composite and a restorative composite. 10 samples were fabricated, each with heat cure acrylic and restorative composite and 20 samples were fabricated with UDMA based composite; thus, the total number of samples amounted to 40. All the samples were subject to shear bond stress fracture tests and observed for the type of bond failure. The greatest mean shear bond strength was recorded in relation to the UDMA based composite material when thermal conducting paste was used during the curing (10.51 MPa). The mean bond strength values of UDMA based composite without thermal conducting paste (8.92 MPa), heat cured acrylic veneering material (4.24 MPa) and restorative composite material (5.03 MPa) were significantly different from each other (p > 0.05). Samples veneered with heat cure acrylic veneering material and restorative composite material showed adhesive failure. Samples prepared with UDMA based composite veneering composite showed cohesive or predominantly cohesive failure. UDMA based composite veneering material when used with heat protection paste exceeds the shear bond strength requirement as suggested by Matsumura et al. (>10 MPa). A statistically significant association between the test groups and the type of failure was observed.

  20. Bond strength of dental nanocomposites repaired with a bulkfill composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimova, Leyla; Baltacioglu, İsmail H.; Kiremitçi, Arlin

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze the bond strength of aged resin based nanocomposites repaired with the same and bulk fill composites. Material and Methods Seventy-two disc shaped resin composites consisted of three different nanocomposite resins (Filtek Ultimate/FU, Herculite XRV Ultra/HXRV, and Reflectys/R) were produced. After storing the samples for 8 weeks in distilled water, each material was combined with the same material or the bulk-fill composite resin system (Filtek Ultimate+Filtek Ultimate/Group-1; Filtek Ultimate+Tetric BF/Group-2; Herculite XRV+Herculite XRV/Group-3; Herculite XRV+Tetric BF/ Group-4; Reflectys+Reflectys/Group 5; Reflectys+Tetric BF/Group-6), for repair. Then specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing(SBS), and the debonded surfaces were examined. Results There was a significant difference among three materials(repaired with itself+bulk fill) for SBS testing values (p=0.001). FU and R were found to be similar, while HXRV was significantly different from them. A significant difference between group-1 and 2 (p=0.006) was detected, while there were no differences between group 3 and 4 (p= 0.142), and 5 and 6 (p=0.346). Among the six groups, repair SBS testing values with TBF were higher than repair with itself except for FU. Conclusions The bulk-fill repaired materials showed higher bond strength except for FU, which showed the highest SBS value when repaired with itself. An increased incidence of adhesive fracture was observed at low strengths. Key words:Resin-based composites, nanofillers, surface treatment, macro-shear, repair. PMID:28298988

  1. Shear bond strength of new self-adhesive flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajdowicz, Michael N; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Means, Mark T

    2012-01-01

    Recently, new self-adhesive flowable composite resin systems have been introduced to the market. These new composite resin systems reportedly bond to dentin and enamel without the application of an adhesive bonding agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to enamel of two new self-adhesive flowable composites with and without the use of an etch-and-rinse bonding agent. The new self-adhesive flowable composites had significantly lower bond strengths to enamel compared to a traditional adhesively bonded flowable composite. Both self-adhesive flowable composites had a significant increase in bond strength to enamel with the use of a phosphoric acid-etch and adhesive bonding agent.

  2. Role of bonding agents in the repair of composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staxrud, Frode; Dahl, Jon E

    2011-08-01

    Six commonly used composite resin materials and recommended bonding systems were tested to assess shear bond strength at the interface between aged and new composites with and without bonding. Test specimens were aged in water for 60 d before new composite was placed. Shear bond strength was assessed after 22 ± 2 h (Test 1) and after additional ageing by thermocycling (5-55°C/5,000 cycles) (Test 2). After an additional 180 d in water, the aged specimens were randomly divided into three groups to blind the test with respect to the aged composite. New composites were placed on aged specimens (two groups with and one without bonding agent) and thermocycled (Test 3). After 24 h (Test 1), the mean shear bond strength of the test specimens was 21-26 MPa when bonding agents were used, as opposed to 10-15 MPa without bonding agents. After thermocycling (Test 2), the mean shear bond strength was 16-23 MPa with a bonding agent and 17 MPa without a bonding agent. After 180 d in water and subsequent thermocycling (Test 3), the mean shear bond strength was 9-13 MPa with bonding agent and 2-3 MPa when no bonding agent was used. The results of this study therefore indicate that the use of bonding agents significantly improves the quality of composite repair.

  3. The effects of restorative composite resins on the cytotoxicity of dentine bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghwan; Son, Kyung Mi; Kwon, Ji Hyun; Lim, Bum-Soon; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    During restoration of damaged teeth in dental clinics, dentin bonding agents are usually overlaid with restorative resin composites. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of restorative resin composites on cytotoxicity of dentin bonding agents. Dentin bonding agents were placed on glass discs, pre-cured and uncured resin composite discs. Bonding agents on the glass discs and composite resins discs were light cured and used for agar overlay cytotoxicity testing. Dentin bonding agents on composite resin discs exhibited far less cytotoxicity than that on glass discs. The polymerization of resin composite increased the surface hardness and decreased the cytotoxicity of bonding agents. In conclusion, composite resins in dental restorations are expected to enhance the polymerization of dentin bonding agents and reduce the elution of resin monomers, resulting in the decrease of cytotoxicity.

  4. Effect of multi-step and single- step dentin bonding agents on the bond strength of composite to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maleknejad F

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Composite resin restorative materials, that nowadays are used as tooth-colour materials, have both benefits and weaknesses. One of these weaknesses is the contraction resulted from resin polymerization which influences on the composite dentin bond strength and it has been tried to be eliminated by different bonding systems. The aim of this in-vitro study was to compare the dentin bond strength of two dentine adhesive systems: multi-step Scoth Bond Multipurpose (SBMP and single- step Excite, by two composites of Ideal Makoo and Tetric. One hundred sixty (160 sound human molars were selected. At first they were debrided and mounted with acrylic resin in molds. The enamel of the buccal surface was eliminated by diamond burs. To provide a flat dentin surface, it was removed about lmm. Then, based on the type of dentin adhesive, they were divided into two groups of 30 teeth and were applied on the exposed dentine surface according to the manufacturer's instructions. Then, each group was divided into two subgroups of 15, based on the type of composite resin. Cylinders of the desired composite resin, attached to the dentin surface, were used for 80 seconds. The samples were stored in 100% humidity (37°c for 24 hours. The bond strengths was measured by a cross head blade with the speed of 2mm/min. Variance analysis and Duncan test, with 95% confidence level, showed that statistically, two factors of adhesive and composite, interact on each other, in bond strength. There was no significant difference in bond strength, between two composites with similar adhesives, however, comparing two different adhesives with the same composite, showed that the bond strength of Tetric with Excite (28.39 was more than that of SBMP (17.98 Mpa. Finally, it was recognized that among four experimental groups, there was only a significant difference in bond strengths, between Tetric-Excite with Tetric- SBMP. This study shows that dentin bond strength is influenced by

  5. Composite Bonded Joints’ Lifetime for Aircraft under Random Fatigue Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guo Shen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this present study, a lifetime prediction model of composite bonded joint in aircraft is developed based on variation of its elastic modulus under Random Fatigue Loads (RFL of aircraft and its approach is deduced by Miner linear damage accumulated theory. Considering some assumptions, this prediction model is conservative for aircraft engineering industry. Finally, simulation approach and analysis is developed and done for verification of deduction models. As a precondition, some assumptions are defined for simulation and verification. From simulating results, we can give a conclusion that models are properly accuracy for further study and engineering application.

  6. Nanoindentation on the doubler plane of KDP single crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Xiaoguang; Zhang Xiaoji; Tang Xianzhao; Guo Dongming; Gao Hang; Teng Xiaoji

    2013-01-01

    The nanohardness is from 1.44 to 2.61 GPa,the Vickers hardness is from 127 to 252 Vickers,and elastic modulus is from 52 to 123 GPa by the nanoindentation experiments on the doubler plane of KDP crystal.An indentation size effect is observed on the doubler plane in the test as the nanohardness and elastic modulus decreases with the increase of the maximum load.Slippage is identified as the major mode of plastic deformation,and pop-in events are attributed to the initiation of slippage.And the variation of unloading curve end is the result of stick effects between the indenter and the contact surface.The depth of the elastic deformation,which is between 40 and 75 nm,is responsible for the elastic deformation.The doubler plane of KDP crystal has anisotropy,and the relative anisotropy ofnanohardness is 8.2% and the relative anisotropy of elastic modulus is 8.0%.

  7. Effect of different adhesion strategies on bond strength of resin composite to composite-dentin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, M; Pekkan, G

    2013-01-01

    Service life of discolored and abraded resin composite restorations could be prolonged by repair or relayering actions. Composite-composite adhesion can be achieved successfully using some surface conditioning methods, but the most effective adhesion protocol for relayering is not known when the composite restorations are surrounded with dentin. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesion strategies on the bond strength of resin composite to the composite-dentin complex. Intact maxillary central incisors (N=72, n=8 per subgroup) were collected and the coronal parts of the teeth were embedded in autopolymerized poly(methyl tfr54methacrylate) surrounded by a polyvinyl chloride cylinder. Cylindrical cavities (diameter: 2.6 mm; depth: 2 mm) were opened in the middle of the labial surfaces of the teeth using a standard diamond bur, and the specimens were randomly divided into three groups. Two types of resin composite, namely microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine; AS) and nanohybrid (Grandio; G), were photo-polymerized incrementally in the cavities according to each manufacturer's recommendations. The composite-enamel surfaces were ground finished to 1200-grit silicone carbide paper until the dentin was exposed. The surfaces of the substrate composites and the surrounding dentin were conditioned according to one of the following adhesion protocols: protocol 1: acid-etching (dentin) + silica coating (composite) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); protocol 2: silica coating (composite) + acid-etching (dentin) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); and protocol 3: acid-etching (dentin) + primer (dentin) + silanization (composite) + bonding agent (dentin + composite). Applied primer and bonding agents were the corresponding materials of the composite manufacturer. Silica coating (CoJet sand, 30 μm) was achieved using a chairside air-abrasion device (distance: 10 mm; duration

  8. Anisotropic thermal conductivity in epoxy-bonded magnetocaloric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Bruno; Sellschopp, Kai; Bierdel, Marius; Funk, Alexander; Bobeth, Manfred; Krautz, Maria; Waske, Anja

    2016-09-01

    Thermal management is one of the crucial issues in the development of magnetocaloric refrigeration technology for application. In order to ensure optimal exploitation of the materials "primary" properties, such as entropy change and temperature lift, thermal properties (and other "secondary" properties) play an important role. In magnetocaloric composites, which show an increased cycling stability in comparison to their bulk counterparts, thermal properties are strongly determined by the geometric arrangement of the corresponding components. In the first part of this paper, the inner structure of a polymer-bonded La(Fe, Co, Si)13-composite was studied by X-ray computed tomography. Based on this 3D data, a numerical study along all three spatial directions revealed anisotropic thermal conductivity of the composite: Due to the preparation process, the long-axis of the magnetocaloric particles is aligned along the xy plane which is why the in-plane thermal conductivity is larger than the thermal conductivity along the z-axis. Further, the study is expanded to a second aspect devoted to the influence of particle distribution and alignment within the polymer matrix. Based on an equivalent ellipsoids model to describe the inner structure of the composite, numerical simulation of the thermal conductivity in different particle arrangements and orientation distributions were performed. This paper evaluates the possibilities of microstructural design for inducing and adjusting anisotropic thermal conductivity in magnetocaloric composites.

  9. Bonding of Glass Ceramic and Indirect Composite to Non-aged and Aged Resin Composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco; Ozcan, Mutlu; Muis, Maarten; Kalk, Warner

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Since adhesion of the restorative materials to pre-polymerized or aged resin composites presents a challenge to the clinicians, existing restorations are often removed and remade prior to cementation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). This study evaluated bond strength of non-aged and aged

  10. Bond strength durability of direct and indirect composite systems following surface conditioning for repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Ozcan, Mutlu; Vanderlei, Aleska Dias; Leite, Fabiola Pessoa Pereira; Kimpara, Estevao Tomomitsu; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the effect of surface conditioning methods and thermocycling on the bond strength between a resin composite and an indirect composite system in order to test the repair bond strength. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of indirect resin composite (Sin

  11. Caul and method for bonding and curing intricate composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willden, Kurtis S. (Inventor); Goodno, Kenneth N. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention disclosed here is a method for forming and curing an intricate structure of criss-crossing composite stringers and frames that are bonded to a skin panel. A structure constructed in accordance with the invention would be well-suited for use as a portion of an aircraft fuselage, a boat hull, or the like. The method is preferably practiced by applying uncured composite stringers to an uncured composite sheet panel. This is followed by placing cured frames crosswise over the stringers. The frames have openings at the locations where they intersect with the stringers which enables the frames to come into direct contact with the skin along most of their length. During the forming and curing process, the stringers are covered with a plurality of cauls, and the entire assembly of skin panel, stringers, frames and cauls is subjected to a vacuum bagging and curing process. The cauls serve to maintain both part shape and to control the flow of resin within the stringers as they are cured. Further, they probably eliminate the need for intermediate protective materials between the vacuum bag and the stringers.

  12. Health monitoring of bonded composite repair in bridge rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhanjun; Qing, Xinlin P.; Ghosh, Kumar; Karbhar, Vistasp; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2008-08-01

    Structural rehabilitation with carbon fiber reinforced composite materials has proven to be an excellent way to enhance/repair steel reinforced concrete structures and prolong their service lives. However, disbonds between composite repair patches and host structures continue to be a great concern of this technology. In this paper, a built-in piezoelectric sensor network based structural health monitoring system is introduced for monitoring the disbonds between composite repair patches and the host structures. This diagnostic system combines the sensor network, diagnostic hardware and data analysis software allowing for real-time monitoring of the integrity of the bonded repair. The effectiveness of detecting disbonds using the system has been demonstrated on a full scale bridge model in a laboratory setting. The bridge model was loaded incrementally to failure, and disbond monitoring was carried out during the loading intervals. Test results showed that the system could detect the disbonds before they have a noticeable effect on the global stiffness of the bridge model.

  13. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N=84) were condensed into acrylic and randomly assigned to one of the following treatments (N=6): (1) Alloy primer + opaquer, (2) Air-particle abrasion (50 micro m Al(2)O(3)) + alloy primer + opaquer, (3) Silica coating (30 micro m SiO(x)) + silanization + opaquer, (4) Opaquer + pre-impregnated continuous bidirectional E-glass fibre sheets, (5) Silica coating + silanization + fibre sheets, (6) Silica coating + silanization + opaquer + fibre sheet application. Non-conditioned amalgam surfaces were considered as control group (7). The mean surface roughness depth (R(Z)) was measured from the control group and air-abraded amalgam surfaces. The resin composite was bonded to the conditioned amalgam specimens using polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested under dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. The shear bond strength of resin composite to amalgam substrates was measured in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Surface roughness values for the non-conditioned control group (R(Z) approximately 0.14 micro m) and for air-particle abraded surfaces with either Al(2)O(3) or SiO(x) (R(Z) approximately 0.19 micro m and R(Z) approximately 0.16 micro m, respectively) did not show significant differences (p=0.23) (One-way ANOVA). In dry conditions, silica coating and silanization followed by fibre sheet application exhibited significantly higher results (14.8+/-5.6 MPa) than those of the groups conditioned with alloy primer (2.2+/-0.7 MPa) (p<0.001), air-particle abrasion+alloy primer (4.4+/-2.0 MPa, p<0.001), silica coating+silanization alone (6.2+/-0.8 MPa, p=0.009) or non-conditioned group (1.4+/-0.6, p<0.001). Silica coating and silanization followed

  14. Bonded structure application for aircraft. Kokuki ni okeru secchaku gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, O. (Japan Airlines Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-01-05

    Adhesives play an important role in a technology of the aircraft structure for which lightness and strength are required. The paper explains the present situation of bonding technology employed for aircraft, the honeycomb structure, production of composite materials and the related problems. Advantages and purposes of employing adhesives as substitutes for fasteners like screws, rivets, etc. are as follows: decreases in stress concentration, weight reduction, smoothing of surfaces, improvement of acoustic fatigue by adhesives flexibility, prevention of gas-liquid leakage. Epoxide adhesives are mainly used for aircraft. Together with tear straps, which are metal-metal bonded to the rear fuselage plate of aircraft, and waffle doublers, an aluminium honeycomb sandwich structure, whose weight is 1/7 of an aluminium plate same in rigidity, is used in such parts of aircraft as spoilers, outer plates of flaps, etc. The problem of the bonded structure is detachment. Therefore, how to prevent, discover and repair it is most important. 3 figs.

  15. Adhesive Characterization and Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2014-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  16. Parametric analysis of the planar metamaterials based on complementary double-ring resonators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Wei-Bing; Ji Zhong-Fu

    2011-01-01

    The planar metamaterials comprising complementary double-ring resonators (CDRRs) show its left handed behaviour. As a consequent work, this paper presents a detailed parametric study on the magnetically resonant transmission characteristics of the complementary double-ring metamaterials based on its structural parameters. This will be useful for the design of compact planar metamaterials based on the transmission lines loaded with CDRRs.

  17. Comparison of shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable composite with different flowable composites to dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Merve Erkmen Almaz; Aylin Akbay Oba; Işıl Şaroğlu Sönmez; Deniz Sönmez

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the shear bond strength of a self-adhering flowable resin composite with different flowable composites to dentin. Materials and Methods: A total of 48 extracted teeth were divided randomly into four groups, and dentin surfaces were exposed. Following materials were applied to dentin surfaces; Group I: VF (self-adhering flowable composite), Group II: CSE Bond (two-step self-etch adhesive) + CMF (conventional flowable composite), Gro...

  18. Human pulp response to a new composite system. Vytol composite restorative and bonding agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalleske, R L; Stanley, H R; Heyde, J B

    1978-09-01

    A new two-paste composite system (Vytol and Vytol Bonding Agent) was evaluated to establish its level of pulpal response in human teeth and to determine whether a calcium hydroxide base is required. Class V cavity preparations were cut in seventy-two teeth of ten male patients whose ages averaged 52.5 years. The teeth were restored and extracted at 1 to 7 days, 12 to 14 days, and 47 to 56 days. Histologic evaluation indicated that the unlined Vytol System reacted very similarly to other commercially available composite restorative materials and that a calcium hydroxide base is effective in reducing or eliminating adverse pulp responses.

  19. Studies on BEPC upgrade from pretzel to double-ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Physics opportunity in the charm and τ energy region calls for higher luminosity of the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPC).The BEPC has experienced continuous improvement since its completion in 1988.BEPCII,as a major upgrading project of the BEPC,aims at enhancing its luminosity of factor 30–100,following the principle of "one machine,two purposes" as adopted in BEPC,so that both high energy physics and synchrotron radiation experiments can be carried out with BEPCII.From the BEPC to BEPCII,the double-ring scheme with multi-bunch e +-e-collision in the large crossing angle was studied in comparison with the single-ring pretzel scheme.For the dedicated synchrotron radiation operation,artful "bridges" are designed to connect two halves of the outer ring in both the southern and the northern crossing regions.This paper reviews the studies on the BEPC upgrade from pretzel to double-ring structure of BEPCII.

  20. Conducting and non-conducting biopolymer composites produced by particle bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this report, we introduce two types of processes for the production of biopolymer composites: one is fabricated by bonding biopolymers with corn protein or wheat protein and the other by bonding starch with a synthetic polymer. These two types of biopolymer composites make use of the strong bon...

  1. Ultrasonic Characterization of the Fiber-Matrix Interfacial Bond in Aerospace Composites

    OpenAIRE

    D. G. Aggelis; Kleitsa, D.; Matikas, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    The properties of advanced composites rely on the quality of the fiber-matrix bonding. Service-induced damage results in deterioration of bonding quality, seriously compromising the load-bearing capacity of the structure. While traditional methods to assess bonding are destructive, herein a nondestructive methodology based on shear wave reflection is numerically investigated. Reflection relies on the bonding quality and results in discernable changes in the received waveform. The key element...

  2. Microleakage of Class II Combined Amalgam-Composite Restorations Using Different Composites and Bonding Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sharafeddin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to assess the microleakage of composite restorations with and without a cervical amalgam base and to compare the results of dif-ferent composites and bonding agents.Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty mesio-occlusal (MO and disto-occlusal (DO Class II cavities were prepared on sixty extracted permanent premolar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 30 and restored as follows:In group A, the mesio-occlusal cavity (MO, Scotchbond multi purpose plus + Z250 and in the disto-occlusal (DO cavity, Prompt-L-Pop + Z250 were applied. As for group B, in the MO and DO cavities, Clearfil SE Bond + Clearfil APX, and varnish + amalgam (In box + Clearfil SE Bond + Clearfil APX were used respectivelywhile in group C; the teeth were restored with amalgam and varnish mesio-occlusally and with amalgam only disto-occlusally. As for group D, varnish + amalgam (in box + Scotchbond multi purpose plus + Z250 were applied mesio-occlusally and Varnish + Amalgam (in box + Prompt–L–Pop + Z250 disto-occlusally.Marginal leakage was assessed by the degree of dye penetration into various sections of the restored teeth. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used for data analysis.Results: Microleakage in gingival margin was more than that in occlusal margin (P<0.05 and microleakage of combined amalgam-composite restorations was significantly lower than that of conventional composite and amalgam restorations.Conclusion: Marginal microleakage decreased by using amalgam at the base of the box in Class II composite restorations.

  3. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on bonding of experimental composite resin artificial teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyaga-Rendon, Paola G; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Reza, Fazal

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate how ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation using an ordinary UV sterilizer would affect the bonding of experimental composite resins to an autopolymerizing acrylic resin. To this end, three composite resins and one unfilled resin--of which the compositions were similar to commercial composite resin artificial teeth--were prepared as repair composites. Their shear bond strengths after UV irradiation for one to 60 minutes were significantly greater than those before UV irradiation regardless of composite resin type. Failure mode after UV irradiation for one to 60 minutes was mainly cohesive failure of the composite resins, but that before UV irradiation and after 24 hours' irradiation was mainly adhesive failure. These results thus suggested that a short period of UV irradiation on composite resin teeth would improve the bonding efficacy of composite resin artificial teeth to autopolymerizing resin.

  4. Bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of short fiber-reinforced resin composite in comparison with other composite restoratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) and surface free-energy (SFE) of short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC), using different adhesive systems, in comparison with other composite restoratives. The resin composites used were everX Posterior (EP), Clearfil AP-X (CA), and Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal Restorative (FS). The adhesive systems used were Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and G-Premio Bond (GB). Resin composite was bonded to dentin, and SBS was determined after 24 h of storage in distilled water and after 10,000 thermal cycles (TCs). The SFEs of the resin composites and the adhesives were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. The SFE values and SFE characteristics were not influenced by the type of resin composite, but were influenced by the type of adhesive system. The results of this study suggest that the bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of SFRC are the same as for other composite restoratives, but that these parameters are affected by the type of adhesive system. The bonding performance of SFRC was enhanced by thermal cycling in a manner similar to that for other composite restoratives.

  5. Composite bonding to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding and single-bottle systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattan, Mohammad Ali; Pani, Sharat Chandra; Alomari, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of nanocomposite to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding system. Material and Methods. Eighty (80) stainless steel crowns (SSCs) were divided into four groups (20 each). Packable nanocomposite was bonded to the lingual surface of the crowns in the following methods: Group A without adhesive (control group), Group B using a new universal adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), and Group C and Group D using two different brands of single-bottle adhesive systems. Shear bond strengths were calculated and the types of failure also were recorded. Results. The shear strength of Group B was significantly greater than that of other groups. No significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of Groups C and D. The control group had significantly lower shear bond strength (P steel crowns using the new universal bonding agent (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) show significantly greater shear bond strengths and fewer adhesive failures when compared to traditional single-bottle systems.

  6. Transmission of asymmetric coupling double-ring resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, C. Y.; Tan, W. H.

    2015-02-01

    Based on the asymmetry between waveguide and double ring, the transmission and phase characteristics of coupled double-ring resonators are analyzed systemically. It is shown that the initial detuning determines the shape of transmission spectrum. The transmission spectrum of all-optical analog to electromagnetic inducted transparency (EIT) is controlled by tuning the asymmetric coupled parameter and loss. With the increasing of asymmetric coupled parameter, the transmission spectrum changes from EIT-like profile to Lorenz profile. The EIT-like transmission spectrum results from the interference between two Lorenz profiles. With the increasing of the loss, the transmission spectrum full frequency width at half-maximum broadens and its peak declines. The detuning and loss also make significant influences on the phase profile.

  7. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Material and Methods Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Results Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. Conclusions The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Key words:Bond strength, self-adhesive cement, silane, dentin, indirect composite. PMID:26855700

  8. Bond strength of a resin cement to a cured composite inlay material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latta, M A; Barkmeier, W W

    1994-08-01

    Although resin cements have been effectively bonded to mineralized tooth structures, bonding to a cured composite material has remained a challenge. This study evaluated the shear bond strength of a resin cement bonded to a cured composite inlay material by use of a variety of composite surface treatments: (1) hydrofluoric acid/60 seconds, (2) ammonium bifluoride/60 seconds, (3) resin adhesive, (4) microabrasion with 50 microns aluminum oxide, and (5) microabrasion with 50 microns aluminum oxide and application of a resin adhesive. The resin cement was also bonded to human enamel that was etched with phosphoric acid. Scanning electron microscopy examinations were completed to evaluate the effects of the composite surface treatments. The results indicated that microabrasion of a cured composite enhances bonding of a resin cement. The bond strength of a resin cement to a composite surface that was air abraded with aluminum oxide, with or without the application of a resin adhesive, was higher than surface treatments with hydrofluoric acid or ammonium bifluoride. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that an irregular surface on the composite was created with aluminum oxide air abrasion.

  9. Effect of temporary filling materials on repair bond strengths of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eldeniz, Ayce Unverdi; Belli, Sema

    2008-08-01

    Endodontic access cavities sometimes can be prepared through a permanent composite restoration. Between the appointments, temporary cements are used to seal access cavities and may have negative effect on bonding of further composite restoration. The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength of composite to composite which had been in contact with various temporary filling materials. Standard cavities were prepared on 160 acrylic resin blocks, obturated with composite resin (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray, Japan) and randomly divided into eight groups (n = 20). Group 1 received no treatment. From group 2-8, composite surfaces were covered with the following cements temporarily: Zinc-oxide/calcium-sulphate (Cavit-G, ESPE, Germany), two different Zinc-Oxide-Eugenol materials (ZnOE, Cavex, Holland and IRM, Dentsply, USA), Zinc-phosphate cement (Adhesor, Spofa-Dental, Germany), Zinc-polycarboxylate cement (Adhesor-Carbofine, Spofa-Dental, Germany), Glass-Ionomer-Cement (Argion-Molar, Voco, Germany), or light curing temporary material (Clip, Voco, Germany). The cements were removed mechanically after 1 week storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C and composite surfaces were treated with a self-etch adhesive system (SE-Bond, Kuraray, Japan). Composite resin build-ups were created on composite surfaces. Shear bond strength values were measured using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data was calculated in MPa and statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Eugenol-containing cements significantly reduced shear bond strengths of composite to composite (p materials had no adverse effect on shear bond strength (p > 0.05). These findings suggested that temporary filling materials except eugenol-containing materials have no negative effect on composite repair bond strengths.

  10. The ultimate strength of doubler plate reinforced Y-joints under compression loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENQ Qi; TAN Jia-hua

    2005-01-01

    It is common practice in the offshore industry to solve the punching shear problem due to compression by using doubler plate. The finite-element method is a useful tool for studying this problem. The aim of this paper is to study the static strength of doubler plate reinforced Y-joints subjected to compression loading. The finite-element method is adopted in numerical parametric studies. The individual influences of the geometric parameters βand τd (doubler plate to chord wall thickness ratio) and ld/d1(dubler plate length to brace diameter ratio) on the ultimate strength are made clear. The results show the size of plate may have important effects on the strength of reinforced joints. It is found that the ultimate strength of Y-joints reinforced with appropriately proportioned doubler plates can be greatly improved nearly up tothree times to un-reinforced Y-joints.

  11. Hydrogen bonds of sodium alginate/Antarctic krill protein composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lijun; Guo, Jing; Yu, Yue; An, Qingda; Wang, Liyan; Li, Shenglin; Huang, Xuelin; Mu, Siyang; Qi, Shanwei

    2016-05-20

    Sodium alginate/Antarctic krill protein composite material (SA/AKP) was successfully obtained by blending method. The hydrogen bonds of SA/AKP composite material were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Nuclear magnetic resonance hydrogen spectrum (HNMR). Experiment manifested the existence of intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonds in SA/AKP system; strength of intermolecular hydrogen bond enhanced with the increase of AKP in the composite material and the interaction strength of hydrogen bonding followed the order: OH…Ether O>OH…π>OH…N. The percentage of intermolecular hydrogen bond decreased with increase of pH. At the same time, the effect of hydrogen bonds on properties of the composite material was discussed. The increase of intermolecular hydrogen bonding led to the decrease of crystallinity, increase of apparent viscosity and surface tension, as well as obvious decrease of heat resistance of SA/AKP composite material. SA/AKP fiber SEM images and energy spectrum showed that crystallized salt was separated from the fiber, which possibly led to the fibrillation of the composite fibers.

  12. Effect of desensitizer application on shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Tooth sensitivity is common after vital tooth bleaching. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of a desensitizing agent on shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel; and determine whether a delay of one or two weeks in bonding procedure is sufficient subsequent to bleaching/desensitizer regimen. Materials and Methods: Buccal enamel surfaces of ninety-six human sound molars were prepared and divided into eight groups. The surfaces of specimens in Group 1 as negative control group were bonded by composite resin using the single bond adhesive. Specimens in Groups 2-4 were bleached with an at-home bleaching agent (Daywhite ACP. Relief ACP desensitizing gel alone was applied in Group 5. In Groups 6-8, specimens were bleached same as in Group 2 and relief ACP desensitizing gel was applied same as inGroup 5 subsequent to each bleaching session. Composite cylinders were bonded after 24 h, 7 days and 14 days in Groups 2-4, respectively, and also in Groups 6-8, respectively. The shear bond strengths of the cylinders were tested and data was analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05. Results: The results showed that bleaching and bleaching/desensitizer regimens significantly reduced the bond strength of composite resin to enamel. However, desensitizer alone did not reduce bond strength. No statistically significant differences were found between bleaching and bleaching/desensitizer regarding bond strength. Conclusion: Bleaching or bleaching/desensitizer treatment significantly decreases bond strength of composite resin to enamel. In both regimens, adhesive bonding is recommended after two weeks.

  13. Evaluation of shear bond strength of composite resin to nonprecious metal alloys with different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Yassini E.; Almasi S

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aim: Replacing fractured ceramometal restorations may be the best treatment option, but it is costly. Many different bonding systems are currently available to repair the fractured ceramometal restorations. This study compared the shear bond strength of composite to a base metal alloy using 4 bonding systems.Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, fifty discs, casted in a Ni-Cr-Be base metal alloy (Silvercast, Fulldent),were ground with 120, 400 and 600 grit...

  14. Effect of prebonding procedures on shear bond strength of resin composite to pressable ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estafan, D; Dussetschleger, F; Estafan, A; Jia, W

    2000-01-01

    Low bond strength between tooth structure and restorative ceramic material is a major cause of ceramic fractures or failures. Prebonding measures performed on pressable ceramic material were evaluated and the different shear bond strengths obtained by each method were tabulated. The three individual groups were subjected to 9% hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel for 0, 1, and 5 minutes. The different acid-etched time groups were chemically treated with silane coupler alone, silane coupling agent with bonding agent, and bonding agent alone. The silane coupling agent produced the highest bond strength between the composite structure and the pressable ceramic restorative material. High bond values were achieved by etching the porcelain for one minute. The use of the silane coupling agent with a one minute 9% HF acid etch yielded the greatest bond strength.

  15. Factors associated with shear bond strength of composite resin to human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, G B; MacMillan, S; Payne, A P; McGadey, J

    1996-12-01

    The preparation of enamel surfaces before etching by removing 0.5 mm of surface tooth structure is common-place in modern restorative dentistry. This study was designed to measure and compare the shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to prepared and unprepared enamel using various proprietary bonding systems. The analysed results failed to show significant differences between the shear bond strengths of the prepared and unprepared enamel specimens. Conditioning enamel surfaces for 60 seconds using 2.5% nitric acid where the solution was allowed to desiccate, resulted in significantly lower bond strengths compared to the other regimes. A correlation of the etchant pH with the mean shear bond strength of the adhesive systems to enamel was observed. The surface topography of the etched enamel surfaces correlated moderately well with the bond strengths obtained.

  16. Bond Characteristics of Macro Polypropylene Fiber in Cementitious Composites Containing Nanosilica and Styrene Butadiene Latex Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Woong Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the bond properties of polypropylene (PP fiber in plain cementitious composites (PCCs and styrene butadiene latex polymer cementitious composites (LCCs at different nanosilica contents. The bond tests were evaluated according to JCI SF-8, in which the contents of nanosilica in the cement were 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 wt%, based on cement weight. The addition of nanosilica significantly affected the bond properties between macro PP fiber and cementitious composites. For PCCs, the addition of 0–2 wt% nanosilica enhanced bond strength and interface toughness, whereas the addition of 4 wt% or more reduced bond strength and interface toughness. The bond strength and interfacial toughness of LCCs also increased with the addition of up to 6% nanosilica. The analysis of the relative bond strength showed that the addition of nanosilica affects the bond properties of both PCC and LCC. This result was confirmed via microstructural analysis of the macro PP fiber surface after the bond tests, which revealed an increase in scratches due to frictional forces and fiber tearing.

  17. In vitro Evaluation of Microleakage of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded Using Methacrylate and Silorane Base Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Davari

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: The results of the current relealed that silorane-bass silorane-base composite provided low microleakage for orthodontic brackets, for this reason, it could be used it for bonding brackets.

  18. Comparison of shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable composite with different flowable composites to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Erkmen Almaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the shear bond strength of a self-adhering flowable resin composite with different flowable composites to dentin. Materials and Methods: A total of 48 extracted teeth were divided randomly into four groups, and dentin surfaces were exposed. Following materials were applied to dentin surfaces; Group I: VF (self-adhering flowable composite, Group II: CSE Bond (two-step self-etch adhesive + CMF (conventional flowable composite, Group III: AB SE (one-step self-etch adhesive + AF (conventional flowable composite, Group IV: AEO (one-step self-etch adhesive + FUF (conventional flowable composite. The specimens were subjected to shear loading using a universal testing machine. The type of failure was detected with an illuminated microscope. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparison test were used to determine statistical significance differences between groups. Results: Mean shear bond strength values were ranked as follows; Group II > Group IV > Group III > Group I. Statistically significant differences were found among all groups (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Group I; the self-adhering flowable resin composite had the lowest shear bond strength values while Group II; showed the highest shear bond strength among the materials tested.

  19. Shear bond strength between titanium alloys and composite resin: sandblasting versus fluoride-gel treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Bum-Soon; Heo, Seok-Mo; Lee, Yong-Keun; Kim, Cheol-We

    2003-01-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of fluoride gel treatment on the bond strength between titanium alloys and composite resin, and the effect of NaF solution on the bond strength of titanium alloys. Five titanium alloys and one Co-Cr-Mo alloy were tested. Surface of the alloys were treated with three different methods; SiC polishing paper (No. 2000), sandblasting (50-microm Al2O3), and commercially available acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (F-=1.23%, pH 3.0). After treatment, surfaces of alloy were analyzed by SEM/EDXA. A cylindrical gelatin capsule was filled with a light-curable composite resin. The composite resin capsule was placed on the alloy surface after the application of bonding agent, and the composite resin was light cured for 30 s in four different directions. Shear bond strength was measured with the use of an Instron. Fluoride gel did not affect the surface properties of Co-Cr-Mo alloy and Ni-Ti alloy, but other titanium alloys were strongly affected. Alloys treated with the fluoride gel showed similar bond strengths to the alloys treated with sandblasting. Shear bond strength did not show a significant difference (ptitanium alloys. To enhance the bond strength of composite resin to titanium alloys, fluoride-gel treatment may be used as an alternative technique to the sandblasting treatment.

  20. Effect of silorane-based adhesive system on bond strength between composite and dentin substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Ricardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The complexities of the oral environment, the dentin substrate, and the different bond and composite resin systems represent a challenge to the maintenance of reasonable bond between the composite resin and the tooth structure. Aims: To evaluate the effect of the adhesive system on bond strength between silorane-based composite resin and dentin. Materials and Methods: Fourteen human molars extracted were selected and vertically cut into 3 dentin fragments, randomly divided among the experimental groups and restored with Z250 and P90 composite resin using different adhesive protocols (Adper Single Bond 2, Silorano primer, Adper SE Plus, and Scotchbond Multiuse. Two composite resin cylinders were built up on each dentin surface (n = 10 and subjected to a micro-shear bond strength test. Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (P = 0.05. Results: According to the results, Kruskal-Wallis test evidenced at least one statistical significant difference (P = 0.001. The Tukey test showed statistically significant differences among the group (P < 0.05. Group PSM8 (P90 + SM showed statically significant higher results when compared with groups PSP4 (P90 + SP, PSB2 (P90 + SB, and ZSE5 (Z250 + SE. Conclusion: The results evidenced that the monomer of the adhesive system has an effect on bond strength between the composite resin and dentin.

  1. Ultrasonic characterization of the fiber-matrix interfacial bond in aerospace composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggelis, D G; Kleitsa, D; Matikas, T E

    2013-01-01

    The properties of advanced composites rely on the quality of the fiber-matrix bonding. Service-induced damage results in deterioration of bonding quality, seriously compromising the load-bearing capacity of the structure. While traditional methods to assess bonding are destructive, herein a nondestructive methodology based on shear wave reflection is numerically investigated. Reflection relies on the bonding quality and results in discernable changes in the received waveform. The key element is the "interphase" model material with varying stiffness. The study is an example of how computational methods enhance the understanding of delicate features concerning the nondestructive evaluation of materials used in advanced structures.

  2. Ultrasonic Characterization of the Fiber-Matrix Interfacial Bond in Aerospace Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Aggelis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of advanced composites rely on the quality of the fiber-matrix bonding. Service-induced damage results in deterioration of bonding quality, seriously compromising the load-bearing capacity of the structure. While traditional methods to assess bonding are destructive, herein a nondestructive methodology based on shear wave reflection is numerically investigated. Reflection relies on the bonding quality and results in discernable changes in the received waveform. The key element is the “interphase” model material with varying stiffness. The study is an example of how computational methods enhance the understanding of delicate features concerning the nondestructive evaluation of materials used in advanced structures.

  3. Effect of surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin composite to composite after aging conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Barbosa, Silvia Helena; Melo, Renata Marques; Galhano, Graziela Avila Prado; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of two different surface conditioning methods on the repair bond strength of a bis-GMA-adduct/bis-EMA/TEGDMA based resin composite after three aging conditions. Methods. Thirty-six composite resin blocks (Esthet X, Dentsply) were prepared (5 mm x 6 mm x 6

  4. Shear bond strength between an indirect composite veneering material and zirconia ceramics after thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komine, Futoshi; Kobayashi, Kazuhisa; Saito, Ayako; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Matsumura, Hideo

    2009-12-01

    The present study evaluated the shear bond strength between an indirect composite material and zirconium dioxide (zirconia) ceramics after thermocycling. A total of 80 zirconia (Katana) discs were divided into five groups and primed with one of following agents: All Bond 2 Primer B (ABB), Alloy Primer (ALP), AZ Primer (AZP), Estenia Opaque Primer (EOP), and Porcelain Liner M Liquid A (PLA). An indirect composite material (Estenia C&B) was then bonded to the primed zirconia. One-half of the specimens (n = 8) in each group were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, and the remaining eight specimens were thermocycled 5,000 times before shear bond strength testing. Mean bond strengths before thermocycling varied from 10.1 to 15.6 MPa; bond strengths after thermocycling ranged from 4.3 to 17.6 MPa. The ALP group had the highest strengths after thermocycling; there were no significant differences among the PLA, AZP, and EOP groups. The bond strength values for PLA, AZP, EOP, and ALP did not decrease with thermocycling. The application of an acidic functional monomer containing carboxylic anhydride (4-META), phosphonic acid (6-MHPA), or phosphate monomer (MDP) provided durable bond strength between Estenia C&B indirect composite and Katana zirconia.

  5. The Effect of Different Disinfecting Agents on Bond Strength of Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mohammed Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different disinfectant agents on bond strength of two types of resin composite materials. Methods. A total of 80 sound posterior teeth were used. They were divided into four groups (n=20 according to the dentin surface pretreatment (no treatment, chlorhexidine gluconate 2%, sodium hypochlorite 4%, and EDTA 19%. Each group was divided into two subgroups according to the type of adhesive (prime and bond 2.1 and Adper easy one. Each subgroup was further divided into two subgroups according to the type of resin composite (TPH spectrum and Tetric EvoCeram. Shear bond strength between dentin and resin composite was measured using Universal Testing Machine. Data collected were statistically analyzed by t-test and one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Results. It was found that dentin treated with EDTA recorded the highest shear bond strength values followed by sodium hypochlorite and then chlorhexidine groups while the control group showed the lowest shear bond strength. Conclusions. The surface treatment of dentin before bonding application has a great effect on shear bond strength between resin composite and dentin surface.

  6. Bonding quality of Yb:Y3Al5O12/Y3Al5O12 composite crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bourdet; GILBET; J; C; CHANTELOUP

    2008-01-01

    The Yb:Y3Al5O12/Y3Al5O12 (Yb:YAG/YAG) composite crystals were prepared by thermal bonding method with different technological parameters. The bonding in-terface of the composite crystals were observed by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, and atom force microscope. The light scattering experiments for bonding interface of the composite crystals were measured by the laser and transmission spectra. All experiments show that high-quality Yb:YAG/YAG com-posite crystals without space transition layer and light scattering on the bonding interface can be obtained by thermal bonding method under appropriate technological parameters.

  7. Evaluation of the Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Wet and Dry Enamel Using Dentin Bonding Agents Containing Various Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramarao, Sathyanarayanan; John, Bindu Meera; Rajesh, Praveen; Swatha, S

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Bonding of composite resin to dentin mandates a wet substrate whereas, enamel should be dry. This may not be easily achievable in intracoronal preparations where enamel and dentin are closely placed to each other. Therefore, Dentin Bonding Agents (DBA) are recommended for enamel and dentinal bonding, where enamel is also left moist. A research question was raised if the “enamel-only” preparations will also benefit from wet enamel bonding and contemporary DBA. Aim The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strengths of composite resin, bonded to dry and wet enamel using fifth generation DBA (etch and rinse system) containing various solvents such as ethanol/water, acetone and ethanol. Materials and Methods The crowns of 120 maxillary premolars were split into buccal and lingual halves. They were randomly allocated into four groups of DBA: Group 1-water/ethanol based, Group 2-acetone based, Group 3-ethanol based, Group 4-universal bonding agent (control group). The buccal halves and lingual halves were bonded using the wet bonding and dry bonding technique respectively. After application of the DBAs and composite resin build up, shear bond strength testing was done. Results Group 1 (ethanol/water based ESPE 3M, Adper Single Bond) showed highest bond strength of (23.15 MPa) in dry enamel. Group 2 (acetone based Denstply, Prime and Bond NT, showed equal bond strength in wet and dry enamel condition (18.87 MPa and 18.02 MPa respectively). Conclusion Dry enamel bonding and ethanol/water based etch and rinse DBA can be recommended for “enamel-only” tooth preparations. PMID:28274042

  8. Simulation on Magnetostriction Strain of Polymer-bonded Terfenol-D Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiuchun YAN; Shixiong LU; Shiqin YANG; Shiyu HE

    2003-01-01

    A model of magnetostrictive strain for polymer-bonded Terfenol-D composite is presented, which is composed of asubmodel for the average strain of Terfenol-D composite and a magnetostriction submodel for Terfenol-D particles.Simulated results show that the

  9. Effect Aging Conditions on the Repair Bond Strength of a Microhybrid and a Nanohybrid Resin Composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Cura, Cenk; Brendeke, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the effect of different aging methods on the repair bond strength and failure types of a microhybrid and a nanohybrid composite Materials and Methods Disk shaped microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine-QA) and nanohybrid (Tetric EvoCeram TE) resin composite specimens (N = 1

  10. An In vitro Evaluation of Flexural Bond Strength of Indirect Composites Fused to Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunitha, N; Ariga, Padma; Jain, Ashish R; Philip, Jacob Mathew

    2013-06-01

    With the advent of newer indirect composite resin materials for crown and bridge prosthesis, it has become imperative to evaluate their strength to serve as long term replacements as a substitute to metal ceramic restorations. This study aimed to evaluate and compare the flexural bond strength of three composite resin veneering material to metal, cured by different methods. Specimen were fabricated with pattern resin by duplicating it with machined metal die and divided into three groups. Three composite resin materials were used in this study. Group (A) received Adoro, Group (B) received Targis and Group (C) received Tescera. The bond strength of all specimens was tested with Lloyd's universal testing machine under three point loading. The highest values for fracture resistance were displayed by light, heat and pressure cured composites followed by composites cured using a temperature of 104 °C and composites with curing temperature of 95 °C. The results indicate that there is a significant difference between the three groups, with the Tescera group specimens exhibiting the highest flexural bond strength. Of the other two groups, Adoro group exhibited higher flexural bond strength than Targis group. The results of this study suggest that Tescera group with curing temperature of 130 °C and pressure of 80 Psi, cured with metal halide unit exhibited the highest flexural bond strength when compared to Adoro and Targis groups.

  11. Standard Guide for Acousto-Ultrasonic Assessment of Composites, Laminates, and Bonded Joints

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This guide explains the rationale and basic technology for the acousto-ultrasonic (AU) method. Guidelines are given for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of flaws and physical characteristics that influence the mechanical properties and relative strength of composite structures (for example, filament-wound pressure vessels), adhesive bonds (for example, joints between metal plates), and interlaminar and fiber/matrix bonds in man-made composites and natural composites (for example, wood products). 1.2 This guide covers technical details and rules that must be observed to ensure reliable and reproducible quantitative AU assessments of laminates, composites, and bonded structures. The underlying principles, prototype apparatus, instrumentation, standardization, examination methods, and data analysis for such assessments are covered. Limitations of the AU method and guidelines for taking advantage of its capabilities are cited. 1.3 The objective of AU is to assess subtle flaws and associated strength variations...

  12. Evaluation of the shear bond strength of the Orthobond composite under different conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Carlos de Oliveira Ruellas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the shear bond strength of metal brackets bonded with Orthobond composite (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil under different enamel surface conditions. Methods: Ninety bovine mandibular permanent incisors were divided into six groups (n = 15. In Group 1 (control and Group 2 the bonding procedures were performed by using Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, USA and Orthobond (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil composites,respectively, according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. In the other groups brackets were bonded with Orthobond composite (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil as follows: Group 3 – dental surface conditioned with Transbond Plus Self-Etching Primer (3M Unitek, Monrovia, USA; Group 4 – bonding procedure without application of Orthoprimer (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil; Group 5 - Eagle Bond applied on saliva/blood-contaminated dental surface; and Group 6 – use of homogenized Orthobond (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil. After bonding the brackets, all the samples were submitted to shear bond strength tests by means of an Emic Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results obtained in mega Pascal (MPa were submitted to the analysis of variance (ANOVA and then to the Tukey test. Results: The results in mega Pascal showed statistically significant differences between Groups 1 and 2 (p= 0.041, 1 and 5 (p=0.000 and between 4 and 5 (p=0.016. The ARI (Adhesive Remnant Index scores showed evidence of a higher number of fractures at the bracket/composite interface. Conclusion: In all tested situations the Orthobond (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil was shown to be apt for bracket bonding.

  13. Adhesive bond strength evaluation in composite materials by laser-generated high amplitude ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perton, M.; Blouin, A.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of composites laminates is highly efficient but is not used for joining primary aircraft structures, since there is presently no nondestructive inspection technique to ensure the quality of the bond. We are developing a technique based on the propagation of high amplitude ultrasonic waves to evaluate the adhesive bond strength. Large amplitude compression waves are generated by a short pulse powerful laser under water confinement and are converted after reflection by the assembly back surface into tensile waves. The resulting tensile stresses can cause a delamination inside the laminates or at the bond interfaces. The adhesion strength is evaluated by increasing the laser pulse energy until disbond. A good bond is unaffected by a certain level of stress whereas a weaker one is damaged. The method is shown completely non invasive throughout the whole composite assembly. The sample back surface velocity is measured by an optical interferometer and used to estimate stress history inside the sample. The depth and size of the disbonds are revealed by a post-test inspection by the well established laser-ultrasonic technique. Experimental results show that the proposed method is able to differentiate weak bond from strong bonds and to estimate quantitatively their bond strength.

  14. Effect of newer antioxidants on the bond strength of composite on bleached enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Manoharan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study aims to evaluate the effect of the application of two antioxidants on the bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: Eighty enamel surfaces were obtained from forty human extracted premolars. Specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n = 20. Group 1: No bleaching (control; Group 2a: Bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide gel; Group 2b: Bleaching, followed by application of 10% sodium ascorbate gel; Group 2c: Bleaching, followed by application of 5% proanthocyanidin agent. Surfaces were etched followed by application of total etch bonding system, and composite resin cylinders were bonded. Specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way analysis of variance was used for multiple group comparison and post hoc Tukey′s test for individual group-wise comparison. Results: Significantly higher shear bond strength values were observed in Group 2c and 2b as compared with Group 1 and 2a (P < 0.05. Among the antioxidants, Group 2c showed significantly higher shear bond strength values than Group 2b (P < 0.05. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the use of antioxidant before bonding procedures on bleached enamel completely neutralizes the deleterious effects of bleaching and increases the bond strength significantly.

  15. Microleakage of three self-etch bonding agents in class 5 composite cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Nemati Anaraki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Microleakage is one of the most common problems in bonding systems, which cause different clinical shortcomings such as post operative sensitivity, marginal discoloration and pulp necrosis that can decrease those using bonding systems. The aim of this study was to compare the microleakage of three self etch bonding agents (generation 6 and 7 in class 5 composite cavities. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 facial class 5 cavities were prepared in 30 human premolar teeth which were freshly extracted for orthodontic purposes. Cl V cavities were prepared in 2*3*2 mm dimensions. Occlusal margins were in enamel and gingival ones in cementum and randomly divided into 3 groups of 10 each. Then the cavities were treated by clearhil SE Bond (Kuraray, Japan, G Bond (GC, Japan, and Opti Bond Solo Plus (Kerr, USA, according to the manufacturers’ insductions. Then the cavities were filled using Z100 resin composite. The specimens were then immersed in a 50% AgNo solution for 24 hrs. Then, the teeth were cut buccolingually to be evaluated for dye penetration with stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: This study revealed that Opti bond solo plus had type1 microleakage (dye penetration up to 1/3 of cavity in 80% of specimen, and type 4 microleakage (along axial wall in 10%. Clearfil SE bond had no leakage in 50%, type1 in 40% and type 2 (up to 2/3 of cavity in 10%. But there was no significant difference in the microleakage at the gingival margins between 3 groups (P>0.05. Conclusion: Clearfil SE Bond and G bond could prevent microleakage more effectively than that of Opti Bond Solo Plus on the occlusal margins. However, no difference in the microleakage on the gingival surfaces was found.

  16. Investigation of the interfacial bonding in composite propellants. 1,3,5-Trisubstituted isocyanurates as universal bonding agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GORDANA S. USCUMLIC

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of 1,3,5-trisubstituted isocyanurates (substituents: CH2CH2OH, CH2CH=CH2 and CH2CH2COOH was synthesized according to a modified literature procedure. Experimental investigations included modification of the synthetic procedure in terms of the starting materials, solvents, temperature, isolation techniques, as well as purification and identification of the products. All the synthesized isocyanurates were identified by their melting point and FTIR, 1H NMR and UV spectroscopic data. Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry was also used to study the interaction between ammonium perchlorate, hydroxyl terminated poly(butadiene, carboxyl terminated poly(butadiene, poly(butadiene-co-acrylonitrile, poly(propylene ether, cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine and the compounds synthesized in this work, which can serve as bonding agents. The results show that tris(2-hydroxyethylisocyanurate is a universal bonding agent for the ammonium perchlorate/carboxyl terminated poly(butadiene/cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine composite propellant system.

  17. A comparative effect of various surface chemical treatments on the resin composite-composite repair bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaloo Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was an attempt to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength between pre-existing composite and repair composite resin. Materials and Methods: Forty acrylic blocks were prepared in a cuboidal mould. In each block, a well of 5 mm diameter and 5 mm depth was prepared to retain the composite resin (Filtek™ Z350, 3M/ESPE. Aging of the composite discs was achieved by storing them in water at 37°C for 1 week, and after that were divided into 5 groups (n = 8 according to surface treatment: Group I- 37% phosphoric acid, Group II-10% hydrofluoric acid, Group III-30% citric acid, Group IV-7% maleic acid and Group V- Adhesive (no etchant. The etched surfaces were rinsed and dried followed by application of bonding agent (Adper™ Single Bond 2. 3M/ESPE. The repair composite was placed on aged composite, light-cured for 40 seconds and stored in water at 37°C for 1 week. Shear bond strength between the aged and the new composite resin was determined with a universal testing machine (crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis: The compressive shear strengths were compared for differences using ANOVA test followed by Tamhane′s T2 post hoc analysis. Results: The surface treatment with 10% hydrofluoric acid showed the maximum bond strength followed by 30% citric acid, 7% maleic acid and 37% phosphoric acid in decreasing order. Conclusion: The use of 10% hydrofluoric acid can be a good alternative for surface treatment in repair of composite resin restoration as compared to commonly used 37% orthophosphoric acid.

  18. The comparative evaluation of fracture resistance and microleakage in bonded amalgam, amalgam, and composite resins in primary molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H S Vanishree

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Bonded amalgam appears to be comparable to amalgam when microleakage is considered and to composite resin when fracture resistance is considered; hence, bonded amalgam can also be an alternative material to amalgam in primary molars.

  19. Effect of Pre-heating on Microtensile Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Dentin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrahim Davari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Direct composite resin restorations are widely used and the impact of different storage temperatures on composites is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of composite to dentin after different pre-curing temperatures.Occlusal surfaces of 44 human molars were ground with diamond burs under water coolant and polished with 600 grit silicon carbide papers to obtain flat dentin surfaces. The dentin was etched with 37% phosphoric acid and bonded with Adper Single Bond 2 according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups (n=22 according to the composite resin applied: FiltekP60 and Filtek Z250. Each group included three subgroups of composite resin pre-curing temperatures (4°C, 23°C and 37°C. Composite resins were applied to the dentin surfaces in a plastic mold (8mm in diameter and 4mm in length incrementally and cured. Twenty-two composite-to-dentin hour-glass sticks with one mm(2 cross-sectional area per group were prepared. Microtensile bond strength measurements were made using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of one mm/min. For statistical analysis, t-test, one-way and two-way ANOVA were used. The level of significance was set at P<0.05.Filtek P60 pre-heated at 37ºC had significantly higher microtensile bond strength than Filtek Z250 under the same condition. The microtensile bond strengths were not significantly different at 4ºC, 23ºC and 37ºC subgroups of each composite resin group.Filtek P60 and Filtek Z250 did not have significantly different microtensile bond strengths at 4ºC and 23ºC but Filtek P60 had significantly higher microtensile bond strength at 37 ºC. Composite and temperature interactions had significant effects on the bond strength.

  20. Influence of Different Bonding Agents and Composite Resins on Fracture Resistance of Reattached Incisal Tooth Fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davari AR.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Reattachment of the fractured tooth fragment should be considered as a conservative treatment and valid alternative to a composite restoration. Purpose: This in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different adhesives and composite resins on fracture resistance of dental fragment reattached to sectioned incisal edges. Materials and Method: 120 sound human maxillary central incisors were selected under standard conditions and randomly divided into 3 groups, 12 sound teeth were used as a control group and the remaining teeth were assigned to 3 groups (n=36 and each group into three subgroups (n=12. The incisal third of samples was sectioned using a diamond disk and the respective fragments were then reattached utilizing different intermediate restorative materials, namely: i adhesive materials alone (OptiBond S or OptiBond XTR or OptiBond All-in-One; ii Premise flowable composite and iii Point 4 composite in the one of mentioned adhesive interface. After storage for two weeks at 37°C and 100% humidity and then thermocycling; shear bond strength (SBS was recorded in kilogram force (kgf by applying a load in the middle incisal third with a Zwick Universal Testing Machine at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD (p< 0.05. Results: The control group had a significantly higher SBS than other groups (p= 0.001; the highest SBS values was obtained using the premise flowable composite and OptiBond S adhesive (112.44±30.46 Mpa; and the lowest with OptiBond All-in-One alone (33.97± 15.63 Mpa. Conclusion: Although, none of the tested materials provided fracture resistance similar to that found with the intact maxillary central incisors; utilizing the premise flowable composite and OptiBond S adhesive improved the SBS of the reattached fragment than other materials.

  1. Push-Out Bond Strength of Restorations with Bulk-Fill, Flow, and Conventional Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vieira Caixeta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strengths of composite restorations made with different filler amounts and resin composites that were photoactivated using a light-emitting diode (LED. Thirty bovine incisors were selected, and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. All preparations were etched with Scotchbond Etching Gel, the Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus adhesive system was applied followed by photoactivation, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtek Z350 XT, Filtek Z350 XT Flow, or bulk-fill X-tra fil resin composite (n = 10 followed by photoactivation. A push-out test to determine bond strength was conducted using a universal testing machine. Data (MPa were submitted to Student’s t-test at a 5% significance level. After the test, the fractured specimens were examined using an optical microscope under magnification (10x. Although all three composites demonstrated a high prevalence of adhesive failures, the bond strength values of the different resin composites photoactivated by LED showed that the X-tra fil resin composite had a lower bond strength than the Filtek Z350 XT and Filtek Z350 XT Flow resin composites.

  2. Bonded repair of composite aircraft structures: A review of scientific challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katnam, K. B.; Da Silva, L. F. M.; Young, T. M.

    2013-08-01

    Advanced composite materials have gained popularity in high-performance structural designs such as aerospace applications that require lightweight components with superior mechanical properties in order to perform in demanding service conditions as well as provide energy efficiency. However, one of the major challenges that the aerospace industry faces with advanced composites - because of their inherent complex damage behaviour - is structural repair. Composite materials are primarily damaged by mechanical loads and/or environmental conditions. If material damage is not extensive, structural repair is the only feasible solution as replacing the entire component is not cost-effective in many cases. Bonded composite repairs (e.g. scarf patches) are generally preferred as they provide enhanced stress transfer mechanisms, joint efficiencies and aerodynamic performance. With an increased usage of advanced composites in primary and secondary aerospace structural components, it is thus essential to have robust, reliable and repeatable structural bonded repair procedures to restore damaged composite components. But structural bonded repairs, especially with primary structures, pose several scientific challenges with the current existing repair technologies. In this regard, the area of structural bonded repair of composites is broadly reviewed - starting from damage assessment to automation - to identify current scientific challenges and future opportunities.

  3. Resistance of Bonded Composite Restorations on Fractures of Endodontically Treated Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Daneshkazemi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was performed to evaluate the effect of dentine bonding agents and Glass Ionomer cement beneath composite restorations and its resistance on fractures of endodontically treated teeth. Material and Methods: Forty sound maxillary teeth were selected; ten of them for positive control, and on the rest, RCT and MOD cavity preparations were done with standard methods. Then, the teeth were divided to four groups: 1-Sound teeth for positive control. 2-Prepared without any restoration for negative control. 3-Prepared and restored with Vitrabond(3M, USA, Single bond(3M, USA and Z100(3M, USA resin composite. 4-Prepared and restored by Single bond and Z100 resin composite. Specimens were subjected to compressive load by Instron 8502 until fracture occurred. Results: Group 1 showed the highest resistance to compressive forces followed by group 4,3&2 respectively. ANOVA, t test and Chi-square tests indicated significant difference between all the groups. Conclusion: Use of dentine bonding agents and resin composite increases resistance of endodontically treated teeth to fractures more than teeth restored with sandwich of glass ionomer cements, dentine bonding agents and resin composite.

  4. Strengthening of Concrete Structures with cement based bonded composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Blanksvärd, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Polymers). The method is very efficient and has achieved world wide attention. However, there are some drawbacks with the use of epoxy, e.g. working environment, compatibility and permeability. Substituting the epoxy adherent with a cement based bonding agent will render a strengthening system...... with improved working environment and better compatibility to the base concrete structure. This study gives an overview of different cement based systems, all with very promising results for structural upgrading. Studied parameters are structural retrofit for bending, shear and confinement. It is concluded...

  5. Effect of dentin primer on shear bond strength of composite resin to moist and dry enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, P; Stewart, G P

    2000-01-01

    The etched enamel-composite resin bond is the most reliable bond known to us. Moisture and dentin primers are the two most important variables that can interfere with this bond. This study investigated the effect of dentin primer on bond strengths of composite resin to moist and dry enamel. One hundred freshly extracted molar teeth were used for shear bond strength testing. The teeth were mounted in phenolic rings with an approximal enamel surface exposed. The exposed enamel surface on each tooth was flattened using 320- 400- and 600-grit silicon carbide papers and etched using 34-38% phosphoric acid gel. The teeth were then divided into 10 groups (n = 10). Four groups were assigned to each of the two dentin bonding systems, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and OptiBond FL. Two groups were assigned to the single-bottle bonding agent (Single Bond). Each bonding system was tested on moist and dry enamel. OptiBond FL and Scotchbond MP were tested with and without the use of primer. All samples were thermocycled and tested in shear. Fracture analysis was performed using a binocular microscope. For scanning electron microscopy, approximal samples of enamel (1 mm thick) were flattened, etched, and bonded with and without primer on moist and dry enamel. A 1 mm-thick layer of Z100 was bonded to the specimens, which were then immersed in 10% HCl for 24 hours to dissolve the enamel. The specimens were viewed under a scanning electron microscope. Results indicated that the use of primer on dry enamel did not significantly affect (P > 0.05) shear bond strengths for the two bonding systems, Scotchbond MP (primed 24.10 +/- 4.83 MPa, unprimed 29.57 +/- 7.49 MPa) and OptiBond FL (primed 26.82 +/- 4.44, unprimed 25.66 +/- 2.95). However, the use of primer was found to be essential on moist enamel to obtain acceptable bond strengths with both Scotchbond MP (primed 25.61 +/- 10.29 MPa, unprimed 3.26 +/- 0.95 MPa) and OptiBond FL (primed 30.28 +/- 3.49 MPa, unprimed 8.37 +/- 3.31 MPa

  6. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Al/Mg Alloy Multilayered Composites Produced by Accumulative Roll Bonding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.S.Liu; B.Zhang; G.P.Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Al/Mg alloy multilayered composites were produced successfully at the lower temperature (280℃) by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) processing technique. The microstructures of Al and Mg alloy layers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Vickers hardness and three-point bending tests were conducted to investigate mechanical properties of the composites. It is found that Vickers hardness, bending strength and stiffness modulus of the Al/Mg alloy multilayered composite increase with increasing the ARB pass. Delamination and crack propagation along the interface are the two main failure modes of the multilayered composite subjected to bending load. Strengthening and fracture mechanisms of the composite are analyzed.

  7. “Evaluation of shear bond strength of a composite resin to white mineral trioxide aggregate with three different bonding systems”-An in vitro analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Anand C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a biomaterial that has been investigated for endodontic applications. With the increased use of MTA in pulp capping, pulpotomy, perforation repair, apexification and obturation, the material that would be placed over MTA as a final restoration is an important matter. As composite resins are one of the most widely used final restorative materials, this study was conducted to evaluate the shear bond strength of a composite resin to white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) using three different bonding systems namely the two-step etch and rinse adhesive, the self-etching primer and the All-in-one system. Material and Methods Forty five specimens of white MTA (Angelus) were prepared and randomly divided into three groups of 15 specimens each depending on the bonding systems used respectively. In Group A, a Two-step etch and rinse adhesive or ‘total-etch adhesive’, Adper Single Bond 2 (3M/ESPE) and Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN) were placed over WMTA. In group B, a Two-step self-etching primer system, Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Medical Inc) and Filtek Z350 were used. In Group C, an All-in-one system, G Bond (GC corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and Filtek Z350 were used. The shear bond strength was measured for all the specimens. The data obtained was subjected to One way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe’s post hoc test. Results The results suggested that the Two-step etch and rinse adhesive when used to bond a composite resin to white MTA gave better bond strength values and the All-in-one exhibited the least bond strength values. Conclusions The placement of composite used with a Two-step etch and rinse adhesive over WMTA as a final restoration may be appropriate. Key words:Composite resins, dentin bonding agents, mineral trioxide aggregate, shear bond strength. PMID:27398177

  8. Influence of Fabric Geometrical Structure on Bonding of the Fabric Reinforced Cement Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Qiao-zhen

    2007-01-01

    Influence of fabric geometrical parameters,including the number of filling yams per 10 cm, yarntwist and fiber type, on bonding of the fabric reinforcedcement composites is studied by fabric pull-out test andSEM microstructure analysis. The results show that thebonding strength increase with the increase of the numberof filling yams per 10 cm in the range of this study. Butthe influence of fabric count on the interfacial bonding isdual and there is a critical value. The twist of yarns hasa little effect on the bending strength and interfacialbonding behaves of nylon fabric reinforced cementcomposites. There is an optimum twist range. Withinthis range, the bonding strength increase slowly with theincrease of yarn twist. Beyond this range, it is versus.The bonding strength is strongly affected by the fabriccharacter. The bonding between the nylon fiber fabricand cement is good; that of between glass fiber fabric andcement is moderate and that of between the carbon fiberfabric and cement is poor.

  9. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide Particulate Reinforced 2024 A1 Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@A study has been made on diffusion bonding of SiCp/2024Al composites by means of pure Al interlayer. In the condition of TB=843 K, PB=16 MPa, tB=-60 min, the diffusion bonded joint,with a shear strength of 235 MPa, was obtained when a 15μm thick interlayer was used. The results of the shear testing and SEM indicate that fracture of the joint presented characteristics of ductile rupture.

  10. Effects of three surface conditioning techniques on repair bond strength of nanohybrid and nanofilled composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassoohi, Negin; Kazemi, Haleh; Sadaghiani, Morad; Mansouri, Mona; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Repair bond strength of different composite resins has been assessed in few studies. In addition, reports on the efficacy of surface treatments are debated. Therefore, this in vitro study was conducted to evaluate the effect of three surface treatments on two nanocomposites versus a microhybrid composite. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 135 composite blocks (45 specimens per composite) of microhybrid (Filtek Supreme Z250, 3M ESPE, USA), nanohybrid (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE), and nanofilled (Filtek Supreme Z350, 3M ESPE) were thermocycled (5000 rounds) and then surface roughened (except in a control group of 9 specimens of three composite types). Each composite type was divided into three subgroups of surface treatments: (1) Bur abrading and phosphoric acid (PA) etching, (2) sandblasting and PA etching, and (3) hydrofluoric etching and silane application (n = 15 × 9, complying with ISO TR11405). Composite blocks were repaired with the same composite type but of a different color. Microtensile bond strength and modes of failure were analyzed statistically using two-way analyses of variance, Tukey and Chi-square tests (α = 0.05). Results: There were significant differences between three composite resins (P < 0.0001) and treatment techniques (P < 0.0001). Their interaction was nonsignificant (P = 0.228). The difference between nanofilled and nanohybrid was not significant. However, the microhybrid composite showed a significantly higher bond strength (Tukey P < 0.05). Sandblasting was significantly superior to the other two methods, which were not different from each other. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it seems that microhybrid composite might have higher repair strengths than two evaluated nanocomposites. Among the assessed preparation techniques, sandblasting followed by PA etching might produce the highest bond strength. PMID:26759592

  11. Effects of three surface conditioning techniques on repair bond strength of nanohybrid and nanofilled composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Nassoohi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Repair bond strength of different composite resins has been assessed in few studies. In addition, reports on the efficacy of surface treatments are debated. Therefore, this in vitro study was conducted to evaluate the effect of three surface treatments on two nanocomposites versus a microhybrid composite. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 135 composite blocks (45 specimens per composite of microhybrid (Filtek Supreme Z250, 3M ESPE, USA, nanohybrid (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE, and nanofilled (Filtek Supreme Z350, 3M ESPE were thermocycled (5000 rounds and then surface roughened (except in a control group of 9 specimens of three composite types. Each composite type was divided into three subgroups of surface treatments: (1 Bur abrading and phosphoric acid (PA etching, (2 sandblasting and PA etching, and (3 hydrofluoric etching and silane application (n = 15 × 9, complying with ISO TR11405. Composite blocks were repaired with the same composite type but of a different color. Microtensile bond strength and modes of failure were analyzed statistically using two-way analyses of variance, Tukey and Chi-square tests (α = 0.05. Results: There were significant differences between three composite resins (P < 0.0001 and treatment techniques (P < 0.0001. Their interaction was nonsignificant (P = 0.228. The difference between nanofilled and nanohybrid was not significant. However, the microhybrid composite showed a significantly higher bond strength (Tukey P < 0.05. Sandblasting was significantly superior to the other two methods, which were not different from each other. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it seems that microhybrid composite might have higher repair strengths than two evaluated nanocomposites. Among the assessed preparation techniques, sandblasting followed by PA etching might produce the highest bond strength.

  12. Comparative study to evaluate shear bond strength of RMGIC to composite resin using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj G Chandak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study is to compare and evaluate the role of new dental adhesives to bond composite to the resinmodified glass inomer cement (RMGIC. Materials and Methods: Thirty specimens were prepared on acrylic blocks, with wells prepared in it by drilling holes, to retain the RMGIC. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups of ten specimens each. In Group a thin layer of selfetch adhesive (3M ESPE was applied between the RMGIC and the composite resin FILTEK P60 (3M SPE. In Group II, total etch adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2, 3M ESPE was applied, and in Group III, there was no application of any adhesive between RMGIC and the composite resin. After curing all the specimens, the shear bond strength was measured using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: The results were drawn and tabulated using ANOVA-fishers and Dunnet D statistical tests.The maximum shear bond strength values were recorded in Group I specimens with self-etch adhesive showing a mean value of 2.74 when compared to the Group II adhesive (Total etch showing a mean shear strength of value 1.89, where no adhesive was used, showed a minimum mean shear bond strength of 1.42. There was a great and significant difference between Group I and Group II (P value 0.05 whereas, both Group I and Group II showed a vast and significant difference from Group III (P value = 0-001. Conclusion: Hence, this present study concludes that application of self-etch adhesive (3M ESPE, U.S.A in between RMGIC and composite resin increases the shear bond strength between RMGIC and the resin composites, as compared to the total-etch type adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2,3M ESPE, U.S.A as well as without application of the adhesive agent.

  13. Efficacy of Experimental Hydrofluoric Acid (HF on Bond Strength and Microleakage of Composite-Porcelain Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Mahvidyzadeh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of an experimental hydrofluoric acid (HF for preparation of porcelain and to compare it with two commercial hydrofluoric acids in Iranian trademark. Materials and Methods: A- Evaluation of etch pattern of experimental HF using scanning electron microscope (SEM: 6 feldespathic discs were divided into 3 groups. Each group was etched with related HF (experimental, Ultradent and Kimia for 1 minute. SEM images were recorded at 3 magnifications. B- Bond strength test: 18 feldespathic discs were considered for each acidic group. Then the porcelain surfaces were etched and bonded to composite with unfilled resin. Consequently, the microshear test was done. C- Microleakage test: 54 discs were divided into 3 groups (n=18. Then the porcelain surfaces were etched and bonded to composite with unfilled resin and finally observed under stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Smirnov tests. Results: SEM analysis showed no difference between groups in terms of etch pattern. Microshear bond strength values for experimental, Kimia, and Ultradent HF were 28.53 (±4.92, 28.21 (±6.61, and 26.14 (±7.61 MPa, respectively. There was no significant difference between the bond strength of test groups (P0.05. Conclusion: Quality of experimental HF in terms of etch pattern, microshear bond strength and microleakage of composite/porcelain interface was similar to that of two commercial hydrofluoric acids.

  14. Shear Bond Strength of Composite-Resin to Porcelain: Effect of Thermocycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khoroushi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Different ceramic repair systems have been reported for fractured ceramics.However, limited information is available concerning the bond strength of these systems especially after thermocycling. The aim of this in-vitro study was to determinethe effect of thermocycling on the shear bond strength of composite-resin to feldspathic porcelain with and without silane pretreatment.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, forty porcelain blocks were prepared and randomly divided into four groups (n=10. All porcelain surfaces were etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid, rinsed and air dried. In groups 1 and 3, silane pretreatment was applied using Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus (ASMP.Smallparticlecomposite-resin was subsequently added on the ceramic surfaces, and lightcured.Specimens of groups 3 and 4 then subjected to 1000 thermal cycles. Shear bond strength was determined on a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Two-way ANOVA test (α=0.05 was used to analyze the bond strength.Results: There were statistically significant differences between study groups (P<0.05.Thermocycling caused a decrease in the shear bond strength for both silanized and nonsilanized groups.Conclusion: According to the results of this study, shear bond strength after thermocycling reduced considerably in ASMP system. In addition, silane treatment of porcelain was critical for achieving durable bond strength between composite-resin and porcelain.

  15. Lamb wave based active damage identification in adhesively bonded composite lap joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Prateek

    Bonding composite structures using adhesives offers several advantages over mechanical fastening such as better flow stress, weight saving, improved fatigue resistance and the ability to join dissimilar structures. The hesitation to adopt adhesively bonded composite joints stems from the lack of knowledge regarding damage initiation and propagation mechanisms within the joint. A means of overcoming this hesitation is to continuously monitor damage in the joint. This study proposes a methodology to conduct structural health monitoring (SHM) of an adhesively bonded composite lap joint using acoustic, guided Lamb waves by detecting, locating and predicting the size of damage. Finite element modeling of a joint in both 2D and 3D is used to test the feasibility of the proposed damage triangulation technique. Experimental validation of the methodology is conducted by detecting the presence, location and size of inflicted damage with the use of tuned guided Lamb waves.

  16. Love Waves in Layered Graded Composite Structures with Imperfectly Bonded Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Theoretical analysis and numerical calculations of Love wave propagation in layered graded composites with imperfectly bonded interface are described in this paper. On the basis of WKB method, the approximate analytic solutions for Love waves are obtained. By the interface shear spring model, the dispersion relations for Love waves in layered graded composite structures with rigid, slip, and imperfectly bonded interfaces are given, and the effects of the interface conditions on the phase velocities of Love waves in SiC/Al layered graded composites are discussed. Numerical analysis shows that the phase velocity decreases when the defined flexibility parameter is greater. For the general imperfectly bonded interface, the phase velocity changes in the range of the velocities for the rigid and slip interface conditions.

  17. Theoretical and experimental study on white light interferometric sensing network with double-ring topology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jun; YUAN Li-bo

    2006-01-01

    A white-light interferometric fiber-optic sensing network based on the double-ring topology is demonstrated,which can be applied to the measurements of quasidistributed strain and temperature in a smart structure.In order to increase the multiplexing capacity,decrease the measurement cost of each sensor,and improve the ability of reliability of the sensor network,a double-port interrogating technology was used.The double- ring fiber optical sensing network based on the space division multiplexing (SDM) is further developed,The low coherent multiplexing principle in the double-ring network structure is analyzed.Based on the optical path matching condition of SDM,the intensity characteristic of the interference signal in the sensor is deduced.The characteristics of the double-ring sensing network connecting 9 sensors and its property of robust resisting destruction are verified by experiments,and the results are analyzed and discussed.

  18. A dense and strong bonding collagen film for carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Sheng; Li, Hejun, E-mail: lihejun@nwpu.edu.cn; Li, Kezhi; Lu, Jinhua; Zhang, Leilei

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Significantly enhancement of biocompatibility on C/C composites by preparing a collagen film. • The dense and continuous collagen film had a strong bonding strength with C/C composites after dehydrathermal treatment (DHT) crosslink. • Numerous oxygen-containing functional groups formed on the surface of C/C composites without matrix damage. - Abstract: A strong bonding collagen film was successfully prepared on carbon/carbon (C/C) composites. The surface conditions of the modified C/C composites were detected by contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectra. The roughness, optical morphology, bonding strength and biocompatibility of collagen films at different pH values were detected by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), universal test machine and cytology tests in vitro. After a 4-h modification in 30% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution at 100 °C, the contact angle on the surface of C/C composites was decreased from 92.3° to 65.3°. Large quantities of hydroxyl, carboxyl and carbonyl functional groups were formed on the surface of the modified C/C composites. Then a dense and continuous collagen film was prepared on the modified C/C substrate. Bonding strength between collagen film and C/C substrate was reached to 8 MPa level when the pH value of this collagen film was 2.5 after the preparing process. With 2-day dehydrathermal treatment (DHT) crosslinking at 105 °C, the bonding strength was increased to 12 MPa level. At last, the results of in vitro cytological test showed that this collagen film made a great improvement on the biocompatibility on C/C composites.

  19. Production of Degradable Biopolymer Composites by Particle-bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conventionally, polymer composites had been manufactured by mixing the component materials in the extruder at high temperature. Agricultural biopolymers are usually mixtures of many types of compounds; when used as raw materials, however, high-temperature process causes unwanted consequences such a...

  20. Laser Surface Preparation of Epoxy Composites for Secondary Bonding: Optimization of Ablation Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Hopkins, John; Wohl, Christopher J.; Lin, Yi; Connell, John W.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Blohowiak, Kay Y.

    2015-01-01

    Surface preparation has been identified as one of the most critical aspects of attaining predictable and reliable adhesive bonds. Energetic processes such as laser ablation or plasma treatment are amenable to automation and are easily monitored and adjusted for controlled surface preparation. A laser ablation process was developed to accurately remove a targeted depth of resin, approximately 0.1 to 20 micrometers, from a carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite surface while simultaneously changing surface chemistry and creating micro-roughness. This work demonstrates the application of this process to prepare composite surfaces for bonding without exposing or damaging fibers on the surface. Composite panels were prepared in an autoclave and had a resin layer approximately 10 micrometers thick above the fiber reinforcement. These composite panels were laser surface treated using several conditions, fabricated into bonded panels and hygrothermally aged. Bond performance of aged, experimental specimens was compared with grit blast surface treated specimens using a modified double cantilever beam test that enabled accelerated saturation of the specimen with water. Comparison of bonded specimens will be used to determine how ablation depth may affect average fracture energies and failure modes.

  1. Effects of Er:YAG laser on enamel bonding of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Ulrich; Hibst, Raimund

    1993-07-01

    Cylinders of microfil light-cured composite resin were bonded to the labial enamel surface of bovine incisor teeth which had previously been subjected to different laser treatments. One part of the tooth surfaces were laser treated in a defocused way only, another part with a different overlaying pattern of focused laser pulses. Specimens were thermocycled and the adhesion of the composites were determined by tensile strength tests. The best results were obtained by laser conditioning of the enamel surface in a defocused way with an overlaying fine pattern of focused single shots. The tensile strength reached 92.5% of the acid etched bonding.

  2. Evaluation of shear bond strength of composite resin to nonprecious metal alloys with different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassini E.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Replacing fractured ceramometal restorations may be the best treatment option, but it is costly. Many different bonding systems are currently available to repair the fractured ceramometal restorations. This study compared the shear bond strength of composite to a base metal alloy using 4 bonding systems.Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, fifty discs, casted in a Ni-Cr-Be base metal alloy (Silvercast, Fulldent,were ground with 120, 400 and 600 grit sandpaper and divided equally into 5 groups receiving 5 treatments for veneering. Conventional feldspathic porcelain (Ceramco2, Dentsply Ceramco was applied on control group (PFM or group1 and the remaining metal discs were air- abraded for 15 seconds with 50 mm aluminum oxide at 45 psi and washed for 5 seconds under tap water.Then the specimens were dried by compressed air and the  groups were treated with one of the bonding systems as follows: All-Bond 2 (AB, Ceramic Primer (CP, Metal Primer II (MP and Panavia F2 (PF. An opaque composite (Foundation opaque followed by a hybrid composite (Gradia Direct was placed on the treated metal surface and light cured separately. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 370C and thermocycled prior to shear strength testing. Fractured specimens were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis was performed with one way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance.Results: Mean shear bond strengths of the groups in MPa were as follows: PFM group 38.6±2, All-Bond 2 17.06±2.85, Ceramic Primer 14.72±1.2, Metal Primer II 19.04±2.2 and Panavia F2 21.37±2.1. PFM group exhibited the highest mean shear bond strength and Ceramic Primer showed the lowest. Tukey's HSD test revealed the mean bond strength of the PFM group to be significantly higher than the other groups (P<0.001. The data for the PF group was significantly higher than AB and CP groups (P<0.05 and the shear

  3. [Effects of different surface conditioning agents on the bond strength of resin-opaque porcelain composite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjia; Fu, Jing; Liao, Shuang; Su, Naichuan; Wang, Hang; Liao, Yunmao

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate the effects of different silane coupling agents on the bond strength between Ceramco3 opaque porcelain and indirect composite resin. Five groups of Co-Cr metal alloy substrates were fabricated according to manufacturer's instruction. The surface of metal alloy with a layer of dental opaque porcelain was heated by fire. After the surface of opaque porcelain was etched, five different surface treatments, i.e. RelyX Ceramic Primer (RCP), Porcelain Bond Activator and SE Bond Primer (mixed with a proportion of 1:1) (PBA), Shofu Porcelain Primer (SPP), SE bond primer (SEP), and no primer treatment (as a control group), were used to combine P60 and opaque porcelain along with resin cement. Shear bond strength of specimens was tested in a universal testing machine. The failure modes of specimens in all groups were observed and classified into four types. Selected specimens were subjected to scanning electron microscope and energy disperse spectroscopy to reveal the relief of the fracture surface and to confirm the failure mode of different types. The experimental results showed that the values of the tested items in all the tested groups were higher than that in the control group. Group PBA exhibited the highest value [(37.52 +/- 2.14) MPa] and this suggested a fact that all of the specimens in group PBA revealed combined failures (failure occurred in metal-porcelain combined surface and within opaque porcelain). Group SPP and RCP showed higher values than SEP (P porcelain or composite resin) while all the specimens in group SEP and control group revealed adhesive failures. Conclusions could be drawn that silane coupling agents could reinforce the bond strength of dental composite resin to metal-opaque porcelain substrate. The bond strength between dental composite resin and dental opaque porcelain could meet the clinical requirements.

  4. Effect of postoperative peroxide bleaching on the stability of composite to enamel and dentin bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, M; Roubickova, A; Comba, L; Housova, D; Bradna, P

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of peroxide bleaching gel on the durability of the adhesive bond between composite material, enamel, and dentin created with the etch-and-rinse adhesive Gluma Comfort Bond (GLU) and with the self-etch adhesives Clearfil SE Bond (CLE), Adper Prompt (ADP), and iBond (IBO). The adhesives were applied to flattened enamel and dentin of extracted human molars and built up with a microhybrid composite (Charisma). After 25 eight-hour cycles of bleaching with a 20% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel (Opalescence PF 20), the shear bond strength was measured and compared with one-day and two-month control specimens stored in water. The data were analyzed using nonparametric Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis statistics (pIBO and markedly affected a fracture pattern of ADP specimens at the periphery of their bonded area. The results of our study indicate that the durability of adhesive restorations can be detrimentally influenced by carbamide peroxide bleaching and that different adhesives show varying sensitivity levels to the bleaching gel.

  5. Supersonic Retropulsion Surface Preparation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites for Adhesive Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Blohowiak, Kay Y.; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Surface preparation is widely recognized as a key step to producing robust and predictable bonds in a precise and reproducible manner. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, can lack precision and reproducibility, which can lead to variation in surface properties and subsequent bonding performance. The use of a laser to ablate composite surface resin can provide an efficient, precise, and reproducible means of preparing composite surfaces for adhesive bonding. Advantages include elimination of physical waste (i.e., grit media and sacrificial peel ply layers that ultimately require disposal), reduction in process variability due to increased precision (e.g. increased reproducibility), and automation of surface preparation, all of which improve reliability and process control. This paper describes a Nd:YAG laser surface preparation technique for composite substrates and the mechanical performance and failure modes of bonded laminates thus prepared. Additionally, bonded specimens were aged in a hot, wet environment for approximately one year and subsequently mechanically tested. The results of a one year hygrothermal aging study will be presented.

  6. Bond strength investigations and structural applicability of composite fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) rebars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachlakev, Damian Ivanov

    The composite FRP rebars research at Oregon State University was initiated in 1993 principally to develop a non-metallic hollow reinforcement. It was recognized that the tensile properties of such reinforcement are unquestionably superior to steel, but its performance in concrete could be problematic. The bond between FRP rebars and concrete was identified as a critical area of concern. The purpose of this study is (i) to analyze a variety of FRP and steel reinforcing units; (ii) to advance the knowledge of bond mechanism, failure modes, and parameters influencing the bond strength; (iii) to compare composite rebars to conventional steel and to assess their applicability as reinforcing members. Commercially available FRP rebars were investigated. Particular emphasis was given to a hollow glass FRP rod designed at Oregon State University. Several parameters were investigated, including: failure mode, concrete compressive strength, rebar diameter and circumference/cross section ratio, embedment length, concrete cover, and microstructure of the composite rebars. It was recognized that the ASTM C234-90 pull-out standard is test of concrete strength. Therefore, a modified pull-out test was developed for evaluating the bond strength behavior. A newly developed European bond test procedure was compared with locally modified version of the pull-out method. The new procedure was used for the first time in the United States. The study demonstrated a phenomenon, not reported in the published research at this time, defined as a size effect. The size effects result in lower bond strength with increasing area of the interface between FRP bars and concrete. The next phase of the research was dedicated to the hollow glass FRP rebar. The goal was to compare its bond properties to conventional steel and solid FRP bars. The study led to two new phenomena not described in the literature previously. Results showed that the concrete compressive strength does not significantly affect the

  7. Effect of three porcelain etchants type (HF-APF-PHA on porcelain- composite shear bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kermanshah H.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Porcelain restorations are susceptible to fracture and a common method for repairing is the use of silane and composite on etched porcelain. Although HF is very effective in porcelain etching but has detrimental effects on tissues. Purpose: In this study, the effect of APF and PHA was compared with HF in porcelain etching. Also the role of silane, unfilled resin and dentin bonding in bond strength of composite- porcelain was evaluated. Methods and Materials: In this experimental in-vitro study, one-hundred twenty porcelain square blocks (552 mm were prepared and bonding surfaces of each sandblasted. Samples were divided into three groups. The first group (n=40 were etched with buffered HF 9.5% (Ultradent for 1 min., the second group (n=40 were etched with Iranian APF 1.23% (Kimia for 10 minutes and the third group (n=40 were etched with Iranian PHA 37% (Kimia for 1 min. Ultradent silane was applied on the surfaces of half of cases in each group. On the surfaces of half of silane-treated samples unfilled resin was applied and dentin bonding was used on the surfaces of the remaining. Samples without silane were treated in a similar manner. Composite cylinder with 4mm diameter and 2 mm height was bonded to porcelain. Specimens were stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours and subjected to 500 cycles. Shear bond strength was measured with an Instron machine and type of fracture was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Results were analyzed using 3 way ANOVA, Kaplan- Maier and Tukey HSD tests. Results: Findings showed that PHA and APF roughened the porcelain surface without creating retentive micro undercuts but HF etches porcelain and creates retentive microundercuts. Ultradent silane had no significant effect on bond strength of porcelain- composite. Unfilled resin with Ultradent silane compared with dentin bonding with the same silane is more effective in bond strength of composite- porcelain. Conclusion: Based on

  8. Evaluating the Microshear Bond Strength and Microleakage of Flowable Composites Containing Zinc Oxide Nano-particles

    OpenAIRE

    Teymoornezhad, Koorosh; Alaghehmand, Homayoun; Daryakenari, Ghazaleh; Khafri, Soraya; Tabari, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Preventive resin restorations (PRR) are the conservative choice for the most common carious lesions in children. Thus, new age flowable resin composites with higher filler content are readily used. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength and microleakage of two flowable resin composites containing different percentages of nano zinc oxide (NZnO) particles, which have proven to have antimicrobial properties. Methods This experimental in-vitro study was ca...

  9. Study on Non-interlayer Liquid Phase Diffusion Bonding for SiCp/ZL101 Aluminum Matrix Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei GUO; Jitai NIU; Jinfan ZHAI; Changli WANG; Jie YU; Guangtao ZHOU

    2003-01-01

    Through the vacuum diffusion bonding for SiCp/ZLl01 aluminum matrix composite, the influence of bonding parameters on the joint properties was reported, with the aim to obtain optimal bonding parameters. The microstructureof joints was analyzed by means o

  10. Bond strength durability of a resin composite on a reinforced ceramic using various repair systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Leite, Fabiola; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. This study compared the durability of repair bond strength of a resin composite to a reinforced ceramic after three repair systems. Methods. Alumina-reinforced feldspathic ceramic blocks (Vitadur-alpha(R)) (N=30) were randomly divided into three groups according to the repair method: PR-

  11. Temperature effect on the static behaviour of adhesively-bonded metal skin to composite stiffener

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teixeira De Freitas, S.; Sinke, J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the effect of temperature on the static behavior of an hybrid structure consisting of adhesively bonded Fiber Metal Laminate skin to a composite stiffener. This hybrid structure was tested using stiffener pull-off tests, which is a typical set-up used to simu

  12. Adhesive Properties of Bonded Orthodontic Retainers to Enamel : Stainless Steel Wire vs Fiber-reinforced Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foek, Dave Lie Sam; Krebs, Eliza; Sandham, John; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to compare the bond strength of a stainless steel orthodontic wire vs various fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) used as orthodontic retainers on enamel, analyze the failure types after debonding, and investigate the influence of different application proced

  13. INVESTIGATION OF TITANIUM BONDED GRAPHITE FOAM COMPOSITES FOR MICRO ELECTRONIC MECHANICAL SYSTEMS (MEMS) APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menchhofer, Paul A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    PiMEMS Inc. (Santa Barbara, CA) in collaboration with ORNL investigated the use of Titanium Bonded Graphite Foam Composites (TBGC) for thermal mitigation in Micro Electronic Mechanical Systems (MEMS) applications. Also considered were potentially new additive manufacturing routes to producing novel high surface area micro features and diverse shaped heat transfer components for numerous lightweight MEMs applications.

  14. Shear bond strength of composite resin to dentin after application of cavity disinfectants - SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different cavity disinfectants on dentin bond strengths of composite resin applied with two different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred mandibular molars were sectioned parallel to the occlusal surface to expose dentin in the midcoronal one-third. The dentinal surfaces were polished with waterproof-polishing papers. The specimens were randomly divided into five groups of 40 teeth each as follows: group 1(control -- specimens were not treated with any cavity disinfectants. Groups 2--5 (experimental groups -- dentin surfaces were treated with the following cavity disinfectants, respectively; 2% chlorhexidine solution, 0.1% benzalkonium chloride-based disinfectant, 1% chlorhexidine gel, and an iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectant. The specimens were then randomly divided into two subgroups including 20 teeth each to evaluate the effect of different bonding systems. Dentin bonding systems were applied to the dentin surfaces and the composite buildups were done. After the specimens were stored in an incubator for 24 hours, the shear bond strength was measured at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The specimens were then statistically analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: One way analysis of variance and Tukey-HSD tests were used. Results: There was no significant difference between chlorhexidine gel and control groups regardless of the type of the bonding agent used (P>0.05. On the other hand, pretreatment with benzalkonium chloride-based, iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectants or chlorhexidine solutions had a negative effect on the shear bond strength of self-etching bonding systems. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that when benzalkonium chloride-based, iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectants or chlorhexidine solutions are used as a cavity disinfectant, an etch-and-rinse bonding system should be preferred.

  15. An Experimental Investigation of Silicone-to-Metal Bond Strength in Composite Space Docking System Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Siamidis, John; Larkin, Elizabeth M. G.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently developing a new universal docking mechanism for future space exploration missions called the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS). A candidate LIDS main interface seal design is a composite assembly of silicone elastomer seals vacuum molded into grooves in an electroless nickel plated aluminum retainer. The strength of the silicone-tometal bond is a critical consideration for the new system, especially due to the presence of small areas of disbond created during the molding process. In the work presented herein, seal-to-retainer bonds of subscale seal specimens with different sizes of intentional disbond were destructively tensile tested. Nominal specimens without intentional disbonds were also tested. Tension was applied either uniformly on the entire seal circumference or locally in one short circumferential length. Bond failure due to uniform tension produced a wide scatter of observable failure modes and measured load-displacement behaviors. Although the preferable failure mode for the seal-to-retainer bond is cohesive failure of the elastomer material, the dominant observed failure mode under the uniform loading condition was found to be the less desirable adhesive failure of the bond in question. The uniform tension case results did not show a correlation between disbond size and bond strength. Localized tension was found to produce failure either as immediate tearing of the elastomer material outside the bond region or as complete peel-out of the seal in one piece. The obtained results represent a valuable benchmark for comparison in the future between adhesion loads under various separation conditions and composite seal bond strength.

  16. Bond slip detection of concrete-encased composite structure using shear wave based active sensing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lei; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Kong, Qingzhao; Huo, Linsheng; Lim, Ing; Li, Mo; Song, Gangbing

    2015-12-01

    Concrete-encased composite structure exhibits improved strength, ductility and fire resistance compared to traditional reinforced concrete, by incorporating the advantages of both steel and concrete materials. A major drawback of this type of structure is the bond slip introduced between steel and concrete, which directly reduces the load capacity of the structure. In this paper, an active sensing approach using shear waves to provide monitoring and early warning of the development of bond slip in the concrete-encased composite structure is proposed. A specimen of concrete-encased composite structure was investigated. In this active sensing approach, shear mode smart aggregates (SAs) embedded in the concrete act as actuators and generate desired shear stress waves. Distributed piezoceramic transducers installed in the cavities of steel plates act as sensors and detect the wave response from shear mode SAs. Bond slip acts as a form of stress relief and attenuates the wave propagation energy. Experimental results from the time domain analysis clearly indicate that the amplitudes of received signal by lead zirconate titanate sensors decreased when bond slip occurred. In addition, a wavelet packet-based analysis was developed to compute the received signal energy values, which can be used to determine the initiation and development of bond slip in concrete-encased composite structure. In order to establish the validity of the proposed method, a 3D finite element analysis of the concrete-steel bond model is further performed with the aid of the commercial finite element package, Abaqus, and the numerical results are compared with the results obtained in experimental study.

  17. Effect of Different Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength of Veneering Composite to Polyetherketone Core Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Pourkhalili

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective:The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the effect of different surface treatment methods on shear bond strength of the veneering composite to polyetheretherketone (PEEK core material. Materials and Methods::In this in vitro, experimental study, 60 PEEK discs were fabricated, polished with silicon carbide abrasive paper and divided into five surface treatment groups (n=12 namely air abrasion with 110µm alumina particles at 0.2MPa pressure for 10 seconds, 98% sulfuric acid etching for one minute, air abrasion plus sulfuric acid etching, application of cyanoacrylate resin and a no surface treatment control group. Visio.link adhesive and GC Gradia veneering composite were applied on PEEK surfaces and light-cured. Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine and the data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results:The mean ± standard deviation (SD values of shear bond strength of the veneering composite to PEEK surfaces were 8.85±3.03, 15.6±5.02, 30.42±5.43, 26.14±4.33 and 5.94±4.49MPa in the control, air-abrasion, sulfuric acid etching, air-abrasion plus sulfuric acid etching and cyanoacrylate resin groups, respectively. The control and cyanoacrylate groups had significant differences with air abrasion, sulfuric acid etching and air abrasion plus sulfuric acid etching groups in terms of shear bond strength (P<0.0001. Higher bond strength values were noted in sulfuric acid etching, air-abrasion plus sulfuric acid etching and air abrasion groups compared to the control and cyanoacrylate groups (P<0.0001. Conclusion:Sulfuric acid etching, air abrasion and a combination of both are recommended as efficient surface treatments to increase the shear bond strength of the veneering composite to PEEK core material.

  18. Photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels with a double-ring sensor featuring a narrow angular aperture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, Roy G.M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Leeuwen, van Ton G.; Mul, de Frits F.M.

    2004-01-01

    A photoacoustic double-ring sensor, featuring a narrow angular aperture, is developed for laser-induced photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels. An integrated optical fiber enables reflection-mode detection of ultrasonic waves. By using the cross-correlation between the signals detected by the two ri

  19. A Voltage Doubler Circuit to Extend the Soft-switching Range of Dual Active Bridge Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zian; Shen, Yanfeng; Wang, Huai;

    2017-01-01

    A voltage doubler circuit is realized to extend the soft-switching range of Dual Active Bridge (DAB) converters. No extra hardware is added to the DAB to form this circuit, since it is composed of the dc blocking capacitor and the low side full bridge converter, which already exist in DAB. With t...

  20. Body-insensitive Multi-Mode MIMO Terminal Antenna of Double-Ring Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Shuai; Ishimiya, Katsunori;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel multimode multi-input multi-output (MIMO) antenna system composed of a dual-element MIMO cellular antenna and dual-element MIMO Wi-Fi antenna for mobile terminal applications. The antenna system has a double-ring structure and can be integrated with the metal fra...

  1. A Protection Circuit for DC-DC Converter with Voltage Doubler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Elangovan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method to obtain a protected voltage gain by employing a protection circuit for the voltage doubler or multiplier circuit in an isolated tyde DC-DC Converter. The entire set up consists of a phase shift converter with a protected bridge/voltage doubler rectifier on the output side. The operating frequency of the phase shift converter is 20-25kHz (depending on the requirement of the application which is high enough to improve the efficiency. Ferrite core transformer is used in place of ordinary air core transformer, which is small in size with number of turns of the transformer is reduced and the overall power density is increased. The doubler circuit consists of electrolytic capacitors, which are rated at 400V in order to comply with IEC65 requirements. This paper proposes an “electrolytic capacitor protection circuit”, which enables the voltage rating of the electrolytics to be reduced to 250V. This circuit results in cost savings of more than 50% in the price of the electrolytic filter capacitors. The circuits were simulated using PSPICE SOFTWARE and the following results were obtained. For an input voltage of 200V, an output of 200V and400V were obtained in bridge mode and doubler mode respectively.

  2. Revisiting the Fully Automated Double-Ring Infiltrometer Using Open-Source Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The double-ring infiltrometer (DRI) is commonly used for measuring soil hydraulic conductivity. However, constant-head DRI tests typically involve the use of Mariotte tubes, which can be problematic to set-up, and time-consuming to maintain and monitor during infiltration tests....

  3. Evaluating the Microshear Bond Strength and Microleakage of Flowable Composites Containing Zinc Oxide Nano-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymoornezhad, Koorosh; Alaghehmand, Homayoun; Daryakenari, Ghazaleh; Khafri, Soraya; Tabari, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Preventive resin restorations (PRR) are the conservative choice for the most common carious lesions in children. Thus, new age flowable resin composites with higher filler content are readily used. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength and microleakage of two flowable resin composites containing different percentages of nano zinc oxide (NZnO) particles, which have proven to have antimicrobial properties. Methods This experimental in-vitro study was carried out in the Dental Material Research Center of Babol University of Medical Sciences in 2015. One nanohybrid and one nanofill flowable resin composite were chosen and modified with the incorporation of 1% and 3% Wt NZnO particles. Six groups (n=10, 0%, 1%, and 3%) of resin composite sticks on dental enamel (2×2mm) were prepared to be placed in the microtensile tester. The microshear bond strength magnitude (MPa) was recorded at the point of failure. A class I box (3×0.8×1 mm) was prepared on 60 premolars and filled using the resin composites (6 groups, n=10). The specimens were immersed in a 5% basic fuschin solution and sectioned bucco-lingually to view the microleakage using a stereomicroscope. One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests for microshear and Wilcoxon and Kruskal–Wallis tests for microleakage were used to analyze the data in the IBM SPSS Statistics version 22 software. Results The bond strength of the 3% clearfill group significantly decreased while no significant change occurred in the bond strength in other groups. The Z-350 group had significantly lower microleakage as nanoparticles increased. No significant difference was observed in the clearfill group. Conclusion Up to 3% Wt incorporation of NZnO particles will not diversely alter the bond strength, but it will be beneficial in providing antimicrobial effects with lower microleakage rates. PMID:28070263

  4. Balanced G-band Gm-boosted frequency doublers in transferred substrate InP HBT technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Thualfiqar, Al-Sawaf; Weimann, Nils

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, balanced G-band Gm-boosted frequency doublers in transferred substrate (TS) InP HBT technology are reported for the first time. The Gm-boosted frequency doublers consist of a phase compensated Marchand balun, Gm-boosted doubler stage, and an optional cascode gain stage at the output....... The doubler without cascode demonstrates a maximum output power of +4.7 dBm around a narrow frequency range at 200 GHz when driven with an input power of +10 dBm. A Gm-boosted frequency doubler with cascode demonstrates an output power of +5.4 dBm at 190 GHz when driven with an input power of +11 d......Bm. The power consumptions of the Gm-boosted frequency doubler without and with cascode are 30.9 mW and 56.4 mW, respectively. The fundamental suppression for both doublers remains better than 17.3 dB over an input frequency range of 75–110 GHz....

  5. The cryogenic bonding evaluation at the metallic-composite interface of a composite overwrapped pressure vessel with additional impact investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Eric A.

    A bonding evaluation that investigated the cryogenic tensile strength of several different adhesives/resins was performed. The test materials consisted of 606 aluminum test pieces adhered to a wet-wound graphite laminate in order to simulate the bond created at the liner-composite interface of an aluminum-lined composite overwrapped pressure vessel. It was found that for cryogenic applications, a flexible, low modulus resin system must be used. Additionally, the samples prepared with a thin layer of cured resin -- or prebond -- performed significantly better than those without. It was found that it is critical that the prebond surface must have sufficient surface roughness prior to the bonding application. Also, the aluminum test pieces that were prepared using a surface etchant slightly outperformed those that were prepared with a grit blast surface finish and performed significantly better than those that had been scored using sand paper to achieve the desired surface finish. An additional impact investigation studied the post impact tensile strength of composite rings in a cryogenic environment. The composite rings were filament wound with several combinations of graphite and aramid fibers and were prepared with different resin systems. The rings were subjected to varying levels of Charpy impact damage and then pulled to failure in tension. It was found that the addition of elastic aramid fibers with the carbon fibers mitigates the overall impact damage and drastically improves the post-impact strength of the structure in a cryogenic environment.

  6. Relationship between mechanical properties and bond durability of short fiber-reinforced resin composite with universal adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between mechanical properties and bond durability of short fiber-reinforced resin composite with universal adhesive. As controls, micro-hybrid and nano-hybrid resin composites were tested. The universal adhesives used were Scotchbond Universal, Adhese Universal, and G-Premio Bond. The fracture toughness and flexural properties of resin composites, and shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength of universal adhesive with resin composite using both total-etch and self-etch modes were determined. In the results, short fiber-reinforced resin composite showed significantly higher fracture toughness than did micro-hybrid and nano-hybrid resin composites. The flexural strength and modulus of short fiber-reinforced and nano-hybrid resin composites were significantly lower than were those of micro-hybrid resin composites. Regardless of etching mode, the shear bond strength of universal adhesives with short fiber-reinforced resin composite did not show any significant differences from micro-hybrid and nano-hybrid resin composites. The shear fatigue strength of universal adhesives with short fiber-reinforced resin composite and micro-hybrid resin composites were significantly higher than that of nano-hybrid resin composites. The results of this study suggest that the mechanical properties of short fiber-reinforced resin composite improve their bond durability with universal adhesive.

  7. An in vitro study to evaluate the effect of two ethanol-based and two acetone-based dental bonding agents on the bond strength of composite to enamel treated with 10% carbamide peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Basavaraj Benni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Carbamide peroxide bleaching has been implicated in adversely affecting the bond strength of composite to enamel. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol-based (Clearfil S 3 bond, Kuraray, Adper Single bond 2, 3M ESPE dental products and acetone-based (Prime and Bond NT, Dentsply, One Step, Bisco bonding agents on the shear bond strength of composite to enamel treated with 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 extracted human noncarious permanent incisors were randomly divided into two groups (control and experimental. Experimental group specimens were subjected to a bleaching regimen with a 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching system (Opalescence; Ultradent Products Inc, South Jordan, USA. Composite resin cylinders were bonded to the specimens using four bonding agents and shear bond strength was determined with universal testing machine. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the shear bond strength between control and experimental groups with both ethanol-based (Clearfil S 3 Bond and Adper Single Bond 2 and acetone-based bonding agent (Prime and Bond NT and One Step. Interpretation and Conclusion: The adverse effect of bleaching on bonding composite to enamel can be reduced or eliminated by using either ethanol- or acetone-based bonding agent. Clinical Significances: Immediate bonding following bleaching procedure can be done using ethanol- or acetone-based bonding agent without compromising bond strength.

  8. The use of image analysis for the study of interfacial bonding in solid composite propellant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JASMINA DOSTANIC

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of this research, the program Image Pro Plus was applied for determining the polymer–oxidizer interactions in HTPB-based composite propellants. In order to improve the interactions, different bonding agents were used, and their efficiency was analyzed. The determination of the quantity, area and radius of non-bonded oxidizer crystals is presented. The position of formed cracks in the specimen and their area has a great influence on the mechanical properties of composite propellant. The preparation of the composite propellant in order to enable the photographing of their structure by means of stereoscopic and metallographic microscopes with the digital camera is also described as well.

  9. Environmental Aging of Scotch-Weld(TradeMark) AF-555M Structural Adhesive in Composite to Composite Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tan-Hung; Miner, Gilda A.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Connell, John W.; Baughman, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Fiber reinforced resin matrix composites have found increased usage in recent years. Due to the lack of service history of these relatively new material systems, their long-term aging performance is not well established. In this study, adhesive bonds were prepared by the secondary bonding of Scotch-Weld(TradeMark) AF-555M between pre-cured adherends comprised of T800H/3900-2 uni-directional laminate. The adherends were co-cured with wet peel-ply for surface preparation. Each bond-line of single-lap-shear (SLS) specimen was measured to determine thickness and inspected visually for voids. A three-year environmental aging plan for the SLS specimens at 82 C and 85% relative humidity was initiated. SLS strengths were measured for both controls and aged specimens at room temperature and 82 C. The aging results of strength retention and failure modes to date are reported.

  10. Effect of surface treatment on bond strength between an indirect composite material and a zirconia framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komine, Futoshi; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Koizuka, Mai; Taguchi, Kohei; Kamio, Shingo; Matsumura, Hideo

    2012-03-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments for zirconia ceramics on shear bond strength between an indirect composite material and zirconia ceramics. In addition, we investigated the durability of shear bond strength by using artificial aging (20,000 thermocycles). A total of 176 Katana zirconia disks were randomly divided into eight groups according to surface treatment, as follows: group CON (as-milled); group GRD (wet-ground with 600-grit silicon carbide abrasive paper); groups 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 MPa (airborne-particle abrasion at 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 MPa, respectively); and group HF (9.5% hydrofluoric acid etching). Shear bond strength was measured at 0 thermocycles in half the specimens after 24-h immersion. The remaining specimens were subjected to 20,000 thermocycles before shear bond strength testing. Among the eight groups, the 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 MPa airborne-particle abraded groups had significantly higher bond strengths before and after thermocycling. The Mann-Whitney U-test revealed no significant difference in shear bond strength between 0 and 20,000 thermocycles, except in the 0.2 MPa group (P = 0.013). From the results of this study, use of airborne-particle abrasion at a pressure of 0.1 MPa or higher increases initial and durable bond strength between an indirect composite material and zirconia ceramics.

  11. [Is amalgam stained dentin a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtanus, J D

    2016-06-01

    After the removal of amalgam restorations, black staining of dentin is often observed, which is attributed to the penetration of corrosion products from amalgam. A study was carried out to determine whether this amalgam stained dentin is a proper substrate for bonding resin composites. A literature study and an in vitro study showed that Sn and Zn in particular are found in amalgam stained dentin, and this was the case only in demineralised dentin. In vitro, demineralised dentin acted as porte d'entrÈe for amalgam corrosion products. Bond strength tests with 5 adhesive strategies showed no differences between bond strengths to amalgam stained and to sound dentin, but did show different failure types. A clinical study showed good survival of extensive cusp replacing resin composite restorations. No failures were attributed to inadequate adhesion. It is concluded that staining of dentin by amalgam corrosion products has no negative effect upon bond strength of resin composite. It is suggested that Sn and Zn may have a beneficial effect upon dentin, thus compensating the effects of previous carious attacks, preparation trauma and physico-chemical challenges during clinical lifetime.

  12. Effect of desensitizing treatments on bond strength of resin composites to dentin - an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Makkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hypersensitivity is a common clinical multietiological problem. Many desensitizing treatments are there to overcome hypersensitivity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different dentin-desensitizing treatments on the tensile bond strength of composite restoration. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four sound human molars were used. Enamel was wet abraded to expose flat dentin surfaces, polished with sandpaper. The specimens were then divided into three groups (n = 8 based on the type of dentin-desensitizing treatment given. The first group: G1 was the control group where no desensitizing agent was used. The second group: G2 was treated with desensitizing dentifrice containing a combination of potassium nitrate, triclosan, and sodium monoflorophosphate. The third group: G3 was treated with Er:YAG laser. Afterwards, the desensitized specimens were treated with one step self-etch adhesive according to manufacturer′s instructions and composite microcylinders were packed. The specimens were then examined for tensile bond strength using universal tensile machine (KMI TM . Results: Statistical analysis of the data obtained revealed the mean values for the tensile bond strengths were 10.2613 MPa, 5.9400 MPa and 6.3575 MPa for groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. These values were statistically significantly different between groups pretreated with laser or dentifrice as compared to control group. Conclusions: Dentifrice and Laser pre-treated dentin has lower tensile bond strength with resin composites as compared to dentin that is untreated.

  13. Bond-slip detection of concrete-encased composite structure using electro-mechanical impedance technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yabin; Li, Dongsheng; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Kong, Qingzhao; Lim, Ing; Song, Gangbing

    2016-09-01

    Concrete-encased composite structure is a type of structure that takes the advantages of both steel and concrete materials, showing improved strength, ductility, and fire resistance compared to traditional reinforced concrete structures. The interface between concrete and steel profiles governs the interaction between these two materials under loading, however, debonding damage between these two materials may lead to severe degradation of the load transferring capacity which will affect the structural performance significantly. In this paper, the electro-mechanical impedance (EMI) technique using piezoceramic transducers was experimentally investigated to detect the bond-slip occurrence of the concrete-encased composite structure. The root-mean-square deviation is used to quantify the variations of the impedance signatures due to the presence of the bond-slip damage. In order to verify the validity of the proposed method, finite element model analysis was performed to simulate the behavior of concrete-steel debonding based on a 3D finite element concrete-steel bond model. The computed impedance signatures from the numerical results are compared with the results obtained from the experimental study, and both the numerical and experimental studies verify the proposed EMI method to detect bond slip of a concrete-encased composite structure.

  14. Shear test of composite bonded to dentin: Er:YAG laser versus dental handpiece preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visuri, Steven R.; Gilbert, Jeremy L.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.; Wigdor, Harvey A.

    1995-05-01

    The erbium:YAG laser coupled with a cooling stream of water appears to be an effective means of removing dental hard tissues. However, before the procedure is deemed clinically viable, there are several important issues of safety and efficacy that need to be explored. In this study we investigated the surface that remains following laser ablation of dentin and compared the results to the use of a dental handpiece. Specifically, we studied the effect the laser radiation had on the bonding of composite to dentin. The crowns of extracted human molars were removed revealing the underlying dentin. An additional thickness of material was removed with either a dental handpiece or an Er:YAG laser by raster scanning the samples under a fixed handpiece or laser. Comparable surface roughnesses were achieved. A cylinder of composite was bonded onto the prepared surfaces following the manufacturer's directions. The dentin-composite bond was then shear stressed to failure on a universal testing apparatus and the maximum load recorded. Preliminary results indicated that laser irradiated samples had improved bond strengths. SEM photographs of the surfaces were also taken to compare the two methods of tooth preparation.

  15. THE EFFECT OF BONDING AND SURFACE SEALANT APPLICATION ON POSTOPERATIVE SENSITIVITY FROM POSTERIOR COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan TEKÇE

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the postoperative sensitivity of posterior Class I composite restoration at short-term, restorated with two different all-in-one self-etch adhesives with or without surface sealant application. Materials and Methods: 44 restorations were inserted in 11 patients who required Class I restorations in their molars. Each patient received 4 restorations, thus four groups were formed; (1 G-Aenial Bond (GC, Japan; (2 Clearfil S3 Bond (Kuraray, Japan; (3 G-Aenial Bond+Fortify Plus (Bisco, USA, (4 Clearfil S3 Bond+Fortify Plus. Sensitivity was evaluated at 24h, 7, 15, and 30 days using cold air, ice, and pressure stimuli using a visual analog scale. Comparisons of continuous variables between the sensitivity evaluations were performed using the Friedman’s One-Way Analysis of Variance with repeated measures test (p0.05. The use of Clearfil S3 Bond resulted in almost the same level of postoperative sensitivity as did the use of G-Aenial Bond. The highest sensitivity scores were observed for the surface sealant applied teeth without any statistical significance (p>0.05. Conclusions: Self etch adhesives displayed postoperative sensitivity. The sensitivity scores slightly decreased at the end of 30 days (p>0.05. Surface sealant application did not result in a decrease in sensitivity scores for either dentin adhesives.

  16. Identification of parameters of cohesive elements for modeling of adhesively bonded joints of epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kottner R.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Adhesively bonded joints can be numerically simulated using the cohesive crack model. The critical strain energy release rate and the critical opening displacement are the parameters which must be known when cohesive elements in MSC.Marc software are used. In this work, the parameters of two industrial adhesives Hunstman Araldite 2021 and Gurit Spabond 345 for bonding of epoxy composites are identified. Double Cantilever Beam (DCB and End Notched Flexure (ENF test data were used for the identification. The critical opening displacements were identified using an optimization algorithm where the tests and their numerical simulations were compared.

  17. Surface modifications and Nano-composite coatings to improve the bonding strength of titanium-porcelain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Litong, E-mail: guolitong810104@163.com [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); ustralian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Chen, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Xuemei; Feng, Wei [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Li, Baoe [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Lin, Cheng; Tao, Xueyu; Qiang, Yinghuai [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China)

    2016-04-01

    Surface modifications of Ti and nano-composite coatings were employed to simultaneously improve the surface roughness, corrosion resistance and chemical bonding between porclain-Ti. The specimens were studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, surface roughness, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, corrosion resistance and bonding strength tests. The SEM results showed that hybrid structures with micro-stripes, nano-pores and nano-protuberances were prepared by surface modification of Ti, which significantly enhanced the surface roughness and corrosion resistance of Ti. Porous nano-composite coatings were synthesized on Ti anodized with pre-treatment in 40% HF acid. TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were added into the hybrid coating to increase the solid phase content of the sols and avoid the formation of microcracks. With the TiO{sub 2} content increasing from 45 wt% to 60 wt%, the quantities of the microcracks on the coating surface gradually decreased. The optimal TiO{sub 2} content for the nanocomposite coatings is 60 wt% in this research. Compared to the uncoated group, the bonding strength of the coated groups showed a bonding strength improvement of 23.96%. The cytotoxicity of the 4# coating group was ranked as zero, which corresponds to non-cytotoxicity. - Highlights: • Surface roughness of Ti was increased by surface modification of Ti. • Corrosion resistance was enhanced by surface modification of Ti. • Porous nano-composite coatings were synthesized on Ti by sol–gel process. • TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were added into the coating to avoid formation of cracks. • The nano-composite coatings increased the bonding strength of about 24%.

  18. The effect of different surface treatments of stainless steel crown and different bonding agents on shear bond strength of direct composite resin veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajami B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Stainless steel crown (SSC is the most durable and reliable restoration for primary teeth with extensive caries but its metalic appearance has always been a matter of concern. With advances in restorative materials and metal bonding processes, composite veneer has enhanced esthetics of these crowns in clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of SSC to composite resin using different surface treatments and adhesives. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 90 stainless steel crowns were selected. They were mounted in molds and divided into 3 groups of 30 each (S, E and F. In group S (sandblast, buccal surfaces were sandblasted for 5 seconds. In group E (etch acidic gel was applied for 5 minutes and in group F (fissure bur surface roughness was created by fissure diamond bur. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (SB, AB, P based on different adhesives: Single Bond, All Bond2 and Panavia F. Composite was then bonded to specimens. Cases were incubated in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength was measured by Zwick machine with crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test with p0.05 so the two variables were studied separately. No significant difference was observed in mean shear bond strength of composite among the three kinds of adhesives (P>0.05. Similar results were obtained regarding surface treatments (P>0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, treating the SSC surface with bur and using single bond adhesive and composite can be used successfully to obtain esthetic results in pediatric restorative treatments.

  19. An In vitro Evaluation of the Effect of Four Dentin Bonding System on the Bond Strength between Quartz Fiber Post and Composite Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirinzad M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: A strong bond of fiber post to resin core, as well as to dentin would critically ensure the durability of restorations in endodontically treated teeth. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of etch-and-rinse dentin bonding systems on the bond strength between resin core and fiber post after application of 24% hydrogen peroxide. Materials and Method: 24 fiber posts (RTD; St. Egèven, France were treated with 24% hydrogen peroxide for 10 minutes. They were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=6 based on the bonding agent used: Group P: Prime&Bond, Group O: One Step, Group S: Single Bond and Group E: Excite. Each group was prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions. For all posts, a flowable composite core (ÆliteFlo; Bisco, USA was built-up over the bonded area. Each specimen was sectioned to produce 2 sticks, 1mm in thickness and underwent microtensile bond strength (µTBS. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA at the 0.05 level. The fractured surfaces of all sticks were evaluated by stereomicroscope (× 20. Scanning electron microscopy(SEM assessment of two sticks from each group was performed to evaluate the surface morphology. Results: The means and SDs of µTBS were: Group P: 10.95±1.74; Group S: 10.25±2.39; Group E: 9.52±2.07; and Group O: 9.12±1.34. There was no statistically significant difference in bond strength means between the groups tested (p> 0.05. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated the bonding agents used had no significant influence on the bond strength of fiber post to composite core.

  20. An In vitro Evaluation of the Effect of Four Dentin Bonding System on the Bond Strength between Quartz Fiber Post and Composite Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirinzad M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: A strong bond of fiber post to resin core, as well as to dentin would critically ensure the durability of restorations in endodontically treated teeth. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of etch-and-rinse dentin bonding systems on the bond strength between resin core and fiber post after application of 24% hydrogen peroxide. Materials and Method: Twenty-four fiber posts (RTD; St. Egèven, France were treated with 24% hydrogen peroxide for 10 minutes. They were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=6 based on the bonding agent used: Group P: Prime&Bond, Group O: One Step, Group S: Single Bond and Group E: Excite. Each group was prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions. For all posts, a flowable composite core (ÆliteFlo, Bisco, USA were built-up over the bonded area. Each specimen was sectioned to produce 2 sticks, 1mm in thickness and underwent microtensile bond strength (µTBS. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA at the 0.05 level. The fractured surfaces of all sticks were evaluated by stereomicroscope (× 20. SEM assessment of two sticks from each group was performed to evaluate the surface morphology. Results: The means and SDs of µTBS were: Group P: 10.95±1.74; Group S: 10.25±2.39; Group E: 9.52±2.07; and Group O: 9.12±1.34. There was no statistic means and SDs ally significant difference in bond strength means between the groups used (p> 0.05. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated the bonding agents used had no significant influence on the bond strength of fiber post to composite core.

  1. Effect of microstructure on the high temperature strength of nitride bonded silicon carbide composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Rakshit; P K Das

    2002-10-01

    Four compositions of nitride bonded SiC were fabricated with varying particle size of SiC of ∼ 9.67, ∼ 13.79, ∼ 60 and their mixture with Si of ∼ 4.83 particle size. The green density and hence the open porosity of the shapes were varied between 1.83 to 2.09 g/cc and 33.3 to 26.8 vol.%, respectively. The effect of these parameters on room temperature and high temperature strength of the composite up to 1300°C in ambient condition were studied. The high temperature flexural strength of the composite of all compositions increased at 1200 and 1300°C because of oxidation of Si3N4 phase and blunting crack front. Formation of Si3N4 whisker was also observed. The strength of the mixture composition was maximum.

  2. Al-based magnetic composites produced by accumulative roll bonding (ARB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daneshvar, F.; Reihanian, M., E-mail: reihanian@scu.ac.ir; Gheisari, Kh.

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Al-based magnetic composites are produced by accumulative roll bonding (ARB). • Ni and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} are used as the reinforcing and magnetizing materials in the Al. • The tensile strength of Al/Ni composites is higher than that of Al/Ni/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. • Saturation magnetization increases linearly with increasing the Ni fraction. • Electrical resistivity increases with increasing the number of ARB cycle. - Abstract: Accumulative roll bonding (ARB) was used to fabricate Al/Ni (with two initial Ni thicknesses) and Al/Ni/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites. During ARB, Ni layers necked and fractured owing to the difference in flow properties of Al and Ni. In addition, large and elongated clusters of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles were broken into smaller ones and distributed gradually in Al matrix. After the fourth and sixth cycle, weak bonding and several pores were observed at particle/matrix interface while the bonding quality increased after the eighth cycle. Results show that after eight cycles, an Al-based composite with a satisfactorily magnetic behavior was produced. The Al/Ni (0.5) composite exhibited the highest tensile strength (182 MPa) with the highest value of saturation magnetization (13.47 emu/g). The relative permeability decreased with increasing frequency for a given number of ARB cycles. The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles caused the saturation magnetization to decrease and the critical frequency to increase due to the eddy current effects.

  3. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage.

  4. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatri A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown. The study samples consisted of 30 primary anterior stainless steel crowns (Unitek TM , size R4, embedded in resin blocks with crown, in test groups of 15 samples each. Mounting of the crown was done using resin block with one crown each. Sandblasting was done and the bonding agent Prime and Bond NT (Dentsply was applied on the labial surface of the primary anterior sandblasted crown. The composite resin and nanocomposite resin were placed into the well of Teflon jig and bonded to Stainless Steel Crowns. The cured samples were placed in distilled water and stored in incubator at 37°C for 48 hours. Shear bond strength was measured using universal testing machine (Hounsefield U.K. Model, with a capacity of 50 KN. Independent sample ′t′ test revealed a nonsignificant ( P < 0.385 difference between mean shear bond strength values of conventional and nanocomposite group. The bond strength values revealed that nanocomposite had slightly higher mean shear bond strength (21.04 ± 0.56 compared to conventional composite (20.78 ± 0.60. It was found that conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin had statistically similar mean shear bond strength, with nanocomposite having little more strength compared to conventional composite.

  5. Time Effects on Morphology and Bonding Ability in Mercerized Natural Fibers for Composite Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Williams

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of cellulose-derived fibers are extremely sensitive to surface treatment. Many studies have investigated the effects of varying surface treatment parameters in natural fibers to improve fiber-matrix bonding; however, work is still needed to assist with developing better quality control methods to use these fibers in more load-bearing composites. Kenaf fibers were alkali treated, and the surface and morphology were analyzed to determine how treatment time affected the bonding sites in natural fibers. The mechanical behavior was also characterized, and tensile testing reported a 61% increase in strength and a 25% increase in modulus in fibers treated for 16 hours. The increase in tensile properties was assumed to result from increased intermolecular interaction and increased crystallinity in cellulose, which was supported by XRD. On the other hand, FTIR spectroscopy and XPS showed that the amount of hydroxyl groups needed for fiber-matrix bonding decreased at longer treatment times.

  6. Effect of sodium ascorbate on the bond strength of silorane and methacrylate composites after vital bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Guler

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of sodium ascorbate (SA on the microtensile bond strengths (MTBSs of different composites to bovine enamel after vital bleaching with hydrogen peroxide (HP or carbamide peroxide (CP. Thirty bovine incisors were randomly divided into five groups and treated with no bleaching application (control, 35% HP alone, 35% HP + 10% SA for 10 minutes (HP + SA, 16% CP alone, or 16% CP + 10% SA for 10 minutes (CP + SA. Specimens were restored with Silorane adhesive and Filtek Silorane composite (designated as S / group or with Clearfil SE bond and Filtek Supreme XT (designated as F / group. Composite build-up was created on the enamel. Sectioned specimens (n = 10 per group; 1 mm2; cross-sectional area were created and stressed in a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. The application of 10% SA immediately after bleaching with 16% CP or 35% HP increased the enamel MTBS, regardless of the adhesive / composite resin used. The resulting MTBS values were similar to those of the control groups. Use of 16% CP and 35% HP alone decreased the enamel MTBS, regardless of the adhesive / composite resin used, with F / CP + SA = F / HP + SA = F / CP = S / CP + SA = S / HP + SA = S / C > S / CP = S / HP = F / CP = F / HP (p < 0.05. We concluded that the application of SA for 10 minutes immediately after vital bleaching increases the enamel BS for dimethacrylate- and silorane-based composites

  7. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  8. Effect of Additives on Liner Properties of Case-bonded Composite Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Navale

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available A thin layer of liner is applied to ensure a good bond between the insulator and the propellant in case-bonded rocket motors. It also acts as a protective shield for the insulatorby providing a limited fire protection effect. Liner compositions should preferably be based on the same binder system used in the propellant formulations. As the liner has to hold the propellant and the insulator without debond under all the environmental conditions, it plays a key role in predicted performance of a rocket motor. Hence, studies were carried out to improve the liner properties using various hydroxyl compounds, such as butanediol, cardanol, trimethylol propane, pyrogallol, etc as additives. Butanediol and phloroglucinol combination gave the best results in terms of mechanical properties and interface properties for the liner compositions. The effect of filler content on the liner properties was also studied. The results showed that higher filler content does not affect interface properties. Considering the fire retardancy effect and reinforcement of antimony trioxide (S£203, the formulation containing higher Sb2O3 was selected. The studies on pot life/castable life of liner showed that propellant could be cast up to 6 days after liner coating, without adversely affecting the bonding and the bond strength.

  9. Surface modifications and Nano-composite coatings to improve the bonding strength of titanium-porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Litong; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Xuemei; Feng, Wei; Li, Baoe; Lin, Cheng; Tao, Xueyu; Qiang, Yinghuai

    2016-04-01

    Surface modifications of Ti and nano-composite coatings were employed to simultaneously improve the surface roughness, corrosion resistance and chemical bonding between porclain-Ti. The specimens were studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, surface roughness, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, corrosion resistance and bonding strength tests. The SEM results showed that hybrid structures with micro-stripes, nano-pores and nano-protuberances were prepared by surface modification of Ti, which significantly enhanced the surface roughness and corrosion resistance of Ti. Porous nano-composite coatings were synthesized on Ti anodized with pre-treatment in 40% HF acid. TiO2 nanoparticles were added into the hybrid coating to increase the solid phase content of the sols and avoid the formation of microcracks. With the TiO2 content increasing from 45 wt% to 60 wt%, the quantities of the microcracks on the coating surface gradually decreased. The optimal TiO2 content for the nanocomposite coatings is 60 wt% in this research. Compared to the uncoated group, the bonding strength of the coated groups showed a bonding strength improvement of 23.96%. The cytotoxicity of the 4# coating group was ranked as zero, which corresponds to non-cytotoxicity.

  10. Multitechnique monitoring of fatigue damage in adhesively bonded composite lap-joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpenko, Oleksii; Koricho, Ermias; Khomenko, Anton; Dib, Gerges; Haq, Mahmoodul; Udpa, Lalita

    2015-03-01

    The requirement for reduced structural weight has driven the development of adhesively bonded joints. However, a major issue preventing their full acceptance is the initiation of premature failure in the form of a disbond between adherends, mainly due to fatigue, manufacturing flaws or impact damage. This work presents the integrated approach for in-situ monitoring of degradation of the adhesive bond in the GFRP composite lap-joint using ultrasonic guided waves and dynamic measurements from strategically embedded FBG sensors. Guided waves are actuated with surface mounted piezoelectric elements and mode tuning is used to provide high sensitivity to the degradation of the adhesive layer parameters. Composite lap-joints are subjected to fatigue loading, and data from piezoceramic transducers are collected at regular intervals to evaluate the progression of damage. Results demonstrate that quasi-static loading affects guided wave measurements considerably, but FBG sensors can be used to monitor the applied load levels and residual strains in the adhesive bond. The proposed technique shows promise for determining the post-damage stiffness of adhesively bonded joints.

  11. Evaluation of bond strength between glass fiber and resin composite using different protocols for dental splinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaral R Fabrício

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Many different polymeric materials to chair-side application on pre-impregnated glass fibers (PGF are available and different protocols are used in clinical procedure. Aims: This study evaluated protocols used for dental splinting on adhesion between PGF and resin. Settings and Design: 42 pair of nano composite resin blocks with (6 × 6 × 8 mm 3 were assigned into seven groups (n=6 and bonded according to the protocol: Gar adhesive, resin; Ggr glass fiber, resin; Ggar glass fiber, adhesive, resin; Gfgar flowable resin, glass fiber, adhesive, resin; Ggafr glass fiber, adhesive, flowable resin, resin; Ggfar glass fiber, flowable resin, adhesive, resin; Gfgr flowable resin, glass fiber, resin. Materials and Methods: Micro sticks obtained from each group were submitted to the micro tensile bond strength test. Statistical Analysis: The data were statistically evaluated using ANOVA and Tukey`s test (5%. Results: The protocol had a significant effect on the bond strength results (P=0.00. Gar and Ggar resulted in the highest bond strength with no statistical difference. Conclusions: The use of adhesive agent showed to be efficient to promote initial adhesion between fiber and nano composite resin.

  12. Resistance of composite and amalgam core foundations retained with and without pins and bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbery, Terence A; Swigert, Ryan; Richman, Brian; Sawicki, Vincent; Pace, Lauren; Moon, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    To compare the resistance of different amalgam and composite core foundations retained by pins, bonding agents, or both, 100 molars were mounted in acrylic resin and their occlusal surfaces were reduced to expose dentin. Pins were inserted at the four line angles of the teeth and matrices were placed. Bonding agents were applied according to the manufacturers' instructions. Amalgam was handcondensed and composite was incrementally added and photocured. Restorations were adjusted to produce specimens (n = 10) 5 mm in height with a 1 mm bevel at the axial-occlusal surface. After immersion in deionized water for 24 hours, specimens were loaded at a 45 degree angle on their beveled surfaces in a Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 0.02 in./minute. ANOVA and Tukey's tests indicated that FluoroCore 2 (with or without pins) was statistically stronger than all other combinations (p < 0.05).

  13. Effect of three surface conditioning methods to improve bond strength of particulate filler resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Alander, P; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W

    2005-01-01

    The use of resin-based composite materials in operative dentistry is increasing, including applications in stress-bearing areas. However, composite restorations, in common with all restorations, suffer from deterioration and degradation in clinical service. Durable repair alternatives by layering a new composite onto such failed composite restorations, will eliminate unnecessary loss of tooth tissue and repeated insults to the pulp. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the repair bond strength of a particulate filler resin-composite (PFC) to 5 PFC substrates. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following surface conditioning methods: (1) Hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel (9.5%) etching, (2) Air-borne particle abrasion (50 microm Al2O3), (3) Silica coating (30 microm SiOx, CoJet-Sand). After each conditioning method, a silane coupling agent was applied. Adhesive resin was then applied in a thin layer and light polymerized. The low-viscosity diacrylate resin composite was bonded to the conditioned substrates in polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested in dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. One-way ANOVA showed significant influence of the surface conditioning methods (p acid etched specimens (5.7-14.3 MPa) and those treated with either air-borne particle abrasion (13.0-22.5 MPa) or silica coating (25.5-41.8 MPa) in dry conditions (ANOVA, p < 0.001). After thermocycling, the silica coating process resulted in the highest bond values in all material groups (17.2-30.3 MPa).

  14. Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadizenouz, Ghazaleh; Esmaeili, Behnaz; Taghvaei, Arnica; Jamali, Zahra; Jafari, Toloo; Amiri Daneshvar, Farshid; Khafri, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Background. Repairing aged composite resin is a challenging process. Many surface treatment options have been proposed to this end. This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS) of nano-filled composite resin repairs. Methods. Seventy-five cylindrical specimens of a Filtek Z350XT composite resin were fabricated and stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours. After thermocycling, the specimens were divided into 5 groups according to the following surface treatments: no treatment (group 1); air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles (group 2); irradiation with Er:YAG laser beams (group 3); roughening with coarse-grit diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid (group 4); and etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 120 s (group 5). Another group of Filtek Z350XT composite resin samples (4×6 mm) was fabricated for the measurement of cohesive strength (group 6). A silane coupling agent and an adhesive system were applied after each surface treatment. The specimens were restored with the same composite resin and thermocycled again. A shearing force was applied to the interface in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05). Results. One-way ANOVA indicated significant differences between the groups (P < 0.05). SBS of controls was significantly lower than the other groups; differences between groups 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 were not significant. Surface treatment with diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid resulted in the highest bond strength. Conclusion. All the surface treatments used in this study improved the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite resin used. PMID:27092209

  15. Relationship between non-destructive OCT evaluation of resins composites and bond strength in a cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsh, T. A.; Sadr, A.; Shimada, Y.; Khunkar, S.; Tagami, J.; Sumi, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Formation of microgaps under the composite restorations due to polymerization stress and other causes compromise the adhesion to the dental substrate and restoration durability. However, the relationship between cavity adaptation and bond strength is not clear. In this paper, we introduce a new testing method to assess cavity adaptation by swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) and microtensile bond strength (MTBS) in the same class-I cavity. Methods: Round class-I cavities 3 mm in diameter and 1.5 mm in depth were prepared on 10 human premolars. After application of Tokuyama Bond Force adhesive, the cavities were filled by one of the two techniques; incremental technique using Estelite Sigma Quick universal composite or flowable lining using Palfique Estelite LV with bulk filling using the universal composite. Ten serial B-scan images were obtained throughout each cavity by SS-OCT. Significant peaks in the signal intensity were detected at the bonded interface of the cavity floor and to compare the different filling techniques. The specimens were later cut into beams (0.7x0.7 mm) and tested to measure MTBS at the cavity floor. Results: Flowable lining followed by bulk filling was inferior in terms of cavity adaptation and MTBS compared to the incremental technique (p<0.05, t-test). The adaptation (gap free cavity floor) and MTBS followed similar trends in both groups. Conclusion: Quantitative assessment of dental restorations by OCT can provide additional information on the performance and effectiveness of dental composites and restoration techniques. This study was supported by Global Center of Excellence, Tokyo Medical and Dental University and King Abdulaziz University.

  16. Fracture analysis of cracked metallic plate repaired with adhesive bonding composite patch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Weiguo; Mu Zhitao

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth test of cracked metallic plate repaired with adhesive bonding composite patch was conducted to study the fracture behavior of crack patching. The failure mode was that crack grows along with adhesive debonding. The crack length and debonding area were measured at different numbers of cycles. The nonlinear three-dimensional(3D)finite element(FE)model considering adhesive debonding and crack growth simultaneously was developed. The experimental and analytical results were in good agreement with each other.

  17. Bonding Effectiveness of Luting Composites to Different CAD/CAM Materials

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the influence of different surface treatments of six novel CAD/CAM materials on the bonding effectiveness of two luting composites. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six different CAD/CAM materials were tested: four ceramics - Vita Mark II; IPS Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD; Celtra Duo - one hybrid ceramic, Vita Enamic, and one composite CAD/CAM block, Lava Ultimate. A total of 60 blocks (10 per material) received various mechanical surface treatments: 1. 600-grit SiC ...

  18. Processing–structure–property relations of chemically bonded phosphate ceramic composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H A Colorado; C Hiel; H T Hahn

    2011-07-01

    Mechanical properties and microstructures of a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) and its composite with 1.0 wt% graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) reinforcement have been investigated. Microstructure was identified by using optical and scanning electron microscopes, X-ray tomography, and X-ray diffraction. In addition, weight loss of the resin at room temperature was studied. The microstructure characterization shows that CBPC is itself a composite with several crystalline (wollastonite and brushite) and amorphous phases. SEM and micro tomography show a homogeneous distribution of crystalline phases. Bending and compression strength of the CBPC was improved by reducing bubbles via preparation in vacuum.

  19. Non-destructive Evaluation of Bonds Between Fiberglass Composite and Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Selina; Sonta, Kestutis; Perey, Daniel F.; Cramer, K. E.; Berger, Libby

    2015-01-01

    To assess the integrity and reliability of an adhesive joint in an automotive composite component, several non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methodologies are correlated to lap shear bond strengths. A glass-fabric-reinforced composite structure was bonded to a metallic structure with a two-part epoxy adhesive. Samples were subsequently cut and tested in shear, and flaws were found in some areas. This study aims to develop a reliable and portable NDE system for service-level adhesive inspection in the automotive industry. The results of the experimental investigation using several NDE methods are presented and discussed. Fiberglass-to-metal bonding is the ideal configuration for NDE via thermography using excitation with induction heating, due to the conductive metal and non-conductive glass-fiber-reinforced composites. Excitation can be either by a research-grade induction heater of highly defined frequency and intensity, or by a service-level heater, such as would be used for sealing windshields in a body shop. The thermographs thus produced can be captured via a high-resolution infrared camera, with principal component analysis and 2D spatial Laplacian processing. Alternatively, the thermographs can be captured by low resolution thermochromic microencapsulated liquid crystal film imaging, which needs no post-processing and can be very inexpensive. These samples were also examined with phased-array ultrasound. The NDE methods are compared to the lap shear values and to each other for approximate cost, accuracy, and time and level of expertise needed.

  20. Influence of 10-MDP Adhesive System on Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia-Composite Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Cornelius Pott

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This in-vitro study investigated the initial 24h bond strength between different composites and zirconia after application of four different adhesive systems. Methods: A total of 120 specimens of zirconia (InCoris, Sirona, Germany, Bernsheim were ground with a 165 µm grit rotating diamond disc. Thirty specimens were each additionally treated with Cimara Zircon “CZ” (VOCO GmbH, Germany, Cuxhaven, Futurabond U “FBU” (VOCO GmbH, Futurabond M+ “FBM” (VOCO GmbH or Futurabond M+ in combination with the DCA activator “FBMD” (VOCO GmbH. One of three different types of composites – BifixSE (“BS”, BifixQM (“BQ” or GrandioSO (“G” (VOCO GmbH – was bonded to ten specimens each in every group. Shear bond strength (SBS was determined in a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA and the Tukey test. Results: FBM and FBMD gave higher SBS than CZ and FBU in combination with all tested composites. In comparison to FBU, FBM gave statistically significant increases in SBS with BifixSE (19.4±5.7 MPa (P

  1. Evaluation of effects of dentin bonding agents on microleakage in composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahlevan A.

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Dentin bonding agents create stronger bonding between dental composites and dentin. But, none of them can prevent the microleakage. The important factors of progressing microleakage are the stress of polymerization shrinkage of resin composite and removal of smear layer in total-etch technique. The aim of this study was the evaluation of the effect of experimental method (modifying smear layer and etching of enamel margin and comparison with the total-etch technique. In this experimental method, 60 extracted human molar teeth were disinfected. Then, class 5 cavities were prepared on the buccal surface and 1 mm above CEJ. The specimens were divided randomly to 6 groups with iO samples in each group. The specimens groups were:"n1- Scotchbond Muiti- Purpose Plus Adhesive System (S.B.M.P.P +Tetric composite"n2- S.B.M.P.P + Ariston composite"n3- Ariston liner + Ariston composite"n4- S.B.M.P.P without enamel and dentin etching + Tetric composite + rebonding with Flowable Tetric"n5- S.B.M.P.P without enamel and dentin etching + Ariston composite + rebonding with Flowable Tetric"n6- S.B.M.P.P without enamel and dentin etching + Tetric composite"nAfter finishing and polishing, the specimens were termocycled, stained with fushin, sectioned within the specimens and evaluated for dye penetration with stereomicroscope. Wilcoxon Sign and Kruskal Wallis tests were used for statistical analysis."nResults showed that group 3 had microleakage more than groups of 1, 2 and 5 (P<0.0 5 and this difference was significant. There was no significant difference among the other groups.

  2. Characterization of polysulfone-epoxy/amine interphase for bonding themoplastic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Immordino, K.M.; McKnight, S.H.; Gillespie, J.W. Jr. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Thermoplastic matrix composites offer several advantages over thermoset matrix composites such as higher interlaminar toughness and infinite shelf life and rapid manufacturing. However, traditional welding techniques for joining thermoplastics require intimate contact between the components, localized heating at the interface and moderate consolidation pressure. Assembly tolerances represent a challenge in scaling welding techniques to large structures where any gaps in the bondline may result in overheating and poor joint quality and performance. Thermoset adhesives offer a low pressure solution to fill gaps. However joining thermoplastic composite components with structural thermoset adhesives often requires elaborate surface treatment of the thermoplastic composite adherents. These surface treatments have several limitations in production environments including finite shelf life, cost, and possible restrictions on part size and shape. These limitations may potentially hinder the widespread use of these materials in structural applications. Other methods for enhancing the bond performance are available. Previous work at the authors` institution has shown that adhesion between thermoplastic composites and epoxy-based adhesives is improved in instances where polymer interdiffusion across the interface is suspected. The improved joint performance has been attributed to interfacial diffusion of the adhesive pre-polymers into the thermoplastic material during processing. Upon final cure, bonding is believed to be enhanced through entanglements between the thermoplastic polymer chains and the network structure of the adhesive. Optimization of this bonding process requires an understanding of the rate of diffusion of the adhesive prepolymers into the thermoplastic and the structure and properties of the interfacial region. This paper focuses on the diffusion study.

  3. Energy transfer, orbital angular momentum, and discrete current in a double-ring fiber array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeyev, C. N.; Volyar, A. V. [Taurida National V.I. Vernadsky University, Vernadsky Prospekt, 4, Simferopol, 95007, Crimea (Ukraine); Yavorsky, M. A. [Taurida National V.I. Vernadsky University, Vernadsky Prospekt, 4, Simferopol, 95007, Crimea (Ukraine); Universite Bordeaux and CNRS, LOMA, UMR 5798, FR-33400 Talence (France)

    2011-12-15

    We study energy transfer and orbital angular momentum of supermodes in a double-ring array of evanescently coupled monomode optical fibers. The structure of supermodes and the spectra of their propagation constants are obtained. The geometrical parameters of the array, at which the energy is mostly confined within the layers, are determined. The developed method for finding the supermodes of concentric arrays is generalized for the case of multiring arrays. The orbital angular momentum carried by a supermode of a double-ring array is calculated. The discrete lattice current is introduced. It is shown that the sum of discrete currents over the array is a conserved quantity. The connection of the total discrete current with orbital angular momentum of discrete optical vortices is made.

  4. Effect of Different Surface Treatments on Microtensile Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Normal and Fluorotic Enamel after Microabrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahshid Mohammadi Basir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to determine the effect of surface treatments such as tooth reduction and extending the etching time on microtensile bond strength (µTBS of composite resin to normal and fluorotic enamel after microabrasion. Materials and Methods: Fifty non-carious anterior teeth were classified into two groups of normal and fluorotic (n=25 using Thylstrup and Fejerskov index (TFI=4-6. Teeth in each group were treated with five modalities as follows and restored with OptiBond FL and Z350 composite resin: 1-Etching (30 seconds, bonding, filling (B; 2-Tooth reduction (0.3mm, etching, bonding, filling (R-B; 3-Microabrasion (120 seconds, etching, bonding, filling (M-B; 4- Microabrasion, tooth reduction, etching, bonding, filling (M-R-B; and 5- Microabrasion, etching (60 seconds, bonding, filling (M-2E-B. Ten experimental groups (n=5 were designed; 150 rectangular samples (10 in each group with a cross-sectional area of 1×1mm2 were prepared for µTBS test. Failure mode was determined under a stereomicroscope and one specimen was selected from each group for scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test.Results: The µTBS to normal enamel was higher than to fluorotic enamel in all groups except for group (R-B. The Maximum and minimum µTBS were noted in the group (normal, reduction, bonding and (fluorosed, microabrasion, bonding, respectively.  Tooth reduction increased µTBS more effectively than extended etching time after microabrasion. Conclusions: Fluorosis may reduce µTBS of composite resin to enamel. Microabrasion reduced the bond strength. Tooth reduction and extended etching time increased µTBS of composite resin to both normal and fluorotic enamel.Keywords: Fluorosis, Dental; Enamel Microabrasion; Dental Bonding; Composite Resins

  5. Oxygen inhibition layer of composite resins: effects of layer thickness and surface layer treatment on the interlayer bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijelic-Donova, Jasmina; Garoushi, Sufyan; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-02-01

    An oxygen inhibition layer develops on surfaces exposed to air during polymerization of particulate filling composite. This study assessed the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer of short-fiber-reinforced composite in comparison with conventional particulate filling composites. The effect of an oxygen inhibition layer on the shear bond strength of incrementally placed particulate filling composite layers was also evaluated. Four different restorative composites were selected: everX Posterior (a short-fiber-reinforced composite), Z250, SupremeXT, and Silorane. All composites were evaluated regarding the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer and for shear bond strength. An equal amount of each composite was polymerized in air between two glass plates and the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer was measured using a stereomicroscope. Cylindrical-shaped specimens were prepared for measurement of shear bond strength by placing incrementally two layers of the same composite material. Before applying the second composite layer, the first increment's bonding site was treated as follows: grinding with 1,000-grit silicon-carbide (SiC) abrasive paper, or treatment with ethanol or with water-spray. The inhibition depth was lowest (11.6 μm) for water-sprayed Silorane and greatest (22.9 μm) for the water-sprayed short-fiber-reinforced composite. The shear bond strength ranged from 5.8 MPa (ground Silorane) to 36.4 MPa (water-sprayed SupremeXT). The presence of an oxygen inhibition layer enhanced the interlayer shear bond strength of all investigated materials, but its absence resulted in cohesive and mixed failures only with the short-fiber-reinforced composite. Thus, more durable adhesion with short-fiber-reinforced composite is expected.

  6. Effect of surface treatments of laboratory-fabricated composites on the microtensile bond strength to a luting resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos José; Giannini, Marcelo; Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares de; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments on composite resin on the microtensile bond strength to a luting resin cement. Two laboratory composites for indirect restorations, Solidex and Targis, and a conventional composite, Filtek Z250, were tested. Forty-eight composite resin blocks (5.0 x 5.0 x 5.0mm) were incrementally manufactured, which were randomly divided into six groups, according to the surface treatments: 1- control, 600-grit SiC paper (C); 2- silane priming (SI); 3- sandblasting with 50 mm Al2O3 for 10s (SA); 4- etching with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 60 s (HF); 5- HF + SI; 6 - SA + SI. Composite blocks submitted to similar surface treatments were bonded together with the resin adhesive Single Bond and Rely X luting composite. A 500-g load was applied for 5 minutes and the samples were light-cured for 40s. The bonded blocks were serially sectioned into 3 slabs with 0.9mm of thickness perpendicularly to the bonded interface (n = 12). Slabs were trimmed to a dumbbell shape and tested in tension at 0.5mm/min. For all composites tested, the application of a silane primer after sandblasting provided the highest bond strength means.

  7. Synthesis of chemically bonded graphene/carbon nanotube composites and their application in large volumetric capacitance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Naeyoung; Kwon, Soongeun; Lee, Dongwook; Yoon, Dong-Myung; Park, Young Min; Benayad, Anass; Choi, Jae-Young; Park, Jong Se

    2013-12-17

    Chemically bonded graphene/carbon nanotube composites as flexible supercapacitor electrode materials are synthesized by amide bonding. Carbon nanotubes attached along the edges and onto the surface of graphene act as spacers to increase the electrolyte-accessible surface area. Our lamellar structure electrodes demonstrate the largest volumetric capacitance (165 F cm(-3) ) ever shown by carbon-based electrodes.

  8. Correlation between microstructure, phase composition and mechanical properties of thermo-insulation bonding agents based on waste material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terzić Anja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Building composites - thermo-insulating and/or high-temperature resistant bonding agents in which fly ash, as potentially environmentally harmful waste material, is combined with ordinary and refractory cement is new option for reapplication of this waste material. In this study, investigated bonding agents were based on two types of fly ashes from coal combustion process and cements - ordinary Portland cement and highaluminate cement. Change of mineral phase composition of the composites with increasing temperature was analyzed by means of XRD method. Microstructural changes within investigated composites were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Macro-performance - mechanical properties of the investigated bonding agents was finally correlated with its microstructure. The investigated bonding agents showed excellent compressive strength, while SEM and XRD analysis indicated its valuable refractory and thermo-insulation properties. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172057 i br. 45008

  9. Investigation on The Properties of Fe-Si3N4 Bonded SiC Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; FENG Di; PENG Dayan

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical properties of pressureless sintering Fe-Si3N4 bonded SiC and Si3 N4 bonded SiC with same manufacture process have been compared in this paper.The oxidizing mechanism of Fe-Si3 N4 bonded SiC ceramic matrix composite has been investigated especially through TG-DSC (thermo gravimetric analysis-differential scanning calorimeter) experiment. During oxidation procedure the main reaction is the oxidation of SiC and Si3N4, SiO2 which form protecting film to prevent further oxidizing. And residual iron in the samples become Fe2 O3 and Fe3O4, the oxidation kinetics at 1100 ~ 1300℃ of re-Si3 N4 bonded SiC has been studied especially. The weight gain per unit area at initial stage changes according to beeline rule, in the middle according to conic, and in the last oxidation period follows parabola rule.

  10. Interfacial fracture of dentin adhesively bonded to quartz-fiber reinforced composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Renata M. [Department of Dental Materials and Pronsthodontics at Sao Jose dos Campos Dental Shool, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo 12245-820 (Brazil); Rahbar, Nima, E-mail: nrahbar@umassd.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, Massachusetts 02720 (United States); Soboyejo, Wole [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2011-05-10

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of interfacial failure in a multilayered structure consisting of a dentin/resin cement/quartz-fiber reinforced composite (FRC). Slices of dentin close to the pulp chamber were sandwiched by two half-circle discs made of a quartz-fiber reinforced composite, bonded with bonding agent (All-bond 2, BISCO, Schaumburg) and resin cement (Duo-link, BISCO, Schaumburg) to make Brazil-nut sandwich specimens for interfacial toughness testing. Interfacial fracture toughness (strain energy release rate, G) was measured as a function of mode mixity by changing loading angles from 0 deg. to 15 deg. The interfacial fracture surfaces were then examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) to determine the failure modes when loading angles changed. A computational model was also developed to calculate the driving forces, stress intensity factors and mode mixities. Interfacial toughness increased from {approx} 1.5 to 3.2 J/m{sup 2} when the loading angle increases from {approx} 0 to 15 deg. The hybridized dentin/cement interface appeared to be tougher than the resin cement/quartz-fiber reinforced epoxy. The Brazil-nut sandwich specimen was a suitable method to investigate the mechanical integrity of dentin/cement/FRC interfaces.

  11. Effectiveness of bonding fiber posts to root canals and composite core build-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathke, Andreas; Haj-Omer, Dima; Muche, Rainer; Haller, Bernd

    2009-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of fiber posts, silanization, and luting agents on the interfacial strength to root dentin and composite cores. Root canals of 120 crownless human teeth were instrumented. Three different posts (opaque and translucent), with and without silane treatment, were bonded using etch-and-rinse, self-etch, and self-adhesive luting agents. The restored roots were built up with dual-curing composite. After storage in water for 24 h at 37 degrees C, 2-mm-thick slices were cut from each sample: one from the composite core and one from the restored root. Interfacial push-out bond strengths of the posts were determined in a universal testing machine. Failure modes were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The post type and the luting agent had significant effects on both the post-to-dentin and post-to-core strengths. Silanization did not significantly influence post-to-dentin strengths, but enhanced post-to-core strengths. With etch-and-rinse luting agents, debonding occurred predominantly between the post and the cement, while the self-etch and self-adhesive luting agents showed more failures on root dentin. No failures occurred between the composite core and the cement. The combination of translucent posts and etch-and-rinse dual-curing luting agents can positively influence the retention of fiber posts in root canals. Silanization seems to be less relevant for intra-root canal bonding, but may have beneficial effects on post-to-core strengths.

  12. Preliminary evaluation of adhesion strength measurement devices for ceramic/titanium matrix composite bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlchuck, Bobby; Zeller, Mary V.

    1992-01-01

    The adhesive bond between ceramic cement and a titanium matrix composite substrate to be used in the National Aerospace Plane program is evaluated. Two commercially available adhesion testers, the Sebastian Adherence Tester and the CSEM REVETEST Scratch Tester, are evaluated to determine their suitability for quantitatively measuring adhesion strength. Various thicknesses of cements are applied to several substrates, and bond strengths are determined with both testers. The Sabastian Adherence Tester has provided limited data due to an interference from the sample mounting procedure, and has been shown to be incapable of distinguishing adhesion strength from tensile and shear properties of the cement itself. The data from the scratch tester has been found to be difficult to interpret due to the porosity and hardness of the cement. Recommendations are proposed for a more reliable adhesion test method.

  13. Characterization of debond growth mechanism in adhesively bonded composites under mode II static and fatigue loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, S.; Kochhar, N. K.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation of adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize the debond growth mechanism under mode II static and fatigue loadings. For this purpose, end-notched flexure specimens of graphite/epoxy (T300/5208) adherends bonded with EC 3445 adhesive were tested. In all specimen tested, the fatigue failure occurred in the form of cyclic debonding. The present study confirmed the result of previous studies that total strain-energy-release rate is the driving parameter for cyclic debonding. Further, the debond growth resistance under cyclic loading with full shear reversal (i.e., stress ratio, R = -1) is drastically reduced in comparison to the case when subjected to cyclic shear loading with no shear reversal (i.e., R = 0.1).

  14. Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadizenouz, Ghazaleh; Esmaeili, Behnaz; Taghvaei, Arnica; Jamali, Zahra; Jafari, Toloo; Amiri Daneshvar, Farshid; Khafri, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Background. Repairing aged composite resin is a challenging process. Many surface treatment options have been proposed to this end. This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS) of nano-filled composite resin repairs. Methods. Seventy-five cylindrical specimens of a Filtek Z350XT composite resin were fabricated and stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours. After thermocycling, the specimens were divided into 5 groups according to the following surface treatments: no treatment (group 1); air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles (group 2); irradiation with Er:YAG laser beams (group 3); roughening with coarse-grit diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid (group 4); and etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 120 s (group 5). Another group of Filtek Z350XT composite resin samples (4×6 mm) was fabricated for the measurement of cohesive strength (group 6). A silane coupling agent and an adhesive system were applied after each surface treatment. The specimens were restored with the same composite resin and thermocycled again. A shearing force was applied to the interface in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P composite resin used.

  15. In-Vitro Evaluation of the Effect of Herbal Antioxidants on Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Bleached Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Khamverdi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A reduction in bond strength of composite to bleached enamel has been reported immediately after bleaching treatment. Application of some antioxidant agents may decrease the adverse effects of whitening agents on bond strength and enhance composite bond to enamel. This study aimed to assess the effect of green tea, sodium ascorbate, sage and grape seed extract on bond strength of composite to bleached enamel.Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, 90 human enamel surfaces were randomly divided into six groups as follows (n=15: G1, no bleaching; G2, bleaching with 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP; G3, HP+1000 μmol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG for 10 minutes; G4, HP+10% sodium ascorbate for 10 minutes; G5, HP+10% sage for 10 minutes and G6, HP+5% grape seed extract for 10 minutes. The specimens were bonded to composite in all groups. The shear bond strength of specimens was measured in Megapascals (MPa. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD test (α=0.05.Results: The highest and the lowest mean shear bond strength values were observed in group 1 (22.61±3.29MPa and group 2 (5.87±1.80MPa, respectively. The reduction in bond strength in group 2 was greater than that in other groups (P<0.001. No significant difference was found among groups 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6 (P>0.05. Conclusions: All the herbal antioxidants used in this study equally compensated for the reduced bond strength of composite to bleached enamel.Keywords: Antioxidants; Tooth Bleaching; Composite Resins; Shear Strength 

  16. Development of structural health monitoring systems for composite bonded repairs on aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Stephen C.; Powlesland, Ian G.; Moss, Scott D.; Konak, Michael J.; van der Velden, Stephen P.; Stade, Bryan; Baker, Alan A.

    2001-08-01

    The application of bonded composite patches to repair or reinforce defective metallic structures is becoming recognized as a very effective versatile repair procedure for many types of problems. Immediate applications of bonded patches are in the fields of repair of cracking, localized reinforcement after removal of corrosion damage and for reduction of fatigue strain. However, bonded repairs to critical components are generally limited due to certification concerns. For certification and management of repairs to critical structure, the Smart Patch approach may be an acceptable solution from the airworthiness prospective and be cost effective for the operator and may even allow some relaxation of the certification requirements. In the most basic form of the Smart Patch in-situ sensors can be used as the nerve system to monitor in service the structural condition (health or well-being) of the patch system and the status of the remaining damage in the parent structure. This application would also allow the operator to move away from current costly time-based maintenance procedures toward real-time health condition monitoring of the bonded repair and the repaired structure. TO this end a stand-alone data logger device, for the real-time health monitoring of bonded repaired systems, which is in close proximity to sensors on a repair is being developed. The instrumentation will measure, process and store sensor measurements during flight and then allow this data to be up-loaded, after the flight, onto a PC, via remote (wireless) data access. This paper describes two in-situ health monitoring systems which will be used on a composite bonded patch applied to an F/A-18. The two systems being developed consists of a piezoelectric (PVDF) film-based and a conventional electrical-resistance foil strain gauge-based sensing system. The latter system uses a primary cell (Lithium- based battery) as the power source, which should enable an operating life of 1-2 years. The patch

  17. Post silanization improves bond strength of translucent posts to flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaladejo, Alberto; Osorio, Raquel; Papacchini, Federica; Goracci, Cecilia; Toledano, Manuel; Ferrari, Marco

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of post silanization on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of translucent fiber posts to seven flowable composite resins used as core material. Seventy fiber posts were employed. In half of the posts, silanization was performed with Monobond-S. A cylindrical plastic matrix was placed around the post and filled with different resins: UniFil Flow Experimental, UniFil Low Flow Plus Experimental, Venus Flow, Revolution Formula 2, Point 4 Flowable, X-Flow, and Wave mv. Five posts were bonded per group. After polymerization, two longitudinal cuts were made on two opposite sides of the post at its outermost periphery. Then, each specimen was serially sectioned, obtaining 30-35 beams with 1-mm(2) cross-sectional area. Each beam was tested in tension in an Instron machine at 0.5 mm/min. ANOVA and Student Newman Keuls tests were performed. The different resin composite materials and the post silanization procedure had a significant effect on MTBS. The application of a silane coupling agent increased MTBS of flowable composite resins to translucent posts. X-flow and Point 4 attained the highest MTBS regardless of the silane treatment.

  18. The effect of various primers on shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic and resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasiwimol Sanohkan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine the in vitro shear bond strengths (SBS of zirconia ceramic to resin composite after various primer treatments. Materials and Methods: Forty zirconia ceramic (Zeno, Wieland Dental specimens (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were prepared, sandblasted with 50 μm alumina, and divided into four groups (n = 10. Three experimental groups were surface treated with three primers; CP (RelyX Ceramic Primer, 3M ESPE, AP (Alloy Primer, Kuraray Medical, and MP (Monobond Plus, Ivoclar Vivadent AG. One group was not treated and served as the control. All specimens were bonded to a resin composite (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE cylinder with an adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive, 3M ESPE and then stored in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 h before SBS testing in a universal testing machine. Mean SBS (MPa were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and the Tukey′s Honestly Significant Difference (HSD test (α = 0.05. Results: Group AP yielded the highest mean and standard deviation (SD value of SBS (16.8 ± 2.5 MPa and Group C presented the lowest mean and SD value (15.4 ± 1.6 MPa. The SBS did not differ significantly among the groups (P = 0.079. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, the SBS values between zirconia ceramic to resin composite using various primers and untreated surface were not significantly different.

  19. Microtensile bond strength of quartz fiber posts to different composite cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Khamverdi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the microtensile bond strength of quartz fiber posts to different composites, and to composite combinations used as core materials. Thirty fiber posts were treated with a 24% hydrogen peroxide solution and silanized. The posts were divided into 5 groups according to the resin composite used as follows (n = 6: G1 - Ælite Flow (Bisco, Inc, G2 - Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE, G3 - Biscore (Bisco, Inc, G4 - Ælite Flow + Filtek Z250, G5 - Ælite Flow + Biscore. The resin composites were placed around the posts to produce cylindrical specimens. Two 1-mm² thick sticks containing the post in the center and composite cores on both ends were provided from each cylinder and tested for microtensile strength with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests were used for statistical analysis. Fractured surfaces were observed using a stereomicroscope with 20× magnification. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to evaluate the interface of the fractured sticks. The results showed that G2 had the highest bond strength values, and the lowest values were seen with G3. There were significant differences between groups 1, 2, 4 and groups 3, 5 (p < 0.05. Under the stereomicroscope, most of the failures were adhesive between the post and core material. Under SEM, Ælite and Z250 had smoother surfaces than Biscore, containing less porosities and voids.

  20. Reliability Analysis for Adhesive Bonded Composite Stepped Lap Joints Loaded in Fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimiaeifar, Amin; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Lund, Erik

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a probabilistic approach to calculate the reliability of adhesive bonded composite stepped lap joints loaded in fatigue using three- dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). A method for progressive damage modelling is used to assess fatigue damage accumulation and residual...... strength under fully reversed cyclic loading based on stiffness/strength degradation. The FEA simulations are conducted using the commercial FEA code ANSYS 12.1. A design equation for fatigue failure of wind turbine blades is chosen based on recommendations given in the wind turbine standard IEC 61400...

  1. Strain analysis of a bonded, dissimilar, composite material T-joint using moiré interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascoigne, H. E.; Abdallah, M. G.

    High-sensitivity moiré interferometry and finite-element analysis are used to analyze the state of deformation and stress in the region of contact between a plane orthotropic rectangular punch bonded to a foundation with dissimilar elastic properties which models a highly loaded region of a composite material rocket motor casing. Stress distributions are presented for the contact region and an estimate of the maximum shear stress in the foundation is given. The displacement components show good qualitative agreement between analysis and experiment. The lack of quantitative agreement between the experimental and the finite-element analysis is attributed to uncertainty of the material properties.

  2. Influence of 10-MDP Adhesive System on Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia-Composite Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Philipp Cornelius Pott; Meike Stiesch; Michael Eisenburger

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This in-vitro study investigated the initial 24h bond strength between different composites and zirconia after application of four different adhesive systems. Methods: A total of 120 specimens of zirconia (InCoris, Sirona, Germany, Bernsheim) were ground with a 165 µm grit rotating diamond disc. Thirty specimens were each additionally treated with Cimara Zircon “CZ” (VOCO GmbH, Germany, Cuxhaven), Futurabond U “FBU” (VOCO GmbH), Futurabond M+ “FBM” (VOCO GmbH) or Futurabond M+ i...

  3. Effect of Different Surface Treatments on Microtensile Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Normal and Fluorotic Enamel After Microabrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassir, Mahshid Mohammadi; Rezvani, Mohammad Bagher; Hosseini, Zahra Malek

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to determine the effect of surface treatments such as tooth reduction and extending the etching time on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of composite resin to normal and fluorotic enamel after microabrasion. Materials and Methods: Fifty non-carious anterior teeth were classified into two groups of normal and fluorotic (n=25) using Thylstrup and Fejerskov index (TFI=4–6). Teeth in each group were treated with five modalities as follows and restored with OptiBond FL and Z350 composite resin: 1-Etching (30 seconds), bonding, filling (B); 2-Tooth reduction (0.3mm), etching, bonding, filling (R-B); 3-Microabrasion (120 seconds), etching, bonding, filling (MB); 4- Microabrasion, tooth reduction, etching, bonding, filling (M-R-B); and 5- Microabrasion, etching (60 seconds), bonding, filling (M-2E-B). Ten experimental groups (n=5) were designed; 150 rectangular samples (10 in each group) with a cross-sectional area of 1×1mm2 were prepared for μTBS test. Failure mode was determined under a stereomicroscope and one specimen was selected from each group for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: The μTBS to normal enamel was higher than to fluorotic enamel in all groups except for group (R-B). The Maximum and minimum μTBS were noted in the group (normal, reduction, bonding) and (fluorosed, microabrasion, bonding), respectively. Tooth reduction increased μTBS more effectively than extended etching time after microabrasion. Conclusions: Fluorosis may reduce μTBS of composite resin to enamel. Microabrasion reduced the bond strength. Tooth reduction and extended etching time increased μTBS of composite resin to both normal and fluorotic enamel. PMID:28243305

  4. The bond strength of highly filled flowable composites placed in two different configuration factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Sagsoz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS of different flowable composite resins placed in different configuration factors (C-factors into Class I cavities. Materials and Methods: Fifty freshly extracted human molars were divided into 10 groups. Five different composite resins; a universal flowable composite (AeliteFlo, BISCO, two highly filled flowable composites (GrandioSO Flow, VOCO; GrandioSO Heavy Flow, VOCO, a bulk-fill flowable composite (smart dentin replacement [SDR], Dentsply, and a conventional paste-like composite (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE were placed into Class I cavities (4 mm deep with 1 mm or 2 mm layers. Restored teeth were sectioned vertically with a slow-speed diamond saw (Isomet 1000, Buehler and four micro-specimens (1 mm × 1 mm were obtained from each tooth (n = 20. Specimens were subjected to μTBS test. Data were recorded and statistically analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Tukey′s post-hoc test. Fractured surfaces were examined using a scanning electron microscope. Results: The μTBS in SDR-1 mm were higher than other groups, where Filtek Supreme XT-2 mm and GrandioSO Flow-2 mm were lower. No significant differences were found between C-factors for any composite resin (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Bulk-fill flowable composite provided more satisfactory μTBS than others. Different C-factors did not affect mean μTBS of the materials tested.

  5. Assessment of the fiber matrix interface bond strength in SiC/Ti-6Al-4V composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warrier, S.G.; Krishnamurthy, S. [Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH (United States). Air Force Res. Lab.]|[UES, Inc., 4401 Dayton-Xenia Road, Dayton, OH (United States); Rangaswamy, P.; Bourke, M.A.M. [Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH (United States). Air Force Res. Lab.]|[LANSCE, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1999-01-31

    The mechanical properties of composites are significantly influenced by the properties of the fiber/matrix interface. From a fundamental as well as an interface development standpoint it is necessary to determine the bond strength of interface. The calculated value of the interface bond strength is extremely sensitive to the value of the compressive radial residual stress at the interface since this residual stress has to be overcome before interface separation can occur. In this study, neutron diffraction was employed to measure radial residual stresses in SCS-6/Ti-6Al-4V composites. A combination of stress measurements, finite element analyses and transverse tension tests was employed to systematically evaluate the interface bond strength. The fiber vertical stroke matrix interface bond strength for SCS-6/Ti-6Al-4V composites was determined to be about 140 MPa. (orig.) 36 refs.

  6. Composite resin bond strength to tooth structure treated with an erbium,chromium:YSGG-laser-powered hydrokinetic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sean; Caputo, Angelo A.; Rizoiu, Ioana-Mihaela; Eversole, Lewis R.

    1998-04-01

    Er;YAG and Er,Cr;YSGG Lasers that emit in the near red wave lengths cut both enamel and dentine. Dental preparations are often restored with composite resins that bond to enamel. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the shear strength of composite resin bonded to tooth structure cut by an Er,Cr;YSGG powered hydrokinetic system (HKS), (Millennium SystemTM, BioLase Technology, Inc, San Clemente, CA) as compared to surfaces cut with a carbide bur. Extracted human molars devoid of caries and restorations were treated with both systems, with and without acid etching. Shear bond strengths (SBS) for composite resin adherence to these surfaces were measured and compared. There was no significant difference between bur and HKS prepared surfaces in the etched enamel group. The SBS for composite bonded to nonetched enamel was significantly higher with the HKS treatment compared with the bur cut surfaces. There were no significant differences between acid etched bur cut and non etched HKS enamel surfaces. Bonded to nonetched dentin was found to be higher for bur cut surfaces. It is concluded that the Er,Cr;YSGG hydrokinetic system produces surface characteristics that allow for adequate bonding of composite resin to both etched and nonetched enamel.

  7. Cu-(B4Cp metal matrix composites processed by accumulative roll-bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mansourzadeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Cu/B4C metal matrix composites were prepared by accumulative roll-bonding (ARB. The microstructure of the processed samples was characterized by TEM, SEM and optical microscopy. The microhardness, uniaxial tensile and four-point probe tests were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties and electrical resistivity of the ARBed monolithic and composite samples. The results showed that the reinforcement distribution was improved by increasing ARB cycles, which was quantitatively confirmed by some models. Based on TEM observations, the formation of an ultrafine grained structure in the composite matrix was also approved. It was shown that with increasing ARB cycles, the microhardness and tensile strength of the monolithic Cu samples were enhanced up to the 3rd cycle and then saturated, but the microhardness and tensile strength of the composites showed an increasing trend to the last cycle. Apart from a substantial improvement in the mechanical properties of the Cu/B4C composites, a minor decrement in electrical conductivity was detected after six ARB cycles.

  8. Enhancing the separation performance by introducing bioadhesive bonding layer in composite pervaporation membranes for ethanol dehydration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Wu; Tiantian Zhou; Xianshi Li; Cuihong Zhao; Zhongyi Jiang

    2015-01-01

    A high performance composite membrane was prepared under the inspiration of bioadhesion principles for pervaporative dehydration of ethanol. Chitosan (CS) and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) ultrafiltration membranes were used as the active layer and the support layer, respectively. Guar gum (GG), a natural bioadhesive, was in-troduced as the intermediate bonding layer to improve the separation performance and stability of the fabricated CS/GG/PAN composite membranes. The contact angle of the GG layer was just between those of the CS layer and the PAN layer, minimizing the difference of hydrophilicity between the active layer and the support layer. The peeling strength of the composite membrane was significantly enhanced after the introduction of the GG layer. The effects of preparation conditions and operation conditions including GG concentration, operating tempera-ture and ethanol concentration in feed on the pervaporation performance were investigated. The as-fabricated CS/GG/PAN composite membrane showed the optimum performance with a permeation flux of up to 804 g·m−2·h−1 and a separation factor higher than 1900. Besides, the composite membranes exhibited a desir-able long-term operational stability.

  9. Photocatalytic properties of TiO2 bonded active carbon composites prepared by SOL-GEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李佑稷; 李效东; 李君文; 尹静

    2004-01-01

    Photocatalyst of TiO2 bonded active carbon (TiO2/AC), was prepared via sol-gel method from a mixture of TiO2 sol with active carbon. Post heat treatment was performed at 250 ℃ for 2 h in air and then kept at 400 ℃ to 600 ℃ under a flow of nitrogen for 2 h. The TiO2/AC composites obtained were characterized by SEM, XRD, UV-vis and BET. The photocatalytic activities of the TiO2/AC composites were studied in comparison with TiO2, AC,P-25 and a mixture of TiO2 and AC, respectively. The Ramnant rate of Rhodamine B absorbed by the active carbon is found to be almost 70% and the remnant rates of the Rhodamine B decolorized by TiO2 and the mixture of TiO2 and the active carbon are 30% and 25%, respectively. However, nearly complete removal of Rhodamine B is observed for a TiO2/AC composite after 200 min under UV irradiation, which will take the P-25 commercial product 5 h. Therefore, the TiO2/AC composite is much more effective in decolorization of aqueous Rhodamine B. In addition, the composite can be easily separated from solutions.

  10. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resin Bonded to Alloy Treated With Sandblasting and Electrolytic Etching

    OpenAIRE

    Goswami, M. M.; Gupta, S.H.; Sandhu, H. S.

    2013-01-01

    Conservation of natural tooth structure precipitated the emergence of resin-retained fixed partial dentures. The weakest link in this modality is the bond between resin cement and alloy of the retainer. Various alloy surface treatment have been recommended to improve alloy–resin bond. This in vitro study was carried out to observe changes in the Nickel–Chromium alloy (Wiron 99, Bego) surface following sandblasting or electrolytic etching treatment by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and to ...

  11. Evaluation of shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to alloy treated with sandblasting and electrolytic etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, M M; Gupta, S H; Sandhu, H S

    2014-03-01

    Conservation of natural tooth structure precipitated the emergence of resin-retained fixed partial dentures. The weakest link in this modality is the bond between resin cement and alloy of the retainer. Various alloy surface treatment have been recommended to improve alloy-resin bond. This in vitro study was carried out to observe changes in the Nickel-Chromium alloy (Wiron 99, Bego) surface following sandblasting or electrolytic etching treatment by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and to evaluate the shear bond strength of a resin luting cement bonded to the surface treated alloy. 80 alloy blocks were cast and divided into four groups of 20 each. In groups-A & B, the test surfaces were treated by sandblasting with 50 and 250 μm sized aluminium oxide particles respectively. In groups-C & D, the test surfaces were first treated by sandblasting with 50 and 250 μm sized aluminium oxide particles respectively followed by electrolytic etching. Test surfaces were observed under SEM at 1,000× magnification. Two alloy blocks of each group were luted together by a resin luting cement (Rely X, 3M) and their shear bond strength was tested. The mean shear bond strength in MPa of groups-A to D were 6.44 (±0.74), 8.18 (±0.51), 14.45 (±0.59) and 17.43 (±1.20) respectively. Group-D showed bond strength that is more than clinically acceptable bond strength. It is recommended that before luting resin-retained fixed partial dentures, the fitting surface of the retainer should be electrolytically etched to achieve adequate micromechanical retention.

  12. Relationship between degree of polymerization of resin composite and bond strength to Gluma-treated dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, T; Finger, W J

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between shear bond strength (SBS) to dentin and degree of polymerization of resin adjacent to the coupling interface. A hybrid-type resin composite was polymerized on Gluma-treated dentin at thicknesses of 1, 2, 3 and 5 mm, respectively, with seven different light activation times (LAT) from 3 through 180 seconds. SBS of the specimens was determined 10 minutes after the end of light activation. The degree of polymerization of resin close to the dentin interface was determined by Wallace Indentation Depth (WID) of specimens polymerized under the same conditions as the SBS samples, however, separated from the dentin surface by a thin glass plate. Consistent relationships were found for SBS vs. LAT and WID vs. LAT by regression analyses (y = A+B/x). There was a strong linear correlation between SBS and WID (r = -0.93), indicating that the early bond strength to Gluma-treated dentin is a function of mechanical characteristics of resin close to the bonding interface.

  13. Excellent bonding behaviour of novel surface-tailored fibre composite rods with cementitious matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fernando Cunha; Sohel Rana; Raul Fangueiro; Graça Vasconcelos

    2014-08-01

    Novel composite rods were produced by a special braiding technique that involves braiding of polyester yarns around a core of resin-impregnated carbon fibres and subsequent curing. The surface roughness of these braided rods was tailored by replacing one or two simple yarns in the outer-braided layer with braided yarns (produced from 8 simple yarns) and adjusting the take-up velocity. Pull-out tests were carried out to characterize the bond behaviour of these composite rods with cementitious matrix. It was observed that the rod produced with two braided yarns in the outer cover and highest take-up speed was ruptured completely before pull-out, leading to full utilization of its tensile strength, and exhibited 134% higher pull-out force as compared to the rods produced using only simple braiding yarns.

  14. Bio-Inspired Composite Interfaces: Controlling Hydrogel Mechanics via Polymer-Nanoparticle Coordination Bond Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holten-Andersen, Niels

    2015-03-01

    In soft nanocomposite materials, the effective interaction between polymer molecules and inorganic nanoparticle surfaces plays a critical role in bulk mechanical properties. However, controlling these interfacial interactions remains a challenge. Inspired by the adhesive chemistry in mussel threads, we present a novel approach to control composite mechanics via polymer-particle interfacial dynamics; by incorporating iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) into a catechol-modified polymer network the resulting hydrogels are crosslinked via reversible coordination bonds at Fe3O4 NP surfaces thereby providing a dynamic gel network with robust self-healing properties. By studying the thermally activated composite network relaxation processes we have found that the polymer-NP binding energy can be controlled by engineering both the organic and inorganic side of the interface.

  15. SEM/XPS analysis of fractured adhesively bonded graphite fibre-reinforced polyimide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Messick, D. L.; Wightman, J. P.; Progar, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The surfaces of the graphite fiber-reinforced polyimide composites presently pretreated prior to bonding with polyimide adhesive contained variable amounts of a fluoropolymer, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Lap shear strengths were determined for unaged samples and for those aged over 500- and 1000-hour periods at 177 and 232 C. Unaged sample lap strengths, which were the highest obtained, exhibited no variation with surface pretreatment, but a significant decrease is noted with increasing aging temperature. These thermally aged samples, however, had increased surface fluorine concentration, while a minimal concentration was found in unaged samples. SEM demonstrated a progressive shift from cohesive to adhesive failure for elevated temperature-aged composites.

  16. Effects of surface conditioning on repair bond strengths of non-aged and aged microhybrid, nanohybrid, and nanofilled composite resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinastiti, Margareta; Siswomihardjo, Widowati; Busscher, Henk J.; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates effects of aging on repair bond strengths of microhybrid, nanohybrid, and nanofilled composite resins and characterizes the interacting surfaces after aging. Disk-shaped composite specimens were assigned to one of three aging conditions: (1) thermocycling (5,000x, 5-55 degrees C

  17. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength and nanoleakage of conventional and self-adhering flowable composites to primary teeth dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Sachdeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The latest advancement in adhesive dentistry is the development of self adhering flowable composite resin which incorporates the self-etch adhesion technology to eliminate the steps of etching, rinsing, priming and bonding. Few studies have addressed resin bonding to primary teeth. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength and nanoleakage of conventional and self adhering flowable composites to primary teeth dentin. Settings and Design: This study was conducted in the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, I.T.S Dental College, Hospital and Research Centre, Greater Noida; in association with the Department of Mechanical Engineering, I.T.S Engineering College, Greater Noida; and the Advanced Instrumentation Research Facility (AIRF, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. Materials and Methods: Sixty of the ninety primary teeth were evaluated for shear bond strength and thirty for nanoleakage. The samples were divided into three groups; Group I - Dyad Flow (Kerr, Group II - Fusio Liquid Dentin (Pentron Clinical Technologies and Group III - G-aenial Universal Flo (GC. Shear bond strength was determined using a universal testing machine. Nanoleakage pattern was observed under scanning electron microscope. Results: The shear bond strength of conventional flowable composite was significantly greater than self adhering flowable composite (p<0.05. Nanoleakage scores of both conventional and self adhering flowable composites were comparable. Conclusions: Self adhering flowable composites combine properties of composites and self etch adhesives, eliminating the need for separate bond application that simplifies direct restorative procedure. The evolution of self adhering materials could open new horizons for pediatric dentistry.

  18. Effect of saliva contamination on bond strength witha hydrophilic composite resin

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    Mauren Bitencourt Deprá

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of saliva contamination on the bond strength of metallic brackets bonded to enamel with hydrophilic resin composite. METHODS: Eighty premolars were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 20 according to bonding material and contamination: G1 bonded with Transbond XT with no saliva contamination, G2 bonded with Transbond XT with saliva contamination, G3 bonded with Transbond Plus Color Change with no saliva contamination and G4 bonded with Transbond Plus Color Change with saliva contamination. The results were statistically analyzed (ANOVA/Tukey. RESULTS: The means and standard deviations (MPa were: G110.15 ± 3.75; G2 6.8 ± 2.54; G3 9.3 ± 3.36; G4 8.3 ± 2.95. The adhesive remnant index (ARI ranged between 0 and 1 in G1 and G4. In G2 there was a prevalence of score 0 and similar ARI distribution in G3. CONCLUSION: Saliva contamination reduced bond strength when Transbond XT hydrophobic resin composite was used. However, the hydrophilic resin Transbond Plus Color Change was not affected by the contamination.OBJETIVO: avaliar a influência da contaminação por saliva na resistência de união de braquetes metálicos colados ao esmalte com um compósito resinoso hidrofílico. MÉTODOS: oitenta pré-molares foram divididos aleatoriamente em quatro grupos (n=20, de acordo com o material de colagem e a presença de contaminação - G1 colagem com Transbond XT na ausência de contaminação; G2 colagem com Transbond XT na presença de contaminação; G3 colagem com Transbond Plus Color Change na ausência de contaminação; G4 colagem com Transbond Plus Color Change na presença de contaminação. Os resultados foram tratados estatisticamente (ANOVA/Tukey. RESULTADOS: as médias e desvios-padrão (MPa foram G1 = 10,15 ± 3,75; G2 = 6,8 ± 2,54; G3 = 9,3 ± 3,36; G4 = 8,3 ± 2,95. O índice de adesivo remanescente (IAR variou entre 0 e 1 no G1 e no G4; no G2, houve predomínio do escore 0 e distribuição similar no

  19. A Nonlinear Finite Element Method for Magnetoelectric Composite and the Study on the Influence of Interfacial Bonding

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    He-Ling Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoelectric composite material is effective in transferring magnetic field into electric signal. In this paper, a nonlinear finite element method is present to model the magnetoelectric composite of ferroelectric and magnetostrictive material. In the method, the nonlinear and coupling behavior of magnetostrictive material such as Terfenol-D is considered. The nonuniform magnetic, electric, and mechanical field distributions are present. An interfacial transferring coefficient is defined to investigate the performance of interfacial mechanical coupling quantitatively, and the influence of the properties of interfacial bonding material and interfacial cracks on magnetoelectric coefficient is discussed. A new laminate ME composite of curved interface is proposed to overcome weak interfacial bonding.

  20. Effects of bonding agent types and incremental techniques on minimizing contraction gaps around resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torstenson, B; Oden, A

    1989-07-01

    In this in vitro study, large rectangular cavities were prepared on the proximal surfaces of human premolars with cervical margins placed beyond the cemento-enamel junction. Before the insertion of resin composite, the cavity walls were treated with Bowen's system, Scotchbond, or Gluma combined with different bonding agents. Various incremental techniques were tested. The contraction gap was determined by use of the resin impregnation technique: After polymerization shrinkage, a low-viscosity resin with a fluorescent additive was applied to the cervical and occlusal margins to penetrate the contraction gap. After being ground, the width of fluorescent resin could be measured with a microscope. All combinations of materials and techniques produced contraction gaps at the cervical wall. The range for mean width of the impregnated gap at the cervical wall was from 5 to 13 microns. The lowest mean value was obtained for Gluma in combination with Clearfil Bonding Agent. Placement of the composite in two increments significantly reduced the gap width. No reduction was achieved when a three-step insertion technique was used.

  1. Temporary zinc oxide-eugenol cement: eugenol quantity in dentin and bond strength of resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Tamara; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Malinovskii, Vladimir; Flury, Simon; Häner, Robert; Lussi, Adrian

    2013-08-01

    Uptake of eugenol from eugenol-containing temporary materials may reduce the adhesion of subsequent resin-based restorations. This study investigated the effect of duration of exposure to zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) cement on the quantity of eugenol retained in dentin and on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of the resin composite. The ZOE cement (IRM Caps) was applied onto the dentin of human molars (21 per group) for 1, 7, or 28 d. One half of each molar was used to determine the quantity of eugenol (by spectrofluorimetry) and the other half was used for μTBS testing. The ZOE-exposed dentin was treated with either OptiBond FL using phosphoric acid (H₃PO₄) or with Gluma Classic using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) conditioning. One group without conditioning (for eugenol quantity) and two groups not exposed to ZOE (for eugenol quantity and μTBS testing) served as controls. The quantity of eugenol ranged between 0.33 and 2.9 nmol mg⁻¹ of dentin (median values). No effect of the duration of exposure to ZOE was found. Conditioning with H₃PO₄ or EDTA significantly reduced the quantity of eugenol in dentin. Nevertheless, for OptiBond FL, exposure to ZOE significantly decreased the μTBS, regardless of the duration of exposure. For Gluma Classic, the μTBS decreased after exposure to ZOE for 7 and 28 d. OptiBond FL yielded a significantly higher μTBS than did Gluma Classic. Thus, ZOE should be avoided in cavities later to be restored with resin-based materials.

  2. Polymer composition and substrate influences on the adhesive bonding of a biomimetic, cross-linking polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos-Pérez, Cristina R; White, James D; Wilker, Jonathan J

    2012-06-06

    Hierarchical biological materials such as bone, sea shells, and marine bioadhesives are providing inspiration for the assembly of synthetic molecules into complex structures. The adhesive system of marine mussels has been the focus of much attention in recent years. Several catechol-containing polymers are being developed to mimic the cross-linking of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) used by shellfish for sticking to rocks. Many of these biomimetic polymer systems have been shown to form surface coatings or hydrogels; however, bulk adhesion is demonstrated less often. Developing adhesives requires addressing design issues including finding a good balance between cohesive and adhesive bonding interactions. Despite the growing number of mussel-mimicking polymers, there has been little effort to generate structure-property relations and gain insights on what chemical traits give rise to the best glues. In this report, we examine the simplest of these biomimetic polymers, poly[(3,4-dihydroxystyrene)-co-styrene]. Pendant catechol groups (i.e., 3,4-dihydroxystyrene) are distributed throughout a polystyrene backbone. Several polymer derivatives were prepared, each with a different 3,4-dihyroxystyrene content. Bulk adhesion testing showed where the optimal middle ground of cohesive and adhesive bonding resides. Adhesive performance was benchmarked against commercial glues as well as the genuine material produced by live mussels. In the best case, bonding was similar to that obtained with cyanoacrylate "Krazy Glue". Performance was also examined using low- (e.g., plastics) and high-energy (e.g., metals, wood) surfaces. The adhesive bonding of poly[(3,4-dihydroxystyrene)-co-styrene] may be the strongest of reported mussel protein mimics. These insights should help us to design future biomimetic systems, thereby bringing us closer to development of bone cements, dental composites, and surgical glues.

  3. An adhesive bond state classification method for a composite skin-to-spar joint using chaotic insonification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasel, Timothy R.; Todd, Michael D.

    2010-07-01

    The combination of chaotically amplitude-modulated ultrasonic waves and time series prediction algorithms has shown the ability to locate and classify various bond state damage conditions of a composite bonded joint. This study examines the ability of a new two-part supervised learning classification scheme not only to classify disbond size but also to classify whether a bond for which there is no baseline data is undamaged or has some form of disbond. This classification is performed using data from a similarly configured composite bond for which baseline data are available. The test structures are analogous to a wing skin-to-spar bonded joint. An active excitation signal is imparted to the structure through a macro fiber composite (MFC) patch on one side of the bonded joint and sensed using an equivalent MFC patch on the opposite side of the joint. There is an MFC actuator/sensor pair for each bond condition to be identified. The classification approach compares features derived from an autoregressive (AR) model coefficient vector cross-assurance criterion.

  4. Effects of etching and adhesive applications on the bond strength between composite resin and glass-ionomer cements

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    Tijen Pamir

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study determined the effects of various surface treatment modalities on the bond strength of composite resins to glass-ionomer cements. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Conventional (KetacTM Molar Quick ApplicapTM or resin-modified (PhotacTM Fil Quick AplicapTM glass-ionomer cements were prepared. Two-step etch-rinse & bond adhesive (AdperTM Single Bond 2 or single-step self-etching adhesive (AdperTM PromptTM L-PopTM was applied to the set cements. In the etch-rinse & bond group, the sample surfaces were pre-treated as follows: (1 no etching, (2 15 s of etching with 35% phosphoric acid, (3 30 s of etching, and (4 60 s of etching. Following the placement of the composite resin (FiltekTM Z250, the bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine and the data obtained were analyzed with the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by the Tukey's HSD post hoc analysis (p=0.05. Then, the fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: The bond strength of the composite resin to the conventional glass-ionomer cement was significantly lower than that to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (p0.05. However, a greater bond strength was obtained with 30 s of phosphoric acid application. CONCLUSIONS: The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement improved the bond strength of the composite resin to the glass-ionomer cement. Both etch-rinse & bond and self-etching adhesives may be used effectively in the lamination of glass-ionomer cements. However, an etching time of at least 30 s appears to be optimal.

  5. Comparison of the resin cement bond strength to an indirect composites treated by Er;YAG laser and sandblast

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    Mansure Mirzaee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Indirect composites are designed to overcome the shortcomings of direct composites such as polymerization shrinkage and low degree of conversion. But, good adhesion of resin cements to indirect composites is still difficult. This research was designed to assess the effect of different powers of Er;YAG laser compared with sandblasting. On the micro tensil bond strength of resin cement to indirect composites.   Materials and Methods: Specimens were prepred using dental resin composite (Gradia GC and metallic mold (15×5×5 mm and were cured according to the manufacturer’s instructions. 24 blocks were prepared and randomly divided into 12 groups. G1:no treatment (as control, G 2-6: Er; YAG laser irradiation (2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Watt, G7: sandblast. Two composite blocks were bonded to each other with Panavia F.2. resin cement. The cylindrical sections with dimensions of 1 mm were tested in a microtensile bond strength tester device using 0.5 mm/min speed until fracture points. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and T-test.   Results: Interaction between lasers irradiation and sandblast treatments were significant (P0.05 whether samples were sandblasted or not. Samples which received 300 mJ of laser showed lower bond strength compared with no laser treatment. Other groups showed no significant difference (P>0.05.   Conclusion: It seems that application of sandblast with proper variables, is a good way to improve bond strength.Laser application had no influence in improving the bond strength between the indirect composite and resin cement.

  6. Comparison of shear bond strength of resin reinforced chemical cure glass ionomer, conventional chemical cure glass ionomer and chemical cure composite resin in direct bonding systems: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kolasani Srinivasa; Reddy, T Praveen Kumar; Yugandhar, Garlapati; Kumar, B Sunil; Reddy, S N Chandrasekhar; Babu, Devatha Ashok

    2013-01-01

    The acid pretreatment and use of composite resins as the bonding medium has disadvantages like scratching and loss of surface enamel, decalcification, etc. To overcome disadvantages of composite resins, glass ionomers and its modifications are being used for bonding. The study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of resin reinforced glass ionomer as a direct bonding system with conventional glass ionomer cement and composite resin. The study showed that shear bond strength of composite resin has the higher value than both resin reinforced glass ionomer and conventional glass ionomer cement in both 1 and 24 hours duration and it increased from 1 to 24 hours in all groups. The shear bond strength of resin reinforced glass ionomer cement was higher than the conventional glass ionomer cement in both 1 and 24 hours duration. Conditioning with polyacrylic acid improved the bond strength of resin reinforced glass ionomer cement significantly but not statistically significant in the case of conventional glass ionomer cement.

  7. A Study on Effect of Surface Treatments on the Shear Bond Strength between Composite Resin and Acrylic Resin Denture Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Gupta, Tapas K; Banerjee, Ardhendu

    2011-03-01

    Visible light-cured composite resins have become popular in prosthetic dentistry for the replacement of fractured/debonded denture teeth, making composite denture teeth on partial denture metal frameworks, esthetic modification of denture teeth to harmonize with the characteristics of adjacent natural teeth, remodelling of worn occlusal surfaces of posterior denture teeth etc. However, the researches published on the bond strength between VLC composite resins and acrylic resin denture teeth is very limited. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of five different methods of surface treatments on acrylic resin teeth on the shear bond strength between light activated composite resin and acrylic resin denture teeth. Ninety cylindrical sticks of acrylic resin with denture teeth mounted atop were prepared. Various treatments were done upon the acrylic resin teeth surfaces. The samples were divided into six groups, containing 15 samples each. Over all the treated and untreated surfaces of all groups, light-cured composite resin was applied. The shear strengths were measured in a Universal Testing Machine using a knife-edge shear test. Data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and mean values were compared by the F test. Application of bonding agent with prior treatment of methyl methacrylate on the acrylic resin denture teeth resulted in maximum bond strength with composite resin.

  8. Initial approach for obtaining sintered composites from heterobimetallic complexes containing Sn–Fe bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neto, Jonas L., E-mail: neto.jl@dqi.ufla.br [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Lavras, 37200-000 Lavras, MG (Brazil); Lima, Geraldo M. de; Porto, Arilza O. [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Ardisson, José D. [CDTN/CNEN, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rezende, Carlos C. [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Lavras, 37200-000 Lavras, MG (Brazil)

    2014-03-01

    Three heterobimetallic complexes, [FeCp(CO){sub 2}]{sub 2}SnCl{sub 2}, [FeCp(CO){sub 2}]SnCl{sub 3} and [FeCp(CO){sub 2}]{sub 2}Sn(PDC) in which Cp = cyclopentadienyl and PDC = pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate, were synthesized, characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C and {sup 119}Sn NMR), infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetric experiments (TG/DT), and elemental analysis (C, H, and N). The complexes were then used as precursors for an initial approach of obtaining sintered composites respectively designated as (1), (2) and (3). X-ray diffraction (XRD, powder method) and {sup 119}Sn and {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer results have showed the presence of SnO{sub 2}, syn cassiterite and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, syn hematite as main constitutes of the materials. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) and scanning electron micrographs (SEM) have indicated the formation of a compact solid for samples (1) and (2) and the PDC ligand have contributed to the presence of more well-formed and dispersed grains for (3). - Highlights: • We have used complexes containing Sn–Fe bond as precursors for sintered materials. • Sintered composites were obtained at lower temperature. • The composites were characterized as syn cassiterite and α-hematite. • A higher concentration of Sn and Fe seems to affect the sintering process.

  9. Bond Strengths of Silorane- and Methacrylate-Based Composites to Various Underlying Materials

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    Sezin Ozer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate shear bond strength (SBS values of a methacrylate (FZ 250 and a silorane-based (FS resin composite to various underlying materials. Materials and Methods. A total of 80 samples were prepared with four different underlying materials; a flowable (FLC and a bulk-fill flowable composite (BFC, and a conventional (CGIC and resin modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC. These underlying materials were laminated plus to methacrylate or silorane-based resin composites (n=10. To evaluate the specimens SBS values were evaluated with a universal testing machine (cross-head speed; 1.0 mm/min. Statistical comparisons were carried out using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test with a significance level of P0.05. Conclusion. The use of FS in conjunction with any of the tested materials showed lower SBS than the FZ 250. Also, new low elastic modulus liner BFC presented slightly good interfacial adhesion so, the usage of BFC as an underlying material may be preferable for FZ 250.

  10. Repair bond strength of resin composite to a novel CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic using different repair systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the repair bond strength of a nanohybrid resin composite to a novel CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic based on four intraoral ceramic repair systems. Vita Enamic (VE) CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic was used in this study. Specimens were divided into five test groups according to the repair method performed on the ceramic surface: Gr C (No treatment; control); Gr CZ (Cimara Zircon); Gr PR (Porcelain Repair); Gr CR (Clearfil Repair); and Gr CS (CoJet system). Nanohybrid resin composite (GrandioSO) was packed onto treated ceramic surfaces for adhesion testing using microtensile bond strength test. Debonded specimens were examined with a stereomicroscope and SEM to determine the fracture mode. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. PR and CZ repair systems significantly enhanced the bond strength of nanohybrid resin composite to VE CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic when compared with the other tested repair systems.

  11. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

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    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  12. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    TÜRKMEN, Cafer; DURKAN, Meral; CİMİLLİ, Hale; ÖKSÜZ, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. Material and Methods Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group): direct composite resin restoration (Alert) with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive), Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia) luted with a resin cement (Cement-It) combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond), Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively) onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. Results The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7) showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05). The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. Conclusion The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces. PMID:21710095

  13. Effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of resin composite bonded to CAD/CAM resin-ceramic hybrid materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngör, Merve Bankoğlu; Bal, Bilge Turhan; Ünver, Senem; Doğan, Aylin

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of resin composite bonded to thermocycled and non-thermocycled CAD/CAM resin-ceramic hybrid materials. MATERIALS AND METHODS 120 specimens (10×10×2 mm) from each material were divided into 12 groups according to different surface treatments in combination with thermal aging procedures. Surface treatment methods were airborne-particle abrasion (abraded with 50 micron alumina particles), dry grinding (grinded with 125 µm grain size bur), and hydrofluoric acid (9%) and silane application. According to the thermocycling procedure, the groups were assigned as non-thermocycled, thermocycled after packing composites, and thermocycled before packing composites. The average surface roughness of the non-thermocycled specimens were measured after surface treatments. After packing composites and thermocycling procedures, shear bond strength (SBS) of the specimens were tested. The results of surface roughness were statistically analyzed by 2-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), and SBS results were statistically analyzed by 3-way ANOVA. RESULTS Surface roughness of GC were significantly lower than that of LU and VE (P<.05). The highest surface roughness was observed for dry grinding group, followed by airborne particle abraded group (P<.05). Comparing the materials within the same surface treatment method revealed that untreated surfaces generally showed lower SBS values. The values of untreated LU specimens showed significantly different SBS values compared to those of other surface treatment groups (P<.05). CONCLUSION SBS was affected by surface treatments. Thermocycling did not have any effect on the SBS of the materials except acid and silane applied GC specimens, which were subjected to thermocycling before packing of the composite resin. PMID:27555894

  14. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Cantrell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes KN of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites, subjected to different fiber surface treatments, are calculated from the Morse potential for the interactions of hydroxyl and carboxyl acid groups formed on the carbon fiber surfaces with epoxy receptors. The τ calculations range from 7.7 MPa to 18.4 MPa in magnitude, depending on fiber treatment. The KN calculations fall in the range (2.01 – 4.67 ×1017 N m−3. The average ratio KN/|τ| is calculated to be (2.59 ± 0.043 × 1010 m−1 for the seven composites, suggesting a nearly linear connection between ILSS and H-bonding at the fiber-matrix interfaces. The linear connection indicates that τ may be assessable nondestructively from measurements of KN via a technique such as angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy.

  15. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, John H., E-mail: john.h.cantrell@nasa.gov [Research Directorate, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes K{sub N} of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites, subjected to different fiber surface treatments, are calculated from the Morse potential for the interactions of hydroxyl and carboxyl acid groups formed on the carbon fiber surfaces with epoxy receptors. The τ calculations range from 7.7 MPa to 18.4 MPa in magnitude, depending on fiber treatment. The K{sub N} calculations fall in the range (2.01 – 4.67) ×10{sup 17} N m{sup −3}. The average ratio K{sub N}/|τ| is calculated to be (2.59 ± 0.043) × 10{sup 10} m{sup −1} for the seven composites, suggesting a nearly linear connection between ILSS and H-bonding at the fiber-matrix interfaces. The linear connection indicates that τ may be assessable nondestructively from measurements of K{sub N} via a technique such as angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy.

  16. Lasing and thermal characteristics of Yb:YAG/YAG composite with atomic diffusion bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar Nagisetty, Siva; Severova, Patricie; Miura, Taisuke; Smrž, Martin; Kon, Hitoe; Uomoto, Miyuki; Shimatsu, Takehito; Kawasaki, Masato; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrated the laser performance of an Yb:YAG/YAG composite ceramic laser medium mounted on an aluminium heatsink via atomic diffusion bonding (ADB) technique using nanocrystalline metal films at room temperature in air. The surface temperature rise of the ADB bonded laser medium was linear with 57 °C lower than that of the commercially available soldered Yb:YAG thin disk at the pump power of 280 W. Moreover, the ADB disk was pumped 1.5 times higher (7.3 kW cm-2) than the typical damage threshold of the soldered disk without any sign of damage. The undoped capping may be effective for the suppression of ASE heating; however, according to the in situ OPD measurement it induces strong thermal lensing. The CW laser output power of 177 W was obtained at the pump power of 450 W with the optical-to-optical efficiency of 40% using V-shape cavity.

  17. Clinical evaluation of simple fixed space maintainers bonded with flow composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Sera; Yilmaz, Yucel; Gurbuz, Taskin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of simple fixed space maintainers bonded by using a flow composite resin (Tetric Flow) to prevent space resulting from early extracted primary teeth. For that reason, 64 fixed space maintainers (34 in the lower jaw and 30 in the upper jaw) were applied to 45 patients. The patients followed up for 12 to 18 months. Survival rate, prevention ability of that space, and whether damage to the abutment teeth occurred were evaluated. Five percent of space maintainers were determined to be unsuccessful at the end of the control period. During this period, loss of space among the abutment teeth was found to be statistically insignificant (P > .05). Finally, it was observed that the use of simple fixed space maintainers was successful due to operator experience and the choosing of favorable patient groups.

  18. The analysis of adhesively bonded advanced composite joints using joint finite elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Scott E.

    The design and sizing of adhesively bonded joints has always been a major bottleneck in the design of composite vehicles. Dense finite element (FE) meshes are required to capture the full behavior of a joint numerically, but these dense meshes are impractical in vehicle-scale models where a course mesh is more desirable to make quick assessments and comparisons of different joint geometries. Analytical models are often helpful in sizing, but difficulties arise in coupling these models with full-vehicle FE models. Therefore, a joint FE was created which can be used within structural FE models to make quick assessments of bonded composite joints. The shape functions of the joint FE were found by solving the governing equations for a structural model for a joint. By analytically determining the shape functions of the joint FE, the complex joint behavior can be captured with very few elements. This joint FE was modified and used to consider adhesives with functionally graded material properties to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. Furthermore, proof-of-concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint. Furthermore, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior with large rotations was developed, and progressive failure of the adhesive was modeled by re-meshing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results predicted using the joint FE was compared with experimental results for various

  19. The Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Advanced Composite Joints Using Joint Finite Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    The design and sizing of adhesively bonded joints has always been a major bottleneck in the design of composite vehicles. Dense finite element (FE) meshes are required to capture the full behavior of a joint numerically, but these dense meshes are impractical in vehicle-scale models where a course mesh is more desirable to make quick assessments and comparisons of different joint geometries. Analytical models are often helpful in sizing, but difficulties arise in coupling these models with full-vehicle FE models. Therefore, a joint FE was created which can be used within structural FE models to make quick assessments of bonded composite joints. The shape functions of the joint FE were found by solving the governing equations for a structural model for a joint. By analytically determining the shape functions of the joint FE, the complex joint behavior can be captured with very few elements. This joint FE was modified and used to consider adhesives with functionally graded material properties to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. Furthermore, proof-of-concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint. Furthermore, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior with large rotations was developed, and progressive failure of the adhesive was modeled by re-meshing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results predicted using the joint FE was compared with experimental results for various

  20. An isolated bridgeless AC-DC PFC converter using a LC resonant voltage doubler rectifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin-woo; Do, Hyun-Lark

    2016-12-01

    This paper proposed an isolated bridgeless AC-DC power factor correction (PFC) converter using a LC resonant voltage doubler rectifier. The proposed converter is based on isolated conventional single-ended primary inductance converter (SEPIC) PFC converter. The conduction loss of rectification is reduced than a conventional one because the proposed converter is designed to eliminate a full-bridge rectifier at an input stage. Moreover, for zero-current switching (ZCS) operation and low voltage stresses of output diodes, the secondary of the proposed converter is designed as voltage doubler with a LC resonant tank. Additionally, an input-output electrical isolation is provided for safety standard. In conclusion, high power factor is achieved and efficiency is improved. The operational principles, steady-state analysis and design equations of the proposed converter are described in detail. Experimental results from a 60 W prototype at a constant switching frequency 100 kHz are presented to verify the performance of the proposed converter.

  1. Damage prognosis of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of unmanned aerial vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gobbato, Maurizio [UCSD; Conte, Joel [UCSD; Kosmatke, John [UCSD; Oliver, Joseph A [UCSD

    2009-01-01

    The extensive use of lightweight advanced composite materials in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) drastically increases the sensitivity to both fatigue- and impact-induced damage of their critical structural components (e.g., wings and tail stabilizers) during service life. The spar-to-skin adhesive joints are considered one of the most fatigue sensitive subcomponents of a lightweight UAV composite wing with damage progressively evolving from the wing root. This paper presents a comprehensive probabilistic methodology for predicting the remaining service life of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of UAVs. Non-destructive evaluation techniques and Bayesian inference are used to (i) assess the current state of damage of the system and, (ii) update the probability distribution of the damage extent at various locations. A probabilistic model for future loads and a mechanics-based damage model are then used to stochastically propagate damage through the joint. Combined local (e.g., exceedance of a critical damage size) and global (e.g.. flutter instability) failure criteria are finally used to compute the probability of component failure at future times. The applicability and the partial validation of the proposed methodology are then briefly discussed by analyzing the debonding propagation, along a pre-defined adhesive interface, in a simply supported laminated composite beam with solid rectangular cross section, subjected to a concentrated load applied at mid-span. A specially developed Eliler-Bernoulli beam finite element with interlaminar slip along the damageable interface is used in combination with a cohesive zone model to study the fatigue-induced degradation in the adhesive material. The preliminary numerical results presented are promising for the future validation of the methodology.

  2. Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhering Flowable Composite and Resin-modified Glass Ionomer to Two Pulp Capping Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doozaneh, Maryam; Koohpeima, Fatemeh; Firouzmandi, Maryam; Abbassiyan, Forugh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of a self-adhering flowable composite (SAFC) and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Methods and Materials: A total of 72 acrylic blocks with a central hole (4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in depth) were prepared. The holes were filled with MTA (sub group A) and CEM cement. The specimens of both restorative materials were divided into 6 groups; overall there were 12 groups. In groups 1 and 4, SAFC was used without bonding while in groups 2 and 5 SAFC was used with bonding agent. In all these groups the material was placed into the plastic mold and light cured. In groups 3 and 6, after surface conditioning with poly acrylic acid and rinsing, RMGI was placed into the mold and photo polymerized. After 24 h, the shear bond strength values were measured and fracture patterns were examined by a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using the two-way ANOVA and student’s t-test. Results: The use of bonding agent significantly increased the shear bond strength of FC to MTA and CEM cement (P=0.008 and 0.00, respectively). In both materials, RMGI had the lowest shear bond strength values (2.25 Mpa in MTA and 1.32 Mpa in CEM). The mean shear bond strength were significantly higher in MTA specimen than CEM cement (P=0.003). There was a significant differences between fracture patterns among groups (P=0.001). Most failures were adhesive/mix in MTA specimen but in CEM cement groups the cohesive failures were observed in most of the samples. Conclusion: The bond strength of self-adhering flowable composite resin to MTA and CEM cement was higher than RMGI which was improved after the additional application of adhesive. PMID:28179935

  3. Effects of different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of composite resin to amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Koolman, C; Aladag, A; Dündar, M

    2011-01-01

    Repairing amalgam restorations with composite resins using surface conditioning methods is a conservative treatment approach. This study investigated the effects of different conditioning methods that could be used for repair of amalgam fractures. Amalgam (N=96) was condensed into cavities within autopolymerizing polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and the exposed surface of each specimen (diameter, 6 mm; thickness, 2 mm) was ground finished. The specimens were randomly divided into nine experimental groups (n=12 per group), depending on the conditioning method used. The control group had natural central incisors with amalgam (n=12). The combination of the following conditioning methods was tested: silicacoating (Sc), sandblasting (Sb), metal primers, coupling agents, fiber (Fb) application, and opaquers (O). Five types of silanes, metal primers, or adhesives (Visiobond [V], Porcelain Photobond [PP], Alloy Primer [AP], Unibond sealer [Us], ESPE-Sil [ES]), and four opaquers, namely, Clearfil St Opaquer (CstO), Sinfony (S), Miris (M), and an experimental Opaquer (EO-Cavex), were used. The groups were as follows: group 1, Sc+ES+S+V; group 2, Sc+ES+CstO+V; group 3, Sc+ES+M+V; group 4, Sc+ES+EO+V; group 5, Sb+AP+S; group 6, Sb+AP+PP+CstO; group 7, Sc+ES+S+Fb+V+Fb; group 8-control, SC+ES+V; and group 9, Etch+Sc+ES+S+Us. One repair composite was used for all groups (Clearfil Photo Bond Posterior, Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan). Shear bond strengths (SBSs) (MPa ± SD) were evaluated after 5 weeks of water storage (analysis of variance [ANOVA], Tukey honestly significant differences [HSD], α=0.05). Group 1 exhibited significantly higher values (35.5 ± 4.1) than were seen in group 4 (19.4 ± 8.9), group 6 (19.1 ± 7.8), and group 8 (20.1 ± 4.1) (pcomposite adhesion to amalgam. Experimental opaquer exhibited lower values. Leaving a small border of enamel around the restoration decreased the bond strength.

  4. The influence of different placement techniques on the microtensile bond strength of low-shrink silorane composite bonded to Class I cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida e Silva, J S; Rolla, Juliana Nunes; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Monteiro, Sylvio

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of a low-shrink silorane-based composite (Filtek Silorane) and a methacrylate-based composite (Filtek Z250) to the bottom dentin of a Class I cavity using different placement techniques. Twelve third molars were used. Standard, box-type Class I cavities (6.0 x 4.0 x 2.5 mm) were prepared at the occlusal crown center, with the pulpal floor ending approximately at the midcoronal dentin. The teeth were then randomly divided into four groups, according to each placement technique: ZI--Filtek Z250 placed incrementally; ZB--Filtek Z250 placed in bulk; SI--Filtek Silorane placed incrementally; and SB--Filtek Silorane placed in bulk. Each restored third molar was subjected to microtensile bond testing after 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C. After storage, each molar was longitudinally sectioned in both axes to obtain rectangular sticks with an approximate 0.49 mm2 cross-sectional area. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by a Tukey post hoc test (P = 0.05). After debonding, the failure modes were analyzed using a stereomicroscope. The ZI group (72.6 MPa) showed the highest µTBS, followed by the ZB group (60.2 MPa), while the SI (34.4 MPa) and SB (42.6 MPa) groups demonstrated statistically significant lower bond strengths. The type of placement technique did not influence the µTBS of silorane-based composites to the bottom dentin of Class I cavities. The methacrylate-based composite showed superior performance, regardless of the placement technique.

  5. Effect of various antioxidants on the shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mageshwaran Thandalam Arumugam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effect of 10% sodium ascorbate, 6.5% proanthocyanidin, and 5% lycopene on the bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: Labial enamel surfaces of 100 extracted human maxillary central incisors were used in this study. Twenty teeth served as group I (control and received no bleaching treatment. The remaining 80 teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 20 teeth each, based on the antioxidant used as follows: group II- bleaching with 35% carbamide peroxide gel for 30 min without the use of an antioxidant, group III- bleaching followed by use of 10% sodium ascorbate solution, group IV- bleaching followed by use of 6.5% proanthocyanidin, and group V- bleaching followed by use of 5% lycopene. These groups were further subdivided into two subgroups of 10 teeth each, based on whether composite buildup was done immediately (subgroup A or after a delay of 2 weeks (subgroup B post bleaching. Shear bond strength of the specimens was tested under universal testing machine. The data were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: Significantly higher shear bond strength values were observed in teeth treated with control group prior to bonding, followed by sodium ascorbate group. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded all the antioxidants used in this study increased the bond strength of bleached enamel. Among the antioxidant groups, sodium ascorbate showed significantly higher bond strength compared to proanthocyanidin and lycopene.

  6. Sequential fault diagnosis for mechatronics system using diagnostic hybrid bond graph and composite harmony search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a sequential fault diagnosis method to handle asynchronous distinct faults using diagnostic hybrid bond graph and composite harmony search. The faults under consideration include fault mode, abrupt fault, and intermittent fault. The faults can occur in different time instances, which add to the difficulty of decision making for fault diagnosis. This is because the earlier occurred fault can exhibit fault symptom which masks the fault symptom of latter occurred fault. In order to solve this problem, a sequential identification algorithm is developed in which the identification task is reactivated based on two conditions. The first condition is that the latter occurred fault has at least one inconsistent coherence vector element which is consistent in coherence vector of the earlier occurred fault, and the second condition is that the existing fault coherence vector has the ability to hide other faults and the second-level residual exceeds the threshold. A new composite harmony search which is capable of handling continuous variables and binary variables simultaneously is proposed for identification purpose. Experiments on a mobile robot system are conducted to assess the proposed sequential fault diagnosis algorithm.

  7. In Vitro Evaluation of Various Surface Treatments of Fiber Posts on the Bond Strength to Composite Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sareh Nadalizadeh

    Full Text Available Introduction: The reliable bond at the root-post-core interface is critical for the clinical success of post-retained restorations. To decrease the risk of fracture, it is important to optimize the adhesion. Therefore, various post surface treatments have been proposed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments of fiber posts on the bond strength to composite core. Materials & Methods: In this study, 40 fiber reinforced posts were used. After preparing and sectioning them, resulting specimens were divided into four groups (N=28. The posts received different surface treatments such as no surface treatment (control group, preparing with hydrogen peroxide 10%, preparing with silane, preparing with HF and silane. Then, posts were tested in micro tensile testing machine. The results were analyzed by One-Way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Results: The greatest bond strength observed was in treatment with hydrogen peroxide 10% (19.84±8.95 MPa, and the lowest strength was related to the control group (12.44±3.40 MPa. The comparison of the groups with Dunnett T3 test showed that the differences between the groups was statistically significant (α=0.05.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, preparing with H2O2 -10 % and silane increases the bond strength of FRC posts to the composite core more than the other methods. Generally, the bond strength of posts to the composite core increases by surface treatment.

  8. Influence of Sealer and Light-Curing Units on Push-Out Bond Strength Of Composite Resin to Weakened Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Adriana Corrêa de; Rached-Junior, Fuad Jacob; Faria, Natália Spadini de; Messias, Danielle Cristine; Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; Freitas, Jessica Vavassori de; Baratto-Filho, Flares; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of sealer and light-curing unit on regional bond strength of resin composite to the weakened roots. Ninety roots of incisors were experimentally weakened, subjected to biomechanical preparation and filled with either Endofill, AH Plus or MTA Fillapex The roots were desobturated e reinforced with resin composite and fiber post light-activated with one of the light sources: halogen at 600 mW/ cm2 (QTH-600), LED at 800 mW/ cm2 (LED-800) and LED at 1500 mW/ cm2 (LED-1500). The roots were sectioned in slices from cervical, middle and apical root-reinforcement regions and analyzed by push out test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Bond strength data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Tukey´s test (α=0.05). Specimens filled with AH Plus had higher bond strength, followed by MTA Fillapex and Endofill (pfilling material in the dentinal tubules for all groups. The eugenol-containing sealer (Endofill) compromised the push-out bond strength of composite resin to the root dentin. Bond strength was favored in the cervical region, and when LED-1500 was used.

  9. Effect of thione primers on adhesive bonding between an indirect composite material and Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Hideyuki; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Shimoe, Saiji; Hirata, Isao; Matsumura, Hideo; Nikawa, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effect of primers on the shear bond strength of an indirect composite material joined to a silverpalladium-copper-gold (Ag-Pd-Cu-Au) alloy (Castwell). Disk specimens were cast from the alloy and were air-abraded with alumina. Eight metal primers were applied to the alloy surface. A light-polymerized indirect composite material (Solidex) was bonded to the alloy. Shear bond strength was determined both before and after the application of thermocycling. Two groups primed with Metaltite (thione) and M. L. Primer (sulfide) showed the greatest post-thermocycling bond strength (8.8 and 6.5 MPa). The results of the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analysis suggested that the thione monomer (MTU-6) in the Metaltite primer was strongly adsorbed onto the Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy surface even after repeated cleaning with acetone. The application of either the thione (MTU-6) or sulfide primer is effective for enhancing the bonding between a composite material and Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy.

  10. Effect of ascorbic acid on bond strength between the hydrogen peroxide-treated fiber posts and composite resin cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Talebian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study evaluated the effect of 10% ascorbic acid on the bond strength between fiber post and composite resin core after applying 24% hydrogen peroxide. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four hydrogen peroxide-treated fiber posts were divided into 4 groups (n = 6. Group 1 was the control group with no treatment. In groups 2-4, post surfaces were treated with 10% v ascorbic acid solution for 10, 30 and 60 minutes, respectively. Cores were built up using flowable composite resin. Two sticks were prepared from each specimen. Microtensile bond strength test was performed for each stick. Failure modes of sticks were evaluated under a stereomicroscope (×20. Surface morphologies of two fractured sticks from each group were assessed by SEM. Statistical analysis: Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (α = 0.05. Results: The highest microtensile bond strength was observed in Group 4 (20.55 ± 2.09 and the lowest in Group 1 (10.10 ± 0.55. There were significant differences in microtensile bond strength between all the groups (P < 0.05. Conclusion: It is concluded that ascorbic acid application increased the microtensile bond strength between the hydrogen peroxide treated fiber post and composite resin core. The increase is dependent on the duration of exposure to the antioxidant.

  11. Effect of amalgam corrosion products in non-discolored dentin on the bond strength of replaced composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjaneh Ghavamnasiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the effect of amalgam corrosion products in non-discolored dentin on the bond strength of replaced composite resin. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty-one Class I cavities were prepared on extracted premolars and divided into seven groups. Group 1: Light-cured composite; Groups 2, 3, and 4: Amalgam stored in 37°C normal saline for respectively 1, 3, and 6 months and then replaced with composite leaving the cavity walls intact. Groups 5, 6, and 7: Identical to Groups 2, 3, and 4, except the cavity walls were extended 0.5 mm after amalgam removal. Eighteen specimens from each group were selected for shear bond strength testing, while on remaining five samples, elemental microanalysis was conducted. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Freidman (α = 0.05. Results: There was a significant difference between Groups 1 and 4 and also between Group 1 and Groups 5, 6, and 7. However, Groups 1, 2, and 3 showed no significant difference regarding bond strength. Bond strengths of Group 4 was significantly less than Groups 2 and 3. However, Groups 5, 6, and 7 showed similar bond strength. There was no difference among all groups in terms of metal elements at any storage times.

  12. Approach to In- Situ Producing Reinforcing Phase Within an Active-Transient Liquid Phase Bond Seam for Aluminum Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Liao, Xianjin; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Linjie; Zhang, Jianxun

    2015-06-01

    To optimize the braze composition design route for aluminum matrix composite, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the transient liquid phase bond seam matrix, by adding active melting point increaser (MPI, e.g., Ti) together with general melting point depressant (MPD, e.g., Cu) into the interlayer, was demonstrated. For SiC p /A356 composite, by comparing the wettability, joint microstructure, joint shear strength, and fracture path for the developed Al-19Cu-1Ti, Al-19Cu, Al-33Cu-1Ti, Al-33Cu (wt pct), and commercial Cu foils as interlayer, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the bond seam by adding Ti was demonstrated. Especially for Al-19Cu-1Ti active braze, small and dispersed ternary aluminide of Al-Si-Ti phase was obtained within the bond seam as in situ reinforcement, leading to a favorable fracture path within SiC p /A356, not along the initial interface or within the bond seam. For the formation mechanism of the in situ reinforcing phase of MPI-containing intermetallic compound within the bond seam, a model of repeating concentration-precipitation-termination-engulfment during isothermal solidification is proposed.

  13. Effect of silane activation on shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite post to resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyun-Dong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Hee-Sun; Cha, Hyun-Suk

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Among the surface treatment methods suggested to enhance the adhesion of resin cement to fiber-reinforced composite posts, conflicting results have been obtained with silanization. In this study, the effects of silanization, heat activation after silanization, on the bond strength between fiber-reinforced composite post and resin cement were determined. MATERIALS AND METHODS Six groups (n=7) were established to evaluate two types of fiber post (FRC Postec Plus, D.T. Light Post) and th...

  14. SEM/XPS analysis of fractured adhesively bonded graphite fibre surface resin-rich/graphite fibre composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Wightman, J. P.; Progar, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Samples of graphite fiber-reinforced polyimide were fabricated allowing the resin to accumulate at the composite surface. These surface resin-rich composites were then bonded together and tested for lap shear strength both before and after thermal aging. Lap shear strength did not appear to show a significant improvement over that previously recorded for resin-poor samples and was shown to decrease with increasing aging time and temperature.

  15. Effects of surface conditioning on repair bond strengths of non-aged and aged microhybrid, nanohybrid, and nanofilled composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinastiti, Margareta; Özcan, Mutlu; Siswomihardjo, Widowati; Busscher, Henk J

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluates effects of aging on repair bond strengths of microhybrid, nanohybrid, and nanofilled composite resins and characterizes the interacting surfaces after aging. Disk-shaped composite specimens were assigned to one of three aging conditions: (1) thermocycling (5,000 ×, 5-55 °C), (2) storage in water at 37 °C for 6 months, or (3) immersion in citric acid at 37 °C, pH 3 for 1 week; a non-aged group acted as the control. Two surface conditionings were selected: intermediate adhesive resin application (IAR-application) and chairside silica coating followed by silanization and its specific IAR-application (SC-application). Composite resins, of the same kind as their substrate, were adhered onto the substrates, and repair shear bond strengths were determined, followed by failure type evaluation. Filler particle exposure was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and surface roughness analyzed using scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Surface roughness increased in all composite resins after aging, but filler particle exposure at the surface only increased after thermocycling and citric acid immersion. Composite resin type, surface conditioning, and aging method significantly influenced the repair bond strengths (p water storage. Repair bond strengths in aged composite resins after IAR-application were always lower in non-aged ones, while SC-application led to higher bond strengths than IAR-application after thermocycling and water storage. In addition, SC-application led to more cohesive failures than after IAR-application, regardless the aging method.

  16. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooran Samimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB and Prompt L-Pop (PLP adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1 Immediate light-curing, (2 delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3 self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05. PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study.

  17. A high conversion-gain Q-band InP DHBT subharmonic mixer using LO frequency doubler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Vidkjær, Jens; Krozer, Viktor;

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents analysis and design of a Q-band subharmonic mixer (SHM) with high conversion gain. The SHM consists of a local oscillator (LO) frequency doubler, RF pre-amplifier, and single-ended mixer. The SHM has been fabricated in a high-speed InP double heterojunction bipolar transistor...

  18. Effect of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate pre-treatment on micro-tensile bond strength of resin composite to demineralized dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, J; Itota, T; Torii, Y; Nakabo, S; Yoshiyama, M

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) application on the micro-tensile bond strength of resin composite to demineralized dentin. Artificially demineralized lesions were formed on bovine dentin surfaces and treated with 10, 30, 50, 70 and 100 wt% HEMA aqueous solution. The surfaces were then applied and covered with SE Bond and AP-X according to the manufacturer's instruction. After immersion in 37 degrees C water for 24 h, bond strength were measured using a universal testing machine. Bond strengths to both demineralized dentin and normal dentin, without HEMA application, were also measured. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis at the resin-dentin interface were also performed. The bond strength data were statistically compared with anova and Scheffe's test (P Bond strength to demineralized dentin treated with over 30 wt% HEMA aqueous solution were significantly higher than that to demineralized dentin without HEMA application, but significantly lower than that to normal dentin. SEM observation revealed that the hybrid layer and resin-tags thickened and lengthened with HEMA application. In CLSM, the diffusion of adhesive primer into demineralized dentin increased with HEMA application. These results indicated that HEMA application might increase the bond strength to demineralized dentin by the enhancement of resin monomer penetration of HEMA.

  19. Bond strength comparison of amalgam repair protocols using resin composite in situations with and without dentin exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Schoonbeek, Geert; Gökçe, Bülent; Cömlekoglu, Erhan; Dündar, Mine

    2010-01-01

    The replacement of defective amalgam restorations leads to loss of tooth material and weakens the tooth, creating an increased risk of cusp fracture. The repair of such defects is a minimal intervention technique. The current study compared the repair bond strengths of a resin composite to amalgam and an amalgam-dentin complex after various surface conditioning methods. The specimens (N = 50) consisted of sound human canines with cylindrical preparations (diameter: 2.3 mm, depth: 3 mm) with amalgam-dentin complex (N = 30, n = 10/per group) and two groups with amalgam only (N = 20, n = 10/per group). The teeth were embedded in auto-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The preparations were filled with non-Gamma 2 amalgam. The enamel was removed to expose dentin. The specimens with the amalgam-dentin complex were randomly assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 1: Silicacoating amalgam, etching dentin, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both; Group 2: Etching dentin, silicacoating amalgam, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both and Group 3: Etching dentin, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer, resin composite. The specimens with only amalgam were assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 4: Silicacoating, silane application, opaquer, resin composite and Group 5: Opaquer, resin composite. For the two control groups, where no dentin was involved (Groups 4 and 5), bonding was achieved only on amalgam and Group 5 had no conditioning. The specimens were kept in water at 37 degrees C for five weeks before bond strength (MPa +/- SD) testing (Universal Testing Machine). After debonding, the failure types were analyzed. The results were significantly affected by the surface conditioning method (ANOVA). Only dentin conditioning (Group 3) showed the highest bond strength (39.9 +/- 14). The unconditioned control

  20. Effect of the cross-linking silane concentration in a novel silane system on bonding resin-composite cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matinlinna, Jukka; Ozcan, Mutlu; Lassila, Lippo; Kalk, Warner; Vallittu, Pekka

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Four experimental blends of an organo-functional silane monomer with a non-functional cross-linking silane monomer (a novel silane system) were evaluated as adhesion promoters in an experiment in which a resin-composite cement was bonded to silica-coated titanium. Material and Methods. 3-

  1. Shear bond strength between porcelain and nano filler composite resin with or without 9% hydrofluoric acid etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Ismiyatin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reparation technique on restorations with broken or damaged porcelain which are still attached with the teeth are difficult, because it is very hard to remove the porcelain restoration without damaging it, and it needs a long time. Various ways have been developed to repair the broken porcelain, one of them is the use of composite resin as the material for the restoration of fractured porcelain. Repairing porcelain inside the mouth without removing the restoration of the damaged porcelain using light cured composite resins material seems to be an advantageous option because it is relatively simple, has low risks, good esthetically and cheap. Purpose: The objective of this study was to find out the difference of shear bond strength in porcelain reparation using nano filler composite resin with or without 9% hydrofluoric acid etching by using Autograph measuring device. Methods: Twenty pieces of the porcelain samples devided into 2 groups. Group I: etching process using 9% hydrofluoric acid, and group II : without etching process. Result: The data was analyzed using t test in a p value of 0.0001 (p≤0.05, which means there is a significant different of shear bond strength between treated group I and II. The biggest shear bond strength was in treatment group I. Conclusion: The use of 9% hydrofluoric acid on the surface of porcelain can increase the shear bond strength between porcelain and nano filler composite resin.

  2. Clinical longevity of ceramic laminate veneers bonded to teeth with and without existing composite restorations up to 40 months

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco M. M.; Kalk, Warner; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the survival rate of ceramic laminate veneers bonded to teeth with and without existing composite restorations (ECR). Twenty patients (mean age: 49.7 years) received 92 feldspathic ceramic laminate veneers (Shofu Vintage AL) on the maxillary teeth (intact teeth: n = 26; teeth wi

  3. Structural Evaluation and Mechanical Properties of Aluminum/Tungsten Carbide Composites Fabricated by Continual Annealing and Press Bonding (CAPB) Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirkhanlou, Sajjad; Ketabchi, Mostafa; Parvin, Nader; Drummen, G. P. C.

    2014-12-01

    In the present work, a novel technique is introduced called continual annealing and press bonding (CAPB) for the manufacturing of a bulk aluminum matrix composite dispersed with 10 vol pct tungsten carbide particles (Al/WCp composite). The microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of the Al/WCp composite during various CAPB cycles were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDX), and tensile testing. The microstructure of the fabricated composite after fourteen cycles of CAPB showed homogenous distribution of the WC particles in the aluminum matrix and strong bonding between the various layers. According to WDX analysis, the manufactured Al/WCp composite did not evidence the presence of additional elements. The results indicated that the tensile strength of the composites increased with the number of CAPB cycles, and reached a maximum value of 140 MPa at the end of the fourteenth cycle, which was 1.6 times higher than the obtained value for annealed aluminum (raw material, 88 MPa). Even though the elongation of the Al/WCp composite was reduced during the initial cycles of CAPB process, it increased significantly during the final cycles. SEM observation of fracture surfaces showed that the rupture mode in the CAPB-processed Al/WCp composite was of the shear ductile rupture type.

  4. Shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable composite on dentin surface as a result of scrubbing pressure and duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferry Jaya

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-adhering flowable composite is a combination of composite resin and adhesive material. Its application needs scrubbing process on the dentin surface, but sometimes it is difficult to determine the pressure and duration of scrubbing. Purpose: This study was aimed to analyze the effect of scrubbing pressure and duration on shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable composite to dentin surface Methods: Fifty four mandibulary third molar were cut to get the dentin surface and divided into nine groups (n = 6. Dentin surface was scrubbed with 1, 2, and 3 grams of scrubbing pressure, each for 15, 20, and 25 seconds respectively. surface was scrubbed with 1, 2, and 3 grams of scrubbing pressure, each for 15, 20, and 25 seconds respectively. Composite resin was applied incrementally and polymerized for 20 seconds. All specimens were immersed in saline solution at 37º C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength was tested for all specimens by using Universal Testing Machine (Shimadzu AG-5000E, Japan at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute and analyzed by ANOVA and Post Hoc Test Bonferonni. The interface between self-adhering flowable interface between self-adhering flowable composite and dentin was observed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (JEOL JSM 6510LA. Results: The highest shear bond strength was obtained by 3 grams scrubbing pressure for 25 seconds or equal to applying the brush applicator in 0º relative to dentin surface. Conclusion: Increasing the scrubbing pressure and duration will increase the shear bond strength of self adhering flowable composite resin to dentinal surface. The highest shear bond strength was obtained when the applicator in 0º relative to dentin surface. Latar belakang: Self-adhering flowable composite merupakan gabungan resin komposit dengan material adhesif yang dalam penggunaannya memerlukan teknik scrubbing pada permukaan dentin, namun sulit untuk menentukan besar tekanan yang tepat saat scrubbing. Tujuan

  5. Micro-tensile bond strength of different adhesive systems on sound dentin and resin-based composite: An in-vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Rashmirekha; Sarangi, Priyanka; Mohanty, Sandhyarani; Behera, Subasish; Nanda, Soumyaranjan; Satapathy, Sukanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the difference in the micro-tensile bond strength of specimens made with two different adhesive systems and compare them with two homogenous substrates. Materials and Methods: Sixty permanent mandibular molars were mounted in acrylic blocks and sectioned with exposed dentin surfaces. Samples were then divided into four groups. To Group-I Adper Single Bond 2 and to Group-II Adper Self-Etch plus bonding agents were applied. For Group-I and Group-II beams consisted of resin composite in the upper half and dentin in the lower half. In Group-III beams were made of only dentin. In Group-IV beams were made of only composite. Fifteen specimens of each group were taken for the micro-tensile bond strength test. Statistical Analysis: The results are analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Critical Difference test. Results: The interface bonded with the two adhesive systems had lower micro-tensile bond strength than those of dentin and resin composite and the self-etching adhesive Adper Self-Etch plus had comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesive Adper Single Bond 2. Conclusion: The bond strength values for current adhesive systems cannot be compared to the micro-tensile bond strength of dentin and resin composite, and self-etching adhesives have comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesives. PMID:26430301

  6. Effects of carbon fiber surface characteristics on interfacial bonding of epoxy resin composite subjected to hygrothermal treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Liu, Hongxin; Gu, Yizhuo; Li, Yanxia; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2014-01-01

    The changes of interfacial bonding of three types of carbon fibers/epoxy resin composite as well as their corresponding desized carbon fiber composites subjecting to hygrothermal conditions were investigated by means of single fiber fragmentation test. The interfacial fracture energy was obtained to evaluate the interfacial bonding before and after boiling water aging. The surface characteristics of the studied carbon fiber were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effects of activated carbon atoms and silicon element at carbon fiber surface on the interfacial hygrothermal resistance were further discussed. The results show that the three carbon fiber composites with the same resin matrix possess different hygrothermal resistances of interface and the interfacial fracture energy after water aging can not recovery to the level of raw dry sample (irreversible changes) for the carbon fiber composites containing silicon. Furthermore, the activated carbon atoms have little impact on the interfacial hygrothermal resistance. The irreversible variations of interfacial bonding and the differences among different carbon fiber composites are attributed to the silicon element on the carbon fiber bodies, which might result in hydrolyzation in boiling water treatment and degrade interfacial hygrothermal resistance.

  7. Adhesive Bonding and Self-Curing Characteristics of α-Starch Based Composite Binder for Green Sand Mould/Core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia ZHOU; Jinzong YANG; Guohui QU

    2004-01-01

    Interactions between different components in α-starch based composite binder for green sand mould/core were investigated by using XRD, IR spectra, 1H NMR spectra and SEM. Several adhesive hardening structures and theories of the binder at room temperature were proposed according to the interactions between various compositions. Thus,the reasons for the binder to have excellent combination properties and unique adhesive bonding and self-curing characteristics were explained by these theories successfully. And the theories are of great directive importance to design and development of composite binder for green sand mould/core.

  8. Shear-bond-strength of orthodontic brackets to aged nano-hybrid composite-resin surfaces using different surface preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtas, Hatice Kubra; Akin, Mehmet; Ileri, Zehra; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different surface preparation methods on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic metal brackets to aged nano-hybrid resin composite surfaces in vitro. A total of 100 restorative composite resin discs, 6 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were obtained and treated with an ageing procedure. After ageing, the samples were randomly divided as follows according to surface preparation methods: (1)Control, (2)37% phosphoric acid gel, (3)Sandblasting, (4)Diamond bur, (5)Air-flow and 20 central incisor teeth were used for the control etched group. SBS test were applied on bonded metal brackets to all samples. SBS values and residual adhesives were evaluated. Analysis of variance showed a significant difference (phybrid composite resin surfaces.

  9. Cryogenic optical measurements of 12-segment-bonded carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composite mirror with support mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Hidehiro; Nakagawa, Takao; Onaka, Takashi; Enya, Keigo; Makiuti, Sin'itirou; Takaki, Junji; Haruna, Masaki; Kume, Masami; Ozaki, Tsuyoshi

    2008-03-01

    A 720 mm diameter 12-segment-bonded carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite mirror has been fabricated and tested at cryogenic temperatures. Interferometric measurements show significant cryogenic deformation of the C/SiC composite mirror, which is well reproduced by a model analysis with measured properties of the bonded segments. It is concluded that the deformation is due mostly to variation in coefficients of thermal expansion among segments. In parallel, a 4-degree-of-freedom ball-bearing support mechanism has been developed for cryogenic applications. The C/SiC composite mirror was mounted on an aluminum base plate with the support mechanism and tested again. Cryogenic deformation of the mirror attributed to thermal contraction of the aluminum base plate via the support mechanism is highly reduced by the support, confirming that the newly developed support mechanism is promising for its future application to large-aperture cooled space telescopes.

  10. Effect of Silane Solvent on Microtensile Bond Strength of Hy-drogen Peroxide-Treated Fiber Post and Composite Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Kasraei

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this in vitrostudy was to evaluate the effect of the type of solvent in silane solution on microtensile bond strength of fiber posts to composite resin cores af-ter application of 24% hydrogen peroxide.Materials and Methods: Eighteen white fiber posts, immersed in 24% hydrogen peroxide were divided into three groups (n=6. In the group A post surfaces were silanized with an ethanol based solution, in group B with an acetone based solution, in the group C with and un-diluted methacryloxytrimethoxysilane (as the control group. The cores were built up using flowable composite. Microtensile bond strength test and evaluations using stereomi-croscope were performed on the samples and the data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests.Results: A significant difference was observed between the amounts of microtensile bond strength of fiber poststo composite cores in the groups A and B, and the ones in group C (P0.05.Conclusion: The type of solvent in silane solution has no effect on microtensile bond strength between fiber post andcomposite resin core after application of 24% Hydrogen Peroxide.

  11. Evaluation of dental adhesive systems with amalgam and resin composite restorations: comparison of microleakage and bond strength results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neme, A L; Evans, D B; Maxson, B B

    2000-01-01

    A variety of laboratory tests have been developed to assist in predicting the clinical performance of dental restorative materials. Additionally, more than one methodology is in use for many types of tests performed in vitro. This project assessed and compared results derived from two specific laboratory testing methods, one for bond strength and one for microleakage. Seven multi-purpose dental adhesives were tested with the two methodologies in both amalgam and resin composite restorations. Bond strength was determined with a punch-out method in sections of human molar dentin. Microleakage was analyzed with a digital imaging system (Image-Pro Plus, Version 1.3) to determine the extent of dye penetration in Class V preparations centered at the CEJ on both the buccal and lingual surfaces of human molar teeth. There were 32 treatment groups (n = 10); seven experimental (dental adhesives) and one control (copal varnish, 37% phosphoric acid) followed by restoration with either amalgam or resin composite. Specimens were thermocycled 500 times in 5 degrees and 55 degrees C water with a one-minute dwell time. Bond strength and microleakage values were determined for each group. ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests demonstrated an interaction between restorative material and adhesive system with a significant difference among adhesives (p resin composite restorations than in the amalgam restorations. Bond strength testing was more discriminating than microleakage evaluation in identifying differences among materials.

  12. Flexural Strength of Preheated Resin Composites and Bonding Properties to Glass-Ceramic and Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Richard Kramer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the impact of preheating (25, 37, 54, or 68 °C of TetricEvoCeram (TEC, FiltekSupremeXT (FSXT, and Venus (V on flexural strength (FS, shear bond strength (SBS and interfacial tension (IFT. FS was tested with TEC and FSXT. For SBS, glass-ceramic and human dentin substrate were fabricated and luted with the preheated resin composite (RC. SBSs of 1500 thermal cycled specimens were measured. For IFT, glass slides covered with the non-polymerized RC were prepared and contact angles were measured. Data were analyzed using 2/1-way ANOVA with Scheffé-test, and t-test (p < 0.05. Preheated TEC (37–68 °C showed higher FS compared to the control-group (25 °C (p < 0.001. FSXT presented higher FS than TEC (p < 0.001. For SBS to dentin higher values for FSXT than TEC were found. The preheating temperature showed no impact on SBS to dentin. SBS to glass-ceramic revealed a positive influence of temperature for TEC 25–68 °C (p = 0.015. TEC showed higher values than V and FSXT (p < 0.001. IFT values increased with the preheating temperature. A significant difference could be observed in every RC group between 25 and 68 °C (p < 0.001.

  13. Grinding performance evaluation of porous composite-bonded CBN wheels for Inconel 718

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhenzhen; Xu Jiuhua; Ding Wenfeng; Ma Changyu

    2014-01-01

    For high-efficiency grinding of difficult-to-cut materials such as titanium and nickel alloys, a high porosity is expected and also a sufficient mechanical strength to satisfy the function. However, the porosity increase is a disadvantage to the mechanical strength. As a promising pore forming agent, alumina bubbles are firstly induced into the abrasive layer to fabricate porous cubic boron nitride (CBN) wheels. When the wheel porosity reaches 45%, the bending strength is still high up to 50 MPa with modified orderly pore distribution. A porous CBN wheel was fabricated with a total porosity around 30%. The grinding performance of the porous composite-bonded CBN wheel was evaluated in terms of specific force, specific grinding energy, and grinding temper-ature, which were better than those of the vitrified one under the same grinding conditions. Com-pared to the vitrified CBN wheel, clear straight cutting grooves and less chip adhesion are observed on the ground surface and there is also no extensive loading on the wheel surface after grinding.

  14. Grinding performance evaluation of porous composite-bonded CBN wheels for Inconel 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhenzhen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available For high-efficiency grinding of difficult-to-cut materials such as titanium and nickel alloys, a high porosity is expected and also a sufficient mechanical strength to satisfy the function. However, the porosity increase is a disadvantage to the mechanical strength. As a promising pore forming agent, alumina bubbles are firstly induced into the abrasive layer to fabricate porous cubic boron nitride (CBN wheels. When the wheel porosity reaches 45%, the bending strength is still high up to 50 MPa with modified orderly pore distribution. A porous CBN wheel was fabricated with a total porosity around 30%. The grinding performance of the porous composite-bonded CBN wheel was evaluated in terms of specific force, specific grinding energy, and grinding temperature, which were better than those of the vitrified one under the same grinding conditions. Compared to the vitrified CBN wheel, clear straight cutting grooves and less chip adhesion are observed on the ground surface and there is also no extensive loading on the wheel surface after grinding.

  15. Flexural Behavior of RC Members Using Externally Bonded Aluminum-Glass Fiber Composite Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Nam Hong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns improvement of flexural stiffness/strength of concrete members reinforced with externally bonded, aluminum-glass fiber composite (AGC beams. An experimental program, consisting of seven reinforced concrete slabs and seven reinforced concrete beams strengthened in flexure with AGC beams, was initiated under four-point bending in order to evaluate three parameters: the cross-sectional shape of the AGC beam, the glass fiber fabric array, and the installation of fasteners. The load-deflection response, strain distribution along the longitudinal axis of the beam, and associated failure modes of the tested specimens were recorded. It was observed that the AGC beam led to an increase of the initial cracking load, yielding load of the tension steels and peak load. On the other hand, the ductility of some specimens strengthened was reduced by more than 50%. The A-type AGC beam was more efficient in slab specimens than in beam specimens and the B-type was more suitable for beam specimens than for slabs.

  16. Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical and Corrosion Behavior of Accumulative Roll Bonded Mg-2%Zn/Al-7075 Multilayered Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne, Gajanan; Ramesh, M. R.; Shivananda Nayaka, H.; Arya, Shashi Bhushan; Sahu, Sandeep

    2017-02-01

    Multilayered composite of Mg-2%Zn/Al-7075 was developed by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) of wrought Mg-2%Zn and aluminum 7075 alloy. The Mg-2%Zn/Al-7075 multilayered composite exhibited density of 2295 kg/m3 and an average grain size of 1 and 1.3 μm in Mg-2%Zn and Al-7075 layers, respectively. A thorough microstructural characterization was performed on the composites by scanning electron microscope, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscope and phase analysis by x-ray diffraction. In addition, mechanical properties were evaluated by microhardness and tensile tests. Corrosion behavior of the multilayered composite was examined using electrochemical polarization test. EBSD analysis showed the presence of ultrafine grains with high-angle grain boundaries. The composite exhibited a significant improvement in ultimate tensile strength ( 1.82 times) and elongation ( 1.5 times) as compared with Mg-2%Zn alloy, after four-pass ARB process.

  17. Bonding of flowable resin composite restorations to class 1 occlusal cavities with and without cyclic load stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Takatoshi; Maseki, Toshio; Nara, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    To examine the bonding of flowable resin composite restorations (F-restoration) to class 1 occlusal cavities with and without cyclic load stress, compared with that of a universal resin composite restoration (U-restoration). Two flowable composites and one universal composite (control) were applied with an adhesive system to 42 standardized class 1 occlusal cavities. The restored specimens were subjected to cyclic load stress and no stress modes. The microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) of the dentin floor was measured. The U-restoration did not show pretesting failure. The F-restorations exhibited pretesting failure, regardless of the stress mode. The μ-TBS was not significantly different among the three restorations, regardless of the stress mode. The cyclic load stress did not influence the μ-TBS of the F-restorations; however, it significantly reduced μ-TBS in the U-restoration. The bonding reliability of the F-restorations was inferior to that of the U-restoration, for both stress modes.

  18. Effects of Thermal Cycling on Thermal Expansion and Mechanical Properties of Sic Fiber-reinforced Reaction-bonded Si3n4 Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Palczer, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal expansion curves for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix composites (SiC/RBSN) and unreinforced RBSN were measured from 25 to 1400 C in nitrogen and in oxygen. The effects of fiber/matrix bonding and cycling on the thermal expansion curves and room-temperature tensile properties of unidirectional composites were determined. The measured thermal expansion curves were compared with those predicted from composite theory. Predicted thermal expansion curves parallel to the fiber direction for both bonding cases were similar to that of the weakly bonded composites, but those normal to the fiber direction for both bonding cases resulted in no net dimensional changes at room temperature, and no loss in tensile properties from the as-fabricated condition. In contrast, thermal cycling in oxygen for both composites caused volume expansion primarily due to internal oxidation of RBSN. Cyclic oxidation affected the mechanical properties of the weakly bonded SiC/RBSN composites the most, resulting in loss of strain capability beyond matrix fracture and catastrophic, brittle fracture. Increased bonding between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix due to oxidation of the carbon-rich fiber surface coating and an altered residual stress pattern in the composite due to internal oxidation of the matrix are the main reasons for the poor mechanical performance of these composites.

  19. In vitro analysis of shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index comparing light curing and self-curing composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo Gaby Neves

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate, in vitro, the shear bond strength of self-curing (ConciseTM - 3M and Alpha Plast - DFL and light-curing composites (TransbondTM XT - 3M and Natural Ortho - DFL used in orthodontics bonding, associated to Morelli metal brackets, with further analysis of adhesive remnant index (ARI and enamel condition in scanning electron microscopy (SEM. METHODS: Forty human premolars, just extracted and stored in physiologic solution 0.9 % were used. Randomly, these samples were divided in four groups: G1 group, the brackets were bonded with ConciseTM - 3M composite; in G2 group, Alpha Plast - DFL composite was used; in G3 group, TransbondTM XT - 3M was used; in G4 group, Natural Ortho - DFL composite was used. These groups were submitted to shear strength tests in universal testing machine, at 0.5 mm per minute speed. RESULTS: Statistical difference between G3 and G4 groups was recorded, as G4 showing higher strength resistance than G3. In the other hand, there were no statistical differences between G1, G2 and G3 and G1, G2 and G4 groups. ARI analysis showed that there was no statistical difference between the groups, and low scores were recorded among then. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis revealed the debonding spots and the enamel surface integrity. CONCLUSIONS: Shear bond strength was satisfactory and similar between the composites, however Natural Ortho - DFL revealed best comparing to TransbondTM XT - 3M.

  20. Highly sensitive liquid-level sensor based on dual-wavelength double-ring fiber laser assisted by beat frequency interrogation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yi; Sun, Qizhen; Tan, Sisi; Wo, Jianghai; Zhang, Jiejun; Liu, Deming

    2012-12-01

    A highly sensitive liquid-level sensor based on dual-wavelength single-longitudinal-mode fiber laser is proposed and demonstrated. The laser is formed by exploiting two parallel arranged phase-shift fiber Bragg gratings (ps-FBGs), acting as ultra-narrow bandwidth filters, into a double-ring resonators. By beating the dual-wavelength lasing output, a stable microwave signal with frequency stability better than 5 MHz is obtained. The generated beat frequency varies with the change of dual-wavelength spacing. Based on this characteristic, with one ps-FBG serving as the sensing element and the other one acting as the reference element, a highly sensitive liquid level sensor is realized by monitoring the beat frequency shift of the laser. The sensor head is directly bonded to a float which can transfer buoyancy into axial strain on the fiber without introducing other elastic elements. The experimental results show that an ultra-high liquid-level sensitivity of 2.12 × 10(7) MHz/m within the measurement range of 1.5 mm is achieved. The sensor presents multiple merits including ultra-high sensitivity, thermal insensitive, good reliability and stability.

  1. A study of the non-linear behaviour of adhesively-bonded composite assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Cognard, Jean Yves; Davies, Peter; Sohier, S; Creac' Hcadec, R

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to define a reliable tool for dimensioning of adhesively bonded assemblies, particularly for marine and underwater applications. This paper presents experimental and numerical results, which describe the non-linear behaviour of an adhesive in a bonded assembly for various loadings. A modified Arcan fixture, well-suited for the study of the behaviour of bonded metal-metal assemblies, was developed in order to focus on the analysis of the behaviour of the adhesive...

  2. Effect of Iron Morphology and Interfacial Bonding on the Toughening of Al2O3/Fe Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.M.El-Sayed Seleman; Xudong SUN; Liang ZUO

    2001-01-01

    Two morphologically different composites comprising an alumina matrix and 20 vol. pct Fe particles have been fabricated by hot pressing technique. Two kinds of microstructures, i.e. a dispersive distribution of Fe particles and a network distribution of Fe particles in alumina matrix,have been produced. Both composites are tougher than the virgin alumina matrix. The fracture toughness of the composite with a network microstructure is much higher than the composite with a microstructure of dispersed particles. For the particulate dispersion microstructure, the main limitation to the toughening is the lack of plastic deformation of the ductile Fe due to the pull out of Fe particles, indicating weak bonding at the Al2O3/Fe interface. For the network microstructure composite, the gauge length of the ductile phase is much larger, allowing the ductile Fe to be stretched to failure between the crack faces. The weak bonding at Al2O3/Fe interface can promote partial debonding and contribute further to toughening in the network microstructure composite.

  3. In vitro evaluation of the fracture resistance and microleakage of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to teeth with composite fillings after cyclic loading

    OpenAIRE

    Sadighpour, Leyla; Geramipanah, Farideh; Allahyari, Somayeh; Fallahi Sichani, Babak; Kharazi Fard, Mohamd Javad

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE There is insufficient data regarding the durability of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to existing composite fillings. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the fracture resistance and microleakage of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to teeth with existing composite fillings. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty maxillary central incisors were divided into three groups (for each group, n=10): intact teeth (NP), teeth with class III composite fillings (C3) and teeth with class IV cav...

  4. Effect of endodontic irrigation and dressing procedures on the shear bond strength of composite to coronal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar E. Abo-Hamar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effects of three sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl-endodontic irrigation procedures used alone or in combinations with two intermediate dressing materials on bond strengths of two adhesive composite systems to coronal dentin. Surfaces were treated with NaOCl or NaOCl–Glyde-File-Prep (H2O2 and EDTA with or without chlorhexidine (CHX as a final rinse. Intermediate dressing materials of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH2 and sodium perborate (SP were combined with surface treatments. Surface treatment groups (n = 10/group included (1 distilled water (control, (2 5.25% NaOCl (30 min, (3 NaOCl/Glyde (30 min, (4 NaOCl/Glyde (30 min + CHX (2 min, (5 NaOCl/Glyde (30 min + Ca(OH2 (5 days + CHX (2 min, and (6 NaOCl/Glyde (30 min + SP (9 days + CHX (2 min. For each surface treatment group, dentin shear bond strengths of two different composite systems (Excite/Tetric Flow Chroma, [EX/TFC], and Clearfil Protect Bond/Protect Liner F [PB/PLF] were evaluated. Median shear bond strengths (EX/TFC, PB/PLF for each surface treatment group in MPa were (1 21, 18; (2 26, 18; (3 21, 17; (4 22, 16; (5 17, 11; and (6 14, 11, respectively. NaOCl significantly increased the bond strength of EX/TFC (p  0.05, whereas it significantly decreased PB/PLF (p < 0.05. Ca(OH2 and SP significantly decreased the bond strengths of both adhesive systems (p < 0.05. Adhesion to coronal dentin is dependent upon the irrigation regimen and the type of adhesive.

  5. Evaluation of bond strength and thickness of adhesive layer according to the techniques of applying adhesives in composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Fernando Carlos Hueb; da Silva, Stella Borges; Valentino, Thiago Assunção; Oliveira, Maria Angélica Hueb de Menezes; Rastelli, Alessandra Nara de Souza; Conçalves, Luciano de Souza

    2013-01-01

    Adhesive restorations have increasingly been used in dentistry, and the adhesive system application technique may determine the success of the restorative procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the application technique of two adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Scotchbond MultiPurpose) on the bond strength and adhesive layer of composite resin restorations. Eight human third molars were selected and prepared with Class I occlusal cavities. The teeth were restored with composite using various application techniques for both adhesives, according to the following groups (n = 10): group 1 (control), systems were applied and adhesive was immediately light activated for 20 seconds without removing excesses; group 2, excess adhesive was removed with a gentle jet of air for 5 seconds; group 3, excess was removed with a dry microbrushtype device; and group 4, a gentle jet of air was applied after the microbrush and then light activation was performed. After this, the teeth were submitted to microtensile testing. For the two systems tested, no statistical differences were observed between groups 1 and 2. Groups 3 and 4 presented higher bond strength values compared with the other studied groups, allowing the conclusion that excess adhesive removal with a dry microbrush could improve bond strength in composite restorations. Predominance of adhesive fracture and thicker adhesive layer were observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in groups 1 and 2. For groups 3 and 4, a mixed failure pattern and thinner adhesive layer were verified. Clinicians should be aware that excess adhesive may negatively affect bond strength, whereas a thin, uniform adhesive layer appears to be favorable.

  6. Study on the bonding strength between calcium phosphate/chitosan composite coatings and a Mg alloy substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jie [School of Chemistry Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Pharmacy College, Jiamusi University, Jiamusi 154007 (China); Dai Changsong, E-mail: changsd@hit.edu.cn [School of Chemistry Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wei Jie [School of Chemistry Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); School of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Suzhou Science Technology University, Suzhou 215009 (China); Wen Zhaohui, E-mail: wenzhaohui1968@163.com [Department of Neuro intern, First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcium phosphate/chitosan composite coatings on the MAO-AZ91D alloy were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The bonding force between the coating and the magnesium alloy was optimized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composite coating slowed down the corrosion rate of magnesium alloy in m-SBF. - Abstract: In order to improve the bonding strength between calcium phosphate/chitosan composite coatings and a micro-arc oxidized (MAO)-AZ91D Mg alloy, different influencing parameters were investigated in the process of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) followed by conversion in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS). Surface morphology and phase constituents of the as-prepared materials were investigated by using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier-transformed infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR), Raman spectrometer, scanning electron microscope (SEM) with an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and a thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analyzer (TG-DTA). Scratch tests were carried out to study the bonding properties between the coatings and the substrates. In vitro immersion tests were conducted to determine the corrosion behaviors of samples with and without deposit layers through electrochemical experiments. In the EPD process, the acetic acid content in the electrophoresis suspension and the electrophoretic voltage played important roles in improving the bonding properties, while the contents of chitosan (CS) and nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA, Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}) in the suspension had less significant influences on the mechanical bonding strength. It was observed that the coatings showed the excellent bonding property when an electrophoretic voltage was in a range of 40-110 V with other reagent amounts as follows: acetic acid: 4.5 vol.%, CS {<=} 0.25 g, nHA {<=} 2.0 g in 200 ml of a CS-acetic acid aqueous solution and nHA {<=} 2.5 g in 300 ml of absolute ethanol. The morphology of the composite coating

  7. Effect of different modes of light modulation on the bond strength and knoop hardness of a dental composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalli'Magro, Eduardo; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Sicoli, Eliseu Augusto; Mendoça, Marcio José; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength and Knoop hardness of Z250 composite resin, light activated with XL2500 curing unit, using different protocols: continuous mode - high intensity (CH) (700 mW/cm(2)) for 20 s; continuous mode - low intensity (CL) (150 mW/cm(2)) for 20 s; and pulse-delay with 150 mW/cm(2) for 2(P2), 3(P3), 5(P5), 10(P10) or 15 s (P15), with a 1-min delay, followed by 700 mW/cm(2) for 20 s. For the push-out test (n=10), the bond strength values were obtained using a universal test machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. For Knoop hardness (n=5), the specimens were made using the same light-activation protocols. The hardness measurements were made with a hardness tester at six depths (top, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mm). The data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. For bond strength, CL and P5 presented significantly higher mean values (p0.05) between P2, P3, P10, P15 and CH. For Knoop hardness, CH and P15 presented the highest mean values from top surface up to 4 mm depth , while CL presented the lowest hardness mean values (psurface. In conclusion, for the pulse-delay method, the initial exposure time can influence bond strength and Knoop hardness of composites.

  8. Features of microstructure and fracture in the transient liquid phase bonded aluminium-based metal matrix composite joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙大谦; 刘卫红; 吴建红; 贾树盛; 邱小明

    2002-01-01

    Transient liquid phase (TLP) bonded aluminium-based metal matrix composite (MMC) joints can be classified into three distinct regions, i.e. the particulate segregation region, the denuded particulate region and the base material region. The microstructure of the particulate segregation region consists of alumina particulate and Al alloy matrix with the Al2Cu and MgAl2O4. It contains more and smaller alumina particulates compared with the base material region. The TLP bonded joints have the tensile strength of 150MPa~200MPa and the shear strength of 70MPa~100MPa. With increasing tensile stress, cracks initiate in the particulate segregation region, especially in the particulate/particulate interface and the particulate/matrix interface, and propagate along particulate/matrix interface, througth thin matrix metal and by linking up the close cracks. The particulate segregation region is the weakest during tensile testing and shear testing due to obviously increased proportion of weak bonds (particulate-particulate bond and particulate-matrix bond).

  9. Adhesive-Bonded Composite Joint Analysis with Delaminated Surface Ply Using Strain-Energy Release Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadegani, Alireza; Yang, Chihdar; Smeltzer, Stanley S. III

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model to determine the strain energy release rate due to an interlaminar crack of the surface ply in adhesively bonded composite joints subjected to axial tension. Single-lap shear-joint standard test specimen geometry with thick bondline is followed for model development. The field equations are formulated by using the first-order shear-deformation theory in laminated plates together with kinematics relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. The system of second-order differential equations is solved to using the symbolic computation tool Maple 9.52 to provide displacements fields. The equivalent forces at the tip of the prescribed interlaminar crack are obtained based on interlaminar stress distributions. The strain energy release rate of the crack is then determined by using the crack closure method. Finite element analyses using the J integral as well as the crack closure method are performed to verify the developed analytical model. It has been shown that the results using the analytical method correlate well with the results from the finite element analyses. An attempt is made to predict the failure loads of the joints based on limited test data from the literature. The effectiveness of the inclusion of bondline thickness is justified when compared with the results obtained from the previous model in which a thin bondline and uniform adhesive stresses through the bondline thickness are assumed.

  10. Bond Strength of Silorane- and Methacrylate-Based Composites to Resin-Modified Glass Ionomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-13

    showed the vast majority of recurrent caries occur at the gingival 3 margins, and suggests the need for a better bond at the dentinal/restoration...Mine et al., 2010). Yaman et al. (2010) examined premolars marked for extraction due to orthodontics , bonded either Filtek Supreme XT with Adper

  11. High Output Voltage Based Multiphase Step-Up DC-DC Converter Topology with Voltage Doubler Rectifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Xiaozhong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available High Output Voltage Based Multiphase Step-Up DC-DC Converter topology with voltage doubler rectifiers is presented in this paper. High output voltage is obtained due to the series combination of voltage doubler rectifiers on the secondary side of high frequency transformers. This topology is useful in the application where the output voltage is greater than the input. The two loop control strategy has been developed in order to analyze the stable and effective working of the converter topology. Therefore the working mode analysis of the converter topology has been described in detail. The multiphase step-up DC-DC converter topology is first simulated on MATLAB and then a prototype has been designed in order to verify the simulation and experimental results. Finally the simulation and experimental results are found to be satisfactory.

  12. Development of FRP composite structural biomaterials: fatigue strength of the fiber/matrix interfacial bond in simulated in vivo environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latour, R A; Black, J

    1993-10-01

    Fiber/matrix interfacial bonding in fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials is potentially sensitive to degradation in aqueous environments. Ultimate bond strength (UBS) in carbon fiber/polysulfone (CF/PSF) and polyaramid/polysulfone (K49/PSF) was previously reported to be significantly decreased in two simulated in vivo environments. While UBS is a useful parameter, for orthopedic implant applications the fatigue behavior of the interface is probably a more relevant indicator of long-term composite material performance. In this article, the effects of simulated in vivo environments (saline, exudate) upon the fatigue behavior of the interface of CF/PSF and K49/PSF are reported. The fatigue behavior of both material combinations was linearly dependent on the logarithm of fatigue life in the dry (control), saline, and exudate environments. Testing either material in saline and exudate resulted in significantly lower fatigue strength than in the dry environment; however, results in the two wet environments were indistinguishable. The CF/PSF interface experienced fatigue failure at approximately 10(5) load cycles at a maximum applied load level of only 15% of its ultimate dry bond strength without indication of an endurance limit being reached. These results raise some important questions regarding the durability of CF/PSF composite in load bearing orthopedic applications.

  13. Assessment of the Shear Bond Strength between Nanofilled Composite Bonded to Glass-ionomer Cement Using Self-etch Adhesive with Different pHs and Total-Etch Adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Sharafeddin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: In the sandwich technique, the undesirable bond between the composite resin and glass-ionomer cement (GIc is one of the most important factors which lead to the failure of restoration. Total-etch and self-etch adhesives may improve the bond strength based on their pH. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between the nanofilled composite resin and GIc using different adhesives. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, 40 specimens (6×6mm in 4 groups (n=10 were prepared in acrylic mold. Each specimen contained conventional GI ChemFil Superior with a height of 3mm, bonded to Z350 composite resin with a height measured 3mm. In order to bond the composite to the GI, the following adhesives were used, respectively: A: mild Clearfil SE Bond self-etch (pH=2, B: intermediate OptiBond self-etch (pH=1.4, C: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=1, and D: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch (pH=7.2. The shear bond strength was measured by using universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used to analyze the data (p< 0.05. Results: The shear bond strength in group A was significantly higher than group B (p= 0.002, C (p< 0.001, and D (p< 0.001. Moreover, the shear bond strength of groups A and B (self-etch was significantly different from group D (total-etch (p< 0.001; and C (self-etch with D (p= 0.024. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that applying the mild self-etch adhesive between the composite and the GIc results in stronger shear bond strength compared to intermediate and strong self-etch adhesives. Moreover, the self-etch adhesive increased the shear bond strength between composite resin and GIc more significantly than total-etch adhesive.

  14. Clinical comparison between a resin-reinforced self-cured glass ionomer cement and a composite resin for direct bonding of orthodontic brackets. Part 2: Bonding on dry enamel and on enamel soaked with saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciafesta, V; Bosch, C; Melsen, B

    1999-11-01

    The purposes of this investigation were to compare the clinical performance of a resin-reinforced self-cured glass ionomer cement to a standard composite resin in the direct bonding of orthodontic brackets when bonded onto: a) dry teeth and b) teeth soaked with saliva. The two bonding agents were compared using a split-mouth design. In that, both systems were used for direct bonding of stainless steel brackets in every patient. Thirty-eight consecutive patients with fixed appliances were followed for a period of 12 months. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: group A (11 patients) and group B (27 patients). In group A, the performance of 220 stainless steel brackets was evaluated: 110 brackets were bonded with GC Fuji Ortho glass ionomer cement (GC Industrial Co., Tokyo, Japan) onto dry teeth, and 110 bonded with System 1+ composite resin (Ormco Corp., Glendora, CA). In group B, the performance of 540 stainless steel brackets was evaluated: 270 brackets were bonded with GC Fuji Ortho onto teeth soaked with saliva, and 270 bonded with System 1+. In group A, GC Fuji Ortho recorded an overall failure rate (34.5%) significantly higher (p 0.05) between the failure rates of the two bonding agents were found when GC Fuji Ortho was used on teeth soaked with saliva. It was concluded, therefore, that GC Fuji Ortho shows clinically acceptable bond strengths when bonded onto moist teeth, but not when used on dry enamel. Both bonding agents failed mostly at the enamel/adhesive interface, without causing any enamel damage.

  15. Effect of mucoprotein on the bond strength of resin composite to human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Lilliam Marie; Powers, John M; O'Keefe, Kathy L; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Marshall, Grayson W

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the bond strength and analyze the morphology of the dentin-adhesive interface of two etch and rinse and two self-etch adhesive systems with two kinds of artificial saliva (with and without 450 mg/L mucin) contamination under different conditions of decontaminating the interface. Bonded specimens were sectioned perpendicularly to the bonded surface in 1-mm thick slabs. These 1-mm thick slabs were remounted in acrylic blocks and sectioned in sticks perpendicular to the bonding interfaces with a 1-mm(2) area. Nine specimens from each condition were tested after 24 h on a testing machine (Instron) at a speed of 0.5 mm/min for a total of 360 specimens. Mean and standard deviations of bond strength (MPa) were calculated. ANOVA showed significant differences as well as Fisher's PLSD intervals (p < 0.05). The following values are the results for different groups: Control group 34-60 MPa, saliva without mucin 0-52 MPa, and saliva with mucin 0-57 MPa. Failure sites were mixed and adhesive failure was common for the low bond strength results. P&BNT with ideal conditions and following the manufacturer's instructions (control) had the highest bond strengths and the dentin-adhesive interface exhibited an ideal morphology of etch-and-rinse system. SEM gave complementary visual evidence of the effect in the dentin/adhesive interface structure with some contaminated conditions compared with their respective control groups. This in vitro artificial saliva model with and without mucin showed that an organic component of saliva could increase or decrease the bond strength depending on the specific bonding agent and decontamination procedure.

  16. Spiking suppression of high power QCW pulse 1319 nm Nd:YAG laser with different intracavity doublers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Qi; Zuo, Jun-Wei; Guo, Chuan; Xu, Chang; Shen, Yu; Zong, Nan; Bo, Yong; Peng, Qin-Jun; Chen, Hong-Bin; Cui, Da-Fu; Xu, Zu-Yan

    2016-09-01

    We describe the results of our efforts in suppressing spiking of a high power, high beam quality 1319 nm Nd:YAG microsecond-pulse laser with three different intracavity frequency doublers. The 1319 nm laser is generated by a quasi-continuous-wave diode-pumped Nd:YAG ring laser system. One potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP), two KTPs and one lithium triborate (LBO) as frequency doublers are installed in the ring resonator and tested, respectively. At 800 Hz repetition rate, with a pulse width of 100 µs, performances of spiking suppression for each case are observed. The average output power are 23.6 W, 22.7 W and 23.4 W with beam quality factors of M 2  =  2.21, 1.28 and 1.25 for one KTP, two KTPs and one LBO, respectively. The corresponding brightness are 270 MW/(cm2·sr), 780 MW/(cm2·sr) and 860 MW/(cm2·sr). With better beam quality, higher brightness, and easier maintainability, the LBO is the best option of the three. A laser rate equation model including the insertion loss of the doubler is applied for theoretical analysis of the output temporal pulse shape and power, and the simulated results agree well with the experimental data.

  17. Effect of postoperative peroxide bleaching on the marginal seal of composite restorations bonded with self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubickova, A; Dudek, M; Comba, L; Housova, D; Bradna, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of peroxide bleaching on the marginal seal of composite restorations bonded with several adhesive systems. Combined cylindrical Class V cavities located half in enamel and half in dentin were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of human molars. The cavities were bonded with the self-etch adhesives Clearfil SE-Bond (CLF), Adper Prompt (ADP), and iBond (IBO) and an etch-and-rinse adhesive Gluma Comfort Bond (GLU) and restored with a microhybrid composite Charisma. Experimental groups were treated 25 times for eight hours per day with a peroxide bleaching gel Opalescence PF 20, while the control groups were stored in distilled water for two months and then subjected to a microleakage test using a dye penetration method. Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the etching and penetration abilities of the adhesives and morphology of debonded restoration-enamel interfaces after the microleakage tests. Statistical analyses were performed using nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, and Wilcoxon tests at p=0.05. The microleakage of all GLU groups was low and not significantly affected by peroxide bleaching. Low microleakage was recorded for CLF control groups, but after bleaching, a small but significant increase in microleakage at the enamel margin indicated its sensitivity to peroxide bleaching. For ADP and IBO control groups, the microleakage at the enamel margins was significantly higher than for GLU and CLF and exceeded that at the dentin margins. Bleaching did not induce any significant changes in the microleakage. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that in our experimental setup, decreased adhesion and mechanical resistance of the ADP- and IBO-enamel interfaces could be more important than the chemical degradation effects induced by the peroxide bleaching gel.

  18. Influence of method and period of storage on the microtensile bond strength of indirect composite resin restorations to dentine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ribeiro Santana

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of the method and period of storage on the adhesive bond strength of indirect composite resin to bovine dentin. Ninety bovine incisors were stored in three different solutions: 0.2% thymol, 10% formalin, and 0.2% sodium azide, during 3 periods of storage: 7 days, 30 days and 6 months, resulting in 9 groups (n = 10. The roots were cut off and the buccal surface was ground with #600-grit silicon carbide paper. The surface was conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s and a composite resin restoration (TPH Spectrum was fixed using a one-bottle adhesive system (Adper Single Bond and a dual-cured resinous cement (Rely X ARC under a load of 500 g for 5 minutes. The samples were serially cut perpendicular to the bonded interface to obtain slices of 1.2 mm in thickness. Each slab was trimmed with a cylindrical diamond bur resulting in an hourglass shape with a cross-sectional area of approximately 1 mm². The microtensile bond strength (μTBS testing was performed in a testing machine (EMIC 2000 DL at a 0.5 mm/minute crosshead-speed until failure. After fracture, the specimens were examined under SEM to analyze the mode of fracture. μTBS Means were expressed in MPa and the data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (3X3 and the Tukey test (α = 0.05. The storage times of 7 and 30 days produced no significant difference irrespective of the solution type. The formalin and thymol solutions, however, did have a negative influence on bond strength when the teeth were stored for 6 months.

  19. The Effect of Ti on Microstructural Characteristics and Reaction Mechanism in Bonding of Al-Ceramic Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Li; Kehong, Wang; Deku, Zhang

    2016-09-01

    The effect of Ti on microstructural characteristics and reaction mechanism in bonding of Al-Ceramic composite was studied. Ti and Al-Ceramic composite were diffusion welded at 550, 600, 700, 800, and 900 °C in a vacuum furnace. The microstructures and compositions of the interface layers were analyzed, and the mechanical properties and fracture morphology of the joints were examined. The results indicated that there was a systematic switch from Ti/Ti7Al5Si12/composite at 600 °C and Ti/TiAl3/Ti7Al5Si12/composite at 700 °C to Ti/Ti7Al5Si12/TiAl3/Ti7Al5Si12/composite at 800 °C and Ti/Ti7Al5Si12/TiAl3/composite at 900 °C. The formation of TiAl3 at 700 and 800 °C depended on Al segregation, which was an uphill diffusion driven by chemical potential. The maximum shear strength was 40.9 MPa, found in the joint welded at 700 °C. Most joints fractured between Ti7Al5Si12 and Al-Ceramic composite. In any case, Ti7Al5Si12 was favorable for Al-Ceramic composite welding, which attached to Al-Ceramic composite, reducing the differences in physiochemical properties between SiC and metal, improving the mechanical properties of the joints and increasing the surface wettability of Al-Ceramic composite.

  20. Repair of amalgam restorations with composite resin and bonded amalgam: A microleakage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Araújo Veloso Popoff

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: The use of adhesive systems significantly affected the ability to seal the repair/ tooth interface. However, at the level of the repair/restoration interface, the bonded amalgam technique may increase microleakage.

  1. Optimized composition for bonding assistant coat in carbon steel sandwich panels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Liu; Jingtao Han

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the alloying theory of bonding assistant coat (BAC),taking into account of the interaction of alloy elements,the regressive equation,which relates the wetting ability of bonding assistant coat with the contents of Mn,Ni,Si,Sn,and B,was established by using quadratic regression orthogonal design of five factors.The influence of elements and their interaction on the wetting ability was analyzed.The ranges of alloy elements were optimized.The melting point of bonding assistant coat was measured by using differential thermal analysis.The results show that the interactions of Ni and Mn,Ni,and Sn can increase the wetting ability obviously and the melting point of bonding assistant coat has been decreased.

  2. Role of enamel deminerlization and remineralization on microtensile bond strength of resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Abbas; Zafar, Muhammad S.; Al-Wasifi, Yasser; Fareed, Wamiq; Khurshid, Zohaib

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study is aimed to establish the microtensile bond strength of enamel following exposure to an aerated drink at various time intervals with/without application of remineralization agent. In addition, degree of remineralization and demineralization of tooth enamel has been assessed using polarized light microscopy. Materials and Methods: Seventy extracted human incisors split into two halves were immersed in aerated beverage (cola drink) for 5 min and stored in saliva until the time of microtensile bond testing. Prepared specimens were divided randomly into two study groups; remineralizing group (n = 70): specimens were treated for remineralization using casein phosphopeptides and amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) remineralization agent (Recaldent™; GC Europe) and control group (n = 70): no remineralization treatment; specimens were kept in artificial saliva. All specimens were tested for microtensile bond strength at regular intervals (1 h, 1 days, 2 days, 1 week, and 2 weeks) using a universal testing machine. The results statistically analyzed (P = 0.05) using two-way ANOVA test. Results: Results showed statistically significant increase in bond strength in CPP-ACP tested group (P < 0.05) at all-time intervals. The bond strength of remineralizing group samples at 2 days (~13.64 megapascals [MPa]) is comparable to that of control group after 1 week (~12.44 MPa). Conclusions: CPP-ACP treatment of teeth exposed to an aerated drink provided significant increase in bond strength at a shorter interval compared to teeth exposed to saliva alone. PMID:27403057

  3. Ultrasonic and micromechanical study of damage and elastic properties of SiC/RBSN ceramic composites. [Reaction Bonded Silicon Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Y. C.; Hefetz, M.; Rokhlin, S. I.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Ultrasonic techniques are employed to develop methods for nondestructive evaluation of elastic properties and damage in SiC/RBSN composites. To incorporate imperfect boundary conditions between fibers and matrix into a micromechanical model, a model of fibers having effective anisotropic properties is introduced. By inverting Hashin's (1979) microstructural model for a composite material with microscopic constituents the effective fiber properties were found from ultrasonic measurements. Ultrasonic measurements indicate that damage due to thermal shock is located near the surface, so the surface wave is most appropriate for estimation of the ultimate strength reduction and critical temperature of thermal shock. It is concluded that bonding between laminates of SiC/RBSN composites is severely weakened by thermal oxidation. Generally, nondestructive evaluation of thermal oxidation effects and thermal shock shows good correlation with measurements previously performed by destructive methods.

  4. Cobalt double-ring and double-dot structures: Magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Urías, F., E-mail: flo@ipicyt.edu.mx [Advanced Materials Department, IPICYT, Camino a la presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a sección, 78216, San Luis Potosí S.L.P., México (Mexico); Torres-Heredia, J.J. [Instituto Tecnológico Superior de Las Choapas, Col. J. M. Rosa do, 96980, Las Choapas, Veracruz (Mexico); Muñoz-Sandoval, E. [Advanced Materials Department, IPICYT, Camino a la presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a sección, 78216, San Luis Potosí S.L.P., México (Mexico)

    2016-02-15

    The magnetization reversal mechanism of nanostructures of cobalt double-rings (D-rings) and double-dots (D-dots) is investigated in the framework of micromagnetic simulations. The arrays contain two identical coupled rings (wide and narrow) or dots with outer diameter of 200 nm and thicknesses ranging from 2–20 nm. Hysteresis loops, dipole–dipole and exchange energies are systematically calculated for the cases of the structures touching and the structures with a 50-nm inter-magnet separation; moreover, magnetization states along the hysteresis curve are analyzed. The results of both dot and ring D-magnets are compared with the corresponding individual magnets. Our results reveal that all D-ring (in contact and separated) arrays containing narrow rings exhibit non-null remanent magnetization; furthermore, higher coercive fields are promoted when the magnet thickness is increased. It is observed that the magnetization reversal is driven mainly by a clockwise rotation of onion-states, followed by states of frustrated vortices. Our results could help improve the understanding of the magnetic interactions in nanomagnet arrays.

  5. F-111 Adhesive Bonded Repairs Assessment Program - Progress Report 2: Analysis of FM300-2K Repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    areas of honeycomb- core stiffened aluminium panels, which exist across the fuselage and are used for most control surfaces. The honeycomb panels...typically are manufactured by adhesively bonding an upper and lower aluminium skin to aluminium honeycomb-core. The structure provides added stiffness to... aluminium doubler of similar thickness to the skin thickness is bonded over the exposed core with a prescribed overlap length (Figure 1). The purpose

  6. Effectively Exerting the Reinforcement of Dopamine Reduced Graphene Oxide on Epoxy-Based Composites via Strengthened Interfacial Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenbin; Shang, Tinghua; Yang, Wengang; Yang, Huichuan; Lin, Song; Jia, Xiaolong; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2016-05-25

    The effects of dopamine reduced graphene oxide (pDop-rGO) on the curing activity and mechanical properties of epoxy-based composites were evaluated. Taking advantage of self-polymerization of mussel-inspired dopamine, pDop-rGO was prepared through simultaneous functionalization and reduction of graphene oxide (GO) via polydopamine coating. Benefiting from the universal binding ability of polydopamine, good dispersion of pDop-rGO in epoxy matrix was able to be achieved as the content of pDop-rGO being below 0.2 wt %. Curing kinetics of epoxy composites with pDop-rGO were systematically studied by nonisothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Compared to the systems of neat epoxy or epoxy composites containing GO, epoxy composites loaded with pDop-rGO showed lower activation energy (Eα) over the range of cure (α). It revealed that the amino-bearing pDop-rGO was able to react with epoxy matrix and enhance the curing reactions as an amine-type curing agent. The nature of the interactions at GO-epoxy interface was further evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, confirming the occurrence of chemical bonding. The strengthened interfacial adhesion between pDop-rGO and epoxy matrix thus enhanced the effective stress transfer in the composites. Accordingly, the tensile and flexural properties of EP/pDop-rGO composites were enhanced due to both the well dispersion and strong interfacial bonding of pDop-rGO in epoxy matrix.

  7. Critical surface energy of composite cement containing MDP (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate) and chemical bonding to hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabsie, Firas; Grégoire, Geneviève; Sharrock, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Self-adhesive composite cements are increasingly used for cementing inlays/onlays, intraradicular posts, crowns and laminate veneers. Wider clinical acceptance is driven by simpler and faster handling procedures, much like observed for self-etching adhesives. 10-Methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) is a bi-functional monomer incorporated as the reactive ingredient in a contemporary self-adhesive cement. We have examined the surface free energy parameters of this cement and studied the mode of action of the cement on dentine substrate by contact angle measurements to determine the critical surface energy of the cement. Retention of the infrared absorption bands characteristic of the acrylate moieties on the surface of hydroxyapatite particles suggests that MDP contributes to the overall bonding to dentine by forming ionic chemical bonds with surface calcium ions in dentine crystalites.

  8. Investigating the Possibility of Geopolymer to Produce Inorganic-Bonded Wood Composites for Multifunctional Construction Material – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Noorbaini Sarmin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Wood-based composites are widely used in consumer products, either in structural or non-structural applications. One of the basic elements for wood-based composites is the binder itself. Recent years have seen great development and trends in the field of eco-friendly binders in wood-based composite. There have been many concerns on the effects of formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOC released from wood-based products. Researchers have put lot of effort into developing environmental friendly products with enhanced sustainability. Binder materials with a focus on geopolymers (i.e., alumino-silicates are discussed in this publication. The development and utilization of geopolymeric binders is relatively new in the field of wood-based composites. Up to the present there has been insufficient information regarding the manufacturing conditions and properties of wood-nonwood composite materials prepared using a geopolymeric binder. This paper considers the background of geopolymer materials and the possibilities of producing inorganic-bonded wood composite using geopolymer.

  9. Effect of three surface conditioning methods to improve bond strength of particulate filler resin composites

    OpenAIRE

    Özcan, M.; Alander, P.; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M.C.; Kalk, W

    2005-01-01

    The use of resin-based composite materials in operative dentistry is increasing, including applications in stress-bearing areas. However, composite restorations, in common with all restorations, suffer from deterioration and degradation in clinical service. Durable repair alternatives by layering a new composite onto such failed composite restorations, will eliminate unnecessary loss of tooth tissue and repeated insults to the pulp. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of th...

  10. The effects of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of composite resin to machined titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljadi, Mohammad

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between machined titanium and composite resin using different surface treatments. Materials and Methods: Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) specimens were ground with 600 grit SiC paper and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=20/group). Group #1 (Control): samples were sandblasted with 110 microm Al2 O3 for 10 sec. Group #2 (Rocatec): samples were treated with the Rocatec system following the manufacturer's directions but the silanization step was eliminated. Group #3 (Silano Pen): samples were treated with the Silano Pen system. Group #4 (H2SO4 etched): samples were sandblasted with 110 microm Al2O3 for 10 sec and etched with 48% H2SO4 for 60 minutes at 60 oC. Group#5 (acid etching + Rocatec): samples received both treatments as described in Groups 4 and 2, respectively. Group #6 (acid etching + Silano Pen): samples received both treatments as described in Groups 4 and 3, respectively. Composite was bonded to the treated titanium surface, half of the specimens from each group (n=10/group) were subjected to thermocycling, and the samples were tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine. Representative samples from each group were evaluated with SEM. Results: Two-way ANOVA revealed that there were significant differences (p silanization step in the Rocatec system is a critical step and eliminating it may dramatically alter its effectiveness. 3) Combining two surface treatments may not always result in an additive effect. 4) Thermocycling significantly decreased the bond strength regardless of the surface treatment used.

  11. Evaluation of the endodontic treatment influence on the bond strength of fiber posts reinforced by a restorative composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ferreira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Fiber posts are widely used to increase the mechanical strength of the restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of fiber posts reinforced by a restorative composite to radicular dentin on its cervical, middle and apical thirds, regarding to post preparation prior or posterior to the endodontic treatment. Materials and methods: Thirty bovine incisors were used, which had their debris removed, washed in tap water, and stored frozen. The samples were divided into two groups (n = 15 – according to the treatment applied previously to the installation of the posts: Group 1 – root canal obturation followed by root canal preparation for fiber posts bonding; and Group 2 – fiber posts preparation followed by root canal obturation. The posts were cemented and the roots were cut on their cervical (C, medium (M and apical (A thirds – for push out test application. Bond strength was calculated in MPa and data were statistically analyzed by Anova and Tukey test (p < 0.05. Results: The mean values were (MPa ± SD: G1C – 4.0 ± 6.0; G1M – 3.5 ± 2.9; G1A – 7.2 ± 6.3; G2C – 12.7 ± 8.1; G2M – 11.6 ± 10.2; G2A – 6.5 ± 8.1. The cervical and middle thirds of group 2 had the highest mean values, showing significant statistically difference compared to group 1. For apical third, no significant statistically differences were found among groups. When the cervical, middle and apical thirds were analysed separately, no significant statistically differences were found. Conclusion: The post preparation prior to root canal obturation increased the bond strength of fiber posts reinforced by a restorative composite.

  12. 复合树脂间粘接的微拉伸强度研究%Microtensile strength of composite-composite bonding:an in vitro study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林斐; 刘伟; 闫鹏; 岳林

    2015-01-01

    目的:了解不同复合树脂间粘接后的强度。方法:选用甲基丙烯酸基复合树脂Clearfil APX( APX)及其配套粘接剂Clearfil SE Bond ( SE )和环氧基复合树脂Filtek P90( P90)及其配套粘接剂Filtek P90 System Adhesive (SA)。实验分为3组:(1)整块组,将树脂分层固化制成完整一体的树脂块;(2)直接充填组,将树脂固化成块后,表面打磨,再直接填充新树脂,光固化;(3)粘接组,树脂固化成块后打磨,涂布粘接剂,再填充新树脂,光固化。将上述树脂试样切成数条1 mm ×1 mm ×14 mm的样品,检测微拉伸强度,以One-Way ANOVA和LSD法对数据进行统计分析。结果:(1)整块组的微拉伸强度最高,APX为(81.11±1.79) MPa,P90为(82.07±1.42) MPa,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。(2)直接充填组中,APX-APX为(43.54±2.99) MPa,P90-APX为(42.74±2.49) MPa, APX-P90为(41.28±1.96) MPa,P90-P90为(42.39±3.24) MPa,各亚组间差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05)。(3)粘接组中,比较上层树脂的种类显示,用APX修复的微拉伸强度均显著高于用P90修复;比较底层树脂的种类显示,当上层树脂粘接相同种类的底层树脂时,其微拉伸强度要高于其对异种树脂的粘接(P<0.05);比较粘接剂的种类系显示,用SE粘接两树脂的微拉伸强度均显著高于用SA粘接。( 4 )微拉伸强度排序为:整块>SE粘接APX>SA粘接APX>SE粘接P90=直接充填>SA粘接P90。结论:底层树脂表面经打磨后,使用APX粘接修复的强度高于使用P90修复,SE粘接两树脂的强度高于SA,底层树脂的类型对粘接强度影响不大。%Objective: To investigate the bonding strength of different resin composites .Methods:Methacrylate-based resin APX and silorane-based resin composite P90 were chosen in this study , with their

  13. Microstructure, mechanical properties and texture of an AA6061/AA5754 composite fabricated by cross accumulative roll bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verstraete, K., E-mail: kevin.verstraete@u-psud.fr [Université Paris-Sud, SP2M, ICMMO, UMR CNRS 8182, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Helbert, A.L. [Université Paris-Sud, SP2M, ICMMO, UMR CNRS 8182, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Brisset, F. [Université Paris-Sud, ICMMO, UMR CNRS 8182, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Benoit, A.; Paillard, P. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), UMR 6502, Polytech’Nantes, Nantes Cedex (France); Baudin, T. [Université Paris-Sud, SP2M, ICMMO, UMR CNRS 8182, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2015-07-29

    AA6061 alloy is a widely used material in the automotive and aerospace industries, but is prone to hot cracking, which limits its weldability. To prevent this phenomenon, the AA6061/AA5754 composite was formed using a severe plastic deformation technique, Cross Accumulative Roll Bonding (CARB), at an elevated temperature (350 °C) to ensure good bonding between layers. This technique was efficient to maintain a small grain size, even under the process temperature conditions, and consequently, preserve good mechanical properties. The composite had better mechanical properties than the initial aluminium alloys. Microstructure and texture remained stable after two cycles and yield stress tended towards an equal value in the rolling and the transverse directions. After two cycles, the main component was the {001}〈110〉 rotated Cube, which was maintained for up to 10 cycles. Diffusion was more effective as the strain increased. Finally, a tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process was performed on the composite and confirmed resistance to hot cracking.

  14. Study on the bonding strength between calcium phosphate/chitosan composite coatings and a Mg alloy substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Dai, Chang-Song; Wei, Jie; Wen, Zhao-Hui

    2012-11-01

    In order to improve the bonding strength between calcium phosphate/chitosan composite coatings and a micro-arc oxidized (MAO)-AZ91D Mg alloy, different influencing parameters were investigated in the process of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) followed by conversion in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS). Surface morphology and phase constituents of the as-prepared materials were investigated by using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier-transformed infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR), Raman spectrometer, scanning electron microscope (SEM) with an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and a thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analyzer (TG-DTA). Scratch tests were carried out to study the bonding properties between the coatings and the substrates. In vitro immersion tests were conducted to determine the corrosion behaviors of samples with and without deposit layers through electrochemical experiments. In the EPD process, the acetic acid content in the electrophoresis suspension and the electrophoretic voltage played important roles in improving the bonding properties, while the contents of chitosan (CS) and nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) in the suspension had less significant influences on the mechanical bonding strength. It was observed that the coatings showed the excellent bonding property when an electrophoretic voltage was in a range of 40-110 V with other reagent amounts as follows: acetic acid: 4.5 vol.%, CS ≤ 0.25 g, nHA ≤ 2.0 g in 200 ml of a CS-acetic acid aqueous solution and nHA ≤ 2.5 g in 300 ml of absolute ethanol. The morphology of the composite coating obtained under the above optimal condition had a flake-like crystal structure. The EPD in the nHA/CS-acetic acid/ethanol suspension resulted in hydroxyapatite, chitosan, brushite (DCPD, CaHPO4·2H2O) and Ca(OH)2 in the coatings. After the as-prepared coating materials were immersed into PBS, Ca(OH)2 could be converted into HA and DCPD. The results of the electrochemical tests

  15. Effect of Addition of Curcumin Nanoparticles on Antimicrobial Property and Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Composite to Bovine Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Baghaeian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study sought to assess the effect of curcumin nanoparticles (curcNPs on antimicrobial property and shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic composite to bovine enamel.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro, experimental study, 1%, 5% and 10% curcNPs were added to Transbond XT composite. Stainless steel brackets were bonded to 48 sound bovine incisors in four groups (n=12 using composite containing 0% (control, 1%, 5% and 10% curcNPs. The bracket-tooth SBS was measured by a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI score was calculated after debonding using a stereomicroscope. Also, 180 discs were fabricated of the four composites; 108 were subjected to eluted component test, 36 were used for disc diffusion test and 36 were used for biofilm test to assess their antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis and Lactobacillus acidophilus.Results: The highest and lowest SBS belonged to control and 10% curcNP groups, respectively. The difference in SBS was significant among the four groups (P=0.008. The SBS of control group was significantly higher than that of 10% curcNPs (P=0.006. The four groups were not significantly different in terms of ARI score (P>0.05. Growth inhibition zones were not seen in any group. In biofilm test, the colony counts of all bacteria significantly decreased by an increase in percentage of curcNPs. Colony count significantly decreased only at 30 days.Conclusions: At 1% concentration, curcNPs have significant antimicrobial activity against cariogenic bacteria with no adverse effect on SBS. However, insolubility of curcNPs remains a major drawback.Keywords: Curcumin; Nanoparticles; Shear Strength; Composite Resins; Orthodontic Brackets; Anti-Bacterial Agents

  16. Effect of Etching Time and Preparation on Push-Out Bond Strength of Composite to Intracanal Dentin of Primary Anterior Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Mosharrafian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This in-vitro study aimed to compare the push-out bond strength of composite to prepared and unprepared intracanal dentin using a 5th generation bonding agent in primary anterior teeth after etching for seven and 15 seconds.Materials and Methods: Sixty primary anterior teeth were randomly divided into four groups. In groups one and two, intracanal dentin remained intact while in groups three and four it was prepared using a #5 round bur and low-speed handpiece. Single Bond 2 was used in groups one and three after 15 seconds and in groups two and four after seven seconds of etching with phosphoric acid. After restoring with composite resin and incubation, the specimens were subjected to push-out bond strength test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Kaplan Meier curves.Results: The mean bond strength was not significantly different between seven and 15 seconds etching times (P=0.198. Dentin preparation had no significant effect on the mean bond strength (P=0.838. The interaction effect of etching time and dentin preparation was not significant either (P=0.680.Conclusions: Decreasing the etching time from 15 to seven seconds and preparation of intracanal dentin had no significant effect on push-out bond strength of composite to intracanal dentin of primary anterior teeth. Keywords: Dental Etching; Composite Resins; Dentin; Tooth, Deciduous

  17. Bond strength between composite resin and resin modified glass ionomer using different adhesive systems and curing techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Boruziniat; Samineh Gharaei

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate bond strength between RMGI and composite using different adhesive systems and curing techniques. Materials and Methods: Sixty prepared samples of RMGI were randomly divided into six groups according to adhesive systems (total-etch, two-step self-etch and all-in-one) and curing techniques (co-curing and pre-curing). In co-curing technique, the adhesive systems were applied on uncured RMGI samples and co-cured together. In the pre-curing technique, before application of adh...

  18. SIMPLE FIXED SPACE MAINTAINER BONDED WITH FLOWABLE RESIN COMPOSITE IN PREMATURE LOSS OF MAXILLARY FIRST PRIMARY MOLAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heni Primaywati

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The premature loss of primary teeth will make the adjacent tooth drift due to the mesial force of the erupting posterior teeth in the growing child. To overcome this problem a space maintainer is needed. But, space maintainer needs to undergo a laboratorial process, which means needing more time and money. This paper reported a case with premature loss of maxillary first primary molar using space maintainer which can be used immediately, easy to do, and need low cost, a simple fixed space maintainer bonded with flowable resin composite.

  19. Dielectric Non-Destructive Testing of Adhesively Bonded and Composite Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-31

    Transmission) has not proved a practical way of measuring water uptake in aluminium oxide powders and so an alternative method based on glancing angle FTIR...method is being use. It has been shown in the literature (Ageing of aluminium oxide surfaces and their subsequent reactivity towards bonding with

  20. Repair bond strength of a resin composite to alumina-reinforced feldspathic ceramic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goia, Tamiye Simone; Pereira Leite, Fabiola Pessoa; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Oezcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2006-01-01

    This study compared the microtensile bond strength of a repair resin to an alumina-reinforced feldspathic ceramic (Vitadur-alpha, Vita) after 3 surface conditioning methods: Group 1, etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid for 1 minute plus rinsing and drying, followed by application of silane for 5 min

  1. Physico-Chemical Factors Affecting Hydrothermal Resistance and Bonding of Polymeric Composites to Steel Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-01

    7 , I 71iil 7 7 771111011111111111171111 Type A consists of a strong ionic interaction associated with charge transfer bonding mechanisms which...the ionic interaction regions and the density of entangleicnt macromol- ecules at interfaces are not evident from the limited data. Nevertheless

  2. Effect of Porcelain Surface Pretreatments on Composite Resin-Porcelain Shear Bond Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    Release lAW 190-1 Distributed Unlimited ERNEST A. HAYGOOD, ist Lt, USAF Executive Officer 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words ) 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF...Bonding Orthodontic Attachments to Porcelain Teeth Using a Silane Coupling Agent, Am J Orthod 77: 233. Jones, D. W. (1985): Low Fusing Porcelains. In

  3. Effects of two erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet lasers and conventional treatments as composite surface abrasives on the shear bond strength of metal brackets bonded to composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobouti, Farhad; Dadgar, Sepideh; Sanikhaatam, Zahra; Nateghian, Nazanin; Saravi, Mahdi Gholamrezaei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bonding brackets to dental surfaces restored with composites are increasing. No studies to date have assessed the efficacy of laser irradiation in roughening of composite and the resulted shear bond strength (SBS) of the bonded bracket. We assessed, for the 1st time, the efficacy of two laser beams compared with conventional methods. Materials and Methods: Sixty-five discs of light-cured composite resin were stored in deionized distilled water for 7 days. They were divided into five groups of 12 plus a group of five for scanning electron microscopy (SEM): Bur-abrasion followed by phosphoric acid etching (bur-PA), hydrofluoric acid conditioning (HF), sandblasting, 3 W and 2 W erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser irradiation for 12 s. After bracket bonding, specimens were water-stored (24 h) and thermocycled (500 cycles), respectively. SBS was tested at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was scored under ×10 magnification. SEM was carried out as well. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA), Kruskal–Wallis, Tukey, Dunn, one-sample t-test/Wilcoxon tests, and Weibull analysis (α =0.05). Results: The SBS values (megapascal) were bur-PA (11.07 ± 1.95), HF (19.70 ± 1.91), sandblasting (7.75 ± 1.10), laser 2 W (15.38 ± 1.38), and laser 3 W (20.74 ± 1.73) (compared to SBS = 6, all P = 0.000). These differed significantly (ANOVA P = 0.000) except HF versus 3 W laser (Tukey P > 0.05). ARI scores differed significantly (Kruskal–Wallis P = 0.000), with sandblasting and 2 W lasers having scores inclined to the higher end (safest debonding). Weibull analysis implied successful clinical outcome for all groups, except for sandblasting with borderline results. Conclusion: Considering its high efficacy and the lack of adverse effects bound with other methods, the 3 W laser irradiation is recommended for clinical usage. PMID:26998473

  4. Formation process,microstructure and mechanical property of transient liquid phase bonded aluminium-based metal matrix composite joint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙大谦; 刘卫红; 贾树盛; 邱小明

    2004-01-01

    The formation process, microstructure and mechanical properties of transient liquid phase (TLP) bonded aluminium-based metal matrix composite (MMC) joint with copper interlayer were investigated. The formation process of the TLP joint comprises a number of stages: plastic deformation and solid diffusion (stage 1), dissolution of interlayer and base metal (stage 2), isothermal solidification (stage 3) and homogenization (stage 4). The microstructure of the joint depends on the joint formation process (distinct stages). The plastic deformation and solid diffusion in stage 1 favoure the intimate contact at interfaces and liquid layer formation. The microstructure of joint consists of aluminium solid solution, alumina particle, Al2Cu and MgAl2O4 compounds in stage 2. The most pronounced feature of joint microstructure in stage 3 is the alumina particle segregation in the center of the joint. The increase of joint shear strength with increasing bonding temperature is mainly attributed to improving the fluidity and wettability of liquid phase and decreasing the amount of Al2Cu brittle phase in the joint. The principal reason of higher bonding temperature (>600 ℃) resulting in lowering obviously the joint shear strength is the widening of alumina particle segregation region that acts as a preferential site for failure. The increase of joint shear strength with increasing holding time is mainly associated with decreasing the amount of Al2 Cu brittle phase and promoting homogenization of joint.

  5. Electrochemical and Reaction Bonding Processing of Thick ZrO2/Al2O3 Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGZhou-cheng; XIAOPing

    2004-01-01

    A novel technique combining electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and reaction bonding process (RBP) is developed to fabricate thick ZrO2/Al2O3 composite coatings. Mixed organic solvents are used here to make suspension containing yttria stablised zirconia (YSZ) and aluminium (Al). The results show that densely packed green form coatings are deposited using a mixture of ethanol and acetylacetone as suspension medium and ball milling for 48 hours. On subsequent heat treatment, melting and oxidation of aluminium in the green forms promote densification during sintering. By these means,thick, uniform and crack-free ZrO2/Al2O3 composite coatings have been fabricated on metal substrate.

  6. Electrochemical and Reaction Bonding Processing of Thick ZrO2/Al2O3 Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhou-cheng; XIAO Ping

    2004-01-01

    A novel technique combining electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and reaction bonding process (RBP) is developed to fabricate thick ZrO2/Al2O3 composite coatings. Mixed organic solvents are used here to make suspension containing yttria stablised zirconia (YSZ) and aluminium (Al). The results show that densely packed green form coatings are deposited using a mixture of ethanol and acetylacetone as suspension medium and ball milling for 48 hours. On subsequent heat treatment, melting and oxidation of aluminium in the green forms promote densification during sintering. By these means,thick, uniform and crack-free ZrO2/Al2O3 composite coatings have been fabricated on metal substrate.

  7. Repair bond strength of a resin composite to alumina-reinforced feldspathic ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goia, Tamiye Simone; Leite, Fabíola Pessôa; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2006-01-01

    This study compared the microtensile bond strength of a repair resin to an alumina-reinforced feldspathic ceramic (Vitadur-alpha, Vita) after 3 surface conditioning methods: Group 1, etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid for 1 minute plus rinsing and drying, followed by application of silane for 5 minutes; group 2, airborne particle abrasion with 110-mm aluminum oxide using a chairside air-abrasion device followed by silane application for 5 minutes; group 3, chairside tribochemical silica coating with 30-microm SiOx followed by silane application for 5 minutes (N = 30). Group 1 presented the highest mean bond strength (19.7 +/- 3.8 MPa), which was significantly higher than those of groups 2 (10 +/- 2.6 MPa) and 3 (10.4 +/- 4 MPa) (P < .01). Scanning electron microscope analysis of the failure modes demonstrated predominantly mixed types of failures, with adhesive and/or cohesive failures in all experimental groups.

  8. Effect of three surface conditioning methods to improve bond strength of particulate filler resin composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özcan, M.; Alander, P.; Vallittu, P.K.; Huysmans, M.C.; Kalk, W.

    2005-01-01

    The use of resin-based composite materials in operative dentistry is increasing, including applications in stress-bearing areas. However, composite restorations, in common with all restorations, suffer from deterioration and degradation in clinical service. Durable repair alternatives by layering a

  9. Effect of three surface conditioning methods to improve bond strength of particulate filler resin composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özcan, M.; Alander, P.; Vallittu, P.K.; Huysmans, M.C.; Kalk, W.

    2004-01-01

    The use of resin-based composite materials in operative dentistry is increasing, including applications in stress-bearing areas. However, composite restorations, in common with all restorations, suffer from deterioration and degradation in clinical service. Durable repair alternatives by layering a

  10. Interfacial layers evolution during annealing in Ti-Al multi-laminated composite processed using hot press and roll bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, A. H.; Eghbali, B.

    2016-09-01

    Ti-Al multi-laminated composites have great potential in high strength and low weight structures. In the present study, tri-layer Ti-Al composite was synthesized by hot press bonding under 40 MPa at 570 °C for 1 h and subsequent hot roll bonding at about 450 °C. This process was conducted in two accumulative passes to 30% and to 67% thickness reduction in initial and final passes, respectively. Then, the final annealing treatments were done at 550, 600, 650, 700 and 750 °C for 2, 4 and 6 h. Investigations on microstructural evolution and thickening of interfacial layers were performed by scanning electron microscopes, energy dispersive spectrometer, X-ray diffraction and micro-hardness tests. The results showed that the thickening of diffusion layers corresponds to amount of deformation. In addition to thickening of the diffusion layers, the thickness of aluminum layers decreased and after annealing treatment at 750 °C for 6 h the aluminum layers were consumed entirely, which occurred because of the enhanced interdiffusion of Ti and Al elements. Scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer showed that the sequence of interfacial layers as Ti3Al-TiAl-TiAl2-TiAl3 which are believed to be the result of thermodynamic and kinetic of phase formation. Micro-hardness results presented the variation profile in accordance with the sequence of intermetallic phases and their different structures.

  11. Short-pulse Er:YAG laser increases bond strength of composite resin to sound and eroded dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cersosimo, Maria Cecília Pereira; Matos, Adriana Bona; Couto, Roberta Souza D.'Almeida; Marques, Márcia Martins; de Freitas, Patricia Moreira

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the irradiation with a short-pulse Er:YAG laser on the adhesion of composite resin to sound and eroded dentin (SD and ED). Forty-six samples of occlusal dentine, obtained from human molars, had half of their surface protected, while the other half was submitted to erosive cycles. Afterward, 23 samples were irradiated with Er:YAG laser, resulting in four experimental groups: SD, sound irradiated dentine (SID-Er:YAG, 50 μs, 2 Hz, 80 mJ, and 12.6 J/cm2), ED, and eroded irradiated dentin (EID-erosion + Er:YAG laser). A self-etching adhesive system was used, and then cylinders of composite resin were prepared. A microshear bond strength test was performed after 24 h storage (n=20). The morphology of SD and ED, with or without Er:YAG laser irradiation, was evaluated under scanning electron microscopy (n=3). Bond strength values (MPa) were subjected to analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test. Statistically significant differences were found among the experimental groups: SD (9.76±3.39 B), SID (12.77±5.09 A), ED (5.12±1.72 D), and EID (7.62±3.39 C). Even though erosion reduces the adhesion to dentin, the surface irradiation with a short-pulse Er:YAG laser increases adhesion to both ED and SD.

  12. Bonding characteristics of the Al2O3-metal composite coating fabricated onto carbon steel by combustion synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-feng Xue; Ze-hua Wang; Ze-hua Zhou; Shao-qun Jiang; Jiang-bo Cheng; Chang-hao Wang; Jia Shao

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication of an alumina-metal composite coating onto a carbon steel substrate by using a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis technique was demonstrated. The effects of the type and thickness of the pre-coated layer on the binding structure and surface qual-ity of the coating were systematically investigated. The macrostructure, phase composition, and bonding interface between the coating and the substrate were investigated by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrome-try (EDS). The diffraction patterns indicated that the coating essentially consisted ofα-Al2O3, Fe(Cr), and FeO⋅Al2O3. With an increase in the thickness of the pre-coated working layer, the coating became more smooth and compact. The transition layer played an important role in enhancing the binding between the coating and the substrate. When the pre-coated working layer was 10 mm and the pre-coated transition layer was 1 mm, a compact structure and metallurgical bonding with the substrate were obtained. Thermal shock test results indicated that the ceramic coating exhibited good thermal shock resistance when the sample was rapidly quenched from 800°C to room temperature by plung-ing into water.

  13. Effect of applied dc bias voltage on composition, chemical bonding and mechanical properties of carbon nitride films prepared by PECVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-xuan; XU Tao; HAO Jun-ying; CHEN Jian-min; ZHOU Hui-di; XUE Qun-ji; LIU Hui-wen

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nitride films were deposited on Si (100) substrates using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique from CH4 and N2 at different applied dc bias voltage. The microstructure, composition and chemical bonding of the resulting films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus of the films were evaluated using nano-indentation. As the results, the Raman spectra, showing the G and D bands, indicate the amorphous structure of the films. XPS and FTIR measurements demonstrate the existence of various carbon-nitride bonds in the films and the hydrogenation of carbon nitride phase. The composition ratio of N to C, the nano-hardness and the elastic modulus of the carbon nitride films increase with increasing dc bias voltage and reach the maximums at a dc bias voltage of 300 V, then they decrease with further increase of the dc bias voltage. Moreover, the XRD analyses indicate that the carbon nitride film contains some polycrystalline C3N4 phase embedded in the amorphous matrix at optimized deposition condition of dc bias voltage of 300 V.

  14. Effect of Etching Time and Preparation on Push-Out Bond Strength of Composite to Intracanal Dentin of Primary Anterior Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosharrafian, Shahram; Afshar, Hossein; Farbod, Maryam; Baniameri, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This in-vitro study aimed to compare the push-out bond strength of composite to prepared and unprepared intracanal dentin using a 5th generation bonding agent in primary anterior teeth after etching for seven and 15 seconds. Materials and Methods: Sixty primary anterior teeth were randomly divided into four groups. In groups one and two, intracanal dentin remained intact while in groups three and four it was prepared using a #5 round bur and low-speed handpiece. Single Bond 2 was used in groups one and three after 15 seconds and in groups two and four after seven seconds of etching with phosphoric acid. After restoring with composite resin and incubation, the specimens were subjected to push-out bond strength test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Kaplan Meier curves. Results: The mean bond strength was not significantly different between seven and 15 seconds etching times (P=0.198). Dentin preparation had no significant effect on the mean bond strength (P=0.838). The interaction effect of etching time and dentin preparation was not significant either (P=0.680). Conclusions: Decreasing the etching time from 15 to seven seconds and preparation of intracanal dentin had no significant effect on push-out bond strength of composite to intracanal dentin of primary anterior teeth. PMID:28127329

  15. Ormocer: An aesthetic direct restorative material; An in vitro study comparing the marginal sealing ability of organically modified ceramics and a hybrid composite using an ormocer-based bonding agent and a conventional fifth-generation bonding agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Kalra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives : To compare the marginal sealing ability of ormocer with a hybrid composite using an ormocer based bonding agent and a conventional fifth generation bonding agent. Materials and Methods : Fifty four human premolars were randomly distributed into four test groups of 12 teeth each and two control groups of 3 teeth each. Class I occlusal preparation of 1.5 mm depth were made in each tooth. These were restored using the adhesive and restorative material according to the group. The restorations were finished using a standard composite finishing and polishing kit. Thermocycling between 5 o C and 55 o C was carried out. Having blocked the root apex and the entire tooth surface except 1 mm around the restoration margin, the teeth were immersed in 2% methylene blue for 48 hours, after which the dye penetration through the margins of each sample was studied under a stereomicroscope. Results and Discussion : Group IV (Admira with Admira Bond showed the minimum marginal leakage with a mean of 0.200 mm. Four samples in this group showed no microleakage at all and a maximum of 0.400 mm was seen in one sample. Group II (Spectrum TPH with Admira Bond showed the maximum leakage with a mean of 0.433 mm. One sample showed as much as 1.00 mm of microleakage. Admira when used with Admira Bond showed lesser microleakage than Spectrum TPH used with Prime & Bond NT, the difference being statistically insignificant.

  16. Development of a Low-Cost Process for Manufacturing of Ti-Metal Matrix Composite by Roll-Diffusion Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testani, C.; Ferraro, F.

    2010-06-01

    Composite materials with titanium-alloy matrix are currently the class of material with the highest specific resistance at temperatures up to 800 °C. The main hurdle to their application is their final cost. Even if it is clear that the costs of constituent materials are decreasing due to volume production effects, the production processing costs remain high due to the batch production approach. Centro Sviluppo Materiali’s (CSM) efforts have focused on the manufacturing process in order to obtain an innovative solution to reduce the manufacturing costs with respect to the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) process that represents the standard production process for this class of materials. The new approach can allow a cost reduction of about 40%; this result was obtained by developing an experimental “diffusion bonding” plant for co-rolling at high temperature in a superplastic rolling regime, sheets of titanium alloy and monofilament silicon carbide fabrics. The experimental pilot plant was proposed for patent with RM2006A000261 in May 2006. This paper describes the manufacturing phases and process results. Moreover, has been shown that the diffusion in the solid state was obtained in a process window that was at least 100 times faster than that of HIP. High-temperature tensile tests were carried out on specimens machined from metallic matrix composite materials produced with the roll-diffusion bonding (RDB) process. The samples produced were also submitted to electrochemical dissolution tests of the metallic matrix in order to verify the geometric integrity of the fibers inside the matrix after the bonding phase. The results achieved as well as the process knowledge acquired with the CSM pilot plant are the base for further development of industrial application of the titanium roll-diffusion bonding.

  17. Dynamic modeling and analysis of the PZT-bonded composite Timoshenko beams: Spectral element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Usik; Kim, Daehwan; Park, Ilwook

    2013-03-01

    The health of thin laminated composite beams is often monitored using the ultrasonic guided waves excited by wafer-type piezoelectric transducers (PZTs). Thus, for the smart composite beams which consist of a laminated composite base beam and PZT layers, it is very important to develop a very reliable mathematical model and to use a very accurate computational method to predict accurate dynamic characteristics at very high ultrasonic frequency. In this paper, the axial-bending-shear-lateral contraction coupled differential equations of motion are derived first by the Hamilton's principle with Lagrange multipliers. The smart composite beam is represented by a Timoshenko beam model by adopting the first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT) for the laminated composite base beam. The axial deformation of smart composite beam is improved by taking into account the effects of lateral contraction by adopting the concept of Mindlin-Herrmann rod theory. The spectral element model is then formulated by the variation approach from coupled differential equations of motion transformed into the frequency domain via the discrete Fourier transform. The high accuracy of the present spectral element model is verified by comparing with other solution methods: the finite element model developed in this paper and the commercial FEA package ANSYS. Finally the dynamics and wave characteristics of some example smart composite beams are investigated through the numerical studies.

  18. Contraction stresses in dental composites adjacent to and at the bonded interface as measured by crack analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Nishide, Akihito; Swain, Michael V; Ferracane, Jack L; Sakaguchi, Ronald L; Momoi, Yasuko

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to calculate stresses produced by polymerization contraction in regions surrounding a dental resin composite restoration. Initial cracks were made with a Vickers indenter at various distances from the edge of a cylindrical hole in a soda-lime glass disk. Indentation crack lengths were measured parallel to tangents to the hole edge. Resin composites (three brands) were placed in the hole and polymerized (two light irradiation protocols) at equal radiation exposures. The crack lengths were re-measured at 2 and 10 min after irradiation. Radial tensile stresses due to polymerization contraction at the location of the cracks (σ(crack)) were calculated from the incremental crack lengths and the fracture toughness K(c) of the glass. Contraction stresses at the composite-glass bonded interface (σ(interface)) were calculated from σ(crack) on the basis of the simple mechanics of an internally pressurized thick-walled cylinder. The greater the distance or the shorter the time following polymerization, the smaller was σ(crack). Distance, material, irradiation protocol and time significantly affected σ(crack). Two-step irradiation resulted in a significant reduction in the magnitude of σ(interface) for all resin composites. The contraction stress in soda-lime glass propagated indentation cracks at various distances from the cavity, enabling calculation of the contraction stresses.

  19. Effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on surface characteristics of CAD/CAM composite materials and the bond strength of resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARAO Nobuaki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The study aimed to evaluate effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on bond strengths of resin cements to CAD/CAM composite materials. Material and Methods CAD/CAM composite block materials [Cerasmart (CS and Block HC (BHC] were pretreated as follows: (a no treatment (None, (b application of a ceramic primer (CP, (c alumina-blasting at 0.2 MPa (AB, (d AB followed by CP (AB+CP, and (e glass-beads blasting at 0.4 MPa (GBB followed by CP (GBB+CP. The composite specimens were bonded to resin composite disks using resin cements [G-CEM Cerasmart (GCCS and ResiCem (RC]. The bond strengths after 24 h (TC 0 and after thermal cycling (TC 10,000 at 4–60°C were measured by shear tests. Three-way ANOVA and the Tukey compromise post hoc tests were used to analyze statistically significant differences between groups (α=0.05. Results For both CAD/CAM composite materials, the None group exhibited a significant decrease in bond strength after TC 10,000 (p0.05. The AB+CP group showed a significantly higher bond strength after TC 10,000 than did the AB group for RC (p<0.05, but not for GCCS. The GBB+CP group showed the highest bond strength for both thermal cyclings (p<0.05. Conclusions Air abrasion with glass beads was more effective in increasing bond durability between the resin cements and CAD/CAM composite materials than was using an alumina powder and a CP.

  20. Experimental Study of the Impact Damage of Composition B and Plastic Bonded Explosive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈鹏万; 黄风雷; 丁雁生

    2003-01-01

    A long-pulse low-velocity gas gun with a gas buffer is used to induce impact damage in cast Composition B and hot pressed PBXN-5. To obtain different damage states, a range of projectile velocities are used by controlling the launching pressure of gas gun. The stress history during impact loading is recorded. Various methods are used to characterize the damage state of impacted explosive samples. The microstructure is examined by use of scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and polarized light microscopy (PLM). The densities and ultrasonic attenuation are also measured. The results show that both Composition B and PBXN-5 exhibit some damage characteristics of brittle materials. However, due to the difference in compositions, PBXN-5 exhibits better resistance to impact loading than Composition B.

  1. Molecular composition, grafting density and film area affect the swelling-induced Au-S bond breakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Bei'er; Zhou, Yitian; Cha, Wenli; Wu, Yuanzi; Hu, Jinxing; Li, Liqiang; Chi, Lifeng; Ma, Hongwei

    2014-06-11

    In previous studies, we reported the first observation of the Au-S bond breakage induced mechanically by the swelling of the surface-tethered weak polyelectrolyte brushes in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), a phenomenon with broad applications in the fields of biosensors and functional surfaces. In this study, three factors, namely the molecular composition, grafting density and film area of the weak polyelectrolyte, carboxylated poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate-random-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (poly(OEGMA-r-HEMA)), were studied systematically on how they affected the swelling-induced Au-S bond breakage (ABB). The results showed that, first, the swelling-induced ABB is applicable to a range of molecular compositions and grafting densities; but the critical thickness (Tcritical,dry) varied with both of the two factors. An analysis on the swelling ratio further revealed that the difference in the Tcritical,dry arose from the difference in the swelling ability. A film needed to swell to ∼250 nm to induce ABB regardless of its composition or structure, thus a higher swelling ratio would lead to a lower Tcritical,dry value. Then, the impact of the film area was studied in micrometer- and sub-micrometer-scale brush patterns, which showed that only partial, rather than complete ABB was induced in these microscopic films, resulting in buckling instead of film detaching. These results demonstrated that the ABB is suitable to be used in the design of biosensors, stimulus-responsive materials and mechanochemical devices. Although the >160 μm(2) required area for uniform ABB hinders the application of ABB in nanolithography, the irreversible buckling provides a facile method of generating rough surfaces.

  2. Covalent bonding of YIGSR and RGD to PEDOT/PSS/MWCNT-COOH composite material to improve the neural interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Tang, Rong-Yu; Zhao, Xiao-Bo; Li, Jun-Jie; Lang, Yi-Ran; Jiang, Xiao-Xia; Sun, Hong-Ji; Lin, Qiu-Xia; Wang, Chang-Yong

    2015-11-28

    The development of coating materials for neural interfaces has been a pursued to improve the electrical, mechanical and biological performances. For these goals, a bioactive coating was developed in this work featuring a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)/carbon nanotube (CNT) composite and covalently bonded YIGSR and RGD. Its biological effect and electrical characteristics were assessed in vivo on microwire arrays (MWA). The coated electrodes exhibited a significantly higher charge storage capacity (CSC) and lower electrochemical impedance at 1 kHz which are desired to improve the stimulating and recording performances, respectively. Acute neural recording experiments revealed that coated MWA possess a higher signal/noise ratio capturing spikes undetected by uncoated electrodes. Moreover, coated MWA possessed more active sites and single units, and the noise floor of coated electrodes was lower than that of uncoated electrodes. There is little information in the literature concerning the chronic performance of bioactively modified neural interfaces in vivo. Therefore in this work, chronic in vivo tests were conducted and the PEDOT/PSS/MWCNT-polypeptide coated arrays exhibited excellent performances with the highest mean maximal amplitude from day 4 to day 12 during which the acute response severely compromised the performance of the electrodes. In brief, we developed a simple method of covalently bonding YIGSR and RGD to a PEDOT/PSS/MWCNT-COOH composite improving both the biocompatibility and electrical performance of the neural interface. Our findings suggest that YIGSR and RGD modified PEDOT/PSS/MWCNT is a promising bioactivated composite coating for neural recording and stimulating.

  3. Interface structure and formation mechanism of vacuum-free vibration liquid phase diffusion-bonded joints of SiCp/ZL101A composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jiu-chun; XU Hui-bin; XU Zhi-wu; LI Da-cheng; YANG Shi-qin

    2005-01-01

    The vacuum-free vibration liquid phase(VLP) diffusion-bonding of SiCp/ZL101A composites was investigated. The effects of vibration on the interface structure, the phase transformation and the tensile strength of bonded joints were examined. Experimental results show that the oxide film on the surface of the composites is a key factor affecting the tensile strength of boned joints. The distribution of the oxide layers at the interface changes from a continuous line to a discontinuous one during vibration. The tensile strength of the VLP diffusion-bonded joints increases with the vibration time, and is up to the maximum of 172 MPa when the vibration time is 30 s. The phase structure of the bond region changes from the Zn-Al-Cu hyper-eutectic (η+ (β+ η)+(β+η+ε)) phases to Al-rich Al-base solid solution (α-Al) with increasing the vibration time.

  4. Asymptotic Sampling for Reliability Analysis of Adhesive Bonded Stepped Lap Composite Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimiaeifar, Amin; Lund, Erik; Thomsen, Ole Thybo;

    2013-01-01

    Reliability analysis coupled with finite element analysis (FEA) of composite structures is computationally very demanding and requires a large number of simulations to achieve an accurate prediction of the probability of failure with a small standard error. In this paper Asymptotic Sampling, which...... failure in the composite and adhesive layers, respectively, and the results are compared with the target reliability level implicitly used in the wind turbine standard IEC 61400-1. The accuracy and efficiency of Asymptotic Sampling is investigated by comparing the results with predictions obtained using...

  5. Effect of Etching Time and Preparation on Push-Out Bond Strength of Composite to Intracanal Dentin of Primary Anterior Teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Shahram Mosharrafian; Hossein Afshar; Maryam Farbod; Zahra Baniameri

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This in-vitro study aimed to compare the push-out bond strength of composite to prepared and unprepared intracanal dentin using a 5th generation bonding agent in primary anterior teeth after etching for seven and 15 seconds.Materials and Methods: Sixty primary anterior teeth were randomly divided into four groups. In groups one and two, intracanal dentin remained intact while in groups three and four it was prepared using a #5 round bur and low-speed handpiece. Single Bond 2 was u...

  6. Evaluation of single liquid primers with organic sulfur compound for bonding between indirect composite material and silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoe, Saiji; Tanoue, Naomi; Satoda, Takahiro; Murayama, Takeshi; Nikawa, Hiroki; Matsumura, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of primers on bonding between a silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy and an indirect composite material. Cast disks were air-abraded with alumina, conditioned with one of five primers (Alloy Primer, Luna-Wing Primer, Metal Primer II, Metaltite, M.L. Primer), and bonded with a light-activated indirect composite. Shear bond strengths were determined after 20,000 times of thermocycling. The results showed that four of the primers, except the Luna-Wing Primer, were effective in enhancing the bond strength as compared with the unprimed control group. Of these four primers, Alloy Primer, Metal Primer II, and M.L. Primer exhibited significantly greater bond strengths. It can be concluded that the effectiveness of primers varies considerably according to the organic sulfur compounds added to the solvent, and that care must be taken in selecting priming agents for bonding the composite material and the silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy.

  7. Liquid-phase diffusion bonding: Temperature effects and solute redistribution in high temperature lead-free composite solders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iver [Ames Lab. and Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Choquette, Stephanie [Ames Lab. and Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-05-17

    Liquid-phase diffusion bonding (LPDB) is being studied as the primary phenomena occurring in the development of a high temperature lead-free composite solder paste composed of gas-atomized Cu-10Ni, wt.% (Cu-11Ni, at.%) powder blended with Sn-0.7Cu-0.05Ni-0.01Ge (Sn-1.3Cu-0.1Ni-0.02Ge, at.%) Nihon-Superior SN100C solder powder. Powder compacts were used as a model system. LPDB promotes enhanced interdiffusion of the low-melting alloy matrix with the solid Cu-10Ni reinforcement powder above the matrix liquidus temperature. The initial study involved the effective intermetallic compound (IMC) compositions and microstructures that occur at varying reflow temperatures and times between 250-300°C and 30-60s, respectively. Certain reflow temperatures encourage adequate interdiffusion to form a continuous highly-conductive network throughout the composite solder joints. The diffusion of nickel, in particular, has a disperse pattern that foreshadows the possibility of a highly-conductive low-melting solder that can be successfully utilized at high temperatures.

  8. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Accumulative Roll-Bonded AA1050A/AA5005 Laminated Metal Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Kümmel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Laminated metal composites (LMCs with alternating layers of commercial pure aluminum AA1050A and aluminum alloy AA5005 were produced by accumulative roll-bonding (ARB. In order to vary the layer thickness and the number of layer interfaces, different numbers of ARB cycles (4, 8, 10, 12, 14 and 16 were performed. The microstructure and mechanical properties were characterized in detail. Up to 8 ARB cycles, the ultrafine-grained (UFG microstructure of the layers in the LMC evolves almost equally to those in AA1050A and AA5005 mono-material sheets. However, the grain size in the composites tends to have smaller values. Nevertheless, the local mechanical properties of the individual layers in the LMCs are very similar to those of the mono-material sheets, and the macroscopic static mechanical properties of the LMCs can be calculated as the mean value of the mono-material sheets applying a linear rule of mixture. In contrast, for more than 12 ARB cycles, a homogenous microstructure was obtained where the individual layers within the composite cannot be visually separated any longer; thus, the hardness is at one constant and a high level across the whole sheet thickness. This results also in a significant higher strength in tensile testing. It was revealed that, with decreasing layer thickness, the layer interfaces become more and more dominating.

  9. A Study of Influencing Factors on the Tensile Response of a Titanium Matrix Composite With Weak Interfacial Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2000-01-01

    The generalized method of cells micromechanics model is utilized to analyze the tensile stress-strain response of a representative titanium matrix composite with weak interfacial bonding. The fiber/matrix interface is modeled through application of a displacement discontinuity between the fiber and matrix once a critical debonding stress has been exceeded. Unidirectional composites with loading parallel and perpendicular to the fibers are examined, as well as a cross-ply laminate. For each of the laminates studied, analytically obtained results are compared to experimental data. The application of residual stresses through a cool-down process was found to have a significant effect on the tensile response. For the unidirectional laminate with loading applied perpendicular to the fibers, fiber packing and fiber shape were shown to have a significant effect on the predicted tensile response. Furthermore, the interface was characterized through the use of semi-emperical parameters including an interfacial compliance and a "debond stress;" defined as the stress level across the interface which activates fiber/matrix debonding. The results in this paper demonstrate that if architectural factors are correctly accounted for and the interface is appropriately characterized, the macro-level composite behavior can be correctly predicted without modifying any of the fiber or matrix constituent properties.

  10. Nanostructured Al/SiC-Graphite Composites Produced by Accumulative Roll Bonding: Role of Graphite on Microstructure, Wear and Tensile Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reihanian, M.; Fayezipour, S.; Lari Baghal, S. M.

    2017-03-01

    Nanostructured Al/SiC composite was fabricated by accumulative roll bonding (ARB). The effect of Gr, as the soft and second reinforcing particle, on the microstructure and deformation behavior of Al/SiC composite was examined. After eight ARB cycles, a homogeneous ultra-fine grained structure with the average grain size of about 710 nm was obtained in the Al/SiC composite. Results showed that Gr could not affect the particle distribution. However, the bonding quality between the layers reduced and the mechanical properties of the composite deteriorated considerably with increasing the Gr content. Compared with the Gr-free composite, the Al/SiC-Gr hybrid composite with the highest Gr content exhibited the lowest bonding quality and the lowest tensile strength. Tensile fracture surface of the composites showed that the number of delaminated layers was increased by increasing the Gr content. The best wear resistance was obtained in the composite whose powder mixture contained 80 SiC and 20 Gr (in wt.%).

  11. Interaction of bonding agent with filler in coking-pitch compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firsanov, A.V.; Beylina, N.Yu.; Kolodin, E.A.; Ostrovskiy, V.S.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Shipkov, N.N.

    1983-01-01

    Coke's selective sorption of highly molecular components of pitch was determined with the aid of gel-penetrating chromatography. It was shown that behavior of pitch in coking-pitch compositions, as well as the nature of release of pyrolysis products is determined by dispersion of the filler.

  12. Effects of different surface treatments on bond strength of an indirect composite to bovine dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laiza Tatiana Poskus

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Sandblasting was a safe surface treatment for the indirect composite, increasing the BS values. Hydrofluoric acid applied after sandblasting damaged the BS values and should not be recommended while ethanol and H2O2, when applied after sandblasting, were effective in increasing BS values.

  13. Time Effects on Morphology and Bonding Ability in Mercerized Natural Fibers for Composite Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    biocomposites were also studied by Suizu et al. [11]. Suiza et al. alkali treated unidirectional ramie yarns for 2 hours with a 15wt% NaOH solution. After...and M. P. Ansell, “The effect of alkalization and fibre alignment on the mechanical and thermal properties of kenaf and hemp bast fibre composites

  14. Effects of different surface treatments and accelerated artificial aging on the bond strength of composite resin repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Veiga de Melo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to assess the bond strength of composite resin repairs subjected to different surface treatments and accelerated artificial aging. 192 cylindrical samples (CSs were prepared and divided into 24 groups (n = 8. Half of the CSs were stored in water for 24 h, and the other half were subjected to C-UV accelerated aging for non-metallic specimens. The treatments were phosphoric acid + silane + adhesive (PSA; phosphoric acid + adhesive (PA; diamond bur + phosphoric acid + silane + adhesive (DPSA; diamond bur + phosphoric acid + adhesive (DPA; air abrasion + phosphoric acid + silane + adhesive (APSA; and air abrasion + phosphoric acid + adhesive (APA. The repair was performed and the specimens were again aged as described above. A control group (n = 8 was established and did not receive any type of aging or surface treatment. The specimens were loaded to failure in shear mode with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA/Tukey's test (p < 0.05. No statistically significant differences were found among DPSA, DPA, APSA, APA, and the control group. The aged PSA and PA achieved low bonding values and were statistically different from the control group, whereas the non-aged PSA and PA presented no statistically significant difference from the control group. Repairs with the proposed surface treatments were viable on both recent and aged restorations; however, phosphoric acid + adhesive alone were effective only on recent restorations.

  15. The effect of composition on the bond structure and refractive index of silicon nitride deposited by HWCVD and PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verlaan, V.; Verkerk, A.D.; Arnoldbik, W.M.; Van der Werf, C.H.M.; Bakker, R.; Houweling, Z.S.; Schropp, R.E.I. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, P.O. Box 80.000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Romijn, I.G.; Borsa, D.M.; Weeber, A.W. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Luxembourg, S.L.; Zeman, M. [DIMES, Delft University of Technology, Delf (Netherlands); Dekkers, H.F.W. [IMEC, Leuven (Belgium)

    2009-04-15

    Silicon nitride (SiNx) is a material with many applications and can be deposited with various deposition techniques. Series of SiNx films were deposited with HWCVD, RF PECVD,MWPECVD and LF PECVD. The atomic densities are quantified using RBS and ERD. The influence of the atomic densities on the Si-N and Si-Si bond structure is studied. The density of N-N bonds is found to be negligible. New Si-N FTIR proportionality factors are determined which increase with increasing N/Si ratio from 1.2 x 10{sup 19} cm-1 for Si rich films (N/Si=0.2) to 2.4 x 10{sup 19}cm-1 for N rich films (N/Si=1.5). The peak position of the Si-H stretching mode in the FTIR spectrum is discussed using the chemical induction model. It is shown that especially for Si-rich films the hydrogen content affects the Si-H peak position. The influence of the composition on the refractive index of the films is discussed on the basis of the Lorentz-Lorenz equation and the Kramers-Kronig relation. The decreasing refractive index with increasing N/Si ratio is primarily caused by an increase of the band gap.

  16. Effect of LED curing on the microleakage, shear bond strength and surface hardness of a resin-based composite restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberholzer, Theunis G; Du Preez, Ignatius C; Kidd, M

    2005-06-01

    To determine the effect of Light emitting diode (LED) curing on dental resins, microleakage, shear bond strength and surface hardness of a dental composite cured with different LEDs were determined and compared with conventional halogen curing. For microleakage, Class V cavities were restored with Esthet-X, divided into groups, and exposed to one of the curing protocols (Elipar Freelight in soft start and standard modes; Ultra-Lume 2; Spectrum 800). Standard dye penetration tests were performed and the data summarised in a 2-way contingency table of observed frequencies. The Chi-square test was used (psurface hardness, samples of Esthet-X were exposed to the light-curing units (LCUs). Vickers hardness was determined on the upper and the bottom surfaces. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using ANOVA (phardness score for the halogen light was significantly lower than for the LED lights (p<0.01). The Spectrum 800 and the Elipar Freelight (soft start) have significantly higher shear bond strengths than the others (p<0.01). It was concluded that the LED source is more efficient for a comparable overall power output.

  17. Study of the damaging mechanisms of a carbon - carbon composite bonded to copper under thermomechanical loading; Etude des mecanismes d'endommagement d'un assemblage cuivre / composite carbone - carbone sous chargement thermomecanique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moncel, L

    1999-06-15

    The purpose of this work is to understand and to identify the damaging mechanisms of Carbon-Carbon composite bonded to copper under thermomechanical loading. The study of the composite allowed the development of non-linear models. These ones have been introduced in the finite elements analysis code named CASTEM 2000. They have been validated according to a correlation between simulation and mechanical tests on multi-material samples. These tests have also permitted us to better understand the behaviour of the bonding between composite and copper (damaging and fracture modes for different temperatures) under shear and tensile loadings. The damaging mechanisms of the bond under thermomechanical loading have been studied and identified according to microscopic observations on mock-ups which have sustained thermal cycling tests: some cracks appear in the composite, near the bond between the composite and the copper. The correlation between numerical and experimental results have been improved because of the reliability of the composite modelization, the use of residual stresses and the results of the bond mechanical characterisation. (author)

  18. Microstructure of arc brazed and diffusion bonded joints of stainless steel and SiC reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elßner, M.; Weis, S.; Grund, T.; Wagner, G.; Habisch, S.; Mayr, P.

    2016-03-01

    Joint interfaces of aluminum and stainless steel often exhibit intermetallics of Al-Fe, which limit the joint strength. In order to reduce these brittle phases in joints of aluminum matrix composites (AMC) and stainless steel, diffusion bonding and arc brazing are used. Due to the absence of a liquid phase, diffusion welding can reduce the formation of these critical in- termetallics. For this joining technique, the influence of surface treatments and adjusted time- temperature-surface-pressure-regimes is investigated. On the other hand, arc brazing offers the advantage to combine a localized heat input with the application of a low melting filler and was conducted using the system Al-Ag-Cu. Results of the joining tests using both approaches are described and discussed with regard to the microstructure of the joints and the interfaces.

  19. Short-pulse Er:YAG laser increases bond strength of composite resin to sound and eroded dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cersosimo, Maria Cecília Pereira; Matos, Adriana Bona; Couto, Roberta Souza D'Almeida; Marques, Márcia Martins; de Freitas, Patricia Moreira

    2016-04-30

    This study evaluated the influence of the irradiation with a short-pulse Er:YAG laser on the adhesion of composite resin to sound and eroded dentin (SD and ED). Forty-six samples of occlusal dentine, obtained from human molars, had half of their surface protected, while the other half was submitted to erosive cycles. Afterward, 23 samples were irradiated with Er:YAG laser, resulting in four experimental groups: SD, sound irradiated dentine (SID—Er:YAG, 50  μs 50  μs , 2 Hz, 80 mJ, and 12.6  J/cm 2 12.6  J/cm2 ), ED, and eroded irradiated dentin (EID—erosion + Er:YAG laser). A self-etching adhesive system was used, and then cylinders of composite resin were prepared. A microshear bond strength test was performed after 24 h storage (n=20 n=20 ). The morphology of SD and ED, with or without Er:YAG laser irradiation, was evaluated under scanning electron microscopy (n=3 n=3 ). Bond strength values (MPa) were subjected to analysis of variance followed by Tukey’s test. Statistically significant differences were found among the experimental groups: SD (9.76±3.39  B 9.76±3.39  B ), SID (12.77±5.09 A 12.77±5.09 A ), ED (5.12±1.72 D 5.12±1.72 D ), and EID (7.62±3.39 C 7.62±3.39 C ). Even though erosion reduces the adhesion to dentin, the surface irradiation with a short-pulse Er:YAG laser increases adhesion to both ED and SD.

  20. SiC-Si interfacial thermal and mechanical properties of reaction bonded SiC/Si ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chun-Yen; Deng, Fei; Karandikar, Prashant; Ni, Chaoying

    Reaction bonded SiC/Si (RBSC) ceramic composites are broadly utilized in military, semiconductor and aerospace industries. RBSC affords advanced specific stiffness, hardness and thermal. Interface is a key region that has to be considered when working with any composites. Both thermal and mechanical behaviors of the RBSC are highly dependent on the SiC-Si interface. The SiC-Si interface had been found to act as a thermal barrier in restricting heat transferring at room temperature and to govern the energy absorption ability of the RBSC. However, up to present, the role of the SiC-Si interface to transport heat at higher temperatures and the interfacial properties in the nanoscale have not been established. This study focuses on these critically important subjects to explore scientific phenomena and underlying mechanisms. The RBSC thermal conductivity with volume percentages of SiC at 80 and 90 vol% was measured up to 1,200 °C, and was found to decrease for both samples with increasing environmental temperature. The RBSC with 90 vol% SiC has a higher thermal conductivity than that of the 80 vol%; however, is still significantly lower than that of the SiC. The interfacial thermal barrier effect was found to decrease at higher temperatures close 1200 °C. A custom-made in-situ tensile testing device which can be accommodated inside a ZEISS Auriga 60 FIB/SEM has been setup successfully. The SiC-Si interfacial bonding strength was measured at 98 MPa. The observation and analysis of crack propagation along the SiC-Si interface was achieved with in-situ TEM.

  1. Adhesively-Bonded Structural Composite Joint Utilizing Shoulder-Centered Sleeves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukowski, Florian P., Jr. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite joint includes a first member having a groove therein, a second member adjacent to the first member, and a connector member disposed between the second member and the first member. The connector member is received in the groove so as to bias a load path between the first member and the second member from a peripheral portion to a central portion of the connector member.

  2. Needle-Bonded Electromagnetic Shielding Thermally Insulating Nonwoven Composite Boards: Property Evaluations

    OpenAIRE

    Jia-Horng Lin; Yu-Chun Chuang; Chen-Hung Huang; Ting-Ting Li; Chien-Lin Huang; Yueh-Sheng Chen; Ching-Wen Lou

    2016-01-01

    Complicated environmental problems inevitably arise when technology advances. One major environmental problem is the presence of electromagnetic radiation. Long-term exposure to electromagnetic radiation can damage people’s health in many ways. Therefore, this study proposes producing composite boards with electromagnetic shielding effectiveness and thermal insulation by utilizing the structures and properties of materials. Different combinations of flame-retardant polyester fiber (FR fiber),...

  3. A comparison of atmospheric composition using the Carbon Bond and Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sarwar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We incorporate the recently developed Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (version 2, RACM2 into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system for comparison with the existing 2005 Carbon Bond mechanism with updated toluene chemistry (CB05TU. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean hydroxyl radical concentrations by 46% and nitric acid by 26%. However, it reduces hydrogen peroxide by 2%, peroxyacetic acid by 94%, methyl hydrogen peroxide by 19%, peroxyacetyl nitrate by 40%, and organic nitrate by 41%. RACM2 predictions generally agree better with the observed data than the CB05TU predictions. RACM2 enhances ozone for all ambient levels leading to higher bias at low (70 ppbv concentrations. The RACM2 ozone predictions are also supported by increased ozone production efficiency that agrees better with observations. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean sulfate by 10%, nitrate by 6%, ammonium by 10%, anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols by 42%, biogenic secondary organic aerosols by 5%, and in-cloud secondary organic aerosols by 7%. Increased inorganic and organic aerosols with RACM2 agree better with observed data. While RACM2 enhances ozone and secondary aerosols by relatively large margins, control strategies developed for ozone or fine particles using the two mechanisms do not differ appreciably.

  4. A comparison of atmospheric composition using the Carbon Bond and Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sarwar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We incorporate the recently developed Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (version 2, RACM2 into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system for comparison with the existing 2005 Carbon Bond mechanism with updated toluene chemistry (CB05TU. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean hydroxyl radical concentrations by 46% and nitric acid by 26%. However, it reduces hydrogen peroxide by 2%, peroxyacetic acid by 94%, methyl hydrogen peroxide by 19%, peroxyacetyl nitrate by 40%, and organic nitrate by 41%. RACM2 enhances ozone compared to CB05TU at all ambient levels. Although it exhibited greater overestimates at lower observed concentrations, it displayed an improved performance at higher observed concentrations. The RACM2 ozone predictions are also supported by increased ozone production efficiency that agrees better with observations. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean sulfate by 10%, nitrate by 6%, ammonium by 10%, anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols by 42%, biogenic secondary organic aerosols by 5%, and in-cloud secondary organic aerosols by 7%. Increased inorganic and organic aerosols with RACM2 agree better with observed data. Any air pollution control strategies developed using the two mechanisms do not differ appreciably.

  5. To evaluate and compare the effect of different Post Surface treatments on the Tensile Bond Strength between Fiber Posts and Composite Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shori, Deepa; Pandey, Swapnil; Kubde, Rajesh; Rathod, Yogesh; Atara, Rahul; Rathi, Shravan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Fiber posts are widely used for restoration of mutilated teeth that lack adequate coronal tooth structure to retain a core for definitive restoration, bond between the fiber post and composite material depends upon the chemical reaction between the post surface and the resin material used for building up the core. In attempt to maximize the resin bonding with fiber post, different post surface conditioning is advocated. Therefore the purpose of the study is to examine the interfacial strength between fiber post and composite, as core build-up material after different surface treatments of fiber posts. Materials & Methods:Twenty fiber posts were split into four groups off five each according to different surface treatments viz. Group I-(Negative Control), Group II-Silanization (Positive control), Group III-(37% Phosphoric Acid & Silanization) ,Group IV- (10% Hydrogen Peroxide and Silanization). With the preformed plastic mould, a core of dual cure composite resin around the fiber post having the uniform thickness was created. Tensile bond strength of each specimen was measured under Universal Testing Machine (UTM) at the cross head speed of 3mm/min. Results: The results achieved with 10% Hydrogen peroxide had a marked effect on micro tensile bond strength values between the tested materials. Conclusion: Immense enhancement in the silanization efficiency of quartz fiber phase was observed with different surface chemical treatment of the resin phase of fiber posts with the marked increase in the micro-tensile bond strength between fiber post and composite core. How to cite this article: Shori D, Pandey S, Kubde R, Rathod Y, Atara R, Rathi S. To evaluate and compare the effect of different Post Surface treatments on the Tensile Bond Strength between Fiber Posts and Composite Resin. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):27-32. PMID:24324301

  6. Effect of Green Tea Extract as Antioxidant on Shear Bond Strength of Resin Composite to in-Office and Home-Bleached Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharafeddin F

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Shear bond strength (SBS of home and office bleached enamel will be compromised by immediate application of composite restoration. Antioxidant agent may overcome this problem. Objectives: This in vitro study assessed the effect of green tea extract on shear bond strength of resin composite to in-office and home-bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 40 extracted intact human incisors were embedded in cylindrical acrylic resin blocks (2.5 ×1.5 cm, with the coronal portion above the cemento enamel junction out of the block. Then, after bleaching labial enamel surfaces of 20 teeth with 15% carbamide peroxide 6 hours a day for 5 days, they were randomly divided into two groups: A1 and A2 (n = 10, depending upon whether or not they are treated with antioxidant. Labial enamel surfaces of the remaining 20 teeth were bleached with 38% hydrogen peroxide before being randomly divided into groups B1 and B2 (n = 10, again depending on whether or not the antioxidant was used in their treatment . The experimental groups (A2,B2 were treated with 5% solution of green tea extract before resin composite restoration was done by a cylindrical Teflon mould (5×2 mm. Shear bond strength of the specimens was tested under a universal testing machine (Zwick/Roell Z020. The SBS data were analyzed by using One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (p < 0.05. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between shear bond strength of the control group (A1 and treated group (A2 but there were statistically significant differences between the groups B1 and B2 (p < 0.05. Conclusions: Application of antioxidant did not increase the shear bond strength of home-bleached enamel to resin composite but its application increased the shear bond strength of in-office bleached enamel to resin composite.

  7. Reactive diffusion bonding of SiCp/Al composites by insert layers of mixed Al-Si and Al-Si-SiC powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jihua Huang; Yueling Dong; Yun Wan; Jiangang Zhang; Hua Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Mixed Al-Si and Al-Si-SiC powders were employed as insert layers to reactive diffusion bond SiCp/6063 MMC (metal matrix composites). The results show that SiCp/6063 MMC joints bonded by the insert layer of the mixed Al-Si powder have a dense joining layer with a typical hypoeutectic microstructure. Using the mixed Al-Si-SiC powder as the insert layer, SiCp/6063 MMC can be reactive diffusion bonded by a composite joint. Because of the SiC segregation, however, there are a number of porous zones in the joining layer, which results in the bad shear strength of the joints reactive diffusion bonded by the insert layer of the mixed Al-SiSiC powder, even lower than that of the joints reactive diffusion bonded by the insert layer of the mixed Al-Si powder. Ti and Mg added in the insert layers obviously improve the strength of the joints reactive diffusion bonded by the insert layer of the mixed AlSi-SiC powder, especially, Mg has a more obvious effect.

  8. Physicochemical characterisation and investigation of the bonding mechanisms of API-titanate nanotube composites as new drug carrier systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, Barbara; Pintye-Hódi, Klára; Kónya, Zoltán; Kelemen, András; Regdon, Géza; Sovány, Tamás

    2017-02-25

    Titanate nanotube (TNT) has recently been explored as a new carrier material for active pharmaceutical ingredients (API). The aim of the present work was to reveal the physicochemical properties of API-TNT composites, focusing on the interactions between the TNTs and the incorporated APIs. Drugs belonging to different Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) classes were loaded into TNTs: diltiazem hydrochloride (BCS I.), diclofenac sodium (BCS II.), atenolol (BCS III.) and hydrochlorothiazide (BCS IV.). Experimental results demonstrated that it is feasible for spiral cross-sectioned titanate nanotubes to carry drugs and maintain their bioactivity. The structural properties of the composites were characterized by a range of analytical techniques, including FT-IR, DSC, TG-MS, etc. The interactions between APIs and TNTs were identified as electrostatic attractions, mainly dominated by hydrogen bonds. Based on the results, it can be stated that the strength of the association depends on the hydrogen donor strength of the API. The drug release of incorporated APIs was evaluated from compressed tablets and compared to that of pure APIs. Differences noticed in the dissolution profiles due to incorporation showed a correlation with the strength of interactions between the APIs and the TNTs observed in the above analytical studies.

  9. Adhesive force measurement between HOPG and zinc oxide as an indicator for interfacial bonding of carbon fiber composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Brendan A; Galan, Ulises; Sodano, Henry A

    2015-07-22

    Vertically aligned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires have recently been utilized as an interphase to increase the interfacial strength of carbon fiber composites. It was shown that the interaction between the carbon fiber and the ZnO nanowires was a critical parameter in adhesion; however, fiber based testing techniques are dominated by local defects and cannot be used to effectively study the bonding interaction directly. Here, the strength of the interface between ZnO and graphitic carbon is directly measured with atomic force microscopy (AFM) using oxygen plasma treated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and an AFM tip coated with ZnO nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis is used to compare the surface chemistry of HOPG and carbon fiber and to quantify the presence of various oxygen functional groups. An indirect measurement of the interfacial strength is then performed through single fiber fragmentation testing (SFF) on functionalized carbon fibers coated with ZnO nanowires to validate the AFM measurements. The SFF and AFM methods showed the same correlation, demonstrating the capacity of the AFM method to study the interfacial properties in composite materials. Additionally, the chemical interactions between oxygen functional groups and the ionic structure of ZnO suggest that intermolecular forces at the interface are responsible for the strong interface.

  10. Mullite fiber reinforced reaction bonded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, T.; Lightfoot, A.; Haggerty, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Sayir, A. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Fracture toughnesses of brittle ceramic materials have been improved by introducing reinforcements and carefully tailored interface layers. Silicon carbide and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} have been emphasized as matrices of structural composites intended for high temperature service because they combine excellent mechanical, chemical, thermal and physical properties. Both matrices have been successfully toughened with SiC fibers, whiskers and particles for ceramic matrix composite (CMC) parts made by sintering, hot pressing or reaction forming processes. These SiC reinforced CMCs have exhibited significantly improved toughnesses at low and intermediate temperature levels, as well as retention of properties at high temperatures for selected exposures; however, they are vulnerable to attack from elevated temperature dry and wet oxidizing atmospheres after the matrix has cracked. Property degradation results from oxidation of interface layers and/or reinforcements. The problem is particularly acute for small diameter ({approximately}20 {mu}m) polymer derived SiC fibers used for weavable toes. This research explored opportunities for reinforcing Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrices with fibers having improved environmental stability; the finding should also be applicable to SiC matrix CMCs.

  11. Influence of curing rate of resin composite on the bond strength to dentin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Asmussen, E; Peutzfeldt, A

    2007-01-01

    @ 1000 mW/cm2) for all groups. A split Teflon mold was clamped to the treated dentin surface and filled with resin composite. The rate of cure was varied, using one of four LED-curing units of different power densities. The rate of cure was also varied using the continuous or pulse-delay mode....... In continuous curing mode, in order to give an energy density totaling 16 J/cm2, the power densities (1000, 720, 550, 200 mW/cm2) emitted by the various curing units were compensated for by the light curing period (16, 22, 29 or 80 seconds). In the pulse-delay curing mode, two seconds of light curing at one...... of the four power densities was followed by a one-minute interval, after which light cure was completed (14, 29, 27 or 78 seconds), likewise, giving a total energy density of 16 J/cm2. The specimens produced for each of the eight curing protocols and two resin composites (Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent...

  12. Needle-Bonded Electromagnetic Shielding Thermally Insulating Nonwoven Composite Boards: Property Evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Horng Lin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Complicated environmental problems inevitably arise when technology advances. One major environmental problem is the presence of electromagnetic radiation. Long-term exposure to electromagnetic radiation can damage people’s health in many ways. Therefore, this study proposes producing composite boards with electromagnetic shielding effectiveness and thermal insulation by utilizing the structures and properties of materials. Different combinations of flame-retardant polyester fiber (FR fiber, recycled far-infrared polyester fiber (FI fiber, and 4D low-melting-point fibers (LM fiber were made into flame-retardant and thermally insulating matrices. The matrices and carbon fiber (CF woven fabric in a sandwich-structure were needle-punched in order to be tightly compact, and then circularly heat dried in order to have a heat set and reinforced structure. The test results indicate that Polyester (PET/CF composite boards are mechanically strong and have thermal insulation and electromagnetic shielding effectiveness at a frequency between 0.6 MHz and 3 GHz.

  13. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  14. Three Three-Year Aging of Prototype Flight Laser at 10 kHz and 1 ns Pulses With External Frequency Doubler for ICESat-2 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konoplev, Oleg A.; Chiragh, Furqan L.; Vasilyev, Aleksey A.; Edwards, Ryan; Stephen, Mark A.; Troupaki, Elisavet; Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Sawruk, Nick; Hovis, Floyd; Culpepper, Charles F.; Strickler, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of three year life-aging of a specially designed prototype flight source laser operating at 1064 nm, 10 kHz, 1ns, 15W average power and external frequency doubler. The Fibertek-designed, slightly pressurized air, enclosed-container source laser operated at 1064 nm in active Q-switching mode. The external frequency doubler was set in a clean room at a normal air pressure. The goal of the experiment was to measure degradation modes at 1064 and 532 nm discreetly. The external frequency doubler consisted of a Lithium triborate, LiB3O5, crystal operated at non-critical phase-matching. Due to 1064 nm diagnostic needs, the amount of fundamental frequency power available for doubling was 13.7W. The power generated at 532 nm was between 8.5W and 10W, depending on the level of stress and degradation. The life-aging consisted of double stress-step operation for doubler crystal, at 0.35 Jcm2 for almost 1 year, corresponding to normal conditions, and then at 0.93 Jcm2 for the rest of the experiment, corresponding to accelerated testing. We observed no degradation at the first step and linear degradation at the second step. The linear degradation at the second stress-step was related to doubler crystal output surface changes and linked to laser-assisted contamination. We discuss degradation model and estimate the expected lifetime for the flight laser at 532 nm. This work was done within the laser testing for NASAs Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) LIDAR at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD with the goal of 1 trillion shots lifetime.

  15. Three Year Aging of Prototype Flight Laser at 10 Khz and 1 Ns Pulses with External Frequency Doubler for the Icesat-2 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konoplev, Oleg A.; Chiragh, Furqan L.; Vasilyev, Aleksey A.; Edwards, Ryan; Stephen, Mark A.; Troupaki, Elisavet; Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Sawruk, Nick; Hovis, Floyd; Culpepper, Charles F.; Strickler, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of three year life-aging of a specially designed prototype flight source laser operating at 1064 nm, 10 kHz, 1ns, 15W average power and external frequency doubler. The Fibertek-designed, slightly pressurized air, enclosed-container source laser operated at 1064 nm in active Q-switching mode. The external frequency doubler was set in a clean room at a normal air pressure. The goal of the experiment was to measure degradation modes at 1064 and 532 nm discreetly. The external frequency doubler consisted of a Lithium triborate, LiB3O5, crystal operated at non-critical phase-matching. Due to 1064 nm diagnostic needs, the amount of fundamental frequency power available for doubling was 13.7W. The power generated at 532 nm was between 8.5W and 10W, depending on the level of stress and degradation. The life-aging consisted of double stress-step operation for doubler crystal, at 0.35 J/cm2 for almost 1 year, corresponding to normal conditions, and then at 0.93 J/cm2 for the rest of the experiment, corresponding to accelerated testing. We observed no degradation at the first step and linear degradation at the second step. The linear degradation at the second stress-step was related to doubler crystal output surface changes and linked to laser-assisted contamination. We discuss degradation model and estimate the expected lifetime for the flight laser at 532 nm. This work was done within the laser testing for NASA's Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) LIDAR at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD with the goal of 1 trillion shots lifetime.

  16. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velagala L Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC to three different liners: TheraCal LC TM (TLC, a novel resin-modified (RM calcium silicate cement, Biodentine TM (BD, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into three groups of 10 samples each based on the liner used as Group A (TLC, Group B (BD, and Group C (RMGIC. Composite post of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm height was then bonded to each sample using universal adhesive. Shear bond strength (SBS analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and post hoc test using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 20. Results: No significant difference was observed between group A and group C (P = 0.573 while group B showed the least bond strength values with a highly significant difference (P = 0.000. The modes of failure were predominantly cohesive in Groups A and B (TLC and BD while RMGIC showed mixed and adhesive failures. Conclusions: Hence, this present study concludes that the bond strength of composite resin to TLC and RMGIC was similar and significantly higher than that of BD following application of universal adhesive.

  17. Effects of tributylborane-activated adhesive and two silane agents on bonding computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Ayano; Taira, Yohsuke; Sawase, Takashi

    2017-01-09

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of an experimental adhesive agent [methyl methacrylate-tributylborane liquid (MT)] and two adhesive agents containing silane on the bonding between a resin composite block of a computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system and a light-curing resin composite veneering material. The surfaces of CAD/CAM resin composite specimens were ground with silicon-carbide paper, treated with phosphoric acid, and then primed with either one of the two silane agents [Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SC) and GC Ceramic Primer II (GC)], no adhesive control (Cont), or one of three combinations (MT/SC, MT/GC, and MT/Cont). A light-curing resin composite was veneered on the primed CAD/CAM resin composite surface. The veneered specimens were subjected to thermocycling between 4 and 60 °C for 10,000 cycles, and the shear bond strengths were determined. All data were analyzed using analysis of variance and a post hoc Tukey-Kramer HSD test (α = 0.05, n = 8). MT/SC (38.7 MPa) exhibited the highest mean bond strengths, followed by MT/GC (30.4 MPa), SC (27.9 MPa), and MT/Cont (25.7 MPa), while Cont (12.9 MPa) and GC (12.3 MPa) resulted in the lowest bond strengths. The use of MT in conjunction with a silane agent significantly improved the bond strength. Surface treatment with appropriate adhesive agents was confirmed as a prerequisite for veneering CAD/CAM resin composite restorations.

  18. Effect of drying time of 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane on the shear bond strength of a composite resin to silica-coated base/noble alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özcan, Mutlu; Matinlinna, Jukka P.; Vallittu, Pekka K.; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. In this in vitro study, the effect of various drying (surface reaction) times of a commercial silane, other than that recommended by the manufacturer (at least 5 min), on the bond strength between the resin composite and silica coated base and noble alloys was evaluated. Methods. A total

  19. Microstructural investigation of Si-ion-irradiated single crystal 3C-SiC and SA-Tyrannohex SiC fiber-bonded composite at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Chun-Yu [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Shuo-Cheng [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lin, Hua-Tay [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Chen, Fu-Rong [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Kai, Ji-Jung, E-mail: ceer0001@gmail.com [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-15

    Silicon carbides (SiCs) are considered as one of the promising candidates for structural and core materials used in fusion reactor and high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) due to its high thermal stability, and good resistance to irradiation and chemical attack. Single crystal 3C-SiC with less intrinsic defects was used to precisely characterize the radiation-induced defects in 3C-SiC. In addition, there are limited discussions related to radiation effect of SA-Tyrannohex fiber-bonded composite at high temperatures. Therefore, in this study, single crystal 3C-SiC thin film and SA-Tyrannohex SiC fiber-bonded composite were irradiated at 1000–1350 °C with 7 MeV Si{sup 3+} ion to simulate the neutron irradiation in reactors. The microstructure of the irradiated SiC was examined by using high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). In irradiated single crystal 3C-SiC, high resolution images showed that the planar defects were extrinsic stacking faulted loop with changing atomic sequences and intrinsic stacking faulted loop, i.e. vacancy loop. In addition, dislocation loops, voids, and edge dislocations in SA-Tyrannohex SiC fiber-bonded composite after irradiation were investigated. Besides, larger voids (with diameter 10–40 nm) formed in alumina with preferred orientation after irradiation perhaps resulting in degradation of strength of the SA-Tyrannohex SiC fiber-bonded composite.

  20. Influence of retainer design on two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed dental prostheses: An in vitro and finite element analysis study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, F.; de Jager, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strenght of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Conclusion: A dual-wing retainer is the optimal design for replacement of a single premol

  1. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Deepa, Velagala L; Bhargavi Dhamaraju; Indira Priyadharsini Bollu; Tandri S Balaji

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC TM (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine TM (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into th...

  2. Assessment of Tensile Bond Strength of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Resin to Enamel Using Two Types of Resin Cements and Three Surface Treatment Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghaffari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin-bonded bridgework with a metal framework is one of the most conservative ways to replace a tooth with intact abutments. Visibility of metal substructure and debonding are the complications of these bridgeworks. Today, with the introduction of fiber-reinforced composite resins, it is possible to overcome these complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin materials (FRC to enamel. Methods: Seventy-two labial cross-sections were prepared from intact extracted teeth. Seventy-two rectangular samples of cured Vectris were prepared and their thickness was increased by adding Targis. The samples were divided into 3 groups for three different surface treatments: sandblasting, etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid, and roughening with a round tapered diamond bur. Each group was then divided into two subgroups for bonding to etched enamel by Enforce and Variolink II resin cements. Instron universal testing machine was used to apply a tensile force. The fracture force was recorded and the mode of failure was identified under a reflective microscope. Results: There were no significant differences in bond strength between the three surface treatment groups (P=0.53. The mean bond strength of Variolink II cement was greater than that of Enforce (P=0.04. There was no relationship between the failure modes (cohesive and adhesive and the two cement types. There was some association between surface treatment and failure mode. There were adhesive failures in sandblasted and diamond-roughened groups and the cohesive failure was dominant in the etched group. Conclusion: It is recommended that restorations made of fiber-reinforced composite resin be cemented with VariolinkII and surface-treated by hydrofluoric acid. Keywords: Tensile bond strength; surface treatment methods; fiber-reinforced composite resin

  3. Effect of preheating of low shrinking resin composite on intrapulpal temperature and microtensile bond strength to dent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba A. El-Deeb

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of preheating of the silorane-based resin composite on intrapulpal temperature (IPT and dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS was evaluated. For the IPT, teeth (n = 15 were sectioned to obtain discs of 0.5 mm thickness (2 discs/tooth. The discs were divided into three groups (n = 10/group according to the temperature of the Filtek LS™ silorane-based resin composite during its placement, either at room temperature (23 ± 1 °C or preheated to 54 °C or 68 °C using a commercial Calset™ device. Discs were subjected to a simulated intrapulpal pressure (IPP and placed inside a specially constructed incubator adjusted at 37 °C. IPT was measured before, during and after placement and curing of the resin composite using K-type thermocouple. For μTBS testing, flat occlusal middentin surfaces (n = 24 were obtained. P90 System Adhesive was applied according to manufacturer’s instructions then Filtek LS was placed at the tested temperatures (n = 6. Restorative procedures were done while the specimens were connected to IPP simulation. IPP was maintained and the specimens were immersed in artificial saliva at 37 °C for 24 h before testing. Each specimen was sectioned into sticks (0.9 ± 0.01 mm2. The sticks (24/group were subjected to μTBS test and their modes of failure were determined using scanning electron microscope (SEM. For both preheated groups, IPT increased equally by 1.5–2 °C upon application of the composite. After light curing, IPT increased by 4–5 °C in all tested groups. Nevertheless, the IPT of the preheated groups required a longer time to return to the baseline temperature. One-way ANOVA revealed no significant difference between the μTBS values of all groups. SEM revealed predominately mixed mode of failure. Preheating of silorane-based resin composite increased the IPT but not to the critical level and had no effect on dentin μTBS.

  4. Effect of preheating of low shrinking resin composite on intrapulpal temperature and microtensile bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Abd El-Aziz, Sara; Mobarak, Enas H

    2015-05-01

    The effect of preheating of the silorane-based resin composite on intrapulpal temperature (IPT) and dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS) was evaluated. For the IPT, teeth (n = 15) were sectioned to obtain discs of 0.5 mm thickness (2 discs/tooth). The discs were divided into three groups (n = 10/group) according to the temperature of the Filtek LS™ silorane-based resin composite during its placement, either at room temperature (23 ± 1 °C) or preheated to 54 °C or 68 °C using a commercial Calset™ device. Discs were subjected to a simulated intrapulpal pressure (IPP) and placed inside a specially constructed incubator adjusted at 37 °C. IPT was measured before, during and after placement and curing of the resin composite using K-type thermocouple. For μTBS testing, flat occlusal middentin surfaces (n = 24) were obtained. P90 System Adhesive was applied according to manufacturer's instructions then Filtek LS was placed at the tested temperatures (n = 6). Restorative procedures were done while the specimens were connected to IPP simulation. IPP was maintained and the specimens were immersed in artificial saliva at 37 °C for 24 h before testing. Each specimen was sectioned into sticks (0.9 ± 0.01 mm(2)). The sticks (24/group) were subjected to μTBS test and their modes of failure were determined using scanning electron microscope (SEM). For both preheated groups, IPT increased equally by 1.5-2 °C upon application of the composite. After light curing, IPT increased by 4-5 °C in all tested groups. Nevertheless, the IPT of the preheated groups required a longer time to return to the baseline temperature. One-way ANOVA revealed no significant difference between the μTBS values of all groups. SEM revealed predominately mixed mode of failure. Preheating of silorane-based resin composite increased the IPT but not to the critical level and had no effect on dentin μTBS.

  5. A Double-Ring Algorithm for Modeling Solar Active Regions: Unifying Kinematic Dynamo Models and Surface Flux-Transport Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz-Jaramillo, Andrés; Martens, Petrus C H; Yeates, Anthony R

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of tilted bipolar active regions and the dispersal of their flux, mediated via processes such as diffusion, differential rotation and meridional circulation is believed to be responsible for the reversal of the Sun's polar field. This process (commonly known as the Babcock-Leighton mechanism) is usually modeled as a near-surface, spatially distributed $\\alpha$-effect in kinematic mean-field dynamo models. However, this formulation leads to a relationship between polar field strength and meridional flow speed which is opposite to that suggested by physical insight and predicted by surface flux-transport simulations. With this in mind, we present an improved double-ring algorithm for modeling the Babcock-Leighton mechanism based on active region eruption, within the framework of an axisymmetric dynamo model. Using surface flux-transport simulations we first show that an axisymmetric formulation -- which is usually invoked in kinematic dynamo models -- can reasonably approximate the surface flux dy...

  6. Comparison of Push-Out Bond Strength of Two Bulk-Fill and One Conventional Composite to Intracanal Dentin in Severely Damaged Primary Anterior Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Mosharrafian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study sought to compare the push-out bond strength of two bulk-fill and one conventional composite to intracanal dentin in primary anterior teeth.Materials and Methods: This in vitro, experimental study was conducted on 39 primary anterior teeth, which were randomly divided into three groups. After cleaning and shaping, the root canals were filled with Metapex in such a way that after the application of 1mm light-cure liner on top of it, the coronal 3mm of the canal remained empty for composite post space. Z250 conventional composite was used in group 1 and SonicFill and Filtek bulk-fill composites along with Single Bond 2 were used in groups 2 and 3, respectively. The samples were subjected to thermocycling. One-millimeter thick sections were made of the mid-root and subjected to push-out bond strength test. Mode of failure was determined under a stereomicroscope at ×25 magnification. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.Results: The mean (±standard deviation push-out bond strength was 11.40±4.23MPa, 10.94±6.69MPa and 8.79±4.12MPa in the conventional, SonicFill and Filtek groups, respectively. The difference in this regard among the three groups was not statistically significant (P=0.397.Conclusions: Based on the results, bulk-fill composites, similar to conventional types, can be successfully used for the fabrication of composite intracanal posts in primary teeth to decrease the treatment time in children.Keywords: Composite Resins; Dentin; Tooth, Deciduous

  7. Knoop hardness of enamel and shear bond strength of brackets bonded with composite resin with and without fluoride Dureza Knoop do esmalte e resistência ao cisalhamento de braquetes colados com resina composta com e sem flúor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Amélia Scudeler Vedovello

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the Knoop hardness of enamel, shear bond strength and failure pattern (adhesive, bracket/resin interface or mixed after bonding and debonding brackets, using resin composite with fluoride (Ortho Lite Cure, Ortho Source® and without fluoride (Orthobond, Morelli®. METHODS: Fragments (6 mm x 6 mm of 40 bovine incisor crowns were embedded in acrylic self-polymerizing resin. The Knoop hardness measurements were performed before and after bonding metal brackets. The specimens were divided into two groups, according to composite resin: with fluoride (Ortho Lite Cure, Ortho Source® and without fluoride (Orthobond, Morelli®. After bonding, the specimens were submitted to demineralization and remineralization cycling for 14 days. Shear bond strength testing was performed in a universal test machine (EMIC, at 5 mm/min crosshead speed. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in shear bond strength between Groups I and II. After demineralization and remineralization procedures (DE/RE, the specimens bonded with Ortho Lite Cure showed higher Knoop hardness than Orthobond. For both groups there was predominance of failure at bracket/resin interface. CONCLUSION: specimens bonded with fluoride resin composite showed higher microhardness after DE/RE cycling than those bonded with resin composite without fluoride, although no difference in shear bond strength was found.OBJETIVO: o propósito deste estudo foi avaliar a dureza Knoop do esmalte, resistência ao cisalhamento e padrão de falha (adesiva; interface braquete/resina; e mista após a colagem e descolagem de braquetes, utilizando uma resina composta com flúor (Ortho Lite Cure, Ortho Source® e uma sem flúor (Orthobond, Morelli®. MÉTODOS: fragmentos (6mm x 6mm de 40 coroas de incisivos bovinos foram embutidos em resina acrílica autopolimerizável. A dureza Knoop foi avaliada antes e após a colagem dos braquetes metálicos. Os corpos de prova

  8. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instruments Module (ISIM) Electronics Compartment (IEC) Conformal Shields Composite Bond Structure Qualification Test Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Calinda; Stephens, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The JWST IEC conformal shields are mounted onto a composite frame structure that must undergo qualification testing to satisfy mission assurance requirements. The composite frame segments are bonded together at the joints using epoxy, EA 9394. The development of a test method to verify the integrity of the bonded structure at its operating environment introduces challenges in terms of requirements definition and the attainment of success criteria. Even though protoflight thermal requirements were not achieved, the first attempt in exposing the structure to cryogenic operating conditions in a thermal vacuum environment resulted in approximately 1 bonded joints failure during mechanical pull tests performed at 1.25 times the flight loads. Failure analysis concluded that the failure mode was due to adhesive cracks that formed and propagated along stress concentrated fillets as a result of poor bond squeeze-out control during fabrication. Bond repairs were made and the structures successfully re-tested with an improved LN2 immersion test method to achieve protoflight thermal requirements.

  9. The texture-structure relationship in Ti-Al-Nb multilayered composites processed by accumulative roll bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liming

    Multilayered Ti/Al/Nb composites were processed by the accumulative roll bonding (ARB) process using elemental foils of titanium, aluminum, and niobium. The rolled multilayered composites (MLCs) were prepared by ARB process up to two ARB cycles. The microstructure and texture evolution of the Ti, Al, and Nb in the MLCs were studied utilizing X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The characterizations of crystallographic texture and microstructure were conducted using a creative approach; a layer by layer method on the rolling plane. Texture evolution in the MLCs produced by symmetric rolling and asymmetric rolling was also studied in a layer by layer manner. In addition to studying the texture evolution of the Nb in the MLCs produced by the ARB process, the Bingham distribution was used to model the orientation distribution function (ODF) by employing MTEX, a quantitative texture analysis toolbox for Matlab RTM. This provided a bridge for the gap between experiments and Bingham modeling in terms of the crystallographic texture. As the numbers of ARB cycles increased, the microstructures tended to be heterogeneous through the thickness. Also, the texture development of the mating layers in the MLCs exhibited multiple texture domination rather than random. Furthermore, the developed textures of the layers in the MLCs during the ARB process were significantly different from that produced by conventional rolling. The characteristic textures formed in the MLCs subjected to the ARB process implied that the partial recrystallization and recovery occurred as a result of the adiabatic heat. The shear and compressive strain distributions were inhomogeneous through the thickness. Thus, the texture developments of the layers in the MLCs suggested a strong locational dependence. Where, the surface and the middle layers tended to form textures attributed to the shear, while, the transitory layers

  10. Surface modification with alumina blasting and H2SO4-HCl etching for bonding two resin-composite veneers to titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Yohsuke; Egoshi, Takafumi; Kamada, Kohji; Sawase, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an experimental surface treatment with alumina blasting and acid etching on the bond strengths between each of two resin composites and commercially pure titanium. The titanium surface was blasted with alumina and then etched with 45wt% H2SO4 and 15wt% HCl (H2SO4-HCl). A light- and heat-curing resin composite (Estenia) and a light-curing resin composite (Ceramage) were used with adjunctive metal primers. Veneered specimens were subjected to thermal cycling between 4 and 60°C for 50,000 cycles, and the shear bond strengths were determined. The highest bond strengths were obtained for Blasting/H2SO4-HCl/Estenia (30.2 ± 4.5 MPa) and Blasting/Etching/Ceramage (26.0 ± 4.5 MPa), the values of which were not statistically different, followed by Blasting/No etching/Estenia (20.4 ± 2.4 MPa) and Blasting/No etching/Ceramage (0.8 ± 0.3 MPa). Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed that alumina blasting and H2SO4-HCl etching creates a number of micro- and nanoscale cavities on the titanium surface, which contribute to adhesive bonding.

  11. Evaluation of the flocculation performance of carboxymethyl chitosan-graft-polyacrylamide, a novel amphoteric chemically bonded composite flocculant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Yuan, Bo; Huang, Xin; Zhou, Junyu; Cai, Jun; Yang, Hu; Li, Aimin; Cheng, Rongshi

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, a novel amphoteric chemically bonded composite flocculant (carboxymethyl chitosan-graft-polyacrylamide, denoted as CMC-g-PAM) was successfully prepared and used to flocculate the kaolin suspension. The flocculation performance of CMC-g-PAM in acidic, neutral, and alkaline conditions was systematically evaluated by light scattering in combination with fractal theory, as well as by traditional turbidity and zeta potential measurements. Based on the experimental facts from in situ size and fractal dimension measurements, different flocculation mechanisms play key roles at various pH levels, resulting in substantially varied flocculation kinetic processes under three pH conditions. In acidic condition, patching was the main mechanism involved in the opposite zeta potential between CMC-g-PAM and the kaolin suspension. A flat configuration was favored when the polymeric flocculant was adsorbed onto the particle surface, leading to a slower initial floc growth rate but larger and denser flocs. Bridging was the dominant mechanism in neutral and alkaline conditions. A faster initial rate of bridging resulted in smaller and more open floc structures. A rearrangement process in neutral pH subsequently led to more compact flocs, whereas no restructuration of flocs occurred in alkaline conditions because of the electrostatic repulsion of the same negative charges on the flocculant and particles.

  12. Acid Hydrolysis and Molecular Density of Phytoglycogen and Liver Glycogen Helps Understand the Bonding in Glycogen α (Composite) Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Prudence O.; Sullivan, Mitchell A.; Sheehy, Joshua J.; Schulz, Benjamin L.; Warren, Frederick J.; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoglycogen (from certain mutant plants) and animal glycogen are highly branched glucose polymers with similarities in structural features and molecular size range. Both appear to form composite α particles from smaller β particles. The molecular size distribution of liver glycogen is bimodal, with distinct α and β components, while that of phytoglycogen is monomodal. This study aims to enhance our understanding of the nature of the link between liver-glycogen β particles resulting in the formation of large α particles. It examines the time evolution of the size distribution of these molecules during acid hydrolysis, and the size dependence of the molecular density of both glucans. The monomodal distribution of phytoglycogen decreases uniformly in time with hydrolysis, while with glycogen, the large particles degrade significantly more quickly. The size dependence of the molecular density shows qualitatively different shapes for these two types of molecules. The data, combined with a quantitative model for the evolution of the distribution during degradation, suggest that the bonding between β into α particles is different between phytoglycogen and liver glycogen, with the formation of a glycosidic linkage for phytoglycogen and a covalent or strong non-covalent linkage, most probably involving a protein, for glycogen as most likely. This finding is of importance for diabetes, where α-particle structure is impaired. PMID:25799321

  13. Acid hydrolysis and molecular density of phytoglycogen and liver glycogen helps understand the bonding in glycogen α (composite particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prudence O Powell

    Full Text Available Phytoglycogen (from certain mutant plants and animal glycogen are highly branched glucose polymers with similarities in structural features and molecular size range. Both appear to form composite α particles from smaller β particles. The molecular size distribution of liver glycogen is bimodal, with distinct α and β components, while that of phytoglycogen is monomodal. This study aims to enhance our understanding of the nature of the link between liver-glycogen β particles resulting in the formation of large α particles. It examines the time evolution of the size distribution of these molecules during acid hydrolysis, and the size dependence of the molecular density of both glucans. The monomodal distribution of phytoglycogen decreases uniformly in time with hydrolysis, while with glycogen, the large particles degrade significantly more quickly. The size dependence of the molecular density shows qualitatively different shapes for these two types of molecules. The data, combined with a quantitative model for the evolution of the distribution during degradation, suggest that the bonding between β into α particles is different between phytoglycogen and liver glycogen, with the formation of a glycosidic linkage for phytoglycogen and a covalent or strong non-covalent linkage, most probably involving a protein, for glycogen as most likely. This finding is of importance for diabetes, where α-particle structure is impaired.

  14. Effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Pyun, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Tae-Bong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Cha, Hyun-Suk

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS The specimens were prepared to evaluate the bond strength of epoxy resin-based fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) to dual-curing resin cement (RelyX U200). The specimens were divided into four groups (n=18) according to different surface treatments: group 1, no treatment; group 2, silanization; group 3,...

  15. Effects of sandblasting, H2SO4/HCl etching, and phosphate primer application on bond strength of veneering resin composite to commercially pure titanium grade 4

    OpenAIRE

    Egoshi, Takafumi; Taira, Yohsuke; Soeno, Kohyoh; SAWASE Takashi

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of surface treatments on the bond strength of a resin composite to a commercially pure titanium. The bonding surfaces of all titanium specimens were ground with 1,000-grit silicon carbide paper and then subjected to one or more of these surface treatments: sandblasting with alumina (sand), etching with 45wt% H2SO4 and 15wt% HCl (SH-etchant) at 70°C for 10 min, and/or phosphate primer (MDP-primer) application. Specimens not subjected to any surface treatment...

  16. Use of composite materials, health monitoring and self-healing concepts to refurbish our civil and military infrastructure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Delong, Waylon Anthony; White, Scott (University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois); Yepez, Esteban; Rackow, Kirk A.; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    An unavoidable by-product of a metallic structure's use is the appearance of crack, corrosion, erosion and other flaws. Economic barriers to the replacement of these structures have created an aging civil and military infrastructure and placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair and inspection methods. As a result of Homeland Security issues and these aging infrastructure concerns, increased attention has been focused on the rapid repair and preemptive reinforcement of structures such as buildings and bridges. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program established the viability of using bonded composite patches to repair metallic structures. High modulus fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) material may be used in lieu of mechanically fastened metallic patches or welds to reinforce or repair damaged structures. Their use produces a wide array of engineering and economic advantages. Current techniques for strengthening steel structures have several drawbacks including requiring heavy equipment for installation, poor fatigue performance, and the need for ongoing maintenance due to continued corrosion attack or crack growth. The use of bonded composite doublers has the potential to correct the difficulties associated with current repair techniques and the ability to be applied where there are currently no rehabilitation options. Applications include such diverse structures as: buildings, bridges, railroad cars, trucks and other heavy machinery, steel power and communication towers, pipelines, factories, mining equipment, ships, tanks and other military vehicles. This LDRD also proved the concept of a living infrastructure by developing custom sensors and self-healing chemistry and linking this technology with the application of advanced composite materials. Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) systems and mountable, miniature sensors were designed to continuously or periodically assess structural integrity. Such systems are able to

  17. Adhesive bonding of resin composite to various titanium surfaces using different metal conditioners and a surface modification system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercules Jorge ALMILHATTI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the effect of three metal conditioners on the shear bond strength (SBS of a prosthetic composite material to cpTi grade I having three surface treatments. Material and Methods: One hundred sixty eight rivet-shaped specimens (8.0x2.0 mm were cast and subjected to polishing (P or sandblasting with either 50 mm (50SB or 250 mm (250SB Al2O3. The metal conditioners Metal Photo Primer (MPP, Cesead II Opaque Primer (OP, Targis Link (TL, and one surface modification system Siloc (S, were applied to the specimen surfaces, which were covered with four 1-mm thick layers of resin composite. The resin layers were exposed to curing light for 90 s separately. Seven specimens from each experimental group were stored in water at 37ºC for 24 h while the other 7 specimens were subjected to 5,000 thermal cycles consisting of water baths at 4ºC and 60ºC (n=7. All specimens were subjected to SBS test (0.5 mm/min until failure occurred, and further 28 specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Tukey's test (α=0.05. Results: On 50SB surfaces, OP groups showed higher SBS means than MPP (P<0.05, while no significant difference was found among OP, S, and TL groups. On 250SB surfaces, OP and TL groups exhibited higher SBS than MPP and S (P<0.05. No significant difference in SBS was found between OP and TL groups nor between MPP and S groups. The use of conditioners on 250SB surfaces resulted in higher SBS means than the use of the same products on 50SB surfaces (P<0.05. Conclusion: Sandblasting associated with the use of metal conditioners improves SBS of resin composites to cpTi.

  18. Investigation of the role of aziridine bonding agents on the aging of the composite solid rocket propellant(CSRP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amged A Ali; ZHANG Jian-wei; CAI Guo-biao

    2008-01-01

    The role of bonding agents on the aging characteristics is one of the important research topics.Aging program of the prepared propellant samples was conducting as follows:Five samples,two free of bonding agents,and three containing an aziridine based bonding agents (MAPO,HX-752,MAT4),four samples based on different bonding and curing agents all were aged at 70℃.The prepared bonding agent"MAT4"gave remarkable improvements and resulted in highly stable mechanical properties comparing with HX-752 or MAPO.The selected bonding agents family inhibited the rate of decomposition of the propellants during the aging periods and supported the propellant matrix against decomposition at the elevated temperatures.

  19. Texture analysis of a friction stir welded ultrafine grained Al–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite produced by accumulative roll-bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamanian, Morteza, E-mail: shamanian@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadnezhad, Mahyar [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Szpunar, Jerzy [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N5A9 (Canada)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Aluminum matrix composite was successfully bonded using friction stir welding. • After welding process the fraction of low angle boundary area rapidly decreases. • The grain growth in the NZ is related the increase of temperature during the FSW. • The aluminum matrix composite has a strong Rotated Cube texture. • The weld nugget has a Rotated Cube and shear texture. - Abstract: In recent years, several studies have been focused on friction stir welding of aluminum alloys, and some researchers have also been reported on welding of aluminum-based composites. In the present research, ultrafine grained sheets of aluminum matrix composite (Al–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were produced by accumulative roll-bonding (ARB) technique. The aluminum composite sheets were then joined by friction stir welding. The present work describes the effect of the FSW process on the microstructure and crystallographic textures in the base metal and weld nugget. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) results demonstrated the existence of different grain orientations within the weld nugget as compared to the base metal. Al composite plates have a Rotated Cube texture component. Moreover, in the nugget, grain structure with Rotated Cube and shear texture developed. Friction stir welding coarsened the grain size in the weld zone from the original grain size of 3–17 μm.

  20. Effect of an Indirect Composite Resin Surface Treatment with Two Types of Lasers: Nd: YAG, Er:YAG and Acid Etching on the Microshear Bond Strength of a Resin Cement

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In order to increase the bonding strength of the composite resin cements to the indirect composites, experiments such as the creation of surface roughness with sandblasting, acid-etching, silane application, laser, etc. have been carried out. However, there is no consensus about the results. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Er: YAG and Nd: YAG lasers and acid etching on microshear bond strength of an indirect composite resin. Methods: Aft...

  1. Effects of sandblasting, H2SO4/HCl etching, and phosphate primer application on bond strength of veneering resin composite to commercially pure titanium grade 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egoshi, Takafumi; Taira, Yohsuke; Soeno, Kohyoh; Sawase, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of surface treatments on the bond strength of a resin composite to a commercially pure titanium. The bonding surfaces of all titanium specimens were ground with 1,000-grit silicon carbide paper and then subjected to one or more of these surface treatments: sandblasting with alumina (sand), etching with 45wt% H2SO4 and 15wt% HCl (SH-etchant) at 70°C for 10 min, and/or phosphate primer (MDP-primer) application. Specimens not subjected to any surface treatment were used as controls. After resin composite veneer placement and 24-h water immersion, the shear bond strengths of the specimens in descending order were: sand/SH-etchant/MDP-primer, sand/SH-etchant/no primer, no sand/SH-etchant/MDP-primer, sand/no etch/MDP-primer, no sand/SH-etchant/no primer, sand/no etch/no primer, no sand/no etch/MDP-primer, no sand/no etch/no primer. Scanning electron microscope observations revealed that sandblasting and SH-etchant created many micro- and nanoscale cavities on the titanium surface. Results showed that a combined use of sandblasting, SH-etchant, and MDP-primer application had a cooperative effect on titanium bonding.

  2. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF COMPOSITE RESIN TO DENTAL ENAMEL CONDITIONED WITH PHOSPHORIC ACID OR Nd: YAG LASER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO Carlos de Paula

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has been focused on a comparison between the shear bond strength of a composite resin attached to dental enamel surface, after a 35% phosphoric acid etching and after a Nd:YAG laser irradiation with 165.8 J/cm2 of energy density per pulse. After etching and attaching resin to these surfaces, the specimens were thermocycled and then underwent the shearing bond strength tests at a speed of 5 mm/min. The results achieved, after statistical analysis with Student's t-test, showed that the adhesion was significantly greater in the 35% phosphoric acid treated group than in the group treated with the Nd:YAG laser, thus demonstrating the need for developing new studies to reach the ideal parameters for an effective enamel surface conditioning as well as specific adhesives and composite resins when Nd:YAG laser is used

  3. INVESTIGATION OF BONDING IN OXIDE-FIBER (WHISKER) REINFORCED METALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CERAMIC FIBERS , BONDING), (*COMPOSITE MATERIALS, BONDING), (*BONDING, CERAMIC FIBERS ), ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, OXIDES, ZIRCONIUM, NICKEL, TITANIUM, CHROMIUM, SINGLE CRYSTALS, VACUUM, SHEAR STRESSES, SURFACE PROPERTIES, ADDITIVES.

  4. Improvement of Joint Strength of SiCp/Al Metal Matrix Composite in Transient Liquid Phase Bonding Using Cu/Ni/Cu Film Interlayer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rongfa CHEN; Dunwen ZUO; Min WANG

    2006-01-01

    The compact oxide on the surface of SiCp/Al metal matrix composite (SiCp/Al MMC) greatly depends on the property of the joint. Inlaid sputtering target was applied to etch the oxide completely on the bonding surface of SiCp/Al MMC by plasma erosion. Cu/Ni/Cu film of 5 μm in thickness was prepared by magnetron sputtering method on the clean bonding surface in the same vacuum chamber, which was acted as an interlayer in transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding process. Compared with the same thickness of single Cu foil and Ni foil interlayer,the shear strength of 200 MPa was obtained using Cu/Ni/Cu film interlayer during TLP bonding, which was 89.7% that of base metal. In addition, homogenization of the bonding region and no particle segregation in interfacial region were found by analysis of the joint microstructure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the micrograph of the joint interface. The result shows that a homogenous microstructure of joint was achieved, which is similar with that of based metal.

  5. Novel trends in electrocatalysis: Extended Brewer hypo-hyper-d-interionic bonding theory and selective interactive grafting of composite bifunctional electrocatalysts for simultaneous anodic hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neophytides S.G.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel Trends in Electrocatalysis: Extended Brewer Hypo-Hyper-d-lnterionic Bonding Theory and Selective Interactive Grafting of Composite Bifunctional Electrocatalysts for Simultaneous Anodic Hydrogen and CO OxidationThe Extended Brewer Interactive Interionic Bonding Theory (EBIIBT has been developed to show the equivalence of interatomic and interionic bonding features, and for their mutual combinations, as well as its effect upon electrocatalytic properties for the hydrogen electrode reactions (HELR. The equivalence of interionic hypo-hyper-d-interelectronic interaction in both metallic and any other ionic state and its effect upon electrocatalytic properties for hydrogen electrode reactions (HELR has been proved and inferred. TG (Thermal Gravimetry analysis of TPR (Temperature Programmed Reduction of mixed hypc-hyper-d-electronic oxides of transition elements was broadly employed to prove the EBIIBT effect as reflected in dramatically decreased individual temperatures of their mutual reduction into intermetallic phases. The same interionic Brewer (and/or intermetallic bonding effect has been confirmed both by UPD of hyper-d-upon hypo-d-electronic substrates and vice versa, and by the shift of bonding peaks in XPS analysis.

  6. An In Vitro Comparison of the Bond Strength of Composite to Superficial and Deep Dentin, Treated With Er:YAG Laser Irradiation or Acid-Etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaghehmand, Homayoon; Nezhad Nasrollah, Fatemeh; Nokhbatolfoghahaei, Hanieh; Fekrazad, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin on superficial and deep dentin after conditioning with phosphoric acid and Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Methods: Thirty human molars were selected, roots were removed and crowns were bisected to provide a total of 60 half-crowns. Specimens were ground to expose superficial and deep dentin. Samples were assigned to six groups: (1) AS (acid etching of superficial dentin); (2) AD (acid etching of deep dentin); (3) LS (Er:YAG laser irradiation on superficial dentin); (4) LD (Er:YAG laser irradiation on deep dentin); (5) LAS (Er:YAG laser irradiation on superficial dentin followed by acid etching); (6) LAD (Er:YAG laser irradiation on deep dentin followed by acid etching) The adhesive protocol was performed. Samples were thermocycled and micro-shear bond strength was tested to failure. The data were submitted to statistical analysis with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc test. Results: The AS group, demonstrated the greatest amount of micro-shear bond strength. Statistical analysis showed a decrease in bond strength in laser-treated groups which was more significant for deep dentin. Conclusion: Preparation of dentin with laser did not improve bonding to superficial and deep dentin. PMID:28144437

  7. Clinical evaluation on porcelain laminate veneers bonded with light-cured composite: results up to 7 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcangelo, Camillo; De Angelis, Francesco; Vadini, Mirco; D'Amario, Maurizio

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of laminate porcelain veneers bonded with a light-cured composite. Thirty patients were restored with 119 porcelain laminate veneers. The veneers were studied for an observation time of 7 years. Marginal adaptation, marginal discoloration, secondary caries, color match, and anatomic form were clinically examined following modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. Each restoration was also examined for cracks, fractures, and debonding. Pulp vitality was verified. In addition, plaque and gingival indexes and increase in gingival recession were recorded. Survival rate evaluating absolute failures and success rate describing relative failures were statistically determined, using both restoration and patient-related analyses. On the basis of the criteria used, most of the veneers rated Alfa. After 7 years, the results of the clinical investigation regarding marginal adaptation and marginal discoloration revealed only 2.5% and 4.2% Bravo ratings, respectively, among the 119 initially placed veneers. Using the restoration as the statistical unit, the survival rate was 97.5%, with a high estimated success probability of 0.843 after 7 years. Using the patient as the statistical unit, the survival rate was 90.0% and the estimated success probability after 7 years was 0.824. Gingival response to the veneers was all in the satisfactory range. Porcelain laminate veneers offer a predictable and successful treatment modality giving a maximum preservation of sound tooth. The preparation, cementation, and finishing procedures adopted are considered key factors for the long-term success and aesthetical result of the veneer restorations.

  8. The Effect of Energy Densities on the Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhering Flowable Composite to Er:YAG Pretreated Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahas, Paul; Zeinoun, Toni; Majzoub, Zeina; Corbani, Karim; Nammour, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable resin composite, to dentin, after exposing it to Er:YAG laser radiation, at different energy densities. Materials and Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human third molars were randomly divided into five groups (n = 12). In the control group, dentin was left unirradiated, whereas, in the other four groups, dentin was irradiated with Er:YAG laser in noncontact mode (MSP mode = 100 µs; 10 Hz; beam diameter: 1.3 mm; speed of 1 mm/second; air 6 mL/min; and water 4 mL/min), and respectively, with the following level of energy (50 mJ, 60 mJ, 80 mJ, and 100 mJ). Then, self-adhering flowable resin composite was bonded to all prepared dentin surfaces. Shear bond strength (SBS) was applied and fractured surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Results. SBS values showed significant differences in 60 mJ (P flowable resin composite when it is used at the appropriate low level of energy density.

  9. Diffusion bonding process between W-Cu composite and Cu%W-Cu复合材料与Cu的扩散连接工艺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范景莲; 杨树忠; 刘涛; 周强

    2015-01-01

    The high mismatch on coefficient of thermal expansion between W and Cu makes the bonding between W and Cu on divertor application become a problem. The W-Cu composite and Cu were bonded by diffusion bonding in the reduced furnace with a high active Fe-Cu powder interlayer in the present paper, and the metallographical morphologies, micro-hardness, tensile strength and elements distribution of the bonded specimen were investigated. The results show that interface bonding quality of the joint is improved effectively by using an interlayer. Metallographical morphologies, micro-hardness and SEM-EDS indicate that successive and tight bonding is obtained near the joint interface of W-Cu and Cu bonded specimen. Furthermore, the average tensile strength of the joint is 168.55 MPa, which is close to the strength of Cu substrate and demonstrates the success of reaching the diffusion bonding of W-Cu and Cu by using an interlayer of active Fe-Cu composite powder.%钨、铜热膨胀系数的过度失配,使得钨、铜的连接在偏滤器上的应用成为难点。本文基于钨铜梯度材料概念对钨、铜进行连接,以高活性 Fe-Cu 粉为中间层,在还原炉中采用扩散连接的方法对 W-Cu 复合材料与 Cu进行连接,并对连接样品的金相显微形貌、显微硬度、拉伸强度和元素分布进行研究。结果表明,采用添加中间层的方法可以有效改善连接界面,提高连接质量。金相、显微硬度和能谱分析说明W-Cu与Cu连接样品的连接界面处形成了连续、紧密的结合;拉伸实验测得的平均强度为168.55 MPa,接近于Cu基材的强度,进一步证实添加中间层的方法可实现W-Cu与Cu的扩散连接。

  10. Avaliação da resistência ao cisalhamento de braquetes colados com resinas ortodônticas fluoretadas Evaluation of shear bond strength of brackets bonded with orthodontic fluoride-releasing composite resins

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    Marcia Cristina Rastelli

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a resistência ao cisalhamento de braquetes metálicos colados com resinas que contêm flúor, comparando-as a uma resina convencional; e analisar a quantidade de adesivo remanescente na superfície do esmalte. MÉTODOS: sessenta pré-molares foram divididos aleatoriamente em 3 grupos: Grupo I - Concise (3M, Grupo II - Ultrabond (Aditek do Brasil e Grupo III - Rely-a-Bond (Reliance. Após a colagem dos braquetes, as amostras foram termocicladas (500 ciclos nas temperaturas de 5°C e 55°C. Após 48 horas, foram submetidas aos ensaios mecânicos de cisalhamento na direção oclusocervical, com velocidade de carga de 0,5mm/min, em uma máquina MTS 810. RESULTADOS: foram observadas resistências médias ao cisalhamento de 24,54±6,98MPa para o Grupo I, de 11,53±6,20MPa para o Grupo II e de 16,46±5,72MPa para o Grupo III. A Análise de Variância determinou diferença estatística entre as médias de resistência ao cisalhamento entre os grupos (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the shear bond strength of stainless steel brackets bonded with fluoride releasing composite resins, comparing them with a conventional resin and to analyze the amount of resin left on the enamel surface. METHODS: Sixty premolars were randomly divided into three groups: Group I - Concise (3M, Group II - Ultrabond (Aditek do Brasil and Group III - Rely-a-Bond (Reliance. After bonding, the samples were thermocycled (500 cycles at 5ºC and 55ºC temperatures. After 48 hours they were subjected to shear bond strength testing, in the occluso-gingival direction, using an MTS 810 Universal Testing Machine with load speed of 0.5 mm/min. RESULTS: The results demonstrated a mean shear bond strength of 24.54 ± 6.98 MPa for Group I, 11.53 ± 6.20 MPa for Group II, and 16.46 ± 5.72 MPa for Group III. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA determined a statistical difference in the mean shear bond strengths between groups (p < 0.001. The Tukey test evidenced that the averages of the

  11. An investigation on the effect of light cure and self cure composite resins on bonding strength of light cure glass ionomer to dentin (In-vitro

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    Pahlavan A

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Composite reins have recently become popular for posterior teeth restorations. Gap"nformation and subsequent microleakage are of the complications resulting from such restorations. One of the"ntechniques to overcome polymerization shrinkage of composite resins is sandwich technique (application of"nglass ionomer as a base beneath the composite resin. Since polymerization patterns in two types of composite"nresins (light cure and self cure differ from each other, various effects on the bond strength between glass"nionomer and dentin are expected."nPurpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of self- cure and light- cure composite"nresins in sandwich technique on the bond strength of light cure glass ionomer and dentin."nMaterials and Methods: 40 extracted human premolars were selected and divided into four groups:"nGroup 1: Light cure glass ionomer of 1mm thickness was placed on dentin."nGroup 2: 1mm thickness of light cure glass ionomer plus a mass of self cure composite resin of 2mm"nthickness were placed."nGroup 3: 1mm thickness of light cure glass ionomer plus light cure composite resin as two separate 1mm layer"nwere placed."nGroup 4: 1mm thickness of light cure glass ionomer with 37% phosphoric acid etching followed by two"nseparate layers of light cure composite resin of 1 mm thickness were placed."nSEM was used to determine gap size ai Gl- dentin and Gi- composite interlaces. The findings were analyzed"nby ANOVA and t-student tests."nResults: Groups 1 and 2 showed no gap at Gl-dentm interface and also cracks were not observed in all these"nspecimens. In group 3, there was gap between light cure GI and light cure composite resin and cracks were"nseen in GI, too. Group 4 showed gap at both interfaces and more cracks were seen in GI. Groups I and 2"nshowed the least gap formation and group 4 showed the most. Statistically significant difference was found"nbetween groups 3, 4 and group 1 (control, 2."nConclusion: Base

  12. PRACTICE OF CONDUCTING A GEOTECHNICAL MONITORING FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE ROAD TUNNEL “DOUBLER KURORTNOGO PROSPEKTA” IN SOCHI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesnoy V. A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the practice of conducting a geotechnical monitoring of the road tunnel № № 8, 8а «Doubler Kurortnogo Prospekta» in Sochi in difficult geotechnical conditions. Geotechnical monitoring method was developed on the results of mathematical modeling performed based on engineering studies and design solutions. The particular importance is paid to areas of shallow road tunnels, because in these areas there are the highest strain that could lead to malfunction of the lithological technical system "accommodating array - fixing tunnel" and the further destruction of the road tunnel walling. Geotechnical monitoring at the stage of engineering survey allows us to assess comprehensively the condition of the geological environment in a pristine condition, as well as detailed consideration to the effect on her of construction of mining operations. Implementation of geotechnical monitoring at the stages the engineering survey and construction will identify weaknesses malfunction of the lithological technical system "accommodating array - fixing tunnel" and ensure the security of the operation of such a technically complex and demanding facilities such as road tunnels

  13. Evaluation of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Effect on Microshear Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Flowable Composite in the Dentin of Permanent Molar: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslemi, Masoumeh; Fotouhi Ardakani, Faezeh; Javadi, Fatemeh; Khalili Sadrabad, Zahra; Shadkar, Zahra; Shadkar, Mohammad Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Background. Recently, new restorative materials such as self-adhesive flowable composites, because of their simple use and no need to bonding and etching, are considered important, particularly in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on microshear bond strength of self-adhesive flowable composite on permanent teeth dentin in vitro. Material and Methods. In this experimental study, 40 dentin sections were prepared from healthy third molars and divided into two groups according to their surface preparation by Er,Cr:YSGG laser or without laser, only with silicon carbide paper. In each group, two groups of 10 teeth were treated with self-adhesive flowable composite (Dyad) and conventional flowable composite (acid etch and bonding). Samples were stored in normal saline and after 48 hours their bond strength was measured. The failure mode of samples was observed on stereomicroscope. In order to analyse the results, the one way ANOVA and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons were used. Result. The maximum bond strength was related to conventional flowable composite with laser preparation group (24/21 Mpa). The lowest one was seen in Dyad composite without laser emitting (9/89 Mpa). The statistical difference between this two groups was significant (P value = 0/0038). The microshear bond strength differences between Dyad composite groups with laser preparation (mean = 16/427 ± 1/79) and without laser preparation (mean = 12/85 ± 1/90) were statistically significant too (P value = 0/01). Conclusion. Self-adhesive flowable composite has lower microshear bond strength than conventional flowable composite. Moreover, the laser irradiation as a surface treatment can improve this bond strength.

  14. Evaluation of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Effect on Microshear Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Flowable Composite in the Dentin of Permanent Molar: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Moslemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Background. Recently, new restorative materials such as self-adhesive flowable composites, because of their simple use and no need to bonding and etching, are considered important, particularly in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on microshear bond strength of self-adhesive flowable composite on permanent teeth dentin in vitro. Material and Methods. In this experimental study, 40 dentin sections were prepared from healthy third molars and divided into two groups according to their surface preparation by Er,Cr:YSGG laser or without laser, only with silicon carbide paper. In each group, two groups of 10 teeth were treated with self-adhesive flowable composite (Dyad and conventional flowable composite (acid etch and bonding. Samples were stored in normal saline and after 48 hours their bond strength was measured. The failure mode of samples was observed on stereomicroscope. In order to analyse the results, the one way ANOVA and Tukey’s test for multiple comparisons were used. Result. The maximum bond strength was related to conventional flowable composite with laser preparation group (24/21 Mpa. The lowest one was seen in Dyad composite without laser emitting (9/89 Mpa. The statistical difference between this two groups was significant (P value = 0/0038. The microshear bond strength differences between Dyad composite groups with laser preparation (mean = 16/427±1/79 and without laser preparation (mean = 12/85±1/90 were statistically significant too (P value = 0/01. Conclusion. Self-adhesive flowable composite has lower microshear bond strength than conventional flowable composite. Moreover, the laser irradiation as a surface treatment can improve this bond strength.

  15. Study on preparation technique and properties of magnetostrictive epoxy bonded Tb1-xPrx(Fe0.4Co0.6)1.93 composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jinjun; LIU Xincai; JIANG Chengyong; PAN Jing

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic and magnetostrictive properties of epoxy bonded Tb1-xPrx(Fe0.4Co0.6)1.93 (0.85≤x≤1.00) composites, prepared with different epoxy proportions using cold compression-molding technique, were investigated. It is found that the optimal conditions were with a compaction pressure of 100 MPa and a mass ratio of resin to powder of 5:100. The Tb0.1Pr0.9(Fe0.4Co0.6)1.93 composite rod had a high magnetostriction of 770 ppm at an applied magnetic field of 960 kA/m, whereas the Pr(Fe0.4Co0.6)1.93 composite reached 500 ppm at 400 kA/m. The good magnetostrictive properties of Pr(Fe0.4Co0.6)1.93 composite at low-field (≤400 kA/m) could be explained by its low anisotropy. These results indicated that the epoxy bonded Tb1-xPrx(Fe0.4Co0.6)1.93 rod samples for high Pr content of x=0.9-1.0 were of practical value.

  16. THE EFFECTS OF EDGE BANDING THICKNESS OF ULUDAG FIR BONDED WITH SOME ADHESIVES ON WITHDRAWAL STRENGTHS OF BEECH DOWEL PINS IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS

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    Şeref Kurt

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials and wooden dowels are being used increasingly in the construction of furniture frames and inner decoration. Yet there is little information available concerning the withdrawal strength of various fasteners, and, in particular, dowels in composite materials edged solid wood edge bandings. The aim of this study was to determine the withdrawal strengths of 6, 8, 10 mm diameter dowels produced from beech with respect to edge of a medium-density fiberboard (MDF or particleboard (PB edged with 5, 10 and 15 mm thickness of solid wood edge banding of uludag fir, bonded with different adhesives. According to TS 4539 standard, the effects of edge banding thickness, dimension of dowels, type of composite materials and type of adhesives used for edge banding on the withdrawal strength were determined. The highest (6.37 N/mm² withdrawal strength was obtained in beech dowels with 8 mm diameter for MDF with 5 mm thickness of solid wood edge banding of uludag fir bonded with D-VTKA adhesive. According to results, if the hole wall and the surface of dowel are smooth then the adhesives give better mechanical adhesion with dowels and composite materials.

  17. The Effects of Temperature, Humidity and Aircraft Fluid Exposure on T800H/3900-2 Composites Bonded with AF-555M Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Gilda A.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Lowther, Sharon E.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Connell, John W.; Blasini, Sheila Roman

    2010-01-01

    Fiber reinforced resin matrix composites and structural adhesives have found increased usage on commercial and military aircraft in recent years. Due to the lack of service history of these relatively new material systems, their long-term aging performance has not been well established. In this study, single lap shear specimens (SLS) were fabricated by secondary bonding of Scotch-Weld(TradeMark) AF-555M between pre-cured adherends comprised of T800H/3900-2 uni-directional laminates. The adherends were co-cured with wet peel-ply for surface preparation. Each bond-line of the SLS specimen was measured to determine thickness and inspected visually using an optical microscope for voids. A three-year environmental aging plan for the SLS specimens at 82 C (180 F) and 85% relative humidity was initiated. SLS strengths were measured for both controls and aged specimens at room temperature and 82 C. The effect of this exposure on lap shear strength and failure modes to date is reported. In addition, the effects of water, saline water, deicing fluid, JP-5 jet fuel and hydraulic fluid on both the composite material and the adhesive bonds were investigated. The up to date results on the effects of these exposures will be discussed.

  18. The influence of surface roughness on the bond strength of composite to dental hard tissues after Er:YAG laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Andrew K.; Staninec, Michal; Fried, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    The uniformity of laser treated hard tissue surfaces depends on the laser beam quality and the degree of spatial overlap between adjacent laser pulses. Since the surface roughness or surface topography is expected to influence adhesion, our aim in this study was to assess the influence of the surface topography on the adhesion of composite to both enamel and dentin treated at the optimal conditions for the efficient ablation of those tissues with the Er:YAG laser. Human dentin and bovine enamel samples were uniformly irradiated by an Er:YAG laser operating with a pulse duration of 20-30-μs. The laser pulses were 300-μm in diameter with the laser operating in a single TEM00 transverse mode, and the distance between laser spots was varied from 50-200-μm. A motion control system and a pressurized spray system incorporating a microprocessor controlled pulsed nozzle for water delivery, were used to ensure uniform treatment of the entire surface. Shear bond testing was used to evaluate the adhesive strength in order to assess the suitability of laser treated surfaces for bonding. The effect of the degree of overlap of adjacent laser pulses on the surface roughness and the shear bond strength of composite to enamel and dentin is reported.

  19. Influence of the LED curing source and selective enamel etching on dentin bond strength of self-etch adhesives in class I composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo José; Araújo, Cíntia Tereza Pimenta; Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the LED curing unit and selective enamel etching on dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS) for self-etch adhesives in class I composite restorations. On 96 human molars, box-shaped class I cavities were made maintaining enamel margins. Self-etch adhesives (Clearfil SE - CSE and Clearfil S(3) - S3) were used to bond a microhybrid composite. Before adhesive application, half of the teeth were enamel acid-etched and the other half was not. Adhesives and composites were cured with the following light curing units (LCUs): one polywave (UltraLume 5 - UL) and two single-peak (FlashLite 1401 - FL and Radii Cal - RD) LEDs. The specimens were then submitted to thermomechanical aging and longitudinally sectioned to obtain bonded sticks (0.9 mm(2)) to be tested in tension at 0.5 mm/min. The failure mode was then recorded. The μTBS data were submitted to a three-way ANOVA and Tukey's (α = 0.05). For S3, the selective enamel-etching provided lower μTBS values (20.7 ± 2.7) compared to the non-etched specimens (26.7 ± 2.2). UL yielded higher μTBS values (24.1 ± 3.2) in comparison to the photoactivation approach with FL (18.8 ±3.9) and RD (19.9 ±1.8) for CSE. The two-step CSE was not influenced by the enamel etching (p ≥ 0.05). Enamel acid etching in class I composite restorations affects the dentin μTBS of the one-step self-etch adhesive Clearfil S(3), with no alterations for Clearfil SE bond strength. The polywave LED promoted better bond strength for the two-step adhesive compared to the single-peak ones.

  20. Influence of Different Power Outputs of Er:YAG Laser on Shear Bond Strength of a Resin Composite to Feldspathic Porcelain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Porcelain may fracture or chip if exposed to any trau-mas and can be repaired by using a resin composite. Purpose: This study was aimed to evaluate the influences of Er:YAG laser on shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite to feldspathic porcelain. Materials and Method: Seventy-two porcelain blocks were divided into six groups (n=12: G1: no treatment (control group; G2: 9% hydrofluoric acid (HF; G3-6 were separately irradiated with Er:YAG laser using four energy parameters: 2W, 100mj (G3; 3W, 150mj (G4; 4W, 200mj (G5 and 5W, 250mj (G6, respectively; and 20 Hz frequency in long-pulse mode. After silane treatment, a resin composite rod was bonded to each of the porcelain block. The SBS was measured following storage and thermocycling. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, Tamhane and Chi-Square tests. Results: The highest SBS (12.29±3.04 MPa was obtained with HF (G2. The lowest SBS (2.23±0.60 MPa was observed in G4, followed by G3 (1.96±0.76 MPa. G6 had a significantly higher SBS (8.00±2.22 MPa than other laser irradiation groups. Conclusion: Although, Er:YAG laser irradiation at 5W, 250mJ/20 Hz was effective in promoting adhesion of resin composite to feldspathic porcelain compared with the control group, it cannot be used as a safe alternative method to HF acid. Laser irradiation with the evaluated parameters in this study does not promote an effective adhesion on porcelain surface to create adequate bond for clinical use.

  1. Influence of Different Power Outputs of Er:YAG Laser on Shear Bond Strength of a Resin Composite to Feldspathic Porcelain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mostafa; Davari, Abdolrahim; Abolghasami Mahani, Amin; Hakimi, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Porcelain may fracture or chip if exposed to any traumas and can be repaired by using a resin composite. Purpose This study was aimed to evaluate the influences of Er:YAG laser on shear bond strength (SBS) of resin composite to feldspathic porcelain. Materials and Method Seventy-two porcelain blocks were divided into six groups (n=12): G1: no treatment (control group); G2: 9% hydrofluoric acid (HF); G3-6 were separately irradiated with Er:YAG laser using four energy parameters: 2W, 100mj (G3); 3W, 150mj (G4); 4W, 200mj (G5) and 5W, 250mj (G6), respectively; and 20 Hz frequency in long-pulse mode. After silane treatment, a resin composite rod was bonded to each of the porcelain block. The SBS was measured following storage and thermocycling. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, Tamhane and Chi-Square tests. Results The highest SBS (12.29±3.04 MPa) was obtained with HF (G2). The lowest SBS (2.23±0.60 MPa) was observed in G4, followed by G3 (1.96±0.76 MPa). G6 had a significantly higher SBS (8.00±2.22 MPa) than other laser irradiation groups. Conclusion Although, Er:YAG laser irradiation at 5W, 250mJ/20 Hz was effective in promoting adhesion of resin composite to feldspathic porcelain compared with the control group, it cannot be used as a safe alternative method to HF acid. Laser irradiation with the evaluated parameters in this study does not promote an effective adhesion on porcelain surface to create adequate bond for clinical use. PMID:25759855

  2. Microstructure and Crystallographic Texture Variations in the Friction-Stir-Welded Al-Al2O3-B4C Metal Matrix Composite Produced by Accumulative Roll Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadnezhad, Mahyar; Shamanian, Morteza; Zabolian, Azam; Taheri, Mahshid; Javaheri, Vahid; Navidpour, Amir Hossein; Nezakat, Majid; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-12-01

    In this research, ultrafine-grained sheets of aluminum matrix composite (Al-Al2O3-B4C) were produced by accumulative roll bonding ARB technique. As-received, ultrafine-grained aluminum composite sheets were joined by friction-stir welding. The microstructure, crystallographic texture, and Vickers hardness in the weld zones were investigated. Electron backscattered diffraction results revealed occurrence of dynamic recrystallization and demonstrated existence of different grain orientations within the weld nugget. Produced composite plates illustrated rotated cubic texture. Moreover, in the nugget, a well-recrystallized grain structure having characteristic strong shear texture component finally developed. However, the texture result in the heat-affected zone illustrated rotated cubic and Goss components that related to the effect of heat input. Friction-stir welding refined the grain size in the weld zone. The hardness also improved with the peak hardness being observed towards the advancing stir welding side.

  3. Evaluation of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Effect on Microshear Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Flowable Composite in the Dentin of Permanent Molar: An In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Masoumeh Moslemi; Faezeh Fotouhi Ardakani; Fatemeh Javadi; Zahra Khalili Sadrabad; Zahra Shadkar; Mohammad Saeid Shadkar

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Background. Recently, new restorative materials such as self-adhesive flowable composites, because of their simple use and no need to bonding and etching, are considered important, particularly in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on microshear bond strength of self-adhesive flowable composite on permanent teeth dentin in vitro. Material and Methods. In this experimental study, 40 dentin sections were prepared from healthy third m...

  4. Effects of Interlayer Composition on Bond Strength and Interfacial Microstructure of Green Joined CePO4-ZrO2 Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高海; 刘家臣; 刘名郑; 王丽娟; 霍伟荣

    2003-01-01

    Effects of interlayer composition on bonding strength and interfacial microstruc ture of green joined CePO4-ZrO2 ceramics were studied. Green bodies of 25%C ePO4/ZrO2 and ZrO2 ceramics were joined by using interlayer composed of Ce PO4 and ZrO2 at 1450 ℃ for 120 min without applied pressure.The effects of CePO4/(CePO4+ZrO2) ratio on the bond strength of the joints were investiga ted. Under the experimental conditions, the grain size of the particles grown in the joint is smaller than those in joined ceramics. The microstructure of the joint is more homogeneous than that of the matrix and without obvious cracks, pores and other defects.

  5. Chemical bonding structural analysis of nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared by coaxial arc plasma deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gima, Hiroki; Zkria, Abdelrahman; Katamune, Yūki; Ohtani, Ryota; Koizumi, Satoshi; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped ultra-nanocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared in hydrogen and nitrogen mixed-gas atmospheres by coaxial arc plasma deposition with graphite targets were studied electrically and chemical-bonding-structurally. The electrical conductivity was increased by nitrogen doping, accompanied by the production of n-type conduction. From X-ray photoemission, near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure, hydrogen forward-scattering, and Fourier transform infrared spectral results, it is expected that hydrogen atoms that terminate diamond grain boundaries will be partially replaced by nitrogen atoms and, consequently, π C–N and C=N bonds that easily generate free electrons will be formed at grain boundaries.

  6. Ceramic (Feldspathic & IPS Empress II) vs. laboratory composite (Gradia) veneers; a comparison between their shear bond strength to enamel; an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikzad, S; Azari, Abbas; Dehgan, S

    2010-07-01

    Patient demand for aesthetic dentistry is steadily growing. Laminates and free metal restorations have evolved in an attempt to overcome the invasiveness nature of full veneer restorations. Although many different materials have been used for making these restorations, there is no single material that fits best for all purposes. Two groups of ceramic material (Feldspathic and IPS Empress II) and one group of laboratory composite (Gradia) discs (10 discs in each group; 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were prepared according to the manufacturer's instruction. The surface of ceramic discs were etched and silanized. In Gradia group, liquid primer was applied on composite surfaces. Thirty freshly extracted sound human molars and premolars were randomly divided into three groups. The enamel surface of each tooth was slightly flattened (0.3 mm) on the buccal or lingual side and then primed and cemented to the prepared discs with the aid of a dental surveyor. The finishing specimens were thermocycled between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C for 2500 cycles and then prepared for shear bond strength testing. The resulting data were analyzed by one-way anova and Tukey HSD test. The fractured surfaces of each specimen were inspected by means of stereomicroscope and SEM. There is significant difference between the bond strength of materials tested. The mean bond strengths obtained with Feldspathic ceramic, IPS Empress II and Gradia were 33.10 +/- 4.31 MPa, 26.04 +/- 7.61 MPa and 14.42 +/- 5.82 MPa, respectively. The fracture pattern was mainly mixed for ceramic groups. More scientific evidence needed for standardization of bonding protocols.

  7. Tensile bond srength between composite resin using different adhesive systems Avaliação da resistência à ruptura por tração entre resina composta e diversos adesivos dentinários

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Dias

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluate the tensile bond strength (TBS among nine adhesive systems and one composite resin. The groups were made as follows: Single Bond/3M (G1, Etch & Prime 3.0 /Degussa (G2, Bond 1/Jeneric/Pentron (G3, Prime & Bond 2.1/Dentsply (G4, OptiBond FL/Kerr (G5, Stae/SDI (G6, Snap Bond/ Copalite-Cooley & Cooley (G7, Prime & Bond NT/Dentsply (G8, Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus/3M (G9. The control group (G10 was made only with the composite resin (Z100/3M. One hundred specimens were made, 10 for each group. There were significant differences on TBS among groups. G3 showed the hightest TBS in comparison to other tested groups. G10 presented higher TBS than all groups. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi investigar in vitro a resistência de união entre uma resina composta e nove sistemas adesivos dentinários. Os adesivos estudados foram assim agrupados: Single Bond/3M (G1, Etch & Prime 3.0/ Degussa (G2, Bond 1/Jeneric/Pentron (G3, Prime & Bond 2.1/Dentsply (G4, OptiBond FL/Kerr (G5, Stae/SDI (G6, Snap Bond/Copalite (G7, Prime & Bond NT/Dentsply (G 8, Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus/3M (G9. O Grupo controle (G10. foi confeccionado somente com a resina composta (Z100/3M. Foram confeccionados 100 espécimes, 10 para cada grupo. Houve diferenças estatísticas significantes entre os grupos. O grupo 3 foi o que mostrou a mais alta resistência em comparação aos nove testados. O grupo controle (G10 apresentou a mais alta resistência entre todos os Grupos.  

  8. The Effect of Energy Densities on the Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhering Flowable Composite to Er:YAG Pretreated Dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbani, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable resin composite, to dentin, after exposing it to Er:YAG laser radiation, at different energy densities. Materials and Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human third molars were randomly divided into five groups (n = 12). In the control group, dentin was left unirradiated, whereas, in the other four groups, dentin was irradiated with Er:YAG laser in noncontact mode (MSP mode = 100 µs; 10 Hz; beam diameter: 1.3 mm; speed of 1 mm/second; air 6 mL/min; and water 4 mL/min), and respectively, with the following level of energy (50 mJ, 60 mJ, 80 mJ, and 100 mJ). Then, self-adhering flowable resin composite was bonded to all prepared dentin surfaces. Shear bond strength (SBS) was applied and fractured surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Results. SBS values showed significant differences in 60 mJ (P < 0.05) compared to other groups. Morphological evaluation revealed tags or plugs in dentinal tubules, especially when 60 mJ and 80 mJ were used. All four groups tended to leave more residues on the dentin surface, than the control group. Conclusion. Er:YAG dentin irradiation may enhance SBS of the self-adhering flowable resin composite when it is used at the appropriate low level of energy density. PMID:27830151

  9. The Effect of Energy Densities on the Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhering Flowable Composite to Er:YAG Pretreated Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Nahas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable resin composite, to dentin, after exposing it to Er:YAG laser radiation, at different energy densities. Materials and Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human third molars were randomly divided into five groups (n=12. In the control group, dentin was left unirradiated, whereas, in the other four groups, dentin was irradiated with Er:YAG laser in noncontact mode (MSP mode = 100 µs; 10 Hz; beam diameter: 1.3 mm; speed of 1 mm/second; air 6 mL/min; and water 4 mL/min, and respectively, with the following level of energy (50 mJ, 60 mJ, 80 mJ, and 100 mJ. Then, self-adhering flowable resin composite was bonded to all prepared dentin surfaces. Shear bond strength (SBS was applied and fractured surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Results. SBS values showed significant differences in 60 mJ (P<0.05 compared to other groups. Morphological evaluation revealed tags or plugs in dentinal tubules, especially when 60 mJ and 80 mJ were used. All four groups tended to leave more residues on the dentin surface, than the control group. Conclusion. Er:YAG dentin irradiation may enhance SBS of the self-adhering flowable resin composite when it is used at the appropriate low level of energy density.

  10. Influence of artificial aging on the shear bond strength of zirconia-composite interfaces after pretreatment with new 10-MDP adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    p.c pott

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This in-vitro study investigates the bond strength of different zirconia composites  with three different modern adhesive systems after artificial aging using thermocycling and water storage. Methods: A total of 90 specimens of zirconia (InCoris, Sirona, Germany, Bernsheim were ground using a 165 µm grit rotating diamond disc. Thirty specimens were additionally treated with either Futurabond U “FBU” (VOCO GmbH, or Futurabond M+ “FBM” (VOCO GmbH or Futurabond M+ in combination with the DCA activator “FBMD” (VOCO GmbH. One of the three different types of composites – BifixSE “BS”, BifixQM “BQ” or GrandioSO “G” (VOCO GmbH – was bonded to the ten specimens of each group. All of the specimens underwent artificial aging using thermocycling between 5°C and 55°C for 5000 cycles followed by water storage for 100 days. Shear bond strength (SBS was determined in a universal testing machine. The type of failure was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy. The data were compared to existing data without artificial aging. Statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA and the Tukey test. Results: FBM and FBMD had higher SBS than FBU in combination with all tested composites, except BifixSE. In nearly all groups, artificial aging had no effect, with the exception of the combination of FBMD with BifixSE, in which there was a significant decrease in SBS after the aging process (p

  11. Wavelength and pulselength dependence of laser conditioning and bulk damage in doubler-cut KH2PO4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J J; Bruere, J R; Bolourchi, M; Carr, C W; Feit, M D; Hackel, R P; Hahn, D E; Jarboe, J A; Lane, L A; Luthi, R L; McElroy, J N; Rubenchik, A M; Stanley, J R; Sell, W D; Vickers, J L; Weiland, T L; Willard, D A

    2005-10-28

    An experimental technique has been utilized to measure the variation of bulk damage scatter with damaging fluence in plates of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP) crystals. Bulk damage in unconditioned and laser-conditioned doubler-cut KDP crystals has been studied using 527 nm (2{omega}) light at pulselengths of 0.3-10 ns. It is found that there is less scatter due to damage at fixed fluence for longer pulselengths. In particular, there is {approx}4X increase in fluence for equivalent scatter for damage at 2{omega}, 10 ns as compared to 0.30 ns in unconditioned KDP. The results for the unconditioned and conditioned KDP show that for all the pulselengths the scatter due to the bulk damage is a strong function of the damaging fluence ({phi}{sup -5}). It is determined that the 2{omega} fluence pulselength-scaling for equivalent bulk damage scatter in unconditioned KDP varies as {tau}{sup 0.30{+-}0.11} and in 3{omega}, 3ns ramp-conditioned KDP varies as {tau}{sup 0.27{+-}0.14}. The effectiveness of 2{omega} and 3{omega} laser conditioning at pulselengths in the range of 0.30-23 ns for damage induced 2{omega}, 3 ns is analyzed in terms of scatter. For the protocols tested (i.e. peak conditioning irradiance, etc.), the 3{omega}, 300 ps conditioning to a peak fluence of 3 J/cm{sup 2} had the best performance under 2{omega}, 3 ns testing. The general trend in the performance of the conditioning protocols was shorter wavelength and shorter pulselength appear to produce better conditioning for testing at 2{omega}, 3 ns.

  12. Influence of artificial aging on the shear bond strength of zirconia-composite interfaces after pretreatment with new 10-MDP adhesive systems

    OpenAIRE

    p.c pott; Stiesch, M; M Eisenburger

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This in-vitro study investigates the bond strength of different zirconia composites  with three different modern adhesive systems after artificial aging using thermocycling and water storage. Methods: A total of 90 specimens of zirconia (InCoris, Sirona, Germany, Bernsheim) were ground using a 165 µm grit rotating diamond disc. Thirty specimens were additionally treated with either Futurabond U “FBU” (VOCO GmbH), or Futurabond M+ “FBM” (VOCO GmbH) or Futurabond M+ in combination...

  13. Evaluation of Alternative Peel Ply Surface Preparation Methods of SC-15 Epoxy / Fiberglass Composite Surfaces for Secondary Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    surface preparation, secondary bonding, peel ply, film adhesive, toughened epoxy, VARTM 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...for the VARTM process. .......................6 Figure 2. Vacuum-bagged laminate during the debulk process...processing temperature. .........................3 Table 2. ARL cure schedule for VARTM processing of SC-15

  14. Three-year aging of prototype flight laser at 10 kHz and 1 ns pulses with external frequency doubler for ICESat-2 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konoplev, Oleg A.; Chiragh, Furqan L.; Vasilyev, Aleksey A.; Edwards, Ryan; Stephen, Mark A.; Troupaki, Elisavet; Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Sawruk, Nick; Hovis, Floyd; Culpepper, Charles F.; Strickler, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a three-year operational-aging test of a specially designed prototype flight laser operating at 1064 nm, 10 kHz, 1ns, 15W average power and externally frequency-doubled. Fibertek designed and built the q-switched, 1064nm laser and this laser was in a sealed container of dry air pressurized to 1.3 atm. The external frequency doubler was in a clean room at a normal air pressure. The goal of the experiment was to measure degradation modes at 1064 and 532 nm separately. The external frequency doubler consisted of a Lithium triborate, LiB3O5, non-critically phase-matched crystal. After some 1064 nm light was diverted for diagnostics, 13.7W of fundamental power was available to pump the doubling crystal. Between 8.5W and 10W of 532nm power was generated, depending on the level of stress and degradation. The test consisted of two stages, the first at 0.3 J/cm2 for almost 1 year, corresponding to expected operational conditions, and the second at 0.93 J/cm2 for the remainder of the experiment, corresponding to accelerated optical stress testing. We observed no degradation at the first stress-level and linear degradation at the second stress-level. The linear degradation was linked to doubler crystal output surface changes from laser-assisted contamination. We estimate the expected lifetime for the flight laser at 532 nm using fluence as the stress parameter. This work was done for NASA's Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) LIDAR at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD with the goal of 1 trillion shots lifetime.

  15. Effect of Particles Content on Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Electrochemical Behavior of Aluminum-Based Hybrid Composite Processed by Accumulative Roll Bonding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Naseri, Majid; Alemi, Mohamad Hesam

    2017-03-01

    Effect of B4C/SiC particles content on the microstructure, deformation, and electrochemical behavior of aluminum-based hybrid composite processed by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) was investigated. The ARB process was used to fabricate hybrid composites which consist of 1 and 2.5 wt pct of B4C/SiC mixed particles as reinforcement. The microstructure of the fabricated hybrid composites after the ninth cycle of the ARB process exhibited an excellent distribution of B4C/SiC particles in the aluminum matrix where no porosity was observed. In addition, with increasing the particle content in the aluminum matrix, the hybrid composites demonstrated higher tensile strength and lower elongation. The ARB-processed hybrid composites exhibited 3.12 and 3.37 times higher hardness for samples having 1 and 2.5 wt pct B4C/SiC, respectively, than that of the annealed aluminum. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization curves revealed that the corrosion resistance dropped drastically by increasing the number of ARB cycles from 3 to 5. However, by further ARB processing, the corrosion resistance gradually increased, and finally, after 9 cycles reached to the values higher than those of 3-cycle ARB-processed samples.

  16. Effect of Particles Content on Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Electrochemical Behavior of Aluminum-Based Hybrid Composite Processed by Accumulative Roll Bonding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Naseri, Majid; Alemi, Mohamad Hesam

    2017-01-01

    Effect of B4C/SiC particles content on the microstructure, deformation, and electrochemical behavior of aluminum-based hybrid composite processed by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) was investigated. The ARB process was used to fabricate hybrid composites which consist of 1 and 2.5 wt pct of B4C/SiC mixed particles as reinforcement. The microstructure of the fabricated hybrid composites after the ninth cycle of the ARB process exhibited an excellent distribution of B4C/SiC particles in the aluminum matrix where no porosity was observed. In addition, with increasing the particle content in the aluminum matrix, the hybrid composites demonstrated higher tensile strength and lower elongation. The ARB-processed hybrid composites exhibited 3.12 and 3.37 times higher hardness for samples having 1 and 2.5 wt pct B4C/SiC, respectively, than that of the annealed aluminum. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization curves revealed that the corrosion resistance dropped drastically by increasing the number of ARB cycles from 3 to 5. However, by further ARB processing, the corrosion resistance gradually increased, and finally, after 9 cycles reached to the values higher than those of 3-cycle ARB-processed samples.

  17. Static and dynamic failure load of fiber-reinforced composite and particulate filler composite cantilever resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, F.; van Dalen, A.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of fiber reinforcement and luting cement on the static failure load (SFL) and dynamic failure load (DFL) of simulated two-unit cantilever resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs). Materials and Methods: Forty-six particulate

  18. Streptococcus mutans counts in plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement or resin-based composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Machado Mota

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU (colony forming units in the saliva and plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with a glass ionomer cement - GIC (Fuji Ortho or a resin-based composite - RC (Concise. Twenty male and female patients, aged 12 to 20 years, participated in the study. Saliva was collected before and after placement of appliances. Plaque was collected from areas adjacent to brackets and saliva was again collected on the 15th, 30th, and 45th day after placement. On the 30th day, 0.4% stannous fluoride gel was applied for 4 minutes. No significant modification in the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU in saliva was observed after placement of the fixed orthodontic appliances. On the 15th day, the percentage of Streptococcus mutans CFU in plaque was statistically lower in sites adjacent to GIC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.365 than in those adjacent to RC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.935. No evidence was found of a contribution of GIC to the reduction of CFU in plaque after the 15th day. Topical application of stannous fluoride gel on the 30th day reduced the number of CFU in saliva, but not in plaque. This study suggests that the antimicrobial activity of GIC occurs only in the initial phase and is not responsible for a long-term anticariogenic property.

  19. Bond strength of composite to dentin: effect of acid etching and laser irradiation through an uncured self-etch adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, F. L. A.; Carvalho, J. G.; Andrade, M. F.; Saad, J. R. C.; Hebling, J.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect on micro-tensile bond strength (µ-TBS) of laser irradiation of etched/unetched dentin through an uncured self-etching adhesive. Dentinal surfaces were treated with Clearfil SE Bond Adhesive (CSE) either according to the manufacturer’s instructions (CSE) or without applying the primer (CSE/NP). The dentin was irradiated through the uncured adhesive, using an Nd:YAG laser at 0.75 or 1 W power settings. The adhesive was cured, composite crowns were built up, and the teeth were sectioned into beams (0.49 mm2) to be stressed under tension. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey statistics (α = 5%). Dentin of the fractured specimens and the interfaces of untested beams were observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that non-etched irradiated surfaces presented higher µ-TBS than etched and irradiated surfaces (p 0.05). SEM showed solidification globules on the surfaces of the specimens. The interfaces were similar on irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces. Laser irradiation of dentin through the uncured adhesive did not lead to higher µ-TBS when compared to the suggested manufacturer’s technique. However, this treatment brought benefits when performed on unetched dentin, since bond strengths were higher when compared to etched dentin.

  20. Effect of Er:YAG laser pretreatment on bond strength of a composite core build-up material to fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Križnar, Igor; Jevnikar, Peter; Fidler, Aleš

    2015-02-01

    The study evaluated the micro push-out bond strength of resin material (Multicore Flow) to two types of fiber posts (FP), namely fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) Postec and Radix Fiber posts using Er:YAG laser pretreatment. FP were divided into four groups, two being control groups. Before the core build-up procedure, representative specimens from each group were chosen to determine the surface roughness (Ra) at three different areas using a contact profilometer, while after the procedure, 1.5-mm-thick discs were sectioned and the micro push-out method was used to assess the bond strength of the core build-up material to the fiber post in each group. Two-way analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis with the level of significance set at p Er:YAG laser pretreatment and to classify the failure mode after loading. The type of pretreatment (p Er:YAG laser pretreatment group was significantly lower compared to the FRC Postec posts control group (p Er:YAG laser pretreatment groups were significantly higher compared to control groups (p Er:YAG laser pretreatment at tested parameters negatively affected the bond strength of Multicore to FP and cannot be recommended as a standard procedure.

  1. Strong bonding strength between HA and (NH4)2S2O8-treated carbon/carbon composite by hydrothermal treatment and induction heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xin-bo; Zeng, Xie-rong; Zou, Chun-li; Zhou, Ji-Zhao

    2009-06-01

    Carbon/carbon composite with hydroxyapatite (HA) coating is an attractive material in the dental and orthopedic fields, but the reported bonding strength between them was very poor. In this study, a compact crystalline HA coating on (NH(4))(2)S(2)O(8)-treated C/C substrate about 10 microm in width was obtained by hydrothermal treatment and induction heating. The microstructure, composition and morphologies of the as-prepared coatings were identified by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. A strong shear strength averaging 74.2 MPa between C/C substrate and HA was achieved and adhesion failures were observed more frequently than cohesion failures. The coating adhesion measured using a scratch test was 23 N and the reasons for this are discussed.

  2. Investigation of the Microstructure and the Mechanical Properties of Cu-NiC Composite Produced by Accumulative Roll Bonding and Coating Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Ali; Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, Cu-1.8 wt.% NiC (nickel coating) composite was produced by the combination of two methods, including accumulative roll bonding (ARB) and electroplating processes. Electroplating process was done on copper strips in order to produce a nickel-particle-reinforced composite. Microstructure, texture, and the mechanical properties of the produced composite were evaluated during various cycles of ARB using optical and scanning electron microscopes, x-ray diffraction, microhardness, and tensile tests. In addition, the results were compared with Cu-Cu and also Cu-NiS (nickel sheet) samples. It was found that nickel layers were fractured from the first cycle of the process, and nickel fragments were distributed in the copper matrix as the number of cycles was increased. Variation of orientation density of α-, β-, and τ-fibers for the produced composite was examined in different cycles. Microhardness for different elements in different cycles of Cu-NiC was also evaluated. Also, the investigation of the mechanical properties showed that by proceeding the ARB process, the tensile strength of the produced Cu-NiC and Cu-Cu samples was increased. However, improvement in the mechanical properties of composite samples was more noticeable due to the reinforcing effect of nickel particles. The elongation of composite samples showed a decrease in the primary cycles, unlike Cu-Cu ones; however, it was then increased. Finally, by using scanning electron microscopy, the fracture surfaces of Cu-NiC composite were studied to disclose the fracture mechanism of the samples.

  3. The comparative evaluation of fracture resistance and microleakage in bonded amalgam, amalgam, and composite resins in primary molars

    OpenAIRE

    H S Vanishree; B M Shanthala; W Bobby

    2015-01-01

    Background : The intense development of adhesive restorative materials and parents′ preferences for esthetic restorations prompt clinicians to use alternative restorative materials for primary molars. Amalgam, however, is the choice of material when it comes to occlusal stress bearing areas, either in primary or permanent molars. To overcome the drawbacks of amalgam and restorative adhesive materials, the bonded amalgam technique is employed. Aims: To evaluate microleakage and fracture re...

  4. The Cryogenic Impact Resistant Evaluation of Composite Materials for Use in Composite Pressure Vessels with an Additional Cryogenic Bonding Scope Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The intent of the proposed effort is to investigate the detailed composite material performance characteristics after being subjected to cryogenic temperatures and...

  5. Evaluation of push-out bond strength of two fiber-reinforced composite posts systems using two luting cements in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kadam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The concept of using a "post" for the restoration of teeth has been practiced to restore the endodontically treated tooth. Metallic posts have been commonly used, but their delirious effects have led to the development of fiber-reinforced materials that have overcome the limitations of metallic posts. The use of glass and quartz fibers was proposed as an alternative to the dark color of carbon fiber posts as far as esthetics was concerned. "Debonding" is the most common failure in fiber-reinforced composite type of posts. This study was aimed to compare the push-out bond strength of a self-adhesive dual-cured luting agent (RelyX U100 with a total etch resin luting agent (Variolink II used to cement two different FRC posts. Materials and Methods: Eighty human maxillary anterior single-rooted teeth were decoronated, endodontically treated, post space prepared and divided into four groups (n = 20; Group I: D.T. light post (RTD and Variolink II (Ivoclare vivadent, Group II: D.T. light post (RTD and RelyX U100 (3M ESPE, Group III: Glassix post (Nordin and Variolink II (Ivoclare vivadent and Group IV: Glassix post (Nordin and RelyX U100 (3M ESPE. Each root was sectioned to get slices of 2 ± 0.05-mm thickness. Push-out tests were performed using a triaxial loading frame. To express bond strength in megapascals (Mpa, load value recorded in Newton (N was divided by the area of the bonded interface. After testing the push-out strengths, the samples were analyzed under a stereomicroscope. Results: The mean values of the push-out bond strength show that Group I and Group III had significantly higher values than Group II and Group IV. The most common mode of failure observed was adhesive between dentin and luting material and between post and luting material. Conclusions: The mean push-out bond strengths were higher for Groups I and III where Variolink II resin cement was used for luting the fiber post, which is based on the total etch

  6. Buckling of a Longitudinally Jointed Curved Composite Panel Arc Segment for Next Generation of Composite Heavy Lift Launch Vehicles: Verification Testing Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokh, Babak; Segal, Kenneth N.; Akkerman, Michael; Glenn, Ronald L.; Rodini, Benjamin T.; Fan, Wei-Ming; Kellas, Sortiris; Pineda, Evan J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, an all-bonded out-of-autoclave (OoA) curved longitudinal composite joint concept, intended for use in the next generation of composite heavy lift launch vehicles, was evaluated and verified through finite element (FE) analysis, fabrication, testing, and post-test inspection. The joint was used to connect two curved, segmented, honeycomb sandwich panels representative of a Space Launch System (SLS) fairing design. The overall size of the resultant panel was 1.37 m by 0.74 m (54 in by 29 in), of which the joint comprised a 10.2 cm (4 in) wide longitudinal strip at the center. NASTRAN and ABAQUS were used to perform linear and non-linear analyses of the buckling and strength performance of the jointed panel. Geometric non-uniformities (i.e., surface contour imperfections) were measured and incorporated into the FE model and analysis. In addition, a sensitivity study of the specimens end condition showed that bonding face-sheet doublers to the panel's end, coupled with some stress relief features at corner-edges, can significantly reduce the stress concentrations near the load application points. Ultimately, the jointed panel was subjected to a compressive load. Load application was interrupted at the onset of buckling (at 356 kN 80 kips). A post-test non-destructive evaluation (NDE) showed that, as designed, buckling occurred without introducing any damage into the panel or the joint. The jointed panel was further capable of tolerating an impact damage to the same buckling load with no evidence of damage propagation. The OoA cured all-composite joint shows promise as a low mass factory joint for segmented barrels.

  7. Effect of loading weight on bond durability of composite-type resin cement under cyclic impact test (part 2). Loading with light weight of 100-120 g.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Masahiro; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2009-03-01

    The bond durability of composite-type resin cement was evaluated by means of cyclic impact tests using three different loads. In terms of experimental setup, a casting alloy, 12% Au-Pd-Ag, was used as the adherend and bonded to a cast block using a composite-type cement (Bistite II). A shear load--using plungers of three different weights at 100, 110, and 120 g--was dropped from a 3-mm height onto a small piece of the casting alloy until debonding. The cycle numbers that caused debonding were 1756 +/- 680 x 10(4) times for 100 g, 1403 +/- 515 x 10(4) times for 110 g, and 420 +/- 200 x 10(4) times for 120 g, respectively. Therefore, the group loaded with 120 g showed a significantly lower value as compared to the other two groups. On the fracture mode of the cement, it was a bulk fracture regardless of the loading weight employed in this study--the same result obtained in a previous study where heavier weights were employed.

  8. Evaluation of microshear bond strength of resin composites to enamel of dental adhesive systems associated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassimiro-Silva, Patricia F.; Zezell, Denise M.; Monteiro, Gabriela Q. d. M.; Benetti, Carolina; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of resin composite to enamel etching by Er,Cr:YSGG laser with the use of two differents adhesives systems. Fifty freshly extracted human molars halves were embedded in acrylic resin before preparation for the study, making a total of up to 100 available samples. The specimens were randomly assigned into six groups (η=10) according to substrate pre-treatment and adhesive system on the enamel. A two-step self-etching primer system (Clearfil SE Bond) and a universal adhesive used as an etch-andrinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond Universal) were applied to the nonirradiated enamel surface according to manufacturer's instructions, as control groups (Control CF and Control SB, respectively). For the other groups, enamel surfaces were previously irradiated with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with 0.5 W, 75 mJ and 66 J/cm2 (CF 5 Hz and SB 5 Hz) and 1.25 W, 50 mJ and 44 J/cm2 (CF 15 Hz and SB 15 Hz). Irradiation was performed under air (50%) and water (50%) cooling. An independent t-test was performed to compare the adhesive systems. Mean μSBS ± sd (MPa) for each group was 16.857 +/- 2.61, 17.87 +/- 5.83, 12.23 +/- 2.02, 9.88 +/- 2.26, 15.94 +/- 1.98, 17.62 +/- 2.10, respectively. The control groups and the 50 mJ laser groups showed no statistically significant differences, regardless of the adhesive system used. The results obtained lead us to affirm that the bonding interaction of adhesives to enamel depends not only on the morphological aspects of the dental surface, but also on the characteristics of the adhesive employed and the parameters of the laser.

  9. The effect of various sandblasting conditions on surface changes of dental zirconia and shear bond strength between zirconia core and indirect composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Naichuan; Yue, Li; Liao, Yunmao; Liu, Wenjia; Zhang, Hai; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To measure the surface loss of dental restorative zirconia and the short-term bond strength between an indirect composite resin (ICR) and zirconia ceramic after various sandblasting processes. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three hundred zirconia bars were randomly divided into 25 groups according to the type of sandblasting performed with pressures of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 MPa, sandblasting times of 7, 14 and 21 seconds, and alumina powder sizes of 50 and 110 µm. The control group did not receive sandblasting. The volume loss and height loss on zirconia surface after sandblasting and the shear bond strength (SBS) between the sandblasted zirconia and ICR after 24-h immersion were measured for each group using multivariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Least Significance Difference (LSD) test (α=.05). After sandblasting, the failure modes of the ICR/zirconia surfaces were observed using scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS The volume loss and height loss were increased with higher sandblasting pressure and longer sandblasting treatment, but they decreased with larger powder size. SBS was significantly increased by increasing the sandblasting time from 7 seconds to 14 seconds and from 14 seconds to 21 seconds, as well as increasing the size of alumina powder from 50 µm to 110 µm. SBS was significantly increased from 0.1 MPa to 0.2 MPa according to the size of alumina powder. However, the SBSs were not significantly different with the sandblasting pressure of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 MPa. The possibilities of the combination of both adhesive failure and cohesive failure within the ICR were higher with the increases in bonding strength. CONCLUSION Based on the findings of this study, sandblasting with alumina particles at 0.2 MPa, 21 seconds and the powder size of 110 µm is recommended for dental applications to improve the bonding between zirconia core and ICR. PMID:26140173

  10. Effect of aluminum chloride hemostatic agent on microleakage of class V composite resin restorations bonded with all-in-one adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Bahari, Mahmood; Pournaghi-Azar, Fatemeh; Mozafari, Aysan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Since hemostatic agents can induce changes on enamel and dentin surfaces and influence composite resin adhesion, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the aluminum chloride hemostatic agent on the gingival margin microleakage of class V (Cl V) composite resin restorations bonded with all-in-one adhesive. Study design: Cl V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 60 sound bovine permanent incisors. Gingival margins of the cavities were placed 1.5 mm apical to the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). The teeth were randomly divided into two groups of 30. In group 1, the cavities were restored without the application of a hemostatic agent; in group 2, the cavities were restored after the application of the hemostatic agent. In both groups all-in-one adhesive and Z250 composite resin were used to restore the cavities with the incremental technique. After finishing and polishing, the samples underwent a thermocycling procedure, followed by immersion in 2% basic fuschin solution for 24 hours. The samples were sectioned and gingival microleakage was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. The non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare microleakage between the two groups. Statistical significance was defined at Padhesive with aluminum chloride hemostatic agent significantly increases restoration gingival margin microleakage. Key words:All-in-one adhesive resin, composite resin restoration, hemostatic agent, microleakage. PMID:22322497

  11. Impact behavior of a SiC fiber-reinforced reaction bonded Si3N4 composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, J.; Bhatt, R.; Klima, S.

    1989-01-01

    Impact tests were performed on a series of ceramic plate specimens. Monolithic (unreinforced) and composite specimens with various fiber layups were tested to determine the effect that the fiber reinforcement has on impact damage initiation and dynamic response of the ceramic materials. Results show that a porous surface layer of Si3N4 on the composite specimens can enhance the energy absorbing capability of the composite specimens. The addition of SiC fiber reinforcement to the RBSN matrix material is also shown to significantly change the mode of failure and reduce the extent of damage due to impact.

  12. Bonding and Integration of C-C Composite to Cu-Clad-Molybdenum for Thermal Management Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthana, R.; Singh, M.; Shpargel, T.P.

    2008-01-01

    Two- and three-dimensional carbon-carbon composites with either resin-derived matrix or CVI matrix were joined to Cu-clad-Mo using active Ag-Cu braze alloys for thermal management applications. The joint microstructure and composition were examined using Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive Spectroscopy, and the joint hardness was characterized using the Knoop microhardness testing. Observations on the infiltration of the composite with molten braze, dissolution of metal substrate, and solute segregation at the C-C surface have been discussed. The thermal response of the integrated assembly is also briefly discussed.

  13. Resistência ao cisalhamento da colagem com compósitos utilizando potencializador de adesão Shear bond strength of composites using an adhesion booster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edivaldo de Morais

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a resistência ao cisalhamento dos compósitos Transbond XT e Concise Ortodôntico utilizando o potencializador de adesão Ortho Primer. MÉTODOS: a amostra consistiu de 90 incisivos bovinos divididos em seis grupos (n=15. Todos os dentes receberam profilaxia com pedra-pomes e condicionamento do esmalte com ácido fosfórico. No Grupo I, utilizou-se Transbond XT de maneira convencional. O Grupo II foi semelhante ao I, porém, aplicou-se o Ortho Primer ao invés do XT Primer. No Grupo III, após condicionamento, o esmalte foi contaminado com saliva, aplicou-se o Ortho Primer e colagem com Transbond XT. No Grupo IV, utilizou-se o Concise Ortodôntico de maneira convencional. O Grupo V foi semelhante ao IV, porém, utilizou-se o Ortho Primer ao invés da resina fluida. No Grupo VI, após condicionamento, o esmalte foi contaminado com saliva, aplicou-se o Ortho Primer e colagem com Concise. Os corpos de prova foram armazenados em água destilada em estufa a 37ºC por 24h e submetidos ao ensaio de resistência ao cisalhamento. Os dados foram submetidos à ANOVA e ao teste de Tukey (5%. RESULTADOS: a resistência da colagem no Grupo IV foi estatisticamente superior à dos Grupos II, III e VI (p0,05. O Transbond XT e o Concise utilizados convencionalmente obtiveram os maiores valores adesivos. O Ortho Primer em esmalte seco atuou efetivamente como agente de união dos compósitos avaliados. Em esmalte contaminado, a colagem com Concise obteve baixa resistência adesiva.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of the Transbond XT and Concise Orthodontics composites using the Ortho Primer adhesion booster. METHODS: The sample consisted of 90 bovine incisors divided in 6 groups (n=15. All teeth were submitted to prophylaxes with pumice stone and etching with phosphoric acid. In Group I the Transbond XT was used conventionally. Group II was similar to Group I, however, Ortho Primer was used instead of XT

  14. The effect of a desensitizer and CO2 laser irradiation on bond performance between eroded dentin and resin composite

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Meng; Shin, Sang-Wan; Kim, Min-Soo; Ryu, Jae-Jun; Lee, Jeong-Yol

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was aimed to evaluate effect of the desensitizing pretreatments on the micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBS) to eroded dentin and sound dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty-two extracted molars were prepared to form a flat dentin surface, and then they were divided into two groups. Group I was stored in distilled water while group II was subjected to a pH cycling. Each group was then subdivided into three subgroups according to desensitizing pretreatment used: a) pretreatment ...

  15. Aesthetic Management of Fluoresced Teeth with Ceramic Veneers and Direct Composite Bonding – An Overview and A Case Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Shah, Harsh Haren; Paliwal, Ashutosh; Parikh, Viral

    2015-01-01

    Tooth discolouration is a common problem and affects people of all ages. Apart from the conventional treatment modalities for the same, newer options are available today with better techniques and materials. The present case report describes a 17-year-old girl who had stained and pitted teeth, attributable to dental fluorosis and she desired aesthetic treatment for the same. The pros and cons of all treatment options were carefully weighed and a multistep treatment process involving ceramic veneers and direct bonding were planned. The execution of the planned treatment yielded a good aesthetic and functional outcome. PMID:26266231

  16. Aesthetic Management of Fluoresced Teeth with Ceramic Veneers and Direct Composite Bonding - An Overview and A Case Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Shah, Harsh Haren; Paliwal, Ashutosh; Parikh, Viral; Patel, Shrikant

    2015-06-01

    Tooth discolouration is a common problem and affects people of all ages. Apart from the conventional treatment modalities for the same, newer options are available today with better techniques and materials. The present case report describes a 17-year-old girl who had stained and pitted teeth, attributable to dental fluorosis and she desired aesthetic treatment for the same. The pros and cons of all treatment options were carefully weighed and a multistep treatment process involving ceramic veneers and direct bonding were planned. The execution of the planned treatment yielded a good aesthetic and functional outcome.

  17. Influência do eugenol na microdureza da resina composta utilizando sistemas adesivos atuais Influence of eugenol on the microhardness of composite resin using current bonding systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Rubio de SOUZA

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar, in vitro, se a utilização do cimento de óxido de zinco e eugenol exerce influência na microdureza da restauração de resina composta (Z100 realizada com dois sistemas adesivos (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus® - sistema que remove o "smear layer", e o Clearfil Liner Bond 2® - adesivo que promove o tratamento do "smear layer", sem removê-lo totalmente. Para isto, foram utilizados 40 molares humanos hígidos que foram divididos igualmente em 4 grupos. Para cada adesivo havia um grupo controle (sem óxido de zinco e eugenol e outro onde foram realizadas e removidas as restaurações provisórias com cimento de óxido de zinco e eugenol. Após sete dias de armazenamento em estufa a 37ºC, os dentes foram cortados e mediu-se a microdureza da resina composta na região a 0,3 mm da interface dente-restauração em um microdurômetro SHIMADZU HMV 2000, com ponta penetradora Knoop de 50 gramas por 45 segundos. Os resultados obtidos foram analisados estatisticamente pela ANOVA (alfa = 1%, e verificou-se não haver diferença estatisticamente significante na microdureza da resina composta entre os grupos estudados.The zinc oxide-eugenol cement is still widely used as a temporary restorative material. Its use is known, however, to disturb the curing process of composite resins used in the final restoration. Nevertheless, with the development of dentin bonding systems, total etch is used to remove or treat the smear layer before the construction of the composite resin restoration. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if the zinc oxide-eugenol cement influenced the microhardness of composite resin (Z100 restorations used in association with either one of two bonding systems (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus® and Clearfil Liner Bond 2®. Forty molars were divided into four groups. For each bonding material there was a control group that did not receive cement and a group that received a temporary zinc oxide