WorldWideScience

Sample records for bond strength chemistry

  1. Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperature...

  2. Is There a Need to Discuss Atomic Orbital Overlap When Teaching Hydrogen-Halide Bond Strength and Acidity Trends in Organic Chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarajan, Deepa; Gustafson, Samantha J.; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias; Ess, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate organic chemistry textbooks and Internet websites use a variety of approaches for presenting and explaining the impact of halogen atom size on trends in bond strengths and/or acidity of hydrogen halides. In particular, several textbooks and Internet websites explain these trends by invoking decreasing orbital overlap between the…

  3. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  4. Effect of nonthermal plasma treatment on surface chemistry of commercially-pure titanium and shear bond strength to autopolymerizing acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vechiato-Filho, Aljomar José; da Silva Vieira Marques, Isabella; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Matos, Adaias Oliveira; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; da Cruz, Nilson Cristino; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo

    2016-03-01

    The effect of nonthermal plasma on the surface characteristics of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti), and on the shear bond strength between an autopolymerizing acrylic resin and cp-Ti was investigated. A total of 96 discs of cp-Ti were distributed into four groups (n=24): Po (no surface treatment), SB (sandblasting), Po+NTP and SB+NTP (methane plasma). Surface characterization was performed through surface energy, surface roughness, scanning microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction tests. Shear bond strength test was conducted immediately and after thermocycling. Surface treatment affected the surface energy and roughness of cp-Ti discs (P<.001). SEM-EDS showed the presence of the carbide thin film. XRD spectra revealed no crystalline phase changes. The SB+NTP group showed the highest bond strength values (6.76±0.70 MPa). Thermocycling reduced the bond strength of the acrylic resin/cp-Ti interface (P<.05), except for Po group. NTP is an effective treatment option for improving the shear bond strength between both materials. PMID:26706504

  5. Bond strength of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings on phosphate steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, P.; Mastný, L.; Sýkora, V.; Pala, Zdeněk; Brožek, Vlastimil

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 2 (2015), s. 411-414. ISSN 0543-5846 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1872 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : phosphating * plasma spraying * ceramic coatings * corrosion * bond strength Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.959, year: 2014

  6. Dynamic strength of molecular adhesion bonds.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, E; Ritchie, K

    1997-01-01

    In biology, molecular linkages at, within, and beneath cell interfaces arise mainly from weak noncovalent interactions. These bonds will fail under any level of pulling force if held for sufficient time. Thus, when tested with ultrasensitive force probes, we expect cohesive material strength and strength of adhesion at interfaces to be time- and loading rate-dependent properties. To examine what can be learned from measurements of bond strength, we have extended Kramers' theory for reaction k...

  7. Mechanical strength of adhesive-bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to meet the prospective application of a GFRP dewar for energy storage system using a large superconducting magnet, the dewar with a complex structure together with a large size are desired to be made. It is difficult to manufacture such a type of the dewars in one united body. These dewars can be manufactured by the adhesive-bonding method. In the present study, the mechanical strength of adhesive-bonding is studied from this point of view. The mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding has been investigated by the static tensile method and the impact loading method using small test samples. From the static tensile tests, the following results have been obtained. For the sample adhesive-bonded with insertion structure, the mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding is found to depend on the adhesives used and on the difference of the thermal contraction between the materials which are adhesive-bonded each other. Using a soft adhesive as Araldite 106, the mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding is small at room temperature, but it remarkably increases at cryogenic temperatures. For a hard adhesive as Araldite 103 and Stycast 2850 FT, it is large at room temperature, and it further increases at cryogenic temperatures. The dewar has to be strong enough not only at cryogenic temperatures but also at room temperature. A soft adhesive is not suitable for constructing the dewar. For the sample adhesive-bonded with screwing structure, the mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonding depends on the shear strength of GFRP itself. The mechanical strength of the adhesive-bonded part increases with the decreasing temperature. Therefore, this screwing method is advantageous for the construction of the dewar. According to the impact loading tests, it is found that the adhesive-bonding of screwing structure is not brittle at cryogenic temperature. This is due to inherent property of GFRP. (J.P.N.)

  8. Tensile Bond Strength of Latex-Modified Bonded Concrete Overlays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Cameron; Ramseyer, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The tensile bond strength of bonded concrete overlays was tested using the in-situ pull-off method described in ASTM C 1583 with the goal of determining whether adding latex to the mix design increases bond strength. One slab of ductile concrete (f'c > 12,000 psi) was cast with one half tined, i.e. roughened, and one half steel-troweled, i.e. smooth. The slab surface was sectioned off and overlay mixtures containing different latex contents cast in each section. Partial cores were drilled perpendicular to the surface through the overlay into the substrate. A tensile loading device applied a direct tensile load to each specimen and the load was increased until failure occurred. The tensile bond strength was then calculated for comparison between the specimens.

  9. Bond strength of thermally recycled metal brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, J J; Ackerman, R J

    1983-03-01

    Bracket recycling has emerged concurrently with the practice of direct bonding. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of recycling on the retention of mesh-backed stainless steel brackets. Mesh strand diameter was measured on forty new brackets. These brackets were bonded to recently extracted human premolar teeth, and the tensile force required to fracture each bond was recorded. The brackets were then reconditioned by a thermal process. The mesh strand size was remeasured and the tensile test was repeated. It was found that (1) mesh strand diameter decreased 7 percent during the reconditioning process (93.89 microns +/- 3.17 S.D. compared to 87.07 microns +/- 4.76 S.D., z = 17.62, P less than 1 X 10(-5) ), (2) new bracket bonds were 6 percent stronger than recycled bracket bonds (43.88 pounds +/- 7.98 S.D. bond strength), and (3) reduction in mesh strand diameter during the reconditioning process did not correlate with changes in bond strength between initial and recycled bonding (Pearson r = 0.038). PMID:6338725

  10. Surface Bond Strength in Nickel Based Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh, Ganesh; Padmanabhan, T. V.; Ariga, Padma; Joshi, Shalini; Bhuminathan, S.; Vijayaraghavan, Vasantha

    2012-01-01

    Bonding of ceramic to the alloy is essential for the longevity of porcelain fused to metal restorations. Imported alloys used now a days in processing them are not economical. So this study was conducted to evaluate and compare the bond strength of ceramic material to nickel based cost effective Nonferrous Materials Technology Development Center (NFTDC), Hyderabad and Heraenium S, Heraeus Kulzer alloy. An Instron testing machine, which has three-point loading system for the application of loa...

  11. Cryogenic evaluation of epoxy bond strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albritton, N.; Young, W.

    The purpose of the work presented here was to determine methods of optimizing the adhesion of a particular epoxy (CTD-101K, Composite Technology Development Inc.) to a particular nickel-based alloy substrate (Incoloy ® 908, Inco Alloys International) for cryogenic applications. Initial efforts were focused on surface preparation of the substrate material via various mechanical and chemical cleaning techniques. Test samples, fabricated to simulate the conduit-to-insulation interface, were put through a mock heat treat and vacuum/pressure impregnation process. Samples were compression/shear load tested to compare the bond strengths at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature. The resulting data indicate that acid etching creates a higher bond strength than the other tested techniques and that the bond formed is stronger at cryogenic temperatures than at room temperature. A description of the experiment along with the resulting data is presented here.

  12. Bond strength of repaired amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Rosalia; Mondragon, Eduardo; Shen, Chiayi

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the interfacial flexural strength (FS) of amalgam repairs and the optimal combination of repair materials and mechanical retention required for a consistent and durable repair bond. Amalgam bricks were created, each with 1 end roughened to expose a fresh surface before repair. Four groups followed separate repair protocols: group 1, bonding agent with amalgam; group 2, bonding agent with composite resin; group 3, mechanical retention (slot) with amalgam; and group 4, slot with bonding agent and amalgam. Repaired specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 1, 10, 30, 120, or 360 days before being loaded to failure in a 3-point bending test. Statistical analysis showed significant changes in median FS over time in groups 2 and 4. The effect of the repair method on the FS values after each storage period was significant for most groups except the 30-day storage groups. Amalgam-amalgam repair with adequate condensation yielded the most consistent and durable bond. An amalgam bonding agent could be beneficial when firm condensation on the repair surface cannot be achieved or when tooth structure is involved. Composite resin can be a viable option for amalgam repair in an esthetically demanding region, but proper mechanical modification of the amalgam surface and selection of the proper bonding system are essential. PMID:26325656

  13. Probing the Hydrogen Bond Strength at Single Bond Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Lü, Jing-Tao; Chen, Ji; Peng, Jinbo; Meng, Xiangzhi; Wang, Zhichang; Li, Xin-Zheng; Wang, Enge; Jiang, Ying

    2015-03-01

    Many extraordinary physical, chemical and biological properties of water are determined by hydrogen-bonding interaction between the water molecules. So far, the routine way to determine the hydrogen-bonding strength of water is probing the frequency shift of O-H stretching mode using various spectroscopic techniques, which all suffer from the difficulty of spectral assignment and the broadening of vibrational signals due to the lack of spatial resolution. In this talk, we show the ability to probe the hydrogen-bonding strength of interfacial water at single bond limit using resonantly enhanced inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The conventional IET signals of water molecules are extremely weak and far beyond the experimental detection limit due to the negligible molecular density of states (DOS) around the Fermi level. This difficulty can be surmounted by turning on the tip-water coupling, which shifts and broadens the frontier molecular orbitals of water to the proximity of Fermi level, resulting in a resonantly enhanced IET process. International Center for Quantum Materials, School of Physics, Peking University.

  14. Shear bond strength of partial coverage restorations to dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Román Rodríguez, Juan Luis; Agustín Panadero, Rubén; Alonso Pérez Barquero, Jorge; Fons Font, Antonio; Solá Ruiz, María Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Background When partial coverage restorations (veneers, inlays, onlays…) must be cemented to dentin, bond strength may not reach the same predictable values as to enamel. The purpose of this study was: 1. To compare, with a shear bond test, the bond strength to dentin of a total-etch and a self-etching bonding agent. 2. To determine whether creating microretention improves the bond strength to dentin. Material and Methods Two bonding agents were assayed, Optibond FL® (Kerr), two-bottle adhesi...

  15. Non-linear Ultrasonic Bond-Strength Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To date, bond strength is considered one of the ?holy grails? for NDE. Preliminary data indicates that the Luna Nonlinear Ultrasonic Bond Strength (NUBS) monitor...

  16. Proceedings of the Second Annual Symposium for Nondestructive Evaluation of Bond Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Mark J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    Ultrasonics, microwaves, optically stimulated electron emission (OSEE), and computational chemistry approaches have shown relevance to bond strength determination. Nonlinear ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation methods, however, have shown the most effectiveness over other methods on adhesive bond analysis. Correlation to changes in higher order material properties due to microstructural changes using nonlinear ultrasonics has been shown related to bond strength. Nonlinear ultrasonic energy is an order of magnitude more sensitive than linear ultrasound to these material parameter changes and to acoustic velocity changes caused by the acoustoelastic effect when a bond is prestressed. Signal correlations between non-linear ultrasonic measurements and initialization of bond failures have been measured. This paper reviews bond strength research efforts presented by university and industry experts at the Second Annual Symposium for Nondestructive Evaluation of Bond Strength organized by the NDE Sciences Branch at NASA Langley in November 1998.

  17. Evaluation of bond strength of different adhesive systems: Shear and Microtensile Bond Strength Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    GALLUSI, G.; GALEANO, P.; LIBONATI, A.; GIUCA, M.R.; CAMPANELLA, V.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives. Aim of this work is the in vitro bond strength evaluation of three bonding agents comparing the results of two kinds of test, Microtensile Bond Strength Test and a Shear Bond Strength Test. Bond strength tests have been used to test both direct and indirect restorative techniques to investigate if methods could give different results. Methods 72 human third molars have been collected and stored in physiological solution. Three kinds of test were conducted: 1- SB, 2- “Slice” preparation μTBS1, 3- “Stick” preparation μTBS2. We tested three different adhesive systems (Groups 1-2-3 n=24), two restorative techniques (subgroup A–B n=12). The tested adhesives were: Optibond FL (OFL) (Group 1), Optibond Solo Plus (OSP) (Group 2), Optibond Solo Plus Self-Etch (OSSE) (Group 3). For all tests was used a universal load machine Instron Machine. Results. Best values were found for Optibond FL with mean values of 45–50 MPa. Optibond Solo Plus resulted in values very similar and in some cases almost identical to FL. Optibond Solo Self Etch showed poorer adhesion in both direct and indirect restorative techniques. The parametric and non parametric statistical variance analysis pointed out the absence of significant differences between OFL and OSP, and demonstrated a significant difference for OSSE adhesive. Significance. The results confirm that a total etch two-step adhesive is the best compromise between easiness and effectiveness. PMID:23285371

  18. Bond Strength of Repaired Composite Resin Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Máximo de ARAÚJO

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the bond strength of direct composite resins and composite repairs, using 3 different commercial brands - GI: Palfique Estelite Ó (Tokuyama, GII: Filtek Z350 (3M/ESPE and GIII: Te Econon (Ivoclar/Vivadent - and the use of AdperTM Single Bond 2 (3M/ESPE adhesive system at the base/repair interface. Method: Thirty conic bases (5 mm x 5 mm x 3 mm of each commercial brand of composite resin were fabricated. All bases of each group were submitted to a thermocycling regimen of 20,000 cycles (5ºC to 55ºC ± 2ºC, for 30 s. The bases of each group were randomly assigned to 3 sub-groups, in which a combination of the commercial brands was performed for the repairs. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C during 7 days and were thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC - MEM 2000 with 500 kgf load cell running at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Data in MPa were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey’s test (5%.Results: The following results were found: GI: Palfique Estelite Ó (11.22±4.00 MPa, Te Econom (12.03±3.47 MPa and Filtek Z350 (10.66±2.89 MPa; GII: Palfique Estelite Ó (8.88±2.04 MPa, Te Econom (7.77±1.64 MPa and Filtek Z350 (10.50±6.14 MPa; and GIII: Palfique Estelite Ó (8.41±2.50 MPa, Te Econom (12.33±3.18 MPa and Z350 (11.73±3.54 MPa.Conclusion: The bond strengths at the interface of the different composite resins submitted to repair were statistically similar regardless of the commercial brand.

  19. Strength and leak testing of plasma activated bonded interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, M.M.; Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De;

    2002-01-01

    Bond strength and hermeticity of plasma activated bonded (PAB) Si-Si interfaces are reported. Bonding of 100 mm Si(1 0 0) wafers was performed. An average bond strength of 9.0+/-3.9 MPa was achieved without performing any annealing steps. Cavities bonded in vacuum were found to be hermetic based on...... detection of changes in membrane deflections. The detection limit for leak was 8E-13 mbar l/s. For comparison, strength and leak tests were also performed with regular fusion bonded wafers annealed at 1100 degreesC. The PAB was found to withstand post-processing steps such as RCA cleaning, 24 h in de...

  20. Testing Bond Strength, a Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    de Munck, Jan; Mine, Atsushi; Poitevin, André; Van Ende, Annelies; Meerbeek, Bart Van

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Worldwide bond strength tests are used to evaluate bonding effectiveness of different adhesive techniques. The purpose of this study was to systematically collect these data to identify the primary parameters that affect the outcome of bond strength tests, and to attempt to disclose trends in adhesive performance of the different adhesive approaches today available. Materials and Methods: 871 studies were identified by enterin...

  1. Bonding, structure and solid-state chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Ladd, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This book is aimed at undergraduate students in both chemistry and those degree subjects in which chemistry forms a significant part. It does not reflect any particular academic year, and so finds a place during the normal span of degree studies in the physical sciences. An A-level standard in science and mathematics is presumed; additional mathematical treatments are discussed in Appendices. An introductory first chapter leads into the main subject matter, which is treated through four chapters in terms of the principle bonding forces of cohesion in the solid state; a further chapter discusses nanosize materials. Important applications of the study topics are interspersed at appropriate points within the text. Each chapter is provided with a set of problems of varying degrees of difficulty, so as to assist the reader in gaining a facility with the subject matter and its applications. The problems are supplemented by detailed tutorial solutions, some of which present additional relevant material that indicate...

  2. Discovering Chemistry With Natural Bond Orbitals

    CERN Document Server

    Weinhold, Frank

    2012-01-01

    This book explores chemical bonds, their intrinsic energies, and the corresponding dissociation energies which are relevant in reactivity problems. It offers the first book on conceptual quantum chemistry, a key area for understanding chemical principles and predicting chemical properties. It presents NBO mathematical algorithms embedded in a well-tested and widely used computer program (currently, NBO 5.9). While encouraging a "look under the hood" (Appendix A), this book mainly enables students to gain proficiency in using the NBO program to re-express complex wavefunctions in terms of intui

  3. Immediate Dentin Bond Strength of Self-etch Dentine Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lafuente

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate bond strength of two sixth generation and two seventh generation dentin bonding agents to superficial dentin. Specimens were prepared to exposed superficial dentin and either Clearfil SE, Clearfil S3, Adper Prompt-l-pop of G-bond was applied over the dentin surface and light cured. Then composite resin was applied to the treated surface and light-cured in two increments. Specimens were tested 15 minutes after they were made for shear bond strength at 0.01 cm/min. Clearfil SE had statistically higher bond strength than the other three adhesives evaluated (42.9 MPa. There was no statistical difference among Clearfil S3, Adper Prompt-l-pop and G-Bond. The dentin adhesive with an application of an acidic primer before the application of the adhesive showed better immediate bond strength.

  4. Shear bond strength of composite resin to amalgam: an experiment in vitro using different bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Ambrose, E R

    1991-01-01

    The shear bond strength between amalgam and composite resin with and without the use of adhesive systems was evaluated. It was found that the application of Cover-Up II or Prisma Universal Bond prior to placement of composite resin enhanced the shear bond strength between amalgam and composite resin more than five times; and a shear strength of 4.34 and 4.30 MPa was measured respectively. Acid-etching of the roughened amalgam surface prior to application of Prisma Universal Bond decreased the bond strength by nearly 45%. PMID:1784535

  5. Bond strength, bond stress and spallation mechanisms of thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five production thermal barrier coatings were thermally cycled between room temperature and 1121 C (2050 F) to determine relative spallation life. Bond strength measurements were made using a modified ASTM direct pull-test. Bond stress measurements were made in the thermally grown oxide using a laser photoluminescence technique. Bond strength and bond stress measurements were conducted on two electron beam physical vapor deposition coatings as a function of thermal cycling. Each coating showed characteristic values of as-coated strength and stress and changes in strength and stress with thermal cycling. These variations in strength and stress with thermal cycling are related to oxidation and micro-debonding effects. (orig.)

  6. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, L.J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  7. Characterization of bond strength of monolithic two metal layer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in-pile performance of nuclear fuel plates is strongly influenced by the mechanical contact between fuel and cladding. Today, there is not much information available about the bond strength of two layer systems typical for monolithic fuel plates. The bond strength is considered to be a plausible indicator for the quality of the mechanical contact. Using tensile tests, the bond strength of the following material combinations were examined: fuel/cladding, fuel/diffusion barrier and diffusion barrier/cladding. Double layer foils, consisting of uranium-molybdenum alloy with 8 wt.% Mo (DU-8Mo) as fuel surrogate, Al 1050 as cladding and Ti, Nb or Zr as diffusion barrier materials were used. They were produced by sputtering. Beforehand, the behaviour of the adhesive used to mount the samples onto the specimen holders has been examined. Bond strengths of DU-8Mo on Ti and Nb larger than 70 MPa have been achieved. (author)

  8. Tensile bond strength of hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA bonding agent to bovine dentine surface at various humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adioro Soetojo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available One factor that make bonding agent adhere to dentine surface maximally is the humidity condition around the dentine surface. The best bond strength between bonding agent with dentine surface is depending on the moist surface. It mean that the dentine surface should neither too dry or wet. The objective of this research is to know the tensile bond strength of hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA bonding agent to bovine dentine surface at various humidity. The bovine dentine was grounded to give flat surface, which was then etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. Dentine was washed with 20 ml water and dried with blot dry technique. The dentine, except the control group, was placed in a desiccator for one hour at difference humidity. Dentin was removed from desiccator, then covered with bonding agent and put into tensile tool plunger. Self-cured acrylic resin was applied on this bonding agent layer, which was placed on opposite-plunger. After 24 hours, tensile bond strength was measured with Autograph instrument. Data was statistically analyzed with One-Way ANOVA at 95% confidence level, continued with LSD test. Results of this study showed that 60%–90% humidity gave produce the lower of tensile bond strength of bonding agent to dentine surface (p ≤ 0.05. In conclusion, the treatment in 60% humidity gave the greatest tensile bond strength.

  9. Evaluation of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with Er-YAG laser etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Hamid Raji

    2012-01-01

    Results: The mean shear bond strength of the teeth lased with 150 mj was 12.26 ± 4.76 MPa, which was not significantly different from the group with acid etching (15.26 ± 4.16 MPa. Irradiation with 100 mj resulted in mean bond strengths of 9.05 ± 3.16 MPa, which was significantly different from that of acid etching (P < 0.001. Conclusions: laser etching at 150 and 100 mj was adequate for bond strength but the failure pattern of brackets bonded with laser etching is dominantly at adhesive - enamel interface and is not safe for enamel during debonding.

  10. Effects of Resin Hydrophilicity on Dentin Bond Strength

    OpenAIRE

    Nishitani, Y.; Yoshiyama, M; Donnelly, A.M.; Agee, K.A.; Sword, J.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if hydrophobic resins can be coaxed into dentin wet with ethanol instead of water. The test hypothesis was that dentin wet with ethanol would produce higher bond strengths for hydrophobic resins than would dentin wet with water. This study examined the microtensile bond strength of 5 experimental adhesives (50 wt% ethanol/50% comonomers) of various degrees of hydrophilicity to acid-etched dentin that was left moist with water, moist with ethanol, or ...

  11. Evaluation of bond strength of orthodontic brackets without enamel etching

    OpenAIRE

    Boruziniat, Alireza; Khazaei, Yegane; Motaghi, Shiva; Moghaddas, Mohmmadjavad

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare the shear bond strength of brackets with and without enamel etching. Material and Methods In this study, 60 sound premolars were randomly divided into four different groups: 1- TXE group: Enamel etching+Transbond XT adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 2- TXS group: Transbond plus self-etch adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 3- PQ1E group: Enamel etching+ PQ1 adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 4- PQ1 group: PQ1 adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. The shear bond strengths of bra...

  12. Investigation of the Strength of Textile Bonded Seams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urzamal KELESOVA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The strength of the textile bonded seams was analyzed. Two or more fabric layers joining are based on use of base layers structural properties and thermoplastic properties of adhesive film used for bonding. Five commercial produced fabrics of different structure (woven, knitted, laminate and fiber content (polyester, cotton, flax were used in this experiment. Thermoplastic polyurethane film was transferred from the base of silicone to fabric using 160 °C temperature and 10 seconds pressing duration. Fabric layers were bonded using 180 °C temperature and 30 seconds pressing duration. The strength of textile bonded seams was investigated using four different bond types, in order to determine method suitable for the analyzes of bonded seams of knitted fabrics and method suitable to analyze woven fabrics.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.2.1922

  13. Strength of Bond Covenants and Bond Assessment Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Yahanpath

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We examine bond covenants of 29 New Zealand bond issues between 2001 and 2007.Results from the study indicate that protection provided for bondholders is weak and limited.On average, only 2-3 types of covenants are embedded with the issues and only 27% of thesecovenants provide full protection to the bondholders. However, bondholders are not compensated for taking the additional risk. We propose an alternative assessment framework that directly assesses the level of protection offered to bondholders. We calculate thecovenant quality score for the issues and classify them into four levels of protection: very high protection, moderate, low and very low. Recent legislative changes will go some way towards improving investor protection and confidence, but the effect is yet to be seen. This proposed scoring framework can be used by potential investors to complement the traditional credit ratings when making their investment decisions.

  14. Comparison of Shear Bond Strengths of three resin systems for a Base Metal Alloy bonded to

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jlali H

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Resin-bonded fixed partial dentures (F.P.D can be used for conservative treatment of partially edentulous"npatients. There are numerous studies regarding the strength of resin composite bond to base meta! alloys. Shear bond"nstrength of three resin systems were invistigated. In this study these systems consisted of: Panavia Ex, Mirage FLC and"nMarathon V. Thirty base metal specimens were prepared from rexillium III alloy and divided into three groups. Then each"ngroup was bonded to enamel of human extracted molar teeth with these systems. All of specimens were stored in water at"n37ac for 48 hours. A shear force was applied to each specimen by the instron universal testing machine. A statistical"nevaluation of the data using one-way analysis of variance showed that there was highly significant difference (P<0.01"nbetween the bond strengths of these three groups."nThe base metal specimens bonded with panavia Ex luting agent, exhibited the highest mean bond strength. Shear bond"nstrength of the specimens bonded to enamel with Mirage F1C showed lower bond strenght than panavia EX. However, the"nlowest bond strength was obtained by the specimens bonded with Marathon V.

  15. Tensile bond strength of repaired amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Czech, D; Ambrose, E R

    1992-03-01

    This study evaluated the tensile strength of repaired high-copper amalgams and analyzed the different treatments of the amalgam interface prior to repair. One hundred specimens were divided into 10 groups: group 1 was left intact and was considered as the control group. In groups 2 through 8, the specimens were sectioned into halves after 10 days and were reconstructed with new amalgam. Groups 9 and 10 were condensed with time intervals of 15 minutes and all specimens were subjected to tensile loads in a Universal Testing Machine. The tensile strengths at the junction between old and new amalgam ranged between 50% to 79% of those of the control group and verified that the same type of amalgam and uncontaminated interfaces had higher strengths. The results also suggested that if an amalgam repair is anticipated, additional retention is critical to the longevity of the restoration. PMID:1507091

  16. Influence of Water Storage and Bonding Material on Bond Strength of Metallic Brackets to Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana Rosa; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Consani, Simonides; Giorgi, Maria Cecília Caldas; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia; Vedovello Filho, Mário; Santos, Eduardo Cesar Almada; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the influence of water storage (24 h and 6 months), and Transbond XT and Fuji Ortho LC bonding materials on the bond strength of metallic brackets bonded to feldspathic ceramic. Four cylinders of feldspathic ceramic were etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 60 s. Each cylinder received two layers of silane. Metallic brackets were bonded to the cylinders using Transbond XT or Fuji Ortho LC. Light-activation was carried out with 40 s total exposure time using Bluephase G2. Half the specimens for each bonding materials (n=20) were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h and the other half for 6 months. Shear bond strength testing was performed after storage times at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was used to evaluate the amount of adhesive remaining on the ceramic surface at ×8 magnification. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05). Transbond XT showed significantly higher bond strength (p<0.05) than Fuji Ortho LC. Significant differences in bond strength (p<0.05) were found when 24 h and 6 months storage times were compared between materials. ARI showed a predominance of score 0 for all groups, and higher scores at 1, 2 and 3 for 24 h storage time. In conclusion, storage time and bonding materials showed significant influence on the bond strength of brackets to ceramic. PMID:26647936

  17. Shear bond strength of metallic brackets: influence of saliva contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Borges Retamoso

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of saliva contamination on shear bond strength and the bond failure pattern of 3 adhesive systems (Transbond XT, AdheSE and Xeno III on orthodontic metallic brackets bonded to human enamel. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seventy-two permanent human molars were cut longitudinally in a mesiodistal direction, producing seventy-two specimens randomly divided into six groups. Each system was tested under 2 different enamel conditions: no contamination and contaminated with saliva. In T, A and X groups, the adhesive systems were applied to the enamel surface in accordance with manufacturer's instructions. In TS, AS and XS groups, saliva was applied to enamel surface followed by adhesive system application. The samples were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 h, and then tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine (Emic, DL 2000 running at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. After bond failure, the enamel surfaces were observed under an optical microscope at 40x magnification. RESULTS: The control and contaminated groups showed no significant difference in shear bond strength for the same adhesive system. However, shear bond strength of T group (17.03±4.91 was significantly higher than that of AS (8.58±1.73 and XS (10.39±4.06 groups (p<0.05. Regarding the bond failure pattern, TS group had significantly higher scores of no adhesive remaining on the tooth in the bonding area than other groups considering the adhesive remnant index (ARI used to evaluate the amount of adhesive left on the enamel. CONCLUSIONS: Saliva contamination showed little influence on the 24-h shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  18. A comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Sudhir; Tandon, Pradeep; Nagar, Amit; Singh, Gyan P; Singh, Alka; Chugh, Vinay K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of stainless steel (SS) orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives. Materials and Methods: Eighty newly extracted premolars were bonded to 0.022 SS brackets (Ormco, Scafati, Italy) and equally divided into four groups based on adhesive used: (1) Rely-a-Bond (self-cure adhesive, Reliance Orthodontic Product, Inc., Illinois, USA), (2) Transbond XT (light-cure adhesive, 3M Unitek, CA, U...

  19. Shear bond strength of different retainer wires and bonding adhesives in consideration of the pretreatment process

    OpenAIRE

    Reicheneder, C. (Claudia); Hofrichter, B. (Bernd); Faltermeier, A. (Andreas); P. Proff; Lippold, C. (Carsten); Kirschneck, C.J. (Christian)

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We aimed to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different retainer wires and three different bonding adhesives in consideration of the pretreatment process of enamel surface sandblasting. Methods: 400 extracted bovine incisors were divided into 10 groups of 20 paired specimens each. 10 specimens of each group were pretreated by enamel sandblasting. The retainer wires Bond-A-Braid™, GAC-Wildcat®-Twistflex and everStick®ORTHO were bonded to the teeth with the adhesives ...

  20. Interface formation and strength of Be/DSCu diffusion bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, T. [NGK Insulators Ltd., Nagoya (Japan). Mater. Res. Lab.; Iwadachi, T. [NGK Insulators Ltd., Handa-city (Japan). New Metals Div.

    1998-10-01

    Beryllium has been proposed to be used as a plasma facing material of the first wall for ITER, and will be bonded by HIP process to dispersion strengthened copper (DSCu). Be/DSCu diffusion bonding tests in the range of temperature from 600 C to 850 C by hot pressing techniques have been conducted to identify the effect of bonding temperature and time on interface formation and joint strength. The bonded Be/DSCu joints were evaluated by microstructural analysis of the interface and shear strength tests at room temperature. The diffusion layer of directly bonded Be/DSCu joints and the joints with Be-Cu interlayer consisted of Be{sub 2}Cu({delta}) phase on the Be side and Cu + BeCu({gamma}) phase on the DSCu side, Cu + BeCu({gamma}) phase generated remarkably fast at 800-850 C. The thickness of the diffusion layer was linear to a square root of bonding time. Shear strength of the joints bonded at 650-750 C are all around 200 MPa. Shear strength is dominated by the formation of the layer of Be{sub 2}Cu({delta}) phase on the Be side. (orig.) 2 refs.

  1. Bond strength investigation of two shot moulded polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul

    This report on the project “Bond strength investigation of two shot moulded polymers” has been submitted for fulfilling the requirements for the course “Experimental Plastic Technology – 42234” at IPL-DTU. Two shot moulding is a classic manufacturing process to combine two different polymers in a...... single product and it is getting more and more importance day by day. One of the biggest challenges of two shot moulding is to achieve a reasonably good bonding between two polymers. The purpose of this project is to investigate the effects of different process, material and machine parameters on the...... bond strength of two shot moulded polymers. For the experiments two engineering polymers (PS and ABS) were used. After all the experimental work, several parameters were found which could effectively control the bond strength of two shot moulded polymers. This report also presents different aspects of...

  2. The CH/π hydrogen bond: Implication in chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, M.

    2012-06-01

    The CH/π hydrogen bond is the weakest extreme of hydrogen bonds that occurs between a soft acid CH and a soft base π-system. Implication in chemistry of the CH/π hydrogen bond includes issues of conformation, crystal packing, and specificity in host/guest complexes. The result obtained by analyzing the Cambridge Structural Database is reviewed. The peculiar axial preference of isopropyl group in α-phellandrene and folded conformation of levopimaric acid have been explained in terms of the CH/π hydrogen bond, by high-level ab initio MO calculations. Implication of the CH/π hydrogen bond in structural biology is also discussed, briefly.

  3. Bond strength optimization of Ti/Cu/Ti clad composites produced by roll-bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Ti/Cu/Ti clad composite was successfully fabricated by the roll-bonding technique. • The most effective bonding parameter was post-annealing temperature. • The mechanism of the Cu/Ti roll bonding could be clarified using the film theory. - Abstract: This research focuses on the bond strength of the Ti/Cu/Ti composites fabricated by roll-bonding. The peel tests were used to evaluate the bond strength of the clad composites. The Taguchi technique was used to find the optimum conditions to maximize the Cu/Ti bond strength. The optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, as well as peel and microhardness tests were utilized to characterize the interfacial zones. A Taguchi L32 orthogonal array was selected to study the influence of the roll-bonding parameters, including the roller lubrication conditions, temper condition of Cu, rolling temperature, reduction in thickness, post-annealing time, and post-annealing temperature, and rolling speed on the bond strength. Based on the Taguchi statistical analysis, the rolling temperature, reduction in thickness, post-annealing temperature and rolling speed have significant effects on the bond strength. Among these, the post-annealing temperature is the most effective factor. It was shown that the selection of the highest “reduction in thickness”, the lowest “rolling speed”, and the intermediate values of “rolling temperature” and “post-annealing temperature” leads to the highest bond strength. It was also indicated that the mechanism of the Cu/Ti roll bonding could be explained using the film theory

  4. Hydrogen Bond Basicity Prediction for Medicinal Chemistry Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Peter W; Montanari, Carlos A; Prokopczyk, Igor M; Ribeiro, Jean F R; Sartori, Geraldo Rodrigues

    2016-05-12

    Hydrogen bonding is discussed in the context of medicinal chemistry design. Minimized molecular electrostatic potential (Vmin) is shown to be an effective predictor of hydrogen bond basicity (pKBHX), and predictive models are presented for a number of hydrogen bond acceptor types relevant to medicinal chemistry. The problems posed by the presence of nonequivalent hydrogen bond acceptor sites in molecular structures are addressed by using nonlinear regression to fit measured pKBHX to calculated Vmin. Predictions are made for hydrogen bond basicity of fluorine in situations where relevant experimental measurements are not available. It is shown how predicted pKBHX can be used to provide insight into the nature of bioisosterism and to profile heterocycles. Examples of pKBHX prediction for molecular structures with multiple, nonequivalent hydrogen bond acceptors are presented. PMID:26872049

  5. Comparison of shear bond strength of aesthetic restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B P Suryakumari Nujella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : The present study was conducted to determine and compare the shear bond strengths of Conventional glass ionomer; Resin-modified glass ionomer; Polyacid-modified composite and Composite Resin, and to assess and determine the mode of failure (adhesive, cohesive, mixed. Materials and Methods : Occlusal dentin of 40 extracted human teeth were randomly divided into four groups of ten teeth, each based on the restorative materials tested as follows: Group I: Conventional Glass Ionomer Cement (Control; Group II: Resin-modified Glass Ionomer Cement; Group III: Polyacid-modified Composite Resin; Group IV: Hybrid Composite Resin. The bonded materials were subjected to shear bond strength (SBS testing in a Instron Universal Testing Machine (UTM at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The bond failure location was examined by the use of a stereomicroscope at 10× magnification. The mean SBS of Groups I-IV obtained was 3.81, 9.71, 11.96 and 18.16 MPa, respectively. Comparison of mean shear bond strengths of all groups was done by one way ANOVA test and comparison of means in between groups by the Student′s t test. Conclusion : It is concluded that the compomer restorative materials show higher shear bond strength than conventional glass-ionomer and resin-modified glass-ionomer, but less than composite resin.

  6. Bond strength with various etching times on young permanent teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.N.; Lu, T.C. (School of Dentistry, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China))

    1991-07-01

    Tensile bond strengths of an orthodontic resin cement were compared for 15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, or 120-second etching times, with a 37% phosphoric acid solution on the enamel surfaces of young permanent teeth. Fifty extracted premolars from 9- to 16-year-old children were used for testing. An orthodontic composite resin was used to bond the bracket directly onto the buccal surface of the enamel. The tensile bond strengths were tested with an Instron machine. Bond failure interfaces between bracket bases and teeth surfaces were examined with a scanning electron microscope and calculated with mapping of energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry. The results of tensile bond strength for 15-, 30-, 60-, or 90-second etching times were not statistically different. For the 120-second etching time, the decrease was significant. Of the bond failures, 43%-49% occurred between bracket and resin interface, 12% to 24% within the resin itself, 32%-40% between resin and tooth interface, and 0% to 4% contained enamel fragments. There was no statistical difference in percentage of bond failure interface distribution between bracket base and resin, resin and enamel, or the enamel detachment. Cohesive failure within the resin itself at the 120-second etching time was less than at other etching times, with a statistical significance. To achieve good retention, to decrease enamel loss, and to reduce moisture contamination in the clinic, as well as to save chairside time, a 15-second etching time is suggested for teenage orthodontic patients.

  7. Bond strength of a new generation of universal bonding systems to zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passia, Nicole; Mitsias, Miltiadis; Lehmann, Frank; Kern, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this laboratory study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength of a new generation of universal bonding systems to zirconia ceramic and to compare the results with the bond strength of a clinically-established bonding system. Eighty zirconia ceramic test specimens (e.max ZirCAD) were air-abraded and bonded to Plexiglas tubes, filled with an aliphatic dimethacrylate filling material (Clearfil F II), using three so called universal bonding systems of a new generation with different compositions (Monobond Plus/MultilinkAutomix, NX3, Scotchbond Universal/RelyX Ultimate). The latter was used also without the phosphate monomer containing primer Scotchbond Universal. A clinically established phosphate monomer containing adhesive cement served as control group (Panavia F2.0). The specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 3 or 150 days and the long-term storage series were additionally thermal cycled between 5 and 55°C for 37,500 times to simulate oral conditions. All specimens underwent tensile bond strength testing. The statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon-Test with a Bonferroni-Holm correction for multiple testing. After 150 days the median bond strength of RelyX Ultimate, with and without Scotchbond Universal, and Panavia F2.0 did not differ statistically (range: 21.7-28.8MPa), while the bond strength of Monobond Plus/Multilink Automix was significantly lower (15.4MPa), and that of NX3 the lowest (6.6MPa). After 150 days of water storage with thermal cycling, all adhesive system showed significantly reduced tensile bond strengths compared to that after 3 days. Only RelyX Ultimate was comparable to the established bonding system Panavia F2.0. The additional use of Scotchbond Universal did not result in a significant effect. PMID:27232829

  8. Polar Flattening and the Strength of Halogen Bonding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlák, Robert; Kolář, Michal H.; Hobza, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 10 (2015), s. 4727-4732. ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : density functional theory * interaction energies * halogen bonding Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.498, year: 2014

  9. Microshear bond strength between restorative composites and resin cements

    OpenAIRE

    Rubens Nazareno GARCIA; Mário Fernando de GÓES; Marcelo GIANNINI

    2008-01-01

    Introduction and objective: The techniques of adhesive cementationhave been widely used in dental restoration. The purpose of this studywas to evaluate the microshear bond strength between restorativecomposites and resin cements. Material and methods: Twenty composites blocks were prepared in order to obtain a flat surface, using 600-grid sandpaper. The samples were randomly divided in four groups(n=15) according to the experimental groups: [1] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of RelyX ARC...

  10. Shear bond strength of indirect composite material to monolithic zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of indirect composite material (Tescera Indirect Composite System) to monolithic zirconia (inCoris TZI). MATERIALS AND METHODS Partially stabilized monolithic zirconia blocks were cut into with 2.0 mm thickness. Sintered zirconia specimens were divided into different surface treatment groups: no treatment (control), sandblasting, glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application, and sandblasting + glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application. The indirect composite material was applied to the surface of the monolithic zirconia specimens. Shear bond strength value of each specimen was evaluated after thermocycling. The fractured surface of each specimen was examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope to assess the failure types. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey LSD tests (α=.05). RESULTS Bond strength was significantly lower in untreated specimens than in sandblasted specimens (P<.05). No difference between the glaze layer and hydrofluoric acid application treated groups were observed. However, bond strength for these groups were significantly higher as compared with the other two groups (P<.05). CONCLUSION Combined use of glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application and silanization are reliable for strong and durable bonding between indirect composite material and monolithic zirconia.

  11. Bond Strength of Composite CFRP Reinforcing Bars in Timber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Corradi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of near-surface mounted (NSM fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP bars is an interesting method for increasing the shear and flexural strength of existing timber members. This article examines the behaviour of carbon FRP (CFRP bars in timber under direct pull-out conditions. The objective of this experimental program is to investigate the bond strength between composite bars and timber: bars were epoxied into small notches made into chestnut and fir wood members using a commercially-available epoxy system. Bonded lengths varied from 150 to 300 mm. Failure modes, stress and strain distributions and the bond strength of CFRP bars have been evaluated and discussed. The pull-out capacity in NSM CFRP bars at the onset of debonding increased with bonded length up to a length of 250 mm. While CFRP bar’s pull-out was achieved only for specimens with bonded lengths of 150 and 200 mm, bar tensile failure was mainly recorded for bonded lengths of 250 and 300 mm.

  12. Characterization of Dentine to Assess Bond Strength of Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Liaqat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to develop alternating dentine adhesion models that could help in the evaluation of a self-bonding dental composite. For this purpose dentine from human and ivory was characterized chemically and microscopically before and after acid etching using Raman and SEM. Mechanical properties of dentine were determined using 3 point bend test. Composite bonding to dentine, with and without use of acid pre-treatment and/or the adhesive, were assessed using a shear bond test. Furthermore, micro gap formation after restoration of 3 mm diameter cavities in dentine was assessed by SEM. Initial hydroxyapatite level in ivory was half that in human dentine. Surface hydroxyapatites decreased by approximately half with every 23 s of acid etch. The human dentine strength (56 MPa was approximately double that of ivory, while the modulus was almost comparable to that of ivory. With adhesive use, average shear bond strengths were 30 and 26 MPa with and without acid etching. With no adhesive, average bond strength was 6 MPa for conventional composites. This, however, increased to 14 MPa with a commercial flowable “self–bonding” composite or upon addition of low levels of an acidic monomer to the experimental composite. The acidic monomer additionally reduced micro-gap formation with the experimental composite. Improved bonding and mechanical properties should reduce composite failures due to recurrent caries or fracture respectively.

  13. Experimental investigation of bond strength under high loading rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural behaviour of reinforced concrete is governed significantly by the transmission of forces between steel and concrete. The bond is of special importance for the overlapping joint and anchoring of the reinforcement, where rigid bond is required. It also plays an important role in the rotational capacity of plastic hinges, where a ductile bond behaviour is preferable. Similar to the mechanical properties of concrete and steel also the characteristics of their interaction changes with the velocity of the applied loading. For smooth steel bars with its main bond mechanisms of adhesion and friction, nearly no influence of loading rate is reported in literature. In contrast, a high rate dependence can be found for the nowadays mainly used deformed bars. For mechanical interlock, where ribs of the reinforcing steel are bracing concrete material surrounding the bar, one reason can be assumed to be in direct connection with the increase of concrete compressive strength. For splitting failure of bond, characterized by the concrete tensile strength, an even higher dynamic increase is observed. For the design of Structures exposed to blast or impact loading the knowledge of a rate dependent bond stress-slip relationship is required to consider safety and economical aspects at the same time. The bond behaviour of reinforced concrete has been investigated with different experimental methods at the University of the Bundeswehr Munich (UniBw and the Joint Research Centre (JRC in Ispra. Both static and dynamic tests have been carried out, where innovative experimental apparatuses have been used. The bond stress-slip relationship and maximum pull-out-forces for varying diameter of the bar, concrete compressive strength and loading rates have been obtained. It is expected that these experimental results will contribute to a better understanding of the rate dependent bond behaviour and will serve for calibration of numerical models.

  14. Experimental investigation of bond strength under high loading rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michal, Mathias; Keuser, Manfred; Solomos, George; Peroni, Marco; Larcher, Martin; Esteban, Beatriz

    2015-09-01

    The structural behaviour of reinforced concrete is governed significantly by the transmission of forces between steel and concrete. The bond is of special importance for the overlapping joint and anchoring of the reinforcement, where rigid bond is required. It also plays an important role in the rotational capacity of plastic hinges, where a ductile bond behaviour is preferable. Similar to the mechanical properties of concrete and steel also the characteristics of their interaction changes with the velocity of the applied loading. For smooth steel bars with its main bond mechanisms of adhesion and friction, nearly no influence of loading rate is reported in literature. In contrast, a high rate dependence can be found for the nowadays mainly used deformed bars. For mechanical interlock, where ribs of the reinforcing steel are bracing concrete material surrounding the bar, one reason can be assumed to be in direct connection with the increase of concrete compressive strength. For splitting failure of bond, characterized by the concrete tensile strength, an even higher dynamic increase is observed. For the design of Structures exposed to blast or impact loading the knowledge of a rate dependent bond stress-slip relationship is required to consider safety and economical aspects at the same time. The bond behaviour of reinforced concrete has been investigated with different experimental methods at the University of the Bundeswehr Munich (UniBw) and the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra. Both static and dynamic tests have been carried out, where innovative experimental apparatuses have been used. The bond stress-slip relationship and maximum pull-out-forces for varying diameter of the bar, concrete compressive strength and loading rates have been obtained. It is expected that these experimental results will contribute to a better understanding of the rate dependent bond behaviour and will serve for calibration of numerical models.

  15. In vitro bond strengths and SEM evaluation of dentin bonding systems to different dentin substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Perdigão, J.; Swift, E. J.; Denehy, G. E.; Wefel, J S; Donly, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    In comparison to enamel, bonding to normal dentin is a greater challenge because of its organic constituents, fluid-filed tubules, and variations in intrinsic composition. Bonding to sclerotic dentin is even more difficult. To evaluate the shear bond strengths of four adhesive systems to dentin substrates with different levels of mineralization, 120 extracted human teeth were randomly assigned to three groups (n = 40). After mid-coronal dentin was exposed, groups of specimens were artificiall...

  16. College Chemistry Students' Mental Models of Acids and Acid Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClary, LaKeisha; Talanquer, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    The central goal of this study was to characterize the mental models of acids and acid strength expressed by advanced college chemistry students when engaged in prediction, explanation, and justification tasks that asked them to rank chemical compounds based on their relative acid strength. For that purpose we completed a qualitative research…

  17. The Reinforcement Bond Strength Behavior under Different Corrosion Condition

    OpenAIRE

    Yousif A. Mansoor; Zhi Qiang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The main idea of this study is to evaluate the bond strength for reinforcing concrete with corrosion that it can damage the R.C bond. Pullout tests carried out to evaluate the effects of corrosion on bond, for that purpose a series of specimens with varying reinforcement corrosion levels tested. The acceleration steel corrosion was 4, 6 and 8 days corrosion. The aim of choosing 4, 6 and 8 days that are trying to reflect field condition on test. The test designed to provide the data required t...

  18. Evaluation of push-out bond strength of surface treatments of two esthetic posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherif Adel Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Glass fiber posts recorded higher bond strength than glass ceramic post to both root canal and resin core. Surface treatments increase bond strength for glass fiber and zirconia ceramic posts to both root canal and resin core. SB+SIC+SC gave higher bond strength than E+SC. Bond strength at the cervical section is higher than at the apical section.

  19. Shear bond strength, failure modes, and confocal microscopy of bonded amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianconi, Luigi; Conte, Gabriele; Mancini, Manuele

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength, failure modes, and confocal microscopy of two different amalgam alloy restorations lined with five adhesive systems. Two regular-set high-copper dental amalgam alloys, Amalcap Plus and Valiant Ph.D, and five commercially available adhesive systems were selected. One hundred and twenty freshly-extracted human third molars were used for the study. The results were statistically evaluated using two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA). The shear bond strength (SBS) of amalgam to dentin was significantly affected by both the adhesive (pValiant Ph.D, 31 of 50 exhibited adhesive failure, and 19 displayed mixed failure. Laser optical microscopy (OM) of the bonded interface revealed the presence of a good hybrid layer was evident in all experimental groups. Higher bond strengths were measured for four of the five adhesives when used in combination with the spherical alloy. PMID:21383518

  20. Bond strength between acrylic resin and maxillofacial silicone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Filié Haddad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of implant dentistry improved the possibilities of rehabilitation with maxillofacial prosthesis. However, clinically it is difficult to bond the silicone to the attachment system. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an adhesive system on the bond strength between acrylic resin and facial silicone. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 120 samples were fabricated with auto-polymerized acrylic resin and MDX 4-4210 facial silicone. Both materials were bonded through mechanical retentions and/or application of primers (DC 1205 primer and Sofreliner primer S and adhesive (Silastic Medical Adhesive Type A or not (control group. Samples were divided into 12 groups according to the method used to attach the silicone to the acrylic resin. All samples were subjected to a T-peel test in a universal testing machine. Failures were classified as adhesive, cohesive or mixed. The data were evaluated by the analysis of variance (ANOVA and the Tukey's HSD test (α=.05. RESULTS: The highest bond strength values (5.95 N/mm; 3.07 N/mm; 4.75 N/mm were recorded for the samples that received a Sofreliner primer application. These values were significantly higher when the samples had no scratches and did not receive the application of Silastic Medical Adhesive Type A. CONCLUSIONS: The most common type of failure was adhesive. The use of Sofreliner primer increased the bond strength between the auto-polymerized acrylic resin and the Silastic MDX 4-4210 facial silicone.

  1. Strength and leak testing of plasma activated bonded interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, M.M.; Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Hanneborg, A.B.

    detection of changes in membrane deflections. The detection limit for leak was 8E-13 mbar l/s. For comparison, strength and leak tests were also performed with regular fusion bonded wafers annealed at 1100 degreesC. The PAB was found to withstand post-processing steps such as RCA cleaning, 24 h in de...

  2. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Huysmans, MC; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N

  3. Evaluation of Bond Strength between Overlay and Substrate in Concrete Repairs

    OpenAIRE

    Neshvadian Bakhsh, Keivan

    2010-01-01

    Good bond strength between overlay and substrate is a key factor in performance of concrete repairs. This thesis was aimed at studying the evaluation of bond strength between repair material and substrate at the interface. Many factors such as surface roughness, existence of micro cracks, compaction, curing etc influence the bond strength. The quality assurance of the bond strength requires test methods that can quantify the bond strength as well as identify the failure mode. There have been ...

  4. Carbon Nanotube Bonding Strength Enhancement Using Metal "Wicking" Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, James L.; Dickie, Matthew R.; Kowalczyk, Robert S.; Liao, Anna; Bronikowski, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes grown from a surface typically have poor bonding strength at the interface. A process has been developed for adding a metal coat to the surface of carbon nano tubes (CNTs) through a wicking process, which could lead to an enhanced bonding strength at the interface. This process involves merging CNTs with indium as a bump-bonding enhancement. Classical capillary theory would not normally allow materials that do not wet carbon or graphite to be drawn into the spacings by capillary action because the contact angle is greater than 90 degrees. However, capillary action can be induced through JPL's ability to fabricate oriented CNT bundles to desired spacings, and through the use of deposition techniques and temperature to control the size and mobility of the liquid metal streams and associated reservoirs. A reflow and plasma cleaning process has also been developed and demonstrated to remove indium oxide, and to obtain smooth coatings on the CNT bundles.

  5. Computational Tools To Model Halogen Bonds in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Melissa Coates; Ho, P Shing

    2016-03-10

    The use of halogens in therapeutics dates back to the earliest days of medicine when seaweed was used as a source of iodine to treat goiters. The incorporation of halogens to improve the potency of drugs is now fairly standard in medicinal chemistry. In the past decade, halogens have been recognized as direct participants in defining the affinity of inhibitors through a noncovalent interaction called the halogen bond or X-bond. Incorporating X-bonding into structure-based drug design requires computational models for the anisotropic distribution of charge and the nonspherical shape of halogens, which lead to their highly directional geometries and stabilizing energies. We review here current successes and challenges in developing computational methods to introduce X-bonding into lead compound discovery and optimization during drug development. This fast-growing field will push further development of more accurate and efficient computational tools to accelerate the exploitation of halogens in medicinal chemistry. PMID:26465079

  6. Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Enamel: Assessment of Two Ethanol Wet-Bonding Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Khoroushi; Mojgan Rafizadeh; Pouran Samimi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Ethanol wet-bonding (EWB) technique has been stated to decrease degradation of resin-dentin bond. This study evaluated the effect of two EWB techniques on composite resin-to-enamel bond strength. Materials and Methods: Silicon carbide papers were used to produce flat enamel surfaces on the buccal faces of forty-five molars. OptiBond FL (OFL) adhesive was applied on enamel surfaces in three groups of 15 namely: Enamel surface and OFL (control); Protocol 1 of the EWB technique: absolu...

  7. Self-etching bonding systems: in-vitro shear bond strength evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, P D; de Wet, F A; du Preez, I C

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the dentine shear bond strength of five self-etching bonding agents with that of a total-etch dentine bonding agent (used as control). Sixty recently extracted third molar teeth were mounted in acrylic resin and the occlusal surfaces ground to expose superficial dentine. A standardised smear layer was created by polishing with wet 600-grit SiC paper. Products evaluated were Xeno III (XIII), Clearfil SE Bond (SE), ABF (ABF), Optibond Solo Self-etch (OS), Adper Prompt-L-Pop (PLP) and the control, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus (SBMP). Resin stubs were bonded to the dentine using the bonding agents according to manufacturer's instructions. Composite stubs were manufactured using an Ultradent jig and two increments of Z100, A1 shade composite. The bonds were subsequently stressed to failure with an Instron testing machine, operating at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data was statistically analysed using ANOVA (alpha 0.05). Further research into cut (ground) and un-cut (un-ground) enamel shear bond strength and micro-leakage using these bonding agents are needed. PMID:16562613

  8. Effect of moisture, saliva, and blood contamination on the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a conventional bonding system and self-etched bonding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Mandava; Mohamed, Shamil; Nayak, Krishna; Shetty, Sharath Kumar; Talapaneni, Ashok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The success of bonding brackets to enamel with resin bonding systems is negatively affected by contamination with oral fluids such as blood and saliva. The new self-etch primer systems combine conditioning and priming agents into a single application, making the procedure more cost effective. Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of moisture, saliva and blood contamination on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with conventional bonding system and self-etch bonding system. Materials and Methods: Each system was examined under four enamel surface conditions (dry, water, saliva, and blood), and 80 human teeth were divided into two groups with four subgroups each of 10 according to enamel surface condition. Group 1 used conventional bonding system and Group 2 used self-etched bonding system. Subgroups 1a and 2a under dry enamel surface conditions; Subgroups 1b and 2b under moist enamel surface condition; Subgroups 3a and 3b under saliva enamel surface condition and Subgroup 4a and 4b under blood enamel surface condition. Brackets were bonded, and all the samples were then submitted to a shear bond test with a universal testing machine with a cross head speed of 1mm/sec. Results: The results showed that the contamination reduced the shear bond strength of all groups. In self-etch bonding system water and saliva had significantly higher bond strength when compared to other groups. Conclusion: It was concluded that the blood contamination showed lowest bond strength from both bonding systems. Self-etch bonding system resulted in higher bond strength than conventional bonding system under all conditions except the dry enamel surface. PMID:24678210

  9. Repair Bond Strength of Aged Resin Composite after Different Surface and Bonding Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wendler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effect of different mechanical surface treatments and chemical bonding protocols on the tensile bond strength (TBS of aged composite. Bar specimens were produced using a nanohybrid resin composite and aged in distilled water for 30 days. Different surface treatments (diamond bur, phosphoric acid, silane, and sandblasting with Al2O3 or CoJet Sand, as well as bonding protocols (Primer/Adhesive were used prior to application of the repair composite. TBS of the specimens was measured and the results were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA and the Student–Newman–Keuls test (α = 0.05. Mechanically treated surfaces were characterized under SEM and by profilometry. The effect of water aging on the degree of conversion was measured by means of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. An important increase in the degree of conversion was observed after aging. No significant differences in TBS were observed among the mechanical surface treatments, despite variations in surface roughness profiles. Phosphoric acid etching significantly improved repair bond strength values. The cohesive TBS of the material was only reached using resin bonding agents. Application of an intermediate bonding system plays a key role in achieving reliable repair bond strengths, whereas the kind of mechanical surface treatment appears to play a secondary role.

  10. Bond lengths and bond strengths in compounds of the 5f elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variation of bond length (D) with bond strength (S) in normal valence compounds of 3d, 4d, 5d-4f, and 6d-5f elements can be represented approximately as D(S)=D(0.5) F(S), where D(0.5) is a characteristic constant for a given bond and F(S) an empirical function which is the same for all bonds. A bond strength Ssub(ij)=Ssub(ji) is assigned to the bond between atoms i and j such that Σsub(j)Ssub(ij)=Vsub(i) and Σsub(i)Ssub(ij)=Vsub(j), where Vsub(i) and Vsub(j) are the normal valences of the two atoms. The function F(S) decreases monotonically with increasing S, and is normalized to unity at S=0.5, so that the constant D(0.5) has the physical meaning of being the bond length adjusted to S=0.5. In this paper, this method of interpretation is used to interpret and systematize the experimental results on bond lengths in oxides, halides and oxy-halides of the 5f elements. (Auth.)

  11. Increment thickness versus dentin bond strength of bulk fill flowables

    OpenAIRE

    Flury, Simon; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to investigate the influence of increment thickness on shear bond strength (SBS) to dentin of a conventional and two bulk fill flowable composites. Methods: A total of 135 specimens of ground human dentin were produced (n=15/group; 3 increment thicknesses; 3 flowable composites) and the dentin surfaces were treated with the adhesive system OptiBond FL (Kerr) according to manufacturer’s instructions. Split Teflon molds (inner diameter: 3.6 mm) of 2 mm, 4 mm, or 6 mm...

  12. Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. To meet the aggressive Advanced Turbine Systems goals for efficiency, durability and the environment, it will be necessary to employ thermal barrier coatings on turbine airfoils and other hot section components. For The successful application of TBCs to ATS engines with 2600{degrees}F turbine inlet temperatures and required component lives 10 times greater than those for aircraft gas turbine engines, it is necessary to develop quantitative assessment techniques for TBC coating integrity with time and cycles in ATS engines. Thermal barrier coatings in production today consist of a metallic bond coat, such as an MCrAlY overlay coating or a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) diffusion coating. During heat treatment, both these coatings form a thin, tightly adherent alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) film. Failure of TBC coatings in engine service occurs by spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the bond coat to alumina or the alumina to zirconia bonds. Thus, it is the initial strength of these bonds and the stresses at the bond plane, and their changes with engine exposure, that determines coating durability. The purpose of this program is to provide, for the first time, a quantitative assessment of TBC bond strength and bond plane stresses as a function of engine time and cycles.

  13. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Newer Bonding Systems on Superficial and Deep Dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Kumari, R Veena; Siddaraju, Kishore; Nagaraj, Hema; Poluri, Ramya Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of nanocomposite resin to superficial dentin and deep dentin using two different dentin bonding systems. Materials and Methods: All teeth were sectioned at various levels (superficial dentin: Dentin within 0.5-1 mm of dentinoenamel junction; deep dentin: Dentin within 0.5 mm of the highest pulp horn) using a Carborundum Disc and embedded in acrylic block of specific size. Selected specimens (60 premolar teeth) were g...

  14. Comparison of shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdi S; Bahman S; Arghavan A; Fatemeh M

    2008-01-01

    Amalgam′s non-adhesive characteristics necessitate cavity preparations incorporating retentive features, which often require the removal of non-carious tooth structure. Use of adhesives beneath amalgam restorations, would be helpful to overcome this disadvantage. This study was undertaken to compare the mean shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin, to evaluate the efficacy of amalgam adhesives in pediatric dentistry.27 primary and 28 permanent posterior te...

  15. Bonding Interface Imaging and Shear Strength Prediction by Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The propagation of a longitudinal ultrasonic wave normally incident upon an adhesively bonded structure is studied. The structure consists of adherend and adhesive layers with finite thickness. Interfaces between adherend and adhesive are regarded as distributed springs. Theoretical and experimental results show that resonant frequencies of the bonded structure vary sensitively with the interface stiffness constants and adhesive thickness, and these interface characteristics are inversed by the simulation annealing (SA) method. Furthermore, the distribution image of interface stiffnesses is compared with the state of fracture interface, and quantitative prediction of shear strength is achieved based on the distribution of interface stiffnesses and adhesive thicknesses by using a back-propagation neutral network. The average relative error of the shear strength from prediction to real value is 10.7%. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  16. The Bond Strength of Ceramic Brackets Bonded to Remineralized Teeth with Casein

    OpenAIRE

    Kıyak Havlucu, Sevgi; Çakırer, Banu

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded with different adhesives to remineralized teeth with casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate. Premolar teeth (n=120) were used in the study. Teeth were divided into 6 groups (n=20). For 60 teeth in the first 3 groups demineralization was performed before all teeth in the 6 groups were pretreated with CPP-ACP cream (GC Tooth Mousse, GC Corp., Tokyo, Japan) for 30 days. Brackets were bonded with T...

  17. Microshear bond strength according to dentin cleansing methods before recementation

    OpenAIRE

    Taşar, Simge; Ulusoy, Mutahhar Muhammed; Merıç, Gökçe

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine the efficiency of Erbium, Chromium: Yttrium-Scandium-Gallium-Garnet laser in different output powers for removing permanent resin cement residues and therefore its influence on microshear bond strength compared to other cleaning methods. MATERIALS AND METHODS 90 extracted human molars were sectioned in 1 mm thickness. Resin cement was applied to surface of sliced teeth. After the removal of initial cement, 6 test groups were prepared by various d...

  18. Inlays made from a hybrid material: adaptation and bond strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottino, M A; Campos, F; Ramos, N C; Rippe, M P; Valandro, L F; Melo, R M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the internal fit, marginal adaptation, and bond strengths of inlays made of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic and polymer-infiltrated ceramic. Twenty molars were randomly selected and prepared to receive inlays that were milled from both materials. Before cementation, internal fit was achieved using the replica technique by molding the internal surface with addition silicone and measuring the cement thicknesses of the pulpal and axial walls. Marginal adaptation was measured on the occlusal and proximal margins of the replica. The inlays were then cemented using resin cement (Panavia F2.0) and subjected to two million thermomechanical cycles in water (200 N load and 3.8-Hz frequency). The restored teeth were then cut into beams, using a lathe, for microtensile testing. The contact angles, marginal integrity, and surface patterns after etching were also observed. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (p<0.05), the Tukey test for internal fit and marginal adaptation, and the Student t-test for bond strength. The failure types (adhesive or cohesive) were classified on each fractured beam. The results showed that the misfit of the pulpal walls (p=0.0002) and the marginal adaptation (p=0.0001) of the feldspathic ceramic were significantly higher when compared to those of the polymer-infiltrated ceramic, while the bond strength values of the former were higher when compared to those of the latter. The contact angle of the polymer-infiltrated ceramic was also higher. In the present study, the hybrid ceramic presented improved internal and marginal adaptation, but the bond strengths were higher for the feldspathic ceramic. PMID:25405903

  19. Effect of Sandblasting on Shear Bond Strength Composite Resin Veneer

    OpenAIRE

    Octarina Octarina; Andi Soufyan; Yosi Kusuma Eriwati

    2013-01-01

    Attachment between restoration and enamel surface in indirect resin composite veneer restoration (IRCV) is obtained using multi-step (MS) resin cement. Recently, a one step self-adhesive dual-cured resin cement (SADRC) was introduced. Objective: To determine the effect of sandblasting on shear bond strength (SBS) of IRCV to enamel using MS resin cement and SADRC. Methods: Forty specimens of buccal surface of enamel human were light-cured in Solidilite chamber and were divided into two groups...

  20. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of RMGI and Composite Resin for Orthodontic Bracket Bonding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soghra Yassaei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS of resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI and composite resin for bonding metal and ceramic brackets.Eighty-eight human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were divided into 4 groups (n=22. In groups 1 and 2, 22 metal and ceramic brackets were bonded using composite resin (Transbond XT, respectively. Twenty-two metal and ceramic brackets in groups 3 and 4, respectively were bonded using RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC, Japan. After photo polymerization, the teeth were stored in water and thermocycled (500 cycles between 5° and 55°. The SBS value of each sample was determined using a Universal Testing Machine. The amount of residual adhesive remaining on each tooth was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analyses were done using two-way ANOVA.RMGI bonded brackets had significantly lower SBS value compared to composite resin bonded groups. No statistically significant difference was observed between metal and ceramic brackets bonded with either the RMGI or composite resin. The comparison of the adhesive remnant index (ARI scores between the groups indicated that the bracket failure mode was significantly different among groups (P<0.001 with more adhesive remaining on the teeth bonded with composite resin.RMGIs have significantly lower SBS compared to composite resin for orthodontic bonding purposes; however the provided SBS is still within the clinically acceptable range.

  1. A novel bonding method for fabrication of PET planar nanofluidic chip with low dimension loss and high bonding strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plastic planar nanofluidic chips are becoming increasingly important for biological and chemical applications. However, the majority of the present bonding methods for planar nanofluidic chips suffer from high dimension loss and low bonding strength. In this work, a novel thermal bonding technique based on O2 plasma and ethanol treatment was proposed. With the assistance of O2 plasma and ethanol, the PET (polyethylene terephthalate) planar nanofluidic chip can be bonded at a low bonding temperature of 50 °C. To increase the bonding rate and bonding strength, the O2 plasma parameters and thermal bonding parameters were optimized during the bonding process. The tensile test indicates that the bonding strength of the PET planar nanofluidic chip can reach 0.954 MPa, while the auto-fluorescence test demonstrates that there is no leakage or blockage in any of the bonded micro- or nanochannels. (paper)

  2. Modulating the Bond Strength of DNA-Nanoparticle Superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Soyoung E; Wang, Mary X; Shade, Chad M; Rouge, Jessica L; Brown, Keith A; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-02-23

    A method is introduced for modulating the bond strength in DNA-programmable nanoparticle (NP) superlattice crystals. This method utilizes noncovalent interactions between a family of [Ru(dipyrido[2,3-a:3',2'-c]phenazine)(N-N)2](2+)-based small molecule intercalators and DNA duplexes to postsynthetically modify DNA-NP superlattices. This dramatically increases the strength of the DNA bonds that hold the nanoparticles together, thereby making the superlattices more resistant to thermal degradation. In this work, we systematically investigate the relationship between the structure of the intercalator and its binding affinity for DNA duplexes and determine how this translates to the increased thermal stability of the intercalated superlattices. We find that intercalator charge and steric profile serve as handles that give us a wide range of tunability and control over DNA-NP bond strength, with the resulting crystal lattices retaining their structure at temperatures more than 50 °C above what nonintercalated structures can withstand. This allows us to subject DNA-NP superlattice crystals to conditions under which they would normally melt, enabling the construction of a core-shell (gold NP-quantum dot NP) superlattice crystal. PMID:26699102

  3. Effect of dentin surface roughness on the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Poursoltan, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to investigate whether dentin surface preparation with diamond rotary instruments of different grit sizes affects the shear bond strength of resin-bonded restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS The buccal enamel of 60 maxillary central incisors was removed with a low speed diamond saw and wet ground with silicon carbide papers. The polished surfaces of the teeth were prepared with four groups of rotary diamond burs with super-coarse (SC), coarse (C), medium (M), and fine (F) grit sizes. Following surface preparation, 60 restorations were casted with nickel-chromium alloy and bonded with Panavia cement. To assess the shear bond strength, the samples were mounted on a universal testing machine and an axial load was applied along the cement-restoration interface at the crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The acquired data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test (α=.05). RESULTS The mean ± SD shear bond strengths (in MPa) of the study groups were 17.75 ± 1.41 for SC, 13.82 ± 1.13 for C, 10.40 ± 1.45 for M, and 7.13 ± 1.18 for F. Statistical analysis revealed the significant difference among the study groups such that the value for group SC was significantly higher than that for group F (P<.001). CONCLUSION Dentin surface roughness created by diamond burs of different grit sizes considerably influences the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations. PMID:27350858

  4. Bond strength of composite resin to enamel: assessment of two ethanol wet-bonding techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol wet-bonding (EWB technique has been stated to decrease degradation of resin-dentin bond. This study evaluated the effect of two EWB techniques on composite resin-to-enamel bond strength.Silicon carbide papers were used to produce flat enamel surfaces on the buccal faces of forty-five molars. OptiBond FL (OFL adhesive was applied on enamel surfaces in three groups of 15 namely: Enamel surface and OFL (control;Protocol 1 of the EWB technique: absolute ethanol was applied to water-saturated acid-etched enamel surfaces for 1 minute before the application of ethanol-solvated hydrophobic adhesive resin of OFL 3 times;Protocol 2: progressive ethanol replacement; water was gradually removed from the enamel matrix using ascending ethanol concentrations before OFL application. Composite build-ups were made and the specimens were stored for 24 hours at 37°C and 100% relative humidity. Shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Fracture patterns were evaluated microscopically. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Fisher's exact test (α=0.05.There were no significant differences in bond strength between the groups (P=0.73. However, regarding failure patterns, the highest cohesive enamel fractures were recorded in groups 2 and 3.In this study, although both methods of EWB did not influence immediate bond strength of composite resin to enamel, the majority of failure patterns occurred cohesively in enamel.

  5. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength between Composite Resin and Porcelain Using Different Bonding Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Yassini

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Ceramics as in ceramo-metallic and all ceramic tooth restorations have grown popular owing to their high tissue compatibility and esthetic advantages. Such restorations have the capability to deliver valuable services over a long period of time; however, failures under intraoral conditions are not unanticipated.Purpose: The purpose of this in-vitro study was to investigate the shear bond strength of composite resin to porcelain using different bonding system materials.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study forty porcelain blocks were prepared and randomly divided into four equal groups. The porcelain surfaces were then etched with HF for 2 minutes, washed with water for 2 minutes and treated with a silane layer. The silane treated porcelain surfaces were left for one minute and then the specimens were bonded to composite resin as follow:Group 1 (control group, hybrid composite Z100 was applied and light cured from four directions for 20 seconds. Group 2, flowable composite was applied and light cured for 20 seconds. Group 3, unfilled resin was used and photo cured for 20 seconds. Group 4,(Dentin bonding agent adhesive resin was used followed by 20 seconds photo curing.Hybrid composite resin Z100 was subsequently applied on all porcelain surfaces of groups 2, 3 and 4, and light cured for 20 seconds from four directions. Specimens were then subjected to thermocycling 1000 times. Shear bond strength was determined by a Universal testing machine. The data obtained was subjected to a one-way ANOVA test.Results: The results indicate that there is a statistically significant difference between adhesive group and the other three groups of hybrid, flowable and unfilled resin (P<0.05.Conclusion: The results from this study showed that the shear bond strength of composite resin to porcelain was significantly higher for porcelain bonded surfaces using a dentin bonding agent than that of other materials tested.

  6. Comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with halogen and plasma arc light curing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein IndianJPsychiatry

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Using the plasma arc system is superior to other methods due to reduced curing time. Also, since in using the halogen light system, an increase in curing periods from different angles resulted in a significant increase in shear bond strength; it is advisable to apply the halogen light from different angles.

  7. Investigation of the bonding strength and bonding mechanisms of SOFCs interconnector-electrode interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boccaccini, D. N.; Ševeček, O.; Frandsen, L. H.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Molin, S.; Cannio, M.; Hjelm, J.; Hendriksen, P. V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 162, č. 1 (2016), s. 250-253. ISSN 0167-577X Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Metal-ceramic bond strength * Schwickerath crack-initiation test * SOC interfaces Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.489, year: 2014

  8. Are Bonding Agents being Effective on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to the Composite?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Farzanegan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the clinical problems in orthodontics is the bonding of brackets tocomposite restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bondstrength of brackets bonded to composite restorations using Excite. Methods:Forty brackets were bonded to composite surfaces, which were embedded inacrylic resin. One of the following four protocols was employed for surfacepreparation of the composite: group 1 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds, group2 roughening with a diamond bur plus 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds, group3 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds and the applying Excite®, group4 roughening with diamond bur plus 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds andapplying Excite®. Maxillary central brackets were bonded onto thecomposite prepared samples with Transbond XT. Shear Bond Strength (SBS wasmeasured by a universal testing machine. The ANOVA and Tukey test was utilizedfor data analysis. Results: There was a significant difference betweenthe four groups (P

  9. Shear Bond Strength of Resin Bonded to Bleached Enamel Using Different Modified 35% Hydrogen Peroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosavi H

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Bleaching systems with different concentrations and applications are widely used to improve the visual appearance of the teeth, but one of the complications of these materials is reduction of bond strength for immediately bonding to the bleached enamel. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of using different modified hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents on the shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to the bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight sound extracted premolar teeth were collected, sectioned 1 mm below the CEJ to detach the root. The proximal surfaces of the teeth were flattened using diamond disks and silicon carbide papers to achieve flat homogeneous enamel surfaces without exposure to the dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups as follows (n = 12: group 1: bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel; group 2: bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel contained (casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP; group 3: bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel combined with fluoride; and group 4: bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide applying one week before resin restoration placement. Composite resin, Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan, was bonded on each tooth in the mould (4 mm diameter × 3 mm height using Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan. After 24 hours of storage and 1000 cycles of thermocycling, the shear bond strength of the specimens at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min was measured in MPa. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test. Results: The minimum and maximum mean shear bond strength values were observed in groups 2 (15.82 ± 4.41 and 4 (21.00 ± 3.90, respectively. Multiple comparisons of groups revealed no significant differences among the groups except between group 4 and all the other groups. The most common type of failure was adhesive. Conclusions: Using modified bleaching agents decreased the bond

  10. Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young's modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs

  11. Comparison of the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded using silorane base and metacrylate base composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrahim Davari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Orthodontic bracket failure during treatment is a common problem. With the introduction of low shrinkage composites the question is that whether: this sufficient has coefficient bond strength for bonding bracket during orthodontic treatment. The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS of silorane-based and metacrylate-based composites to metal brackets.   Materials and Methods: 30 human premolar teeth were collected and divided into 2 groups. In group 1, 15 orthodontic brackets were bonded using silorane-based composite, in group 2, 15 orthodontic brackets were bonded using metacrylate-based composite. The shear bond strength of each specimen was determined in an Instron machine. Amount of residual adhesive remaining on each tooth was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using T-test to compare the shear bond strength between groups and LSD method to compare the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI scores.   Results: There was significant difference in the SBS between the test groups (P<0.001. The mean bond strength of bonding brackets to silorane-based composite was (42.42 ± 7.03 MPa, and the mean bond strength of bonding brackets metacrylate-based composite was (21.08±2.97 MPa. No significant difference in the ART was found between groups (P=0.66.   Conclusion: Silorane-based composite provided higher bond strength to orthodontic metal brackets.

  12. Effect of clearfil protect bond and transbond plus self-etch primer on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Hamid Raji

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The shear bond strength of clearfil protect bond and transbond plus self-etch primer was enough for bonding the orthodontic brackets. The mode of failure of bonded brackets with these two self-etch primers is safe for enamel.

  13. Failure strength prediction for adhesively bonded single lap joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Niat Mahmud

    For adhesively bonded joint, failure strength depends on many factors such as material properties (both adhesive and adherend), specimen geometries, test environments, surface preparation procedures, etc. Failure occurs inside constitutive materials or along joint interfaces. Based on location, adhesively bonded failure mode can be classified as adhesive failure mode, cohesive failure mode and adherend failure mode. Failure mode directly affects the failure strength of joint. For last eight decades, researchers have developed analytical, empirical or semi-empirical methods capable of predicting failure strength for adhesively bonded joints generating either cohesive failure or adherend failure. Applicability of most of the methods is limited to particular cases. In this research, different failure modes for single lap joints (SLJs) were generated experimentally using epoxy based paste adhesive. Based on experimental data and analytical study, simplified failure prediction methods were developed for each failure mode. For adhesive failure mode, it is observed that peel stress distributions concur along interface near crack initiation points. All SLJs for this test endured consistent surface treatments. Geometric parameters of the joints were varied to study their effect on failure strength. Peel stress distributions were calculated using finite analysis (FEA). Based on peel stress distribution near crack initiation point, a failure model is proposed. Numerous analytical, empirical and semi-empirical models are available for predicting failure strengths of SLJs generating cohesive failures. However, most of the methods in the literature failed to capture failure behavior of SLJs having thickness of adhesive layer as variable. Cohesive failure mode was generated experimentally using aluminum as adherend and epoxy adhesive considering thickness of adhesive layers as variable within SLJs. Comparative study was performed among various methods. It was observed that

  14. Measurement of bond strength at metal/ceramic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report on a method for measuring the bond strength of metal/ceramic interfaces. Test specimens are created by vapor depositing a metal film on a ceramic substrate. The specimen is impacted with a thin metal flyer sending a short planar shock pulse into the ceramic. If the shape and amplitude of the wave is properly controlled the interface will spontaneously debond creating new free surfaces. Measurements indicate the debonding process occurs in less than 1.0 ns, which the authors believe is too short for crack propagation along existing flaws. Therefore, the authors conclude that simultaneous breaking of atomic bonds rather than propagation and coalescence of cracks is the means by which the film and substrate are separated

  15. EFFECT OF CORROSION ON BOND BEHAVIOR AND BENDING STRENGTH OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BEAMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    There is growing concern for corrosion damage in reinforced concrete structures with several decades' service. Pullout tests and beam tests were carried out to study the effect of reinforcement corrosion on the bond behavior and bending strength of reinforced concrete beams. The bond strength of plain bars and concrete initially increases with increasing corrosion, then declines. The turning point depends on the cracking of the concrete cover. The bond strength of deformed bars and concrete increases with corrosion up to a certain amount, but with progressive increase in corrosion, the bond strength decreases, and the cracking of the concrete cover seems to have no effect on the bond strength. On the basis of test data, the bond strength coefficient recommended here, which, together with the bond strength of uncorroded steel bars and concrete, can be used to easily calculate the bond strength of corroded steel bars and concrete. The bond strength coefficient proposed in this paper can be used to study the bond stress-slip relationship of corroded steel bars and concrete. The bending strength of corroded reinforced concrete beams declines with increasing reinforcement corrosion. Decreased bending strength of corroded RC beam is due to reduction in steel bar cross section, reduction of yield strength of steel bar, and reduction of bond capacity between steel bar and concrete.

  16. Shear bond strength of two bonding systems on dentin surfaces prepared with Er:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the shear bond strength of two bonding dentin systems, one 'one step' (Single Bond - 3M) and one 'self-etching' (Prompt-L-ESPE), when applied on dentin surfaces prepared with Er:YAG laser (2,94μm) that underwent ar not, acid etched. Forty one human molars just extracted were selected and after the cut with diamond disc and included in acrylic resin, resulting in 81 specimens (hemi crowns). After, the specimens were divided in one group treated with sand paper and another two groups treated with Er:YAG laser with 200 mJ and 250 mJ of energy and 2 Hz of frequency. Next, the prepared surfaces received three treatments with following application: 1) acid + Single Bond + Z 250 resin, 2) prompt-L-Pop + Z 250 resin, and 3) acid without, Single Bond + Z 250 resin. The Z 250 resin was applied and photopolymerized in increments on a Teflon matrix that belonged to an apparatus called 'Assembly Apparatus' machine producing cylinders of 3,5 mm of diameter and 5 mm of height. After these specimens were submitted to thermo cycling during 1 minute the 55 deg C and during 1 minute with 5 deg C with a total of 500 cycles for specimen, and the measures of shear bond strength were abstained using EMIC model DL 2000 rehearsed machine, with speed of 0,5 mm/min, measuring the final rupture tension (Mpa). The results showed an statistic superiority of 5% of probability level in dentin flattened with sandpaper and with laser using 200 mJ of energy with aspect to the ones flattened with laser using 250 mJ of energy. It was observed that using 'Single Bond' bonding dentin system the marks were statistically superior at 5% of probability with reference to the use of the Prompt-L-Pop adhesive system. So, it was concluded that Er:YAG Laser with 200 mJ of energy produced similar dentin cavity prepare than sandpaper and Single Bond seemed the best bonding agent system between restorative material and dentin. (author)

  17. SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF BRACKETS BONDED TO PORCELAIN SURFACE: IN VITRO STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Fidan Alakuş Sabuncuoğlu; Ergül Ertürk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the effects of different porcelain surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength (SBS) and fracture mode of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: Seventy feldspathic porcelain disk samples mounted in acrylic resin blocks were divided into seven groups (n=10) according to type of surface treatment: I, Diamond bur; II, Orthosphoric acid (OPA); III, hydrofluoric acid (HFA); IV, sandblasted with aluminum oxide (SB); V, SB+HFA; VI, Neodymiu...

  18. Effects of recycling and bonding agent application on bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Bahnasi, Faisal-Ismail; Abd-Rahman, Aida-Nur-Ashikin; Abu-Hassan, Mohamed-Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: 1) to assess different methods of recycling orthodontic brackets, 2) to evaluate Shear Bond Strength (SBS) of (a) new, (b) recycled and (c) repeated recycled stainless steel brackets (i) with and (ii) without bracket base primer. Study Design: A total of 180 extracted human premolar teeth and 180 premolar stainless steel brackets were used. One hundred teeth and 100 brackets were divided into five groups of 20-teeth each. Four methods of recycling orthodontic brackets were used in...

  19. A comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sudhir; Tandon, Pradeep; Nagar, Amit; Singh, Gyan P; Singh, Alka; Chugh, Vinay K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of stainless steel (SS) orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives. Materials and Methods: Eighty newly extracted premolars were bonded to 0.022 SS brackets (Ormco, Scafati, Italy) and equally divided into four groups based on adhesive used: (1) Rely-a-Bond (self-cure adhesive, Reliance Orthodontic Product, Inc., Illinois, USA), (2) Transbond XT (light-cure adhesive, 3M Unitek, CA, USA), (3) Transbond Plus (sixth generation self-etch primer, 3M Unitek, CA, USA) with Transbond XT (4) Xeno V (seventh generation self-etch primer, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) with Xeno Ortho (light-cure adhesive, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) adhesive. Brackets were debonded with a universal testing machine (Model No. 3382 Instron Corp., Canton, Mass, USA). The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was recordedIn addition, the conditioned enamel surfaces were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: Transbond XT (15.49 MPa) attained the highest bond strength. Self-etching adhesives (Xeno V, 13.51 MPa; Transbond Plus, 11.57 MPa) showed clinically acceptable SBS values and almost clean enamel surface after debonding. The analysis of variance (F = 11.85, P < 0.0001) and Chi-square (χ2 = 18.16, P < 0.05) tests revealed significant differences among groups. The ARI score of 3 (i.e., All adhesives left on the tooth) to be the most prevalent in Transbond XT (40%), followed by Rely-a-Bond (30%), Transbond Plus with Transbond XT (15%), and Xeno V with Xeno Ortho (10%). Under SEM, enamel surfaces after debonding of the brackets appeared porous when an acid-etching process was performed on the surfaces of Rely-a-Bond and Transbond XT, whereas with self-etching primers enamel presented smooth and almost clean surfaces (Transbond Plus and Xeno V group). Conclusion: All adhesives yielded SBS values higher than the recommended bond strength (5.9-7–8 MPa), Seventh generation

  20. Shear bond strength of seventh generation bonding agents on dentin of primary teeth--an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Geoffrey; Rich, Alfred P; Finkelman, Matthew D; Defuria, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    This controlled, randomized, in vitro study evaluated the shear bond strength of several seventh generation bonding agents on the dentin of primary teeth. Six different adhesives were used: Xeno IV, Clearfil S3 Bond, Adper Prompt-L-Pop, AdheSE One, Bond Force, and Optibond (control). Ninety primary teeth were prepared by wet grinding with a 320-grit silicon carbide paper on a polishing wheel running at 110 RPM. After 24 hours of storage in water, shear bond strengths of each group were determined. The mean shear bond strength of the tested adhesive systems to primary dentin was 12.27 MPa. One-way ANOVA testing showed a statistically significant difference between adhesive products (P < 0.001). Tukey HSD post hoc tests were used to assess which means were significantly different from one another. There was no statistically significant difference between the fifth generation adhesive system (Optibond) and the two seventh generation systems (Xeno IV and Bond Force), with Optibond exhibiting a lower mean shear bond strength compared to Bond Force. Within the limitations of this study, there is a significant difference between seventh generation bonding materials. Bond Force and Optibond appear to exhibit higher shear bond strengths than the other products. PMID:22313979

  1. Bond Strength of 5(th, 6(th and 7(th Generation Bonding Agents to Intracanal Dentin of Primary Teeth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Afshar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This in-vitro study sought to assess the push-out bond strength of a total etch and 2 self-etch bonding systems to intracanal dentin of primary anterior teeth (PAT.Thirty-six primary anterior teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups of 5(th generation (Single Bond 2, 6(th generation (Clearfil SE and 7(th generation (Single Bond Universal bonding agents. The canal orifice was restored with composite resin and the push-out test was carried out to assess the bond strength. After applying the push-out load, specimens were evaluated under a light microscope at 40X magnification. One-way ANOVA and log-rank test on Kaplan-Meier curves were applied for the comparison of bond strength among the 3 groups.The mean± standard deviation (SD bond strength was 13.6±5.33 MPa for Single Bond 2, 13.85±5.86 MPa for Clearfil SE and 12.28±5.24 MPa for Single Bond Universal. The differences in bond strength among the 3 groups were not statistically significant (P>0.05.All three bonding agents are recommended for use with composite posts in PAT. However, due to high technical sensitivity of the Total Etch system, single or two-step self etch systems may be preferred for uncooperative children.

  2. Effect of Sandblasting on Shear Bond Strength Composite Resin Veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octarina Octarina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Attachment between restoration and enamel surface in indirect resin composite veneer restoration (IRCV is obtained using multi-step (MS resin cement. Recently, a one step self-adhesive dual-cured resin cement (SADRC was introduced. Objective: To determine the effect of sandblasting on shear bond strength (SBS of IRCV to enamel using MS resin cement and SADRC. Methods: Forty specimens of buccal surface of enamel human were light-cured in Solidilite chamber and were divided into two groups: IRCV without sandblasting (n=20 and with sandblasting for 10 seconds (n=20 and then bonded to enamel using MS (n=10 and SADRC (n=10, respectively. After 24h SBS of specimens were tested using a Universal Testing Machine. Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA. Results: The average SBS value of IRCV without SB and bonded with MS was 18.95+7.80MPa and MS with SB was 19.30+ SB (4.85+2.12MPa and SADRC with SB (9.57+3.45MPa(p<0.05. Conclusion: increased SBS VIRK to enamel using MS resin cement than SADRC.  

  3. Microleakage and shear bond strength of orthodontc brackets bonded to hypomineralized enamel following different surface preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabi, Mostafa; Mohamadipour, Hamideh; Moosavi, Horieh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the effects of several conditioning methods on shear bond strength (SBS) and microleakage of orthodontic brackets bonded to demineralized enamel. Study Design: One hundred premolars were selected and immersed in a cariogenic solution for 12 weeks. The teeth were randomly assigned into 5 groups. In groups 1 and 2, the teeth underwent acid etching for 30 and 120 seconds, respectively. In group 3, a combination of laser and acid etching was employed. A self-etch primer (SEP) was applied in group 4 and in group 5, the teeth were exposed to acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) for 4 minutes before etching. After bracket bonding, the teeth were immersed in methylen blue for 12 hours and then were mounted in acrylic resin. SBS was determined with an Instron Universal Testing Machine and the amount of microleakage under the brackets was assessed under a stereomicroscope. Results: The lowest SBS was related to the SEP group and the highest one was observed in the specimens prepared by APF+acid etching. There was a significant difference in SBS (p=0.009), but not in microleakage (p=0.971) of the study groups. The SBS of the specimens treated with SEP was significantly Lower than the other groups, which were not significantly different from each other. The SEP group displayed a higher frequency of bond failure at the enamel-adhesive interface. Conclusions: Enamel preparation with SEP provided the lowest SBS among the groups. All groups showed some degree of microleakage. There was no significant correlation between SBS and microleakage. Key words:Bond strength, microleakage, bonding, self-etch primer, Er:YAG laser. PMID:24790708

  4. Effect of ultrasonic power on wedge bonding strength and interface microstructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fu-liang; LI Jun-hui; HAN Lei; ZHONG Jue

    2007-01-01

    During the aluminum wire wedge bonding, the ultrasonic power and bonding strength were obtained. Based on those data, the relationship between ultrasonic power and bonding strength was studied. The results show that: 1) ultrasonic power is affected by ultrasonic power ratio and other uncontrolled factors such as asymmetric substrate quality, unstable restriction on the interface between wedge tool and aluminum wire; 2) when ultrasonic power is less than 1.0 W, increasing ultrasonic power leads to increasing bonding strength and decreasing failure bonding; on the contrary, when ultrasonic power is greater than 1.6 W, increasing power leads to decreasing bonding strength and increasing failure bonding; 3) only when ultrasonic power is between 1.0 W and 1.6 W, can stable and high yield bonding be reached. Finally, the microstructure of bonding interface was observed, and a ring-shaped bond pattern is founded in the center and friction scrape besides the ring area.

  5. Efficacy of microtensile versus microshear bond testing for evaluation of bond strength of dental adhesive systems to enamel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. El Zohairy; M.H. Saber; A.I. Abdalla; A.J. Feilzer

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of the microtensile bond test (μTBS) and the microshear bond test (μSBS) in ranking four dental adhesives according to bond strength to enamel and identify the modes of failure involved. Materials and methods Forty-four caries-free human mo

  6. Investigation of Bond Strength in Centrifugal Lining of Babbitt on Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diouf, Papa; Jones, Alan

    2010-03-01

    The quality of the bond between Babbitt metal and a cast iron substrate was evaluated for centrifugal casting and static casting using the Chalmers bond strength method and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of three different centrifugal casting parameters, the speed of revolution, the pouring rate, and the cooling rate, was investigated. The bond strength and the microstructure at the bond interface were predominantly affected by the cooling rate, with a fast cooling rate resulting in better properties. The speed of revolution and the pouring rate only had a small effect on the bond strength, with faster revolution and faster pouring rate resulting in slightly better bonds.

  7. Evaluation of micro-shear bond strength of resin modified glass-ionomer to composite resins using various bonding systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Kasraie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to compare the micro-shear bond strength between composite and resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI by different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 discs of RMGI with a diameter of 15 mm and a thickness of 2 mm were randomly divided into four groups (n = 4. Four cylinders of composite resin (z250 were bonded to the RMGI discs with Single Bond, Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond in Groups 1-3, respectively. The fourth group was the control. Samples were tested by a mechanical testing machine with a strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. Failure mode was assessed under a stereo-microscope. Results: The means of micro-shear bond strength values for Groups 1-4 were 14.45, 23.49, 16.23 and 5.46 MPa, respectively. Using a bonding agent significantly increased micro-shear bond strength (P = 0.0001. Conclusion: Micro-shear bond strength of RMGI to composite increased significantly with the use of adhesive resin. The bond strength of RMGI to composite resin could vary depending upon the type of adhesive system used.

  8. Improved bonding strength of bioactive cermet Cold Gas Spray coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardon, M; Concustell, A; Dosta, S; Cinca, N; Cano, I G; Guilemany, J M

    2014-12-01

    The fabrication of cermet biocompatible coatings by means Cold Gas Spray (CGS) provides prosthesis with outstanding mechanical properties and the required composition for enhancing the bioactivity of prosthetic materials. In this study, hydroxyapatite/Titanium coatings were deposited by means of CGS technology onto titanium alloy substrates with the aim of building-up well-bonded homogeneous coatings. Powders were blended in different percentages and sprayed; as long as the amount of hydroxyapatite in the feedstock increased, the quality of the coating was reduced. Besides, the relation between the particle size distribution of ceramic and metallic particles is of significant consideration. Plastic deformation of titanium particles at the impact eased the anchoring of hard hydroxyapatite particles present at the top surface of the coating, which assures the looked-for interaction with the cells. Coatings were immersed in Hank's solution for 1, 4 and 7 days; bonding strength value was above 60 MPa even after 7 days, which enhances common results of HAp coatings obtained by conventional thermal spray technologies. PMID:25491809

  9. The effects of three different desensitizing agents on the shear bond strength of composite resin bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorba, Yahya Orcun; Erdemir, Ali; Ercan, Ertugrul; Eldeniz, Ayce Unverdi; Kalaycioglu, Baris; Ulker, Mustafa

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of three desensitizing agents on the shear bond strengths of four different bonding agents used to bond composite resin to dentin. A total of 160 extracted human molars were sectioned parallel to the occlusal plane under water cooling, polished and randomly divided into 4 groups of 40. Each group was treated with a different desensitizing agent (Tooth Mousse, Ultra-EZ, Cervitec Plus), except for an untreated control group. Each group was then randomly subdivided into 4 groups of 10, and a different dentin bonding agent (XP Bond, AdheSE, Adper Prompt L-pop, GBond) was applied to each group in order to bond the specimens to a resin composite (Gradia Direct) built up using a plastic apparatus. A Universal Testing Machine was used to measure the shear bond strength of each specimen. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests. With the exception of the Control/AdheSE and Ultra-EZ/XP Bond groups, no statistically significant differences were found in the shear bond strength values of the groups tested. These findings suggest that the use of different desensitizing agents does not affect the shear bond strength of various adhesive systems used to bond resin composite to dentin. PMID:20416554

  10. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Nano-filled Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded with two types of nano-composites in comparison to a conventional orthodontic composite. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human first premolars were randomly divided into 3 groups each containing 20 teeth. In group I, a conventional orthodontic composite (Transbond XT was used to bond the brackets, while two nano-composites (Filtek TM Supreme XT and AELITE Aesthetic Enamel were used in groups II and III respectively. The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, thermocycled in distilled water and debonded with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was also evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Results: AELITE Aesthetic Enamel nano-composite revealed a SBS value of 8.44±2.09 MPa, which was higher than Transbond XT (6.91± 2.13 and Filtek TM Supreme XT (6.04± 2.01. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference between groups II and III (P 0.05. Evaluation of ARI showed that Transbond XT left fewer adhesive remains on teeth after debonding. Conclusion: Results of this study indicate that the aforementioned nano-composites can be successfully used for bonding orthodontic brackets.

  11. Effect of various surface treatment methods on repair bond strength of composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Jafari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: In some cases repair of composite resin restorations is preferable to replacement. Various surface treatment methods have been introduced to improve the weak bond strength between the new and old composite resins. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of various surface treatment methods on repair bond strength of composite resin restorations.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 56 composite resin specimens (Filtek Supreme were prepared and randomly divided into seven groups (one control group and six experimental groups. Then one of the surface treatment methods was used in the experimental groups as follows: group 1: diamond bur + phosphoric acid + bonding agent (Single Bond; group 2: diamond bur + phosphoric acid + silane + Single Bond; group 3: air abrasion (50-µm AL2O3 particles + phosphoric acid + Single Bond; group 4: air abrasion (50-µm AL2O3 particles + phosphoric acid + Silane + Single Bond; group 5: diamond bur + phosphoric acid + Clearfil Repair; group 6: diamond bur + phosphoric acid + Clearfil SE Bond. After bonding fresh composite resin, all the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24h prior to measuring shear bond strength using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α=0.05.Results: The highest bond strength values were recorded in groups 2 and 5, with no significant differences (p value = 0.064; the lowest bond strength was recorded in group 1. Clearfil SB exhibited better results than Single Bond (p value = 0.039 and Clearfil Repair Bond exhibited better results than Clearfil SB Bond (p value = 0.038.Conclusion: Surface treatment with diamond bur was more effective than air abrasion. Use of silane was affective in increasing bond strength. Clearfil Repair Bond had the best effect on repair bond strength of composite resins.Key words: Air abrasion, Bonding agent, Composite resins, Dental, Silane.

  12. Bonding strength of Al/Mg/Al alloy tri-metallic laminates fabricated by hot rolling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    X P Zhang; M J Tan; T H Yang; X J Xu; J T Wang

    2011-07-01

    One of major drawbacks of magnesium alloy is its low corrosion resistance, which can be improved by using an aluminized coating. In this paper, 7075 Al/Mg–12Gd–3Y–0.5Zr/7075 Al laminated composites were produced by a hot roll bonding method. The rolling temperature was determined based on the flow stresses of Mg–12Gd–3Y–0.5Zr magnesium alloy and 7075 Al alloy at elevated temperature. The bonding strength of the laminate composites and their mechanism were studied. The effects of the reduction ratio (single pass), the rolling temperature, and the subsequent annealing on the bonding strength were also investigated. It was observed that the bonding strength increased rapidly with the reduction ratio and slightly with the rolling temperature. The bonding strength increases with the annealing time until the annealing time reaches 2 h and then decreases. The mechanical bond plays a major role in the bonding strength.

  13. Tensile bond strength of hydroxyethyl methacrylate dentin bonding agent on dentin surface at various drying techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Ismiyatin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are several dentin surface drying techniques to provide a perfect resin penetration on dentin. There are two techniques which will be compared in this study. The first technique was by rubbing dentin surface gently using cotton pellet twice, this technique is called blot dry technique. The second technique is by air blowing dentin surface for one second and continued by rubbing dentin surface gently using moist cotton. Purpose: This experiment was aimed to examine the best dentin surface drying techniques after 37% phosphoric acid etching to obtain the optimum tensile bond strength between hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA and dentin surface. Method: Bovine teeth was prepared flat to obtain the dentin surface and than was etched using 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. After etching the dentin was cleaned using 20 cc plain water and dried with blot dry techniques (group I, or dried with air blow for one second (group II, or dried with air blow for one second, and continued with rubbing gently using moist cotton pellet (group III, and without any drying as control group (group IV. After these drying, the dentin surfaces were applied with resin dentin bonding agent and put into plunger facing the composite mould. The antagonist plunger was filled with composite resin. After 24 hours, therefore bond strength was measured using Autograph. Result: Data obtained was analyzed using One-Way ANOVA with 95% confidence level and continued with LSD test on p≤0.05. The result showed that the highest tensile bond strength was on group I, while the lowest on group IV. Group II and IV, III and IV, II and III did not show signigicant difference (p>0.05. Conclusion: Dentin surface drying techniques through gentle rubbing using cotton pellet twice (blot dry technique gave the greatest tensile bond strength.Latar belakang masalah: Tehnik pengeringan permukaan dentin agar resin dapat penetrasi dengan sempurna adalah dengan cara pengusapan secara

  14. Effect of water storage on resin-dentin bond strengths formed by different bonding approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins G

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of water storage on resin-dentin bond strengths [µTBS] using different adhesive bonding approaches. Materials and Methods: Flat superficial dentin surfaces of 24 extracted human third molars were exposed and polished to create a standardized smear layer. The teeth were randomly distributed into four different groups: Three-step etch-and-rinse (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE - SBMP, two-step etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond 2, 3 M ESPE - SB; two-step self-etch (AdheSE, Ivoclar/Vivadent - AD; and self-etch 1 step (Adper Prompt L-Pop, 3M ESPE - LP. Following the adhesive application (n = 6, resin composite was incrementally applied (Filtek™ Supreme XT - 3 M ESPE in order to obtain bonded sticks, with a cross-sectioned area of 0.81 mm 2 . The bonded sticks were randomly divided and assigned to be tested after one day [OD] (n 30 or six months [6 M] of water storage [6 M] (n = 30. Results: Two-way ANOVA and Tukey′s test showed that none of the adhesives showed degradation after 6 M. SB achieved the highest µTBS both in the [OD] (49.13 MPa and [6M] (40.27 MPa. Despite the highest values in both time evaluations, the µTBS of SB significantly reduced after 6M. LP showed the lowest µTBS in both periods of evaluation (18.35 and 18.34 MPa. Conclusions: Although a significant degradation was only observed for SB, this was the adhesive that showed the highest µTBS after 6 M of water storage.

  15. Bond strength of resin cements to noble and base metal alloys with different surface treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkhondeh Raeisosadat

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The bond strength of resin cements to metal alloys depends on the type of the metal, conditioning methods and the adhesive resins used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of resin cements to base and noble metal alloys after sand blasting or application of silano-pen.Cylinders of light cured Z 250 composite were cemented to "Degubond 4" (Au Pd and "Verabond" (Ni Cr alloys by either RelyX Unicem or Panavia F2, after sandblasting or treating the alloys with Silano-Pen. The shear bond strengths were evaluated. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t tests at a significance level of P<0.05.When the alloys were treated by Silano-Pen, RelyX Unicem showed a higher bond strength for Degubond 4 (P=0.021 and Verabond (P< 0.001. No significant difference was observed in the bond strength of Panavia F2 to the alloys after either of surface treatments, Degubond 4 (P=0.291 and Verabond (P=0.899. Panavia F2 showed a higher bond strength to sandblasted Verabond compared to RelyX Unicem (P=0.003. The bond strength of RelyX Unicem was significantly higher to Silano-Pen treated Verabond (P=0.011. The bond strength of the cements to sandblasted Degubond 4 showed no significant difference (P=0.59. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated Degubond 4 (P=0.035.The bond strength of resin cements to Verabond alloy was significantly higher than Degubond 4. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated alloys. Surface treatments of the alloys did not affect the bond strength of Panavia F2.

  16. Bond Lengths and Bond Strengths in Weak and Strong Chemisorption: N2, CO, and CO/H on Nickel Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Sayago, David I.; Hoeft, Jon T.; Polcik, Martin; Kittel, Martin; Toomes, Rachel L.; Robinson, J.; Woodruff, David Phillip; Pascal, Mathieu; Lamont, Christine L. A.; Nisbet, Gareth

    2003-01-01

    New chemical-state-specific scanned-energy mode photoelectron diffraction experiments and density functional theory calculations, applied to CO, CO/H, and N2 adsorption on Ni(100), show that chemisorption bond length changes associated with large changes in bond strength are small, but those associated with changes in bond order are much larger, and are similar to those found in molecular systems. Specifically, halving the bond strength of atop CO to Ni increases the Ni-C distance by 0.06 Å...

  17. Comparison of shear bond strength between unfilled resin to dry enamel and dentin bonding to moist and dry enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasini E.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The use of dentine bondings on enamel and dentin in total etch protocols has recently become popular. Unfilled resin is hydrophobic and dentin bonding is hydrophilic in nature. This chemical difference could be effective in enamel bonding process. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of unfilled resin to dry enamel and dentin bonding to dry and moist enamel. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, a total of 30 incisor teeth were used. The specimens were randomly assigned to three groups of 10. 37% phosphoric acid etchant was applied to the enamel surfaces in each group for 15 seconds, rinsed with water for 20 seconds and dried for 20 seconds with compressed air in groups one and two. After conditioning, group 1 received unfilled resin (Margin Bond, Colten and group 2 received dentin bonding (Single Bond, 3M and in group 3 after conditioning and rinsing with water, a layer of dentin bonding (Single Bond was applied on wet enamel. The enamel and dentin bonding were light cured for 20 seconds. A ring mold 3.5 mm in diameter and 2 mm height was placed over the specimens to receive the composite filling material (Z100, 3M. The composite was cured for 40 seconds. The specimens were thermocycled and shear bond strengths were determined using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. The findings were analyzed by ANOVA One-Way and Tukey HSD tests. Results: Shear bond strength of dentin bonding to dry enamel was significantly less than unfilled resin to dry enamel (P<0.05. There was no significant difference between the bond strength of dentin bonding to moist and dry enamel. In addition bond strength of dentin bonding to wet enamel was not significantly different from unfilled resin to dry enamel. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, it is suggested that enamel surface should remain slightly moist after etching before bonding with single bond but when using unfilled resin, the

  18. SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF BRACKETS BONDED TO PORCELAIN SURFACE: IN VITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidan Alakuş Sabuncuoğlu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the effects of different porcelain surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength (SBS and fracture mode of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: Seventy feldspathic porcelain disk samples mounted in acrylic resin blocks were divided into seven groups (n=10 according to type of surface treatment: I, Diamond bur; II, Orthosphoric acid (OPA; III, hydrofluoric acid (HFA; IV, sandblasted with aluminum oxide (SB; V, SB+HFA; VI, Neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG laser; VII, Erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG laser. Brackets were affixed to treated all-porcelain surfaces with a silane bonding agent and adhesive resin and subjected to SBS testing. Specimens were evaluated according to the adhesive remnant index (ARI, and failure modes were assessed quantitatively under a stereomicroscope and morphologically under a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance and the post-hoc Tukey test, with the significance level set at 0.05. Results: The highest SBS values were observed for Group V, with no significant difference between Groups V and III. SBS values for Group I were significantly lower than those of all other groups tested. The porcelain/resin interface was the most common site of failure in Group V (40% and Group III (30%, whereas other groups showed various types of bond failure, with no specific location pre-dominating, but with some of the adhesive left on the porcelain surfaces (ARI scores 2 or 3 in most cases. Conclusion: The current findings indicate that a diamond bur alone is unable to sufficiently etch porcelain surfaces for bracket bonding. Moreover, SB and HFA etching used in combination results in a significantly higher shear-bond strength than HFA or SB alone. Finally, laser etching with either an Nd:YAG or Er:YAG laser was found to be more effective and less time-consuming than both HFA acid and SB for the treatment of deglazed

  19. Effect of rebar cover and development length on bond and slip in high strength concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite behavior of reinforced concrete requires adequate bond between concrete and steel reinforcement that can transfer stresses between them. The bond strength is influenced by cover to the reinforcement and development length. Experimental investigation was carried out and twisted steel bars conforming to BS 4461 were used in high strength concrete to study bond strength characteristics. The post peak bond behavior was studied by using displacement controlled universal testing machine. The results of this experimentation confirmed that by increasing the cover/bar diameter ratio, bond strength increased and slip decreased for both small and large diameter twisted steel bars. This increased confinement reduced the uneven bond stress distribution along the development length. Stress concentration on the front key (concrete between two ribs) was reduced due to its continuity along the twisted steel bar. Hence it offered maximum possible resistance to bond failure and the bond strength increased. Similarly by increasing the development length, bond strength and corresponding slip both increased. Another fact visible from all figures and observed in all samples, is that as the first concrete key failed there was a sudden drop in bond strength due to the formation of longitudinal splitting cracks. These cracks are visible from the surface of the cylinder. Once a key is failed, failure propagated immediately. (author)

  20. Do the Microshear Test Variables Affect the Bond Strength Values?

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    Andrea M. Andrade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the effect of specimen preparation and testing protocols on the micro-shear bond strength (μSBS results. To evaluate whether variations in polyethylene rod use affect (μSBS. Human dentin disks were randomly distributed into six groups (: polyethylene tube (3 levels and adhesive system (2 levels. In Group 1, polyethylene tubes filled with polymerized composite were placed on adhesive covered surfaces. Tubes were removed 24 h after water storage, leaving the rods only. In Group 2, the same procedure was performed; however, tubes were kept in place during testing. In Group 3, composite rods without tubes were placed on adhesive covered dentin. In all groups, adhesives were photoactivated after positioning filled tubes/rods on adhesive covered surfaces. Specimens were tested under shear mode and the data subjected to a two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests. Groups 1 and 2 resulted in statistically similar mean μSBS (; however, a greater number of pretest failures were observed for Group 1. Higher μSBS values were detected for Group 3, irrespective of adhesive system used (. Removing the polyethylene tube before composite rod is placed on dentin affects μSBS values.

  1. Shear Bond Strengths and Morphological Evaluation of Filled and Unfilled Adhesive Interfaces to Enamel and Dentine

    OpenAIRE

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi; Mohammadhosein Fathi; Ebrahim Ataei; Niloufar Khodaeian; Navid Askari

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory study shear bond strengths of three filled and one unfilled adhesive systems to enamel and dentine were compared. Forty-eight extracted intact noncarious human mandibular molars were randomly assigned to two groups of 24 one for bonding to enamel and the other for bonding to dentine. Buccal and lingual surfaces of each tooth were randomly assigned for application of each one of filled (Prime & Bond NT (PBNT), Optibond Solo Plus (OBSP), and Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB)) and unfil...

  2. Teaching Chemical Bonding: A Resource Book for Senior Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Margaret

    This document presents an instructional strategy for teaching chemical bonding using parables and music. Games, student interactions, and worksheets are included in the lesson plans. Topics include metallic bonding, covalent bonding including molecular and network structure, and ionic bonding. (JRH)

  3. Addition of antibacterial agents to MMA-TBB dentin bonding systems--influence on tensile bond strength and antibacterial effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudou, Y; Obara, K; Kawashima, T; Kubota, M; Abe, S; Endo, T; Komatsu, M; Okuda, R

    2000-03-01

    To produce a bonding system which has both high bond strength and antibacterial properties, an antibacterial agent (vancomycin: VCM or metronidazol: MN) was added to the PMMA powder of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (CB). The influence of the addition of an antibacterial agent on tensile bond strength to dentin and the antibacterial effect were investigated in this study. Forty-seven freshly extracted bovine first or second incisors were used to measure the tensile bond strength to dentin. The bond strengths to bovine dentin were not significantly decreased by addition of VCM (1%, 2%, 5%), or MN (1%) to CB (p diffusion method, analyzing the appearance of the inhibition zone around a resin disk following anaerobic culturing. The resin disks containing VCM showed antibacterial effects on all of the strains examined; the widths of the inhibition zones were 4-15 mm. The resin disks containing MN showed antibacterial effects on three strains; the widths of the inhibition zones were 0-4 mm. It was thus possible to produce a bonding system with both antibacterial effect and high tensile bond strength by addition of VCM to PMMA powder. PMID:11219091

  4. Effect of Adhesive Type on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Two Ceramic Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Increased number of adult patients requesting orthodontic treatment result in bonding bracket to ceramic restorations more than before. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to two types of ceramic bases with conventional orthodontic bonding resin and a new nano-filled composite resin.Twenty four feldespathic porcelain and 24 lithium disilicate ceramic disks were fabricated. All of the samples were conditioned by sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid and silane. Maxillary incisor metal brackets were bonded to half of the disks in each group by conventional orthodontic bonding resin and the other half bonded with a nano-filled composite. The samples then were thermocycled for 2000 cycle between 5-55° C. Shear bond strength was measured and the mode of failure was examined. Randomly selected samples were also evaluated by SEM.The lowest bond strength value was found infeldespathic ceramic bonded by nano-filled composite (p<0.05. There was not any statistically significant difference between other groups regarding bond strength. The mode of failure in the all groups except group 1 was cohesive and porcelain damages were detected.Since less damages to feldspathic porcelain was observed when the nano-filled composite was used to bond brackets, the use of nano-filled composite resins can be suggested for bonding brackets to feldspathic porcelain restorations.

  5. Shear bond strength of precoated orthodontic brackets: an in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali H Hassan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ali H HassanDepartment of Preventive Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaObjective: To evaluate the shear bond strength of precoated orthodontic brackets bonded with self-etching primer relative to that of noncoated conventionally-bonded brackets at two different time intervals.Methods: Twenty-one subjects were selected for randomized split-mouth bonding of two types of brackets to the maxillary arch. Half of the teeth had precoated brackets bonded using selfetching adhesive, and the other half had regular brackets bonded using Transbond XT adhesive. Nitinol wires were tied to the upper arch and were left until the time of debonding. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: one debonded after one hour and the other debonded two weeks after the initial wire placement. The shear bond strength was directly recorded from the patients’ mouths using an in vivo debonding device.Results: There were no significant differences in shear bond strength between the precoated and conventional groups or within each group at different time intervals. There were significant differences between anterior and posterior teeth in both the precoated and conventional groups. Conclusion: Pre-coated brackets bonded with self-etching adhesive have the same bonding strength as the conventionally bonded brackets.Keywords: shear bond, bonding, orthodontics, precoated, brackets, self-etching adhesive

  6. Heuristic Reasoning in Chemistry: Making decisions about acid strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClary, LaKeisha; Talanquer, Vicente

    2011-07-01

    The characterization of students' reasoning strategies is of central importance in the development of instructional strategies that foster meaningful learning. In particular, the identification of shortcut reasoning procedures (heuristics) used by students to reduce cognitive load can help us devise strategies to facilitate the development of more analytical ways of thinking. The central goal of this qualitative study was thus to investigate heuristic reasoning as used by organic chemistry college students, focusing our attention on their ability to predict the relative acid strength of chemical compounds represented using explicit composition and structural features (i.e., structural formulas). Our results indicated that many study participants relied heavily on one or more of the following heuristics to make most of their decisions: reduction, representativeness, and lexicographic. Despite having visual access to reach structural information about the substances included in each ranking task, many students relied on isolated composition features to make their decisions. However, the specific characteristics of the tasks seemed to trigger heuristic reasoning in different ways. Although the use of heuristics allowed students to simplify some components of the ranking tasks and generate correct responses, it often led them astray. Very few study participants predicted the correct trends based on scientifically acceptable arguments. Our results suggest the need for instructional interventions that explicitly develop college chemistry students' abilities to monitor their thinking and evaluate the effectiveness of analytical versus heuristic reasoning strategies in different contexts.

  7. Effect of Bleaching and Thermocycling on Resin-Enamel Bond Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horieh Moosavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of bleaching and thermocycling on microshear bond strength of bonded resin composites to enamel. Enamel slices were prepared from ninety-six intact human premolars and resin composite cylinders were bonded by using Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z350 or Filtek silorane adhesive and resin composite. Each essential group was randomly subdivided to two subgroups: control and bleaching. In bleaching group, 35% hydrogen peroxide was applied on samples. Thermocycling procedure was conducted between 5°C and 55°C, for 3.000 cycles on the half of each subgroup specimen. Then microshear bond strength was tested. Methacrylate-based resin composite had higher bond strength than silorane-based one. The meyhacrylate-based group without bleaching along with thermocycling showed the most bond strength, while bleaching with 35% carbamide peroxide on silorane-based group without thermocycling showed the least microshear bond strength. Bleaching caused a significant degradation on shear bond strength of silorane-based resin composites that bonded using self-etch adhesive resin systems.

  8. Push-out bond strength of a fiber post system with two resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Mosharraf

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Under the conditions of this study, there was no significant difference between the mean push out bond strength of self-etching and the conventional resin cement systems. The coronal region of the root dentin showed a significantly higher bond strength than the apical region.

  9. Effect of physicochemical aging conditions on the composite-composite repair bond strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brendeke, Johannes; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the effect of different physicochemical aging methods and surface conditioning techniques on the repair bond strength of composite. It was hypothesized that the aging conditions would decrease the repair bond strength and surface conditioning methods would perform simil

  10. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive.

  11. New Research Center Will Free Chemistry from Earth's Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    A new research center combining the tools of chemistry and astronomy will use the unique laboratory of interstellar space to free the study of basic chemistry from the restrictive bonds of Earth. The Center for Chemistry of the Universe will allow scientists to explore new types of chemical reactions that occur under the extreme conditions of space. The center will combine laboratory experiments, theoretical studies, and radio-telescope observations to dramatically expand our understanding of the processes that build molecules that may "seed" young planets with the building blocks of life. Astrochemistry Graphic CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF The Center forges a unique research collaboration among leading scientists in the field of astrochemistry from the University of Arizona, The Ohio State University, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, and a group of chemists and physicists at the University of Virginia engaged in research to understand the fundamentals of chemical reactions. "We hope to answer some very basic questions, such as just how did the molecules that ultimately became us get their start?" said Brooks Pate, Professor of Chemistry at the University of Virginia (UVa) and leader of the team that will form the new center. The team received an initial grant of 1.5 million from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to form the center during the next two years. If the NSF then fully approves the initiative, the foundation will provide funding of 4 million per year for up to ten years. The new center will bring together laboratory researchers, theoreticians, and observers using radio telescopes of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). The group of chemists participating in the center have discovered more than half of the new interstellar molecules identified worldwide in the past 18 months. The NRAO

  12. In Vitro Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Nanocomposites to Dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellanki, Vinay Kumar; Shetty, Vikram K; Kushwah, Sudhanshu; Goyal, Geeta; Chandra, S.M. Sharath

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To compare the shear bond strength of nanocomposites to dentin using three different types of adhesive systems; and to test few specimens under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for analysing whether the bond failure is adhesive or cohesive. Materials and Methods: Sixty human premolar teeth were selected and were randomly grouped, with 20 specimens in each group: group 1 - fluoride releasing dentin bonding agent; group 2 - antibacterial containing dentin bonding agent; and group 3 - one step conventional self etch adhesive. Each group was treated with its respective bonding agents, composite resin build up was done, and shear bond strengths were tested using Instron Universal testing machine. Few of the specimens were tested under SEM. Results: The results were statistically analysed using One-way ANOVA and paired t-test. It was observed that group 3 has the highest shear bond strength followed by group 2, and then group 1. Adhesive failures and mixed failures were most frequent types of failures as seen under SEM. Conclusion: Addition of antimicrobial agent decreases the bond strength of dentin bonding agent and addition of fluoride further decreases the bond strength. From SEM results it can be concluded that the zone of failure could not be defined and also that the failure mode was independent of the dentin bonding agent used. PMID:25738077

  13. Effect of two different dentin desensitizers on shear bond strength of two different bonding agents to dentin: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekhar Bhatia

    2012-01-01

    Results: Statistically significant difference existed between the two bonding agents in the control groups (group 1 and 2, with Prime and Bond NT showing higher bond strength than Single Bond. No statistically significant difference existed between either control or pretreated with any desensitizer when either of the adhesive systems was used. Prime and Bond NT showed statistically higher bond strength value when teeth were pretreated with Sensodent-K™ (groups 5 and 6. No statistically significant difference in bond strength values were observed between the bonding agents when pretreated with Denshield™ desensitizer.

  14. Comparative in vitro study of the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with restorative and orthodontic resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Isber

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with different restorative systems and compare it with that afforded by an established orthodontic bonding system. Seventy human bicuspids were used, divided into five different groups with 14 teeth each. Whereas a specific orthodontic bonding resin (TransbondTM XT was used in the control group, the restorative systems Charisma, Tetric Ceram, TPH Spectrum and Z100 were used in the other four groups. Seven days after bonding the brackets to the samples, shear forces were applied under pressure in a universal testing machine. The data collected was evaluated using the ANOVA test and, when a difference was identified, the Tukey test was applied. A 5% level of significance was adopted. The mean results of the shear bond strength tests were as follows: Group 1 (Charisma, 14.98 MPa; Group 2 (Tetric Ceram, 15.16 MPa; Group 3 (TPH, 17.70 MPa; Group 4 (Z100, 13.91 MPa; and Group 5 or control group (TransbondTM XT, 17.15 MPa. No statistically significant difference was found among the groups. It was concluded that all tested resins have sufficient bond strength to be recommended for bonding orthodontic brackets.

  15. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Tooth Enamel After Treatment With Different Tooth Bleaching Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahid Dastjerdi, Elahe; Khaloo, Negar; Mojahedi, Seyed Masoud; Azarsina, Mohadese

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bleaching treatments decrease shear bond strength between orthodontic brackets and teeth; although definite results have not been reported in this regard. Objectives: This study determined the effects of different bleaching protocols on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to teeth. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was performed in Iran. Forty-eight extracted human premolars were randomly assigned into four groups. In the control group, no bleaching treatment was performed. In groups 2 - 4, the bleaching procedures were performed using carbamide peroxide 45%, carbamide peroxide 20% and diode laser, respectively. Two weeks later, brackets were bonded to teeth and thermocycled. The shear bond strengths of the brackets to the teeth were measured. Data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Dunnett post-hoc test. Results: Shear bond strength of the brackets to the teeth were 10.54 ± 1.51, 6.37 ± 0.92, 7.67 ± 1.01 and 7.49 ± 1.19 MPa, in groups 1 - 4, respectively. Significant differences were found between control group and all other groups (P laser significantly decreased shear bond strength of brackets to the teeth. 45% carbamide peroxide had a more significant effect on bond strength compared to 20% carbamide peroxide. The difference in bond strength was not significant between laser group and either carbamide peroxide groups. PMID:26734481

  16. Characterization of dentine to assess bond strength of dental composites

    OpenAIRE

    Saad Liaqat; Anas Aljabo; Muhammad Adnan Khan; Hesham Ben Nuba; Laurent Bozec; Paul Ashley; Anne Young

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to develop alternating dentine adhesion models that could help in the evaluation of a self-bonding dental composite. For this purpose dentine from human and ivory was characterized chemically and microscopically before and after acid etching using Raman and SEM. Mechanical properties of dentine were determined using 3 point bend test. Composite bonding to dentine, with and without use of acid pre-treatment and/or the adhesive, were assessed using a shear bond test. F...

  17. In Vivo and In Vitro Effects of Chlorhexidine Pretreatment on Immediate and Aged Dentin Bond Strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaydin, Z; Yazici, A R; Cehreli, Z C

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) pretreatment of dentin on the immediate and aged microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of different adhesives to dentin in vivo and in vitro. Class I cavities were prepared in 80 caries-free human third molars of 40 patients in a split-mouth fashion. In each tooth pair, one tooth received 2% CHX pretreatment after which both teeth were randomly assigned to one of the following groups with respect to the type of adhesive system applied: Adper Single Bond 2 (etch-and-rinse), Clearfil SE Bond (two-step self-etch), Clearfil S(3) Bond (one-step self-etch), and Adper Prompt-L-Pop (all-in-one self-etch). The teeth were restored with resin composite and extracted for μTBS testing either immediately or after six months in function. In vitro specimen pairs were prepared as with the clinical protocol in intact, freshly extracted human molars, and thereafter, subjected to testing immediately or after 5000× thermocycling. Data were analyzed with four-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Bonferroni test was utilized for pair-wise comparisons. The immediate bond strength values were significantly higher than "aged" ones for all tested adhesives (p=0.00). The in vitro immediate bond strength values were statistically higher than in vivo bond strength values (p0.05). In the absence of CHX pretreatment, all adhesives showed significantly higher immediate bond strength values than CHX-treated groups, while all "aged", non-pretreated adhesives exhibited significantly lower bond strength values (both pchlorhexidine pretreatment resulted in significantly higher aged bond strengths, regardless of the adhesive system and testing condition. Aging-associated decline in dentin bond strength of etch-and rinse and self-etch adhesives can be counteracted by chlorhexidine application. PMID:26919083

  18. Bonding and Structure. Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). Unit S4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inner London Education Authority (England).

    This unit on chemical bonding is one of 10 first year units produced by the Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). The unit, which consists of two levels, provides an introduction to the main types of chemical bonding and important aspects of structure. The main emphasis is placed on such topics as ionic and covalent bonding,…

  19. Bond strength of short lap splices in RC beams confined with steel stirrups or external CFRP

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, R.; Helal, Y.; Pilakoutas, K.; GUADAGNINI, M

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the bond behaviour of lapped steel bars using fifteen RC beams tested in flexure. Twelve of the beams were designed to fail by bond splitting at midspan, where the main flexural reinforcement was lapped 10 bar diameters. The parameters studied include the amount and type of confinement at midspan (no confinement, internal steel stirrups or externally bonded carbon FRP), concrete cover and bar size. The results show that the CFRP confinement enhanced the bond strength o...

  20. Effect of Adhesive Type on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Two Ceramic Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi; Farzaneh Aghajani; Javad Chalipa; Amir Hooman Sadrhaghighi

    2014-01-01

    Increased number of adult patients requesting orthodontic treatment result in bonding bracket to ceramic restorations more than before. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to two types of ceramic bases with conventional orthodontic bonding resin and a new nano-filled composite resin.Twenty four feldespathic porcelain and 24 lithium disilicate ceramic disks were fabricated. All of the samples were conditioned by sandblasting,...

  1. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to glass-ionomer cement using self-etching bonding agents with different pH: In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deivanayagam Kandaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the bonding ability of composite to unset glass-ionomer cement (GIC using different self-etching bonding systems. Materials and Methods: One hundred samples of composite bonded to unset GIC were prepared and were divided into four groups. In Group A, composite was bonded to unset GIC employing a strong (pH 1 self-etch primer was used. In Group B, intermediary strong (pH 1.4 self-etch primer was employed. In Group C and D, mild (pH 2 and (pH 2.2 self-etch primer was employed. Shear bond strength analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: Statistical analysis performed with one way analysis of variance and Tukey′s test showed that the bond strength of composite to unset GIC was significantly higher for the mild self-etch primer group. In addition, energy dispersive x-ray (EDX analysis was used to determine the composition of various structural phases identified by FE-SEM along the GIC-bonding agent interfaces. Conclusion: Hence this present study concludes that clinically the use of mild self-etching bonding agent over unset GIC has improved bond strength compared to the use of strong and intermediate self-etching bonding agent.

  2. Bond strength of a resin cement to dentin using the resin coating technique

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Batitucci dos Santos-Daroz; Marcelo Tavares de Oliveira; Mário Fernando de Góes; Toru Nikaido; Junji Tagami; Marcelo Giannini

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of a resin cement to dentin using different adhesive systems (AS) in the presence or absence of a low-viscosity composite liner (Protect Liner F - PLF) applied over the bonded dentin. The adhesive systems selected were: AdheSE/Vivadent (AD); Clearfil Protect Bond/Kuraray (CP); One-Up Bond F/Tokuyama (OU); Single Bond/3M ESPE (SB); Tyrian SPE/One-Step Plus/Bisco (TY); Xeno III/Dentsply (XE) and Unifil Bond/GC (UN). After removing the labi...

  3. Blood contamination effect on shear bond strength of an orthodontic hydrophilic resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taís de Morais Alves da Cunha

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of blood contamination on shear bond strength (SBS and bond failure pattern of metallic brackets bonded using a new hydrophilic resin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighty human premolars were randomly allocated into 4 groups (n=20 according to the bonding material and contamination pattern. GI: brackets bonded with the Transbond XT conventional system without contamination; GII: brackets bonded with the Transbond XT conventional system with blood contamination; GIII: brackets bonded with the Transbond Self Etching Primer and Transbond Plus Color without contamination; GIV: brackets bonded with the Transbond Self Etching Primer and Transbond Plus Color with blood contamination. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and then submitted to SBS test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. After bond failure, the enamel surfaces were observed under an optical microscope at 40x magnification. RESULTS: Blood contamination decreased (P<0.05 shear bond strength when both the hydrophobic (GII and the hydrophilic resin (GIV were used. However, the bond strength of Transbond Color Change group was significantly higher (P<0.05 than that of the Transbond XT conventional system group under blood contamination condition. Under dry conditions no difference was observed between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic resin groups. Regarding the bond failure pattern, when blood contaminated the enamel, the adhesive remnant index (ARI showed predominance of scores 0 and 1, which indicates low adhesion to enamel. CONCLUSIONS: Although there was a significant decrease in the shear bond strength for both adhesive systems under blood contamination, the hydrophilic system showed significantly higher bond strength than the hydrophobic resin adhesive. Therefore, it is advisable to use the hydrophilic resin under risk of blood contamination.

  4. Strength testing and SEM imaging of hydroxide-catalysis bonds between silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Veggel, A A; Scott, J; Skinner, D A; Cunningham, W; Hough, J; Martin, I; Murray, P; Reid, S; Rowan, S [Department of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA Institute for Gravitational Research, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Bezensek, B, E-mail: m.veggel@physics.gla.ac.u [Materials Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-07

    Silicon is under consideration as a substrate material for the mirror masses and quasi-monolithic suspension stages of 'third generation' gravitational wave detectors. Identifying a jointing technique to attach the silicon suspension elements to the optics with repeatable high strength and low mechanical loss is critical. Hydroxide-catalysis bonding is the method of choice for current quasi-monolithic silica suspensions. Here we present measurements of the shear strength of hydroxide-catalysis bonds between silicon samples. Strengths of approximately 3.9 N mm{sup -2} are found, comparable to strengths found for silica to silica bonds. Scanning electron microscope imaging shows that the bonds between two silicon parts with thermally grown SiO{sub 2} layers are wedged with bond thicknesses varying from 30 nm to several micrometres. We suggest a possible explanation for this observation.

  5. Microtensile bond strength of different adhesive systems in dentin irradiated with Er:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective this study was to evaluate in vitro the bond strength of two etch-and-rise and one self-etching adhesive system after dentin irradiation with Er:YAG (erbium: yttrium aluminum garnet) laser using microtensile test. The results revealed that the groups treated with laser Er:YAG presented less tensile bond strength, independently to the adhesive system used. The prompt L-pop adhesive presented less microtensile bond strength compared to the other adhesives evaluated. There was no difference between single bond and excite groups. The adhesive failures were predominant in all the experimental groups. The Er:YAG laser influenced negatively bond strength values of adhesive systems tested in dental substrate

  6. Influence of ceramic surface treatment on shear bond strength of ceramic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Fernandes Ramos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare four different surface treatment methods and determine which produces adequate bond strength between ceramic brackets and facets of porcelain (feldspathic, and evaluate the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI scores. Materials and Methods: Ten facets of porcelain specimens with glazed surfaces were used for each group. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following treatment conditions of the porcelain surface: (1 no surface treatment (control group, (2 fine diamond bur + orthophosphoric acid gel 37%, (3 hydrofluoric acid (HFL 10%, and (4 HFL 10% + silane. Ceramic brackets were bonded with the adhesive cement Transbond XT. The shear bond strength values were measured on a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: There was a significant difference (P<0.05 between the control group and all other groups. There was no significant difference (P<0.05 between treated porcelain surface with diamond bur + orthophosphoric acid gel 37% (4.8 MPa and HFL 10% (6.1 MPa, but the group treated with HFL 10% had clinically acceptable bond strength values. The group treated with HFL 10% + silane (17.5 MPa resulted in a statistically significant higher tensile bond strength (P<0.05. In group 4, 20% of the porcelain facets displayed damage. Conclusion: Etching of the surface with HFL increased the bond strength values. Silane application was recommended to bond a ceramic bracket to the porcelain surface in order to achieve bond strengths that are clinically acceptable.

  7. Comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded using two different hydrophilic primers: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kumaraswamy Anand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Salivary control and maintenance of a dry operating field is a prime requisite of orthodontic bonding. Moisture insensitive primer (MIP with a clinical significant bond strength values have a better edge over the conventional hydrophobic bonding systems. Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of two hydrophilic primers with respect to conventional hydrophobic primer by comparing their shear bond strength (SBS and adhesive-failure locations after contamination with saliva and saliva substitute. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 extracted human premolars were randomly divided into five group s ; Group A (Transbond MIP/saliva substitute, Group B (Opal Primo/saliva substitute, Group C (Transbond MIP/natural saliva, Group D (Opal Primo/natural saliva, control group - Group E (Transbond XT/dry, adhesive-Transbond XT used for all five groups and bonded using stainless steel brackets. Shear forces were applied to the samples with a universal testing machine. SBSs was measured in megapascals. The mode of bond failure was determined using the adhesive remnant index (ARI. Results: The mean SBS produced by Transbond MIP was higher than Opal Primo, which was statistically significant according to one-way analysis of variance. Both the tested groups showed lesser bond strength values than Transbond XT (the control. ARI scores revealed that there was no statistically significant difference in the site of bond failure between study groups. ARI scores were found to be lower for study groups suggesting adhesive failure, compared to higher ARI scores for the control group suggesting cohesive failure. Conclusion: Transbond XT adhesive with Transbond MIP or Opal Primo have clinically acceptable bond strength in wet fields. Opal Primo is a viable option to use as a hydrophilic primer clinically.

  8. Shear Bond Strength of Composite-Resin to Porcelain: Effect of Thermocycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khoroushi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Different ceramic repair systems have been reported for fractured ceramics.However, limited information is available concerning the bond strength of these systems especially after thermocycling. The aim of this in-vitro study was to determinethe effect of thermocycling on the shear bond strength of composite-resin to feldspathic porcelain with and without silane pretreatment.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, forty porcelain blocks were prepared and randomly divided into four groups (n=10. All porcelain surfaces were etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid, rinsed and air dried. In groups 1 and 3, silane pretreatment was applied using Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus (ASMP.Smallparticlecomposite-resin was subsequently added on the ceramic surfaces, and lightcured.Specimens of groups 3 and 4 then subjected to 1000 thermal cycles. Shear bond strength was determined on a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Two-way ANOVA test (α=0.05 was used to analyze the bond strength.Results: There were statistically significant differences between study groups (P<0.05.Thermocycling caused a decrease in the shear bond strength for both silanized and nonsilanized groups.Conclusion: According to the results of this study, shear bond strength after thermocycling reduced considerably in ASMP system. In addition, silane treatment of porcelain was critical for achieving durable bond strength between composite-resin and porcelain.

  9. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen profiles on the bond strength of repaired composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossa, Hossam; ElKhatat, Essam; Hassan, Ahmed M.; Baroudi, Kusai; Beshr, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to evaluate the bond strength of repaired three types of composite resins under various hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) profiles with various session numbers. Materials and Methods: Sixty specimens of three types of composite resin (nanofilled composite, nanohybrid composite and microfilled composite) each type of composite was divided into four group according to various profiles of HBO treatment (control, 2bar, 3 bar and 5 bar). Then, the specimens were repaired; thermocycled, the tensile bond strength were measured. Then the data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05). Results: The highest bond strength was obtained for the repaired nanofilled composite resin specimens while; the lowest bond strength was obtained for the repaired microfilled composite resin specimens. The highest tensile bond strength was recorded for the specimens who treated with the highest pressure of HBO. Conclusion: The bond strength of repaired nanofilled composite resins is better than the other types of composite resin. The highest pressure of HBO, the highest bond strength of repaired composite resins. PMID:27195232

  10. Push-out bond strength of bioceramic materials in a synthetic tissue fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noushin Shokouhinejad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the push-out bond strength of EndoSequence Root Repair Material (ERRM and Bioaggregate (BA, new bioceramic materials, to that of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA after incubation in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, a synthetic tissue fluid, for either 1 week or 2 months.One-hundred and twenty root sections were filled with ProRoot MTA, BA, or ERRM. Each tested material was then randomly divided into two subgroups (n = 20: root sections were immersed in PBS for 1 week or 2 months. The bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. After that, the failure modes were examined with stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The push-out data and failure mode categories were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and chi-square tests, respectively.The bond strength of ERRM was significantly higher than that of BA and MTA at both incubation periods. No significant difference was found between the bond strength of MTA and BA at either 1 week or 2 months. Increasing the incubation time to 2 months resulted in a significant increase in bond strength of all the materials. The failure mode was mainly mixed for MTA and BA, but cohesive for ERRM at both incubation periods.ERRM had significantly higher bond strength to root canal walls compared to MTA and BA. Increasing the incubation time significantly improved the bond strength and bioactive reaction products of all materials.

  11. The effect of dentin primer on the shear bond strength between composite resin and enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Ambrose, E R; Louie, P W; Shinkewski, D J

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of accidental dentin primer contact with etched enamel on shear bond strength of composite resin to enamel. Four dentin bonding systems were included in this study: GLUMA Dentin Bond, Scotchbond, and Prisma Universal Bond 2 and 3. Eighty extracted human permanent anterior teeth were used and divided in eight test groups. The vestibular surfaces were ground and acid etched. For each dentin bonding system 10 samples were treated with dentin primer prior to placement of resin. Shear bond testing showed that enamel contact with dentin primer in the above two systems decreased the shear bond strength between composite and enamel by 31 to 44%. PMID:8337183

  12. Effect of silica coating on bond strength between a gold alloy and metal bracket bonded with chemically cured resin

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Min-Ju; Gang, Sung-Nam; Lim, Sung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal brackets bonded directly to gold alloy with chemically cured resin. Methods Two hundred ten type III gold alloy specimens were randomly divided into six groups according to the combination of three different surface conditioning methods (aluminum oxide sandblasting only, application of a metal primer after aluminum oxide sandblasting, silica...

  13. The effect of elapsed time following bleaching on enamel bond strength of resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, V; Reis, A F; Giannini, M; Ambrosano, G M

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies have concluded that carbamide peroxide bleaching agents significantly affect the bond strength of composite to bleached enamel. This study evaluated the effects of bleaching regimen with different carbamide peroxide concentrations and post-treatment times on composite bond strength to enamel. Two hundred and four flat buccal and lingual enamel surfaces obtained from erupted sound third molars were randomly divided into 17 groups (n = 12). Sixteen experimental groups comprised the evaluation of four carbamide peroxide home bleaching agents (Opalescence 10%-20% and Whiteness 10%-16%) and four time intervals after bleaching (one day, one, two and three weeks). Specimens of control group were not submitted to bleaching and were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C for 10 days. The specimens of experimental groups were exposed to one daily application of carbamide peroxide for six hours for 10 consecutive days. After each daily treatment and post-bleaching, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva solution. Bonds were formed with Scotchbond MP and Z-100 composite resin, and shear bond test was carried out 24 hours after adhesive-composite application. Two-way ANOVA showed that the bond strengths were significantly different (p < 0.05). For the first two weeks post-bleaching, the bond strengths of resin to enamel were low. After a lapse of three weeks, the bond strength returned to that of the untreated control group. Increased concentration did not prolong the time needed prior to bonding. PMID:11699184

  14. Comparison of bond behavior of hot rolled and cold twisted steel reinforcement in high strength concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient bond performance ensures the composite action of reinforced concrete. Hot rolled deformed and cold twisted steel bars are used in Pakistan as reinforcement. Experimental investigation was carried out using twisted steel bars as per BS-4461 and hot rolled deformed steel bars according to ASTMA 615 in high strength concrete. The post peak bond behavior was studied by using strain controlled universal testing machine. The results of this experiment show that by using cold twisted steel bars bond strength and corresponding slip increased. In hot rolled deformed steel bars, concrete key circles around the steel bar like an independent ring subjected to hoop stresses. During the twisting operation to manufacture cold twisted bars, pattern of ribs was changed and they spiraled around the central core. A continuous concrete key was formed, that is considered as skewed for bond action. Stress concentration in the initial part of the helical key was reduced and the stresses were distributed over a longer length as compared with front key in case of hot rolled deformed steel bar. Hence it offered maximum possible resistance to bond failure and the bond strength increased. In high strength concrete stress concentration on the loaded end may cause longitudinal splitting cracks that lead to premature bond failure. Another fact observed in all samples of hot rolled deformed and cold twisted steel bars is that as the first longitudinal splitting crack forms there is a sudden drop in bond strength. These cracks were visible even from the surface of the specimen. (author)

  15. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Barros Cruz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days. Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250. Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×. Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05. Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001. For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  16. Comparison of the Tensile Bond Strength of Four Root Canal Sealers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khedmat

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of problem: The bond strength of root canal sealers to gutta-percha seems to be an important property for maintaining the integrity of the apical seal which can result in reducing apical microleakage.Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to compare the tensile bond strengths of four types of root canal sealers to gutta–percha. This study measured the maximum forces needed to disengage the bond between gutta–percha and these sealers.Materials and Methods: in order to prepare the specimens, 40 blocks of unprepared gutta-percha (20× 10× 3mm was used. Aluminum cylinders, 6 mm in diameter, were stabilized on the gutta–percha with small amounts of wax and were filled with one of the sealers. After setting each sealer, the drops of wax were removed and the tensile bond strengths of all the samples were measured using universal testing machine.Collected data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey tests.Results: The highest bond strength was observed in the Diaket. It was followed by AH26 and Apexit. Dorifill had the least bond strength between the four groups. Thetensile bond strength of Diaket and AH26 to gutta-percha were significantly higher than Dorifill and Apexit.Conclusion: Th According to the findings of the present study it can be concluded that the use of Diaket and AH26 for root canal therapy may produce better results in endodontic treatments.

  17. Bond strength comparison of color-change adhesives for orthodontic bonding using a self-etching primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey GN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Sara Ekhlassi, Jeryl D English, Joe C Ontiveros, John M Powers, Harry I Bussa, Gary N Frey, Clark D Colville, Randy K EllisHouston Department of Orthodontics, The University of Texas Dental Branch, Houston, TX, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two color-change adhesives with a commonly used conventional light-cure adhesive while using a self-etching primer, and to compare any changes in shear bond strengths over time.Methods: One hundred and eighty extracted bovine incisors were randomly divided into nine groups of 20 teeth each. The teeth were prepared with a self-etching primer (Transbond™ Plus Metal lower incisor brackets were bonded directly to each tooth with two different color-change adhesives (TransbondPlus and Grengloo™ and a control (Transbond XT. The teeth were debonded at three different time points (15 minutes, 24 hours, 1 week using an Instron at 1.0 mm/min. The teeth that were to be debonded at 24 hours and 1 week were stored in distilled water at 37°C to simulate the oral environment. The data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and with Fisher's protected least-significant difference multiple comparisons test at the P < 0.05 level of significance. Adhesive remnant index (ARI scores were calculated for each debonded tooth.Results: Transbond Plus at 1 week had the highest mean shear bond strength (14.7 mPa. Grengloo tested at 24 hours had the lowest mean shear bond strength (11.3 mPa. The mean shear bond strengths for the remaining seven groups had a range of 12–14.5 mPa. Grengloo had >80% samples presenting with an ARI score of 1 at all times. Interestingly, both Transbond groups had ARI scores of 3 in more than 50% of their samples.Conclusion: Time had no significant effect on the mean shear bond strength of Transbond XT, Grengloo, or Transbond Plus adhesive.Keywords: bond strength, color-change adhesives, self-etching primer, orthodontic bonding 

  18. Effect of Nanofiller Addition to an Experimental Dentin Adhesive on Microtensile Bond Strength to Human Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH. Kasraei

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the influence of adding nanofiller particles to a dentin bonding agent on resin-dentin bond strength.Materials and Methods: Fifty-four human intact premolar teeth were divided in to 6 groups of nine. The teeth were ground on occlusal surfaces and polished with 320 and then 600 grit silicon carbide papers. An experimental bonding system based on acetone/alcoholsolvent was provided with filler contents of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 weight percent fumed silica nanofiller. After dentin surface etching, rinsing and blot drying, the experimentalbonding agents were applied to dentin surface. A composite resin was, then,bonded to the dentin on the bonding agent. The specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles and sectioned in stick form. After two week of storage in distilled water, resin-dentin microtensile bond strength of the specimens was measured. Data were analyzed by one way ANOVA and DunnettT3 tests.Results: Bond strength to dentin was significantly affected by the filler level. Minimum and maximum resin-microtensile bond strength was in the experimental bonding agent with no filler (5.88 MPa and with filler level of 1.0 weight percent (15.15 MPa, respectively,and decreased with the increase of filler content down to 8.95 MPa for the filler level of 10.0 weight percent.Conclusion: Filler content seems to be one of the important factors influencing the bond strength of dental adhesives. Maximum dentin bond strength was obtained with 1% silanized nanofiller silica added to experimental adhesive system.

  19. Bond strength comparison of color-change adhesives for orthodontic bonding using a self-etching primer

    OpenAIRE

    Frey GN; Bussa HI; Powers JM; Ontiveros JC; English JD; Ekhlassi S; Colville CD; Ellis RK

    2011-01-01

    Sara Ekhlassi, Jeryl D English, Joe C Ontiveros, John M Powers, Harry I Bussa, Gary N Frey, Clark D Colville, Randy K EllisHouston Department of Orthodontics, The University of Texas Dental Branch, Houston, TX, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two color-change adhesives with a commonly used conventional light-cure adhesive while using a self-etching primer, and to compare any changes in shear bond strengths over time.Methods: One hundred and ...

  20. Undergraduate chemistry students' conceptions of atomic structure, molecular structure and chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Erin Roberts

    The process of chemical education should facilitate students' construction of meaningful conceptual structures about the concepts and processes of chemistry. It is evident, however, that students at all levels possess concepts that are inconsistent with currently accepted scientific views. The purpose of this study was to examine undergraduate chemistry students' conceptions of atomic structure, chemical bonding and molecular structure. A diagnostic instrument to evaluate students' conceptions of atomic and molecular structure was developed by the researcher. The instrument incorporated multiple-choice items and reasoned explanations based upon relevant literature and a categorical summarization of student responses (Treagust, 1988, 1995). A covalent bonding and molecular structure diagnostic instrument developed by Peterson and Treagust (1989) was also employed. The ex post facto portion of the study examined the conceptual understanding of undergraduate chemistry students using descriptive statistics to summarize the results obtained from the diagnostic instruments. In addition to the descriptive portion of the study, a total score for each student was calculated based on the combination of correct and incorrect choices made for each item. A comparison of scores obtained on the diagnostic instruments by the upper and lower classes of undergraduate students was made using a t-Test. This study also examined an axiomatic assumption that an understanding of atomic structure is important in understanding bonding and molecular structure. A Pearson Correlation Coefficient, ṟ, was calculated to provide a measure of the strength of this association. Additionally, this study gathered information regarding expectations of undergraduate chemistry students' understanding held by the chemical community. Two questionnaires were developed with items based upon the propositional knowledge statements used in the development of the diagnostic instruments. Subgroups of items from

  1. Effects of surface treatment of provisional crowns on the shear bond strength of brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Xavier de Almeida

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the adhesive resistance of metallic brackets bonded to temporary crowns made of acrylic resin after different surface treatments. METHODS: 180 specimens were made of Duralay and randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 30 according to surface treatment and bonding material: G1 - surface roughening with Soflex and bonding with Duralay; G2 - roughening with aluminum oxide blasting and bonding with Duralay; G3 - application of monomer and bonding with Duralay; G4 - roughening with Soflex and bonding with Transbond XT; G5 - roughening with aluminum oxide blasting and bonding with Transbond XT and G6: application of monomer and bonding with Transbond. The results were statistically assessed by ANOVA/Games-Howell. RESULTS: The means (MPa were: G1= 18.04, G2= 22.64, G3= 22.4, G4= 9.71, G5= 11.23, G6= 9.67. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI ranged between 2 and 3 on G1, G2 and G3 whereas in G4, G5 and G6 it ranged from 0 to 1, showing that only the material affects the pattern of adhesive flaw. CONCLUSION: The surface treatment and the material influenced adhesive resistance of brackets bonded to temporary crowns. Roughening by aluminum blasting increased bond strength when compared to Soflex, in the group bonded with Duralay. The bond strength of Duralay acrylic resin was superior to that of Transbond XT composite resin.

  2. Microtensile dentin bond strength of fifth with five seventh-generation dentin bonding agents after thermocycling: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Bruhvi Poptani; K S Gohil; Jaishree Ganjiwale; Manisha Shukla

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this in vitro study was to compare the microtensile dentin bond strength (μTBS) of five seventh-generation dentin bonding agents (DBA) with fifth-generation DBA before and after thermocycling. Materials and Methods: Ten extracted teeth were assigned to fifth generation control group (optibond solo) and each of the five experimental groups namely, Group I (G-Bond) ,Group II (S 3 Clearfil), Group III (One Coat 7.0), Group IV (Xeno V), and Group V (Optibond all in on...

  3. Bonding of self-adhesive resin cements to enamel using different surface treatments: bond strength and etching pattern evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-08-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strengths and etching patterns of seven self-adhesive resin cements to human enamel specimens which were subjected to one of the following surface treatments: (1) Polishing with #600 polishing paper; (2) Phosphoric acid; (3) G-Bond one-step adhesive; or (4) Phosphoric acid and G-Bond. After surface treatment, the human incisor specimens were bonded to a resin composite using a self-adhesive resin cement [Maxcem (MA), RelyX Unicem (UN), Breeze (BR), BisCem (BI), seT (SE), Clearfil SA Luting (CL)] or a conventional resin cement [ResiCem (RE)]. Representative morphology formed with self-adhesive resin cements showed areas of etched enamel intermingled with areas of featureless enamel. In conclusion, etching efficacy influenced the bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive resin cements to unground enamel, and that a combined use of phosphoric acid and G-Bond for pretreatment of human enamel surfaces improved the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements. PMID:20668359

  4. The strength of side chain hydrogen bonds in the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova, Kalina; Sarabipour, Sarvenaz

    2013-03-01

    There are no direct quantitative measurements of hydrogen bond strengths in membrane proteins residing in their native cellular environment. To address this knowledge gap, here we use fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to measure the impact of hydrogen bonds on the stability of a membrane protein dimer in vesicles derived from eukaryotic plasma membranes, and we compare these results to previous measurements of hydrogen bond strengths in model lipid bilayers. We demonstrate that FRET measurements of membrane protein interactions in plasma membrane vesicles have the requisite sensitivity to quantify the strength of hydrogen bonds. We find that the hydrogen bond-mediated stabilization in the plasma membrane is small, only -0.7 kcal/mole. It is the same as in model lipid bilayers, despite the different nature and dielectric properties of the two environments.

  5. The effect of pretreatment with fluoride on the tensile strength of orthodontic bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White spot decalcifications and caries occurring adjacent to bonded orthodontic brackets have long been a concern to orthodontists. One procedure suggested to overcome this problem is fluoride treatment prior to bonding. The purpose of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of orthodontic self-cured resin from Concise on teeth rinsed 4 minutes in 1.23% APF with untreated controls. Measurements were made on an Instron machine. Debonding interfaces were observed with a scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Distributions were calculated. The tensile bond strengths of the fluoride-treated teeth and the untreated teeth were not significantly different. The debonding interfaces between resin and bracket base, within the resin itself, and between enamel and resin were similar in the two experimental groups. However, greater enamel detachment was seen within the fluoride pretreatment group. So while fluoride pretreatment does not significantly affect tensile bond strength, it may cause enamel detachment after debonding

  6. A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF BOND - STRENGTH BETWEEN NORMAL DENTIN AND CARIES AFFECTED DENTIN: AN INVITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The concept of adhesive dentistry has taken leaps forward and has resulted in a concept of more conservation of tooth structure which in turn enhance the life of teeth. The bonding agent forms a hybrid layer with dentin and its other side co - polymerize with the matrix p hase of dental composite, producing strong micro - mechanical bonding. AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the bond strength of adhesive agent to normal dentin and caries affected dentin and also to compare the bond strength between different bonding agents. METHOD: 20 mandibular molar were collected, washed and stored in normal saline. Each tooth was cut longitudinally. Healthy tooth structure of each half of the tooth represents the control group and the carious portion of the same tooth represents as experi mental group. Thus, 80 samples were prepared. The groups were then further subdivided into 4 sub - groups of 4 different bonding agents. The dentin surface of all the sub groups were etched by 37% of phosphoric acid gel for 10 - 15 secs and respective bonding agent were used and cured for 20 secs. Cylindrical composite resin was prepared using a plastic module of internal diameter of 3mm and length 5mm. Statistical analysis was done using mean standard deviation (S.D, student ‘t’ test and level of significance ‘P’. RESULTS: For both the control and experimental group, 3M single bond has showed the strongest bond strength followed by Prime and Bond NT, Excite and PQ1.

  7. A new method for quick predicting the strength of intermolecular hydrogen bonds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A new method is proposed to quick predict the strength of intermolecular hydrogen bonds.The method is employed to produce the hydrogen-bonding potential energy curves of twenty-nine hydro-gen-bonded dimers.The calculation results show that the hydrogen-bonding potential energy curves obtained from this method are in good agreement with those obtained from MP2/6-31+G calculations by including the BSSE correction,which demonstrate that the method proposed in this work can be used to calculate the hydrogen-bonding interactions in peptides.

  8. Low-temperature strength tests and SEM imaging of hydroxide catalysis bonds in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beveridge, N L; Van Veggel, A A; Hendry, M; Murray, P; Montgomery, R A; Scott, J; Cunningham, L; Hough, J; Nawrodt, R; Reid, S; Rowan, S [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA Institute for Gravitational Research, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Jesse, E [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, 3700 Willow Creek Road, Prescott, AZ 86301-3720 (United States); Bezensek, R B, E-mail: n.beveridge@physics.gla.ac.uk [Hunting Energy Services, Aberdeen, AB12 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-21

    Silicon is under consideration as a substrate material for the test masses and suspension elements of gravitational wave detectors of improved sensitivity. Hydroxide catalysis bonding is a candidate technique for jointing silicon elements with the potential for both high strength and low mechanical loss. A future detector with quasi-monolithic silicon final stages may operate at cryogenic temperatures. Here we present the first studies of the strength of silicon-silicon bonds at 77 K (liquid nitrogen temperature) and show characteristic strengths of {approx}44 MPa. When comparing cryogenic to room temperature results, no significant difference is apparent in the strength. We also show that a minimum thickness of oxide layer of 50 nm is desirable to achieve reliably strong bonds. Bonds averaging 47 nm in thickness are achieved for oxide thicknesses greater than 50 nm.

  9. Effect of hot-humid exposure on static strength of adhesive-bonded aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of hot-humid exposure (i.e., 40 °C and 98% R.H. on the quasi-static strength of the adhesive-bonded aluminum alloys was studied. Test results show that the hot-humid exposure leads to the significant decrease in the joint strength and the change of the failure mode from a mixed cohesive and adhesive failure with cohesive failure being dominant to adhesive failure being dominant. Careful analyses of the results reveal that the physical bond is likely responsible for the bond adhesion between L adhesive and aluminum substrates. The reduction in joint strength and the change of the failure mode resulted from the degradation in bond adhesion, which was primarily attributed to the corrosion of aluminum substrate. In addition, the elevated temperature exposure significantly accelerated the corrosion reaction of aluminum, which accelerated the degradation in joint strength.

  10. Composite resin bond strength to caries-affected dentin contaminated with 3 different hemostatic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Hosseini-Shirazi, Moeen; Farahbod, Foroozan; Keshani, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Bonding of composite resins to sound and caries-affected dentin in cervical areas may necessitate the use of hemostatic agents to control sulcular fluid and hemorrhage. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strengths of a self-etching adhesive system to sound and caries-affected dentin after the use of 3 different hemostatic agents. Composite resin cylinders were bonded to 48 caries-affected and 48 sound dentin surfaces in 8 groups. Groups 1-4 utilized caries-affected dentin: group 1, uncontaminated control; 2, ViscoStat; 3, ViscoStat Clear; and 4, trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Groups 5-8 utilized sound dentin: group 5, uncontaminated control; 6, ViscoStat; 7, ViscoStat Clear; and 8, TCA. The hemostatic agents were applied for 2 minutes and rinsed. After 500 rounds of thermocycling, shear bond strength tests were carried out. Data were analyzed with 1- and 2-way analyses of variance, t test, and post hoc Tukey tests at a significance level of P dentin type (F = 38.23; P = 0.0001) and hemostatic agent (F = 6.32; P = 0.001). Furthermore, groups 2 and 6 (ViscoStat) showed significantly lower bond strength values than the control groups (groups 1 and 5) in both affected and sound dentin (P = 0.043 and P = 0.009, respectively). Within the limitations of this study, the bond strength of composite resin to caries-affected dentin was significantly reduced compared to that with sound dentin. Among the studied hemostatic agents, ViscoStat resulted in a greater decrease in dentin bond strength. Contamination of both sound and caries-affected dentin with hemostatic agents decreased composite resin bond strength. Of the 3 hemostatic agents used, ViscoStat Clear appeared to have the least detrimental effect on bond strength. PMID:27367640

  11. The effect of washing water temperature on resin-dentin micro-shear bond strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekipour, Mohammad Reza; Shirani, Farzaneh; Ebrahimi, Mehrnoush

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of washing water temperature on the micro-shear bond strength (μSBS) of composite resin to dentin using a two-step etch-and-rinse system and a two-step self-etching system. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, the intact dentins of buccal and lingual surfaces of healthy third molars were exposed. Dentin surfaces were rinsed with different temperatures of distilled water (20 s) before applying Single Bond (SB) or Clearfil SE Bond(SE). After applying the adhesive, composite cylinders (0.8 mm diameter and 1 mm length) were bonded to the teeth surfaces. After storing the specimens in 37°C distilled water for 48 h and thermocycling, μSBS test was done. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance, post hoc Tukey tests, paired samples t-test, and Fisher exact test (α = 0.05). Results: Temperature and interaction of temperature and type of bonding agent affected the bond strength. The bond strength of SB groups was significantly higher at 50°C washing than 5°C (P = 0.003) and 22°C (P = 0.019), but no significant difference was observed between SE groups. The bond strength of SE was significantly higher at 22°C than that of SB (P = 0.031), whereas the bond strength of SB was significantly higher at 50°C than that of SE (P = 0.007). Conclusion: The use of high-temperature washing water is an appropriate method to enhance bond strength in etch-and-rinse systems. PMID:27076833

  12. Standard Test Method for Shear Strength of Fusion Bonded Polycarbonate Aerospace Glazing Material

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1995-01-01

    1.1 This test method determines the shear yield strength Fsy and shear ultimate strength Fsu of fusion bonds in polycarbonate by applying torsional shear loads to the fusion-bond line. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Khoroushi; Tahereh Saneie

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. Materials and Methods: The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were in...

  14. Shear bond strength between alumina substrate and prosthodontic resin composites with various adhesive resin systems

    OpenAIRE

    AlJehani, Yousef A.; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Pekka K. Vallittu

    2015-01-01

    Background With the increase in demand for cosmetics and esthetics, resin composite restorations and all-ceramic restorations have become an important treatment alternative. Taking into consideration the large number of prosthodontic and adhesive resins currently available, the strength and durability of these materials needs to be evaluated. This laboratory study presents the shear bond strengths of a range of veneering resin composites bonded to all-ceramic core material using different adh...

  15. Bond strength of different adhesives to normal and caries-affected dentins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUAN Wei; HOU Ben-xiang; L(U) Yalin

    2010-01-01

    Background Currently, several systems of dentin substrate-reacting adhesives are available for use in the restorative treatment against caries. However, the bond effectiveness and property of different adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of different adhesives to both normal dentin (ND) and caries-affected dentin (CAD) and to analyze the dentin/adhesive interracial characteristics.Methods Twenty eight extracted human molars with coronal medium carious lesions were randomly assigned to four groups according to adhesives used. ND and CAD were bonded with etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper~(TM) Single Bond 2 (SB2) or self-etching adhesives Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), Clearfil S~3 Bond (CS3), iBond GI (IB). Rectangular sticks of resin-dentin bonded interfaces 0.9 mm~2 were obtained. The specimens were subjected to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Mean μTBS was statistically analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls tests. Interfacial morphologies were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).Results Etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper~(TM) Single Bond 2 yielded high bond strength when applied to both normal and caries-affected dentin. The two-step self-etching adhesive Clearfil SE Bond generated the highest bond strength to ND among all adhesives tested but a significantly reduced strength when applied to CAD. For the one-step self-etching adhesives, Clearfil S~3 Bond and iBond GI, the bond strength was relatively low regardless of the dentin type. SEM interfacial analysis revealed that hybrid layers were thicker with poorer resin tag formation and less resin-filled lateral branches in the CAD than in the ND for all the adhesives tested.Conclusion The etch-and-rinse adhesive performed more effectively to caries-affected dentin than the self-etching adhesives.

  16. Effect of cleaning methods on bond strength of self-etching adhesive to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Delatorre Bronzato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of cleaning methods to remove zinc oxide-eugenol-based root canal sealer (Endomethasone on the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin. Materials and Methods: Twenty crowns of bovine incisors were cut to expose the pulp chamber. A zinc oxide- and eugenol-based sealer was placed for 10 min in contact with the pulp chamber dentin. Specimens were divided into four groups according to the cleaning method of dentin used: G1, no root canal sealer (control; G2, 0.9% sodium chlorite (NaCl; G3, ethanol; and G4, followed by diamond drill. After cleaning, the teeth were restored with composite resin and Clearfil SE Bond. All specimens were sectioned to produce rectangular sticks and dentin/resin interface was submitted to microtensile bond testing. The mean bond strengths were analyzed using ANOVA/Tukey (α = 0.05. Results: G3 and G4 showed bond strengths similar to the G1 (P > 0.05. A significant decrease in the bond strength in the G2 was observed (P < 0.05. G1, G3, and G4, the predominant failure mode was the mixed type. The prevalence of adhesive failure mode was verified in the G2. Conclusion: The cleaning methods affected the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin differently.

  17. The tensile bond strength of new and rebonded stainless steel orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, D; LeMasney, B; van Noort, R

    1993-04-01

    The study investigated the effect on the tensile/peel bond strength of the variables associated with the bracket base, the enamel surface, and the type of adhesive when both new and used brackets were rebonded to a previously bonded enamel surface. The tensile/peel bond strength was firstly evaluated for three different types of stainless steel orthodontic bracket/base combinations. The cast integral base gave a significantly lower bond strength than the foil-mesh and photo-etched bases. Following debonding, a group of new brackets were bonded to the teeth using a chemically-activated or a light-cured adhesive. The old adhesive had been removed from the enamel by either a hand scaler or a tungsten-carbide bur. The rebonded new brackets demonstrated a small, but statistically significant fall in bond strength. No differences were found between the enamel preparations or the adhesives. A further group of previously debonded brackets were rebonded to the same teeth. The bracket bases were prepared by either smoothing with a green stone or heating in a bunsen flame followed by sandblasting and electropolishing. Highly significant falls in bond strength were obtained with all the bases. No significant differences were found between the two methods of bracket preparation. PMID:8500538

  18. The Effect of Different Disinfecting Agents on Bond Strength of Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mohammed Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different disinfectant agents on bond strength of two types of resin composite materials. Methods. A total of 80 sound posterior teeth were used. They were divided into four groups (n=20 according to the dentin surface pretreatment (no treatment, chlorhexidine gluconate 2%, sodium hypochlorite 4%, and EDTA 19%. Each group was divided into two subgroups according to the type of adhesive (prime and bond 2.1 and Adper easy one. Each subgroup was further divided into two subgroups according to the type of resin composite (TPH spectrum and Tetric EvoCeram. Shear bond strength between dentin and resin composite was measured using Universal Testing Machine. Data collected were statistically analyzed by t-test and one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Results. It was found that dentin treated with EDTA recorded the highest shear bond strength values followed by sodium hypochlorite and then chlorhexidine groups while the control group showed the lowest shear bond strength. Conclusions. The surface treatment of dentin before bonding application has a great effect on shear bond strength between resin composite and dentin surface.

  19. THE EFFECT OF 800 0C ON BOND STRENGTH OF CONCRETE WITH MINERAL ADMIXTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet COŞKUN

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of high temperature (800 0C on the bond strength between concrete and rebar was investigated. In addition to concrete mixture with only portland cement, concrete mixtures with 10% silica fume and 15 % fly ash replacing cement by weight was prepared. Maximum aggregate size is as 16 mm. The 150×150×150 mm cube specimens were prepared for compressive strength and the 100×200 mm cylinder specimens were prepared for bond strength. The specimens were cured in air for 270 days after curing in water 20±2 °C for 28 days. After being heated to temperatures of 800 ºC, compressive strength and bond strength of concrete were tested. The results showed that specimens with silica fume always gave the highest values followed by those as specimens with fly ash and specimens without mineral admixtures irrespective of type and age of concrete and test methods.

  20. Shear Strength of Partially Bonded Concrete-Rock Interfaces for Application in Dam Stability Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krounis, Alexandra; Johansson, Fredrik; Larsson, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    The shear strength of the concrete-rock interface has a substantial influence on the sliding stability of concrete gravity dams founded on rock. While several studies have been done on concrete-rock contacts, there remains uncertainty regarding the peak shear strength of partially bonded interfaces. There exists, in particular, an uncertainty regarding the contribution from surface roughness of the unbonded parts to the peak shear strength of the interface due to the dependency of mobilized strength on shear displacement. In this study, a series of 24 direct shear tests are performed under CNL conditions on concrete-rock samples with different bonding conditions. Tests on samples with fully bonded and unbonded interfaces are conducted to study the strain compatibility of the different contacts, while the results of samples with partially bonded interfaces are evaluated in the context of linking the joint roughness of the unbonded parts to the peak shear strength of the interface. The results indicate that a significant part of the surface roughness of the unbonded parts is mobilized prior to degradation of bond strength, in particular for interfaces with low bonding percentages. It is recommended that further research should be conducted to understand how the contribution from roughness change with an increase in scale and degree of matedness.

  1. Comparison of the microshear bond strength of two resin cements to Cercon and Zirkonzahn ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Nokar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Nowadays, the application of all ceramic restorations are being raised, because of their physical characteristics, such as translucency and good appearance. Numerous researchers investigated the impact of surface treatments on the bond strength of zirconia ceramic with resin cements. The aim of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength of Cercon and Zirkonzahn (two kind of zirconia ceramics, to two types of resin cements after thermocycling.   Materials and Methods: In this study, 24 rectangular specimens were made from each group of Cercon and Zirkonzahn ceramics. After sandblasting, these specimens were connected to 3×1 mm2 composite cylinders by two resin cements (Panavia F2 and Rely X Unicem2. After performing a thermocycling regime for 5000 cycles (5-55 ◦ C, the microshear bond strengths were measured by a universal testing machine. The mode of failures were determined by a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA.   Results: Type of ceramics had no significant impact on the microshear bond strength (P=0.317. The highest bond strengths in both ceramics were obtained with Reply X Unicem (P=0.035. The predominant failure mode was adhesive between the cement and ceramic.   Conclusion: Type of resin cement had a significant effect on their bond strengths to zirconia ceramics.

  2. Factors affecting the bond strength of self-etch adhesives: A meta-analysis of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Pranau Vanajasan

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Our analysis has showed that two-step self-etch adhesive system showed a superior in vitro performance in comparison to one-step self-etch system. Nevertheless, certain factors such as dentin origin, site and area of bonding affect the bond strength of adhesives.

  3. Shear bond strength of metallic and ceramic brackets using color change adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha de Souza Gomes Stumpf

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using color change adhesives that are supposed to aid in removing excess of bonding material and compare them to a traditional adhesive. METHODS: Ninety metallic and ninety ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine incisors using two color change adhesives and a regular one. A tensile stress was applied by a universal testing machine. The teeth were observed in a microscope after debonding in order to determine the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI. RESULTS: The statistical analysis (ANOVA, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests demonstrated that the mean bond strength presented no difference when metallic and ceramic brackets were compared but the bond resistance values were significantly different for the three adhesives used. The most common ARI outcome was the entire adhesive remaining on the enamel. CONCLUSIONS: The bond strength was similar for metallic and ceramic brackets when the same adhesive system was used. ARI scores demonstrated that bonding with these adhesives is safe even when ceramic brackets were used. On the other hand, bond strength was too low for orthodontic purposes when Ortho Lite Cure was used.

  4. Effect of zirconia type on its bond strength with different veneer ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Aboushelib; C.J. Kleverlaan; A.J. Feilzer

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The bond strength between veneer ceramic and the zirconia framework is the weakest component in the layered structure. This bond was proven to be sensitive to the surface finish of the framework material and to the type of the veneer ceramic and its method of application. New colored zircon

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Recycled Brackets using Different Methods: An In vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Mukesh; Maheshwari, Amit; Lall, Rajeev; Navit, Pragati; Singh, Rajeshwar; Navit, S

    2014-01-01

    Background: Debonding of brackets commonly occurs during orthodontic treatment. Due to increase in costs replacement of a damaged bracket is not liked by the dentist. This study is done to assess the shear bond strength of recycled brackets using different methods. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted using five groups of orthodontic brackets (0.022” × 0.028”, MBT prescription) bonded on the premolars mounted in cubes. Other materials required were cubical trays, bonding material, ...

  6. A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF BOND - STRENGTH BETWEEN NORMAL DENTIN AND CARIES AFFECTED DENTIN: AN INVITRO STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Arun; Sanjeev; Rohit; De, Asit; Ajay; Kshiti; Harpreet Singh; Farah

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The concept of adhesive dentistry has taken leaps forward and has resulted in a concept of more conservation of tooth structure which in turn enhance the life of teeth. The bonding agent forms a hybrid layer with dentin and its other side co - polymerize with the matrix p hase of dental composite, producing strong micro - mechanical bonding. AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the bond strength of adhesive agent to normal dentin and caries affe...

  7. Consistent descriptions of metal–ligand bonds and spin-crossover in inorganic chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2013-01-01

    -scale DFT studies of inorganic systems in catalysis and bioinorganic chemistry rely directly on the ability to balance correlation effects in the involved bonds across the s-, p-, and d-blocks. This review concerns recent efforts to describe such bonds accurately and consistently across the s-, p-, and d......-blocks. Physical effects and ingredients in functionals, their systematic errors, and approaches to deal with them are discussed, in order to identify broadly applicable methods for inorganic chemistry....

  8. Effects of surface treatments of conventional glass-ionomer on shear bond strength to giomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soodabeh Kimyai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : An appropriate bond between glass-ionomer and the superficial resin materials is very important for the success of sandwich technique. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of three surface treatments of conventional glass-ionomer on its shear bond strength to giomer. Materials and Methods: Sixty cylindrical specimens of a conventional glass-ionomer (GC Fuji II were prepared and randomly divided into three groups (n = 20. The specimens in groups 1 and 2 were treated with total-etch adhesive resin (Single Bond along with acid etching, and self-etch adhesive resin (FL-Bond II on the set glass-ionomer, respectively. Specimens in group 3 were treated with self-etch adhesive resin (FL-Bond II before initial setting of the glass-ionomer was complete. Then a giomer restorative (Beautifil II was added to the specimens. Subsequent to thermocycling, the specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test. Failure modes were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and a post hoc Tukey test at a significance level of P < 0.05. Results: There were statistically significant differences in bond strengths between the groups (P < 0.0005. Differences in bond strengths between group 2 and other groups were significant (P < 0.0005 while the differences between groups 1 and 3 were not significant. Failures were predominantly of the cohesive type in all the groups. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, the use of self-etch adhesive resin (FL-Bond II on the set glass-ionomer yielded the highest bond strength in the glass-ionomer/giomer sandwich technique.

  9. Evaluation of flexural bond strength of porcelain to used nickel-chromium alloy in various percentages

    OpenAIRE

    VNV Madhav; Padmanabhan, T. V.; R Subramnian

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the flexural bond strength of porcelain to combinations of used and new nickel-chromium alloy in various proportions. Materials and Methods: Used and new nickel-chromium bonding alloys were combined in various proportions (groups I to V; 10 samples per group) and their flexural bond strengths with porcelain were compared. A three-point loading system was used for the application of load. Load was applied at a constant speed of 0.5 mm/min...

  10. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Hattar; Hatamleh, Muhanad M.; Faleh Sawair; Mohammad Al-Rabab’ah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the strength of the bond between newly introduced self-adhesive resin cements and tooth structures (i.e., enamel and dentin). Methods: Three self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2, RelyX Unicem, seT SDI) were tested. Cylindrical-shaped cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were bonded to enamel and dentin. Test specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength (SBS) was tested in a Zwick Roll testing machine. Results w...

  11. Effect of Self-etching Adhesives on the Bond Strength of Glass-Ionomer Cements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jaberi Ansari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Adequate bond strength between glass ionomer cements and composite resin is necessary for the success of the sandwich technique.This study assessed the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin to glass-ionomer cements (GIC using self-etch adhesives with different pH values.One hundred specimens (6×4×2 mm were made using Fuji II and Fuji II LC GICs and treated with different adhesives as follows: Group 1:Fuji II+ Adper Prompt L-Pop, Group-2: Fuji II+SE bond, Group-3: Fuji II + AdheSE, Group-4:Fuji II+ Protect bond, Group-5: Fuji II + Single bond, Group-6:Fuji II LC+ Adper Prompt LPop, Group-7: Fuji II LC+SE bond, Group-8:Fuji II LC+ AdheSE, Group-9: Fuji II LC+ Protect bond, and Group-10: Fuji II LC+ Single bond. Each group consisted of 10 specimens. A cylinder of Z100 composite resin was placed on each sample and light cured. After 24 hours of water storage (37°C, the specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength tests (0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test.The mean micro-shear bond strength of groups 1-10 was 11.66±1.79, 16.50±1.85, 18.47±1.77, 13.95±1.77, 15.27±1.49, 15.14±0.90, 20.03±1.19, 17.48±3.00, 16.24±1.98 and 16.03±1.49 MPa, respectively. There were significant differences between groups 1 and 7 (P0.05. Fuji II LC showed higher bond strength than Fuji II (P<0.05.Type of self-etch adhesive had no significant effect on micro-shear bond strength of glass-ionomer to composite resin. Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC exhibited higher bond strength than the conventional GIC.

  12. Enhancing prospective chemistry teachers cognitive structures in the topics of bonding and hybridization by internet-assisted chemistry applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özge Özyalçın Oskay, Sinem Dinçol

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of internet-assisted chemistry applications on prospective chemistry teachers’ cognitive structures in the topics of bonding and hybridization. The sample of the study consisted of 36 prospective chemistry teachers attending Hacettepe University, Faculty of Education, the Department of Chemistry Education in 2010-2011 academic year and taking Basic Chemistry I lesson. In the study, students were separated into experimental and control groups according to their pre-cognitive structures. Students were requested to answer two open ended questions. Answers by each student were gathered and evaluated by flow map method. “Bonding and hybridization” topics were taught to control group with traditional teaching method and to experimental group besides traditional method internet-assisted applications were conducted. The same open-ended questions were given to both groups and their cognitive structures were examined once more. The differences between control and experimental groups’ cognitive structures were examined. A significant difference was identified in favour of experimental group (p<0, 05. The mean score of the Experimental group was X=19.94, and the mean score of the Control group was X=13.88. In addition, subsequent to internet assisted chemistry applications differences in terms of concepts and descriptions in prospective chemistry teachers’ in experimental and control group cognitive structure have been determined. When post flow maps of prospective chemistry teachers in experimental group, on whom internet assisted chemistry applications were made, are formed, it has been determined that there are more statements about hybridization, hybridization types, molecule geometry and bond angles compared to control grou

  13. Effect of digluconate chlorhexidine on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Dionysopoulos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to systematically review the literature for the effect of digluconate chlorhexidine (CHX on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin of composite restorations. Materials and Methods: The electronic databases that were searched to identify manuscripts for inclusion were Medline via PubMed and Google search engine. The search strategies were computer search of the database and review of reference lists of the related articles. Search words/terms were as follows: (digluconate chlorhexidineFNx01 AND (dentinFNx01 OR adhesive systemFNx01 OR bond strengthFNx01. Results: Bond strength reduction after CHX treatments varied among the studies, ranging 0-84.9%. In most of the studies, pretreatment CHX exhibited lower bond strength reduction than the control experimental groups. Researchers who previously investigated the effect of CHX on the bond strength of dental adhesive systems on dentin have reported contrary results, which may be attributed to different experimental methods, different designs of the experiments, and different materials investigated. Conclusions: Further investigations, in particular clinical studies, would be necessary to clarify the effect of CHX on the longevity of dentin bonds.

  14. Problems in Standardization of Orthodontic Shear Bond Strength Tests; A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. A. Akhoundi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Bonding brackets to the enamel surface has gained much popularity today. New adhesive systems have been introduced and marketed and a considerable increase in research regarding bond strength has been published. A considerable amount of these studies deal with shear bond strength of adhesives designed for orthodontic purpose.Previous studies have used variety of test designs. This diversity in test design is due to the fact that there is no standard method for evaluating shear bond strength in orthodontics. Therefore comparison of data obtained from different study is almost impossible.This article tries to briefly discuss the developments occurred in the process of shear bond strength measurement of orthodontic adhesives with an emphasis on the type of test set up and load application.Although the test designs for measuring shear bond strength in orthodontics are still far from ideal, attempts must be made to standardize these tests especially in order to makecomparison of different data easier. It is recommended that test designs be set up in such a manner that better matches with the purpose of the study.

  15. Effect of glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate on shear bond strength of adhesives to primary dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of alternative pulpotomy agents such as glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate on the shear bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems to dentin of primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Eighty human primary molar teeth were sectioned in a mesiodistal direction and divided into experimental and control groups. Lingual dentin specimens in experimental groups were treated with glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate. Buccal surfaces soaked in water served as control group. Each group was then divided into two groups based on the adhesive system used: Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Prompt L-Pop. A teflon mold was used to build the composite (Filtek Z-250 cylinders on the dentinal surface of all the specimens. Shear bond strength was tested for all the specimens with an Instron Universal Testing Machine. The failure mode analysis was performed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Results: The results revealed that glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate significantly reduced the shear bond strength of the tested adhesive systems to primary dentin. Clearfil SE Bond showed much higher shear bond strength than Adper Prompt L Pop to primary dentin. SEM analysis revealed a predominant cohesive failure mode for both adhesive systems. Conclusion: This study revealed that the pulpotomy medicaments glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate adversely affected the bonding of self-etch adhesive systems to primary dentin.

  16. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Eun Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared shear bond strength (SBS of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA, Maxcem Elite (MAX, Clearfil SA Luting (CSL, PermaCem 2.0 (PM2, Rely-X U200 (RXU, Smartcem 2 (SC2 were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC was bonded to the specimens with self-curing. The shear bond strength of all cemented specimens was measured with universal testing machine. Half of the specimens were thermocycled 5000 times before shear bonding strength testing. Fractured surfaces were examined with a field-emission SEM (10,000× and analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. MAX, PM2, SC2 group without thermocycling and GLA, MAX, PM2 group with thermocycling showed adhesive failure, but GLA, CSL, RXU, FJC group without thermocycling and SLC, RXU, SC2, FJC group with thermocycling indicated cohesive failure. Within the limitation of this study, All of SARCs except MAX demonstrated higher bond strength than that of RMGIC regardless of thermocycling. Also, SARC containing MDP monomers (CSL retained better bonds than other cements.

  17. Effect of raw material ratios on the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics is important in biomedical field. In this work, the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics was investigated with different liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios. X-ray diffractometer was applied to characterize its phase composition. The microstructure was imaged using a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the compressive strength of the chemically bonded ceramics increased with the decrease of liquid-to-solid ratio due to the change of the packing density and the crystallinity of hydrated product. However, with the increase of MgO-to-KH2PO4 weight ratio, its compressive strength increased firstly and then decreased. The low compressive strength in lower MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratio might be explained by the existence of the weak phase KH2PO4. However, the low value of compressive strength with the higher MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratio might be caused by lack of the joined phase in the hydrated product. Besides, it has been found that the microstructures were different in these two cases by the scanning electron microscope. Colloidal structure appeared for the samples with lower liquid-to-solid and higher MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios possibly because of the existence of amorphous hydrated products. The optimization of both liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios was important to improve the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics. - Highlights: • High packing density and amorphous hydrated phase improved the compressive strength. • Residual KH2PO4 and poor bonding phase lower the compressive strength. • MPCBC fabricated with optimized parameters had the highest compressive strength

  18. Bond Strength of Glass Ionomers as Restorative Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciass lonomer cement is considered to be a recent material used for restoring teeth. It was launched on the market since 1971. Studies show that 86.4% of dentists use this material and also 71 % of dentists use it only for cementing restorations and crowns for its chemicaly bonding properties. In this paper, the adhesive properties were tested in two kinds of extracted human teeth. First group, recently extracted teeth well preserved in saline and the second group, teeth extracted and preserved in formaline for many years. There was no significant difference in the adhesion between the two groups. The Japanese Fuji showed more adhesion to the recently extracted teeth. (author)

  19. A wafer-level Sn-rich Au–Sn intermediate bonding technique with high strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sn-rich Au–Sn solder bonding has been systematically investigated for low temperature wafer-level hermetic packaging of high-end micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) devices. The AuSn2 phase with the highest Vickers-hardness among the four stable intermetallic compounds of the Au–Sn system makes a major contribution to the high bonding strength. A maximum shear strength of 64 MPa and a leak rate lower than 4.9 × 10−7 atm-cc s−1 have been obtained for Au46Sn54 solder bonded at 310 °C. In addition, several routines have been used to effectively inhibit the solder overflow and preserve a good bonding strength and water resilience: producing dielectric SiO2 structures which do not wet the melting solder to the surrounding bonding region, reducing the bonding pressure, and prolonging the bonding time. This wafer level bonding technique with good hermeticity can be applied to MEMS devices requiring a low temperature package. (paper)

  20. Comparison of the shear bond strengths of conventional mesh bases and sandblasted orthodontic bracket bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Prado Torres Lugato

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare in vitro the shear bond strength between metallic brackets (Abzil with conventional mesh bases and metallic brackets with bases industrially sandblasted with aluminum oxide using three adhesive systems, in order to assess the influence of sandblasting on adhesiveness and to compare 3 different bonding systems. Two hundred and forty bovine incisors were used and randomly divided into 6 groups (40 teeth in each group, according to the bracket base and to the bonding system. The brackets were direct-bonded in bovine teeth with 3 adhesive systems: System A - conventional TransbondTM XT (3M - Unitek; System B - TransbondTM Plus Self Etching Primer + TransbondTM XT (3M - Unitek and System C - Fuji ORTHO LC resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement in capsules (GC Corp.. Shear bond strength tests were performed 24 hours after bonding, in a DL-3000 universal testing machine (EMIC, using a load cell of 200 kgf and a speed of 1 mm/min. The results were submitted to statistical analysis and showed no significant difference between conventional and sandblasted bracket bases. However, comparison between the bonding systems presented significantly different results. System A (14.92 MPa and system C (13.24 MPa presented statistically greater shear bond strength when compared to system B (10.66 MPa. There was no statistically significant difference between system A and system C.

  1. Factors Affecting the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets – a Review of In Vitro Studies

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    Waleed Bakhadher

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The adhesive material used to bond orthodontic brackets to teeth should neither fail during the treatment period, resulting in treatment delays, untoward expenses or patient inconvenience nor should it damage the enamel on debonding at the end of the treatment. Although the effectiveness of a bonding system and any unfavorable effects on the enamel may be studied by conducting in-vivo studies, it is nearly impossible to independently analyze different variables that influence a specific bonding system in the oral environment. In-vitro studies, on the other hand, may utilize more standardized protocols for testing different bonding systems and materials available. Thus, the present review focused attention on in-vitro studies and made an attempt to discuss material-related, teeth-related (fluorotic vs non-fluorotic teeth and other miscellaneous factors that influences the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Within the limitations of this review, using conventional acid-etch technique, ceramic brackets and bonding to non-fluorotic teeth was reported to have a positive influence on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets, but higher shear bond strength found on using ceramic brackets can be dangerous for the enamel.

  2. Bond strength to high-crystalline content zirconia after different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Grace M Dias; Silva, Nelson R F A; Paulillo, Luis A M S; De Goes, Mario F; Rekow, E Dianne; Thompson, Van P

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of primers, luting systems and aging on bond strength to zirconium oxide substrates. Eighteen zirconia discs (19.5 x 4 mm) were polished and treated (n = 3) either with a MDP primer (Md) or with a MDP and VBATDT primer (MV). In the control group (n = 3) no surface chemical treatment was performed. Zirconia specimens were cemented to prepolymerized composite discs utilizing resin cements - RelyX Unicem or Panavia 21 (RU and Pa, respectively). After 24 h, samples were sectioned for microtensile testing and returned to water at 37 degrees C for two different periods before being tested: 72 h or 60 days + thermocycling (5-55 degrees C/5000 cycles). Bond strength testing was performed at 1 mm/min. Values in MPa were analyzed through ANOVA and Tukey's Studentized Range (HSD) (p > 0.05). The application of MV primer resulted in the highest bond strength (22.77 MPa), statistically superior to Md primer (12.78 MPa), and control groups presented the lowest values (9.17 MPa). When luting systems were compared, RU promoted the highest bond strength (16.07 MPa) in comparison with Pa (13.75 MPa). The average bond strength decrease after aging (9.35 MPa) when compared with initial values (20.46 MPa). The results presented by this in vitro study suggest that a chemical surface treatment based on the MDP and VBATDT combination may improve bond strength between zirconia and luting system, without any previous mechanical treatment, depending on the luting system used. This chemical treatment may result in a reliable alternative to achieve adequate and durable bond strength. PMID:20336733

  3. Fracture strength of DS-Cu/316SS HIP bonded structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIP bonded structure of Al2O3 dispersion copper (DS-Cu) and Type 316 stainless steel has been proposed for ITER shielding blanket. In this study fracture toughness test and fatigue crack growth test were performed in order to estimate fracture strength of HIP bonded structure. It is found that fracture toughness of HIP bonded structure depends on HIP temperature and is about 60% of fracture toughness of DS-Cu base metal. It is also found that the crack growth rate along HIP bonded interface is four times higher than that in DS-Cu base metal. (author)

  4. Interaction morphology and bond strength of nanofilled simplified-step adhesives to acid etched dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Vinicius DI HIPÓLITO; Reis, André Figueiredo; Mitra, Sumita B.; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of nanofillers incorporated into adhesives on the microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) and interfacial micromorphology to dentin. Methods: The occlusal enamel of 5 human molars was removed and each tooth sectioned into four quarters. The exposed dentin was treated with one of the following adhesives: Adper Single Bond (SB-unfilled), OptiBond Solo Plus (OS-barium aluminoborosilicate, 400nm Ø), Prime & Bond NT (NT-colloidal silica, 7–40 nm Ø) and Adper Single Bon...

  5. Effects of bonding temperature on microstructure, fracture behavior and joint strength of Ag nanoporous bonding for high temperature die attach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ag nanoparticle sintering has received much attention as an alternative joining method to lead-based soldering for high temperature electronic applications. However, there are still certain issues with this method, such as difficulties of in controlling the joining layer thickness and the occurrence of unexpected voids resulting from solvent evaporation. In this study, the effect of bonding temperature (200–400 °C) and environment (air and N2) on the joint strength of Ag nanoporous bonding (NPB) on electroless nickel/immersion gold finished Cu disks was investigated. A nanoporous Ag sheet fabricated using dealloying method from an Al–Ag precursor was adopted as the insert material. The NPB was conducted at various temperatures (200–400 °C) for 30 min at a pressure of 20 MPa in both air and N2 environments. The joint strength of NPB was closely related with the microstructure of the Ag layer and the fracture mode of the joint, and increased with increasing bonding temperature through the formation of strong interface and a coarsened Ag layer. The effect of the bonding environment was not significant, except in the case of bonding temperature of 400 °C

  6. Shear strength of orthodontic bracket bonding with GIC bonding agent after the application of CPP-ACPF paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa Budipramana

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: White spot lesion is a major problem during fixed orthodontic treatment. This problem can be solved by minimizing white spot lesion before the treatment and using a fluoride-releasing bonding agent. The application of casein phosphopeptidesamorphous calcium phospate fluoride (CPP-ACPF paste as remineralization agent before treatment and GIC as orthodontic bonding agent is expected to overcome this problem as well as to strengthen GIC bonding. Purpose: To measure the shear strength of fix orthodontic appliance using GIC bonding with CPP-ACPF application prior treatment. Methods: In this study, 50 extracted premolars were randomly divided into 2 groups: group 1 as treatment group and group II as control group that was not given CPPACPF pretreatment. After having been cut and put into acrylic device, the samples in group I were given pretreatment with CPP-ACPF paste on enamel surface for 2 minutes twice a day as instructed in product label for 14 days. Orthodontic brackets were bonded with GIC bonding agent on all samples in both groups as instructed in product label. Then, the shear strength was measured by Autograph Shimatzu with crosshead speed 0.5 mm/minute. The data was analyzed with Independent t-test. Results: The mean shear bond strength in treatment group was 19.22 ± 4.04 MPa and in control group was 12.97 ± 3.97 MPa. Independent t-test analysis showed that there was a significant difference between treatment and control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: CPP-ACPF pretreatment could increase GIC orthodontic bonding shear strength.Latar belakang: Lesi putih karies merupakan masalah utama selama perawatan dengan peranti cekat ortodonti. Hal ini dapat diatasi dengan cara mengurangi lesi putih sebelum perawatan dengan menggunakan bahan bonding yang mengandung fluorida. Aplikasi pasta casein phosphopeptides-amorphous calcium phospate fluoride (CPP-ACPF sebagai bahan remineralisasi sebelum perawatan dan bahan bonding GIC diharapkan dapat

  7. Comparative evaluation of the shear bond strength of metal brackets bonded to porcelain using different porcelain surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslami Amirabadi GH

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare shear bond strength of metal brackets bonded to dental porcelain on the basis of presence or absence of silane, type of acid [hydrofluoric acid (HF or phosphoric acid (H3PO4] and roughness of porcelain surface (glazed or deglazed within mouth-like environment."nMaterials and Methods: Eighty glazed ceramic disks were randomly divided into 8 groups of 10 disks: group 1 [HF+silane], group 2 [deglazed+HF+silane], group 3 [HF], group 4 [deglazed+HF], group 5 [H3PO4+silane], group 6 [deglazed+H3PO4+silane], group 7 [H3PO4], group 8 [deglazed+H3PO4]. Then the brackets were bonded and thermocycled. After that, shear bond strength test was done using the Zwick device and the type of bond failure was determined under stereomicroscope at 4X magnification. 3-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis were used for statistical analyses."nResults: The shear bond strength for the test groups were as follows: group (1:13.05±7.7 MPa , group (2:25.16±10.66 MPa, group (3:6.7±5.86 MPa, group (4:15.39±8.97 MPa, group (5:12.76±7.91 MPa, group (6:13.57±7.85 MPa, group (7:0.54±0.67 MPa, group (8: 9.34±6.52 MPa. The type of bond failure in all groups was adhesive failure except for group 2. No significant difference in the interaction between (glazed or deglazed, (presence or absence of silane, and type of acid was found (P>0.05."nConclusion: Under the conditions of this study, the best clinical method was the use of 37% phosphoric acid and silane that resulted in the optimal clinical strength and adhesive bond failure.

  8. Bond Strength Degradation of Corrosive Reinforced Lightweight Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yueshun; LU Yiyan; LI Houxiang; ZENG Sanhai

    2007-01-01

    The influence of reinforced bar corrosion on the bond degradation in lightweight concrete was studied. Accelerated constant current corrosion tests were performed on lightweight reinforced concrete samples, and the influential factors, such as protective layer thickness, reinforced bar diameter and corrosive level were investigated. The constant current step method was used to measure the electric resistance of the concrete protective cover, which was used to characterize the corrosion level of the rebar. Experimental results indicated that the corrosive resistance increased with increasing the cover dimension and decreasing the reinforced bar diameter, and the rate of decrease in the specimen impedance after cracking depended on the cover dimension. A new medium was offered for the further research on the performance degradation of corrosion lightweight concrete.

  9. Fragmentation and bond strength of airborne diesel soot agglomerates

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    Messerer Armin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of diesel soot aerosol particles to break up into smaller units under mechanical stress was investigated by a direct impaction technique which measures the degree of fragmentation of individual agglomerates vs. impact energy. Diesel aerosol was generated by an idling diesel engine used for passenger vehicles. Both the aerosol emitted directly and aerosol that had undergone additional growth by Brownian coagulation ("aging" was investigated. Optionally a thermo-desoption technique at 280°C was used to remove all high-volatility and the majority of low-volatility HC adsorbates from the aerosol before aging. Results It was found that the primary soot agglomerates emitted directly from the engine could not be fragmented at all. Soot agglomerates permitted to grow additionally by Brownian coagulation of the primary emitted particles could be fragmented to a maximum of 75% and 60% respectively, depending on whether adsorbates were removed from their surface prior to aging or not. At most, these aged agglomerates could be broken down to roughly the size of the agglomerates from the primary emission. The energy required for a 50% fragmentation probability of all bonds within an agglomerate was reduced by roughly a factor of 2 when aging "dry" agglomerates. Average bond energies derived from the data were 0.52*10-16 and 1.2*10-16 J, respectively. This is about 2 orders of magnitude higher than estimates for pure van-der-Waals agglomerates, but agrees quite well with other observations. Conclusion Although direct conclusions regarding the behavior of inhaled diesel aerosol in contact with body fluids cannot be drawn from such measurements, the results imply that highly agglomerated soot aerosol particles are unlikely to break up into units smaller than roughly the size distribution emitted as tail pipe soot.

  10. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradabadi, Ashkan [Department of Electrochemistry, Universität Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet [Department of Optoelectonics, Universität Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari [School of Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahbar, Nima, E-mail: nrahbar@wpi.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA 01609 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30 × magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments. - Highlights: • Understanding the dominant mechanism of bonding

  11. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30 × magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments. - Highlights: • Understanding the dominant mechanism of bonding

  12. Shear bond strength of a ceromer to noble and base metal alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorriz H.

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The improvement of the physical and chemical properties of resins as well as great advances achieved in the field of chemical bonding of resin to metal has changed the trend of restorative treatments. Today the second generation of laboratory resins have an important role in the restoration of teeth. The clinical bond strength should be reliable in order to gain successful results. In this study the shear bond strength (SBS between targis (a ceromer and two alloys (noble and base metal was studied and the effect of thermocycling on the bond investigated. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, alloys samples were prepared according to the manufacturer. After sandblasting of bonding surfaces with 50µ AI2o3 Targis was bonded to the alloy using Targis I link. All of the samples were placed in 37°C water for a period of 24 hours. Then half of the samples were subjected to 1000 cycles of thermocycling at temperatures of 5°C and 55°C. Planear shear test was used to test the bond strength in the Instron machine with the speed rate of 0.5mm/min. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. Two-way analysis of variance was used to compare the bond strength among the groups. T test was used to compare the alloys. The influence of thermocycling and alloy type on bond strength was studied using Mann Whitney test. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Result: The studied alloys did not differ significantly, when the samples were not thermocycled (P=0.136 but after thermocycling a significant difference was observed in SBS of resin to different alloys (P=000.1. Thermal stress and alloy type had significant interaction, with regard to shear bond strength (P=0.003. There was a significant difference in SBS before and after thermocycling in noble alloys (P=0.009, but this was not true in base metals (P=0.29. Maximum SBS (19.09 Mpa belonged to Degubond 4, before thermocycling. Minimum SBS (8.21 Mpa was seen in Degubond 4

  13. Bond strength evaluation in adhesive joints using NDE and DIC methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Anish

    Adhesive bonding of graphite epoxy composite laminates to itself or traditional metal alloys in modern aerospace and aircraft structural applications offers an excellent opportunity to use the most efficient and intelligent combination of materials available thus providing an attractive package for efficient structural designs. However, one of the major issues of adhesive bonding is the occasional formation of interfacial defects such as kissing or weak bonds in the bondline interface. Also, there are shortcomings of existing non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods to non-destructively detect/characterize these interfacial defects and reliably predicting the bond shear strength. As a result, adhesive bonding technology is still not solely implemented in primary structures of an aircraft. Therefore, there is a greater demand for a novel NDE tool that can meet the existing aerospace requirement for adhesive bondline characterization. This research implemented a novel Acoustography ultrasonic imaging and digital image correlation (DIC) technique to detect and characterize interfacial defects in the bondline and determine bond shear strength in adhesively bonded composite-metal joints. Adhesively bonded Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) laminate and 2024-T3 Aluminum single lap shear panels subjected to various implanted kissing/weak bond defects were the primary focus of this study. Kissing/weak bonds were prepared by controlled surface contamination in the composite bonding surface and also by improperly mixing the adhesive constituent. SEM analyses were also conducted to understand the surface morphology of substrates and their interaction with the contaminants. Morphological changes were observed in the microscopic scale and the chemical analysis confirmed the stability of the contaminant at or very close to the interface. In addition, it was also demonstrated that contaminants migrated during the curing of the adhesive from CFRP substrate which caused a

  14. Interfacial bond strength of electrophoretically deposited hydroxyapatite coatings on metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, M; Ruys, A J; Swain, M V; Kim, S H; Milthorpe, B K; Sorrell, C C

    1999-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings were deposited onto substrates of metal biomaterials (Ti, Ti6Al4V, and 316L stainless steel) by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Only ultra-high surface area HAp powder, prepared by the metathesis method 10Ca(NO3)2 + 6(NH4)2HPO4 + 8NH4OH), could produce dense coatings when sintered at 875-1000degreesC. Single EPD coatings cracked during sintering owing to the 15-18% sintering shrinkage, but the HAp did not decompose. The use of dual coatings (coat, sinter, coat, sinter) resolved the cracking problem. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) inspection revealed that the second coating filled in the "valleys" in the cracks of the first coating. The interfacial shear strength of the dual coatings was found, by ASTM F1044-87, to be approximately 12 MPa on a titanium substrate and approximately 22 MPa on 316L stainless steel, comparing quite favorably with the 34 MPa benchmark (the shear strength of bovine cortical bone was found to be 34 MPa). Stainless steel gave the better result since -316L (20.5 microm mK(-1)) > alpha-HAp (approximately 14 microm mK(-1)), resulting in residual compressive stresses in the coating, whereas alpha-titanium (approximately 10.3 microm mK(-1)) < alpha-HAp, resulting in residual tensile stresses in the coating. PMID:15348125

  15. Composite shear bond strength to dry and wet enamel with three self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafiee F

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The bonding mechanisms of self etching primers, based upon the simultaneous etching and priming of dentin, simplifies the bonding technique, but the efficiency of these systems is still controversial. This study compared the shear bond strength of three self etch adhesive systems in dry and wet conditions. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, 77 intact bovine lower incisors with flat 600 grit sanded enamel surface were fixed in acrylic molds and divided into 7 groups, of 11 teeth. The enamel surfaces were treated according to a special procedure as follows: Group 1: Prompt L-Pop (PLP in dry condition, Group 2: Prompt L-Pop in wet condition, Group 3: Clearfield SE Bond (CSEB in dry condition, Group 4: Clearfield SE Bond in wet condition, Group 5: iBond (iB in dry condition, Group 6: iBond in wet condition, Group 7: Margin Bond (Control in dry condition. Surfaces were air dried for ten seconds, or blot dried in wet condition. Composite resin was bonded on the enamel and built up by applying a cylindric teflon split mold (4 mm height 2mm diameter. After 24 hours storage in dionized water at room temperature, all specimens were thermocycled and shear bond test was employed by a universal testing machine (Instron with a cross-head speed of 1mm/min. The shear bond strength was recorded in MPa and data were analyzed with ANOVA and Scheffe statistical tests. P<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The mode of failure was examined under a stereomicroscope. Results: 1- Shear bond strength of CSEB in dry condition (21.5 ± 4.8 MPa was significantly higher than PLP and iB groups (p<0.0001. 2- Shear bond strength of iB and PLP groups in dry condition (9.60 ± 2.2, 9.49 ± 3 MPa were significantly lower than CSEB and control (2.99 ± 5.1 MPa (P<0.0001. 3- There was no significant difference between PLP and iB groups in dry condition (P=1. 4- Shear bond strength of CSEB in wet condition (21.8 ± 3 MPa was

  16. Efficacy of Experimental Hydrofluoric Acid (HF on Bond Strength and Microleakage of Composite-Porcelain Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Mahvidyzadeh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of an experimental hydrofluoric acid (HF for preparation of porcelain and to compare it with two commercial hydrofluoric acids in Iranian trademark. Materials and Methods: A- Evaluation of etch pattern of experimental HF using scanning electron microscope (SEM: 6 feldespathic discs were divided into 3 groups. Each group was etched with related HF (experimental, Ultradent and Kimia for 1 minute. SEM images were recorded at 3 magnifications. B- Bond strength test: 18 feldespathic discs were considered for each acidic group. Then the porcelain surfaces were etched and bonded to composite with unfilled resin. Consequently, the microshear test was done. C- Microleakage test: 54 discs were divided into 3 groups (n=18. Then the porcelain surfaces were etched and bonded to composite with unfilled resin and finally observed under stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Smirnov tests. Results: SEM analysis showed no difference between groups in terms of etch pattern. Microshear bond strength values for experimental, Kimia, and Ultradent HF were 28.53 (±4.92, 28.21 (±6.61, and 26.14 (±7.61 MPa, respectively. There was no significant difference between the bond strength of test groups (P0.05. Conclusion: Quality of experimental HF in terms of etch pattern, microshear bond strength and microleakage of composite/porcelain interface was similar to that of two commercial hydrofluoric acids.

  17. Microtensile and tensile bond strength of single-bottle adhesives: a new test method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, A I

    2004-04-01

    To evaluate the tensile and microtensile bond strength of five single-bottle adhesives to dentine, extracted human molar teeth were used. For each tooth dentine was exposed on the occlusal surface by cutting with an isomet saw and the remaining part was mounted in a plastic ring using dental stone. The tested adhesive materials were: Scotchbond 1, Syntac SC, One-Step, Prime & Bond 2.1 and Clearfil SE Bond. The adhesive was applied to either 1 mm(2) of dentine or a circular area with a diameter of 3.9 mm. Composite resin Clearfil AP-X was placed to the adhesives using a Teflon split mould 3.9 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm in height. Tensile and microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min(-1). Under tensile mode, the bond strengths were 16.7 +/- 3.5, 15.2 +/- 2.5, 11.5 +/- 3.2, 13.7 +/- 2.6, 20.9 +/- 4.2 MPa for each material. Under microtensile mode, the bond strengths were 52.5 +/- 9.5, 55.3 +/- 8.3, 40.5 +/- 5.2, 37.5 +/- 8.7, 60 +/- 6.21 MPa. Fracture pattern of bonded specimens showed 66% cohesive dentine failure in samples tested for tensile bond strength. For the microtensile test, failures were mainly adhesive at the interface between adhesive and dentine (94%). PMID:15089946

  18. Shear bond strength of amalgam to dentin using different dentin adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farimah Sardari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the shear bond strength of amalgam to dentin using four dentin adhesive systems.Materials and Methods: One hundred human molars were selected. After enamel removal, a dentin cylinder with 3 mm thickness was prepared. Eighty specimens were resorted with amalgam and four dentin adhesive systems as follows (n=20: group 1, Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose; group 2, One Coat Bond; group 3, PQ1; and group 4, Panavia-F. In group 5, 20 specimens were resorted with amalgam and varnish as control group. The specimens were incubated at 37°C for 24 h. The shear bond strengths were then measured by using push out method. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Duncan's tests.Results: Mean values for bond strengths of test groups were as follows: group 1=21.03±8.9, group 2=23.47±9, group 3=13.16±8.8, group 4=20.07±8.9 and group 5=14.15±8.7 MPa±SD. One-way ANOVA showed the statistically significant difference between the bond strengths of five groups (P=0.001. Post hoc Duncan's test showed significant difference between groups 1and 3 (P=0.008, groups 1 and 5 (P=0.019, groups 2 and 5 (P=0.0008, groups 4 and 5 (P=0.042, and groups 3 and 4 (P=0.018.Conclusion: Results of this study showed that the bond strength of amalgam to dentin using One Coat Bond as dentin adhesive system was higher than that observed in other dentin adhesive systems.

  19. Push-out bond strength of CPP-ACP-modified calcium silicate-based cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Alaa E; Manton, David J; Parashos, Peter; Wong, Rebecca H k; Palamara, Joseph E A; Reynolds, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the push-out bond strength of 0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2.0% and 3.0% (w/w) casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP)-modified calcium silicate-based cements (CSCs). The push-out bond strength of a trial MTA was also compared with two CSCs (Biodentine(™) and Angelus(®) MTA). Three hundred 1 mm thick horizontal root sections were prepared from 60 singlerooted human teeth. The canal space of each section was enlarged and filled with the cements. The sections were stored in a phosphate buffer solution. After incubation for 2 months, the push-out bond strength was measured and the data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test. The addition of CPP-ACP to the test cements increased the push-out bond strength (p<0.05). The push-out bond strength of Biodentine(™) was higher than the other cements (p<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between Angelus(®) MTA and the trial MTA with most of CPP-ACP concentrations. PMID:26235714

  20. The Effect of Thermocycling on Tensile Bond Strength of Two Soft Liners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Geramipanah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Failure of soft liners depends mostly on separation from the denture base resin; therefore measurement of the bond strength is very important. The purpose of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of two soft liners (Acropars, Molloplast-B to denture base resin before and after thermocycling.Materials and Methods: Twenty specimens from each of the two different soft liners were processed according to the manufacturer’s instructions between two polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA sheets. Ten specimens in each group were maintained in 37°C water for 24 hours and 10 were thermocycled (5000 cycles among baths of 5° and 55°C. The tensile bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Mode of failure was determined with SEM (magnification ×30. Two-way ANOVA was used to analyze the data.Results: The mean and standard deviation of tensile bond strength of Acropars and Molloplast-B before thermocycling were 6.59±1.85 and 1.51±0.22 MPa, respectively and 5.89±1.52 and 1.37±0.18 MPa, respectively after thermocycling. There was no significant difference before and after thermocycling. Mode of failure in Acropars and Molloplast-B were adhesive and cohesive, respectivley.Conclusion: The bond strength of Acropars was significantly higher than Molloplast-B (P<0.05.

  1. Comparison of Micro-Shear Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Root Dentin of Bovine Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Dabili

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays resin cements are commonly used in operative dentistry but the strength of micro- shear bonds of these cements was different in various studies. The aim of this study was to compare the micro-shear bond strength of three resin cements with different mechanisms consisting of maxcem, variolink II and panavia F2.0 to bovine tooth dentin. Methods: Thirty nine longitudinal slices of bovine root dentin were prepared. Specimens were randomly divided into three equal groups. In each group one resin cement was used in cylinders with 1×2mm diameters on each slice. After setting of the cement, micro-shear bond strength was evaluated by a micro-tester device with 0.5mm/min cross head speed. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey and Bonferroni tests. Results: Micro-shear bond strength of Panavia F2.0, Maxcem and Variolink II was 15.07, 7.33 and 4.97Mpa, respectively. There were significant differences between groups. Conclusion: Micro-shear bond strength of total-Etch resin cements was lower than self-Etch ones.

  2. Influence of chlorhexidine application on longitudinal adhesive bond strength in deciduous teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Castelo Branco Leitune

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of applying 2% chlorhexidine for 30 seconds after phosphoric acid conditioning of dentin on the immediate and long-term bond strengths in deciduous teeth. The occlusal enamel was removed from 40 human sound deciduous molars, which were exfoliated by natural means, and the dentin was conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds and washed with running water. The specimens were divided into two groups of 20 teeth. The test group received an application of 2% chlorhexidine for 30 seconds prior to a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system, whereas the control group received only the adhesive system. Three cylindrical restorations were made with a composite resin for each tooth. Ten teeth in each group were submitted to a microshear bond strength test after 24 hours, while the remaining teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 6 months before testing the microshear bond strength. The test group had a higher bond strength than did the control group after 6 months of storage. No statistical differences were found when groups with the same dentin treatment were compared at different times. Short applications of chlorhexidine at low concentrations prevent hybrid layer degradation and positively affect bond strength over time.

  3. Factors affecting the bond strength of denture base and reline acrylic resins to base metal materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Tanoue

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The shear bond strengths of two hard chairside reline resin materials and an auto-polymerizing denture base resin material to cast Ti and a Co-Cr alloy treated using four conditioning methods were investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Disk specimens (diameter 10 mm and thickness 2.5 mm were cast from pure Ti and Co-Cr alloy. The specimens were wet-ground to a final surface finish of 600 grit, air-dried, and treated with the following bonding systems: 1 air-abraded with 50-70-µm grain alumina (CON; 2 1 + conditioned with a primer, including an acidic phosphonoacetate monomer (MHPA; 3 1 + conditioned with a primer including a diphosphate monomer (MDP; 4 treated with a tribochemical system. Three resin materials were applied to each metal specimen. Shear bond strengths were determined before and after 10,000 thermocycles. RESULTS: The strengths decreased after thermocycling for all combinations. Among the resin materials assessed, the denture base material showed significantly (p<0.05 greater shear bond strengths than the two reline materials, except for the CON condition. After 10,000 thermocycles, the bond strengths of two reline materials decreased to less than 10 MPa for both metals. The bond strengths of the denture base material with MDP were sufficient: 34.56 MPa for cast Ti and 38.30 for Co-Cr alloy. CONCLUSION: Bonding of reline resin materials to metals assessed was clinically insufficient, regardless of metal type, surface treatment, and resin composition. For the relining of metal denture frameworks, a denture base material should be used.

  4. Valence-Bond Concepts in Coordination Chemistry and the Nature of Metal-Metal Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauling, Linus; Herman, Zelek S.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the valence-bond method, applying it to some coordination compounds of metals, especially those involving metal-metal bonds. Suggests that transition metals can form as many as nine covalent bonds, permitting valence-theory to be extended to transition metal compounds in a more effective way than has been possible before. (JN)

  5. Bonding strength in carbon steel sandwich panels under condition of diffusion-rolling with small reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jing; HAN Jing-tao; FU Ding-mei

    2005-01-01

    One of the key problems by diffusion-rolling bonding with small reduction for carbon steel plates is the bonding assistant coat. A bonding assistant coat used below 850 ℃ was developed. It contained copper as basic element and zinc as main alloy element. Other small elements and rare metals were added to decrease the melting point and to obtain a better clouding and high plasticity. Based on the theory of brazing and transient liquid diffusion welding, two carbon steel plates were rolled with small reduction by using self-made bonding assistant coat. Temperature, pressure and holding time are the main technology parameters for controlling the process of diffusion-rolling. The results show that the bonding strength is the greatest when the bonding temperature is 830 ℃, holding time is 3 min and the reduction rate is 9%.

  6. Effect of confinement on bond strength of hot-dip galvanized lap splices in concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvanizing the reinforcing steel is one of the methods used to protect bars against corrosion. Galvanizing is a hot dip process where the reinforcing bars are immersed in an aqueous pre flux solution of zinc ammonium chloride at a controlled temperature between 840 and 850 degrees F. In 2001, a research program was started at AUB to evaluate experimentally the effect of hot dip galvanizing on the bond capacity of tension lap splices anchored in full-scale beam specimens designed to fail in bond splitting mode. The test results indicated that the use of galvanized bars had a negligible effect on bond strength of reinforcement in normal strength. However, galvanizing caused an average of 20 percent decrease in bond strength of reinforcement in high strength concrete. The primary objective of research reported in this thesis, is the need to find a solution to eliminate the bond reduction of galvanized bars in high strength concrete. It is significant to evaluate the positive effect of the addition of transverse reinforcement in the splice region. The hypothesis to be tested is that such transverse reinforcement will insure uniform bond stress distribution over the entire splice region, thus mobilizing all bar lugs along the splice in the stress transfer mechanism between the bar and the surrounding concrete. Such mechanism might reduce the significant decrease in bond strength in high strength concrete due to galvanizing. To achieve this objective, eighteen full-scale beam specimens were tested in positive bending. Each beam was reinforced with bars spliced in a constant moment region at midspam. The splice length was chosen in such a way that the beams failed in bond splitting of the concrete cover in the splice region. The main variables were type of coating (black or galvanized bars), bar size (20, 25 and 32 mm), and amount of transverse reinforcement in the splice region (0, 2 or 4 stirrups). The test results indicated that confinement did not have a significant

  7. Effects of green tea on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after in-office vital bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Fernandes, Thais Maria; Schwertner, Renata de Castro Alves; Ursi, Wagner José Silva

    2016-01-01

    The application of bleaching agents before placement of resin-bonded fixed appliances significantly, but temporarily, reduces bond strength to tooth structure. Antioxidants have been studied as a means to remove residual oxygen that compromises bonding to bleached enamel. This in vitro study evaluated whether green tea (GT) could restore the shear bond strength between bonded orthodontic brackets and bleached enamel. Six experimental groups were compared: group 1, no bleaching plus bracket bonding (positive control); group 2, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) plus bracket bonding (negative control); group 3, 35% HP plus 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) plus bracket bonding; group 4, 35% HP plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding; group 5, no bleaching plus 10% SA plus bracket bonding; group 6, no bleaching plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding. Results suggested that GT, like SA, may be beneficial for bracket bonding immediately after bleaching. PMID:27148662

  8. Evaluation of shear bond strength of composite resin to nonprecious metal alloys with different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassini E.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Replacing fractured ceramometal restorations may be the best treatment option, but it is costly. Many different bonding systems are currently available to repair the fractured ceramometal restorations. This study compared the shear bond strength of composite to a base metal alloy using 4 bonding systems.Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, fifty discs, casted in a Ni-Cr-Be base metal alloy (Silvercast, Fulldent,were ground with 120, 400 and 600 grit sandpaper and divided equally into 5 groups receiving 5 treatments for veneering. Conventional feldspathic porcelain (Ceramco2, Dentsply Ceramco was applied on control group (PFM or group1 and the remaining metal discs were air- abraded for 15 seconds with 50 mm aluminum oxide at 45 psi and washed for 5 seconds under tap water.Then the specimens were dried by compressed air and the  groups were treated with one of the bonding systems as follows: All-Bond 2 (AB, Ceramic Primer (CP, Metal Primer II (MP and Panavia F2 (PF. An opaque composite (Foundation opaque followed by a hybrid composite (Gradia Direct was placed on the treated metal surface and light cured separately. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 370C and thermocycled prior to shear strength testing. Fractured specimens were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis was performed with one way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance.Results: Mean shear bond strengths of the groups in MPa were as follows: PFM group 38.6±2, All-Bond 2 17.06±2.85, Ceramic Primer 14.72±1.2, Metal Primer II 19.04±2.2 and Panavia F2 21.37±2.1. PFM group exhibited the highest mean shear bond strength and Ceramic Primer showed the lowest. Tukey's HSD test revealed the mean bond strength of the PFM group to be significantly higher than the other groups (P<0.001. The data for the PF group was significantly higher than AB and CP groups (P<0.05 and the shear

  9. Fibre-matrix bond strength studies of glass, ceramic, and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, D. H.; Mandell, J. F.; Hong, K. C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An indentation test technique for compressively loading the ends of individual fibers to produce debonding has been applied to metal, glass, and glass-ceramic matrix composites; bond strength values at debond initiation are calculated using a finite-element model. Results are correlated with composite longitudinal and interlaminar shear behavior for carbon and Nicalon fiber-reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics including the effects of matrix modifications, processing conditions, and high-temperature oxidation embrittlement. The data indicate that significant bonding to improve off-axis and shear properties can be tolerated before the longitudinal behavior becomes brittle. Residual stress and other mechanical bonding effects are important, but improved analyses and multiaxial interfacial failure criteria are needed to adequately interpret bond strength data in terms of composite performance.

  10. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Recycled Brackets using Different Methods: An In vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Maheshwari, Amit; Lall, Rajeev; Navit, Pragati; Singh, Rajeshwar; Navit, S

    2014-01-01

    Background: Debonding of brackets commonly occurs during orthodontic treatment. Due to increase in costs replacement of a damaged bracket is not liked by the dentist. This study is done to assess the shear bond strength of recycled brackets using different methods. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted using five groups of orthodontic brackets (0.022” × 0.028”, MBT prescription) bonded on the premolars mounted in cubes. Other materials required were cubical trays, bonding material, light cure unit, universal testing machine, digital camera and sandblasting unit. Results: From the result of ANOVA test we observed the test is significant (F = 20.79, P electropolisher and silane coupling agent in place of primer, showed the highest shear bond strength. PMID:25395785

  11. Influence of bleaching and desensitizing gel on bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Alves Rodrigues Britto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess, in vitro, the influence of bleaching gel and the use of desensitizing agent over bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bovine enamel. METHODS: One hundred bovine incisors were selected and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20: Group 1, control group (without bleaching; Group 2, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; Group 3, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (three applications, 15 minutes each and desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes; Group 4, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes; Group 5, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes with desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes. Brackets were bonded 7 days after bleaching and submitted to shear bond strength test after 24 hours at a compression rate of 1 mm/minute. After fracture, the adhesive remnant index (ARI was assessed under stereoscopic at 40 x magnification. Shear strength data (MPa were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test with significance level set at 5%. RESULTS: Group 5 (29.33 MPa showed significantly higher bond strength than Group 1 (19.19 MPa, Group 2 (20.59 MPa and Group 4 (23.25 MPa, but with no difference in comparison to Group 3. There was no significant difference among the other groups. The adhesive remnant index showed predominance of score 3, that is, all resin remained adhered to enamel for all groups. CONCLUSION: Bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with calcium associated with desensitizing agent application produced higher bond strength values of brackets bonded to bovine enamel.

  12. Comparative study to evaluate shear bond strength of RMGIC to composite resin using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj G Chandak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study is to compare and evaluate the role of new dental adhesives to bond composite to the resinmodified glass inomer cement (RMGIC. Materials and Methods: Thirty specimens were prepared on acrylic blocks, with wells prepared in it by drilling holes, to retain the RMGIC. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups of ten specimens each. In Group a thin layer of selfetch adhesive (3M ESPE was applied between the RMGIC and the composite resin FILTEK P60 (3M SPE. In Group II, total etch adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2, 3M ESPE was applied, and in Group III, there was no application of any adhesive between RMGIC and the composite resin. After curing all the specimens, the shear bond strength was measured using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: The results were drawn and tabulated using ANOVA-fishers and Dunnet D statistical tests.The maximum shear bond strength values were recorded in Group I specimens with self-etch adhesive showing a mean value of 2.74 when compared to the Group II adhesive (Total etch showing a mean shear strength of value 1.89, where no adhesive was used, showed a minimum mean shear bond strength of 1.42. There was a great and significant difference between Group I and Group II (P value 0.05 whereas, both Group I and Group II showed a vast and significant difference from Group III (P value = 0-001. Conclusion: Hence, this present study concludes that application of self-etch adhesive (3M ESPE, U.S.A in between RMGIC and composite resin increases the shear bond strength between RMGIC and the resin composites, as compared to the total-etch type adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2,3M ESPE, U.S.A as well as without application of the adhesive agent.

  13. Effect of Repeated Container Lid Opening on Dentin Shear Bond Strength of Two Dentin Adhesive Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hassanzadeh

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Comparing the effect of repeated opening of the container lid of two dentin adhesive systems, Prime&Bond NT (P&B NT and iBond (iB, on shear bond strength.Materials and Methods: Intact bovine lower incisors (n=60, fixed in acrylic were ran-domly divided into six groups (n=10. Groups I and II were set as control groups. P&B NT and iB were applied on the samples after five days a week, three times a day for two weeks of use in groups III and VI; and after four weeks of use in groups V and VI. The samples were evaluated by a universal testing-machine (Instron, cross-head speed 1mm/min and stereomicroscope.Results: There was no significant difference between the bond strengths in any of the three P&B NT. The mean amount of the shear bond strength for iB after 60 times of use (15.31 MPa was significantly lowerthan that at the baseline (23.51 MPa. There was no significant difference between iB at the baseline and after 30 times of use (19.26 Mpa, and also between iB after 30 times of use and after 60 times of use. All P&B NT groups showed significantly highershear bond strengths when compared with their similar iB groups in iB.Conclusion: Repeated use (60 times of the all-in-one adhesive container seems to reduce dentin shear bond strength. Therefore, containers with a lower content of the same adhe-sive or a single-dose of the adhesive are preferred.

  14. Effect of laser welding on the titanium ceramic tensile bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Galo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Titanium reacts strongly with elements, mainly oxygen at high temperature. The high temperature of titanium laser welding modifies the surface, and may interfere on the metal-ceramic tensile bond strength. OBJECTIVE: The influence of laser welding on the titanium-ceramic bonding has not yet been established. The purpose of this in vitro study was to analyze the influence of laser welding applied to commercially pure titanium (CpTi substructure on the bond strength of commercial ceramic. The influence of airborne particle abrasion (Al2O3 conditions was also studied. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty CpTi cylindrical rods (3 mm x 60 mm were cast and divided into 2 groups: with laser welding (L and without laser welding (WL. Each group was divided in 4 subgroups, according to the size of the particles used in airborne particle abrasion: A - Al2O3 (250 µm; B - Al2O3 (180 µm; C - Al2O3 (110 µm; D - Al2O3 (50 µm. Ceramic rings were fused around the CpTi rods. Specimens were invested and their tensile strength was measured at fracture with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2.0 mm/min and 200 kgf load cell. Statistical analysis was carried out with analysis of variance and compared using the independent t test (p<0.05. RESULTS: Significant differences were found among all subgroups (p<0.05. The highest and the lowest bond strength means were recorded in subgroups WLC (52.62 MPa and LD (24.02 MPa, respectively. CONCLUSION: Airborne particle abrasion yielded significantly lower bond strength as the Al2O3 particle size decreased. Mechanical retention decreased in the laser-welded specimens, i.e. the metal-ceramic tensile bond strength was lower.

  15. The Effect of Porcelain Veneer and Coloring Pigments on Microtensile Bond Strength of a Zirconia Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alikhasi M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The bond strength between veneer ceramics and zirconia frameworks is the weakest component in the layered ceramics. Due to the possible effect of adding pigments to the core materials on the bond strength between core and veneer as well as the introduction of new ceramic materials in dentistry, the aim of this study was to compare the zirconia core-veneer microtensile bond strength using two ceramic veneers with or without coloring the core.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 12 disc-shaped specimens were fabricated using a manually aided design- manually aided manufactured (MAD/MAM zirconia core (Zirkonzahn. Two veneering ceramics of Ceram Kiss and Zirkonzahn ICE were also used to veneer the specimens. Half of the Zirkonzahn discs were remained white and the others were colored by shade A2.Then, the discs were cut into microbars (30 for each group and the microtensile bond strength of the core-veneer was calculated. The specimens were assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and the data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Student's t-test.Results: Significant differences with respect to veneer layer were found (P<0.001. No significant differences were seen among colored and uncolored cores (P=0.69. Conclusion: According to the apparent effect of veneering ceramics on the core-veneer bond strength, careful selection of these agents is essential to achieve adequate bond strength between core and veneer to prevent delaminating and chipping failures of zirconia veneered restorations.

  16. The Effect of Different Soft Drinks on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    OpenAIRE

    M Omid Khoda; F. Heravi; H Shafee; Mollahassani, H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: It is proved that acidic soft drinks that are commonly used, have an adverse effect on dental structures, and may deteriorate oral heath of our patients and orthodontic appliances. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of yoghurt drink with other soft drinks on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.Materials and Methods: Seventy-five first premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes were selected and standard twin metal brackets were bonded on the center o...

  17. Effects of surface treatments of conventional glass-ionomer on shear bond strength to giomer

    OpenAIRE

    Soodabeh Kimyai; Narmin Mohammadi; Parnian Alizadeh Oskoee; Mohammad Esmaeel Ebrahimi Chaharom; Mahmood Bahari; Alireza Sadr; Ghazaleh Ahmadizenouz

    2012-01-01

    Background : An appropriate bond between glass-ionomer and the superficial resin materials is very important for the success of sandwich technique. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of three surface treatments of conventional glass-ionomer on its shear bond strength to giomer. Materials and Methods: Sixty cylindrical specimens of a conventional glass-ionomer (GC Fuji II) were prepared and randomly divided into three groups (n = 20). The specimens in groups ...

  18. In the Search of Fundamental Inner Bond Strength of Solid Elements

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the physics behind the surface properties and nano-scale phenomena, we are motivated first to investigate the inner bond strengths as well as the effect of number of neighboring atoms and their relative distance in addition to space positions (crystallography). Therefore, in order to study the effect of the nature of metallic bond on their physico-chemical properties, we first tried to investigate and introduce a mathematical model for transforming the bulk molar cohesi...

  19. Evaluation of the Shear Bond Strength of Nanocomposite on Carious and Sound Deciduous Dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Deshmukh, Seema; Nandlal, B

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of conventional composites with nanocomposites in carious and sound deciduous dentin with the use of self-etching adhesive. Methodology: Human primary molars were ground to obtain flat dentin surfaces and divided into two groups: Carious dentin and sound dentin group. The carious teeth specimens were prepared by removing infected dentin and area with affected dentin was used for bonding composite. Teeth wit...

  20. Effect of multiple debonding sequences on shear bond strength of new stainless steel brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Eslamian, Ladan; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Tavakol, Pegah; Tavakol, Ali; Amini, Nazila; Lynch, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This in-vitro study aimed at evaluating the effect of three debonding sequences on the shear bond strength (SBS) of new stainless steel (SS) brackets. Materials and Methods: Stainless steel twin brackets (0.022-inch, American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, WI, USA) were bonded with light cure adhesive (Transbond XT, 3M Unitek, St. Paul, MN, USA) to 80 newly extracted human premolars after acid etching with 37% phosphoric acid (30 s). Brackets were debonded with a universal testing machi...

  1. Effect of enamel protective agents on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Montasser, Mona A; Taha, Mahasen

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper aimed to study the effect of two enamel protective agents on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded with conventional and self-etching primer (SEP) adhesive systems. Methods The two protective agents used were resin infiltrate (ICON) and Clinpro; the two adhesive systems used were self-etching primer system (Transbond Plus Self Etching Primer + Transbond XT adhesive) and a conventional adhesive system (37% phosphoric acid etch + Transbond XT primer ...

  2. Comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using various zirconia primers

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Jin-Seok; Hwang, Chung-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to zirconia surfaces using three different zirconia primers and one silane primer, and subjected to thermocycling. Methods We designed 10 experimental groups following the surface treatment and thermocycling. The surface was treated with one of the following method: no-primer (NP), Porcelain Conditioner (PC), Z-PRIME Plus (ZP), Monobond Plus (MP) and Zirconia Liner Premium (ZL) (n=20). ...

  3. Bond Strength Degradation for CFRP and Steel reinforcing Bars in Concrete at Elevated Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Maluk, Cristian; Bisby, Luke; Terrasi, Giovanni; Green, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Novel concrete elements are emerging utilizing high performance self-consolidating concrete (HPSCC) reinforced with high-strength, lightweight, and non-corroding carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) prestressed reinforcement. The fire performance of these elements must be understood before they can be used with confidence. In particular, the bond performance of the novel CFRP reinforcement at elevated temperatures requires investigation. This paper examines the bond performance of a specifi...

  4. Strength of the pnicogen bond in complexes involving group Va elements N, P, and As.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Dani; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2015-03-01

    A set of 36 pnicogen homo- and heterodimers, R3E···ER3 and R3E···E′R′3, involving differently substituted group Va elements E = N, P, and As has been investigated at the ωB97X-D/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory to determine the strength of the pnicogen bond with the help of the local E···E′ stretching force constants k(a). The latter are directly related to the amount of charge transferred from an E donor lone pair orbital to an E′ acceptor σ* orbital, in the sense of a through-space anomeric effect. This leads to a buildup of electron density in the intermonomer region and a distinct pnicogen bond strength order quantitatively assessed via k(a). However, the complex binding energy ΔE depends only partly on the pnicogen bond strength as H,E-attractions, H-bonding, dipole-dipole, or multipole-multipole attractions also contribute to the stability of pnicogen bonded dimers. A variation from through-space anomeric to second order hyperonjugative, and skewed π,π interactions is observed. Charge transfer into a π* substituent orbital of the acceptor increases the absolute value of ΔE by electrostatic effects but has a smaller impact on the pnicogen bond strength. A set of 10 dimers obtains its stability from covalent pnicogen bonding whereas all other dimers are stabilized by electrostatic interactions. The latter are quantified by the magnitude of the local intermonomer bending force constants XE···E′. Analysis of the frontier orbitals of monomer and dimer in connection with the investigation of electron difference densities, and atomic charges lead to a simple rationalization of the various facets of pnicogen bonding. The temperature at which a given dimer is observable under experimental conditions is provided. PMID:25325889

  5. Tensile bond strength of composite luting cements to metal alloys after various surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Denizoglu Saip; Hanyaloglu Cem; Aksakal Bunyamin

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effects of two different surface treatments and bonding agents on tensile bond strength between a Co-Cr and a Ni-Cr cast alloy and two resin-luting cements. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and forty alloy samples were cast and subjected to surface treatments such as sandblasting, chemical etching, and sandblasting plus chemical etching. Panavia F and CandB cement were used as cementing mediums. The etching qualities were examined by a stereooptic microscope. Failur...

  6. Effect of LASER Irradiation on the Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramic Surface to Dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Sima Shahabi; Poya Aslani; Mohamad Ehsan Khalil; Abbase Azari; Sakine Nikzad

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims: Reliable bonding between tooth substrate and zirconia-based ceramic restorations is always of great importance. The laser might be useful for treatment of ceramic surfaces. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic surface to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 40 Cercon zirconia ceramic blocks were fabricated. The surface treatment was performed using sand...

  7. Influence of bleaching and desensitizing gel on bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Alves Rodrigues Britto; Adriana Simoni Lucato; Heloisa Cristina Valdrighi; Sílvia Amélia Scudeler Vedovello

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess, in vitro, the influence of bleaching gel and the use of desensitizing agent over bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bovine enamel. METHODS: One hundred bovine incisors were selected and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20): Group 1, control group (without bleaching); Group 2, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; Group 3, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (three applications, 15 minutes each) and desensitizing agent applied...

  8. Effect of Pre-heating on Microtensile Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Dentin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrahim Davari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Direct composite resin restorations are widely used and the impact of different storage temperatures on composites is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of composite to dentin after different pre-curing temperatures.Occlusal surfaces of 44 human molars were ground with diamond burs under water coolant and polished with 600 grit silicon carbide papers to obtain flat dentin surfaces. The dentin was etched with 37% phosphoric acid and bonded with Adper Single Bond 2 according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups (n=22 according to the composite resin applied: FiltekP60 and Filtek Z250. Each group included three subgroups of composite resin pre-curing temperatures (4°C, 23°C and 37°C. Composite resins were applied to the dentin surfaces in a plastic mold (8mm in diameter and 4mm in length incrementally and cured. Twenty-two composite-to-dentin hour-glass sticks with one mm(2 cross-sectional area per group were prepared. Microtensile bond strength measurements were made using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of one mm/min. For statistical analysis, t-test, one-way and two-way ANOVA were used. The level of significance was set at P<0.05.Filtek P60 pre-heated at 37ºC had significantly higher microtensile bond strength than Filtek Z250 under the same condition. The microtensile bond strengths were not significantly different at 4ºC, 23ºC and 37ºC subgroups of each composite resin group.Filtek P60 and Filtek Z250 did not have significantly different microtensile bond strengths at 4ºC and 23ºC but Filtek P60 had significantly higher microtensile bond strength at 37 ºC. Composite and temperature interactions had significant effects on the bond strength.

  9. The Impact of Bonding Agent Composition on Flexural Strength of Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharafedin F.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Bonding agent composition for impregnation of fiber may increase the flexural strength of fiber-reinforced composites by means of increasing adhesion.Purpose: Investigating the impact of filler of four commercial bonding agents with different hydrophobicity on the flexural strength of a fiber-reinforced composite.Materials and Method: In this experimental study, six groups (N=15 per group of polyethylene fiber-reinforced composite specimens were prepared. In group 1, the positive control group, the samples were prepared using composite and without fiber, whereas in group 2, as the negative group, fiber-reinforced composite without any bonding agent resination was used. The fibers in group 3 to 6 were resinated with Single bond 2, Single bond, Resist, and all bond 3, respectively. Firstly, the fiber was placed in the base of the specimen preparation mold. Then the mold was filled with composite and cured. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours. In the next step, the flexural strength was measured in Three-point bending test with Instron machine at cross- head speed of 1 mm/min. Failure mode of the specimens was observed with stereomicroscope. At last, statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and LSD post hoc tests ( p < 0.05. Results: Ono-way ANOVA test was used for evaluating the relationship among the groups, and for pair-wise comparison, LSD post-hoc test was used. One-way ANOVA test showed a significant difference among the groups. The All bond 3 group showed a significantly higher flexural strength than the other groups ( p <0.001. Groups 3 to 6 had significantly higher flexural strength than flexural strength of the control groups ( p <0.05.Conclusion: The choice of bonding agent can have a significant impact on the flexural properties of the fiber-reinforced composite. When filled hydrophobic bonding agent was used for impregnation of the fiber, compared to negative control group, flexural

  10. Effects of surface treatments on bond strength of glass-infiltrated ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y C; Tseng, H; Shih, Y H; Lee, S Y

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of various surface treatments on the bond strength at the In-Ceram/resin composite interface. Ninety-eight In-Ceram specimens were divided into seven groups and exposed to various surface treatments as follows: (A) control (B) saliva contamination (C) saliva contamination plus aluminum oxide sandblasting (D) glove powder contamination (E) glove powder contamination plus aluminum oxide sandblasting (F) rough aluminum oxide sandblasting and (G) excess glass infiltration. A resin composite cylinder was cemented to each In-Ceram specimen with Panavia 21 resin luting cement. Half of the cemented specimens in each group were stored in water for 24 h, and the other half were stored in water for 2 weeks and then were thermo-cycled for 2000 cycles. Shear bond strengths (SBS) of seven specimens in each subgroup were determined and analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD test as well as Student's t-test. Scanning electronic microscopy was used to identify the type of bond failure. Shear bond strength was significantly decreased by saliva and glove powder contaminations (P contaminated specimens. However, the glove powder plus sandblasting group showed no significant difference in SBS compared with the control group. There was no significant difference in SBS between the excess glass-infiltrating group and the control group. The SBS was significantly decreased by rough aluminum oxide sandblasting (P contaminants may significantly influence the bond strength of In-Ceram restorative in clinical use. PMID:11580818

  11. Long-term bond strength of adhesive systems applied to etched and deproteinized dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninoshka Uceda-Gómez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the early and 12-month bond strength of two adhesive systems (Single Bond-SB and One Step-OS applied to demineralized dentin (WH and demineralized/NaOCl-treated dentin (H. Twenty flat dentin surfaces were exposed, etched, rinsed and slightly dried. For the H groups, a solution of 10% NaOCl was applied for 60 s, rinsed (15 s and slightly dried. The adhesives were applied according to the manufacturer's instructions and composite resin crowns were incrementally constructed. After 24 h (water-37ºC, the specimens was sectioned in order to obtain resin-dentin sticks (0.8 mm². The specimens were tested in microtensile (0.5 mm/min immediately (IM or after 12 months of water storage (12M. The data (MPa were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05. Only the main factors adhesive and time were significant (p=0.004 and p=0.003, respectively. SB (42.3±9.1 showed higher bond strengths than OS (33.6±11.6. The mean bond strength for IM-group (42.5±8.7 was statistically superior to 12M (33.3±11.8. The use of 10% NaOCl, after acid etching, did not improve the immediate and the long-term resin-dentin bond strength.

  12. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL and a two-steps/self-etch adhesive system (Optibond XTR were used. Composite buildups were performed with a nanohybrid composite (Herculite XTR. All specimens were submitted to thermocycling ageing (10000 cycles. The specimens were sectioned in 1 mm2 sticks. Microtensile bond strength tests were measured. Nonparametric statistical analyses were performed due to nonnormality of data. Optibond XTR on irradiated and nonirradiated teeth did not show any significant differences. However, Optibond FL bond strength was more effective on nonirradiated teeth than on irradiated teeth. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it can be concluded that radiotherapy had a significant detrimental effect on bond strength to human dentin. However, it seems that adhesive choice could be adapted to the substrata. According to the present study, the two-steps/self-etch (Optibond XTR adhesive system tested could be more effective on irradiated dentin compared to three-steps/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL.

  13. Experimental research on bond strength of deformed GFRP rebars with different surface configurations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Qing-duo; WANG Yan-lei; OU Jin-ping

    2009-01-01

    Based on the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) criterion, experiments on 30 pull-out speci-mens were conducted to study the bond strength of deformed GFRP rebars with 8 different surface configura-tions.Each rebar was embedded in a 150 mm concrete cube, and the test embedded length was four times of the rebar diameter.Relationship between the mode of failure, the average bond strength and the average bond strength-slip for each rebar was analyzed.Results show that the failure mode of all specimens is the shearing off or desquamation of fibs, no splitting cracks appear on the cube specimens.The bond stress of deformed GFRP rebars mainly depends on the mechanical interaction between the ribs of the bar and the surrounding concrete, and the bond strength of deformed GFRP rebars is improved obviously.The optimal rib spacing is less than 2.5 times of the rebar diameter, and the rib height is more than 3% of the rebar diameter.

  14. Microtensile bond strength and micromorphologic analysis of surface-treated resin nanoceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joon-Ho

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different surface treatment methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to resin nanoceramic (RNC). MATERIALS AND METHODS RNC onlays (Lava Ultimate) (n=30) were treated using air abrasion with and without a universal adhesive, or HF etching followed by a universal adhesive with and without a silane coupling agent, or tribological silica coating with and without a universal adhesive, and divided into 6 groups. Onlays were luted with resin cement to dentin surfaces. A microtensile bond strength test was performed and evaluated by one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (α=.05). A nanoscratch test, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used for micromorphologic analysis (α=.05). The roughness and elemental proportion were evaluated by Kruskal–Wallis test and Mann–Whitney U test. RESULTS Tribological silica coating showed the highest roughness, followed by air abrasion and HF etching. After HF etching, the RNC surface presented a decrease in oxygen, silicon, and zirconium ratio with increasing carbon ratio. Air abrasion with universal adhesive showed the highest bond strength followed by tribological silica coating with universal adhesive. HF etching with universal adhesive showed the lowest bond strength. CONCLUSION An improved understanding of the effect of surface treatment of RNC could enhance the durability of resin bonding when used for indirect restorations. When using RNC for restoration, effective and systemic surface roughening methods and an appropriate adhesive are required.

  15. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Cécile; Villat, Cyril; Abouelleil, Hazem; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL) and a two-steps/self-etch adhesive system (Optibond XTR) were used. Composite buildups were performed with a nanohybrid composite (Herculite XTR). All specimens were submitted to thermocycling ageing (10000 cycles). The specimens were sectioned in 1 mm(2) sticks. Microtensile bond strength tests were measured. Nonparametric statistical analyses were performed due to nonnormality of data. Optibond XTR on irradiated and nonirradiated teeth did not show any significant differences. However, Optibond FL bond strength was more effective on nonirradiated teeth than on irradiated teeth. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it can be concluded that radiotherapy had a significant detrimental effect on bond strength to human dentin. However, it seems that adhesive choice could be adapted to the substrata. According to the present study, the two-steps/self-etch (Optibond XTR) adhesive system tested could be more effective on irradiated dentin compared to three-steps/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL). PMID:26783528

  16. Effect of thermal cycling on the bond strength of self-adhesive cements to fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzitelli, Claudia; Monticelli, Francesca; Toledano, Manuel; Ferrari, Marco; Osorio, Raquel

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the push-out bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements to epoxy resin-based fiber posts after challenging by thermocycling. Thirty-six single-rooted premolars were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were drilled to receive RelyX Fiber posts #1. Three self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, and Breeze) were used for luting fiber posts. The bonded specimens were either stored for 1 month in a moist field (37°C) or submitted to thermocycling (5,000 times) prior to push-out test. The maximum force required to dislodge the post via an apical-coronal direction was recorded (megapascal). The data were statistically analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (p Breeze were higher than those of G-Cem. After thermocycling, the bond strength of G-Cem increased and no differences were found between groups. RelyX Unicem and Breeze bond strengths were not affected by the thermal challenge. Thermal cycling and cement type differently influence the bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements. Self-adhesive cements can represent an option for luting fiber posts into root canal. PMID:21670983

  17. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Benetti, Ana Raquel;

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the...... of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin...

  18. Concrete-to-concrete bond strength. Influence of the roughness of the substrate surface

    OpenAIRE

    Júlio, Eduardo N. B. S.; Branco, Fernando A. B.; Silva, Vítor D.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to evaluate the bond strength between two concrete layers, for different techniques for increasing the roughness of the substrate surface. In a total of 25 slant shear specimens and 25 pull-off specimens the substrate surface was prepared by wire-brushing; sand-blasting; chipping with a light jackhammer; or were left as-cast against steel formwork. Three months later, the new concrete was added. Pull-off tests were performed to evaluate the bond strength in...

  19. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Shear Bond Strength of Adhesives to Primary Teeth Enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Farokh Gisovar, Elham; Hedayati, Nassim; Shadman, Niloofar; Shafiee, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: CPP-ACP (Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate) has an important role in caries prevention in pediatric patients. This study was done, because of the great use of CPP-ACP and the need for restoration for teeth treated with CPP-ACP as well as the importance of shear bond strength of adhesives in the success of restorations. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on shear bond strength of dental adhesiv...

  20. Emergence, Learning Difficulties, and Misconceptions in Chemistry Undergraduate Students' Conceptualizations of Acid Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tümay, Halil

    2016-03-01

    Philosophical debates about chemistry have clarified that the issue of emergence plays a critical role in the epistemology and ontology of chemistry. In this article, it is argued that the issue of emergence has also significant implications for understanding learning difficulties and finding ways of addressing them in chemistry. Particularly, it is argued that many misconceptions in chemistry may derive from students' failure to consider emergence in a systemic manner by taking into account all relevant factors in conjunction. Based on this argument, undergraduate students' conceptions of acids, and acid strength (an emergent chemical property) were investigated and it was examined whether or not they conceptualized acid strength as an emergent chemical property. The participants were 41 third- and fourth-year undergraduate students. A concept test and semi-structured interviews were used to probe students' conceptualizations and reasoning about acid strength. Findings of the study revealed that the majority of the undergraduate students did not conceptualize acid strength as an emergent property that arises from interactions among multiple factors. They generally focused on a single factor to predict and explain acid strength, and their faulty responses stemmed from their failure to recognize and consider all factors that affect acid strength. Based on these findings and insights from philosophy of chemistry, promoting system thinking and epistemologically sound argumentative discourses among students is suggested for meaningful chemical education.

  1. Two-Center/Three-Electron Sigma Half-Bonds in Main Group and Transition Metal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, John F

    2016-01-19

    First proposed in a classic Linus Pauling paper, the two-center/three-electron (2c/3e) σ half-bond challenges the extremes of what may or may not be considered a chemical bond. Two electrons occupying a σ bonding orbital and one electron occupying the antibonding σ* orbital results in bond orders of ∼0.5 that are characteristic of metastable and exotic species, epitomized in the fleetingly stable He2(+) ion. In this Account, I describe the use of coordination chemistry to stabilize such fugacious three-electron bonded species at disparate ends of the periodic table. A recent emphasis in the chemistry of metal-metal bonds has been to prepare compounds with extremely short metal-metal distances and high metal-metal bond orders. But similar chemistry can be used to explore metal-metal bond orders less than one, including 2c/3e half-bonds. Bimetallic compounds in the Ni2(II,III) and Pd2(II,III) oxidation states were originally examined in the 1980s, but the evidence collected at that time suggested that they did not contain 2c/3e σ bonds. Both classes of compounds have been re-examined using EPR spectroscopy and modern computational methods that show the unpaired electron of each compound to occupy a M-M σ* orbital, consistent with 2c/3e Ni-Ni and Pd-Pd σ half-bonds. Elsewhere on the periodic table, a seemingly unrelated compound containing a trigonal bipyramidal Cu3S2 core caused a stir, leaving prominent theorists at odds with one another as to whether the compound contains a S-S bond. Due to my previous experience with 2c/3e metal-metal bonds, I suggested that the Cu3S2 compound could contain a 2c/3e S-S σ half-bond in the previously unknown oxidation state of S2(3-). By use of the Cambridge Database, a number of other known compounds were identified as potentially containing S2(3-) ligands, including a noteworthy set of cyclopentadienyl-supported compounds possessing diamond-shaped Ni2E2 units with E = S, Se, and Te. These compounds were subjected to

  2. The influence of an adhesive system on shear bond strength of repaired high-copper amalgams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Ambrose, E R; elBadrawy, H E

    1991-01-01

    The shear bond strengths of intact high-copper spherical and admixed amalgams were compared with repaired high-copper spherical and admixed amalgam specimens with and without the use of an adhesive system (Amalgambond). In the spherical group the shear bond strength of the repaired specimens was found to be 55 and 53.2% of the intact specimens without and with the use of the adhesive system. After thermocycling those percentages were 48.5 and 43. In the admixed groups those percentages were 39, 36.5, 34.5, and 35.2 respectively. It was found that the application of Amalgambond did not significantly increase the strength of the repaired amalgam. Thermocycling only had a significantly adverse effect on the repair strength in the admixed group repaired without an adhesive system. PMID:1813872

  3. Confinement effects on the steel-concrete bond strength and pull-out failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this contribution, an experimental campaign based on unconfined and actively confined pull-out tests is presented to investigate the bond stress-slip behavior. This campaign aims at underlining passive (concrete cover) and active (external pressure) confinement effects on the maximal bond stress. Experimental results are associated to a numerical approach in order to predict the evolution of the bond strength. Equations are finally proposed that distinguish splitting failure (function of the concrete tensile properties) and pull-out failure (function of the compressive concrete properties). (authors)

  4. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    OpenAIRE

    Si-Eun Lee; Ji-Hyeon Bae; Jae-Won Choi; Yong-Chan Jeon; Chang-Mo Jeong; Mi-Jung Yoon; Jung-Bo Huh

    2015-01-01

    This study compared shear bond strength (SBS) of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC) and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm) of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA), Maxcem Elite (MAX), Clearfil SA Luting (CSL), PermaCem 2.0 (PM2), Rely-X U200 (RXU), Smartcem 2 (SC2)) were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC)) was bonded to the specimens with self-c...

  5. Effect of water storage on microshear bond strength of four dental adhesive systems to dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Montenegro, Robinson Viegas; Carlo, Hugo Lemes; Batista, André Ulisses Dantas; Montenegro, Sheyla Christinne Lira; Farias, Ohana Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the microshear bond strength of 4 dental adhesive systems after 1 year-water storage. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The sample consisted of 120 cylinders of composite, obtained from 24 bovine incisors, which were divided into four experimental groups: G1-Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, G2-Single Bond 2, G3-Clearfil SE Bond, G4-Adper Easy One and two storage times in distilled water: T0 - 24h and T1 - 1 year. A bivariate analysis was performed using the ANOVA and Tukey test (α=0.05). Result...

  6. Effect of Curing Mode on Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to Composite Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Jin-Young Kim; Ga-Young Cho; Byoung-Duck Roh; Yooseok Shin

    2016-01-01

    To overcome the disadvantages of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) processed indirect restorations using glass-ceramics and other ceramics, resin nano ceramic, which has high strength and wear resistance with improved polish retention and optical properties, was introduced. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and fracture pattern of indirect CAD/CAM composite blocks cemented with two self-etch adhesive cements with different curing mode...

  7. Bonding Properties of Basalt Fiber and Strength Reduction According to Fiber Orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong-Il Choi; Bang Yeon Lee

    2015-01-01

    The basalt fiber is a promising reinforcing fiber because it has a relatively higher tensile strength and a density similar to that of a concrete matrix as well as no corrosion possibility. This study investigated experimentally the bonding properties of basalt fiber with cementitious material as well as the effect of fiber orientation on the tensile strength of basalt fiber for evaluating basalt fiber’s suitability as a reinforcing fiber. Single fiber pullout tests were performed and then th...

  8. An In Vitro Comparative Study of Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Bleached Enamel using Synthetic and Herbal Antioxidants

    OpenAIRE

    Suneetha, Ram; Pavithra, S; Thomas, John; Nanga, G Swapna Priya; Shiromany, Aseem; Shivrayan, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Background: The bond strength to bleached enamel is reduced, if adhesive restorations are carried out immediately. So the purpose of this in vitro study was an attempt to regain the lost bond strength, for which, the comparison of shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel was carried out using various antioxidants: 10% Sodium ascorbate, Rosemary extracts, Pedicularis extracts. Materials and Methods: Fifty human extracted single rooted teeth were collected. They were decoronate...

  9. Bond strengths of brackets bonded to enamel surfaces conditioned with femtosecond and Er:YAG laser systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglarci, Cahide; Demir, Necla; Aksakalli, Sertac; Dilber, Erhan; Sozer, Ozlem Akinci; Kilic, Hamdi Sukur

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare femtosecond and Er:YAG laser systems with regard to enamel demineralization and bracket bond strength. Human-extracted premolars were randomized to three groups (n = 17) depending on the conditioning treatment used for the buccal surfaces: 37 % orthophosphoric acid, Er:YAG laser etching (MSP mode 120 mJ, 10 Hz, 1.2 W), and femtosecond laser etching (0.4 W, 800 nm, 90 fs/pulse, 1 kHz). Metal brackets were bonded with Transbond XT to the conditioned surfaces and light cured for 20 s. The samples were thermocycled (5000 cycles, 5-55 °C) and subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) testing using a universal testing machine. Failure types were analyzed under an optical stereomicroscope and SEM. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was evaluated to assess residual adhesive on the enamel surface. The results revealed no significant differences in SBS between the Er:YAG laser (7.2 ± 3.3 MPa) and acid etching groups (7.3 ± 2.7 MPa; p laser etching group (3.3 ± 1.2 MPa) and the other two groups (p laser conditioning with an Er:YAG system results in successful etching, similar to that obtained with acid. The sole use of a femtosecond laser system may not provide an adequate bond strength at the bracket-enamel interface. PMID:27225386

  10. Oxide film microstructure: the link between surface preparation processes and strength/durability of adhesively bonded aluminum. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsia, K. Jimmy; Pearlstein, Arne J.; Scheeline, Alexander; Shang, Jian Ku

    2000-11-30

    Strength and durability of adhesive bonding of aluminum alloys structures are intrinsically determined by the surface microstructures and interfacial failure micromechanisms. The current project presents a multidisciplinary approach to addressing critical issues controlling the strength and durability of adhesive bonds of aluminum alloys. Three main thrust areas have been pursued: surface treatment technology development to achieve desirable surface microstructures; relationship between surface structure and properties of adhesive bonds; and failure mechanisms of adhesively bonded components.

  11. Effect of various commercially available mouthrinses on shear bond strength of orthodontic metal brackets: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazeer Ahmed Meeran

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Alcohol containing mouthrinses affect the shear bond strength of the metal orthodontic brackets bonded with composite resin (Transbond XT in the present study, more when compared with alcohol-free mouthrinses. It is, therefore, highly advisable to avoid alcohol containing mouthrinses in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment and use alcohol-free mouthrinses as adjuncts to regular oral hygiene procedures for maintaining good enamel integrity and periodontal health, without compromising the shear bond strength of the bonded metal brackets.

  12. Effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of zirconia to three resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadjoo, Nisa

    Statement of problem: There are no standard guidelines for material selection to obtain acceptable bonding to high-strength zirconium oxide ceramic. Studies suggest resin cements in combination with MDP-containing primer is a reasonable choice, however, the other cements cannot be rejected and need further investigation. Objective: The purpose of this in vitro study was the evaluation of the shear bond strength of three composite resin cements to zirconia ceramic after using different surface conditioning methods. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty sintered Y-TZP ceramic (IPS e.max ZirCAD) squares (8 x 8 x 4 mm) were embedded in acrylic molds, then divided into three groups (n=40) based on the type of cement used. Within each group, the specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=10) and treated as follows: (1) Air abrasion with 50microm aluminum oxide (Al2O 3) particles (ALO); (2) Air abrasion + Scotchbond Universal adhesive (SBU); (3) Air abrasion + Monobond Plus (MBP); (4) Air abrasion + Z-Prime Plus (ZPP). Composite cylinders were used as carriers to bond to conditioned ceramic using (1) RelyX Ultimate adhesive resin cement (RX); (2) Panavia SA self-adhesive resin cement (PSA); (3) Calibra esthetic cement (CAL). The bonded specimens were submerged in distilled water and subjected to 24-hour incubation period at 37°C. All specimens were stressed in shear at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA. The bond strength values (MPa), means and standard deviations were calculated and data were analyzed using analysis of variance with Fisher's PLSD multiple comparison test at the 0.05 level of significance. The nature of failure was recorded. Results: The two-way ANOVA showed Panavia SA to have the highest strength at 44.3 +/- 16.9 MPa (presin cement, Panavia SA, yielded the strongest bond to Y-TZP ceramic when compared to adhesive (RelyX Ultimate) or esthetic (Calibra) resin cements. Air

  13. Fracture and shear bond strength analyses of different dental veneering ceramics to zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diniz, Alexandre C. [School of Dentistry (DOD), Division of Prosthodontics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte -UFRN, 59056-000, Natal (Brazil); Nascimento, Rubens M. [Materials Engineering Department, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte - UFRN, Natal (Brazil); Souza, Julio C.M. [Centre for Mechanics and Materials Technologies - CT2M, Department of Mechanical Engineering (DEM), Universidade do Minho, Campus Azurém, 4800-058, Guimarães (Portugal); Henriques, Bruno B. [Materials Engineering Department, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte - UFRN, Natal (Brazil); Centre for Mechanics and Materials Technologies - CT2M, Department of Mechanical Engineering (DEM), Universidade do Minho, Campus Azurém, 4800-058, Guimarães (Portugal); Carreiro, Adriana F.P., E-mail: adrianadafonte@hotmail.com [School of Dentistry (DOD), Division of Prosthodontics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte -UFRN, 59056-000, Natal (Brazil)

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the interaction of different layering porcelains with zirconia via shear bond strength test and microscopy. Four different groups of dental veneering porcelains (VM9, Zirkonzanh, Ceramco, IPS) were fused onto forty zirconia-based cylindrical substrates (8 mm in diameter and 12 mm in height) (n = 10), according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Additionally, layered dental porcelain (D-sign, Ivoclar) was fired on ten Ni–Cr cylindrical substrates Shear bond strength tests of the veneering porcelain to zirconia or Ni–Cr were carried out at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. After the shear bond tests, the interfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fracture type exhibited by the different systems was also assessed. The results were statistically analyzed by ANOVA at a significant level of p < .05. The shear bond strength values of the porcelain-to-NiCr interfaces (25.3 ± 7.1 MPa) were significantly higher than those recorded for the following porcelain-to-zirconia systems: Zirkonzanh (18.8 ± 1 MPa), Ceramco (18.2 ± 4.7 MPa), and IPS (16 ± 4.5 MPa). However, no significant differences were found in the shear bond strength values between the porcelain-to-NiCr and porcelain (VM9)-to-zirconia (23.2 ± 5.1 MPa) groups (p > .05). All-ceramic interfaces revealed mixed failure type, cohesive in the porcelain and adhesive at the interface. This study demonstrated that all-ceramic systems do not attain yet the same bond strength standards equivalent to metal–ceramic systems. Therefore, despite the esthetic appeal of all-ceramic restorations, the adhesion between the porcelain and zirconia framework is still an issue considering the long term success of the restoration. - Highlights: • This study assessed the shear bond strength of different porcelains to zirconia. • The porcelain Vita VM9 showed a high shear bond strength to zirconia. • The fracture surface of all-ceramic systems revealed

  14. Fracture and shear bond strength analyses of different dental veneering ceramics to zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the interaction of different layering porcelains with zirconia via shear bond strength test and microscopy. Four different groups of dental veneering porcelains (VM9, Zirkonzanh, Ceramco, IPS) were fused onto forty zirconia-based cylindrical substrates (8 mm in diameter and 12 mm in height) (n = 10), according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Additionally, layered dental porcelain (D-sign, Ivoclar) was fired on ten Ni–Cr cylindrical substrates Shear bond strength tests of the veneering porcelain to zirconia or Ni–Cr were carried out at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. After the shear bond tests, the interfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fracture type exhibited by the different systems was also assessed. The results were statistically analyzed by ANOVA at a significant level of p < .05. The shear bond strength values of the porcelain-to-NiCr interfaces (25.3 ± 7.1 MPa) were significantly higher than those recorded for the following porcelain-to-zirconia systems: Zirkonzanh (18.8 ± 1 MPa), Ceramco (18.2 ± 4.7 MPa), and IPS (16 ± 4.5 MPa). However, no significant differences were found in the shear bond strength values between the porcelain-to-NiCr and porcelain (VM9)-to-zirconia (23.2 ± 5.1 MPa) groups (p > .05). All-ceramic interfaces revealed mixed failure type, cohesive in the porcelain and adhesive at the interface. This study demonstrated that all-ceramic systems do not attain yet the same bond strength standards equivalent to metal–ceramic systems. Therefore, despite the esthetic appeal of all-ceramic restorations, the adhesion between the porcelain and zirconia framework is still an issue considering the long term success of the restoration. - Highlights: • This study assessed the shear bond strength of different porcelains to zirconia. • The porcelain Vita VM9 showed a high shear bond strength to zirconia. • The fracture surface of all-ceramic systems revealed

  15. Evaluation of bond strength of human dentin subjected to different forms of storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Jacob

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Human teeth are frequently used in laboratory and research activities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of human dentin subjected to different forms of storage.Material and methods: Fifteen intact third molars were selected and divided into three experimental groups (n = 5: 1 teeth sterilized by autoclave for 15 minutes (121°C and frozen in distilled water for 60 days; 2 teeth immersed in 2% glutaraldehyde solution for 24 hours and frozen in distilled water for 60 days; 3 only frozen in distilled water for 60 days (control. Samples were prepared with a diamond disk under cooling until obtaining flat surfaces of middle dentin, which were exposed by wet abrasion with 600-grit SiC paper in order to create smear layer prior to hybridization. The conventional adhesive system Adper Single Bond 2 and the composite Filtek Z250(3M Espe were used according to manufacturer’s instructions.Tygon tubing molds were placed on each sample and its internal volume was filled with the composite. After photoactivation, the molds were removed and the specimens were exposed and stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours before microshear bond strength test.Results: The bond strength was calculated in MPa±SD, and data were statistically analyzed by Anova and Tukey test at 5% significance level. Data showed that the control group presented bond strength statistically higher than the other experimental groups. Conclusion: The autoclaving and immersion in glutaraldehyde solution reduced significantly the bond strength in human dentin when compared to frozen teeth in distilled water.

  16. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Saneie, Tahereh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. Materials and Methods: The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were investigated: Optibond FL (OFL) (three-step etch-and-rinse), Optibond Solo Plus (two-step etch-and-rinse), and Optibond all-in-one (OA) (one-step self-etch) (Kerr, Orange, USA). Unbleached dentin groups (groups 1-3) were prepared as negative controls (NC). The remainder surfaces (groups 4-12) were bleached with 20% Opalescent PF (Ultradent, USA). Specimens were bonded immediately after bleaching (groups 4-6), after 1 week (groups 7-9), or after using 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) gel (groups 10-12). Subsequent to bonding of composite resin, the samples were tested for SBS and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Results: Regarding control groups, OA showed the highest SBS among the studied adhesives (P0.05) except the of delay bonding with OA. Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive. PMID:22363363

  17. Comparison of the Effect of two Denture Cleansers on Tensile bond Strength of a Denture Liner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: One of the most clinical challenging issues in prosthodontics is debonding of soft liners from the denture base. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare tensile bond strength between soft liner and heat-cured acrylic resin when immersed in two different types of denture cleanser and distilled water, at different period of times. Materials and Method: In this experimental in vivo study, 238 heat-cured acrylic blocks were made. A soft liner was embedded between the acrylic blocks. Samples were divided into four groups: 17 samples were in the control group and were not soaked in any solution .The remaining samples were divided into 3 groups (Distilled water, Calgon and Fittydent. Each group was then subdivided into two subcategories, regarding the immersion time variable; 15 and 45 minutes. All samples were placed in tension force and tensile bond strength was recorded with the testing machine. One- way ANOVA and Tucky HSD post-hoc test were adopted to analyze the yielded data (α> 0.05. Results: Specimens which were immersed in two denture cleansers (Fittydent and Calgon and in distilled water showed significant difference (p= 0.001 in bonding strength when compared to the control group. The subjects immersed in denture cleanser solutions and distilled water did not reveal any significant difference (p= 0.90. For all groups; most of the bonding failures (72% were cohesive type. Conclusion: The effect of the denture cleansers and distilled water on the bond strength was not statistically different; however, the difference was significant between the immersed groups with the non-immersed group. Moreover, type of the denture cleanser did not show any effect on the tensile strength. The tensile strength increases with time of immersion.

  18. A comparison of atmospheric composition using the Carbon Bond and Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    G. Sarwar; Godowitch, J.; B. H. Henderson; K. Fahey; Pouliot, G.; W. T. Hutzell; Mathur, R.; Kang, D.; W. S. Goliff; Stockwell, W. R.

    2013-01-01

    We incorporate the recently developed Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (version 2, RACM2) into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system for comparison with the existing 2005 Carbon Bond mechanism with updated toluene chemistry (CB05TU). Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean hydroxyl radical concentrations by 46% and nitric acid by 26%. However, it reduces hydrogen peroxide by 2%, peroxyacetic acid by 94%, methyl hydrogen peroxide...

  19. A comparison of atmospheric composition using the Carbon Bond and Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Sarwar, G.; J. Godowitch; B. H. Henderson; K. Fahey; Pouliot, G.; W. T. Hutzell; Mathur, R.; Kang, D.; Goliff, W. S.; Stockwell, W. R.

    2013-01-01

    We incorporate the recently developed Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (version 2, RACM2) into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system for comparison with the existing 2005 Carbon Bond mechanism with updated toluene chemistry (CB05TU). Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean hydroxyl radical concentrations by 46% and nitric acid by 26%. However, it reduces hydrogen peroxide by 2%, peroxyacetic acid by 94%, methyl hydrogen peroxide by 19%, peroxyace...

  20. A comparison of atmospheric composition using the Carbon Bond and Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Sarwar, G.; J. Godowitch; Henderson, B.; K. Fahey; Pouliot, G.; W. T. Hutzell; Mathur, R.; Kang, D.; Goliff, W. S.; Stockwell, W. R.

    2013-01-01

    We incorporate the recently developed Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (version 2, RACM2) into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system for comparison with the existing 2005 Carbon Bond mechanism with updated toluene chemistry (CB05TU). Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean hydroxyl radical concentrations by 46% and nitric acid by 26%. However, it reduces hydrogen peroxide by 2%, peroxyacetic acid by 94%, methyl hydrogen peroxide by 19%, pe...

  1. Influence of dentin contamination by temporary cements on the bond strength of adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josimeri Hebling

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin contaminated by temporary cements with or without eugenol. Method: Flat dentin surfaces were obtained from twenty-four human third molars. With exception of the control group (n=8, the surfaces were covered with Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA or Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA and kept in an oven at 37oC for seven days. After removing the cements, the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA or Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan were applied in accordance with the manufacturers’ recommendations, and then the crowns were constructed in of resin composite. The teeth were sectioned into specimens with a cross-sectional bond area of 0.81mm2, which were sub mitted to microtensile testing in a mechanical test machine at an actuator speed of 0.5mm/min. The data were analyzed by t- and ANOVA tests, complemented by Tukey tests (α=0.05. Results: For Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA, bond strength did not differ statistically (p>0.05 for all the experimental conditions. For Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan, only the Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA Group showed significantly lower bond strength (30.1±13.8 MPa in comparison with the other groups; control (38.9±13.5 MPa and Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA (42.1±11.0 MPa, which showed no significant difference between them.Conclusion: It was concluded that the previous covering of dentin with temporary cement containing eugenol had a deleterious effect on the adhesive performance of the self-etching system only.

  2. Shear bond strength of composite resin to dentin after application of cavity disinfectants - SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different cavity disinfectants on dentin bond strengths of composite resin applied with two different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred mandibular molars were sectioned parallel to the occlusal surface to expose dentin in the midcoronal one-third. The dentinal surfaces were polished with waterproof-polishing papers. The specimens were randomly divided into five groups of 40 teeth each as follows: group 1(control -- specimens were not treated with any cavity disinfectants. Groups 2--5 (experimental groups -- dentin surfaces were treated with the following cavity disinfectants, respectively; 2% chlorhexidine solution, 0.1% benzalkonium chloride-based disinfectant, 1% chlorhexidine gel, and an iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectant. The specimens were then randomly divided into two subgroups including 20 teeth each to evaluate the effect of different bonding systems. Dentin bonding systems were applied to the dentin surfaces and the composite buildups were done. After the specimens were stored in an incubator for 24 hours, the shear bond strength was measured at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The specimens were then statistically analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: One way analysis of variance and Tukey-HSD tests were used. Results: There was no significant difference between chlorhexidine gel and control groups regardless of the type of the bonding agent used (P>0.05. On the other hand, pretreatment with benzalkonium chloride-based, iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectants or chlorhexidine solutions had a negative effect on the shear bond strength of self-etching bonding systems. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that when benzalkonium chloride-based, iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectants or chlorhexidine solutions are used as a cavity disinfectant, an etch-and-rinse bonding system should be preferred.

  3. An Experimental Investigation of Silicone-to-Metal Bond Strength in Composite Space Docking System Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Siamidis, John; Larkin, Elizabeth M. G.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently developing a new universal docking mechanism for future space exploration missions called the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS). A candidate LIDS main interface seal design is a composite assembly of silicone elastomer seals vacuum molded into grooves in an electroless nickel plated aluminum retainer. The strength of the silicone-tometal bond is a critical consideration for the new system, especially due to the presence of small areas of disbond created during the molding process. In the work presented herein, seal-to-retainer bonds of subscale seal specimens with different sizes of intentional disbond were destructively tensile tested. Nominal specimens without intentional disbonds were also tested. Tension was applied either uniformly on the entire seal circumference or locally in one short circumferential length. Bond failure due to uniform tension produced a wide scatter of observable failure modes and measured load-displacement behaviors. Although the preferable failure mode for the seal-to-retainer bond is cohesive failure of the elastomer material, the dominant observed failure mode under the uniform loading condition was found to be the less desirable adhesive failure of the bond in question. The uniform tension case results did not show a correlation between disbond size and bond strength. Localized tension was found to produce failure either as immediate tearing of the elastomer material outside the bond region or as complete peel-out of the seal in one piece. The obtained results represent a valuable benchmark for comparison in the future between adhesion loads under various separation conditions and composite seal bond strength.

  4. How erosive drinks and enzyme inhibitors impact bond strength to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Moreira MACHADO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Concern has been raised about the bonding of restorative procedures to an erosive lesion, given the change in organic and inorganic composition and structure of this substrate. This in vitro study evaluated the effect of erosive drinks and an enzyme inhibitor (2% chlorhexidine digluconate – 2% CHX on bond strength to dentin. Sixty sound human third molars were selected, and the occlusal enamel was flattened, exposing the dentin surface. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups: AS-Artificial saliva (control group, RC- Regular Cola and ZC- Zero Cola. Twenty specimens were immersed in their respective solution for 1 minute, 3 times a day, over the course of 5 days. After acid etching and before bonding with Adper Single Bond 2, half of the samples of each group (n = 10 were treated with 2% CHX, whereas the other half (n = 10 were not, forming the control group (CONV. All the specimens were restored with Filtek Z250 composite resin filled in Tygon tubes (0.48 mm2, yielding six microcylinders for microshear bond strength testing. Three composite resin microcylinders of each specimen were tested after 1 month, and the remaining microcylinders were tested after 6 months. Failure modes were determined using a stereomicroscope (40x. The data were statistically analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α = 0.05. Overall bonding was reduced after 6 months, regardless of treatment. The 2% CHX enhanced bond strength after 1 month only in the ZC group, and did not enhance bonding performance to demineralized dentin by erosive protocol after 6 months in any group.

  5. A comparative evaluation of the shear bond strength of five different orthodontic bonding agents polymerized using halogen and light-emitting diode curing lights: An in vitro investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujoy Banerjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: With the introduction of photosensitive (light-activated restorative materials in orthodontics, various methods have been suggested to enhance the polymerization of the materials used, including use of more powerful light curing devices. Bond strength is an important property and determines the amount of force delivered and the treatment duration. Many light-cured bonding materials have become popular but it is the need of the hour to determine the bonding agent that is the most efficient and has the desired bond strength. Aim: To evaluate and compare the shear bond strengths of five different orthodontic light cure bonding materials cured with traditional halogen light and low-intensity light-emitting diode (LED light curing unit. Materials and Methods: 100 human maxillary premolar teeth, extracted for orthodontic purpose, were used to prepare the samples. 100 maxillary stainless steel bicuspid brackets of 0.018 slot of Roth prescription, manufactured by D-tech Company, were bonded to the prepared tooth surfaces of the mounted samples using five different orthodontic bracket bonding light-cured materials, namely, Enlight, Fuji Ortho LC (resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Orthobond LC, Relybond, and Transbond XT. The bond strength was tested on an Instron Universal testing machine (model no. 5582. Results: In Group 1 (halogen group, Enlight showed the highest shear bond strength (16.4 MPa and Fuji Ortho LC showed the least bond strength (6.59 MPa (P value 0.000. In Group 2 (LED group, Transbond showed the highest mean shear bond strength (14.6 MPa and Orthobond LC showed the least mean shear bond strength (6.27 MPa (P value 0.000. There was no statistically significant difference in the shear bond strength values of all samples cured using either halogen (mean 11.49 MPa or LED (mean 11.20 MPa, as the P value was 0.713. Conclusion: Polymerization with both halogen and LED resulted in shear bond strength values which were above the

  6. Influence of cast surface finishing process on metal-ceramic bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Vojvodić,

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim To investigate the influence of different cast surface finishingprocess on metal-ceramics bond strength.Methods Six Co-Cr alloy sample groups were cast (Wirobond C,BEGO, Bremen, Germany and randomly selected for use in oneof the six different final processing of the casting surface (oxidation,sandblasting with 110 and 250 µm Al2O3, bonding agent,hydrochloric acid solution prior to application of feldspathic ceramic(Duceram Kiss, DeguDent, Hanau-Wolfgang, Germany.The testing was carried out with a tensile testing machine (LRXwith Nexygen software, Lloyd Instr., Fareham, UK (ISO 9693.Results The highest force (66.902 N for the separation of ceramicsmeasured with the sample sandblasted with 250µm Al2O3,oxidised and repeatedly sandblasted with 250 µm, and the lowestforce (36.260 N with the sample treated with hydrochloric acidsolution. With all sample groups except the group with the bondingagent (cohesive fracture, an adhesive fracture of the mediumand an adhesive-cohesive fracture of the peripheral part of thefracture surface were observed. The oxidation, prolonged oxidationand the bonding agent do not influence the bond strength ofthe tested metal-ceramic system.Conclusion Different casting surface treatments have an importantrole on the bond strength of the ceramic-metal interface.

  7. Effect of endodontic chelating solutions on the bond strength of endodontic sealers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behram TUNCEL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of various chelating solutions on the radicular push-out bond strength of calcium silicate-based and resin-based root canal sealers. Root canals of freshly-extracted single-rooted teeth (n = 80 were instrumented by using rotary instruments. The specimens were randomly divided into 4 groups according to the chelating solutions being tested: (1 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA; (2 9% etidronic acid; (3 1% peracetic acid (PAA; and (4 distilled water (control. In each group, the roots were further assigned into 2 subgroups according to the sealer used: (1 an epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus and (2 a calcium silicate-based sealer (iRoot SP. Four 1 mm-thick sections were obtained from the coronal aspect of each root (n = 40 slices/group. Push-out bond strength test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min., and the bond strength data were analyzed statistically with two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA with Bonferroni’s post hoc test (p 0.05. iRoot SP showed higher resistance to dislocation than AH Plus. Final irrigation with 17% EDTA, 9% Etidronic acid, and 1% PAA did not improve the bond strength of AH Plus and iRoot SP to radicular dentin.

  8. Investigation of the bond strength between the photo-sensitive polymer SU-8 and gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Maria; Johansson, Alicia; Sánchez Noguerón, E.;

    2005-01-01

    We present the results from a thorough investigation of the bond strength between the photo-polymer SU-8 and Au. The data were obtained by pull-test experiments, below the glass transition temperature of the polymer. The different aspects that we investigated were:(i)the effect of using different...

  9. Investigation of the bond strength between the photo-sensitive polymer SU-8 and Au

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordstrom, Maria; Johansson, Alicia; Sanches-Noguerón, E.;

    2004-01-01

    We present the results from a thorough investigation of the bond strength between the photo-polymer SU-8 and Au. The data were optained by pull-test experiments, below the glass transition temperature of the polymer. The different aspects that were investigated were: (i) different adhesion...

  10. Effect of surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of luting cement to ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Özcan, Mutlu; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA based luting cement to six commercial dental ceramics. Methods. Six disc shaped ceramic specimens (glass ceramics, glass infiltrated alumina, glass infiltrated zirconium diox

  11. Evaluation of flexural bond strength of porcelain to used nickel-chromium alloy in various percentages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VNV Madhav

    2012-01-01

    Fresh nickel-chromium alloy shows the greatest porcelain adherence.There is no significant change in bond strength of ceramic to alloy with up to 75% of used nickel-chromium alloy.At least 25%- of new alloy should be added when recycled nickel-chromium alloy is being used for metal ceramic restorations.

  12. Comparison of two bond strength testing methodologies for bilayered all-ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dundar, Mine; Ozcan, Mutlu; Gokce, Bulent; Comlekoglu, Erhan; Leite, Fabiola; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) and microtensile (MTBS) testing methodologies for core and veneering ceramics in four types of all-ceramic systems. Methods. Four different ceramic veneer/core combinations, three of which were feldspathic and the other a fluor-apatite to

  13. Repair bond strength of composite resin to sandblasted and laser irradiated Y-TZP ceramic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmali, Omer; Barutcigil, Çağatay; Ozarslan, Mehmet Mustafa; Barutcigil, Kubilay; Harorlı, Osman Tolga

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of different surface treatments on the repair bond strength of yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline ceramic (Y-TZP) zirconia to a composite resin. Sixty Y-TZP zirconia specimens were prepared and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10) as follows: Group 1, surface grinding with Cimara grinding bur (control); Group 2, sandblasted with 30 µm silica-coated alumina particles; Group 3, Nd:YAG laser irradiation; Group 4, Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation; Group 5, sandblasted + Nd:YAG laser irradiation; and Group 6, sandblasted + Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation. After surface treatments, the Cimara(®) System was selected for the repair method and applied to all specimens. A composite resin was built-up on each zirconia surface using a cylindrical mold (5 × 3 mm) and incrementally filled. The repair bond strength was measured with a universal test machine. Data were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and a Tukey HSD test (p = 0.05). Surface topography after treatments were evaluated by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Shear bond strength mean values ranged from 15.896 to 18.875 MPa. There was a statistically significant difference between group 3 and the control group (p sandblasting and Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation provided a significant increase in bond strength between the zirconia and composite resin. PMID:25715193

  14. Tensile bond strength of composite luting cements to metal alloys after various surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denizoglu Saip

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the effects of two different surface treatments and bonding agents on tensile bond strength between a Co-Cr and a Ni-Cr cast alloy and two resin-luting cements. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and forty alloy samples were cast and subjected to surface treatments such as sandblasting, chemical etching, and sandblasting plus chemical etching. Panavia F and CandB cement were used as cementing mediums. The etching qualities were examined by a stereooptic microscope. Failure surfaces were examined throughout scanning electron microscopy. The data were evaluated using statistical methods, namely analysis of variance and multiple comparison test (Tukey HSD. Results: Significant differences were found in the bonding provided by the various cements (P < 0.001 and also type of surface treatments (P < 0.001. For all groups, sandblasted surfaces showed the highest bond strength values. There was no significant difference between the Cr-Co and the Cr-Ni alloys (P > 0.05. Conclusions: Panavia F showed higher tensile strength and the sandblasted samples possessed higher tensile strength.

  15. Effect of surface treatment of titanium posts on the tensile bond strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmage, P; Sohn, J; Ozcan, M; Nergiz, [No Value

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. Retention of composite resins to metal can be improved when metal surfaces are conditioned. The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the effect of two conditioning treatments on the tensile bond strength of four resin-based luting cements and zinc phosphate cement to titanium

  16. The effect of structural degrees of freedom on bonding and strength characteristics of molybdenum disilicide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šob, Mojmír; Friák, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 7 (2009), s. 523-528. ISSN 0966-9795 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100920; GA MŠk OC 147 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : ab initio calculations * theoretical strength * bonding * molybdenum disilicide Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.231, year: 2009

  17. The influence of rotating fatigue on the bond strength of zirconia-composite interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Mirmohammadi; M.N. Aboushelib; C.J. Kleverlaan; N. de Jager; A.J. Feilzer

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of cyclic loading on the bond strength of resin composite to zirconia framework material. Methods Bar shaped zirconia/composite specimens (2 mm × 2 mm × 25 mm) were prepared using three different resin cements and placed in a four-point bending test setup. The flexu

  18. Effect of desensitizing treatments on bond strength of resin composites to dentin - an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Makkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hypersensitivity is a common clinical multietiological problem. Many desensitizing treatments are there to overcome hypersensitivity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different dentin-desensitizing treatments on the tensile bond strength of composite restoration. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four sound human molars were used. Enamel was wet abraded to expose flat dentin surfaces, polished with sandpaper. The specimens were then divided into three groups (n = 8 based on the type of dentin-desensitizing treatment given. The first group: G1 was the control group where no desensitizing agent was used. The second group: G2 was treated with desensitizing dentifrice containing a combination of potassium nitrate, triclosan, and sodium monoflorophosphate. The third group: G3 was treated with Er:YAG laser. Afterwards, the desensitized specimens were treated with one step self-etch adhesive according to manufacturer′s instructions and composite microcylinders were packed. The specimens were then examined for tensile bond strength using universal tensile machine (KMI TM . Results: Statistical analysis of the data obtained revealed the mean values for the tensile bond strengths were 10.2613 MPa, 5.9400 MPa and 6.3575 MPa for groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. These values were statistically significantly different between groups pretreated with laser or dentifrice as compared to control group. Conclusions: Dentifrice and Laser pre-treated dentin has lower tensile bond strength with resin composites as compared to dentin that is untreated.

  19. Bond strength durability of a resin composite on a reinforced ceramic using various repair systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Leite, Fabiola; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. This study compared the durability of repair bond strength of a resin composite to a reinforced ceramic after three repair systems. Methods. Alumina-reinforced feldspathic ceramic blocks (Vitadur-alpha(R)) (N=30) were randomly divided into three groups according to the repair method: PR-

  20. Effect Aging Conditions on the Repair Bond Strength of a Microhybrid and a Nanohybrid Resin Composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Cura, Cenk; Brendeke, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the effect of different aging methods on the repair bond strength and failure types of a microhybrid and a nanohybrid composite Materials and Methods Disk shaped microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine-QA) and nanohybrid (Tetric EvoCeram TE) resin composite specimens (N = 1

  1. Hydrogen bonded supramolecular elastomers : correlating hydrogen bonding strength with morphology and rheology

    OpenAIRE

    Woodward, Philip; Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Greenland, Barnaby William; Hamley, Ian William; Light, Zoe; Slark, Andrew; Hayes, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    A series of six low molecular weight elastomers with hydrogen bonding end-groups have been designed, synthesised and studied. The poly(urethane) based elastomers all contained essentially the same hard block content (ca. 11%) and differ only in the nature of their end-groups. Solution state 1H NMR spectroscopic analysis of model compounds featuring the end-groups demonstrate that they all exhibit very low binding constants, in the range 1.4 to 45.0 M-1 in CDCl3, yet the corresponding elastome...

  2. The effect of depth of dentin demineralization on bond strengths and morphology of the hybrid layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, J; May, K N; Wilder, A D; Lopes, M

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that different phosphoric acid-based etchants do not penetrate intertubular dentin to the same depth. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of different phosphoric acid-based conditioners on dentin shear bond strengths of three one-bottle bonding systems and to evaluate the corresponding interfacial ultramorphology. The null hypothesis to be tested was that no correlation could be established between the depth of intertubular demineralization and dentin shear bond strengths. The labial surface of 90 bovine incisors was polished to expose middle dentin. The specimens were randomly assigned to three one-bottle adhesive systems (n = 30): OptiBond SOLO, Permaquick PQ1, and Single Bond. For each adhesive system the specimens were divided into three subgroups of different silica-thickened etching gels (n = 10): 37.5% phosphoric acid gel (Kerr Gel Etchant), 35% phosphoric acid gel (Ultraetch), and 35% phosphoric acid gel (Scotchbond Etching Gel). After 24 hours in water at 37 degrees C, the specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles in baths kept at 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C and the shear bond strengths measured. The data were analyzed with one-way and two-way ANOVA. Further, the adhesives were applied to 800 microns-thick bovine dentin disks (two per subgroup), which were restored with a low-viscosity composite resin. Six small dentin/resin sticks with a cross-section of 1.0 mm x 1.0 mm were obtained from each bonded disk. They were then decalcified in a buffered solution of EDTA, fixed, stained, and sectioned in 90 nanometer-thick slices to observe under the Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The mean shear bond strengths were not statistically different at a confidence level of 95%. When the means were pooled for dentin adhesive and for etching gel, the number of cohesive failures was greater for Permaquick PQ1 and for Ultraetch, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient showed no correlation between hybrid

  3. Evaluation of the shear bond strength of the Orthobond composite under different conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Carlos de Oliveira Ruellas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the shear bond strength of metal brackets bonded with Orthobond composite (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil under different enamel surface conditions. Methods: Ninety bovine mandibular permanent incisors were divided into six groups (n = 15. In Group 1 (control and Group 2 the bonding procedures were performed by using Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, USA and Orthobond (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil composites,respectively, according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. In the other groups brackets were bonded with Orthobond composite (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil as follows: Group 3 – dental surface conditioned with Transbond Plus Self-Etching Primer (3M Unitek, Monrovia, USA; Group 4 – bonding procedure without application of Orthoprimer (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil; Group 5 - Eagle Bond applied on saliva/blood-contaminated dental surface; and Group 6 – use of homogenized Orthobond (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil. After bonding the brackets, all the samples were submitted to shear bond strength tests by means of an Emic Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results obtained in mega Pascal (MPa were submitted to the analysis of variance (ANOVA and then to the Tukey test. Results: The results in mega Pascal showed statistically significant differences between Groups 1 and 2 (p= 0.041, 1 and 5 (p=0.000 and between 4 and 5 (p=0.016. The ARI (Adhesive Remnant Index scores showed evidence of a higher number of fractures at the bracket/composite interface. Conclusion: In all tested situations the Orthobond (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil was shown to be apt for bracket bonding.

  4. Effect of superalkali substituents on the strengths and properties of hydrogen and halogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wenkai; Huang, Xin; Li, Qingzhong; Li, Wenzuo; Cheng, Jianbo; Gong, Baoan

    2013-03-01

    Quantum chemical calculations have been performed for the complexes Li(3)OCCX-Y (X = Cl, Br, H; Y = NH(3), H(2)O, H(2)S) and Li(3)OCN-X'Y' (X'Y' = ClF, BrCl, BrF, HF) to study the role of superalkalis in hydrogen and halogen bonds. The results show that the presence of an Li(3)O cluster in a Lewis acid weakens its acidity, while its presence in a Lewis base enhances its basicity. Furthermore, the latter effect is more prominent than the former one, and the presence of an Na(3)O cluster causes an even greater effect than Li(3)O. The strengths of hydrogen and halogen bonds were analyzed using molecular electrostatic potentials. The contributions of superalkalis to the strength of hydrogen and halogen bonds were elucidated by analyzing differences in electron density. PMID:23179773

  5. Crystal growth vs. conventional acid etching: A comparative evaluation of etch patterns, penetration depths, and bond strengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devanna Raghu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect on enamel surface, penetration depth, and bond strength produced by 37% phosphoric acid and 20% sulfated polyacrylic acid as etching agents for direct bonding. Eighty teeth were used to study the efficacy of the etching agents on the enamel surface, penetration depth, and tensile bond strength. It was determined from the present study that a 30 sec application of 20% sulfated polyacrylic acid produced comparable etching topography with that of 37% phosphoric acid applied for 30 sec. The 37% phosphoric acid dissolves enamel to a greater extent than does the 20% sulfated polyacrylic acid. Instron Universal testing machine was used to evaluate the bond strengths of the two etching agents. Twenty percent sulfated polyacrylic acid provided adequate tensile bond strength. It was ascertained that crystal growth can be an alternative to conventional phosphoric acid etching as it dissolves lesser enamel and provides adequate tensile bond strength.

  6. Bond strength of disinfected metal and ceramic brackets: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Cornelia; Zimny, Dorothee; Hopfenmueller, Werner; Holtgrave, Eva Andrea

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro investigation was to test whether disinfecting with Chlorhexamed fluid had an influence on the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. Metal and ceramic brackets were fixed by the composite adhesives Transbond XT (light curing) and Concise (chemical curing) to 224 bovine permanent mandibular incisors. Bovine teeth were divided into eight groups of 28 each as group 1: metal bracket/Transbond XT, group 2: disinfected metal bracket/Transbond XT, group 3: metal bracket/Concise, group 4: disinfected metal bracket/Concise, group 5: ceramic bracket/Transbond XT, group 6: disinfected ceramic bracket/Transbond XT, group 7: ceramic bracket/Concise, and group 8: disinfected ceramic bracket/Concise. Adhesive bonding was done according to the manufacturers' instructions. As shown by group comparison (Kruskal-Wallis test, univariate analysis of variance, P < .001), the disinfection of metal brackets had no statistically relevant influence on shear bond strength (P = .454). However, disinfecting ceramic brackets with either adhesive led to a significant reduction in shear bond strength compared with the untreated ceramic bracket group (P < .001). The Fisher's exact test of the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) scores showed a significant difference within the metal group bonded with different adhesives (P = .0003). The ARI scores 1 and 2 were not reached by the ceramic bracket groups. The disinfection of the ceramic brackets is a suitable procedure for clinical use because the measured shear bond strength values were higher than 6-8 MPa required in orthodontics. PMID:16279832

  7. Effect of LASER Irradiation on the Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramic Surface to Dentin

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    Sima Shahabi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Reliable bonding between tooth substrate and zirconia-based ceramic restorations is always of great importance. The laser might be useful for treatment of ceramic surfaces. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic surface to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 40 Cercon zirconia ceramic blocks were fabricated. The surface treatment was performed using sandblasting with 50-micrometer Al2O3, CO2 laser, or Nd:YAG laser in each test groups. After that, the specimens were cemented to human dentin with resin cement. The shear bond strength of ceramics to dentin was determined and failure mode of each specimen was analyzed by stereo-microscope and SEM investigations. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparisons. The surface morphology of one specimen from each group was investigated under SEM. Results: The mean shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to dentin was 7.79±3.03, 9.85±4.69, 14.92±4.48 MPa for CO2 irradiated, Nd:YAG irradiated, and sandblasted specimens, respectively. Significant differences were noted between CO2 (P=0.001 and Nd:YAG laser (P=0.017 irradiated specimens with sandblasted specimens. No significant differences were observed between two laser methods (P=0.47. The mode of bond failure was predominantly adhesive in test groups (CO2 irradiated specimens: 75%, Nd:YAG irradiated: 66.7%, and sandblasting: 41.7%. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the present study, surface treatment of zirconia ceramics using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers was not able to produce adequate bond strength with dentin surfaces in comparison to sandblasting technique. Therefore, the use of lasers with the mentioned parameters may not be recommended for the surface treatment of Cercon ceramics.

  8. In vitro comparison of the shear bond strength of amalgam to tooth structure using two bonding agents--lutting glass ionomer and 4-META.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheela K; Sudeep P; Hegde V; Francis R; Bhat K

    1998-01-01

    Bonding dental amalgam to tooth structure using 4-META has become an accepted clinical procedure. Glass ionomer cements possess the ability to bind to tooth structure as well as to the components of dental amalgam. The present in vitro study evaluates the shear bond strength of amalgam to tooth structure using luting glass ionomer as a bond mediating agent, and compares with that obtained using 4-META. Results indicate that it is possible to bond amalgam to tooth structure using a thin layer ...

  9. Effect of different irrigant activation protocols on push-out bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuz Ekim, Sefika Nur; Erdemir, Ali

    2015-11-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of various final irrigant activation protocols on push-out bond strength of fiber post. Thirty-two single-rooted human maxillar central teeth were sectioned below the cementoenamel junction, instrumented and obturated. Post-space preparation was performed, and roots were randomly divided into eight groups (n = 4) according to the final irrigant activation protocols; distilled water was used as an irrigant in group 1. The other groups were treated with 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA. Conventional syringe irrigation (CSI, no activation) was used in group 2. Irrigation solutions were activated using passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI, group 3), EndoVac apical negative pressure (ANP, group 4), diode laser (group 5), neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (group 6), erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (group 7), and Er:YAG laser using with photon-induced photoacoustic streaming (PIPS™) technique (group 8). In all groups, fiber posts (White Post DC, FGM) were luted using Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray, Osaka, Japan). The specimens were transversally sectioned, and all slices from coronal and apical regions were subjected to push-out tests. The data were calculated as megapascals and analyzed by using two-way analysis of variance followed by post hoc Tukey honestly significant difference (HSD) tests. Removing the smear layer increased the bond strength to dentine when compared with the control group (p < 0.05). The highest bond strength was obtained in the PIPS laser-activated irrigation group (p < 0.05). Coronal root region presented significantly higher bond strength than the apical region (p < 0.05). PIPS laser-activated irrigation showed higher efficiency as a final irrigant activation protocol on push-out bond strength of fiber post. PMID:26022731

  10. Bond strength of different endodontic sealers to dentin: push-out test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Vicente Baroni Barbizam

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strength of different root canal sealers to dentin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty extracted single-rooted human teeth were examined and the coronal and middle thirds of the canals were prepared with a 1.50 mm post drill (FibreKor Post System, Pentron. The teeth were allocated in two experimental groups, irrigated with 2.5% NaOCl+17% EDTA or saline solution (control group and instrumented using Race rotary files (FKG to a size #40 at the working length. Then, the groups were divided into four subgroups and filled with Epiphany sealer (Group 1, EndoREZ (Group 2, AH26 (Group 3 and Grossman's Sealer (Group 4. After 2 weeks of storage in 100% humidity at 37ºC, all teeth were sectioned transversally into 2-mm-thick discs. Push-out tests were performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min using a universal testing machine. The maximum load at failure was recorded and expressed in MPa. RESULTS: Means (±SD in root canals irrigated with 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA were: G1 (21.6±6.0, G2 (15.2±3.7, G3 (14.6±4.5 and G4 (11.7±4.1.Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test showed the highest bond strength for the Epiphany's group (p< 0.01 when compared to the other tested sealers. Saline solution decreased the values of bond-strength (p<0.05 for all sealers. CONCLUSION: Epiphany sealer presented higher bond strength values to dentin in both irrigating protocols, and the use of 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA increased the bond strength values for all sealers.

  11. The effects of silver coating on friction coefficient and shear bond strength of steel orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Valiollah; Anoush, Keivan; Rabiee, Sayed Mahmood; Rahmatei, Manuchehr; Tavanafar, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    Aims of the present study was to measure frictional resistance between silver coated brackets and different types of arch wires, and shear bond strength of these brackets to the tooth. In an experimental clinical research 28 orthodontic brackets (standard, 22 slots) were coated with silver ions using electroplate method. Six brackets (coated: 3, uncoated: 3) were evaluated with Scanning Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy. The amount of friction in 15 coated brackets was measured with three different kinds of arch wires (0.019 × 0.025-in stainless steel [SS], 0.018-in stainless steel [SS], 0.018-in Nickel-Titanium [Ni-Ti]) and compared with 15 uncoated steel brackets. In addition, shear bond strength values were compared between 10 brackets with silver coating and 10 regular brackets. Universal testing machine was used to measure shear bond strength and the amount of friction between the wires and brackets. SPSS 18 was used for data analysis with t-test. SEM and AFM results showed deposition of a uniform layer of silver, measuring 8-10 μm in thickness on bracket surfaces. Silver coating led to higher frictional forces in all the three types of arch wires, which was statistically significant in 0.019 × 0.025-in SS and 0.018-in Ni-Ti, but it did not change the shear bond strength significantly. Silver coating with electroplating method did not affect the bond strength of the bracket to enamel; in addition, it was not an effective method for decreasing friction in sliding mechanics. PMID:25997114

  12. Ceramic Inlays: Effect of Mechanical Cycling and Ceramic Type on Restoration-dentin Bond Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, F Z; Kleverlaan, C J; da Silva, L H; Feilzer, A J; Cesar, P F; Bottino, M A; Valandro, L F

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between dentin and five different ceramic inlays in permanent maxillary premolars, with and without mechanical cycling. One hundred permanent maxillary premolars were prepared and divided into 10 groups (n=10) according to the ceramic system (IPS e.Max Press; IPS e.Max CAD; Vita PM9; Vita Mark II; and Vita VM7) and the mechanical cycling factor (with and without [100 N, 2 Hz, 1.2×10(6) cycles]). The inlays were adhesively cemented, and all of the specimens were cut into microbars (1×1 mm, nontrimming method), which were tested under microtensile loading. The failure mode was classified and contact angle, roughness, and microtopographic analyses were performed on each ceramic surface. The mechanical cycling had a significant effect (p=0.0087) on the bond strength between dentin and IPS e.max Press. The Vita Mark II group had the highest bond strength values under both conditions, with mechanical cycling (9.7±1.8 MPa) and without (8.2±1.9 MPa), while IPS e.Max CAD had the lowest values (2.6±1.6 and 2.2±1.4, respectively). The adhesive failure mode at the ceramic/cement interface was the most frequent. Vita Mark II showed the highest value of average roughness. IPS e.max Press and Vita Mark II ceramics presented the lowest contact angles. In conclusion, the composition and manufacturing process of ceramics seem to have an influence on the ceramic surface and resin cement bond strength. Mechanical cycling did not cause significant degradation on the dentin and ceramic bond strength under the configuration used. PMID:27455117

  13. Strength and Character of Halogen Bonds in Protein-Ligand Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riley, Kevin Eugene; Hobza, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 10 (2011), s. 4272-4278. ISSN 1528-7483 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Grant ostatní: Research and Development for Innovations of European Social Fund(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : halogen bond * protein-ligand complexes * calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.720, year: 2011

  14. Effect of biological contamination on dentine bond strength of adhesive resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, J H; Botha, F S; van der Vyver, P J; de Wet, F A; Botha, S J

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of saliva (S) and blood (B) contamination on the dentine bond strength of two single-component dentine bonding systems. The occlusal thirds of 120 recently extracted, human molars were removed with a low speed saw and subsequently embedded in Bencor rings by means of self-curing, acrylic resin. The occlusal surfaces were ground wet on 600-grit silicone carbide paper in a polishing machine to expose superficial dentine and to create a smear layer. The teeth were randomly divided into 12 groups (n = 10). All the dentine surfaces were etched with 34% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds rinsed with water, air-dried for 3 seconds, leaving the surfaces visibly moist. For the control groups (C) the etched dentine surfaces were treated with either, Scotchbond 1 (SB1, 3M) or Prime & Bond NT (PBNT, Dentsply) according to the manufacturer's instructions. In the contaminated groups, the saliva or blood was applied by means of a disposable brush, left undisturbed for 1 minute, and the excess then thinned by air spray. The dentine bonding systems were then applied, also according to manufacturer's instructions. Composite (Z250 and TPH) and Compomer (F2000 and Dyract AP (D-AP)) stubs were packed and cured incrementally to the corresponding pretreated dentine surfaces. All specimens were stored for 24 hours under water at 37 degrees C. The bonds were then stressed to failure with a Zwick testing machine, operating at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fractured samples were examined in a Scanning Electron Microscope. The data were statistically analysed (Student-t test). The mean SBS (MPa) were. SB1 with Z250: C = 19.1 +/- 4.4; S = 17.3 +/- 3.5; B = 2.6 +/- 0.9; SB1 with F2000: C = 11.8 +/- 3.3; S = 9.7 +/- 1.8; B = 4.7 +/- 1.6. PBNT with TPH: C = 9.2 +/- 3.2; S = 6.5 +/- 3.0; B = 4.3 +/- 1.5; PBNT with D-AP: C = 10.2 +/- 3.6; S = 9.3 +/- 2.9 and B = 7.3 +/- 2.5. There was no statistical significant difference in shear bond

  15. Effect of three porcelain etchants type (HF-APF-PHA on porcelain- composite shear bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kermanshah H.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Porcelain restorations are susceptible to fracture and a common method for repairing is the use of silane and composite on etched porcelain. Although HF is very effective in porcelain etching but has detrimental effects on tissues. Purpose: In this study, the effect of APF and PHA was compared with HF in porcelain etching. Also the role of silane, unfilled resin and dentin bonding in bond strength of composite- porcelain was evaluated. Methods and Materials: In this experimental in-vitro study, one-hundred twenty porcelain square blocks (552 mm were prepared and bonding surfaces of each sandblasted. Samples were divided into three groups. The first group (n=40 were etched with buffered HF 9.5% (Ultradent for 1 min., the second group (n=40 were etched with Iranian APF 1.23% (Kimia for 10 minutes and the third group (n=40 were etched with Iranian PHA 37% (Kimia for 1 min. Ultradent silane was applied on the surfaces of half of cases in each group. On the surfaces of half of silane-treated samples unfilled resin was applied and dentin bonding was used on the surfaces of the remaining. Samples without silane were treated in a similar manner. Composite cylinder with 4mm diameter and 2 mm height was bonded to porcelain. Specimens were stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours and subjected to 500 cycles. Shear bond strength was measured with an Instron machine and type of fracture was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Results were analyzed using 3 way ANOVA, Kaplan- Maier and Tukey HSD tests. Results: Findings showed that PHA and APF roughened the porcelain surface without creating retentive micro undercuts but HF etches porcelain and creates retentive microundercuts. Ultradent silane had no significant effect on bond strength of porcelain- composite. Unfilled resin with Ultradent silane compared with dentin bonding with the same silane is more effective in bond strength of composite- porcelain. Conclusion: Based on

  16. Effects of mechanical and thermal load cycling on micro tensile bond strength of clearfil SE bond to superficial dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Daneshkazemi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Certain studies have been conducted on the effects of mechanical and thermal load cycling on the microtensile bond strength (microTBS of composites to dentin, but the results were different. The authors therefore decided to evaluate these effects on the bonding of Clearfil SE bond to superficial dentin. Materials and Methods: Flat dentinal surface of 42 molar teeth were bonded to Filtek-Z250 resin composite by Clearfil SE bond. The teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups and exposed to different mechanical and thermal load cycling. Thermocycling was at 5-55°C and mechanical load cycling was created with a force of 125 N and 0.5 Hz. Then, the teeth were sectioned and shaped to hour glass form and subjected to microTBS testing at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results were statistically analyzed by computer with three-way analysis of variance and T-test at P < 0.05 significant. To evaluate the location and mode of failure, the specimens were observed under the stereomicroscope. Then, one of the specimens in each group was evaluated under Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM for mode of failure. Results: All of the study groups had a significantly lower microTBS as compared to the control group ( P < 0.001. There was no statistically significant difference between mechanical cycling with 50K (kilo = 1000 cycles, and 50K mechanical cycles plus 1K thermal cycles. Most of the fractures in the control group were of adhesive type and this type of fracture increased after exposure to mechanical and thermal load cycling. Conclusion: Thermal and mechanical load cycling had significant negative effects on microTBS and the significant effects of mechanical load cycling started to be significant at 100K cycles.

  17. Bond strength of a resin cement to dentin using the resin coating technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Batitucci dos Santos-Daroz

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of a resin cement to dentin using different adhesive systems (AS in the presence or absence of a low-viscosity composite liner (Protect Liner F - PLF applied over the bonded dentin. The adhesive systems selected were: AdheSE/Vivadent (AD; Clearfil Protect Bond/Kuraray (CP; One-Up Bond F/Tokuyama (OU; Single Bond/3M ESPE (SB; Tyrian SPE/One-Step Plus/Bisco (TY; Xeno III/Dentsply (XE and Unifil Bond/GC (UN. After removing the labial and lingual enamel surfaces of bovine incisors, dentin fragments were prepared and randomly divided into 15 groups (n = 8. The dentin substrates were bonded with the AS and the PLF was applied or not before application of the resin cement (Panavia F, Kuraray. In the control group, the ED Primer (ED and the resin cement without PLF were used. The AS, PLF and resin cement tested were used according to the manufacturers' instructions, and all treated dentin surfaces were temporized. After water storage for one week, three cylinders of resin cement were applied to each bonded dentin surface, using tygon tubing molds. The specimens were subjected to micro-shear testing and the data were statistically analyzed (two-way ANOVA, Tukey and Dunnett tests, p < 0.05. The observed mean shear bond strengths in MPa were: ED: 20.2 ± 2.3; AD: 30.3 ± 6.5; CP: 25.3 ± 4.4; OU: 28.3 ± 6.6; SB: 25.6 ± 6.9; TY: 24.5 ± 2.5; XE: 17.3 ± 3.4; UN: 28.4 ± 6.2; AD+PLF: 32.8 ± 4.1; CP+PLF: 29.9 ± 3.9; OU+PLF: 34.1 ± 4.1; SB+PLF: 29.5 ± 8.2; TY+PLF: 29.2 ± 3.9; XE+PLF: 32.8 ± 6.7; UN+PLF: 32.2 ± 4.5. The bond strength of the resin cement to dentin using the tested AS was increased when the low-viscosity composite liner was applied.

  18. Effects of the Er, Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on dentin bond strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccioni, M. A. R. V.; Neves, T. P. C.; Kubo, C. S.; Saad, J. R. C.; Campos, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation and bur on the bond strength of different single step self-etch adhesive systems in normal and artificially hypermineralized dentin. In total, 112 human molars were selected. The specimens were randomly divided into two different groups according to the type of dentin. The teeth from each group were randomly divided into two subgroups according to the adhesive system used: Clearfil S3 Bond and Optibond All in One. Each subgroup received different treatments: (1) conditioning conventional; (2) conditioning of the dentin surface with Er,Cr:YSGG  +  application of the adhesive system; (3) ‘surface roughening’ dentin with 3098 diamond bur  +  application of the adhesive system. The matrices were positioned, filled with composite resin and photoactivated for 40 s. After a storage period of 24 h in a humid environment, the specimens were submitted to microshear bond strength testing. Subsequently, the fracture pattern of each sample was determined. One specimen per group was prepared in order to evaluate the interface and/or appearance of resin tags. The data of the microshear bond strength (μSBS) were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s (p  dentin, there was no significant statistical difference between all the treatments employed, enhancing the option of employing single step self-etch adhesives in dentin sclerotic.

  19. Acid Etching and Surface Coating of Glass-Fiber Posts: Bond Strength and Interface Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchin, Doglas; Farina, Ana Paula; Vitti, Rafael Pino; Moraes, Rafael Ratto; Bacchi, Ataís; Spazzin, Aloísio Oro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of a composite resin to glass-fiber post (GFP) treated or not with phosphoric acid, silane coupling agent, and unfilled resin. GFPs were etched or not with 37% phosphoric acid and different surface coating applied: silane coupling agent, unfilled resin, or both. Composite resin blocks were built around a 4-mm height on the GFP. Unfilled resin (20 s) and composite resin (40 s) were light activated by a light-emitting diode unit. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h. Microtensile bond test was performed using a mechanical testing machine until failure (n=10). The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls' test (padhesive, mixed, or cohesive failures. Additional specimens (n=3) were made to analyze the bonded interfaces by scanning electron microscopy. The statistical analysis showed the factor 'surface coating' was significant (pbond strength was found for the silane and unfilled resin group (padhesive and cohesive failures was found. Differences regarding the homogeneity and thickness of the unfilled resin layer formed by different GFP surface treatments were observed. The application of silane and unfilled resin can improve the bond strength between GFP and resin composite. PMID:27058389

  20. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatri A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown. The study samples consisted of 30 primary anterior stainless steel crowns (Unitek TM , size R4, embedded in resin blocks with crown, in test groups of 15 samples each. Mounting of the crown was done using resin block with one crown each. Sandblasting was done and the bonding agent Prime and Bond NT (Dentsply was applied on the labial surface of the primary anterior sandblasted crown. The composite resin and nanocomposite resin were placed into the well of Teflon jig and bonded to Stainless Steel Crowns. The cured samples were placed in distilled water and stored in incubator at 37°C for 48 hours. Shear bond strength was measured using universal testing machine (Hounsefield U.K. Model, with a capacity of 50 KN. Independent sample ′t′ test revealed a nonsignificant ( P < 0.385 difference between mean shear bond strength values of conventional and nanocomposite group. The bond strength values revealed that nanocomposite had slightly higher mean shear bond strength (21.04 ± 0.56 compared to conventional composite (20.78 ± 0.60. It was found that conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin had statistically similar mean shear bond strength, with nanocomposite having little more strength compared to conventional composite.

  1. Bond Lengths and Bond Strengths in Weak and Strong Chemisorption: N2, CO, and CO/H on Nickel Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Sayago, D.; Hoeft, J.; Polcik, M.; Kittel, M; Toomes, R.; Robinson, J.; Woodruff, D.; Pascal, M.; LaMont, C.; Nisbet, G.

    2003-01-01

    New chemical-state-specific scanned-energy mode photoelectron diffraction experiments and density functional theory calculations, applied to CO, CO/H, and N2 adsorption on Ni(100), show that chemisorption bond length changes associated with large changes in bond strength are small, but those associated with changes in bond order are much larger, and are similar to those found in molecular systems. Specifically, halving the bond strength of atop CO to Ni increases the Ni-C distance by 0.06 Å, ...

  2. Effect of cpp-acp on the bond strength of silorane and methacrylate based restorative systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno de Castro Ferreira Barreto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of the previous application of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP on the bond strength of two restorative systems to dentin. Self-etching adhesive systems Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray and FiltekTM LS System Adhesive (3M ESPE were used in combination with two micro-hybrid composites FiltekTM Z250 (3M ESPE and FiltekTM LS (3M ESPE, respectively. Twenty-eight sound human third molars had the occlusal surface worn until the total exposure of dentin and were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 7: G1 (Clearfil + Z250, G2 (CPP-ACP + Clearfil + Z250, G3 (LS system and G4 (CPP-ACP + LS system. The application of the paste containing CPP-ACP was held in the dentin of G2 and G4 prior to adhesive protocol, which followed the manufacturer's recommendations. Two cylinders of a single increment of resin composite were built on each dentin surface using tygon`s matrix with 1.26 mm of diameter x 1 mm high and light-cured with LED Bluephase 16i (Vivadent apparatus. Microshear bond strength test was conducted in a universal testing machine (EZ Test, Shimadzu with a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were subjected to two-way ANOVA test with a significance of 5%. There was no significant difference on bond strength between restorative systems with or without the previous use of a CPP-ACP paste. It was concluded that the application of CPP-ACP in the dentin prior to adhesive protocol did not influence the bond strength of the restorative systems tested.

  3. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cavalli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL and Optibond Solo Plus (SP, respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age the interface. Both SP and FL adhesive-restored teeth were bleached (n = 10 with 10% CP (CP and 10% CP + fluoride (CPF or were left unbleached (control. Bleaching was performed for 14 days simultaneously with pH cycling, which comprised of 14 h of remineralization, 2 h of demineralization and 8 h of bleaching. The control groups (FL and SP were stored in remineralizing solution during their bleaching periods and were also subjected to carious lesion formation. Parallelepiped-shaped samples were obtained from the bonded interface for microtensile bond strength (∝TBS testing. The enamel ∝TBS of the FL and SP groups (control, not bleached were higher (p FL + CPF = FL + CP and SP > SP + CPF = SP + CP. The groups subjected to treatment with the fluoride-containing bleaching agents exhibited similar ∝TBS compared to regular bleaching agents. Bleaching agents, regardless of whether they contained fluoride, decreased enamel bond strength.

  4. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Vanessa; Liporoni, Priscila Cristiane Suzy; Rego, Marcos Augusto do; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Giannini, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL) and Optibond Solo Plus (SP), respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age the interface. Both SP and FL adhesive-restored teeth were bleached (n = 10) with 10% CP (CP) and 10% CP + fluoride (CPF) or were left unbleached (control). Bleaching was performed for 14 days simultaneously with pH cycling, which comprised of 14 h of remineralization, 2 h of demineralization and 8 h of bleaching. The control groups (FL and SP) were stored in remineralizing solution during their bleaching periods and were also subjected to carious lesion formation. Parallelepiped-shaped samples were obtained from the bonded interface for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. The enamel μTBS of the FL and SP groups (control, not bleached) were higher (p FL > FL + CPF = FL + CP and SP > SP + CPF = SP + CP). The groups subjected to treatment with the fluoride-containing bleaching agents exhibited similar μTBS compared to regular bleaching agents. Bleaching agents, regardless of whether they contained fluoride, decreased enamel bond strength. PMID:23184165

  5. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Yoshio Furuse

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1 rinsing with water and drying; (G2 application of an adhesive system; (G3 rinsing and drying, abrasion with finishing disks, etching and application of adhesive system; (G4 rinsing and drying, etching, application of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin-resin interfaces with saliva significantly reduced shear strength, especially after prolonged storage (p<0.05. Similar values to the original bond strength were obtained after abrasion and application of adhesive (G3 or etching and application of silane and adhesive (G4. If contamination occurs, a surface treatment is required to guarantee an adequate interaction between the resin increments.

  6. Pull-Out Strength and Bond Behavior of Prestressing Strands in Prestressed Self-Consolidating Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-Jian Long

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the extensive use of self-consolidating concrete (SCC worldwide, it is important to ensure that such concrete can secure uniform in-situ mechanical properties that are similar to those obtained with properly consolidated concrete of conventional fluidity. Ensuring proper stability of SCC is essential to enhance the uniformity of in-situ mechanical properties, including bond to embedded reinforcement, which is critical for structural engineers considering the specification of SCC for prestressed applications. In this investigation, Six wall elements measuring 1540 mm × 2150 mm × 200 mm were cast using five SCC mixtures and one reference high-performance concrete (HPC of normal consistency to evaluate the uniformity of bond strength between prestressing strands and concrete as well as the distribution of compressive strength obtained from cores along wall elements. The evaluated SCC mixtures used for casting wall elements were proportioned to achieve a slump flow consistency of 680 ± 15 mm and minimum caisson filling capacity of 80%, and visual stability index of 0.5 to 1. Given the spreads in viscosity and static stability of the SCC mixtures, the five wall elements exhibited different levels of homogeneity in in-situ compressive strength and pull-out bond strength. Test results also indicate that despite the high fluidity of SCC, stable concrete can lead to more homogenous in-situ properties than HPC of normal consistency subjected to mechanical vibration.

  7. Push-out Bond Strength of Root-end Filling Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Bosso-Martelo, Roberta; Costa, Bernardo Cesar; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of root-end filling materials. Forty 2-mm-thick slices were obtained from human single-rooted teeth. After root canal preparation using a 1.5 mm diameter cylindrical drill, the dentinal walls were prepared by diamond ultrasonic tip (CVD T0F-2). The specimens were divided according the material (n=10): MTA Angelus (MTAA), MTA Sealer (MTAS, experimental), Sealer 26 (S26) and zinc oxide and eugenol cement (ZOE). The push-out test was performed in a mechanical test machine (EMIC DL 2000) at 1 mm/min speed. The failure type was evaluated by stereomicroscopy. The results were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey test, at 5% significance level. MTAA (19.18 MPa), MTAS (19.13 MPa) and S26 (15.91 MPa) showed higher bond strength (pbond strength values (pAdhesive failure was prevalent in all groups, except for ZOE, which showed mixed failures. It was concluded that root-end filling materials MTA Angelus, MTA Sealer and Sealer 26 showed higher bond strength to dentinal walls than zinc oxide and eugenol cement after retrograde preparation. PMID:27224569

  8. The Effect of Surface Treatments on the Bond Strength of a Nonprecious Alloy–Ceramic Interface: An Invitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lahori, Manesh; Nagrath, Rahul; Sisodia, Siddharth; Dagar, Preety

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of seven different alloy surface treatments on the bond strength of the porcelain-metal interface. Three layers of opaque porcelain and a measured thickness of dentin porcelain were applied to nickel–chromium alloy, A tensile bond strength test was used. The alloy surface treatment that exhibited the highest bond strength was sandblast + surface grinding + sandblast + de-gas, whereas the alloy surface treatment that exhibited the lowest bond...

  9. Effects of three surface conditioning techniques on repair bond strength of nanohybrid and nanofilled composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Nassoohi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Repair bond strength of different composite resins has been assessed in few studies. In addition, reports on the efficacy of surface treatments are debated. Therefore, this in vitro study was conducted to evaluate the effect of three surface treatments on two nanocomposites versus a microhybrid composite. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 135 composite blocks (45 specimens per composite of microhybrid (Filtek Supreme Z250, 3M ESPE, USA, nanohybrid (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE, and nanofilled (Filtek Supreme Z350, 3M ESPE were thermocycled (5000 rounds and then surface roughened (except in a control group of 9 specimens of three composite types. Each composite type was divided into three subgroups of surface treatments: (1 Bur abrading and phosphoric acid (PA etching, (2 sandblasting and PA etching, and (3 hydrofluoric etching and silane application (n = 15 × 9, complying with ISO TR11405. Composite blocks were repaired with the same composite type but of a different color. Microtensile bond strength and modes of failure were analyzed statistically using two-way analyses of variance, Tukey and Chi-square tests (α = 0.05. Results: There were significant differences between three composite resins (P < 0.0001 and treatment techniques (P < 0.0001. Their interaction was nonsignificant (P = 0.228. The difference between nanofilled and nanohybrid was not significant. However, the microhybrid composite showed a significantly higher bond strength (Tukey P < 0.05. Sandblasting was significantly superior to the other two methods, which were not different from each other. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it seems that microhybrid composite might have higher repair strengths than two evaluated nanocomposites. Among the assessed preparation techniques, sandblasting followed by PA etching might produce the highest bond strength.

  10. Influence of cast surface finishing process on metal-ceramic bond strength

    OpenAIRE

    Denis Vojvodić,; Zdravko Schauperl,; Martina Lauš-Šošić,; Ketij Mehulić,; Sanja Štefančić

    2009-01-01

    Aim To investigate the influence of different cast surface finishingprocess on metal-ceramics bond strength.Methods Six Co-Cr alloy sample groups were cast (Wirobond C,BEGO, Bremen, Germany) and randomly selected for use in oneof the six different final processing of the casting surface (oxidation,sandblasting with 110 and 250 µm Al2O3, bonding agent,hydrochloric acid solution) prior to application of feldspathic ceramic(Duceram Kiss, DeguDent, Hanau-Wolfgang, Germany).The testing was carried...

  11. Effect of different oxidation treatments on the bonding strength of new dental alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influences of heat treatment and addition of a small amount of base metal (In, Sn, and Ir) for oxidation in Au-Pt-based alloy were investigated by electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Au-Pt-based alloys were prepared by argon-arc melting furnace and then they are heat treated. Oxidation on alloy was significantly affected by addition of base metal (In and Sn) and heat treatment. The bond strength of the alloys was not dependent on the changing heat treatment. These results indicated that the Sn and In could be effective as oxidation elements for porcelain bonding to gold alloys.

  12. Effect of different oxidation treatments on the bonding strength of new dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ju-hye [Department of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University 120-752, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woong-Chul; Oh, Sae-Yoon [Dept. of Dental Laboratory Science, College of Health Science, Korea University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung-Nam, E-mail: kimkn@yuhs.a [Department of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University 120-752, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji-Hwan, E-mail: kjh2804@korea.ac.k [Dept. of Dental Laboratory Science, College of Health Science, Korea University (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    The influences of heat treatment and addition of a small amount of base metal (In, Sn, and Ir) for oxidation in Au-Pt-based alloy were investigated by electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Au-Pt-based alloys were prepared by argon-arc melting furnace and then they are heat treated. Oxidation on alloy was significantly affected by addition of base metal (In and Sn) and heat treatment. The bond strength of the alloys was not dependent on the changing heat treatment. These results indicated that the Sn and In could be effective as oxidation elements for porcelain bonding to gold alloys.

  13. Effect of Saliva pH on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Hossein Toodehzaeim; Elham Khanpayeh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of salivary pH on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets to tooth surface.Materials and Methods: Eighty intact premolars were randomly divided into four groups of 20.  After bonding a bracket on each tooth, the groups one to four were stored in artificial saliva at a pH of 3.8, 4.8, 5.8, and 6.8, respectively for two months. The artificial saliva solutions were refreshed weekly. Each tooth was then embedded in an ...

  14. Hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesive systems according to interaction with dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Salvio, Luciana Andrea; Hipólito, Vinicius Di; Martins, Adriano Luis; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods: Ten human molars were ground to expose the dentin and then sectioned in four tooth-quarters. They were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the adhesive used: Two single-step self-etch adhesives – Adper Prompt (ADP) and Xeno III (XE), two two-step self-etching primer systems – Clearfil SE Bond (SE) and Adhe SE (ADSE), and one one-step etch-and-rinse system – Adper Single Bo...

  15. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Cécile Bernard; Cyril Villat; Hazem Abouelleil; Marie-Paule Gustin; Brigitte Grosgogeat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL) and a two-steps/self-et...

  16. Effects of endodontic tri-antibiotic paste on bond strengths of dentin adhesives to coronal dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Mirzakoucheki, Parvin; Walter, Ricardo; Khalighinejad, Navid; Jahromi, Maryam Zare; Mirsattari, Sanaz; Akbarzadeh, Navid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tri-antibiotic paste (TAP) on microtensile bond strengths (MTBS) of dental adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods Sixty extracted molars had their occlusal surfaces flattened to expose dentin. They were divided into two groups, i.e., control group with no dentin treatment and experimental group with dentin treatment with TAP. After 10 days, specimens were bonded using self-etch (Filtek P90 adhesive) or etch-and-rinse (Adper S...

  17. Shear bond strength comparison of implant-retained overdenture attachment pickup materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayouette, Monica J; Barnes, Logan; Vuthiganon, Jompobe; McPherson, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength (SBS) of 4 different retentive materials for the chairside pickup of dental implant attachments. Shear force was applied to determine the SBS of each material to denture acrylic resin. The difference between SBSs of polymethyl methacrylate and UBAR (claimed to bond to metal) to metal housings was also evaluated. There were no statistically significant differences among the SBSs of Jet Denture Repair Acrylic, EZ PickUp, and UBAR, but Quick Up had an SBS that was significantly lower than that of the other 3 materials. In addition, UBAR had a higher SBS to metal housings than did processed polymethyl methacrylate. PMID:27367633

  18. Effect of Different Saliva Decontamination Procedures on Bond Strength to Dentin in Single Bottle Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghavam

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Following the increasing use of composites in restoring anterior and posterior teeth, problems due to its technique sensitivity have become a major concern.One of these problems is the possibility of contamination of dentin with saliva, blood and/or gingival fluid in different stages of bonding procedure, even with application of different methods of isolation. However, by introduction of Single-bottle dentin adhesives,the contamination possibility reduced to two stages. Scientific documents show that saliva contamination reduces bond strength of composites to dentin. Application of simple and efficient methods for reducing or eliminating saliva contamination enables clinicians to carry out dental treatment without any concern about deterioration of clinical longevity of restoration.Purpose: This study was designed to compare the effect of different decontamination methods on the shear bond strength of composite to dentin using a “Single-bottle” adhesive.Materials and Methods: Seventy-two extracted sound human molars and premolars were selected. Enamel of buccal surface was ground flat to expose dentin. The teeth were divided into 9 groups of 8 each. In control group (1 the adhesive “Excite” was used according tothe manufacturer, without any contamination. Conditioned and saliva contaminated dentin was (2 rinsed and blot dried, (3 rinsed, dried and re-etched. In groups 4, 5, 6 uncured adhesive was saliva contaminated and then: (4 only blot dried (5 rinsed, blot dried with adhesive reapplication and (6 resurfaced with bur, rinsed, dried and followed by repeating the whole process. In groups 7, 8, 9 cured adhesive was contaminated with saliva and then:(7 rinsed and dried (8 rinsed, blot dried with adhesive reapplication (9 same as group (6.Then “Tetric Ceram” composite cylinders were bonded to dentin surfaces. Samples were thermo cycled in 5°C and 55°C water, 30 seconds in each bath with a dowel time of 10

  19. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded using halogen light and light-emitting diode at different debond times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Di Nicoló

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the photoactivation effects of QTH (Quartz-Tungsten-Halogen and LED (Light-Emitting Diode on the SBS (Shear Bond Strength of orthodontic brackets at different debond times. Seventy-two bovine lower incisors were randomly divided into two groups according to the photoactivation system used (QTH or LED. The enamel surfaces were conditioned with Transbond self-etching primer, and APC (Adhesive Pre-Coated brackets were used in all specimens. Group I was cured with QTH for 20 s and Group II with LED for 10 s. Both groups were subdivided according to the different experimental times after bonding (immediately, 24 h and 7 days. The specimens were tested for SBS and the enamel surfaces were analyzed according to the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI. The statistical analysis included the Tukey's test to evaluate the main effects of photoactivation and debond time on SBS. The Chi-square test was used to compare the ARI values found for each group, and no statistically significant difference was observed. The debond time of 7 days for QTH photoactivation showed statistically greater values of SBS when compared to the immediate and 24 h periods. There was no statistically significant difference between the QTH and LED groups immediately and after the 24 h period. In conclusion, bonding orthodontic brackets with LED photoactivation for 10 s is suggested because it requires a reduced clinical chair time.

  20. Shear bond strength and fracture analysis of human vs. bovine teeth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Rüttermann

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate if bovine enamel and dentin are appropriate substitutes for the respective human hard tooth tissues to test shear bond strength (SBS and fracture analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 80 sound and caries-free human erupted third molars and 80 freshly extracted bovine permanent central incisors (10 specimens for each group were used to investigate enamel and dentine adhesion of one 2-step self-etch (SE and one 3-step etch and rinse (E&R product. To test SBS the buccal or labial areas were ground plane to obtain appropriate enamel or dentine areas. SE and E&R were applied and SBS was measured prior to and after 500 thermocycles between +5 and +55°C. Fracture analysis was performed for all debonded areas. RESULTS: ANOVA revealed significant differences of enamel and dentin SBS prior to and after thermocycling for both of the adhesives. SBS- of E&R-bonded human enamel increased after thermocycling but SE-bonded did not. Bovine enamel SE-bonded showed higher SBS after TC but E&R-bonded had lower SBS. No differences were found for human dentin SE- or E&R-bonded prior to or after thermocycling but bovine dentin SE-bonded increased whereas bovine dentine E&R-bonded decreased. Considering the totalized and adhesive failures, fracture analysis did not show significances between the adhesives or the respective tooth tissues prior to or after thermocycling. CONCLUSION: Although SBS was different on human and bovine teeth, no differences were found for fracture analysis. This indicates that solely conducted SBS on bovine substrate are not sufficient to judge the perfomance of adhesives, thus bovine teeth are questionnable as a substrate for shear bond testing.

  1. The Effect of Novel Mercapto Silane Systems on Resin Bond Strength to Dental Noble Metal Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yangho; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kim, Young Kyung; Son, Jun Sik; Lee, Eunkyung; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2015-07-01

    Self-assembled monolayers of thiols (RSH), which are key elements in nanoscience and nanotechnology, have been used to link a range of materials to planar gold surfaces or gold nanoparticles. In this study, the adhesive performance of mercapto silane systems to dental noble metal alloys was evaluated in vitro and compared with that of commercial dental primers. Dental gold-palladium-platinum (Au-Pd-Pt), gold-palladium-silver (Au-Pd-Ag), and palladium-silver (Pd-Ag) alloys were used as the bonding substrates after air-abrasion (sandblasting). One of the following primers was applied to each alloy: (1) no primer treatment (control), (2) three commer- cial primers: V-Primer, Metal Primer II, and M.L. Primer, and (3) two experimental silane primer systems: 2-step application with 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (SPS) (1.0 wt%) and then 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) (1.0 wt%), and a silane blend consisting of SPS and MPS (both 1.0 wt%). Composite resin cylinders with a diameter of 2.38 mm were bonded to the surfaces and irradiated for 40 sec using a curing light. After storage in water at 37 °C for 24 h, all the bonded specimens were thermocycled 5000 times before the shear bond strength test. Regardless of the alloy type, the mercapto silane systems (both the 2-step and blend systems) consistently showed superior bonding performance than the commercial primers. Contact angle analysis of the primed surfaces indicated that higher resin bond strengths were produced on more hydrophilic alloy surfaces. These novel mercapto silane systems are a promising alternative for improving resin bonding to dental noble metal alloys. PMID:26373046

  2. An Investigation about the Influence of Bleaching on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets and on Enamel Colour

    OpenAIRE

    Isabell Immerz; Peter Proff; Piero Roemer; Claudia Reicheneder; Andreas Faltermeier

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of bleaching on the colouration of tooth enamel and shear bond strength of orthodontic ceramic brackets based upon current whitening practice. The bleaching and bonding techniques were performed on extracted bovine teeth for the investigation of their colorimetric spectrum and the adhesive bond strength on surface enamel. One group was designated as the control group with no pre-treatment. Another group was treated with a 45% hydrogen peroxid...

  3. “Evaluation of shear bond strength of a composite resin to white mineral trioxide aggregate with three different bonding systems”-An in vitro analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Anand C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a biomaterial that has been investigated for endodontic applications. With the increased use of MTA in pulp capping, pulpotomy, perforation repair, apexification and obturation, the material that would be placed over MTA as a final restoration is an important matter. As composite resins are one of the most widely used final restorative materials, this study was conducted to evaluate the shear bond strength of a composite resin to white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) using three different bonding systems namely the two-step etch and rinse adhesive, the self-etching primer and the All-in-one system. Material and Methods Forty five specimens of white MTA (Angelus) were prepared and randomly divided into three groups of 15 specimens each depending on the bonding systems used respectively. In Group A, a Two-step etch and rinse adhesive or ‘total-etch adhesive’, Adper Single Bond 2 (3M/ESPE) and Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN) were placed over WMTA. In group B, a Two-step self-etching primer system, Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Medical Inc) and Filtek Z350 were used. In Group C, an All-in-one system, G Bond (GC corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and Filtek Z350 were used. The shear bond strength was measured for all the specimens. The data obtained was subjected to One way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe’s post hoc test. Results The results suggested that the Two-step etch and rinse adhesive when used to bond a composite resin to white MTA gave better bond strength values and the All-in-one exhibited the least bond strength values. Conclusions The placement of composite used with a Two-step etch and rinse adhesive over WMTA as a final restoration may be appropriate. Key words:Composite resins, dentin bonding agents, mineral trioxide aggregate, shear bond strength. PMID:27398177

  4. Experimental analysis of the strength of silver-alumina junction elaborated at solid state bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The adhesion strength is closely related to the plastic deformation of the metal joint. → It is possible to transform a system with weak energy of adhesion into a system with strong energy. → The adhesion strength depends on Silver diffusion in the ceramic grains boundaries. -- Abstract: The mechanisms of ceramics-metal assemblies, particularly silver and alumina, can be better understood by studying the strength of their adhesion. These two materials are a priori non-reactive, their thermodynamic work of adhesion is low and the difference between their thermal coefficients of expansion in very considerable. In this study, the strength of silver-alumina junctions elaborated at solid state by thermo-compression is tested by an indirect tensile test and shearing one. The effects of several parameters such as: the pressure of bonding, the time of bonding, the temperature, and the oxygen dissolve in metal solid solution on the strength of the junction are analyzed. The obtained results show that the resistance of the junction is affected by all this parameters and it is essential to optimize these different parameters in order to increase the durability of the junction. It was also shown that the diffusion of the silver in alumina could be the cause of the damage of alumina near the interface.

  5. Friction stir weld assisted diffusion bonding of 5754 aluminum alloy to coated high strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Successful lap joints of Al 5754 sheet to coated DP600 and 22MnB5 steels. • Negligible effect of welding speed on mechanical properties of Al 5754/22MnB5 joints. • Lower strength of Al 5754/22MnB5 joints compared with Al 5754/DP600 joints. - Abstract: In the present paper friction stir-induced diffusion bonding is used for joining sheets of 5754 aluminum alloy to coated high strength steels (DP600 and 22MnB5) by promoting diffusion bonding in an overlap configuration. Mechanical performance and microstructures of joints were analyzed by overlap shear testing, metallography, and X-ray diffraction. Our results show that the strength of joint is dependent upon tool travel speed and the depth of the tool pin relative to the steel surface. The thickness and types of intermetallic compounds formed at the interface play a significant role in achieving a joint with optimum performance. That is, the formation of high aluminum composition intermetallic compounds (i.e. Al5Fe2) at the interface of the friction stir lap joint appeared to have a more negative effect on joint strength compared to the presence of high iron composition intermetallic phases (i.e. FeAl). This is in agreement with previously reported findings that FeAl intermetallic can improve the fracture toughness and interface strength in Al/St joints

  6. In-vitro comparison of the effect of different bonding strategies on the micro-shear bond strength of a silorane-based composite resin to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimi, Pouran; Alizadeh, Vahid; Fathpour, Kamyar; Mazaheri, Hamid; Mortazavi, Vajihosadat

    2016-01-01

    Background: The current study evaluated the micro-shear bond strengths of a new low-shrinkage composite resin to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, 70 extracted premolars were assigned to one of seven groups (n = 10): Group 1: OptiBond Solo Plus (Opt; Kerr); Group 2: SE Bond (SE; Kuraray); Group 3: Silorane System Adhesive (SSA; 3M ESPE); Group 4: OptiBond Solo Plus + LS Bond (Opt LS); Group 5: SE Bond + LS Bond (SE LS); Group 6: OptiBond Solo Plus (Opt Po); and Group 7: SE Bond (SE Po). Occlusal dentin was exposed and restored with Filtek LS (3M ESPE) in groups 1 to 5 and Point 4 (Kerr) in groups 6 and 7. After thermocycling (1000 cycles at 5/55΀C), micro-shear bond test was carried out to measure the bond strengths. The results were submitted to analysis of variance and post hoc Tukeytests (P < 0.05). Results: Two-way ANOVA showed no significant differences between the two types of composite resin (P = 0.187), between bonding agents (P = 0.06) and between composite resin and bonding agents (P = 0.894). Because P value of bonding agents was near the significance level, one-way ANOVA was used separately between the two composite groups. This analysis showed significant differences between silorane composite resin groups (P = 0.045) and Tukey test showed a significant difference between Groups 4 and 5 (P = 0.03). Conclusion: The application of total-etch and self-etch methacrylate-based adhesives with and without use of a hydrophobic resin coating resulted in acceptable bond strengths. PMID:27076826

  7. Bond and fracture strength of metal-ceramic restorations formed by selective laser sintering

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Hae-Young

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture strength of the metal and the bond strength in metal-ceramic restorations produced by selective laser sintering (SLS) and by conventional casting (CAST). MATERIALS AND METHODS Non-precious alloy (StarLoy C, DeguDent, Hanau, Germany) was used in CAST group and metal powder (SP2, EOS GmbH, Munich, Germany) in SLS group. Metal specimens in the form of sheets (25.0 × 3.0 × 0.5 mm) were produced in accordance with ISO 9693:1999 standard...

  8. Effect of Saliva Contamination on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets When Using a Self-Etch Primer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Jing; QI Juan

    2005-01-01

    The effect of saliva contamination on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets, at various stages of the bonding procedure using a new self-etch primer was studied. The samples were divided into 4 groups according to 4 different enamel surface conditions: Group A: dry; Group B: saliva contamination before priming; Group C: saliva contamination after priming, and Group D: saliva contamination before and after priming. Stainless steel brackets were bonded in each test group with a light-cured composite resin (TransbondXT 3M). The shear bond strength was determined in the first 30 min after bonding. The analysis of variance indicated that the shear bond strengths of the 4 groups were significantly different (F= 11.89, P<0.05). Tukey HSD tests indicated that contamination both before and after the application of the acid-etch primer resulted in a significantly lower (=4.6± 1.7 MPa) shear bond strength than either the control group (= 8.8±1.9 MPa) or the groups where contamination occurred either before ( = 7.9± 2.0 MPa) or after (=6.9±1.5 MPa) the application of the primer. It was concluded that the new acid-etch primer could maintain adequate shear bond strength if contamination occurred either before or after the application of the primer. On the other hand, contamination both before and after the application of the primer could significantly reduce the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  9. Microtensile bond strength of restorative composite bonded with self-adhesive resin cements to enamel and dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al-Saleh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine the microtensile bond strength (µTBS of composite restorations when bonded with self-adhesive resin-cements. METHODS: Thirty caries-free extracted molars were sterilized, and divided into 5 equal groups according to adhesive used: SBMP (Scotch-Bond-Multipurpose, total-etch 3-step adhesive, 3M/ESPE, PAN (PanaviaF-2.0, resin-cement with self-etch primer, Kuraray, RXU (RelyX-Unicem, self-adhesive resin-cement, 3M/ESPE, BRZ (Breeze, self-adhesive resin-cement, Pentron and MON (Monocem, self-adhesive resin-cement, Shofu. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups (dentin or enamel. Bonding agents, used according to manufacturers’ directions, or a thin layer of resin cement was applied onto teeth flat surfaces. Six mm-thick Filtek-Z250 (3M/ESPE composite build up was made in three increments. Teeth were sectioned to obtain rectangular specimens which were subjected to tensile force until failure. Specimens were subjected to 1,000 thermo-cycles between 5oC-55°C. Means and standard deviation (SD were calculated and statistically-analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey’s t-test. Specimens’ failure modes were reported. RESULTS: SBMP showed the highest µTBS results with enamel (24.6(6.1 MPa, PAN showed high µTBS with enamel (12.1(3.9MPa and dentin (11.6(4.7MPa compared to the other self-adhesive cements. Failure modes were adhesive and mixed for self-adhesive resin-cements. MON subgroups and BRZ enamel subgroup underwent premature failure. CONCLUSION: self-adhesive resin-cements showed low µTBS compared to SBMP.

  10. Tensile Strength of Bonded Lap-mitered Butt-Joints between Layered CFRP Bands : -In collaboration with RUAG Space AB

    OpenAIRE

    Zeeshan, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Joints in structures always cause strength reduction. The percentage of strength reduction depends upon the selection of several factors such as: type of joint (i.e. adhesive or mechanical), technique of joint (i.e. lap joint, butt joint etc.), geometry of joint, mode of load application etc. Here in this research, the strength of adhesively bonded butt joints with several geometries, later referred as joint angles, is investigated under uniaxial tension loading. Adhesively bonded simple butt...

  11. Acoustic inspection of bond strength of steel-reinforced mortar after exposure to elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang; Tsai; Kan

    2000-03-01

    In order to evaluate the bond strength between the reinforcement and concrete after fire damage, a combination of acoustic through-transmission and pull-out tests were used. Previous studies have shown a 25% decrease in the ultrasonic pulse velocity at 90% of the maximum load at room temperature. The specimens were kept in the oven at an elevated temperature for 1, 2, or 3 h. They were then removed and cooled to room temperature. Inspection was conducted using a high-power ultrasonic pulse velocity system while a pull-out load was applied. The correlation between preheated temperature, acoustic wave velocity, and the applied load was analyzed. Initial results show that bond strength and pulse velocity decreased substantially as the temperature or the heating time increased. PMID:10829721

  12. Effects of Horizontal Density Distribution on Internal Bond Strength of Flakeboard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEIChangtong; DAIChunping; ZHOUDingguo

    2005-01-01

    Horizontal density variation is a structural phenomenon of non-veneer wood composites. The variation and distribution characteristics of horizontal density have impacts on the products properties. In this study, veneer strip simulated flake boards with 4 kinds of density distribution were made using a mat model. The density variation of the modeled mats was discussed, as well as the relationship between sample size and density variation. The effects of density and density distribution of non-veneer composites on the internal bond strength were analyzed. Result shows that the horizontal density of random formed particleboard follows normal distribution. Density has remarkable influence on internal bond strength (IB). Increasing density helps to improve IB at lower density stage, but has negative impacts on IB at higher density stage.Density variation between testing specimens depends on their sizes. Properly increasing specimen size can decrease the variation of the IBs.

  13. Push-out bond strength and SEM evaluation of a new bonding approach into the root canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto Carvalho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the performance of different adhesive systems in fiber post placement aiming to clarify the influence of different hydrophobic experimental blend adhesives, and of one commercially available adhesive on the frictional retention during a luting procedure. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One luting agent (70 Wt% BisGMA, 28.5% TEGDMA; 1.5% p-tolyldiethanolamine to cement fiber posts into root canals was applied with 4 different adhesive combinations: Group 1: The etched roots were rinsed with water for 30 s to remove the phosphoric acid, then rinsed with 99.6% ethanol for 30 s, and blotdried. A trial adhesive (base to catalyst on a 1:1 ratio was used with an experimental luting agent (35% Bis-GMA, 14.37% TeGDMA, 0.5% eDMAB, 0.13% CQ; Group 2: A trial adhesive (base to catalyst on a 1:2 ratio was luted as in Group 1; Group 3: One-Step Plus (OSP, Bisco Inc. following the ethanol bonding technique in combination with the luting agent as in Group 1; Group 4: OSP strictly following the manufacturer's instructions using the luting agent as in Group 1. The groups were challenged with push-out tests. Posted root slices were loaded until post segment extrusion in the apical-coronal direction. Failure modes were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: Push-out strength was not significantly influenced by the luting agent (p>0.05. No statistically significant differences among the tested groups were found as Group 1 (exp 1 - ethanol-wet bonding technique=Group 2 (exp 2 - ethanol-wet bonding technique=Group 3 (OSP - ethanol-wet bonding technique=Group 4 (control, OSP - water-wet bonding technique (p>0.05. The dominating failure modes in all the groups were cohesive/adhesive failures, which were predominantly observed on the post/luting agent interface. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study support the hypothesis that the proposal to replace water with ethanol to bond fiber posts to the root canal using highly hydrophobic

  14. Microtensile Bond Strength of Cad-Cam and Pressed-Ceramic Inlays to Dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, A. Nilgün; İnan, Özgür; İnan, Erkan; Öztürk, Bora

    2007-01-01

    Objectives CAD-CAM system is popular because of high esthetic and short fabrication time. But, there is limited information available about the microtensile bonding of luting cements to CAD-CAM inlays and to dentin. The aim of this study was to examine the bond strength of CAD-CAM (Cerec 3) and pressed-ceramic (IPS Empress 2) inlays to dentin surface by microtensile testing using two luting cements. Materials and Methods Standardized mesio-occlusal cavities were made in forty extracted molar teeth. An occlusal reduction of 2 mm was made; the bucco-lingual width of the proximal boxes was 4 mm, the occlusal width 3 mm and the depth of the pulpal and axial walls 2 mm. The proximal boxes were extended 1 mm below the cemento-enamel junction. Teeth were randomly assigned to 2 groups to evaluate the bonding of 2 ceramic systems, Cerec 3 (Group I) and IPS Empress 2 (Group II), to dentin. Each of the 2 groups were further divided into 2 luting cement groups, Panavia F (Group A) and Variolink II (Group B). After cementation, the teeth were sectioned into two 1.2x1.2 mm wide ‘I’ shape sections. The specimens were then subjected to microtensile testing at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests were used to evaluate the results. Results The mean microtensile bond strengths of Cerec 3 and IPS Empress 2 bonding to dentin with luting agents in MPa were Panavia F (13.98±3.44), Variolink II (14.19±3.12) and Panavia F (15.12±3.15), Variolink II (15.45±3.08) respectively. No significant differences were found among the 2 ceramic systems (P>.05) and 2 luting cements with regard to dentin bond strengths (P>.05). Conlusions There was no difference found between the dentin bond strength of the Cerec 3 and IPS Empress 2 inlays cemented with two luting cements. PMID:19212483

  15. Effect of various surface treatments of tooth – colored posts on bonding strength of resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirzaei M.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Various studies have shown that reliable bond at the root - post - core interfaces are critical for the clinical success of post - retained restorations. Severe stress concentration at post - cement interface increases post debonding from the root. To form a bonded unit that reduces the risk of fracture, it is important to optimize the adhesion. Therefore, some post surface treatments have been proposed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments of tooth - colored posts on the bonding of resin cement. "nMaterials and Methods: In this interventional study, 144 tooth colored posts were used in 18 groups (8 samples in each group. The posts included quartz fiber (Matchpost, glass fiber (Glassix, and zirconia ceramic (Cosmopost and the resin cement was Panavia F 2.0. The posts received the following surface treatments: 1- No surface treatment (control group, 2- Etching with HF and silane, 3- Sandblasting with Cojet sand, 4- Sandblasting with Cojet sand and application of silane, 5- Sandblasting with alumina particles, 6- Sandblasting with alumina particles and application of silane. Then, posts were cemented into acrylic molds with Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The specimens were placed in water for 2 days and debonded in pull - out test. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA followed by Tamhane and Tukey HSD. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope (10 . P<0.05 was considered as the significant level. "nResults: Surface treatments (sandblasting with Cojet and alumina particles ,with or without silane resulted in improved bond strength of resin cement to glass fiber post (Glassix and zirconia ceramic (Cosmopost [p<0/05], but not to the quartz fiber post (Matchpost. In general, higher bond strengths resulted in a to higher percentage of cohesive failures within the cement. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, sandblasting with cojet and alumina

  16. Shear Bond Strength of Composite to Nd-YAG Lased Dentin with and without Dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kermanshah

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The achievement of a good and durable dentin/composite resin bond is an important task in restorative dentistry. The application of acid conditioners and dentin bonding agents is an accepted method to enhance this bond strength. Pretreating of dentin surface by laser irradiation seems to be a supplemental way to obtain better results,since lased dentin is more roughened and has a widest surface area to interact with acidconditioner.Purpose: In this study, the effect of dentin surface pretreating by Nd-YAG laser on dentin/composite shear bond strength was examined. Moreover, the effect of Chinese ink as a surface energy absorber on this value was investigated.Methods and Materials: Thirty-nine freshly extracted human teeth without dentinal caries were collected and their occlusal dentins were exposed using a diamond disk. The collected samples were divided into three identical groups. The dentin surface of the first group was lased by an Nd-YAG pulsed laser (100 mJ, 20 Hz through a 320 mm fiber optic in a swiping movement. In the second group, 10% solution of Chinese ink was applied on the dentinal surface before lasing. The samples of the third group were not lased at all. Thedentinal surface prepared by 35% phosphoric acid and Scotchbond MP primer and adhesive. Then, composite resin was cured on dentinal surface. After incubation, in water at 37°C for 24 hours, the samples were tested by Digital Tritest ELE machine.Results: The values of bond strength were 20.83±3.96 MPa, 17.83±3.63 MPa and 19.38±4.88 MPa for the lased, unlased and dye-enhanced groups, respectively. The results were not significant by ANOVA test (a=0.05. Although in the Weiboul modulus, the lased group offered better bond strength.Conclusion: Further studies are required to determine whether chemical as well as physical alterations to the dentin surface are induced by laser etching, and whether these influence the performance of the range of dentin

  17. Theoretical Chemistry Study of the Hydrogen-bonded Interaction between Acylamine and Chloromethane Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Qing-Yu; WANG Hai-Jun; CHEN Jian-Hua

    2005-01-01

    The hydrogen-bonded interaction between acylamine and chloromethane was studied using theoretical calculation methods. Looking the interaction system as a hydrogen-bonded complex, the geometric optimization of the interaction system was performed with HF and B3LYP methods at 6-311++G** level. Stable structures of these complexes were obtained. Binding energies and some other physical chemistry parameters of them were computed and compared. According to the calculation results, it can be identified that DMA (DMF or DEF) can form stable complex with chloromethane by the hydrogen-bonded interaction between them. The stable orders of these hydrogen-bonded complexes were obtained and described as: DMF-CHCl3>DMF-CH2Cl2>DMF-CH3Cl, DEF-CHCl3>DEF-CH2Cl2>DEF-CH3Cl, DMA-CHCl3>DMA-CH2Cl2>DMA-CH3Cl, respectively.

  18. The Effect of Different Soft Drinks on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Omid Khoda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It is proved that acidic soft drinks that are commonly used, have an adverse effect on dental structures, and may deteriorate oral heath of our patients and orthodontic appliances. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of yoghurt drink with other soft drinks on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.Materials and Methods: Seventy-five first premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes were selected and standard twin metal brackets were bonded on the center of buccal surface with No-Mix composite. The teeth were thermocycled for 625 cycles and randomly divided into five groups of artificial saliva, carbonated yoghurt drink with lactic acid base, non-carbonated yoghurt drink with lactic acid base, 7 up with citric acid base and Pepsi with phosphoric acid base. In all groups, the teeth were immersed in liquid for five-minute sessions three times with equal intervening intervals for 3 months. SBS was measured by a universal testing machine with a speed of 0.5mm/min. Data was analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA.Results: The results showed that mean values for the shear bond strength of carbonated yoghurt drinks, non-carbonated yoghurt drinks, 7up and Pepsi groups were 12.98(+_2.95, 13.26(+_4.00, 16.11(+_4.89, 14.73(+_5.10, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference among the groups (P-value= 0.238Conclusion: Soft drinks used in this study did not decrease the bond strength of the brackets bonded with this specific type of composite.

  19. Effect of three surface conditioning methods to improve bond strength of particulate filler resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Alander, P; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W

    2005-01-01

    The use of resin-based composite materials in operative dentistry is increasing, including applications in stress-bearing areas. However, composite restorations, in common with all restorations, suffer from deterioration and degradation in clinical service. Durable repair alternatives by layering a new composite onto such failed composite restorations, will eliminate unnecessary loss of tooth tissue and repeated insults to the pulp. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the repair bond strength of a particulate filler resin-composite (PFC) to 5 PFC substrates. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following surface conditioning methods: (1) Hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel (9.5%) etching, (2) Air-borne particle abrasion (50 microm Al2O3), (3) Silica coating (30 microm SiOx, CoJet-Sand). After each conditioning method, a silane coupling agent was applied. Adhesive resin was then applied in a thin layer and light polymerized. The low-viscosity diacrylate resin composite was bonded to the conditioned substrates in polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested in dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. One-way ANOVA showed significant influence of the surface conditioning methods (p < 0.001), and the PFC types (p < 0.0001) on the shear bond strength values. Significant differences were observed in bond strength values between the acid etched specimens (5.7-14.3 MPa) and those treated with either air-borne particle abrasion (13.0-22.5 MPa) or silica coating (25.5-41.8 MPa) in dry conditions (ANOVA, p < 0.001). After thermocycling, the silica coating process resulted in the highest bond values in all material groups (17.2-30.3 MPa). PMID:15754140

  20. Influence of saliva contamination on the shear bond strength of adhesives on enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Feres Assad-Loss

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate shear bond strength of 3 adhesive systems (Single Bond, TransbondTM MIP and TransbondTM XT applied on bovine enamel under saliva contamination condition. METHOD: One hundred and twenty enamel surfaces of bovine incisors were divided into 6 groups (n = 20 according to the adhesive system used (TransbondTM XT, TransbondTM MIP and Single Bond with or without saliva contamination. For each adhesive system, there were two groups defined as no contamination group (NC: 37% H3PO4 conditioning for 30 seconds and two layers of adhesive systems; saliva contamination group (SC: After the first adhesive layer application, the examined areas were contaminated with saliva. Samples were mounted appropriately for testing and stored in deionized water at 37 ºC for 7 days. Samples were then submitted to shear bond strength trials at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI was evaluated under stereomicroscopy. Two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test were used to compare mean values (α = 0.05. RESULTS: Groups XT (NC = 26.29 ± 7.23; MIP (NC = 24.47 ± 7.52 and SB (NC = 32.36 ± 4.14 XT (SC = 19.59 ± 6.76; MIP (SC = 18.08 ± 6.39 and SB (SC = 18.18 ± 7.03 MPa. ARI 0 and 1 were the most prevalent scores in all study groups examined. CONCLUSION: Saliva contamination significantly decreased bond strength of the three adhesive systems examined (p <0.05. However, the comparison of groups with and without saliva contamination did not reveal any significant differences, and, therefore, the three systems may be considered equivalent.

  1. Effects of Different Hardeners on the Working Properties and Bonding Strength of Urea-formaldehyde Adhesives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The addition of a hardener is necessary for the curing of urea-formaldehyde (UF) adhesives in the production of MDF and particleboard. The most commonly used hardener, ammonium chloride, however, is suspected to cause the formation of poisonous dioxin when waste boards are combusted and hence considered as a potential source of pollution. To assess the feasibility of substituting ammonium sulphate for ammonium chloride, working properties and bonding strength were measured for UF adhesives with the two ...

  2. Influence of fibreglass post design and lengths on the bond strength

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo César Freitas Santos Filho; Bruno Rodrigues Reis; Crisnicaw Veríssimo; Paulo Vinicius Soares; Murilo Souza Menezes; Carlos José Soares

    2013-01-01

    Post retention in root canal is an important factor on the clinical success of restorations in endodontically treated teeth. AIM: To evaluate the effect of luting agent, fibreglass post design and lengths on the bond strength of posts. MATERIALS AND METHOD: One hundred eighty single-rooted teeth were root filled and prepared to receive either a parallel-sided and serrated fibreglass post or a tapered and smooth fibreglass post (n=90). The posts were cemented with the following resin cements: ...

  3. Effect of bromelain enzyme for dentin deproteinization on bond strength of adhesive system

    OpenAIRE

    Kirti Chauhan; Revaplar Siddaveerappa Basavanna; Vasundhara Shivanna

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To assess the deproteinizing effect of bromelain enzyme and compare it with 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on shear bond strength before application of the adhesive system. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 extracted human premolars were divided into three groups, each one consisted of 10 teeth. The occlusal surface was wet ground to expose superficial dentin. In Group 1, teeth were etched; in Group 2, teeth were etched and deproteinized with bromelain enzyme; in Group 3, teeth w...

  4. Effect of Provisional Cements on Shear Bond Strength of Porcelain Laminate Veneers

    OpenAIRE

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. Methods: The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each to...

  5. Micro-tensile bond strength of adhesives to pulp chamber dentin after irrigation with Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Ç Barutcigil; Arslan, H; Özcan, E; O T Harorli

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different concentrations of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution on adhesion, that is, the bond strength of the different adhesive systems, to the pulp chamber dentin. Materials and Methods: Recently extracted, sound, human, third molars were cut horizontally to expose the pulp horn. The roof of the pulp chamber and pulp tissue was removed. The teeth were then divided into five main groups. The teeth in each group were tre...

  6. Effects of different surface treatments on bond strength of an indirect composite to bovine dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Laiza Tatiana Poskus; Rosana Sampaio Meirelles; Victor Blunck Schuina; Liana Matos Ferreira; Eduardo Moreira da Silva; Jose Guilherme Antunes Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several surface treatments could be used to improve the bond strength (BS) between indirect composites and cement. Aim: To evaluate the BS of an indirect composite submitted to different surface treatments, cemented to bovine dentin. Settings and Design: One hundred and fifty conical cavities were prepared in slices of bovine dentin and bulk filled with the composite. Materials and Methods: After curing and removal from the cavity, the restorations were treated according ...

  7. Bond strength of veneer ceramic and zirconia cores with different surface modifications after microwave sintering

    OpenAIRE

    Saka, Muhammet; Yuzugullu, Bulem

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of surface treatments on shear bond strength (SBS) between microwave and conventionally sintered zirconia core/veneers. MATERIALS AND METHODS 96 disc shaped Noritake Alliance zirconia specimens were fabricated using YenaDent CAM unit and were divided in 2 groups with respect to microwave or conventional methods (n=48/group). Surface roughness (Ra) evaluation was made with a profilometer on randomly selected microwave (n=10) and conventionally sintered (n=10) co...

  8. Effects of three surface conditioning techniques on repair bond strength of nanohybrid and nanofilled composites

    OpenAIRE

    Negin Nassoohi; Haleh Kazemi; Morad Sadaghiani; Mona Mansouri; Vahid Rakhshan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Repair bond strength of different composite resins has been assessed in few studies. In addition, reports on the efficacy of surface treatments are debated. Therefore, this in vitro study was conducted to evaluate the effect of three surface treatments on two nanocomposites versus a microhybrid composite. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 135 composite blocks (45 specimens per composite) of microhybrid (Filtek Supreme Z250, 3M ESPE, USA), nanohybrid (Filtek Su...

  9. The effect of denture base surface pretreatments on bond strengths of two long term resilient liners

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Rahul Shyamrao; Parkhedkar, Rambhau

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Purpose of this study was to evaluate effect of two surface treatments, sandblasting and monomer treatment, on tensile bond strength between two long term resilient liners and poly (methyl methacrylate) denture base resin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two resilient liners Super-Soft and Molloplast-B were selected.Sixty acrylic resin (Trevalon) specimens with cross sectional area of 10×10 mm were prepared and divided into two groups of 30 specimens each. Each group was surface treated (n = 10...

  10. Comparative Evaluation of Impact Strength of Fragment Bonded Teeth and Intact Teeth: An In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Venugopal, L.; Lakshmi, M Narasimha; Babu, Devatha Ashok; Kiran, V Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Background: To test and compare the impact strength of fragment bonded teeth with that of intact teeth by using impact testing machine (pendulum type) as a mode of load. Materials and Methods: Forty extracted, maxillary, central incisors selected for this study (20 control group and 20 experimental group). In experimental group, teeth crowns were fractured with a microtome at 2.5 mm from mesioincisal angle cervically, fractured portion is attached to original crown ...

  11. Effect of digluconate chlorhexidine on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrios Dionysopoulos

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to systematically review the literature for the effect of digluconate chlorhexidine (CHX) on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin of composite restorations. Materials and Methods: The electronic databases that were searched to identify manuscripts for inclusion were Medline via PubMed and Google search engine. The search strategies were computer search of the database and review of reference lists of the related articles. Search words/terms were a...

  12. Mechanical, antibacterial and bond strength properties of nano-titanium-enriched glass ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene GARCIA-CONTRERAS

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of nanoparticles (NPs has become a significant area of research in Dentistry. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the physical, antibacterial activity and bond strength properties of conventional base, core build and restorative of glass ionomer cement (GIC compared to GIC supplemented with titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanopowder at 3% and 5% (w/w. Material and Methods Vickers microhardness was estimated with diamond indenter. Compressive and flexural strengths were analyzed in a universal testing machine. Specimens were bonded to enamel and dentine, and tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine. Specimens were incubated with S. mutans suspension for evaluating antibacterial activity. Surface analysis of restorative conventional and modified GIC was performed with SEM and EDS. The analyses were carried out with Kolmogorov-Smirnov, ANOVA (post-hoc, Tukey test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney. Results Conventional GIC and GIC modified with TiO2 nanopowder for the base/liner cement and core build showed no differences for mechanical, antibacterial, and shear bond properties (p>0.05. In contrast, the supplementation of TiO2 NPs to restorative GIC significantly improved Vickers microhardness (p<0.05, flexural and compressive strength (p<0.05, and antibacterial activity (p<0.001, without interfering with adhesion to enamel and dentin. Conclusion GIC supplemented with TiO2 NPs (FX-II is a promising material for restoration because of its potential antibacterial activity and durable restoration to withstand the mastication force.

  13. Various cements and their effects on bond strength of zirconia ceramic to enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prylinska-Czyzewska, Agata; Piotrowski, Pawel; Prylinski, Mariusz; Dorocka-Bobkowska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Zirconia ceramic disks (Cercon) were fabricated using a computer-aided design/ computer-assisted manufacture system and fitted to hard tooth tissues from freshly extracted bovine mandibular incisors using seven cements (zinc phosphate, zinc polycarboxylate, Eco-Link, Panavia F 2.0, Clearfil SA Cement, MaxCem Elite, and GC Fuji Plus) with various physicochemical and bonding properties. Bond strengths were determined using a universal testing machine (Hounsfield H5KS) with a 5,000-N head and a cutting knife speed of 0.5 mm per minute. The study showed that the strongest bond between zirconia ceramic and hard tooth tissues was obtained with Panavia F 2.0 adhesive cement based on 10 methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate monomer. PMID:25965643

  14. Effect of bleaching on the shear bond strength of the enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Arruda

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of dental bleaching on the shear bond strength of enamel. Methods: Fifty molars were selected and divided into five groups (n=10; G1-without bleaching (control; G2-bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide and restored 24h later; G3-bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide and restored seven days later; G4-bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and restored a 35% and restored 24h later; G5-bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and restored a 35% and restored seven days later. During the 24h and 7-day intervals the test specimens remained stored in artificial saliva, after which the restorative procedures were performed on the enamel. Results: The microshear bond strength test indicated the following results in MPa (ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc: G1-43.15 a (±5.19; G2-31.34 ab (± 4.41; G3-36.66 ab (± 3.11; G4-22.87 c (±3.76 and G5-35.67 ab (± 4.64. Conclusion: Groups G1, G2, G3 and G5 showed no statistical difference and Group G4 (bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and restored 24h later showed diminished bond strength between the bleached enamel and resin composite.

  15. Shear bond strength of provisional restoration materials repaired with light-cured resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiu-Lin; Lai, Yu-lin; Chou, I-chiang; Hu, Chiung-Jen; Lee, Shyh-yuan

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the repair bond strengths of light-cured resins to provisional restoration materials with different chemical compositions and polymerization techniques. Fifty discs (10 mm in diameter and 1.5 mm thick) were fabricated for each provisional resin base material, including a self-cured methacrylate (Alike), self-cured bis-acrylate (Protemp 3 Garant), light-cured bis-acrylate (Revotek LC) and a heat-cured methacrylate (Namilon). All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for seven days before undergoing repair with one of four light-cured resins, including AddOn, Revotek LC, Dyractflow and Unifast LC and a self-cured resin (Alike), according to the manufacturers' instructions, for a total of 200 specimens. After 24 hours of storage in 37 degrees C water, the shear bond strengths were measured with a universal testing machine and fracture surfaces were examined under a stereomicroscope. Two-way ANOVA revealed that provisional resin-base material (p material (p materials repaired with bis-acryl resins, with their failure modes primarily being of the adhesive type. The highest bond strengths were recorded when the provisional resin-base materials and repairing resins had similar chemical components and the failure modes tended to be of the cohesive type. PMID:18833857

  16. Sorption, Solubility, Bond Strength and Hardness of Denture Soft Lining Incorporated with Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Chladek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The colonization of denture soft lining material by oral fungi can result in infections and stomatitis of oral tissues. In this study, 0 ppm to 200 ppm of silver nanoparticles was incorporated as an antimicrobial agent into composites to reduce the microbial colonization of lining materials. The effect of silver nanoparticle incorporation into a soft lining material on the sorption, solubility, hardness (on the Shore A scale and tensile bond strength of the composites was investigated. The data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Newman-Keuls post hoc tests or the chi-square Pearson test at the p < 0.05 level. An increase in the nanosilver concentration resulted in a decrease in hardness, an increase in sorption and solubility, a decrease in bond strength and a change in the failure type of the samples. The best combination of bond strength, sorption, solubility and hardness with antifungal efficacy was achieved for silver nanoparticle concentrations ranging from 20 ppm to 40 ppm. These composites did not show properties worse than those of the material without silver nanoparticles and exhibited enhanced in vitro antifungal efficiency.

  17. Micro-computed tomography and bond strength analysis of different root canal filling techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Nhata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality and bond strength of three root filling techniques (lateral compaction, continuous wave of condensation and Tagger′s Hybrid technique [THT] using micro-computed tomography (CT images and push-out tests, respectively. Materials and Methods: Thirty mandibular incisors were prepared using the same protocol and randomly divided into three groups (n = 10: Lateral condensation technique (LCT, continuous wave of condensation technique (CWCT, and THT. All specimens were filled with Gutta-percha (GP cones and AH Plus sealer. Five specimens of each group were randomly chosen for micro-CT analysis and all of them were sectioned into 1 mm slices and subjected to push-out tests. Results: Micro-CT analysis revealed less empty spaces when GP was heated within the root canals in CWCT and THT when compared to LCT. Push-out tests showed that LCT and THT had a significantly higher displacement resistance (P < 0.05 when compared to the CWCT. Bond strength was lower in apical and middle thirds than in the coronal thirds. Conclusions: It can be concluded that LCT and THT were associated with higher bond strengths to intraradicular dentine than CWCT. However, LCT was associated with more empty voids than the other techniques.

  18. Quantifying bonding strength of CuO nanotubes with substrate using the nano-scratch technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Krishna; Manoj Kumar, R.; Lahiri, Debrupa; Lahiri, Indranil

    2015-07-01

    CuO is a narrow bandgap semiconductor demonstrating applications in/as catalysts, gas sensors, adsorbents, and superconductors, and as electrodes of photocells, super-capacitors, and lithium-ion batteries. One-dimensional (1D) CuO nanostructures are of particular interest in most of these device applications, owing to their huge surface area. Strong bonding between nanomaterials and substrate is essential for extended device life. Hence, knowledge about the strength of the nanomaterial-substrate bond is highly desired. In this research work, CuO nanotubes were synthesized directly on a Cu substrate, and its adhesion strength was quantified using the nano-scratch-based technique. The adhesion energy of CuO nanotubes (for 7 h of reaction period) on the Cu substrate was measured to be 82 Jm-2. The bonding strength can be correlated with the structure of the material. Results of this research will be valuable in analyzing and improving the lifetime of CuO nanotube-based devices, and the technique could be further extended to other 1D transition metal oxide nanostructures.

  19. Interfacial Bonding Strength of TiN Film Coated on Si3N4 Ceramic Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The fraction of TiN/Si3N4 in the cross section was observed with scanning electric microscope (SEM), and residual stresses of TiN coated on the surface of Si3N4 ceramic were measured with X-ray diffraction (XRD).The hardness of TiN film was measured, and bonding strength of TiN film coated on Si3N4 substrate was measured by scratching method. The formed mechanism of residual stress and the failure mechanism of the bonding interface in the film were analyzed, and the adhesion mechanism of TiN film was investigated preliminarily. The results show that residual stresses of TiN film are all behaved as compressive stress, and TiN film is represented smoothly with brittle fracture, which is closely bonded with Si3N4 substrate. TiN film has high hardness and bonding strength of about 500 MPa, which could satisfy usage requests of the surface of cutting Si3N4 ceramic.

  20. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage. PMID:26966567

  1. Comparison of the push-out shear bond strength of four types of glass ionomers when used to bond amalgam: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Vinod Babu Mathew; S. Ramachandran; R Indira; Shankar, P

    2011-01-01

    Background : Dental amalgam is the primary direct posterior restorative material used worldwide, but it have certain shortcomings due to the lack of adhesiveness to the cavity. The introduction of the concept of "bonded amalgam" helped improve the use of amalgam as a restorative material. Aim : Evaluation of the comparative push-out shear bond strength of four types of conventional glass ionomers used to bond amalgam to tooth in simulated class I situations. Materials and Methods : Fo...

  2. Optimization of bond strength between gold alloy and porcelain through a composite interlayer obtained by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → The shear bond strength results using composites were significantly higher (>150 MPa) than those registered in the upper range of conventional PFM techniques (∼80 MPa). → Metal-ceramic bond strength is maximized for composites with similar metal:ceramic content. → Shear bond strength tests showed an improvement of 160% relatively to standard PFM technique. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of a composite interlayer (at the metal-ceramic interface) on the shear bond strength of a metal-ceramic composite when compared with a conventional porcelain fused to metal (PFM). Several metal-ceramic composites specimens were produced by hot pressing. To identify which was the best composition for the interlayer several composites, with different relations of metal/ceramic volume fraction, were bonded to metal and to ceramic substrates. The bond strength of the composites to substrates was assessed by the means of a shear test performed in a universal test machine (crosshead speed: 0.5 mm/min) until fracture. Some interfaces of fractured specimens as well as undestroyed interface specimens were examined with optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM/EDS). The shear bond strength results for all composites bonded to metal and to ceramic substrates were significantly higher (>150 MPa) than those registered in the upper range of conventional porcelain fused to metal (PFM) techniques (∼80 MPa). The use of a composite interlayer proved to enhance metal/ceramic adhesion in 160%.

  3. Effects of silica-coating on surface topography and bond strength of porcelain fused to CAD/CAM pure titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Takushi; Hamano, Naho; Ino, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of porcelain fusing to titanium and the effects of surface treatment on surface structure of titanium. In the shear bond strength test, titanium surface treatments were: conventional, silica-coating without bonding agent, and silica-coating with bonding agent. Titanium surface treatments for analysis by the atomic force microscope (AFM) were: polishing, alumina sandblasting and silica-coating. The shear bond strength value of silica-coating with bonding agent group showed significantly higher than that of other groups. In AFM observation results, regular foamy structure which is effective for wetting was only observed in silica-coating. Therefore, this structure might indicate silicon. Silica-coating renders forms a nanoscopic regular foamy structure, involved in superhydrophilicity, to titanium surface, which is markedly different from the irregular surface generated by alumina sandblasting. PMID:27041024

  4. Effect of microstructure on the high temperature strength of nitride bonded silicon carbide composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Rakshit; P K Das

    2002-10-01

    Four compositions of nitride bonded SiC were fabricated with varying particle size of SiC of ∼ 9.67, ∼ 13.79, ∼ 60 and their mixture with Si of ∼ 4.83 particle size. The green density and hence the open porosity of the shapes were varied between 1.83 to 2.09 g/cc and 33.3 to 26.8 vol.%, respectively. The effect of these parameters on room temperature and high temperature strength of the composite up to 1300°C in ambient condition were studied. The high temperature flexural strength of the composite of all compositions increased at 1200 and 1300°C because of oxidation of Si3N4 phase and blunting crack front. Formation of Si3N4 whisker was also observed. The strength of the mixture composition was maximum.

  5. Comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontics brackets on composite resin restorations with different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Antonio Ribeiro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Orthodontic patients frequently present composite resin restorations, however there are few studies that evaluate the best way for orthodontic bonding in this situation. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this work was to evaluate the bond strength of orthodontic brackets in resin restorations with surface treatment. METHODS: Fifty one bovine lower incisors were randomly divided into three groups. On the control group (CG the brackets were bonded to dental enamel; on experimental groups, brackets were bonded to resin restoration with diamond drill treatment (EGT and with no treatment (EGN. The teeth were placed in PVC tubes with autopolymerized acrylic resin. The shear test was performed in EMIC universal testing machine. The groups were submitted to ANOVA analysis of variance with Tukey post test to verify the statistical difference between groups (α = 0.05. RESULTS: CG (6.62 MPa and EGT (6.82 MPa groups presented similar results, while EGN (5.07 MPa obtained statistically lower results (p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Therefore, it is concluded that the best technique for bonding of orthodontic brackets on composite resin restorations is the performance of surface detritions.

  6. COMPOSITE RESIN BOND STRENGTH TO ETCHED DENTINWITH ONE SELF PRIMING ADHESIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P SAMIMI

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength of composite resins to etched dentin in both dry and wet dentin surface with active and inactive application of a single-bottle adhesive resin (Single Bond, 3M Dental products. Methods. Fourthy four intact human extracted molars and premolars teeth were selected. The facial surfaces of the teeth were grounded with diamond bur to expose dentin. Then specimens were divided into four groups of 11 numbers (9 Molars and 2 Premolars. All the samples were etched with Phosphoric Acid Gel 35% and then rinsed for 10 seconds. The following stages were carried out for each group: Group I (Active-Dry: After rinsing, air drying of dentin surface for 15 seconds, active priming of adhesive resin for 15 seconds, air drying for 5 seconds, the adhesive resin layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group III (Inactive-Dry:After rinsing, air drying of dentin surface for 15 seconds, adhesive resin was applied and air dryied for 5 seconds, the adhesive layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group III (Active-Wet:After rinsing, removal of excess water of dentin surface with a cotton roll, active priming of adhesive resin for 15 seconds and air drying for 5 seconds, the adhesive layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group IV (Inactive-Wet:After rinsing, removal of excess water of dentin surface with a cotton roll, the adhesive resin was applied and air dryied for 5 seconds and then cured for 10 seconds. After adhesive resin application, composite resin (Z250, 3M Dental products was applied on prepared surface with cylindrical molds (with internal diameter of 2.8mm, & height of 5mm and light-cured for 100 seconds (5x20s. The samples were then thermocycled. They were located in 6±3c water .temperature for 10 seconds and then 15 seconds in inviromental temperature, 10s in 55±3c water temperature and then were located at room temperature for 15s. This test was repeated for 100s. All of the specimens

  7. Strength and nature of hydrogen bonding interactions in mono- and di-hydrated formamide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelina, Emilio L; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2011-05-12

    In this work, mono- and di-hydrated complexes of the formamide were studied. The calculations were performed at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of approximation. The atoms in molecules theory (AIM), based on the topological properties of the electronic density distribution, was used to characterize the different types of bonds. The analysis of the hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) in the most stable mono- and di-hydrated formamide complexes shows a mutual reinforcement of the interactions, and some of these complexes can be considered as "bifunctional hydrogen bonding hydration complexes". In addition, we analyzed how the strength and the nature of the interactions, in mono-hydrated complexes, are modified by the presence of a second water molecule in di-hydrated formamide complexes. Structural changes, cooperativity, and electron density redistributions demonstrate that the H-bonds are stronger in the di-hydrated complexes than in the corresponding mono-hydrated complexes, wherein the σ- and π-electron delocalization were found. To explain the nature of such interactions, we carried out the atoms in molecules theory in conjunction with reduced variational space self-consistent field (RVS) decomposition analysis. On the basis of the local Virial theorem, the characteristics of the local electron energy density components at the bond critical points (BCPs) (the 1/4∇ (2)ρ(b) component of electron energy density and the kinetic energy density) were analyzed. These parameters were used in conjunction with the electron density and the Laplacian of the electron density to analyze the characteristics of the interactions. The analysis of the interaction energy components for the systems considered indicates that the strengthening of the hydrogen bonds is manifested by an increased contribution of the electrostatic energy component represented by the kinetic energy density at the BCP. PMID:21506592

  8. Effect of collagen fibrils removal on shear bond strength of total etch and self etch adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pishevar L.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Sodium hypochlorite can remove the organic phase of the demineralized dentin and it produces direct resin bonding with hydroxyapatite crystals. Therefore, the hydrolytic degradation of collagen fibrils which might affect the bonding durability is removed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of collagen fibrils removal by 10% NaOCl on dentin shear bond strength of two total etch and self etch adhesive systems."nMaterials and Methods: Sixty extracted human premolar teeth were used in this study. Buccal surface of teeth were grounded until dentin was exposed. Then teeth were divided into four groups. According to dentin surface treatment, experimental groups were as follows: Group I: Single Bond (3M according to manufacture instruction, Group II: 10% NaOCl+Single bond (3M, Group III: Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray according to manufacture instruction, and Group IV: Clearfil SE Bond primer. After that, the specimens were immersed in 50% acetone solution for removing extra monomer. Then the specimens were rinsed and dried. 10% NaOCl was applied and finally adhesive was used. Then composite was bonded to the treated surfaces using a 4 2 mm cylindrical plastic mold. Specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles (5-55ºC. A shear load was employed by a universal testing machine with a cross head speed of 1mm/min. The data were analyzed for statistical significance with One-way ANOVA, Two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post-hoc tests."nResults: The mean shear bond strengths of groups were as follows: Single Bond=16.8±4.2, Clearfil SE Bond=23.7±4.07, Single Bond+NaOCl=10.5±4.34, Clearfil SE Bond+NaOCl=23.3±3.65 MPa. Statistical analysis revealed that using 10% NaOCl significantly decreased the shear bond strength in Single Bond group (P=0.00, but caused no significant difference in the shear bond strength in Clearfil SE Bond group (P=0.99."nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, NaOCl treatment did not improve the bond

  9. Radiographic, antibacterial and bond-strength effects of radiopaque caries tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umwali, Aurore; Askar, Haitham; Paris, Sebastian; Schwendicke, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Selectively excavated carious lesions remain radiographically detectable. Radiopaque tagging could resolve the resulting diagnostic uncertainty. We aimed to evaluate if tagging depends on lesions depths, is antibacterial, or affects dentin bond-strengths. Artificial lesions (depth-range: 152–682 μm, n = 34/group) were induced in human dentin samples, evaluated using wavelength-independent microradiography, treated with one of two tagging materials (70% SnCl2, 30% SnF2) and re-evaluated. To evaluate antimicrobial effects, 40 dentin samples were submitted to a Lactobacillus rhamnosus invasion-model. Infected samples were treated with placebo, 0.2% chlorhexidine, SnCl2, SnF2 (n = 10/group). Dentin was sampled and colony-forming units/mg determined. Micro-tensile bond-strengths of adhesive restorations (OptiBond FL, Filtek Z250) to tagged or untagged, sound and carious dentin were assessed (n = 12/group). Tagged surfaces were evaluated microscopically and via energy-dispersive X-ray-spectroscopy (EDS). Tagging effects of both materials decreased with increasing lesion depths (p < 0.001). Un-/chlorhexidine-treated dentin contained significantly more viable bacteria (median 7.3/3.7 × 105 CFU/mg) than tagged dentin (no CFU detectable, p < 0.001). Tagging decreased bond strengths (p < 0.001) on sound (−22%/−33% for SnCl2/SnF2) and carious dentin (−50%/−54%). This might be due to widespread tin chloride or fluoride precipitation, as detected via microscopy and EDS. While radiopaque tagging seems beneficial, an optimized application protocol needs to be developed prior clinical use. PMID:27251174

  10. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    Cantrell, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes KN of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites,...

  11. Influence of chlorhexidine concentration on microtensile bond strength of contemporary adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Alves de Campos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of chlorhexidine (CHX concentration on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS of contemporary adhesive systems. Eighty bovine central incisors were used in this study. The facial enamel surface of the crowns was abraded with 600-grit silicon carbide paper to expose flat, mid-coronal dentin surfaces. The tested materials were Scotchbond Multipurpose (SMP, Single-Bond (SB, Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB and Clearfil Tri S Bond (CTSB. All the materials were applied according to manufacturer's instructions and followed by composite application (Z250. The teeth were randomly divided into 16 groups: for the etch-and-rinse adhesives (SMP and SB, 0.12% or 2% CHX was applied prior to or after the acid etching procedure. For the self-etch adhesives (CSEB and CTSB 0.12% or 2% CHX was applied prior to the primer. Control groups for each one of the adhesive systems were also set up. The specimens were immediately submitted to μTBS testing and the data were analyzed using Analysis of Variance and the Tukey post hoc test (alpha = .01. The failure patterns of the specimens were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The effects of 2% CHX were statistically significant (p < 0.01 for the self-etch adhesives but were not significant for the etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. Analysis of the data demonstrated no statistical difference between the etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. CHX-based cavity disinfectants in concentrations higher than 0.12% should be avoided prior to the self-etch adhesive systems evaluated in this study to diminish the possibilities of reduction in bond strength.

  12. Effect of Four Methods of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Zirconium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soghra Yassaei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Providing reliable attachment between bracket base and zirconia surface is a prerequisite for exertion of orthodontic force. The purpose of the present study was to eval- uate the effect of four zirconium surface treatment methods on shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets.Materials and Methods: One block of zirconium was trimmed into four zirconium sur- faces, which served as our four study groups and each had 18 metal brackets bonded to them. Once the glazed layer was removed, the first group was etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (HF, and the other three groups were prepared by means of sandblasting and 1 W, and 2 W Er: YAG laser, respectively. After application of silane, central incisor brackets were bonded to the zirconium surfaces. The SBS values were measured by a Dartec testing ma- chine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min.Results: The highest SBS was achieved in the sandblasted group (7.81±1.02 MPa followed in a descending order by 2 W laser group (6.95±0.87 MPa, 1 W laser group (6.87±0.92MPa and HF acid etched group (5.84±0.78 MPa. The differences between the study groups, were statistically significant except between the laser groups (P < 0.05. Conclusion: In terms of higher bond strength and safety, sandblasting and Er: YAG laser irradiation with power output of 1 W and 2 W can be considered more appropriate alterna- tives to HF acid etching for zirconium surface treatment prior to bracket bonding.

  13. Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadizenouz, Ghazaleh; Esmaeili, Behnaz; Taghvaei, Arnica; Jamali, Zahra; Jafari, Toloo; Amiri Daneshvar, Farshid; Khafri, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Background. Repairing aged composite resin is a challenging process. Many surface treatment options have been proposed to this end. This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS) of nano-filled composite resin repairs. Methods. Seventy-five cylindrical specimens of a Filtek Z350XT composite resin were fabricated and stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours. After thermocycling, the specimens were divided into 5 groups according to the following surface treatments: no treatment (group 1); air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles (group 2); irradiation with Er:YAG laser beams (group 3); roughening with coarse-grit diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid (group 4); and etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 120 s (group 5). Another group of Filtek Z350XT composite resin samples (4×6 mm) was fabricated for the measurement of cohesive strength (group 6). A silane coupling agent and an adhesive system were applied after each surface treatment. The specimens were restored with the same composite resin and thermocycled again. A shearing force was applied to the interface in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05). Results. One-way ANOVA indicated significant differences between the groups (P < 0.05). SBS of controls was significantly lower than the other groups; differences between groups 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 were not significant. Surface treatment with diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid resulted in the highest bond strength. Conclusion. All the surface treatments used in this study improved the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite resin used. PMID:27092209

  14. Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadizenouz, Ghazaleh; Esmaeili, Behnaz; Taghvaei, Arnica; Jamali, Zahra; Jafari, Toloo; Amiri Daneshvar, Farshid; Khafri, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Background. Repairing aged composite resin is a challenging process. Many surface treatment options have been proposed to this end. This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS) of nano-filled composite resin repairs. Methods. Seventy-five cylindrical specimens of a Filtek Z350XT composite resin were fabricated and stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours. After thermocycling, the specimens were divided into 5 groups according to the following surface treatments: no treatment (group 1); air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles (group 2); irradiation with Er:YAG laser beams (group 3); roughening with coarse-grit diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid (group 4); and etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 120 s (group 5). Another group of Filtek Z350XT composite resin samples (4×6 mm) was fabricated for the measurement of cohesive strength (group 6). A silane coupling agent and an adhesive system were applied after each surface treatment. The specimens were restored with the same composite resin and thermocycled again. A shearing force was applied to the interface in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P groups (P groups; differences between groups 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 were not significant. Surface treatment with diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid resulted in the highest bond strength. Conclusion. All the surface treatments used in this study improved the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite resin used. PMID:27092209

  15. The influence of size and structure of metal orthodontic bracket base on bond strength on tooth enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The factors which may influence the bond strength of the applied orthodontic brackets on the tooth surface are the size and structure of the bracket base. Objective. The aim of the paper was to investigate the influence of size and shape of different types of brackets on bond strength on the enamel and analyze the remaining quality of adhesive material on the tooth surface after debonding of orthodontic brackets (adhesive remnant index - ARI. Methods. In this study, three types of metal brackets of different sizes and shapes of Dentaurum manufacturer were used (Utratrimm, Equilibrium 2, Discovery, Dentaurum, Inspringen, Germany. The brackets were applied onto the middle part of the anatomic crowns of buccal surfaces of 30 premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons. In addition, the pre-treatment of teeth by 37% orthophosphoric acid and adhesive material System1+ (Dentaurum, Germany were used. Results. The mean value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Discovery type after debonding was 8.67±0.32 MPa, while the value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Equilibrium 2 type amounted to 8.62±0.22 MPa. The value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Ultratrimm type after debonding was 8.22±0.49 MPa. There were no statistical differences in the values of bond strength regarding all three groups of the investigated orthodontic brackets (F=4.56; p<0.05. Conclusion. The base size and design of metal orthodontic brackets did not play a significant role in bond strength, while the values of ARI index were identical in all three investigated groups.

  16. Push-out Bond Strength of Calcium Enriched Mixture Exposed to Alkaline Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobhnamayan F

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Calcium hydroxide which is commonly used as an intracanal medicament, changes the pH of dentin and periradicular tissues to an alkaline pH. In some clinical situations, endodontic reparative cements like calcium enriched mixture cement are used after calcium hydroxide therapy. However, the alkaline pH may affect the physical properties of this cement. Objectives: This study was designed to evaluate the effect of alkaline pH on the push-out bond strength of calcium enriched mixture. Materials and Methods: 80 root slices were prepared from single-rooted human teeth and their lumens were instrumented to achieve a diameter of 1.3mm. Calcium enriched mixture (CEM was mixed according to the manufacturer’s instruction and introduced into the lumens of root slices. The specimens were then randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 20 and wrapped in pieces of gauze soaked in synthetic tissue fluid (STF buffered in potassium hydroxide at pH values of 7.4, 8.4, 9.4, or 10.4. The samples were incubated for 4 days at 37°C. The push-out bond strengths were then measured using a universal testing machine. Failure modes were examined under a light microscope at ×20 magnification. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey’s post hoc tests. Results: The greatest (1.41 ± 0.193 MPa and lowest (0.8 ± 0.06 MPa mean push-out bond strengths were observed after exposure to pH values of 7.4 and 8.4, respectively. There were significant differences between the neutral group and the groups with pH of 8.4 (p = 0.008 and 10.4 (p = 0.022. The bond failure was predominantly of cohesive type for all experimental groups. Conclusions: Under the condition of this study, alkaline pH adversely affected the Push-out bond strength of CEM cement.

  17. In vitro evaluation of influence of salivary contamination on the dentin bond strength of one-bottle adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nujella B.P Suryakumari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effect of salivary contamination on the bond strength of one-bottle adhesive systems - (the V generation at various stages during the bonding procedure and to investigate the effect of the contaminant removing treatments on the recovery of bond strengths. Materials and Methods: In this study the V generation one-bottle system - (Adper Single Bond was tested. Fifty caries-free human molars with flat dentin surfaces were randomly divided into five groups of ten teeth each: Group I had 15 second etching with 35% Ortho Phosphoric acid, 15 second rinse and blot dried (Uncontaminated; Group II contaminated and blot dried; Group III contaminated and completely dried; Group IV contaminated, washed, blot dried; Group V contaminated, retched washed, and blot dried. The bonding agent was applied and resin composite (Z-100 3M ESPE was bonded to the treated surfaces using the Teflon mold. The specimens in each group were then subjected to shear bond strength testing in an Instron Universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm / minute and the data were subjected to one way ANOVA for comparison among the groups (P<0.05. Results: There was a significant difference between the group that was dried with strong oil-free air after contamination (Group III and the other groups. When the etched surface was contaminated by saliva, there was no statistical difference between the just blot dry, wash, or the re-etching groups (Groups II, IV, V if the dentin surface was kept wet before priming. When the etched dentin surface was dried (Group III the shear bond strength decreased considerably. Conclusion: The bond strengths to the tooth structure of the recent dentin bonding agents are less sensitive to common forms of contamination than assumed. Re-etching without additional mechanical preparation is sufficient to provide or achieve the expected bond strength.

  18. Influence of laser etching on enamel and dentin bond strength of Silorane System Adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustunkol, Ildem; Yazici, A Ruya; Gorucu, Jale; Dayangac, Berrin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of Silorane System Adhesive to enamel and dentin surfaces that had been etched with different procedures. Ninety freshly extracted human third molars were used for the study. After the teeth were embedded with buccal surfaces facing up, they were randomly divided into two groups. In group I, specimens were polished with a 600-grit silicon carbide (SiC) paper to obtain flat exposed enamel. In group II, the overlying enamel layer was removed and exposed dentin surfaces were polished with a 600-grit SiC paper. Then, the teeth in each group were randomly divided into three subgroups according to etching procedures: etched with erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser (a), etched with 35% phosphoric acid (b), and non-etched (c, control). Silorane System Adhesive was used to bond silorane restorative to both enamel and dentin. After 24-h storage in distilled water at room temperature, a SBS test was performed using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni tests (p  0.05). The SBS of self-etch adhesive to dentin was not statistically different from enamel (p > 0.05). Phosphoric acid treatment seems the most promising surface treatment for increasing the enamel and dentin bond strength of Silorane System Adhesive. PMID:23912781

  19. Influence of 10-MDP Adhesive System on Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia-Composite Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Cornelius Pott

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This in-vitro study investigated the initial 24h bond strength between different composites and zirconia after application of four different adhesive systems. Methods: A total of 120 specimens of zirconia (InCoris, Sirona, Germany, Bernsheim were ground with a 165 µm grit rotating diamond disc. Thirty specimens were each additionally treated with Cimara Zircon “CZ” (VOCO GmbH, Germany, Cuxhaven, Futurabond U “FBU” (VOCO GmbH, Futurabond M+ “FBM” (VOCO GmbH or Futurabond M+ in combination with the DCA activator “FBMD” (VOCO GmbH. One of three different types of composites – BifixSE (“BS”, BifixQM (“BQ” or GrandioSO (“G” (VOCO GmbH – was bonded to ten specimens each in every group. Shear bond strength (SBS was determined in a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA and the Tukey test. Results: FBM and FBMD gave higher SBS than CZ and FBU in combination with all tested composites. In comparison to FBU, FBM gave statistically significant increases in SBS with BifixSE (19.4±5.7 MPa (P

  20. Strength Modeling of Reinforced Concrete Beam with Externally Bonded FRP Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Pannirselvam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This research study presents the evaluation of the structural behaviour of reinforced concrete beams with externally bonded Fibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP reinforcements. Three different steel ratios with two different Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer (GFRP types and two different thicknesses in each type of GFRP were used. Totally fifteen rectangular beams of 3 m length were cast. Three rectangular beams were used as reference beam (Control Beams and the remaining were fixed with GFRP laminates on the soffit of the rectangular beam. The variables considered for the study includes longitudinal steel ratio, type of GFRP laminates, thickness of GFRP laminates and composite ratios. Flexural test, using simple beam with third-point loading was adopted to study the performance of FRP plated beams interms flexural strength, deflection, ductility and was compared with the unplated beams. The test results show that the beams strengthened with GFRP laminates exhibit better performance. The flexural strength and ductility increase with increase in thickness of GFRP plate. The increase in first crack loads was up to 88.89% for 3 mm thick WRGFRP plates and 100.00% for 5 mm WRGFRP plated beams and increase in ductility interms of energy and deflection was found to be 56.01 and 64.69% respectively with 5 mm thick GFRP plated beam. Strength models were developed for predicting the flexural strength (ultimate load, service load and ductility of FRP beams. The strength model developed give prediction matching the measurements.

  1. Comparative evaluation of compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and shear bond strength of GIC type IX, chlorhexidine-incorporated GIC and triclosan-incorporated GIC: An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaidka, Shipra; Somani, Rani; Singh, Deepti J.; Shafat, Shazia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To comparatively evaluate the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement type IX, chlorhexidine-incorporated glass ionomer cement, and triclosan-incorporated glass ionomer cement. Materials and Methods: In this study, glass ionomer cement type IX was used as a control. Chlorhexidine diacetate, and triclosan were added to glass ionomer cement type IX powder, respectively, in order to obtain 0.5, 1.25, and 2.5% concentrations of the respective experimental groups. Compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength were evaluated after 24 h using Instron Universal Testing Machine. The results obtained were statistically analyzed using the independent t-test, Dunnett test, and Tukey test. Results: There was no statistical difference in the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement type IX (control), 0.5% triclosan-glass ionomer cement, and 0.5% chlorhexidine-glass ionomer cement. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of 0.5% triclosan-glass ionomer cement and 0.5% chlorhexidine-glass ionomer cement were similar to those of the glass ionomer cement type IX, discernibly signifying that these can be considered as viable options for use in pediatric dentistry with the additional value of antimicrobial property along with physical properties within the higher acceptable range. PMID:27195231

  2. Influence of steel fibres on bond and development length of deformed bars in normal strength concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenzey, Ugyen

    Transverse reinforcement (stirrups) plays an important role in improving bond and anchorage of deformed bars in reinforced concrete structures. Steel fibres or steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) can be used in lieu of stirrups to provide a similar beneficial effect. The application of steel fibres in lieu of stirrups is not recognized in codes of practice for concrete structures because of limited research for this type of application. The results of this study are based on 18 large scale test beams (250 mm wide by 300 mm high and 3.4 m long). Control cylinders and flexure prisms are used to obtain the required concrete material properties together with tension tests of the steel rebar. The focus of this research is to investigate the influence of steel fibres to enhance bond and development of deformed reinforcing bars in normal strength reinforced concrete beams. An attempt is also made to develop an understanding and rationale of the effect SFRC has on improving bond. Longitudinal reinforcement in most of the beams is lap spliced with different types of confinement in the spliced region (plain concrete, plain concrete with stirrups, SFRC, and SFRC with stirrups), and evaluated under third point loading to ensure the spliced bars are subjected to a constant tensile force in the region of constant moment. All of the beams with spliced reinforcement failed in bond before yielding of the longitudinal reinforcement. The SFRC mix uses steel fibres at an 80 kg/m3 dosage (1% by volume). The plain concrete beams without any transverse reinforcement failed suddenly without any warning. The presence of steel fibres did not affect the flexural cracking load of the specimens, but did provide a consistent increase in the load capacity at bond failure and ensure a more controlled failure. The spliced beams with SFRC exhibited a 22.5% increase in the bond failure load capacity compared with the plain concrete beams. The combined effect of fibres and transverse reinforcement

  3. Inflatable rock bolt bond strength versus rock mass rating (RMR):A comparative analysis of pull-out testing data from underground mines in Nevada

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barnard Chase; Kallu Raj R.; Warren Sean; Thareja Rahul

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish confidence in anticipated minimum bond strength for inflatable rock bolts by comparing the bond strength to variable geotechnical conditions using the rock mass rating (RMR) system. To investigate a correlation between these parameters, the minimum bond strength of pull-out tested inflatable rock bolts was compared to the RMR of the rock in which these bolts were placed. Bond strength vs. RMR plots indicate that expected minimum bond strength is positively corre-lated with RMR;however, the correlation is not strong. Cumulative percent graphs indicate that 97%of pull-out tests result in a minimum bond strength of 3.3 and 1.7 ton/m in RMR P 45 and<45, respectively. Although lower bond strengths are more commonly encountered in low RMR ground, high bond strengths are possible as well, yielding higher variability in bond strengths in low RMR ground. Bond strength of friction bolts relies on contact between the rock bolt and drill hole. Experience in Nevada indicates that RMR is known to affect both the quality and consistency of drill holes which likely affects bond strength. Drilling and bolting in low RMR ground is more sensitive to drilling and bolting practices, and strategies for maximizing bond strength in these conditions are discussed.

  4. Shear bond strength of self-ligating orthodontic brackets on different types of porcelain crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamdeep Singh Ahluwalia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to compare shear bond strength (SBS and adhesive remnant index (ARI of self-ligating orthodontic brackets bonded to different porcelain crowns. Materials and Methods: Three groups of different types of porcelain crowns, each containing 12 crowns were fabricated by the same technician and allocated to one of the study groups as follows: Group I - IPS porcelain crowns (Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein, Group II - Porcelain fused to zirconia crowns (Zirkonzahn GmbH, Gais, Italy, Noritake Co., Tokyo, Japan and Group III - Conventional porcelain fused to metal crowns (Ceramco3, Densply, PA, USA. The orthodontic brackets were bonded to these crowns using hydrofluoric acid (HFA + silane etching protocol. After bonding, the SBS of the brackets were tested with a universal testing machine under standard test conditions. Results: Statistical evaluation using analysis of variance showed a significant difference between the groups (P 0.05. Chi-square comparison revealed no significant difference in ARI scores between groups (P > 0.05. Conclusions: When HFA + silane etching protocol were used, IPS crowns showed the greatest SBS of orthodontic brackets. The ARI score was non-significant. Therefore, if there is a need to place crowns over teeth then these crowns can be used for restoration of teeth before orthodontic treatment.

  5. Effect of new adhesion promoter and mechanical interlocking on bonding strength in metal-polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuberth, A.; Göring, M.; Lindner, T.; Töberling, G.; Puschmann, M.; Riedel, F.; Scharf, I.; Schreiter, K.; Spange, S.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    There are various opportunities to improve the adhesion between polymer and metal in metal-plastic composites. The addition of a bonding agent which reacts with both joining components at the interfaces of the composite can enhance the bonding strength. An alternative method for the adjustment of interfaces in metal-plastic composites is the specific surface structuring of the joining partners in order to exploit the mechanical interlock effect. In this study the potential of using an adhesion promoter based on twin polymerization for metal-plastic composites in combination with different methods of mechanical surface treatment is evaluated by using the tensile shear test. It is shown that the new adhesion promoter has a major effect when applied on smooth metal surfaces. A combination of both mechanical and chemical surface treatment of the metal part is mostly just as effective as the application of only one of these surface treatment methods.

  6. Effect of Different Surface Treatments on the Bond Strength of Repaired Resin Restorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last decade, growing demands by patients for mercury-free esthetic restorations had markedly increased the use of resin composites in restorative dentistry. However, despite the continuing development of resin composites with improved properties, several factors, such as discoloration, color mismatch, wear; chipping or bulk fracture might present clinical problems (Mjor and Gordan. 2002, Vichi et al. 2004 and Kolbeck et al. 2006). As a result, the clinician should decide whether to replace or simply repair these restorations. Total replacement of the restoration might be regarded as over-treatment since in most cases, large portions of the restorations might be clinically and radio graphically considered free of failure. Moreover, complete removal of the restoration inevitably resulted in weakening of the tooth, unnecessary removal of intact dental tissues, more money and time consuming. For these reasons, the repair of the restoration instead of its removal would be a favorable procedure (Lucena-Martin et al. 2001, Frankenberger et al. 2003 a and Oztas et al. 2003). The key element in the determination of successful repair procedures was the adequate bond strength between the existing resin composite and the new one. Various methods have been suggested to improve the bond strength of the repaired resin restorations (Tezvergil et al. 2003 and Bonstein et al. 2005). Mechanical and/or chemical treatments had been investigated for preparation of the aged resin restorations to be repaired (Tezvergil et al. 2003, Ozcan et al. 2005 and Hannig et al. 2006). These treatments were introduced to counteract the problems of aged resin restorations which were limited amount of residual free radicals available for reaction with the repair material, contaminated surface, and highly cross-linked resin matrix ( Dall Oca et al. 2006 and Papacchini et al. 2007 a) Previous studies emphasized that mechanical treatments are the most important factor in obtaining optimal repair

  7. Theoretical and Experimental Evaluation of the Bond Strength Under Peeling Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid; Jawad, Oussama Cherkaoui

    1997-01-01

    Reliable applications of adhesively bonded joints require understanding of the stress distribution along the bond-line and the stresses that are responsible for the joint failure. To properly evaluate factors affecting peel strength, effects of defects such as voids on the stress distribution in the overlap region must be understood. In this work, the peel stress distribution in a single lap joint is derived using a strength of materials approach. The bonded joint is modeled as Euler-Bernoulli beams, bonded together with an adhesive. which is modeled as an elastic foundation which can resist both peel and shear stresses. It is found that for certain adhesive and adherend geometries and properties, a central void with the size up to 50 percent of the overlap length has negligible effect on the peak peel and shear stresses. To verify the solutions obtained from the model, the problem is solved again by using the finite element method and by treating the adherends and the adhesive as elastic materials. It is found that the model used in the analysis not only predicts the correct trend for the peel stress distribution but also gives rather surprisingly close results to that of the finite element analysis. It is also found that both shear and peel stresses can be responsible for the joint performance and when a void is introduced, both of these stresses can contribute to the joint failure as the void size increases. Acoustic emission (AE) activities of aluminum-adhesive-aluminum specimens with different void sizes were monitored. The AE ringdown counts and energy were very sensitive and decreased significantly with the void size. It was observed that the AE events were shifting towards the edge of the overlap where the maximum peeling and shearing stresses were occurring as the void size increased.

  8. Influence of previous acid etching on interface morphology and bond strength of self-etching adhesive to cavosurface enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Adriano Fonseca; da Silva, Vinícius Brito; Soares, Giulliana Panfiglio; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Baggio Aguiar, Flávio Henrique; Lovadino, José Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the (1) bond strength of a etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesive systems to cavosurface enamel, (2) influence of the previous acid etching with phosphoric acid 35% to the self-etching adhesive application on bond strength values, and (3) analysis of the cavosurface enamel morphology submitted to different types of conditioning, with the use of a scanning electronic microscope (SEM). Methods: Twenty four human third molars were sectioned on ...

  9. A comparison of shear bond strength of ceramic and resin denture teeth on different acrylic resin bases

    OpenAIRE

    Corsalini, Massimo; Venere, Daniela Di; Pettini, Francesco; Stefanachi, Gianluca; Catapano, Santo; Boccaccio, Antonio; Lamberti, Luciano; Pappalettere, Carmine; Carossa, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the shear bond strength of different resin bases and artificial teeth made of ceramic or acrylic resin materials and whether tooth-base interface may be treated with aluminium oxide sandblasting. Experimental measurements were carried on 80 specimens consisting of a cylinder of acrylic resin into which a single tooth is inserted. An ad hoc metallic frame was realized to measure the shear bond strength at the tooth-base interface. A complete factorial pl...

  10. Dentin Bond Strength of Two Recent CAD/CAM-Materials after Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Flury, Simon; Schmidt, Stefanie Z.; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the bond strength to dentin of two recent resin-ceramic materials for computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) after 24 hours and after six months storage. Methods and Materials: Ninety cylinders were milled out of Lava Ultimate (3M ESPE) and 90 cylinders out of VITA ENAMIC (VITA Zahnfabrik) (dimension of cylinders: ∅=3.6 mm, h=2 mm). All Lava Ultimate cylinders were sandblasted (aluminium oxide, grain size: 27 μm) and cleaned with ethanol, where...

  11. Influence of ultrasound and diamond burs treatments on microtensile bond strength

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre Conde; Vivian Mainieri; Eduardo Gonçalves Mota; Hugo Mitsuo Oshima

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare surface treatments with CVDentUS ® ultrasound tips (UT) and KGSorensen ® diamond burs (DB) on etched (e) and non-etched (n/e) dentin. The microtensile bond strength (μTBS) was measured and fractography was assessed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods: Sixteen molars were divided into four groups of four teeth each according to treatment (DB-n/e; DB-e; UT-n/e; UT-e). The teeth were restored, sectioned into samples for μTBS (n=40) and tested on...

  12. Importance of the oxygen bond strength for catalytic activity in soot oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob M.; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Jensen, Anker D.

    2016-01-01

    (loose contact) the rate constants for a number of catalytic materials outline a volcano curve when plotted against their heats of oxygen chemisorption. However, the optima of the volcanoes correspond to different heats of chemisorption for the two contact situations. In both cases the activation...... oxidation. The optimum of the volcano curve in loose contact is estimated to occur between the bond strengths of α-Fe2O3 and α-Cr2O3. Guided by an interpolation principle FeaCrbOx binary oxides were tested, and the activity of these oxides was observed to pass through an optimum for an FeCr2Ox binary oxide...

  13. Correlation between metal-ceramic bond strength and coefficient of linear thermal expansion difference

    OpenAIRE

    Stella Crosara Lopes; Valéria Oliveira Pagnano; João Manuel Domingos de Almeida Rollo; Mônica Barbosa Leal; Osvaldo Luiz Bezzon

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the metal-ceramic bond strength (MCBS) of 6 metal-ceramic pairs (2 Ni-Cr alloys and 1 Pd-Ag alloy with 2 dental ceramics) and correlate the MCBS values with the differences between the coefficients of linear thermal expansion (CTEs) of the metals and ceramics. Verabond (VB) Ni-Cr-Be alloy, Verabond II (VB2), Ni-Cr alloy, Pors-on 4 (P), Pd-Ag alloy, and IPS (I) and Duceram (D) ceramics were used for the MCBS test and dilatometric test. Forty-eight cera...

  14. A comparative study on the bond strength of porcelain to the millingable Pd-Ag alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Jun-Tae; Shin, Soo-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The porcelain fused to gold has been widely used as a restoration both with the natural esthetics of the porcelain and durability and marginal fit of metal casting. However, recently, due to the continuous rise in the price of gold, an interest towards materials to replace gold alloy is getting higher. This study compared the bond strength of porcelain to millingable palladium-silver (Pd-Ag) alloy, with that of 3 conventionally used metal-ceramic alloys. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four typ...

  15. Effect of ozone gas on the shear bond strength to enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Teixeira Pires

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is an important disinfecting agent, however its influence on enamel adhesion has not yet been clarified. Objective: Evaluate the influence of ozone pretreatment on the shear strength of an etch-and-rinse and a self-etch system to enamel and analyze the respective failure modes. Material and Methods: Sixty sound bovine incisors were used. Specimens were randomly assigned to four experimental groups (n=15: Group G1 (Excite® with ozone and group G3 (AdheSE® with ozone were prepared with ozone gas from the HealOzone unit (Kavo® for 20 s prior to adhesion, and groups G2 (Excite® and G4 (AdheSE® were used as control. Teeth were bisected and polished to simulate a smear layer just before the application of the adhesive systems. The adhesives were applied according to the manufacturer's instructions to a standardized 3 mm diameter surface, and a composite (Synergy D6, Coltene Whaledent cylinder with 2 mm increments was build. Specimens were stored in 100% humidity for 24 h at 37°C and then subjected to a thermal cycling regimen of 500 cycles. Shear bond tests were performed with a Watanabe device in a universal testing machine at 5 mm/min. The failure mode was analyzed under scanning electron microscope. Means and standard deviation of shear bond strength (SBS were calculated and difference between the groups was analyzed using ANOVA, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Levene and Bonferroni. Chi-squared statistical tests were used to evaluate the failure modes. Results: Mean bond strength values and failure modes were as follows: G1- 26.85±6.18 MPa (33.3% of adhesive cohesive failure; G2 - 27.95±5.58 MPa (53.8% of adhesive failures between enamel and adhesive; G3 - 15.0±3.84 MPa (77.8% of adhesive failures between enamel and adhesive and G4 - 13.1±3.68 MPa (36.4% of adhesive failures between enamel and adhesive. Conclusions: Shear bond strength values of both adhesives tested on enamel were not influenced by the previous application of ozone gas.

  16. Effect of 2% Chlorhexidine Digluconate on the Bond Strength to Normal versus Caries-Affected Dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Komori, Paula C. P.; Pashley, David H.; Tjäderhane, Leo; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; de Goes, Mario Fernando; Linda WANG; Carrilho, Marcela R.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) used as a therapeutic primer on the long-term bond strengths of two etch-and-rinse adhesives to normal (ND) and caries-affected (CAD) dentin. Forty extracted human molars with coronal carious lesions, surrounded by normal dentin, were selected for this study. Flat surfaces of two types of dentin (i.e. ND and CAD) were prepared with a water-cooled high speed diamond disc, and then acid-etched, rinsed and air-dried. In contro...

  17. Effect of Numbers of Load Cycling on the Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Total Etch Adhesives to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Daneshkazemi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Today load cycling is used for similarity of invitro and invivo studies, though different results were reported in different studies. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of load cycling on micro tensile bond strength of two total etch adhesives to dentin. Methods: Enamel of 48 molar teeth were removed to expose the superficial dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into two equal groups, and were restored with Single bond (SB, ExciTE and Synergy composite. Then the teeth of each group were divided to 4 equal sub groups. Moreover, load cycling of 0, 50, 100, 200 k load cycle with 50 newton load was used. In each sub group, 12 hour glass slabs with 1mm2 thickness were made. Then the samples were loaded by Dartec testing machine (Model HC/10 with 1 mm/min cross head speed to make the fracture occur. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, t-test, Bonferroni tests. Results: The most micro tensile bond strength belonged to ExciTE without load cycling and lowest refered to SB with 200 k. There was a significant difference between the groups (p ExciTE= 0.0001, p SB = 0.001. Micro tensile bond strength in SB group was significantly lower than ExciTE (p= 0.001. Moreover, load cycling had negative effect on micro tensile bond strength. Conclusion: By increasing load cycling, micro tensile bond strength of both bondings decreased significantly

  18. The effect of antimicrobial agents on bond strength of orthodontic adhesives: a meta-analysis of in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, A S P; Collares, F M; Leitune, V C B; Samuel, S M W

    2016-02-01

    Antimicrobial orthodontic adhesives aim to reduce white spot lesions' incidence in orthodontic patients, but they should not jeopardizing its properties. Systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to answer the question whether the association of antimicrobial agents with orthodontic adhesives compromises its mechanical properties and whether there is a superior antimicrobial agent. PubMed and Scopus databases. In vitro studies comparing shear bond strength of conventional photo-activated orthodontic adhesives to antimicrobial photo-activated orthodontic adhesives were considered eligible. Search terms included the following: orthodontics, orthodontic, antimicrobial, antibacterial, bactericidal, adhesive, resin, resin composite, bonding agent, bonding system, and bond strength. The searches yielded 494 citations, which turned into 467 after duplicates were discarded. Titles and abstracts were read and 13 publications were selected for full-text reading. Twelve studies were included in the meta-analysis. The global analysis showed no statistically significant difference between control and experimental groups. In the subgroup analysis, only the chlorhexidine subgroup showed a statistically significant difference, where the control groups had higher bond strength than the experimental groups. Many studies on in vitro orthodontic bond strength fail to report test conditions that could affect their outcomes. The pooled in vitro data suggest that adding an antimicrobial agent to an orthodontic adhesive system does not influence bond strength to enamel. It is not possible to state which antimicrobial agent is better to be associated. PMID:26257400

  19. Mechanism of Strength Loss of No-bake Phosphate Bonded Sand Mold/Core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Youshou; XUE Yiyu; HUANG Jin; LI Sinian; XIA Lu; HUANG Caihua

    2009-01-01

    The strength loss mechanism of the phosphate bonded sand mold/core was studied. The morphology and composition of phosphate membrane on the surface of sands was analyzed with electron probe X-ray microanalyzer. Results show that magnesium causes cracks in cured phosphate membrane and results in the decrease of sand molds/cores strength. However, the addition of magne-sium significantly enhanced hygroscopy resistance of phosphate membrane. In addition, the phosphate binder added with the magnesium modifier has more rapid hardening reaction speed compared that without or with low magnesium binder. It can be concluded that the phosphate binder with the addition of magnesium modifier is favorably used in high humid and cold circumstance.

  20. Effects of curing mode of resin cements on the bond strength of a titanium post: An intraradicular study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazal Reza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare push-out bond strength between self-cured and dual-cured resin cement using a titanium post. Background: Dual-cured resin cements have been found to be less polymerized in the absence of light; thus the bond strength of cements would be compromised due to the absence of light with a metallic post. Materials and Methods: Ten extracted teeth were prepared for cement titanium PARAPOST, of five specimens each, with Panavia F [dual-cured (PF] and Rely×Luting 2 [self-cured resin-modified glass ionomer luting cement (RL]; the push-out bond strength (PBS at three different levels of the sectioned roots was measured. The failure modes were observed and the significance of the differences in bond strength of the two types of cement at each level and at different levels of the same type was analyzed with non-parametric tests. Results: The push-out bond strength of the RL group was greater at all the three levels; with significant differences at the coronal and middle levels (P<0.05. No significant differences in PBS at different levels of the same group were observed. Cement material around the post was obvious in the PF group. The failure mode was mostly adhesive between the post and resin cement in the RL group. Conclusion: Bond strength was greater with self-cured, resin-modified glass ionomer luting cement, using titanium post.

  1. An in vitro study to evaluate the effect of two ethanol-based and two acetone-based dental bonding agents on the bond strength of composite to enamel treated with 10% carbamide peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Basavaraj Benni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Carbamide peroxide bleaching has been implicated in adversely affecting the bond strength of composite to enamel. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol-based (Clearfil S 3 bond, Kuraray, Adper Single bond 2, 3M ESPE dental products and acetone-based (Prime and Bond NT, Dentsply, One Step, Bisco bonding agents on the shear bond strength of composite to enamel treated with 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 extracted human noncarious permanent incisors were randomly divided into two groups (control and experimental. Experimental group specimens were subjected to a bleaching regimen with a 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching system (Opalescence; Ultradent Products Inc, South Jordan, USA. Composite resin cylinders were bonded to the specimens using four bonding agents and shear bond strength was determined with universal testing machine. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the shear bond strength between control and experimental groups with both ethanol-based (Clearfil S 3 Bond and Adper Single Bond 2 and acetone-based bonding agent (Prime and Bond NT and One Step. Interpretation and Conclusion: The adverse effect of bleaching on bonding composite to enamel can be reduced or eliminated by using either ethanol- or acetone-based bonding agent. Clinical Significances: Immediate bonding following bleaching procedure can be done using ethanol- or acetone-based bonding agent without compromising bond strength.

  2. Bonding Strength Effects in Hydro-Mechanical Coupling Transport in Granular Porous Media by Pore-Scale Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The hydro-mechanical coupling transport process of sand production is numerically investigated with special attention paid to the bonding effect between sand grains. By coupling the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM and the discrete element method (DEM, we are able to capture particles movements and fluid flows simultaneously. In order to account for the bonding effects on sand production, a contact bond model is introduced into the LBM-DEM framework. Our simulations first examine the experimental observation of “initial sand production is evoked by localized failure” and then show that the bonding or cement plays an important role in sand production. Lower bonding strength will lead to more sand production than higher bonding strength. It is also found that the influence of flow rate on sand production depends on the bonding strength in cemented granular media, and for low bonding strength sample, the higher the flow rate is, the more severe the erosion found in localized failure zone becomes.

  3. Ideal Strengths and Bonding Properties of PuO2 under Tension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bao-Tian; MANG Ping

    2011-01-01

    We perform a first-principles computational tensile test on PuO2 based on density-functional theory within a local density approximation ( LDA )+U formalism to investigate its structural, mechanical, magnetic and intrinsic bonding properties in four representative directions: [001], [100], [110]and [111].The stress-strain relations show that the ideal tensile strengths in the four directions are 81.2, 80.5, 28.3 and 16.8GPa at strains of 0.36, 0.36,0.22 and 0.18, respectively.The [001]and [100]directions are prominently stronger than the other two directions since more Pu-O bonds participate in the pulling process.By charge and density of state analysis along the [001]direction, we find that the strong mixed ionic/covalent character of the Pu-O bond is weakened by tensile strain and PuO2 will exhibit an insulator-to-metal transition after tensile stresses exceeding about 79 GPa.%@@ We perform a first-principles computational tensile test on Pu02 based on density-functional theory within a local density approximation(LDA)+U formalism to investigate its structural, mechanical, magnetic and intrinsic bonding properties in four representative directions:[001], [100], [110] and [111].The stress-strain relations show that the ideal tensile strengths in the four directions are 81.2, 80.5, 28.3 and 16.8 GPa at strains of 0.36, 0.36,0.22 and 0.18, respectively.The [001]and [100]directions are prominently stronger than the other two directions since more Pu-0 bonds participate in the pulling process.By charge and density of state analysis along the[001]direction,we find that the strong mixed ioni%ovalent character of the Pu-0 bond is weakened by tensile strain and PuO2 will exhibit an insulator-to-metal transition after tensile stresses exceeding about 79 GPa.

  4. Effect of remineralizing agents on bond strength of orthodontic brackets: an in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) and CPP-ACP with fluoride (CPP-ACP-F) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded with two different adhesive systems. Methods One hundred twenty-six human premolar teeth were selected. One hundred twenty teeth were used for SBS testing, and six teeth were used for scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination. One hundred twenty premolars were divided into mainly three groups: CPP-ACP (group A), CPP-ACP-F (group B), and control group (group C). Each group was sub-divided into two groups according to the bonding adhesive, light cure (groups A1, B1, and C1) and chemical cure (groups A2, B2, and C2). The teeth were pre-treated with the group-specified preventive agent 1 h/day for five consecutive days. Standard edgewise brackets were bonded with the respective adhesives. SBS evaluation was done with the universal testing machine. After debonding, all the teeth were scored for adhesive remaining on the buccal surface, in accordance to adhesive remnant index, under a stereomicroscope. The acid-etched enamel surfaces were observed under SEM after treatment with CPP-ACP, CPP-ACP-F, and artificial saliva. Result In light-cure adhesive group, CPP-ACP-F (B1) showed superior results compared to the control group (C1), whereas the CPP-ACP group (A1) showed lower mean SBS than the control group (C1). Both these differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). In chemical-cure adhesive group, control group C2 showed significantly superior results (p  0.01). Conclusion The SBS of the orthodontic brackets was non-significantly affected when the brackets were cured with light-cure bonding system and treated with either CPP-ACP or CPP-ACP-F, whereas with chemical-cure adhesive, decreased bond strength was seen, which was within the clinically acceptable limits. PMID:24935482

  5. Effects of long-term repeated topical fluoride applications and adhesion promoter on shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Toshiya; Ishida, Rieko; Komatsuzaki, Akira; Sanpei, Shinya; Tanaka, Satoshi; Sekimoto, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of long-term repeated topical application of fluoride before bonding and an adhesion promoter on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: A total of 76 bovine incisors were collected and divided equally into four groups. In group 1, the brackets were bonded without topical fluoride application or adhesion promoter. In group 2, before bonding, the adhesion promoter was applied to nonfluoridated enamel. In group 3, the brackets were bonded without the application of the adhesion promoter to enamel, which had undergone long-term repeated topical fluoride treatments. Teeth in group 4 received the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride, and the brackets were bonded using the adhesion promoter. All the brackets were bonded using BeautyOrtho Bond self-etching adhesive. The shear bond strength was measured and the bond failure modes were evaluated with the use of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) after debonding. Results: The mean shear bond strength was significantly lower in group 3 than in groups 1, 2, and 4, and there were no significant differences between the groups except for group 3. There were significant differences in the distribution of ARI scores between groups 2 and 3, and between groups 3 and 4. Conclusions: The adhesion promoter can recover the bond strength reduced by the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride to the prefluoridation level and had a significantly great amount of adhesives left on either fluoridated or nonfluoridated enamel. PMID:25512720

  6. Effect of delayed insertion of composite resin on the bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive systems

    OpenAIRE

    Edson Alves de CAMPOS; SAAD, José Roberto Cury; Sizenando Toledo PORTO NETO; Campos, Lucas Arrais; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems are characterized bythe dental acid etching previously to the monomer application. Thesematerials can be classified as 3-step (when primer and bond are applied separately) or 2-step (when the primer and bond functions are carried out by a single component). Objective: To determine the influence of immediate or delayed insertion of restorative material on the values of bond strength of 2-step and 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive systems using the mic...

  7. Influence of various surface-conditioning methods on the bond strength of metal brackets to ceramic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Schmage, P; Nergiz, [No Value; Herrmann, W.; Ozcan, M; Nergiz, Ibrahim; �zcan, Mutlu

    2003-01-01

    With the increase in adult orthodontic treatment comes the need to find a reliable method for bonding orthodontic brackets onto metal or ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures. In this study, shear bond strength and surface roughness tests were used to examine the effect of 4 different surface conditioning methods: fine diamond bur, sandblasting, 5% hydrofluoric acid, and silica coating for bonding metal brackets to ceramic surfaces of feldspathic porcelain. Sandblasting and hydrofluoric a...

  8. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  9. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  10. Effect of root canal rinsing protocol on dentin bond strength of two resin cements using three different method of test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Sheikhi, Mohammadreza; Soleimani, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Background Different studies have used different tests to evaluate bond strength of resin cements to root dentin. In this in vitrostudy, three different tests were used to evaluate the bond strength of two resin cements to root dentin using two root dentin irrigation protocols. Material and Methods Ninety-six intact single-rooted teeth were selected for this study. Forty-eight teeth, with a root length of 15mm, were randomly divided into two groups and irrigated with normal saline or 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solutions during root canal preparation, respectively. For each 12 specimens from each group, fiber post #1 was bonded using an etch-and-rinse (Duo-Link) and a self-adhesive (BisCem) resin cement, respectively. After incubation, two specimens were prepared for the push-out test from the middle thirds of the roots. In another 24 teeth, after two 1.5-mm sections were prepared from the middle thirds of the prepared roots, sections of the post were bonded in two subgroups with each of the cements mentioned above and the samples were prepared for the pull-out test. For shear test, the crowns of 48 teeth were cut away, the dentin surfaces were prepared, the two irrigation solutions were used, and the resin cements were bonded. Data collected from the three tests were evaluated by ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey and Weibull tests (α=0.05). Results There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values between the three bond strength tests (P0.05). Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, the method of the test used had an effect on the recorded bond strength between the resin cement and root dentin. Cement type and irrigation protocol resulted in similar variations with all the tests. Push-out and shear tests exhibited more coherent results. Key words:Bond strength, endodontically treated tooth, fiber post, resin cement, sodium hypochlorite. PMID:27398173

  11. The Effect of Four Surface Treatment Methods on the Shear Bond Strength of Metallic Brackets to the Fluorosed Enamel

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    Hooman Zarif Najafi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Some studies have reported the bond strength to be significantly lower in fluorotic enamels than the non-fluorosed. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of metallic brackets to non-fluorosed and fluorosed teeth after different enamel conditioning. Materials and Method: A total of 176 freshly extracted human premolars (88 non-fluorosed and 88 fluorosed teeth were used in this study for bonding the metallic brackets. Teeth with moderate fluorosis were used according to Thylstrup and Fejereskov index (TFI. Eighty non-fluorosed and 80 fluorosed teeth (TFI=4-6 were randomly divided into 8 equal groups of 20 teeth each. The remaining 16 teeth were used for scanning electron microscopy observation. The enamel surface was conditioned by 4 methods: acid etching for 30 sec, acid etching for 120 sec, air abrasion followed by acid etching, and Er: YAG laser etching followed by acid etching. The morphology of etching patterns in different groups was studied under scanning electron microscope. Results: The shear bond strength of fluorosed teeth to the brackets was significantly lower than non-fluorosed ones (p= 0.003. The shear bond strength of laser-acid groups in both non-fluorosed and fluorosed teeth was significantly lower than other groups (p< 0.001. Weibull analysis indicated that the chance of failure under the applied force was different between fluorosed and non-fluorosed group. The scanning electron microscope observations revealed that the fluorosed teeth treated with phosphoric acid had fewer irregularities compared to non-fluorosed teeth. The most irregularities were detected in the teeth conditioned with phosphoric acid for 120 seconds. Conclusion: Fluorotic enamel adversely affects the bond strength of orthodontic brackets. None of the conditioning methods tested in this study could significantly improve shear bond strength of metallic brackets. Er: YAG laser conditioning followed

  12. Bond strength of a resin cement to high-alumina and zirconia-reinforced ceramics : The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felipe Valandro, Luiz; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Cicero; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Scotti, Roberto; Della Bona, Alvaro

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to three high-strength core ceramics: high alumina-based (In-Ceram Alumina, Procera AllCeram) and zirconia-reinforced alumina-based (in-Ceram Zirconia) ce

  13. Effect of the Type of Endodontic Sealer on the Bond Strength Between Fiber Post and Root Wall Dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Ramin Mosharraf; Sepideh Zare

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: An important factor that interferes with the bonding between the root canal wall and resin cement is the root canal sealer remnant. There is controversy about the effect of eugenol-containing sealers on the bond strength between resin cements and fiber post. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the type of endodontic sealer on the bond strength of FRC posts cemented with resin cement to the root canal wall. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 20 extracted...

  14. Effect of Alloying Interlayer on Interfacial Bond Strength of CuW/CuCr Integral Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of Fe alloying interlayers with different content on microstructures and mechanical properties of dissimilar CuW/CuCr joints prepared by sintering-infiltration method were studied. Microhardness (HV) and tensile tests were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the resulting joints. Additionally, optical, scanning electron microscopy examinations and energy dispersive spectrometry elemental analyses were applied to determine the interfacial characteristics of CuW/CuCr integral materials. The results show element Fe in the alloying interlayers is mostly diffused to the Cu-W composite side, the Cu/W interphase has achieved the metallurgical bond, and the CuW/CuCr integrated material with Cu-5wt%Fe alloy interlayer exhibits higher interfacial bond strength. However, when the Fe content in the interlayers is above 5wt%, the W skeletons near the interface are dissolved and eroded by element Fe addition, the amount of eutectic phase is increased and the microhardness on copper matrix is decreased for the Cu-Cr alloy side near the interlayer, and the interfacial strength of CuW/CuCr integrated materials is also decreased.

  15. Influence of Pre-Sintered Zirconia Surface Conditioning on Shear Bond Strength to Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomofumi Sawada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite on zirconia surface to which a specific conditioner was applied before sintering. After sintering of either conditioner-coated or uncoated specimens, both groups were divided into three subgroups by their respective surface modifications (n = 10 per group: no further treatment; etched with hydrofluoric acid; and sandblasted with 50 µm Al2O3 particles. Surfaces were characterized by measuring different surface roughness parameters (e.g., Ra and Rmax and water contact angles. Half of the specimens underwent thermocycling (10,000 cycles, 5–55 °C after self-adhesive resin cement build-up. The SBSs were measured using a universal testing machine, and the failure modes were analyzed by microscopy. Data were analyzed by nonparametric and parametric tests followed by post-hoc comparisons (α = 0.05. Conditioner-coated specimens increased both surface roughness and hydrophilicity (p < 0.01. In the non-thermocycled condition, sandblasted surfaces showed higher SBSs than other modifications, irrespective of conditioner application (p < 0.05. Adhesive fractures were commonly observed in the specimens. Thermocycling favored debonding and decreased SBSs. However, conditioner-coated specimens upon sandblasting showed the highest SBS (p < 0.05 and mixed fractures were partially observed. The combination of conditioner application before sintering and sandblasting after sintering showed the highest shear bond strength and indicated improvements concerning the failure mode.

  16. Microtensile Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Luting Cements to Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Abo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to compare the bond strengths of the self-adhesive luting cements between ceramics and resin cores and examine their relation to the cement thickness. Three self-adhesive luting cements (Smartcem, Maxcem, and G-CEM and a resin cement (Panavia F 2.0 for control were used in the paper. The thickness of the cements was controlled in approximately 25, 50, 100, or 200 μm. Each 10 specimens were made according to the manufacturers’ instructions and stored in water at 37°C. After 24 hours, microtensile bond strength (μTBS was measured. There were significant differences in cements. Three self-adhesive cements showed significantly lower μTBSs than control that required both etching and priming before cementation (Tukey, <0.05. The cement thickness of 50 or 100 μm tended to induce the highest μTBSs for each self-adhesive luting cements though no difference was found.

  17. Ideal Strengths and Bonding Properties of PuO2 under Tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We perform a first-principles computational tensile test on PuO2 based on density-functional theory within a local density approximation (LDA)+U formalism to investigate its structural, mechanical, magnetic and intrinsic bonding properties in four representative directions: [001], [100], [110] and [111]. The stress-strain relations show that the ideal tensile strengths in the four directions are 81.2, 80.5, 28.3 and 16.8 GPa at strains of 0.36, 0.36, 0.22 and 0.18, respectively. The [001] and [100] directions are prominently stronger than the other two directions since more Pu—O bonds participate in the pulling process. By charge and density of state analysis along the [001] direction, we find that the strong mixed ionic/covalent character of the Pu—O bond is weakened by tensile strain and PuO2 will exhibit an insulator-to-metal transition after tensile stresses exceeding about 79 GPa. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  18. Impact of various luting cements on the fixed dentures bonding strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krunić Nebojša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Various luting cements are used to fix dental crowns to prepared teeth, and should provide an adhesive bond to the tooth structure giving reliable retention. The aim of this study was to establish in vitro which type of the tested luting cement provided the strongest adhesive bond of the prepared teeth to the fixed denture. Methods. Testing was carried out on the sample of 100 intact human premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons. The preparation of the teeth was performed by a heavy-duty machine. The surfaces of the prepared teeth were mathematically calculated. Dental crowns from the Nickel-Chromium- Molybenum (Ni-Cr-Mo alloy were made in a standard fashion, and fixed to prepared teeth (two samples of each group with 5 different types of luting cements. The strength of force applyed to separate the cast crowns from the prepared teeth was measured by an electronic dynamometer, after 7 days. Results. The obtained results revealed the connection between the type of luting cement and the values of retention power. The best adhesive bond under the constant convergence angle of the prepared teeth was provided by the resin cement. Conclusion. When choosing a luting cement for fixing dental crowns to prepared teeth, the advantage should be given to the resin cement in case the glassionomers are not available.

  19. Influence of Ortho Primer Morelli adhesion booster on orthodontic brackets shear bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina de Mendonça Invernici

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This work aimed at assessing the bond strength (AS, the site of the flaw and the relation between them and Ortho Primer Morelli® (OPM adhesion optimizer. METHODS: Sixty test specimens, made out of bovine permanent lower incisors, were divided into three groups: TXT Primer (control, in which a conventional adhesive system was applied (primer and paste; OPM, in which TXT primer was replaced by OPM; and TXT without Primer, in which only TXT paste was used. A shear force was applied at a speed of 0,5 mm/min. Failure site was assessed by the Remaining Adhesion Index (RAI. RESULTS: Kruskal-Wallis demonstrated that OPM (8.54 ± 1.86 MPa presented a statistically higher AS (p 0.05 between TXT with or without Primer (6.42 ± 2.12 MPa. Regarding the RAI, the K test demonstrated that TXT Primer and OPM (prevailing scores 2 and 3 showed higher values (p 0.05. CONCLUSION: OPM increases AS and presents the same bond failure location if compared to a conventional adhesive system; the use of the TXT adhesive system paste only was shown to have the same AS if compared to conventional systems, except it does not allow to predict the adhesive failure site; there is no correlation between AS and bond failure location, regardless of the use of any adhesion optimizer.

  20. Evaluation of microtensile bond strength of total-etch, self-etch, and glass ionomer adhesive to human dentin: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelima Lakshmi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength of Single Bond, AdheSE, and Fuji Bond LC to human dentin. Fifteen non-carious third molars were selected for the study. The teeth were randomly divided into three groups of five teeth each. Each group was given a different bonding treatment. Group I was treated with Single Bond (3M, ESPE, group II with AdheSE (Ivoclar, Vivadent, and group III was treated with Fuji Bond LC (GC America. A T-band metal matrix was placed and composite resin bonded on to the tooth surface using appropriate bonding agents. The composite resin was packed in increments and light cured. Each tooth was sectioned to obtain 1 mm x 1 mm beams of dentin-resin samples. Tensile bond testing was done using a universal testing machine (Instron at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: The mean bond strength of Single Bond (35.5 MPa was significantly higher than that of AdheSE (32.8 MPa and Fuji Bond LC (32.6 MPa. The difference between the microtensile bond strength values of AdheSE and Fuji Bond LC was statistically insignificant. Inference: Though the bond strength of AdheSE and Fuji Bond LC was above 30 MPa, it was less than that of Single Bond as evaluated by testing of microtensile bond strength.

  1. Effect of saliva contamination on the shear bond strength of a new self-etch adhesive system to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Munaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To evaluate the effect of saliva contamination on the shear bond strength of a new two-step self-etch adhesive (P90 system adhesive to dentin and to determine the effect of contaminant removing treatments on the recovery of bond strengths. Materials and Methods: The buccal surfaces of 40 human premolars were ground to expose dentin. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups. Group 1 is uncontaminated and serves as the control group. Further groups were divided based on the step in the bonding sequence when the contamination had occurred as follows: Group 2 (primer, saliva contamination, rinse and dry, group 3 (after procedure of group 2, reapplication of primer, and group 4 (after procedure like in control group, saliva contamination, rinse and dry. Filtek P90 composite resin cylinders of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm length were fabricated on the surfaces. Shear bond strength testing was done in an Instron Universal Testing Machine and the data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Student′s t-test. Results: With P90 system adhesive, group 2 and group 4 showed lower shear bond strength than group 1 (control and group 3 (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Saliva contamination significantly decreased the shear bond strength of the adhesive to dentin.

  2. Comparative evaluation of effect of laser on shear bond strength of ceramic bonded with two base metal alloys: An in-vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    K. Deepak; S C Ahila; Muthukumar, B.; M Vasanthkumar

    2013-01-01

    The most common clinical failure in metal ceramic restoration is at the ceramo-metal interface. For the clinical longevity, metal-ceramic prostheses must have satisfactory bond strength between metal and ceramic. Aim and Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Laser etching on shear bond strength between base metal alloys and ceramic. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 specimens were made (Base 5 mm diameter and 1 mm thickness, step with 4 mm diameter and 4 mm ...

  3. Radiographic, antibacterial and bond-strength effects of radiopaque caries tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umwali, Aurore; Askar, Haitham; Paris, Sebastian; Schwendicke, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Selectively excavated carious lesions remain radiographically detectable. Radiopaque tagging could resolve the resulting diagnostic uncertainty. We aimed to evaluate if tagging depends on lesions depths, is antibacterial, or affects dentin bond-strengths. Artificial lesions (depth-range: 152-682 μm, n = 34/group) were induced in human dentin samples, evaluated using wavelength-independent microradiography, treated with one of two tagging materials (70% SnCl2, 30% SnF2) and re-evaluated. To evaluate antimicrobial effects, 40 dentin samples were submitted to a Lactobacillus rhamnosus invasion-model. Infected samples were treated with placebo, 0.2% chlorhexidine, SnCl2, SnF2 (n = 10/group). Dentin was sampled and colony-forming units/mg determined. Micro-tensile bond-strengths of adhesive restorations (OptiBond FL, Filtek Z250) to tagged or untagged, sound and carious dentin were assessed (n = 12/group). Tagged surfaces were evaluated microscopically and via energy-dispersive X-ray-spectroscopy (EDS). Tagging effects of both materials decreased with increasing lesion depths (p bacteria (median 7.3/3.7 × 10(5) CFU/mg) than tagged dentin (no CFU detectable, p sound (-22%/-33% for SnCl2/SnF2) and carious dentin (-50%/-54%). This might be due to widespread tin chloride or fluoride precipitation, as detected via microscopy and EDS. While radiopaque tagging seems beneficial, an optimized application protocol needs to be developed prior clinical use. PMID:27251174

  4. Effect of Coloring–by-Dipping on Microtensile Bond Strength of Zirconia to Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Mahshid

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Studies on the effect of coloring procedures on the bond strength of zirconia to resin cement are lacking in the literature. This study evaluated the effect of dipping of zirconia ceramic in different liquid color shades on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS of zirconia ceramic to resin cement.Materials and Methods: This in vitro study was conducted on 100 microbar specimens divided into five groups of B2, C1, D4, A3 and control (not colored. To prepare the microbars, 20 white zirconia ceramic blocks, measuring 5×11×11 mm, were dipped in A3, B2, C1 or D4 liquid color shades for 10 seconds (five blocks for each color shade and five blocks were not colored as controls. All the zirconia blocks were sintered in a sintering furnace. Composite blocks of similar dimensions were fabricated and bonded to zirconia ceramic blocks using Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. Zirconia-cement-composite blocks were sectioned into microbars measuring 1×1×10 mm. The MTBS of microbars was measured by a testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. All tests were carried out at 0.05 level of significance.Results: Statistically significant differences were found among the groups in MTBS (P<0.001. The D4 group had the highest MTBS value (39.16 ± 6.52 MPa.Conclusion: Dipping affected the MTBS of zirconia ceramic to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement; however, a similar pattern of change was not seen due to the different liquid color shades.

  5. Implementation of strength and burn models for plastic-bonded explosives and propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reaugh, J E

    2009-05-07

    We have implemented the burn model in LS-DYNA. At present, the damage (porosity and specific surface area) is specified as initial conditions. However, history variables that are used by the strength model are reserved as placeholders for the next major revision, which will be a completely interactive model. We have implemented an improved strength model for explosives based on a model for concrete. The model exhibits peak strength and subsequent strain softening in uniaxial compression. The peak strength increases with increasing strain rate and/or reduced ambient temperature. Under triaxial compression compression, the strength continues to increase (or at least not decrease) with increasing strain. This behaviour is common to both concrete and polymer-bonded explosives (PBX) because the microstructure of these composites is similar. Both have aggregate material with a broad particle size distribution, although the length scale for concrete aggregate is two orders of magnitude larger than for PBX. The (cement or polymer) binder adheres to the aggregate, and is both pressure and rate sensitive. There is a larger bind binder content in concrete, compared to the explosive, and the aggregates have different hardness. As a result we expect the parameter values to differ, but the functional forms to be applicable to both. The models have been fit to data from tests on an AWE explosive that is HMX based. The decision to implement the models in LS-DYNA was based on three factors: LS-DYNA is used routinely by the AWE engineering analysis group and has a broad base of experienced users; models implemented in LS-DYNA can be transferred easily to LLNL's ALE 3D using a material model wrapper developed by Rich Becker; and LS-DYNA could accommodate the model requirements for a significant number of additional history variables without the significant time delay associated with code modification.

  6. SHEAR STRENGTH OF HEAT-TREATED TALI (ERYTHROPHLEUM IVORENSE AND IROKO (CHLOROPHORA EXCELSA WOODS, BONDED WITH VARIOUS ADHESIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamiyet Sahin Kol

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat treatment on the shear strength of tali (Erythrophleum ivorense and iroko (Chlorophora excelsa woods, bonded with some structural adhesives. Shear strength of untreated and heat-treated woods bonded with phenol-formaldehyde (PF, melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF, melamine-formaldehyde (MF, and polyurethane (PUR adhesives was studied. An industrial heat treatment method (ThermoWood was used. The timbers were thermally modified for 2 hours at 180 ºC. Laminated samples having two sample sets were prepared from untreated and heat-treated wood for the shear strength test. The results of the tests showed that the heat treatment affected shear strength of laminated wood negatively. Although there was a considerable difference in adhesive bond shear strength between untreated and treated wood, both wood species bonded with the adhesives fulfilled the required value for shear strength of the adhesive bonds. PF, MUF, MF, and PUR adhesives performed in a rather similar way for both wood species.

  7. Microtensile bond strength of quartz fiber posts to different composite cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Khamverdi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the microtensile bond strength of quartz fiber posts to different composites, and to composite combinations used as core materials. Thirty fiber posts were treated with a 24% hydrogen peroxide solution and silanized. The posts were divided into 5 groups according to the resin composite used as follows (n = 6: G1 - Ælite Flow (Bisco, Inc, G2 - Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE, G3 - Biscore (Bisco, Inc, G4 - Ælite Flow + Filtek Z250, G5 - Ælite Flow + Biscore. The resin composites were placed around the posts to produce cylindrical specimens. Two 1-mm² thick sticks containing the post in the center and composite cores on both ends were provided from each cylinder and tested for microtensile strength with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests were used for statistical analysis. Fractured surfaces were observed using a stereomicroscope with 20× magnification. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to evaluate the interface of the fractured sticks. The results showed that G2 had the highest bond strength values, and the lowest values were seen with G3. There were significant differences between groups 1, 2, 4 and groups 3, 5 (p < 0.05. Under the stereomicroscope, most of the failures were adhesive between the post and core material. Under SEM, Ælite and Z250 had smoother surfaces than Biscore, containing less porosities and voids.

  8. Tensile strength and disintegration of tableted silicified microcrystalline cellulose: influences of interparticle bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachrimanis, Kyriakos; Nikolakakis, Ioannis; Malamataris, Stavros

    2003-07-01

    The effects of some material variables (particle size and moisture content) on the tensile strength and disintegration time of tableted standard microcrystalline cellulose (MCC, Avicel) and a silicified brand (SMCC, Prosolv) were studied. Three particle size fractions were employed, after equilibration in three levels of environmental relative humidity (RH%), and the tensile strength and disintegration time were determined at different levels of total tablet porosity or packing fraction (p(f)). The MCC grade or silicification affects the moisture sorption and the packing during tapping as well as the particle deformation (yield pressure, P(y)) during tableting. There was a slight increase in the tensile strength but a marked increase in the disintegration time of Prosolv compared with Avicel in the p(f) range 0.7-0.9, which corresponds the range for pharmaceutical tablets. These increases are explained in terms of the range and magnitude of the interparticle forces developed and the interparticle separation. Despite the higher moisture content of Prosolv after equilibration compared with Avicel, compression of Prosolv results in higher P(y), in tablets of higher energy of interparticle bonding, longer interparticle separation, and extended disintegration compared with Avicel. The incorporated SiO(2) is thought to play the role of barrier or sink for the moisture sorbed, but only for RH up to 52%, which is a moisture content range less than twice that of tightly bound water. At higher RH (72%), the incorporated SiO(2) does not increase the P(y), but reduces the energy of interparticle bonding and the interparticle separation because of its probable saturation. The latter, in turn, results in more extended disintegration times due to reduced uptake of water into the tablets and to the probable reduction of water available for the deployment of the microcrystalline cellulose activity as disintegrant. PMID:12820153

  9. Orthodontic brackets removal under shear and tensile bond strength resistance tests – a comparative test between light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated if a new LEDs system has enough efficient energy to promote efficient shear and tensile bonding strength resistance under standardized tests. LEDs 470 ± 10 nm can be used to photocure composite during bracket fixation. Advantages considering resistance to tensile and shear bonding strength when these systems were used are necessary to justify their clinical use. Forty eight human extracted premolars teeth and two light sources were selected, one halogen lamp and a LEDs system. Brackets for premolar were bonded through composite resin. Samples were submitted to standardized tests. A comparison between used sources under shear bonding strength test, obtained similar results; however, tensile bonding test showed distinct results: a statistical difference at a level of 1% between exposure times (40 and 60 seconds) and even to an interaction between light source and exposure time. The best result was obtained with halogen lamp use by 60 seconds, even during re-bonding; however LEDs system can be used for bonding and re-bonding brackets if power density could be increased

  10. Effect of saliva contamination on bond strength witha hydrophilic composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauren Bitencourt Deprá

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of saliva contamination on the bond strength of metallic brackets bonded to enamel with hydrophilic resin composite. METHODS: Eighty premolars were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 20 according to bonding material and contamination: G1 bonded with Transbond XT with no saliva contamination, G2 bonded with Transbond XT with saliva contamination, G3 bonded with Transbond Plus Color Change with no saliva contamination and G4 bonded with Transbond Plus Color Change with saliva contamination. The results were statistically analyzed (ANOVA/Tukey. RESULTS: The means and standard deviations (MPa were: G110.15 ± 3.75; G2 6.8 ± 2.54; G3 9.3 ± 3.36; G4 8.3 ± 2.95. The adhesive remnant index (ARI ranged between 0 and 1 in G1 and G4. In G2 there was a prevalence of score 0 and similar ARI distribution in G3. CONCLUSION: Saliva contamination reduced bond strength when Transbond XT hydrophobic resin composite was used. However, the hydrophilic resin Transbond Plus Color Change was not affected by the contamination.OBJETIVO: avaliar a influência da contaminação por saliva na resistência de união de braquetes metálicos colados ao esmalte com um compósito resinoso hidrofílico. MÉTODOS: oitenta pré-molares foram divididos aleatoriamente em quatro grupos (n=20, de acordo com o material de colagem e a presença de contaminação - G1 colagem com Transbond XT na ausência de contaminação; G2 colagem com Transbond XT na presença de contaminação; G3 colagem com Transbond Plus Color Change na ausência de contaminação; G4 colagem com Transbond Plus Color Change na presença de contaminação. Os resultados foram tratados estatisticamente (ANOVA/Tukey. RESULTADOS: as médias e desvios-padrão (MPa foram G1 = 10,15 ± 3,75; G2 = 6,8 ± 2,54; G3 = 9,3 ± 3,36; G4 = 8,3 ± 2,95. O índice de adesivo remanescente (IAR variou entre 0 e 1 no G1 e no G4; no G2, houve predomínio do escore 0 e distribuição similar no

  11. The study on interfacial bonding strength of Ag-Ni, Ag-Cu in cold pressure welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李云涛; 杜则裕; 陈丽萍

    2003-01-01

    The area of combination actually is a kind of interfacial phenomena that exist on the surface or thin film. The properties of interface have important effect on the whole welded joint, even decide directly the interfacial bonding strength. The bonding strength of metals in cold pressure welding such as Ag-Ni (they are hardly mutual soluble) and Ag-Cu(they are limited soluble) are discussed in this paper. The results of the tensile test suggest that two kinds of welded joints have enough strength to satisfy with the demand for being used. Moreover, thermodynamics, crystal logy, physics and metal electronic microscopic analysis etc are adopted to further calculate the bonding strength. The results of test and theoretical analyses prove that Ag-Ni, Ag-Cu, especially, for Ag-Ni can form strong welded joint which is higher than that of the relative soft base metals in cold pressure welding.

  12. Comparison of shear bond strengths of conventional orthodontic composite and nano-ceramic restorative composite: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namit Nagar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the shear bond strength of a nano-ceramic restorative composite Ceram-X MonoTM♦, a restorative resin with the traditional orthodontic composite Transbond XTTM† and to evaluate the site of bond failure using Adhesive Remnant Index. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human premolars were divided into two groups of 30 each. Stainless steel brackets were bonded using Transbond XTTM† (Group I and Ceram-X MonoTM♦ (Group II according to manufacturer′s protocol. Shear bond strength was measured on Universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. Adhesive Remnant Index scores were assigned to debonded brackets of each group. Data was analyzed using unpaired ′t′ test and Chi square test. Results: The mean shear bond strength of Group I (Transbond XTTM† was 12.89 MPa ± 2.19 and that of Group II (Ceram-X MonoTM was 7.29 MPa ± 1.76. Unpaired ′t′ test revealed statistically significant differences amongst the shear bond strength of the samples measured. Chi-square test revealed statistically insignificant differences amongst the ARI scores of the samples measured. Conclusions: Ceram-X MonoTM♦ had a lesser mean shear bond strength when compared to Transbond XTTM† which was statistically significant difference. However, the mean shear bond of Ceram X Mono was within the clinically acceptable range for bonding. Ceram-X MonoTM† and Transbond XTTM† showed cohesive fracture of adhesive in 72.6% and 66.6% of the specimens, respectively.

  13. Evaluation of shear bond strengths of gingiva-colored composite resin to porcelain, metal and zirconia substrates

    OpenAIRE

    An, Hong-Seok; Park, Ji-Man; Park, Eun-Jin

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study is to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of the gingiva-colored composite resin and the tooth-colored composite resin to porcelain, metal and zirconia. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty cylindrical specimens were fabricated and divided into the following 6 groups (Group 1-W: tooth-colored composite bonded to porcelain, Group 1-P: gingiva-colored composite bonded to porcelain, Group 2-W: tooth-colored composite bonded to base metal, Group 2-P: gingiva-colo...

  14. Temporary zinc oxide-eugenol cement: eugenol quantity in dentin and bond strength of resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Tamara; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Malinovskii, Vladimir; Flury, Simon; Häner, Robert; Lussi, Adrian

    2013-08-01

    Uptake of eugenol from eugenol-containing temporary materials may reduce the adhesion of subsequent resin-based restorations. This study investigated the effect of duration of exposure to zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) cement on the quantity of eugenol retained in dentin and on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of the resin composite. The ZOE cement (IRM Caps) was applied onto the dentin of human molars (21 per group) for 1, 7, or 28 d. One half of each molar was used to determine the quantity of eugenol (by spectrofluorimetry) and the other half was used for μTBS testing. The ZOE-exposed dentin was treated with either OptiBond FL using phosphoric acid (H₃PO₄) or with Gluma Classic using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) conditioning. One group without conditioning (for eugenol quantity) and two groups not exposed to ZOE (for eugenol quantity and μTBS testing) served as controls. The quantity of eugenol ranged between 0.33 and 2.9 nmol mg⁻¹ of dentin (median values). No effect of the duration of exposure to ZOE was found. Conditioning with H₃PO₄ or EDTA significantly reduced the quantity of eugenol in dentin. Nevertheless, for OptiBond FL, exposure to ZOE significantly decreased the μTBS, regardless of the duration of exposure. For Gluma Classic, the μTBS decreased after exposure to ZOE for 7 and 28 d. OptiBond FL yielded a significantly higher μTBS than did Gluma Classic. Thus, ZOE should be avoided in cavities later to be restored with resin-based materials. PMID:23841789

  15. Development of high toughness, high strength aluminide-bonded carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, P.F.; Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Cemented carbides are widely used in applications where resistance to abrasion and wear are important, particularly in combination with high strength and stiffness. In the present case, ductile aluminides have been used as a binder phase to fabricate dense carbide cermets by either sintering of mixed powders or a melt-infiltration sintering process. The choice of an aluminide binder was based on the exceptional high temperature strength and chemical stability exhibited by these alloys. For example, TiC-based composites with a Ni{sub 3}Al binder phase exhibit improved oxidation resistance, Young`s moduli > 375 GPa, high fracture strengths (> 1 GPa) that are retained to {ge} 900{degrees}C, and fracture toughness values of 10 to 15 MPa{radical}m, identical to that measured in commercial cobalt-bonded WC with the same test method. The thermal diffusivity values at 200{degrees}C for these composites are {approximately} 0.070 to 0.075 cm{sup 2}/s while the thermal expansion coefficients rise with Ni3Al content from {approximately} 8 to {approximately}11 x 10{sup {minus}6}/{degrees}C over the range of 8 to 40 vol. % Ni{sub 3}Al. The oxidation and acidic corrosion resistances are quite promising as well. Finally, these materials also exhibit good electrical conductivity allowing them to be sectioned and shaped by electrical discharge machining (EDM) processes.

  16. Comparison of the Effects of Four Pre-Bonding Preparation Methods on the Bond Strength between a Multilithic Tooth and Denture Base Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Mosharraf

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With introducing composite teeth, their wear resistance has been well investigated, but there are few papers about their bonding to acrylic denture base resins. The aim of this study was to compare the four pre-bonding preparation methods on the ridge lap surface of one multilithic denture tooth by determining its bond strength to denture base resin.Materials and Methods: In this experimental laboratory study, 84 maxillary anterior teeth were divided into four groups based on four different pre-bonding methods (untreated, grinding, 2 retention grooves and diatorics. The teeth were mounted on 2 sides of triangular shaped wax models. Then, the laboratory procedures (wax elimination and resin packing were done. Each of the specimens was tested by universal testing machine with cross head speed of 5 mm/min. The data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann- Whitney tests.Results: The mean bond strength in untreated group was 287.38 ± 51.82 N, in grinding group was 301.52 ± 113.65 N, in retention grooves group was 374.38 ± 88.22 N and in diatorics group was 415.19 ± 226.37 N. The highest mean bond strength was seen in diatorics group (P=0.009. The percentage of cohesive fractures in this group(90.5% was significantly more than that in other groups (P<0.001.Conclusion: The results of this study showed that creating retention hole in the ridge lap surface of the multilithic tooth can increase its bond strength with denture base resin.

  17. The effect of different surface treatments of stainless steel crown and different bonding agents on shear bond strength of direct composite resin veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajami B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Stainless steel crown (SSC is the most durable and reliable restoration for primary teeth with extensive caries but its metalic appearance has always been a matter of concern. With advances in restorative materials and metal bonding processes, composite veneer has enhanced esthetics of these crowns in clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of SSC to composite resin using different surface treatments and adhesives. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 90 stainless steel crowns were selected. They were mounted in molds and divided into 3 groups of 30 each (S, E and F. In group S (sandblast, buccal surfaces were sandblasted for 5 seconds. In group E (etch acidic gel was applied for 5 minutes and in group F (fissure bur surface roughness was created by fissure diamond bur. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (SB, AB, P based on different adhesives: Single Bond, All Bond2 and Panavia F. Composite was then bonded to specimens. Cases were incubated in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength was measured by Zwick machine with crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test with p0.05 so the two variables were studied separately. No significant difference was observed in mean shear bond strength of composite among the three kinds of adhesives (P>0.05. Similar results were obtained regarding surface treatments (P>0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, treating the SSC surface with bur and using single bond adhesive and composite can be used successfully to obtain esthetic results in pediatric restorative treatments.

  18. Effects of saliva contamination and decontamination procedures on shear bond strength of self-etch dentine bonding systems: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelagiri Krishna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to evaluate the effect of saliva contamination on the shear bond strength of two self-etch dentine bonding systems and also investigate the effect of decontamination procedure on the recovery of bond strength. Materials and Methods: Sixty premolars extracted for orthodontic reason were obtained and the buccal surfaces of teeth were reduced to create a flat dentine surface. The samples were randomly divided into three sub-groups for AdheSE (ASE (Ivoclar - Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein and three sub-groups for Adper Prompt Self-Etch Adhesive (ADP (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA of 10 each. For AdheSE (ASE; ASE-I was the control group (primer applied to fresh dentine surface, ASE-II was the contamination group (primer applied, followed by saliva contamination and then air dried and ASE-III was the decontamination group (primer applied, followed by saliva contamination, air dried and then primer reapplied. For Adper Prompt (ADP; ADP-I was the control group (self-etch adhesive applied to fresh dentine surface, ADP-II was the contamination group (self-etch adhesive applied, followed by saliva contamination and then air dried and ADP-III was the decontamination group (self-etch adhesive applied, followed by saliva contamination, air dried and then self-etch adhesive reapplied. Followed by the bonding procedure, a 5 mm composite resin block with Filtek P-60 (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA was built on the substrate. Shear bond strength (SBS was tested with Instron Universal testing machine (Instron Corporation, Canton, MA, USA with a cross head speed of 1 mm per minute. Data obtained was subjected to one way ANOVA test, while the inter group comparison was made using Tukey′s multiple comparison and Unpaired t-test. Results: In AdhSE group (ASE, the sub-group ASE-II (contamination group [5.4 ± 2.2 MPa] showed lower SBS than ASE-I [11.8 ± 2.6 MPa] and ASE-III [8.9 ± 3.3 MPa], which was statistically significant. There was no

  19. Bond strength durability of self-etching adhesives and resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina de Andrade Lima Chaves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar within a short (24 h and long period of evaluation (90 days. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y, producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm² cross-sectional area, which were subjected to µTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The µTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05. RESULTS: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, p<0.001. All eight experimental means (MPa were compared by the Tukey's test (p<0.05 and the following results were obtained: Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/24 h (22.4±7.3; Tyrian-One Step Plus /Variolink II/24 h (39.4±11.6; Xeno III/C&B/24 h (40.3±12.9; Xeno III/Variolink II/24 h (25.8±10.5; Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/90 d (22.1±12.8 Tyrian-One Step Plus/VariolinkII/90 d (24.2±14.2; Xeno III/C&B/90 d (27.0±13.5; Xeno III/Variolink II/90 d (33.0±8.9. CONCLUSIONS: Xeno III/Variolink II was the luting agent/adhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water.

  20. Bond strength analysis of the bone cement- stem interface of hip arthroplasties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan-Feng Zhang; Shi-Rong Ge; Hong-Tao Liu; Kai-Jin Guo; Shu-Yang Han; Juan-Yan Qi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To study and establish the preliminary linear and modified models for the interface shear mechanics performance between implant and bone cement and to explore its damage significance.Method:The loosening research between artificial hip joint prosthesis stem and bone cement interface performance can be evaluated by the push-in test.Based on the debonding performance test, the analytical expressions of the average load and displacement from the debonding failure and splitting failure process were deduced and determined.The correlations of the expressions of the average load-displacement and statistical experimental data were analyzed.Results:It demonstrated that the interface debonding failure mechanical model could be characterized as interface bond strength mechanical performance.Based on analysis of models and experimental data by the three statistical analysis methods, the results indicated the modified model could be better represented by the interfacial debonding strength properties. The bond stressτand relative slidings distribution along the embedment regional were coupling affected by both pressure arch effect and shear lag effect in bone cement.Two stress peaks of implant have been found at the distance from0.175La loading tip to0.325Lafree tip, which also verified the early loosening clinical reports for the proximal and latter region.As the bone cement arch effect, the bond stress peak tend to move to the free tip when the debonding failure would be changed into the splitting failure, which presents a preliminary study on the mechanism of early debonding failurefor the stem-cement interface.Conclusions:Functional models of the stem-bone cement interfacial debonding failure are developed to analyze the relevant mechanism.The different locational titanium alloy stress, and the interfacial bond stress and the relative slides are evaluated to acquire a guide of the different positions of interfacial damage.The coupling effect which is original from

  1. Comparison Of Bond Strength Of Orthodontic Molar Tubes Using Different Enamel Etching Techniques And Their Effect On Enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In fixed orthodontic treatment, brackets and tubes are used for transferring orthodontic forces to the teeth. Those attachments were welded to cemented bands. Fifty years ago, direct bonding of brackets and other attachments has become a common technique in fixed orthodontic treatment. Orthodontists used to band teeth, especially molars and second premolars, to avoid the need for re bonding accessories in these regions of heavy masticatory forces. However, it is a known fact that direct bonding saves chair time as it does not require prior band selection and fitting, has the ability to maintain good oral hygiene, improve esthetics and make easier attachment to crowded and partially erupted teeth. Moreover, when the banding procedure is not performed with utmost care it can damage periodontal and/or dental tissues. Molar tubes bonding decreases the chance of decalcification caused by leakage beneath the bands. Since molar teeth are subjected to higher masticatory impact, especially lower molars, it would be convenient to devise methods capable of increasing the efficiency of their traditional bonding. These methods may include variation in bond able molar tube material, design, bonding materials and etching techniques. For achieving successful bonding, the bonding agent must penetrate the enamel surface; have easy clinical use, dimensional stability and enough bond strength. Different etching techniques were introduced in literature to increase the bond strength which includes: conventional acid etching, sandblasting and laser etching techniques. The process of conventional acid etching technique was invented In (1955) as the surface of enamel has great potential for bonding by micromechanical retention, to form ‘the mechanical lock‘. The primary effect of enamel etching is to increase the surface area. However, this roughens the enamel microscopically and results in a greater surface area on which to bond. By dissolving minerals in enamel, etchants remove the

  2. Characterization of Bond Strength of U-Mo Fuel Plates Using the Laser Shockwave Technique: Capabilities and Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. A. Smith; D. L. Cottle; B. H. Rabin

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes work conducted to-date on the implementation of new laser-based capabilities for characterization of bond strength in nuclear fuel plates, and presents preliminary results obtained from fresh fuel studies on as-fabricated monolithic fuel consisting of uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum alloys clad in 6061 aluminum by hot isostatic pressing. Characterization involves application of two complementary experimental methods, laser-shock testing and laser-ultrasonic imaging, collectively referred to as the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST), that allows the integrity, physical properties and interfacial bond strength in fuel plates to be evaluated. Example characterization results are provided, including measurement of layer thicknesses, elastic properties of the constituents, and the location and nature of generated debonds (including kissing bonds). LST provides spatially localized, non-contacting measurements with minimum specimen preparation, and is ideally suited for applications involving radioactive materials, including irradiated materials. The theoretical principles and experimental approaches employed in characterizing nuclear fuel plates are described, and preliminary bond strength measurement results are discussed, with emphasis on demonstrating the capabilities and limitations of these methods. These preliminary results demonstrate the ability to distinguish bond strength variations between different fuel plates. Although additional development work is necessary to validate and qualify the test methods, these results suggest LST is viable as a method to meet fuel qualification requirements to demonstrate acceptable bonding integrity.

  3. Effect of Multiple Coatings of One-step Self-etching Adhesive on Microtensile Bond Strength to Primary Dentin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Ma; Jian-feng Zhou; Jian-guo Tan; Quan Jing; Ji-zhi Zhao; Kuo Wan

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of multiple coatings of the one-step self-etching adhesive on immediate microtensile bond strength to primary dentin.Methods Twelve caries-free human primary molars were randomly divided into 2 groups with 6 teeth each. In group 1,each tooth was hemisected into two halves. One half was assigned to control subgroup 1,which was bonded with a single-step self-etching adhesive according to the manufacturer's instructions; the other half was assigned to experimental subgroup 1 in which the adhesive was applied three times before light curing. In group 2, the teeth were also hemisected into two halves. One half was assigned to control subgroup 2, which was bonded with the single-step self-etching adhesive according to the manufacturer's instructions; the other half was assigned to experimental subgroup 2 in which three layers of adhesive were applied with light curing each successive layer. Microtensile bond strength was immediately tested after specimen preparation.Results When the adhesive was applied three times before light curing, the bond strength of the experimental subgroup 1 (n=33, 57.49±11.61 MPa) was higher than that of the control subgroup 1 (n=31,49.71±11.43 MPa, P0.05).Conclusion multiple coatings of one-step self-etching adhesive can increase the immediate bond strength to primary dentin when using the technique of light-curing after applying three layers of adhesive.

  4. Influence of MgO and Hybrid Fiber on the Bonding Strength between Reactive Powder Concrete and Old Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Jinchuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reactive powder concrete (RPC was used as concrete repair material in this paper. The influence of steel fiber, steel fiber + MgO, and steel fiber + MgO + polypropylene fiber (PPF on the mechanical properties of RPC repair materials and the splitting tensile strength between RPC and old concrete was studied. Influences of steel fiber, MgO, and PPF on the splitting tensile strength were further examined by using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM and drying shrinkage test. Results indicated that the compressive and flexural strength was improved with the increasing of steel fiber volume fraction. However, the bonding strength showed a trend from rise to decline with the increasing of steel fiber volume fraction. Although MgO caused mechanical performance degradation of RPC, it improved bonding strength between RPC and existing concrete. The influence of PPF on the mechanical properties of RPC was not obvious, whereas it further improved bonding strength by significantly reducing the early age shrinkage of RPC. Finally, the relationship of drying shrinkage and splitting tensile strength was studied, and the equation between the splitting tensile strength relative index and logarithm of drying shrinkage was obtained by function fitting.

  5. Effect of Fast Curing Lights, Argon Laser, and Plasma Arc on Bond Strengths of Orthodontic Brackets: An In Vitro Study

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    M. Hashem-Hoseini

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nowadays light-cured composites are used widely by orthodontists to bond brackets. As these composites require 20-40 seconds time per tooth to be light cured, more chair-time in needed compared to self-cured composites. In recent years, the argon laser and plasma arc lights have been introduced in dentistry to reduce this curing time. The purpose of this study was to compare bond strength of brackets bonded with the argon la-ser and plasma arc light with those bonded with the conventional halogen light.Materials and Methods: Fifty-one intact human premolars were randomly divided into three groups of 17 teeth each. Stainless steel twin premolar brackets (018- in Dyna lock, 3M Unitek were bonded to the teeth using one of these curing devices in each group: the halogen unit (Coltolux 75, Switzerland, the argon laser unit (Bo-5, Iran , and the plasma arc unit (Remecure 15, Belgium. The orthodontic adhesive was the same in the three groups (Transbond XT, 3M Unitek. After thermal cycling, the diametral tensilebond strength of specimens was measured using a debonding plier in a Zwick Universal Testing machine (Z/100, Germany.Results: The mean bond strengths was 17.344 MPa (SD=4.567 for halogen 19.172 MPa(SD=6.328 for laser and 19.322 MPa (SD=4.036 for plasma arc groups. No statistically significant difference existed in the mean bond strengths among three groups.Conclusion: Argon laser lights, significantly reducing the curing time of orthodonticbrackets without affecting bond strength, have the potential to be considered as advanta-geous alternatives to conventional halogen light.

  6. Effect of Bioactive Glass air Abrasion on Shear Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Resins to Decalcified Enamel.

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    Alireza Eshghi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glass air abrasion is a conservative technique to remove initial decalcified tissue and caries. This study examined the shear bond strength of composite resin to sound and decalcified enamel air-abraded by bioactive glass (BAG or alumina using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives.Forty-eight permanent molars were root-amputated and sectioned mesiodistally. The obtained 96 specimens were mounted in acrylic resin; the buccal and lingual surfaces remained exposed. A demineralizing solution was used to decalcify half the specimens. Both sound and decalcified specimens were divided into two groups of alumina and bioactive glass air abrasion. In each group, the specimens were subdivided into two subgroups of Clearfil SE Bond or OptiBond FL adhesives (n=12. Composite resin cylinders were bonded on enamel surfaces cured and underwent thermocycling. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 and three-way ANOVA (α=0.05. Similar to the experimental groups, the enamel surface of one specimen underwent SEM evaluation.No significant differences were observed in composite resin bond strength subsequent to alumina or bioactive glass air abrasion preparation techniques (P=0.987. There were no statistically significant differences between the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive groups (P=1. Also, decalcified or intact enamel groups had no significant difference (P=0.918. However, SEM analysis showed much less enamel irregularities with BAG air abrasion compared to alumina air abrasion.Under the limitations of this study, preparation of both intact and decalcified enamel surfaces with bioactive glass air abrasion results in similar bond strength of composite resin in comparison with alumina air abrasion using etch-&-rinse or self-etch adhesives.

  7. Acidic Environment Effect on the Push-out Bond Strength of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Mixed with Different Liquids

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    Diatry Nari Ratih

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA as retrograde filling is always in contact to inflamed tissues in periradicular area. Objective: To investigate the effect of acidic environment on push-out bond strength of MTA mixed with sterile water, local anesthetic, and 5% CaCl2 . Methods: Thirty middle third of mandibular premolar roots were randomly assigned into 3 groups of 10 each. MTA mixed with sterile water (Group 1, local anesthetic (group 2, 5% CaCl2 (group 3. Each group was then divided into group A: soaked in synthetic tissue fluid with pH 5, and group B: pH 7.4. Specimens were stored in an incubator with a temperature of 370 C for 72 hours, undertaken a push-out test, and observed under a stereo-microscope. Results: A two-way ANOVA showed that acidic environment reduced the push-out bond strength of MTA mixed with either sterile water, local anesthetic or 5% CaCl2 (p <0.05. The predominantly failure was a mixture of adhesive and cohesive type. Conclusion: The acidic environment reduced the push-out bond strength of MTA mixed with either sterile water, local anesthetic or 5% CaCl2 . MTA mixed with 5% CaCl2 produced the greatest push-out bond strength, whereas MTA mixed with local anesthetic had the lowest push-out bond strength.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v22i1.377

  8. The influence of surface standardization of lithium disilicate glass ceramic on bond strength to a dual resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, R; Mazur, R; Almeida, J; Borges, G; Caldas, D

    2011-01-01

    In vitro studies to assess bond strength between resins and ceramics have used surfaces that have been ground flat to ensure standardization; however, in patients, ceramic surfaces are irregular. The effect of a polished and unpolished ceramic on bond strength needs to be investigated. Sixty ceramic specimens (20×5×2 mm) were made and divided into two groups. One group was ground with 220- to 2000-grit wet silicon carbide paper and polished with 3-, 1-, and ¼-μm diamond paste; the other group was neither ground nor polished. Each group was divided into three subgroups: treated polished controls (PC) and untreated unpolished controls (UPC), polished (PE) and unpolished specimens (UPE) etched with hydrofluoric acid, and polished (PS) and unpolished specimens (UPS) sandblasted with alumina. Resin cement cylinders were built over each specimen. Shear bond strength was measured, and the fractured site was analyzed. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc tests were performed. PE (44.47 ± 5.91 MPa) and UPE (39.70 ± 5.46 MPa) had the highest mean bond strength. PS (31.05 ± 8.81 MPa), UPC (29.11 ± 8.11 MPa), and UPS (26.41 ± 7.31 MPa) were statistically similar, and PC (24.96 ± 8.17 MPa) was the lowest. Hydrofluoric acid provides the highest bond strength regardless of whether the surface is polished or not. PMID:21819200

  9. Effect of amalgam corrosion products in non-discolored dentin on the bond strength of replaced composite resin

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    Marjaneh Ghavamnasiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the effect of amalgam corrosion products in non-discolored dentin on the bond strength of replaced composite resin. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty-one Class I cavities were prepared on extracted premolars and divided into seven groups. Group 1: Light-cured composite; Groups 2, 3, and 4: Amalgam stored in 37°C normal saline for respectively 1, 3, and 6 months and then replaced with composite leaving the cavity walls intact. Groups 5, 6, and 7: Identical to Groups 2, 3, and 4, except the cavity walls were extended 0.5 mm after amalgam removal. Eighteen specimens from each group were selected for shear bond strength testing, while on remaining five samples, elemental microanalysis was conducted. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Freidman (α = 0.05. Results: There was a significant difference between Groups 1 and 4 and also between Group 1 and Groups 5, 6, and 7. However, Groups 1, 2, and 3 showed no significant difference regarding bond strength. Bond strengths of Group 4 was significantly less than Groups 2 and 3. However, Groups 5, 6, and 7 showed similar bond strength. There was no difference among all groups in terms of metal elements at any storage times.

  10. In Vitro Evaluation of Various Surface Treatments of Fiber Posts on the Bond Strength to Composite Core

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    Sareh Nadalizadeh

    Full Text Available Introduction: The reliable bond at the root-post-core interface is critical for the clinical success of post-retained restorations. To decrease the risk of fracture, it is important to optimize the adhesion. Therefore, various post surface treatments have been proposed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments of fiber posts on the bond strength to composite core. Materials & Methods: In this study, 40 fiber reinforced posts were used. After preparing and sectioning them, resulting specimens were divided into four groups (N=28. The posts received different surface treatments such as no surface treatment (control group, preparing with hydrogen peroxide 10%, preparing with silane, preparing with HF and silane. Then, posts were tested in micro tensile testing machine. The results were analyzed by One-Way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Results: The greatest bond strength observed was in treatment with hydrogen peroxide 10% (19.84±8.95 MPa, and the lowest strength was related to the control group (12.44±3.40 MPa. The comparison of the groups with Dunnett T3 test showed that the differences between the groups was statistically significant (α=0.05.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, preparing with H2O2 -10 % and silane increases the bond strength of FRC posts to the composite core more than the other methods. Generally, the bond strength of posts to the composite core increases by surface treatment.

  11. Effect of Desensitising Laser Treatment on the Bond Strength of Full Metal Crowns: An In Vitro Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanajay; Rupesh, P L; Daokar, Sadashiv G; (Yadao), Anita Kalekar; Ghunawat, Dhananjay B; (Sayed), Sadaf Siddiqui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dentinal hypersensitivity is a very common complaint of patients undergoing crown and bridge restorations on vital teeth. Of the many desensitizing agents used to counter this issue, desensitizing laser treatment is emerging as one of the most successful treatment modality. However, the dentinal changes brought about by the desensitizing laser application could affect the bond strength of luting cements. Materials and Methods: Freshly extracted 48 maxillary first premolars, which were intact and morphologically similar were selected for the study. The specimens were divided into two groups, an untreated the control group and a desensitizing laser-treated group, which were exposed to Erbium, Chromium: Yttrium, Selenium, Galium, Garnet laser at 0.5 W potency for 15 s. Each of the above two groups were again randomly divided into two subgroups, on to which full veneer metal crowns, which were custom fabricated were luted using glass-ionomer and resin luting cements, respectively. Tensile bond strength of the luting cements was evaluated with the help of a Universal Testing Machine. Statistical analysis of the values were done using descriptive, independent samples’ test, and two-way ANOVA test. Results: The tensile bond strength of crowns luted on desensitizing laser treated specimens using self-adhesive resin cement showed a marginal increase in bond strength though it was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The self-adhesive resin cements could be recommended as the luting agent of choice for desensitizing laser treated abutment teeth, as it showed better bond strength. PMID:26229368

  12. Improvement in the Tensile Bond Strength between 3Y-TZP Ceramic and Enamel by Surface Treatments

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    Seon-Mi Byeon

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of 3 mol % yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (3Y-TZP ceramic surface treatments on the tensile bond strength and surface characteristics of enamel. To measure the tensile bond strength, the 3Y-TZP and tooth specimens were manufactured in a mini-dumbbell shape and divided into four groups based on the type of 3Y-TZP surface treatment: polishing (P, 110 µm alumina sandblasting (S, 110 µm alumina sandblasting combined with selective infiltration etching (SS, and 110 µm alumina sandblasting combined with MDP (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate-containing silane primer (SP. After surface treatment, the surface roughness, wettability, and surface changes were examined, and the tensile bond strength was measured. The mean values (from lowest to highest for tensile bond strength (MPa were as follows: P, 8.94 ± 2.30; S, 21.33 ± 2.00; SS, 26.67 ± 4.76; and SP, 31.74 ± 2.66. Compared to the P group, the mean surface roughness was significantly increased, and the mean contact angle was significantly decreased, while wettability was increased in the other groups. Therefore, surface treatment with 110 µm alumina sandblasting and MDP-containing silane primer is suitable for clinical applications, as it considerably improves the bond strength between 3Y-TZP and enamel.

  13. Comparison of bond strength and surface morphology of dental enamel for acid and Nd-YAG laser etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmeswearan, Diagaradjane; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Ratna, P.; Koteeswaran, D.

    1999-05-01

    Recently, laser pretreatment of dental enamel has emerged as a new technique in the field of orthodontics. However, the changes in the morphology of the enamel surface is very much dependent on the wavelength of laser, emission mode of the laser, energy density, exposure time and the nature of the substance absorbing the energy. Based on these, we made a comparative in vitro study on laser etching with acid etching with reference to their bond strength. Studies were conducted on 90 freshly extracted, non carious, human maxillary or mandibular anteriors and premolars. Out of 90, 60 were randomly selected for laser irradiation. The other 30 were used for conventional acid pretreatment. The group of 60 were subjected to Nd-YAG laser exposure (1060 nm, 10 Hz) at differetn fluences. The remaining 30 were acid pretreated with 30% orthophosphoric acid. Suitable Begg's brackets were selected and bound to the pretreated surface and the bond strength were tested using Instron testing machine. The bond strength achieved through acid pretreatment is found to be appreciably greater than the laser pretreated tooth. Though the bond strength achieved through the acid pretreated tooth is found to be significantly greater than the laser pretreated specimens, the laser pretreatement is found to be successful enough to produce a clinically acceptable bond strength of > 0.60 Kb/mm. Examination of the laser pre-treated tooth under SEM showed globule formation which may produce the mechanical interface required for the retention of the resin material.

  14. Comparison of Effect of C-Factor on Bond Strength to Human Dentin Using Different Composite Resin Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Jaya Prakash; Raju, RVS Chakradhar; Venigalla, Bhuvan Shome; Jyotsna, SV; Bhutani, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Background The study was planned to assess the use of low shrinkage composites for restoring cavities with high configuration factor (C-factor) which are subjected to high stresses. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of C- factor on tensile bond strength to human dentin using methacrylate based nanohybrid and low shrinkage silorane composite. Materials and Methods In this study 40 non carious human molar teeth were selected and assigned into two main groups - cavity (Class I cavity with high C-factor) and flat group (flat surface with low C-factor). Two different composite materials- methacrylate based and silorane low shrinkage composite were used to restore the teeth. Dentin surface was treated, adhesive application was done and composite was applied as per manufacturer’s instructions. Samples were stored in distilled water then subjected to tensile bond strength measurement using universal testing machine. Results Statistical analysis was done using Independent sample t-test. The mean bond strength in methacrylate based and silorane composite was significantly higher in flat preparation (Low C-factor) than cavity preparation. The mean bond strength in both cavity (High C-factor) and flat preparation(Low C-factor) was significantly higher in silorane than in conventional methacrylate based composite. Conclusion The bond strength of composites to dentin is strongly influenced by C-factor and type of composite resin material used. PMID:26436056

  15. Assessment of Bond Strength between Metal Brackets and Non-Glazed Ceramic in Different Surface Treatment Methods

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    I. Harririan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength between metal brackets and non-glazed ceramic with three different surface treatment methods.Materials and Methods: Forty-two non-glazed ceramic disks were assigned into three groups. Group I and II specimens were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid. Subsequently in group I, silane and adhesive were applied and in group II, bonding agent was used only.In group III, specimens were treated with 35% phosphoric acid and then silane and adhesive were applied. Brackets were bonded with light-cured composites. The specimens were stored in water in room temperature for 24 hours and then thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C.Results: The difference of tensile bond strength between groups I and III was not significant(P=0.999. However, the tensile bond strength of group II was significantly lower than groups I, and III (P<0.001. The adhesive remnant index scores between the threegroups had statistically significant differences (P<0.001.Conclusion: With the application of scotch bond multi-purpose plus adhesive, we can use phosphoric acid instead of hydrofluoric acid for bonding brackets to non-glazed ceramic restorations.

  16. Dentin Bond Strength of Two One-Bottle Adhesives after Delayed Activation of Light-Cured Resin Composites

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    F. Shafiei

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Adverse surface interactions between one-bottle adhesives and chemical-cured composites may occur with delayed light activation of light-cured composites. The purpose of this study was to assess the Effects of delayed activation of light-cured compositeson shear bond strength of two one-bottle adhesives with different acidity to bovine dentin.Materials and Methods: Flat dentin surface was prepared on sixty-six bovine incisors using 600 grit carbide papers. Prime&Bond NT, and One-Step adhesives and resin composite were applied in six groups: 1 immediate curing of the composite, 2 the composite was left 2.5 minutes over the cured adhesive before light activation, 3 prior to delayed activation of the composite, the cured adhesive was covered with a layer of nonacidic hydrophobic porcelain bonding resin (Choice 2 and cured immediately. After thermocycling,shear bond strength (SBS test was performed using a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed with Friedmans two-way Non-parametric ANOVA.Results: The SBS of delayed activation of Prime&Bond was significantly lower than immediate activated (P<0.05. Decrease in the SBS of One-Step was not statistically significant after delayed activation. The SBS of delayed activation of Prime&Bond and One-Step with an additional resin layer was significantly higher than delayed activation (P<0.001.Conclusion: The bond strength of Prime&Bond might be compromised by the higher acidity of this adhesive during the 2.5 minutes delayed activation of light-cured composite.Addition of a layer of hydrophobic resin compensated the effect of delayed activation andimproved the bond strength.

  17. Effect on spot welding variables on nugget size and bond strength of 304 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resistance spot welding (RSW) has revolutionized mechanical assembly in the automotive industry since its introduction in the early 1970s. Currently, one mechanical assembly in five is welded using spot welding technology, with welding of stainless steel sheet becoming increasingly common. Consequently, this research paper examines the spot welding of 2 mm thick 304 austenitic stainless steel sheet. The size of a spot weld nugget is primarily determined by the welding parameters: welding current, welding time, electrode force and electrode tip diameter However, other factors such as electrode deformation, corrosion, dissimilar materials and material properties also affect the nugget size and shape. This paper analyzes only the effects of current, weld time and force variations with unchanged electrode tip diameter. A pneumatically driven 75kVA spot welder was used to accomplish the welding process and the welded samples were subjected to tensile, hardness and metallurgical testing to characterize the size and shape of the weld nugget and the bond strength.

  18. Effects of wood fiber surface chemistry on strength of wood–plastic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed variations of surface chemical characteristics according to fiber origin. • Surface chemical characteristics of fibers could partly explain the differences in mechanical properties of the wood–plastic composites. • Fibers with carbohydrate rich surface led to stronger wood–plastic composites because the coupling between the matrix and fibers using coupling agent is achieved with polar sites mostly available on carbohydrates. • Conversely, lignin or extractives rich surface do not have oxidized functions for the esterification reaction with coupling agent and thus led to wood–plastic composites with lower mechanical properties. • Other factors such as mechanical interlocking and fiber morphology interfere with the effects of fiber surface chemistry. - Abstract: Because wood–plastic composites (WPC) strength relies on fiber-matrix interaction at fiber surface, it is likely that fiber surface chemistry plays an important role in WPC strength development. The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationships between fiber surface chemical characteristics and WPC mechanical properties. Different fibers were selected and characterized for surface chemical characteristics using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). WPC samples were manufactured at 40% fiber content and with six different fibers. High density polyethylene was used as matrix and maleated polyethylene (MAPE) was used as compatibility agent. WPC samples were tested for mechanical properties and fiber-matrix interface was observed with scanning electron microscope. It was found WPC strength decreases as the amount of unoxidized carbon (assigned to lignin and extractives) measured with XPS on fiber surface increases. In the opposite case, WPC strength increases with increasing level of oxidized carbon (assigned to carbohydrates) on fiber surface. The same

  19. Effects of wood fiber surface chemistry on strength of wood–plastic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migneault, Sébastien, E-mail: sebastien.migneault@uqat.ca [University of Quebec in Abitibi-Temiscamingue (UQAT), 445 boulevard de l’Université, Rouyn-Noranda, Québec J9X 5E4 (Canada); Koubaa, Ahmed, E-mail: ahmed.koubaa@uqat.ca [UQAT (Canada); Perré, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.perre@ecp.fr [École centrale de Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, F-92 295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Riedl, Bernard, E-mail: Bernard.Riedl@sbf.ulaval.ca [Université Laval, 2425 rue de la Terrasse, Québec City, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed variations of surface chemical characteristics according to fiber origin. • Surface chemical characteristics of fibers could partly explain the differences in mechanical properties of the wood–plastic composites. • Fibers with carbohydrate rich surface led to stronger wood–plastic composites because the coupling between the matrix and fibers using coupling agent is achieved with polar sites mostly available on carbohydrates. • Conversely, lignin or extractives rich surface do not have oxidized functions for the esterification reaction with coupling agent and thus led to wood–plastic composites with lower mechanical properties. • Other factors such as mechanical interlocking and fiber morphology interfere with the effects of fiber surface chemistry. - Abstract: Because wood–plastic composites (WPC) strength relies on fiber-matrix interaction at fiber surface, it is likely that fiber surface chemistry plays an important role in WPC strength development. The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationships between fiber surface chemical characteristics and WPC mechanical properties. Different fibers were selected and characterized for surface chemical characteristics using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). WPC samples were manufactured at 40% fiber content and with six different fibers. High density polyethylene was used as matrix and maleated polyethylene (MAPE) was used as compatibility agent. WPC samples were tested for mechanical properties and fiber-matrix interface was observed with scanning electron microscope. It was found WPC strength decreases as the amount of unoxidized carbon (assigned to lignin and extractives) measured with XPS on fiber surface increases. In the opposite case, WPC strength increases with increasing level of oxidized carbon (assigned to carbohydrates) on fiber surface. The same

  20. Effect of Thermocycling on the Bond Strength Between a Pure Commercially Titanium and Ceromer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato S. NISHIOKA

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify, using a shear mechanic test, the effect of the thermocycling on the bond strength between a pure commercially titanium (cpTi and the esthetic veneer material (Resilab Wilcos/Brazil. Method: Twenty metallic cylinders (n=20, with 5mm of length and 4mm of diameter each one were obtained by machining of titanium bars. The metallic bars were sandblasted with aluminum oxide (250µm, at 2 bars of pressure for 20 seconds, with 3cm of distance. After was applied the adhesive system of the veneer material, Resibond (Wilcos/Brazil, and later the opaque Resilab and veneer on the metallic bases. The samples were stored in distilled water for 24 hours, at 37ºC and after randomly divided into 2 groups: G1 (control and G2 (experimental, which was submitted to 500 thermocycles (5º/55ºC±1, dwell time: 30 s. The two groups were submitted to shear test in a universal testing machine (model DL-1000, EMIC Equipments and Systems Ltda., Sao Jose dos Pinhais - PR - Brazil with a 500kg load cell at a speed of 0.5mm/min. The numeric dates (MPa were submitted to the Mann-Whitney test (p=0.038. Results: After the dates analysis, was observed that the group G1 (7.83-18.72 was statistically different from the group G2 (5.51-15.34. Conclusion: Based on the results is lawful conclude that there was a significance reduction on the bond strength after thermocycling.

  1. A Comparison of the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded With Light-Emitting Diode and Halogen Light-Curing Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM. Abtahi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the problem: Various methods such as light emitting diode (LED have been used to enhance the polymerization of resin-based orthodontic adhesives. There is a lack of information on the advantages and disadvantages of different light curing systems.Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of LED and halogen light curing systems on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.Materials and Methods: Forty extracted human premolars were etched with 37% phosphoric acid and cleansed with water spray and air dried. The sealant was applied on the tooth surface and the brackets were bonded using Transbond adhesive (3M Unitek,Monrovia, Calif. Adhesives were cured for 40 and 20 seconds with halogen (Blue Light, APOZA, Taiwan and LED (Blue dent, Smart, Yugoslavia light-curing systems,respectively. Specimens were thermocycled 2500 times (from 5 to 55 °C and the shear bond strength of the adhesive system was evaluated with an Universal testing machine (Zwick GmbH, Ulm, Germany at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until the bracketswere detached from the tooth. Adhesive remnant index (ARI scores were determined after bracket failure. The data were submitted to statistical analysis, using Mann-Whitney analysis and t-test.Results: No significant difference was found in bond strength between the LED and halogen groups (P=0.12. A significant difference was not observed in the adhesive remnant index scores between the two groups (P=0.97.Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, the shear bond strength of resin-based orthodontic adhesives cured with a LED was statistically equivalent to those cured with a conventional halogen-based unit. LED light-curing units can be suggested for the polymerization of orthodontic bonding adhesives.

  2. Effect of sodium ascorbate on the bond strength of silorane and methacrylate composites after vital bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Guler

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of sodium ascorbate (SA on the microtensile bond strengths (MTBSs of different composites to bovine enamel after vital bleaching with hydrogen peroxide (HP or carbamide peroxide (CP. Thirty bovine incisors were randomly divided into five groups and treated with no bleaching application (control, 35% HP alone, 35% HP + 10% SA for 10 minutes (HP + SA, 16% CP alone, or 16% CP + 10% SA for 10 minutes (CP + SA. Specimens were restored with Silorane adhesive and Filtek Silorane composite (designated as S / group or with Clearfil SE bond and Filtek Supreme XT (designated as F / group. Composite build-up was created on the enamel. Sectioned specimens (n = 10 per group; 1 mm2; cross-sectional area were created and stressed in a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. The application of 10% SA immediately after bleaching with 16% CP or 35% HP increased the enamel MTBS, regardless of the adhesive / composite resin used. The resulting MTBS values were similar to those of the control groups. Use of 16% CP and 35% HP alone decreased the enamel MTBS, regardless of the adhesive / composite resin used, with F / CP + SA = F / HP + SA = F / CP = S / CP + SA = S / HP + SA = S / C > S / CP = S / HP = F / CP = F / HP (p < 0.05. We concluded that the application of SA for 10 minutes immediately after vital bleaching increases the enamel BS for dimethacrylate- and silorane-based composites

  3. The effect of various primers on shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic and resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasiwimol Sanohkan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine the in vitro shear bond strengths (SBS of zirconia ceramic to resin composite after various primer treatments. Materials and Methods: Forty zirconia ceramic (Zeno, Wieland Dental specimens (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were prepared, sandblasted with 50 μm alumina, and divided into four groups (n = 10. Three experimental groups were surface treated with three primers; CP (RelyX Ceramic Primer, 3M ESPE, AP (Alloy Primer, Kuraray Medical, and MP (Monobond Plus, Ivoclar Vivadent AG. One group was not treated and served as the control. All specimens were bonded to a resin composite (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE cylinder with an adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive, 3M ESPE and then stored in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 h before SBS testing in a universal testing machine. Mean SBS (MPa were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and the Tukey′s Honestly Significant Difference (HSD test (α = 0.05. Results: Group AP yielded the highest mean and standard deviation (SD value of SBS (16.8 ± 2.5 MPa and Group C presented the lowest mean and SD value (15.4 ± 1.6 MPa. The SBS did not differ significantly among the groups (P = 0.079. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, the SBS values between zirconia ceramic to resin composite using various primers and untreated surface were not significantly different.

  4. From ab initio quantum chemistry to molecular dynamics: The delicate case of hydrogen bonding in ammonia

    CERN Document Server

    Boese, A D; Martin, J M L; Marx, D; Chandra, Amalendu; Martin, Jan M.L.; Marx, Dominik

    2003-01-01

    The ammonia dimer (NH3)2 has been investigated using high--level ab initio quantum chemistry methods and density functional theory (DFT). The structure and energetics of important isomers is obtained to unprecedented accuracy without resorting to experiment. The global minimum of eclipsed C_s symmetry is characterized by a significantly bent hydrogen bond which deviates from linearity by about 20 degrees. In addition, the so-called cyclic C_{2h} structure is extremely close in energy on an overall flat potential energy surface. It is demonstrated that none of the currently available (GGA, meta--GGA, and hybrid) density functionals satisfactorily describe the structure and relative energies of this nonlinear hydrogen bond. We present a novel density functional, HCTH/407+, designed to describe this sort of hydrogen bond quantitatively on the level of the dimer, contrary to e.g. the widely used BLYP functional. This improved functional is employed in Car-Parrinello ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of liq...

  5. Bond strength of resin cement to dentin and to surface-treated posts of titanium alloy, glass fiber, and zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik;

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of two resin cements (ParaPost Cement and Panavia F) to posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White), and zirconia (Cerapost), and to dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After embedding, planar surfaces...... of posts (n = 9 to 14) and human dentin (n = 10) were obtained by grinding. The posts received one of three surface treatments: 1. roughening (sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid etching), 2. application of primer (Alloy Primer, Metalprimer II, silane), or 3. roughening followed by application of primer...... (sandblasting or etching followed by primer, Cojet treatment). ParaPost Cement and Panavia F were bonded to the post and dentin specimens, and the bonded specimens were placed in water at 37 degrees C for 7 days. The specimens were debonded in shear. RESULTS: Panavia F had significantly higher bond strength to...

  6. Microstructure and strength of TiAl/40Cr joint diffusion bonded with vanadium-copper filler metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何鹏; 冯吉才; 钱乙余; 张炳刚

    2002-01-01

    Intermetallics TiAl was diffusion-bonded to steel 40Cr in vacuum furnace with interlayer V/Cu. The results show that infinite sosoloid that made for bond performance is formed at the interface of V/Cu and Cu/40Cr, and three acting layers are formed at the interface of TiAl/V including Ti3Al layer at TiAl side, intermittent V5Al8 layer in the middle and Ti-V sosoloid at V side. Fragile reactors V5Al8 arising at the interface lead to bad performance of joints, and the strength of the joint is 200MPa, while it was still higher than the strength of the joint intermetallics TiAl to 40Cr steel diffusion-bonded directly. Intermetallic TiAl and 40Cr steel are diffusion-bonded successfully by using a composite isolation layer V/Cu.

  7. Flexural Strength of Preheated Resin Composites and Bonding Properties to Glass-Ceramic and Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Richard Kramer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the impact of preheating (25, 37, 54, or 68 °C of TetricEvoCeram (TEC, FiltekSupremeXT (FSXT, and Venus (V on flexural strength (FS, shear bond strength (SBS and interfacial tension (IFT. FS was tested with TEC and FSXT. For SBS, glass-ceramic and human dentin substrate were fabricated and luted with the preheated resin composite (RC. SBSs of 1500 thermal cycled specimens were measured. For IFT, glass slides covered with the non-polymerized RC were prepared and contact angles were measured. Data were analyzed using 2/1-way ANOVA with Scheffé-test, and t-test (p < 0.05. Preheated TEC (37–68 °C showed higher FS compared to the control-group (25 °C (p < 0.001. FSXT presented higher FS than TEC (p < 0.001. For SBS to dentin higher values for FSXT than TEC were found. The preheating temperature showed no impact on SBS to dentin. SBS to glass-ceramic revealed a positive influence of temperature for TEC 25–68 °C (p = 0.015. TEC showed higher values than V and FSXT (p < 0.001. IFT values increased with the preheating temperature. A significant difference could be observed in every RC group between 25 and 68 °C (p < 0.001.

  8. Influence of Light Source, Thermocycling and Silane on the Shear Bond Strength of Metallic Brackets to Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu Neto, Hugo Franco de; Costa, Ana Rosa; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; Santos, Eduardo Cesar Almada; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Vedovello Filho, Mário

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different light sources, thermocycling and silane on the bond strength of metallic brackets to ceramic. Cylinders of feldspathic ceramic were etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 60 s. Half of the cylinders (Groups 1 to 4) received two layers of silane. Metallic brackets were bonded to the cylinders using Transbond XT and divided into 8 groups (n=20), according to light source (Radii Plus LED - 40 s; Groups 1, 2, 5 and 6 and XL 2500 halogen light - 40 s; Groups 3, 4, 7 and 8) and experimental conditions with (Groups 2, 4, 6 and 8) without thermocycling (Groups 1, 3, 5 and 7). Shear bond testing was carried out after 24 h of deionized water storage (Groups 1, 3, 5 and 7) and thermocycling (Groups 2, 4, 6 and 8; 7,000 cycles - 5°/55 °C). Date were submitted to three-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (α=0.05). The Adhesive Remnamt Index (ARI) was evaluated at 8× magnification. The application of silane was effective in increasing the shear bond strength of the brackets to ceramic (p<0.05). Significant difference (p<0.05) on the bond strength was observed between light sources with or without thermocycling. The ARI showed a predominance of scores 0 for all groups, with an increase in scores 1, 2 and 3 for the silane groups. In conclusion, silane improved significantly the shear bond strength of the brackets to ceramic. The thermocycling and light sources influence on the bond strength. PMID:26963217

  9. In vitro evaluation of the Long-term bond strength of two resin cements to enamel and dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jaberi Ansari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims : In this in vitro study, the long-term bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement and conventional resin cements to human enamel and dentin was compared .   Materials and Methods: 80 sections of intact human third molars were randomly assigned into eight groups according to the cement type [Rely X Unicem (RXU, Rely X ARC (RXA], bond substrate (enamel, dentin and the duration of water storage (24 h or 1 year. Rods of cements (0.75×1 mm were prepared on the top surface of specimens using Tygon tubes. The micro-shear bond strengths of specimens were measured by a micro-tensile tester. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed ranks and Mann Whitney tests ( α =0.05.   Results: The bond strengths of RXA and RXU cements to enamel after 24h were 18.56±4.08 MPa and 14.99±4.17 MPa, and after 1 year were 19.41±6.24 MPa and 15.51±6.17 MPa, respectively. The bond strengths of RXA and RXU cements to dentin were 13.36±4.02 MPa and 14.16±4.69 MPa after 24h , and 14.63±5.96 MPa and 14.08±6.72 MPa after 1 year, respectively. Tooth substrate had significant effect only on the shear bond strength of RXA cement after 24h (P=0.01, while no other significant differences were found in this study (P>0.05.   Conclusion: According to the results of this study, one-step self-adhesive and multi-step conventional resin cements were similarly effective in bonding to enamel and dentin after 1 year water storage.

  10. Effect of calcium hydroxide on the bond strength of two bioactive cements and SEM evaluation of failure patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centenaro, Carolina Fabiana; Santini, Manuela Favarin; da Rosa, Ricardo Abreu; Nascimento, Angela Longo do; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of calcium hydroxide on bond strength of two bioactive cements. One-mm thick longitudinal slabs of root dentin were obtained from freshly extracted human monorradicular teeth (n = 60). Simulated root perforations (1 mm in diameter) were prepared in radicular dentin. Thereafter, the specimens were randomly divided into two groups (n = 30), according to the repair material: MTA (n = 30) and Biodentine (BD) (n = 30). Next, the specimens in each group were further randomly divided into 4 equal subgroups (n = 15) according to the prior use of Ca(OH)2: MTA/Ca(OH)2 and BD/Ca(OH)2 groups: perforations were filled with calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] and after 7 days, it was removed, and MTA and BD groups: calcium hydroxide dressing were not used. Push-out test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Bond strength values were compared statistically using Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn's post-test at a significance level of 5%. The failure analysis was performed using a stereoscopic and classified as adhesive, cohesive and mixed. The push-out bond strength of MTA and BD was not affected by the prior use of Ca(OH)2 (p > 0.05). BD yielded higher push-out bond strength values compared with those of MTA, regardless of the use of Ca(OH)2 (p groups. Ca(OH)2 placement for perforations sealing does not alter the bond strength of MTA and BD to the root dentin. BD presented higher bond strength values than MTA. SCANNING 38:240-244, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26331376

  11. Push-out bond strength and dentinal tubule penetration of different root canal sealers used with coated core materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purali, Nuhan; Coşgun, Erdal; Calt, Semra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the push-out bond strength and dentinal tubule penetration of root canal sealers used with coated core materials and conventional gutta-percha. Materials and Methods A total of 72 single-rooted human mandibular incisors were instrumented with NiTi rotary files with irrigation of 2.5% NaOCl. The smear layer was removed with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Specimens were assigned into four groups according to the obturation system: Group 1, EndoRez (Ultradent Product Inc.); Group 2, Activ GP (Brasseler); Group 3, SmartSeal (DFRP Ltd. Villa Farm); Group 4, AH 26 (Dentsply de Trey)/gutta-percha (GP). For push-out bond strength measurement, two horizontal slices were obtained from each specimen (n = 20). To compare dentinal tubule penetration, remaining 32 roots assigned to 4 groups as above were obturated with 0.1% Rhodamine B labeled sealers. One horizontal slice was obtained from the middle third of each specimen (n = 8) and scanned under confocal laser scanning electron microscope. Tubule penetration area, depth, and percentage were measured. Kruskall-Wallis te