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Sample records for boiling water reactor

  1. Advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, N.; Nakai, H.; Ross, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    In the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) system, steam generated within the nuclear boiler is sent directly to the main turbine. This direct cycle steam delivery system enables the BWR to have a compact power generation building design. Another feature of the BWR is the inherent safety that results from the negative reactivity coefficient of the steam void in the core. Based on the significant construction and operation experience accumulated on the BWR throughout the world, the ABWR was developed to further improve the BWR characteristics and to achieve higher performance goals. The ABWR adopted 'First of a Kind' type technologies to achieve the desired performance improvements. The Reactor Internal Pump (RIP), Fine Motion Control Rod Drive (FMCRD), Reinforced Concrete Containment Vessel (RCCV), three full divisions of Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), integrated digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C), and a high thermal efficiency main steam turbine system were developed and introduced into the ABWR. (author)

  2. Boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Kotaro; Ishida, Masayoshi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To connect a feedwater pipe to a recycling pipe line, the recycling pipe line being made smaller in diameter, thereby minimizing loss of coolant resulting from rupture of the pipe and improving safety against trouble of coolant loss. Structure: A feedwater pipe is directly connected to a recycling pipe line before a booster pump, and a mixture of recycling water and feedwater is increased in pressure by the booster pump, after which it is introduced into a jet pump in the form of water for driving the jet pump to suck surrounding water causing it to be flown into the core. In accordance with the abovementioned structure, since the flow of feedwater can be used as a part of water for driving the jet pump, the flow within the recycling pipe line may be decreased so that the recycling pipe line can be made smaller in diameter to reduce the flow of coolant in the reactor, which flows out when the pipe is ruptured. (Furukawa, Y.)

  3. Boiling water reactor fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzberg, A.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described of compensating, without the use of control rods or burnable poisons for power shaping, for reduced moderation of neutrons in an uppermost section of the active core of a boiling water nuclear reactor containing a plurality of elongated fuel rods vertically oriented therein, the fuel rods having nuclear fuel therein, the fuel rods being cooled by water pressurized such that boiling thereof occurs. The method consists of: replacing all of the nuclear fuel in a portion of only the upper half of first predetermined ones of the fuel rods with a solid moderator material of zirconium hydride so that the fuel and the moderator material are axially distributed in the predetermined ones of the fuel rods in an asymmetrical manner relative to a plane through the axial midpoint of each rod and perpendicular to the axis of the rod; placing the moderator material in the first predetermined ones of the fuel rods in respective sealed internal cladding tubes, which are separate from respective external cladding tubes of the first predetermined ones of the fuel rods, to prevent interaction between the moderator material and the external cladding tube of each of the first predetermined ones of the fuel rods; and wherein the number of the first predetermined ones of the fuel rods is at least thirty, and further comprising the steps of: replacing with the moderator material all of the fuel in the upper quarter of each of the at least thirty rods; and also replacing with the moderator material all of the fuel in the adjacent lower quarter of at least sixteen of the at least thirty rods

  4. Nuclear fuel performance in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkins, R.B.; Baily, W.E.; Proebstle, R.A.; Armijo, J.S.; Klepfer, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    A major development program is described to improve the performance of Boiling Water Reactor fuel. This sustained program is described in four parts: 1) performance monitoring, 2) fuel design changes, 3) plant operating recommendations, and 4) advanced fuel programs

  5. Hydrogen water chemistry for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.L.; Cowan, R.L.; Kass, J.N.; Law, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC) is now a practical countermeasure for intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility of reactor structural materials in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). The concept, which involves adding hydrogen to the feedwater to suppress the formation of oxidizing species in the reactor, has been extensively studied in both the laboratory and in several operating plants. The Dresden-2 Unit of Commonwealth Edison Company has completed operation for one full 18-month fuel cycle under HWC conditions. The specifications, procedures, equipment, instrumentation and surveillance programs needed for commercial application of the technology are available now. This paper provides a review of the benefits to be obtained, the side affects, and the special operational considerations needed for commercial implementation of HWC. Technological and management ''Lessons Learned'' from work conducted to date are also described

  6. Dynamic model for a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscettola, M.

    1963-07-01

    A theoretical formulation is derived for the dynamics of a boiling water reactor of the pressure tube and forced circulation type. Attention is concentrated on neutron kinetics, fuel element heat transfer dynamics, and the primary circuit - that is the boiling channel, riser, steam drum, downcomer and recirculating pump of a conventional La Mont loop. Models for the steam and feedwater plant are not derived. (author)

  7. Nonlinear dynamics of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Cacuci, D.G.; Perez, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Recent stability tests in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) have indicated that these reactors can exhibit the special nonlinear behavior of following a closed trajectory called limit cycle. The existence of a limit cycle corresponds to an oscillation of fixed amplitude and period. During these tests, such oscillations had their amplitudes limited to about +- 15% of the operating power. Since limit cycles are fairly insensitive to parameter variations, it is possible to operate a BWR under conditions that sustain a limit cycle (of fixed amplitude and period) over a finite range of reactor parameters

  8. Boiling water reactor simulator. Workshop material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and workshop material and sponsors workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development; and the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 21 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2002). Course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor (PWR) simulator developed by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated, Canada, is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 22 'Pressurized Water Reactor Simulator' (2003). This report consists of course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor (BWR) simulator. Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated, developed the simulator and prepared this report for the IAEA

  9. SBWR: A simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, J.D.; Sawyer, C.D.; Lagache, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced light water reactor concept is being developed for possible application in the 1990's. The concept, known as SBWR is a boiling water reactor which uses natural circulation to provide flow to the reactor core. In an emergency, a gravity driven core cooling system is used. The reactor is depressurized and water from an elevated suppression pool flows by gravity to the reactor vessel to keep the reactor core covered. The concept also features a passive containment cooling system in which water flows by gravity to cool the suppression pool wall. No operator action is required for a period of at least three days. Use of these and other passive systems allows the elimination of emergency diesel generators, core cooling pumps and heat removal pumps which is expected to simplify the plant design, reduce costs and simplify licensing. The concept is being developed by General Electric, Bechtel and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology supported by the Electric Power Research Institute and the United States Department of Energy in the United States. In Japan, The Japan Atomic Power Company has a great interest in this concept

  10. Boiling water reactor life extension monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancavage, P.

    1991-01-01

    In 1991 the average age of GE-supplied Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) reached 15 years. The distribution of BWR ages range from three years to 31 years. Several of these plants have active life extension programmes, the most notable of which is the Monticello plant in Minnesota which is the leading BWR plant for license renewal in the United States. The reactor pressure vessel and its internals form the heart of the boiling water reactor (BWR) power plant. Monitoring the condition of the vessel as it operates provides a continuous report on the structural integrity of the vessel and internals. Monitors for fatigue, stress corrosion and neutron effects can confirm safety margins and predict residual life. Every BWR already incorporates facilities to track the key aging mechanisms of fatigue, stress corrosion and neutron embrittlement. Fatigue is measured by counting the cycles experienced by the pressure vessel. Stress corrosion is gauged by periodic measurements of primary water conductivity and neutron embrittlement is tracked by testing surveillance samples. The drawbacks of these historical procedures are that they are time consuming, they lag the current operation, and they give no overall picture of structural integrity. GE has developed an integrated vessel fitness monitoring system to fill the gaps in the historical, piecemetal monitoring of the BWR vessel and internals and to support plant life extension. (author)

  11. Outline of advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshio Matsuo

    1987-01-01

    The ABWR (Advanced Boiling Water Reactor) is based on construction and operational experience in Japan, USA and Europe. It was developed jointly by the BWR supplieres, General Electric, Hitachi, and Toshiba, as the next generation BWR for Japan. The Tokyo Electric Power Co. provided leadership and guidance in developing the ABWR, and in combination with five other Japanese electric power companies. The major objectives in developing the ABWR are: 1. Enhanced plant operability, maneuverability and daily load-following capability; 2. Increased plant safety and operating margins; 3. Improved plant availability and capacity factor; 4. Reduced occupational radiation exposure; 5. Reduced radwaste volume, and 6. Reduced plant capital and operating costs. (Liu)

  12. Fundamentals of boiling water reactor (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzola, S.

    1982-01-01

    These lectures on fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are a synthesis of known and established concepts. These lectures are intended to be a comprehensive (even though descriptive in nature) presentation, which would give the basis for a fair understanding of power operation, fuel cycle and safety aspects of the boiling water reactor. The fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are oriented to design and operation. In the first lecture general description of BWR is presented, with emphasis on the reactor physics aspects. A survey of methods applied in fuel and core design and operation is presented in the second lecture in order to indicate the main features of the calculational tools. The third and fourth lectures are devoted to review of BWR design bases, reactivity requirements, reactivity and power control, fuel loading patterns. Moreover, operating limits are reviewed, as the actual limits during power operation and constraints for reactor physics analyses (design and operation). The basic elements of core management are also presented. The constraints on control rod movements during the achieving of criticality and low power operation are illustrated in the fifth lecture. Some considerations on plant transient analyses are also presented in the fifth lecture, in order to show the impact between core and fuel performance and plant/system performance. The last (sixth) lecture is devoted to the open vessel testing during the startup of a commercial BWR. A control rod calibration is also illustrated. (author)

  13. To the analysis of reactor noise in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1972-01-01

    The paper contains some basic thoughts on the problem of neutron flux oscillations in power reactors. The advantages of self-powered detectors and their function are explained. In addition, noise measurements of the boiling water reactors at Lingen and Holden are described, and the possibilities of an employment of vanadium detectors for the analysis of reactor noise are discussed. The final pages of the paper contain a complete list of the author's publications in the field of reactor noise analysis. (RW/AK) [de

  14. Self-Sustaining Thorium Boiling Water Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A thorium-fueled water-cooled reactor core design approach that features a radially uniform composition of fuel rods in stationary fuel assembly and is fuel-self-sustaining is described. This core design concept is similar to the Reduced moderation Boiling Water Reactor (RBWR proposed by Hitachi to fit within an ABWR pressure vessel, with the following exceptions: use of thorium instead of depleted uranium for the fertile fuel; elimination of the internal blanket; and elimination of absorbers from the axial reflectors, while increasing the length of the fissile zone. The preliminary analysis indicates that it is feasible to design such cores to be fuel-self-sustaining and to have a comfortably low peak linear heat generation rate when operating at the nominal ABWR power level of nearly 4000 MWth. However, the void reactivity feedback tends to be too negative, making it difficult to have sufficient shutdown reactivity margin at cold zero power condition. An addition of a small amount of plutonium from LWR used nuclear fuel was found effective in reducing the magnitude of the negative void reactivity effect and enables attaining adequate shutdown reactivity margin; it also flattens the axial power distribution. The resulting design concept offers an efficient incineration of the LWR generated plutonium in addition to effective utilization of thorium. Additional R&D is required in order to arrive at a reliable practical and safe design.

  15. Boiling water reactor turbine trip (TT) benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    In the field of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics computation there is a need to enhance scientific knowledge in order to develop advanced modelling techniques for new nuclear technologies and concepts as well as for current applications. Recently developed 'best-estimate' computer code systems for modelling 3-D coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics transients in nuclear cores and for coupling core phenomena and system dynamics (PWR, BWR, VVER) need to be compared against each other and validated against results from experiments. International benchmark studies have been set up for this purpose. The present report is the second in a series of four and summarises the results of the first benchmark exercise, which identifies the key parameters and important issues concerning the thermalhydraulic system modelling of the transient, with specified core average axial power distribution and fission power time transient history. The transient addressed is a turbine trip in a boiling water reactor, involving pressurization events in which the coupling between core phenomena and system dynamics plays an important role. In addition, the data made available from experiments carried out at the Peach Bottom 2 reactor (a GE-designed BWR/4) make the present benchmark particularly valuable. (author)

  16. Status of the advanced boiling water reactor and simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the excess of U.S. electrical generating capacity which has existed for the past 15 years is coming to an end as we enter the 1990s. Environmental and energy security issues associated with fossil fuels are kindling renewed interest in the nuclear option. The importance of these issues are underscored by the National Energy Strategy (NES) which calls for actions which are designed to ensure that the nuclear power option is available to utilities. Utilities, utility associations, and nuclear suppliers, under the leadership of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), have jointly developed a 14 point strategic plan aimed at establishing a predictable regulatory environment, standardized and pre-licensed Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) nuclear plants, resolving the long-term waste management issue, and other enabling conditions. GE is participating in this national effort and GE's family of advanced nuclear power plants feature two new reactor designs, developed on a common technology base, aimed at providing a new generation of nuclear plants to provide safe, clean, economical electricity to the world's utilities in the 1990s and beyond. Together, the large-size (1300 MWe) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the small-size (600 MWe) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) are innovative, near-term candidates for expanding electrical generating capacity in the U.S. and worldwide. Both possess the features necessary to do so safely, reliably, and economically

  17. Future directions in boiling water reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, D.R.; Hucik, S.A.; Duncan, J.D.; Sweeney, J.I.

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is being developed by an international team of BWR manufacturers to respond to worldwide utility needs in the 1990's. Major objectives of the ABWR program are design simplification; improved safety and reliability; reduced construction, fuel and operating costs; improved maneuver-ability; and reduced occupational exposure and radwaste. The ABWR incorporates the best proven features from BWR designs in Europe, Japan and the United States and application of leading edge technology. Key features of the ABWR are internal recirculation pumps; fine-motion, electrohydraulic control rod drives; digital control and instrumentation; multiplexed, fiber optic cabling netwoek; pressure suppression containment with horizontal vents; cylindrical reinforced concrete containment; structural integration of the containment and reactor building; severe accident capability; state-of-the-art fuel; advanced trubine/generator with 52'' last stage buckets; and advanced radwaste technology. The ABWR is ready for lead plant application in Japan, where it is being developed as the next generation Japan standard BWR under the guidance and leadership of The Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc. and a group of Japanese BWR utilities. In the United States it is being adapted to the needs of US utilities through the Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced LWR Requirements Program, and is being reviewed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for certification as a preapproved US standard BWR under the US Department of Energy's ALWR Design Verification Program. These cooperative Japanese and US programs are expected to establish the ABWR as a world class BWR for the 1990's...... (author)

  18. Radioactive waste management practices with KWU-boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiser, H.

    1976-01-01

    A Kraftwerk Union boiling water reactor is used to demonstrate the reactor auxiliary systems which are applied to minimize the radioactive discharge. Based on the most important design criteria the philosophy and function of the various systems for handling the off-gas, ventilation air, waste water and concentrated waste are described. (orig.) [de

  19. Influence of subcooled boiling on out-of-phase oscillations in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz-Cobo, J.L.; Chiva, S.; Escriva, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a reduced order model with modal kinetics for the study of the dynamic behavior of boiling water reactors. This model includes the subcooled boiling in the lower part of the reactor channels. New additional equations have been obtained for the following dynamics magnitudes: the effective inception length for subcooled boiling, the average void fraction in the subcooled boiling region, the average void fraction in the bulk-boiling region, the mass fluxes at the boiling boundary and the channel exit, respectively, and so on. Each channel has three nodes, one of liquid, one with subcooled boiling, and one with bulk boiling. The reduced order model includes also a modal kinetics with the fundamental mode and the first subcritical one, and two channels representing both halves of the reactor core. Also, in this paper, we perform a detailed study of the way to calculate the feedback reactivity parameters. The model displays out-of-phase oscillations when enough feedback gain is provided. The feedback gain that is necessary to self-sustain these oscillations is approximately one-half the gain that is needed when the subcooled boiling node is not included

  20. A stability identification system for boiling water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belblidia, L.A.; Chevrier, A.

    1994-01-01

    Boiling water reactors are subject to instabilities under low-flow, high-power operating conditions. These instabilities are a safety concern and it is therefore important to determine stability margins. This paper describes a method to estimate a measure of stability margin, called the decay ratio, from autoregressive modelling of time series data. A phenomenological model of a boiling water reactor with known stability characteristics is used to generate time series to validate the program. The program is then applied to signals from local power range monitors from the cycle 7 stability tests at the Leibstadt plant. (author) 7 figs., 2 tabs., 12 refs

  1. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs

  2. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the 2 types of light water reactors that are used to produce electricity: the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Historically the BWR concept was developed after the PWR concept. Today 80% of light water reactors operating in the world are of PWR-type. This comparison is comprehensive and detailed. First the main technical features are reviewed and compared: reactor architecture, core and fuel design, reactivity control, reactor vessel, cooling systems and reactor containment. Secondly, various aspects concerning reactor operations like reactor control, fuel management, maintenance, inspections, radiation protection, waste generation and reactor reliability are presented and compared for both reactors. As for the issue of safety, it is highlighted that the accidental situations are too different for the 2 reactors to be compared. The main features of reactor safety are explained for both reactors

  3. Development of advanced boiling water reactor for medium capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazuo Hisajima; Yutaka Asanuma

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a result of development of an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor for medium capacity. 1000 MWe was selected as the reference. The features of the current Advanced Boiling Water Reactors, such as a Reactor Internal Pump, a Fine Motion Control Rod Drive, a Reinforced Concrete Containment Vessel, and three-divisionalized Emergency Core Cooling System are maintained. In addition, optimization for 1000 MWe has been investigated. Reduction in thermal power and application of the latest fuel reduced the number of fuel assemblies, Control Rods and Control Rod Drives, Reactor Internal Pumps, and Safety Relief Valves. The number of Main Steam lines was reduced from four to two. As for the engineered safety features, the Flammability Control System was removed. Special efforts were made to realize a compact Turbine Building, such as application of an in line Moisture Separator, reduction in the number of pumps in the Condensate and Feedwater System, and change from a Turbine-Driven Reactor Feedwater Pump to a Motor-Driven Reactor Feedwater Pump. 31% reduction in the volume of the Turbine Building is expected in comparison with the current Advanced Boiling Water Reactors. (authors)

  4. Instrument lance for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proell, N.; Bertz, S.; Graebener, K.H.

    1980-01-01

    The instrument lance contains in the lance cover pipe a thimble as part of the drive chamber system. Other thimbles serve to carry neutron detectors. Detectors can be exchanged without opening the reactor pressure vessel and without removing the fuel elements. Furthermore the detector exchange is independent from the fuel element cycle. The measurement lance passes from the bottom of the pressure vessel over the total hight of the core in the water ducts between the fuel elements and can thus determine the neutron flux distribution. (DG) [de

  5. Controllability studies for an advanced CANDU boiling light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepp, R.M.; Hinds, H.W.

    1976-12-01

    Bulk controllability studies carried out as part of a conceptual design study of a 1200 MWe CANDU boiling-light-water reactor fuelled with U 235 - or Pu-enriched uranium oxide are outlined. The concept, the various models developed for its simulation on a hybrid computer and the perturbations used to test system controllability, are described. The results show that this concept will have better bulk controllability than similar CANDU-BLW reactors fuelled with natural uranium. (author)

  6. Modelling of Control Bars in Calculations of Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlaifi, A.; Buiron, L.

    2004-01-01

    The core of a nuclear reactor is generally composed of a neat assemblies of fissile material from where neutrons were descended. In general, the energy of fission is extracted by a fluid serving to cool clusters. A reflector is arranged around the assemblies to reduce escaping of neutrons. This is made outside the reactor core. Different mechanisms of reactivity are generally necessary to control the chain reaction. Manoeuvring of Boiling Water Reactor takes place by controlling insertion of absorbent rods to various places of the core. If no blocked assembly calculations are known and mastered, blocked assembly neutronic calculation are delicate and often treated by case to case in present studies [1]. Answering the question how to model crossbar for the control of a boiling water reactor ? requires the choice of a representation level for every chain of variables, the physical model, and its representing equations, etc. The aim of this study is to select the best applicable parameter serving to calculate blocked assembly of a Boiling Water Reactor. This will be made through a range of representative configurations of these reactors and used absorbing environment, in order to illustrate strategies of modelling in the case of an industrial calculation. (authors)

  7. Fundamentals of boiling water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattern, J.

    1976-01-01

    The reactor assembly consists of the reactor vessel, its internal components of the core, shroud, steam separator, dryer assemblies, feedwater spargers, internal recirculation pumps and control rod drive housings. Connected to the steam lines are the pressure relief valves which protect the pressure boundary from damage due to overpressure. (orig./TK) [de

  8. Power distribution effects on boiling water reactor stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damiano, B.; March-Leuba, J.

    1989-01-01

    The work presented in this paper deals with the effects of spatial power distributions on the stability of boiling water reactors (BWRs). It is shown that a conservative power distribution exists for which the stability is minimal. These results are relevant because they imply that bounding stability calculations are possible and, thus, a worst-possible scenario may be defined for a particular BWR geometry. These bounding calculations may, then, be used to determine the maximum expected limit-cycle peak powers

  9. Calculation of limit cycle amplitudes in commercial boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Perez, R.B.; Cacuci, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the dynamic behavior of a boiling water reactor (BWR) in the nonlinear region corresponding to linearly unstable conditions. A nonlinear model of a typical BWR was developed. The equations underlying this model represent a one-dimensional void reactivity feedback, point kinetics with a single delayed neutron group, fuel behavior, and recirculation loop dynamics (described by a single-node integral momentum equation)

  10. Feasibility study on the thorium fueled boiling water breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PetrusTakaki, N.

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility of (Th,U)O 2 fueled, boiling water breeder reactor based on conventional BWR technology has been studied. In order to determine the potential use of water cooled thorium reactor as a competitive breeder, this study evaluated criticality, breeding and void reactivity coefficient in response to changes made in MFR and fissile enrichments. The result of the study shows that while using light water as moderator, low moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR=0.5), it was possible to breed fissile fuel in negative void reactivity condition. However the burnup value was lower than the value of the current LWR. On the other hand, heavy water cooled reactor shows relatively wider feasible breeding region, which lead into possibility of designing a core having better neutronic and economic performance than light water with negative void reactivity coefficient. (authors)

  11. Safety systems and features of boiling and pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khair, H. O. M.

    2012-06-01

    The safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPP) requires a deep understanding of the functioning of physical processes and systems involved. This study was carried out to present an overview of the features of safety systems of boiling and pressurized water reactors that are available commercially. Brief description of purposes and functions of the various safety systems that are employed in these reactors was discussed and a brief comparison between the safety systems of BWRs and PWRs was made in an effort to emphasize of safety in NPPs.(Author)

  12. Self-Sustaining Thorium Boiling Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gorman, Phillip M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bogetic, Sandra [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Seifried, Jeffrey E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhang, Guanheng [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Varela, Christopher R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fratoni, Massimiliano [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Vijic, Jasmina J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Downar, Thomas [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hall, Andrew [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ward, Andrew [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Jarrett, Michael [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Wysocki, Aaron [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Xu, Yunlin [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kazimi, Mujid [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Shirvan, Koroush [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Mieloszyk, Alexander [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Todosow, Michael [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brown, Nicolas [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cheng, Lap [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The primary objectives of this project are to: Perform a pre-conceptual design of a core for an alternative to the Hitachi proposed fuel-self- sustaining RBWR-AC, to be referred to as a RBWR-Th. The use of thorium fuel is expected to assure negative void coefficient of reactivity (versus positive of the RBWR-AC) and improve reactor safety; Perform a pre-conceptual design of an alternative core to the Hitachi proposed LWR TRU transmuting RBWR-TB2, to be referred to as the RBWR-TR. In addition to improved safety, use of thorium for the fertile fuel is expected to improve the TRU transmutation effectiveness; Compare the RBWR-Th and RBWR-TR performance against that of the Hitachi RBWR core designs and sodium cooled fast reactor counterparts - the ARR and ABR; and, Perform a viability assessment of the thorium-based RBWR design concepts to be identified along with their associated fuel cycle, a technology gap analysis, and a technology development roadmap. A description of the work performed and of the results obtained is provided in this Overview Report and, in more detail, in the Attachments. The major findings of the study are summarized.

  13. Self-Sustaining Thorium Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, Ehud; Gorman, Phillip M.; Bogetic, Sandra; Seifried, Jeffrey E.; Zhang, Guanheng; Varela, Christopher R.; Fratoni, Massimiliano; Vijic, Jasmina J.; Downar, Thomas; Hall, Andrew; Ward, Andrew; Jarrett, Michael; Wysocki, Aaron; Xu, Yunlin; Kazimi, Mujid; Shirvan, Koroush; Mieloszyk, Alexander; Todosow, Michael; Brown, Nicolas; Cheng, Lap

    2015-01-01

    The primary objectives of this project are to: Perform a pre-conceptual design of a core for an alternative to the Hitachi proposed fuel-self- sustaining RBWR-AC, to be referred to as a RBWR-Th. The use of thorium fuel is expected to assure negative void coefficient of reactivity (versus positive of the RBWR-AC) and improve reactor safety; Perform a pre-conceptual design of an alternative core to the Hitachi proposed LWR TRU transmuting RBWR-TB2, to be referred to as the RBWR-TR. In addition to improved safety, use of thorium for the fertile fuel is expected to improve the TRU transmutation effectiveness; Compare the RBWR-Th and RBWR-TR performance against that of the Hitachi RBWR core designs and sodium cooled fast reactor counterparts - the ARR and ABR; and, Perform a viability assessment of the thorium-based RBWR design concepts to be identified along with their associated fuel cycle, a technology gap analysis, and a technology development roadmap. A description of the work performed and of the results obtained is provided in this Overview Report and, in more detail, in the Attachments. The major findings of the study are summarized.

  14. A model for oxidizing species concentrations in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, B.; Chexal, B.; Pathania, R.; Chun, J.; Ballinger, R.; Abdollahian, D.

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate and control the intergranular stress corrosion cracking of boiling water reactor (BWR) vessel internal components requires knowledge of the concentration of oxidizing species that affects the electrochemical potentials in various regions of a BWR. In a BWR flow circuit, as water flows through the radiation field, the radiolysis process and chemical reactions lead to the production of species such as oxygen, hydrogen, and hydrogen peroxide. Since chemistry measurements are difficult inside BWRs, analytical tools have been developed by Ruiz and Lin, Ibe and Uchida and Chun and Ballinger for estimating the concentration of species that provide the necessary input for water chemistry control and material protection

  15. Development of high conversion boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Jun-ichi; Mochida, Takaaki; Uchikawa, Sadao.

    1988-01-01

    It is expected that the period of LWRs being the main source of electric power supply becomes long, therefore, the development of next generation LWRs placing emphasis on the effective utilization of uranium resources and the improvement of economical efficiency is necessary. In this paper, as the next generation BWRs subsequent to ABWRs, the concept of the core of high conversion type BWRs is reported, in which emphasis is placed on the saving of natural uranium resources by raising the rate of conversion to plutonium. This core is that of realizing the high rate of conversion by utilizing the void in the core, which is the feature of BWRs, and the case of making the change of the core structure relatively small by using cross type control rods and the case of changing the core structure for further heightening the rate of conversion and making control rods into cluster type are described. In order to meet the demand like this, Hitachi Ltd. has engaged in the development of the concept of the core of next generation LWRs. In the high conversion type BWRs, there is not large change in the reactor system and turbine system from the current BWRs. The features and the concept of the core of high conversion type BWRs are described. (Kako, I.)

  16. Boiling water reactor turbine trip (TT) benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    In the field of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics computation there is a need to enhance scientific knowledge in order to develop advanced modelling techniques for new nuclear technologies and concepts, as well as for current nuclear applications Recently developed 'best-estimate' computer code systems for modelling 3-D coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics transients in nuclear cores and for the coupling of core phenomena and system dynamics (PWR, BWR, VVER) need to be compared against each other and validated against results from experiments. International benchmark studies have been set up for the purpose. The present volume describes the specification of such a benchmark. The transient addressed is a turbine trip (TT) in a BWR involving pressurization events in which the coupling between core phenomena and system dynamics plays an important role. In addition, the data made available from experiments carried out at the plant make the present benchmark very valuable. The data used are from events at the Peach Bottom 2 reactor (a GE-designed BWR/4). (authors)

  17. Experiences in stability testing of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Otaduy, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize experiences with boiling water reactor (BWR) stability testing using noise analysis techniques. These techniques have been studied over an extended period of time, but it has been only recently that they have been well established and generally accepted. This paper contains first a review of the problem of BWR neutronic stability, focusing on its physical causes and its effects on reactor operation. The paper also describes the main techniques used to quantify, from noise measurements, the reactor's stability in terms of a decay ratio. Finally, the main results and experiences obtained from the stability tests performed at the Dresden and the Browns Ferry reactors using noise analysis techniques are summarized

  18. Boiling water reactor modeling capabilities of MMS-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, R.S.; Abdollahian, D.A.; Elias, E.; Shak, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    During the development period for the Modular Modeling System (MMS) library modules, the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) has been the last major component to be addressed. The BWRX module includes models of the reactor core, reactor vessel, and recirculation loop. A pre-release version was made available for utility use in September 1983. Since that time a number of changes have been incorporated in BWRX to (1) improve running time for most transient events of interest, (2) extend its capability to include certain events of interest in reactor safety analysis, and (3) incorporate a variety of improvements to the module interfaces and user input formats. The purposes of this study were to briefly review the module structure and physical models, to point the differences between the MMS-02 BWRX module and the BWRX version previously available in the TESTREV1 library, to provide guidelines for choosing among the various user options, and to present some representative results

  19. DIRECT-CYCLE, BOILING-WATER NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrer, J.M.; Fromm, L.W. Jr.; Kolba, V.M.

    1962-08-14

    A direct-cycle boiling-water nuclear reactor is described that employs a closed vessel and a plurality of fuel assemblies, each comprising an outer tube closed at its lower end, an inner tube, fuel rods in the space between the tubes and within the inner tube. A body of water lying within the pressure vessel and outside the fuel assemblies is converted to saturated steam, which enters each fuel assembly at the top and is converted to superheated steam in the fuel assembly while it is passing therethrough first downward through the space between the inner and outer tubes of the fuel assembly and then upward through the inner tube. (AEC)

  20. Spectral shift rod for the boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokomizo, O.; Kashiwai, S.; Nishida, K.; Orii, A.; Yamashita, J.; Mochida, T.

    1993-01-01

    A Boiling Water Reactor core concept has been proposed using a new fuel component called spectral shift rod (SSR). The SSR is a new type of water rod in which a water level is formed during core operation. The water level can be controlled by the core recirculation flow rate. By using SSRs, the reactor can be operated with all control rods withdrawn through the operation cycle as well as that a much larger natural uranium saving is possible due to spectral shift operation than in current BWRs. The steady state and transient characteristics of the SSRs have been examined by experiments and analyses to certify the feasibility. In a reference design, a four times larger spectral shift width as for the current BWR has been obtained. (orig.)

  1. The interpretation of neutron noise in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, T.M.; Singh, O.P.

    1985-01-01

    Some qualitative results of neutron noise in a boiling water reactor (BWR) are reported. By using one-group theory, it has been shown that the neutron flux fluctuations caused by a distributed source in space, representative of the coolant boiling noise in BWRs, can be considered as made up of two components: The first one, having a global character, is a quickly varying function of frequency and follows the fundamental mode solution in space; the second, called nonglobal (local), follows the spatial variation of noise-source intensity distribution and is independent of frequency for ω γΣ, this component decreases with increasing frequency. The formulation indicates that the global component is quite sensitive to the neutron multiplication factor of the system and, for the local component, the medium behaves like a nonmultiplying one. The global effect is dominant at lower frequencies in a critical system, and the local effect is dominant at higher fre quencies

  2. Boiling water reactor liquid radioactive waste processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The standard sets forth minimum design, construction and performance requirements with due consideration for operation of the liquid radioactive waste processing system for boiling water reactor plants for routine operation including design basis fuel leakage and design basis occurrences. For the purpose of this standard, the liquid radioactive waste processing system begins at the interfaces with the reactor coolant pressure boundary, at the interface valve(s) in lines from other systems and at those sumps and floor drains provided for liquid waste with the potential of containing radioactive material. The system terminates at the point of controlled discharge to the environment, at the point of interface with the waste solidification system and at the point of recycle back to storage for reuse. The standard does not include the reactor coolant clean-up system, fuel pool clean-up system, sanitary waste system, any nonaqueous liquid system or controlled area storm drains

  3. Age-related degradation of boiling water reactor vessel internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.; Shah, V.N.

    1992-01-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory performed an assessment of the aging of the reactor internals in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and identified the unresolved technical issues related to the degradation of these components. The overall life-limiting mechanism is intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking, fatigue, and thermal aging embrittlement are other potential degradation mechanisms. Several failures in BWR internals have been caused by a combination of factors such as environment, high residual or preload stresses, and flow-induced vibration. The ASME Code Section XI in-service inspection requirements are insufficient for detecting aging-related degradation at many locations in reactor internals. Many of the potential locations for IGSCC or fatigue are not accessible for inspection. (orig.)

  4. Fault tolerant digital control systems for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Cash, N.R.

    1986-01-01

    In a Boiling Water Reactor nuclear power plant, the power generation control function is divided into several systems, each system controlling only a part of the total plant. Presently, each system is controlled by conventional analog or digital logic circuits with little interaction for coordinated control. The advent of microprocessors has allowed the development of distributed fault-tolerant digital controls. The objective is to replace these conventional controls with fault-tolerant digital controls connected together with digital communication links to form a fully integrated nuclear power plant control system

  5. Domestic and overseas development of advanced boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatazawa, Mamoru; Fuchino, Satoshi; Nakada, Kotaro

    2010-01-01

    Since Toshiba delivered the world's first advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) to The Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc. in 1996, we have been devoting continuous efforts to the construction and operational support of ABWR systems as major products. We are now promoting the construction of domestic and overseas ABWR systems along with the standardization of ABWRs. We are also engaged in the research and development of core technologies to support further promotion of ABWRs as a concurrent solution to the issues of global warming and energy security for individual countries. (author)

  6. Prestressed concrete pressure vessels for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, S.

    1979-12-01

    Following a general description of the Scandinavian cooperative project on prestressed concrete pressure vessels for boiling water reactors, detailed discussion is given in four appendices of the following aspects: the verification programme of tests and studies, the development and testing of a liner venting system, a preliminary safety philosophy and comparative assessment of cold and hot liners. Vessel failure probability is briefly discussed and some figures presented. The pressure gradients in the vessel wall resulting from various stipulated linear cracks, with a liner venting system are presented graphically. (JIW)

  7. Loss of coolant accident at boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez G, R.

    1975-01-01

    A revision is made with regard to the methods of thermohydraulic analysis which are used at present in order to determine the efficiency of the safety systems against loss of coolant at boiling water reactors. The object is to establish a program of work in the INEN so that the personnel in charge of the safety of the nuclear plants in Mexico, be able to make in a near future, independent valuations of the safety systems which mitigate the consequences of the above mentioned accident. (author)

  8. Digital control application for the advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fennern, L.E.; Pearson, T.; Wills, H.D.; Swire Rhodes, L.; Pearson, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is a 1300 MWe class Nuclear Power Plant whose design studies and demonstration tests are being performed by the three manufacturers, General Electric, Toshiba and Hitachi, under requirement specifications from the Tokyo Electric Power Company. The goals are to apply new technology to the BWR in order to achieve enhanced operational efficiencies, improved safety measures and cost reductions. In the plant instrumentation and control areas, traditional analog control equipment and wire cables will be replaced by distributed digital microprocessor based control units communicating with each other and the control room over fiber optic multiplexed data buses

  9. Analysis of scrams and forced outages at boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, R.T.; Sullivan, W.P.; Miller, K.R.; Schwegman, W.J.

    1980-07-01

    This report documents the results of a study of scrams and forced outages at General Electric Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) operating in the United States. This study was conducted for Sandia Laboratories under a Light Water Reactor Safety Program which it manages for the United States Department of Energy. Operating plant data were used to identify the causes of scrams and forced outages. Causes of scrams and forced outages have been summarized as a function of operating plant and plant age and also ranked according to the number of events per year, outage time per year, and outage time per event. From this ranking, identified potential improvement opportunities were evaluated to determine the associated benefits and impact on plant availability

  10. Radionuclide buildup in BWR [boiling water reactor] reactor coolant recirculation piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duce, S.W.; Marley, A.W.; Freeman, A.L.

    1989-12-01

    Since the spring of 1985, thermoluminescent dosimeter, dose rate, and gamma spectral data have been acquired on the contamination of boiling water reactor primary coolant recirculation systems as part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission funded study. Data have been gathered for twelve facilities by taking direct measurements and/or obtaining plant and vendor data. The project titled, ''Effectiveness and Safety Aspects of Selected Decontamination Processes'' (October 1983) initially reviewed the application of chemical decontamination processes on primary coolant recirculation system piping. Recontamination of the system following pipe replacement or chemical decontamination was studied as a second thrust of this program. During the course of this study, recontamination measurements were made at eight different commercial boiling water reactors. At four of the reactors the primary coolant recirculation system piping was chemically decontaminated. At the other four the piping was replaced. Vendor data were obtained from two boiling water reactors that had replaced the primary coolant recirculation system piping. Contamination measurements were made at two newly operating boiling water reactors. This report discusses the results of these measurements as they apply to contamination and recontamination of boiling water reactor recirculation piping. 16 refs., 29 figs., 9 tabs

  11. SWR 1000: The new boiling water reactor power plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brettschuh, W.

    1999-01-01

    Siemens' Power Generation Group (KWU) is currently developing - on behalf of and in close co-operation with the German nuclear utilities and with support from various European partners - the boiling water reactor SWR 1000. This advanced design concept marks a new era in the successful tradition of boiling water reactor technology in Germany and is aimed, with an electric output of 1000 MW, at assuring competitive power generating costs compared to large-capacity nuclear power plants as well as coal-fired stations, while at the same time meeting the highest of safety standards, including control of a core melt accident. This objective is met by replacing active safety systems with passive safety equipment of diverse design for accident detection and control and by simplifying systems needed for normal plant operation on the basis of past operating experience. A short construction period, flexible fuel cycle lengths of between 12 and 24 months and a high fuel discharge burnup all contribute towards meeting this goal. The design concept fulfils international nuclear regulatory requirements and will reach commercial maturity by the year 2000. (author)

  12. Operational margin monitoring system for boiling water reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutomi, S.; Takigawa, Y.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on an on-line operational margin monitoring system which has been developed for boiling water reactor power plants to improve safety, reliability, and quality of reactor operation. The system consists of a steady-state core status prediction module, a transient analysis module, a stability analysis module, and an evaluation and guidance module. This system quantitatively evaluates the thermal margin during abnormal transients as well as the stability margin, which cannot be evaluated by direct monitoring of the plant parameters, either for the current operational state or for a predicted operating state that may be brought about by the intended operation. This system also gives operator guidance as to appropriate or alternate operations when the operating state has or will become marginless

  13. Expert system for control rod programming of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzaki, T.; Yoshida, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Matsuura, H.; Hoshi, K.

    1986-01-01

    Control rod programming, one of the main tasks in reactor core management of boiling water reactors (BWRs), can be successfully accomplished by well-experienced engineers. By use of core performance evaluation codes, their knowledge plays the main role in searching through optimal control rod patterns and exposure points for adjusting notch positions and exchanging rod patterns. An expert system has been developed, based on a method of knowledge engineering, to lighten the engineer's load in control rod programming. This system utilizes an inference engine suited for planning/designing problems, and stores the knowledge of well-experienced engineers in its knowledge base. In this report, the inference engine, developed considering the characteristics of the control rod programming, is introduced. Then the constitution and function of the expert system are discussed

  14. Corrosion problems in boiling water reactors and their remedies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, B.

    1989-01-01

    This article briefly presents current corrosion problems in boiling water reactors and their remedies. The problems are different forms of environmentally assisted cracking, and the remedies are divided into material-, environment-, and stress-related remedies. The list of problems comprises: intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in weld-sensitized stainless steel piping; IGSCC in cold-bent stainless steel piping; irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in stainless alloys; IGSCC in high-strength stainless alloys. A prospective corrosion problem, as judged from literature references, and one which relates to plant life, is corrosion fatigue in pressure vessel steel, since the reactor pressure vessel is the most critical component in the BWR pressure boundary as regards plant safety. (author)

  15. Method of providing extended life expectancy for components of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedrach, L.W.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a containment for a boiling water nuclear reactor, a stainless steel containment, the containment having a deposit of a metal of the platinum group of metals on the surfaces thereof exposed to high temperature, high pressure water of the boiling water nuclear reactor

  16. BWR [boiling-water reactor] and PWR [pressurized-water reactor] off-normal event descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This document chronicles a total of 87 reactor event descriptions for use by operator licensing examiners in the construction of simulator scenarios. Events are organized into four categories: (1) boiling-water reactor abnormal events; (2) boiling-water reactor emergency events; (3) pressurized-water reactor abnormal events; and (4) pressurized-water reactor emergency events. Each event described includes a cover sheet and a progression of operator actions flow chart. The cover sheet contains the following general information: initial plant state, sequence initiator, important plant parameters, major plant systems affected, tolerance ranges, final plant state, and competencies tested. The progression of operator actions flow chart depicts, in a flow chart manner, the representative sequence(s) of expected immediate and subsequent candidate actions, including communications, that can be observed during the event. These descriptions are intended to provide examiners with a reliable, performance-based source of information from which to design simulator scenarios that will provide a valid test of the candidates' ability to safely and competently perform all licensed duties and responsibilities

  17. Calculation system for physical analysis of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouveret, F.

    2001-01-01

    Although Boiling Water Reactors generate a quarter of worldwide nuclear electricity, they have been only little studied in France. A certain interest now shows up for these reactors. So, the aim of the work presented here is to contribute to determine a core calculation methodology with CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) codes. Vapour production in the reactor core involves great differences in technological options from pressurised water reactor. We analyse main physical phenomena for BWR and offer solutions taking them into account. BWR fuel assembly heterogeneity causes steep thermal flux gradients. The two dimensional collision probability method with exact boundary conditions makes possible to calculate accurately the flux in BWR fuel assemblies using the APOLLO-2 lattice code but induces a very long calculation time. So, we determine a new methodology based on a two-level flux calculation. Void fraction variations in assemblies involve big spectrum changes that we have to consider in core calculation. We suggest to use a void history parameter to generate cross-sections libraries for core calculation. The core calculation code has also to calculate the depletion of main isotopes concentrations. A core calculation associating neutronics and thermal-hydraulic codes lays stress on points we still have to study out. The most important of them is to take into account the control blade in the different calculation stages. (author)

  18. Outline of the advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hucik, S.A.; Imaoka, T.; Minematsu, A.; Takashima, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The fundamental design of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) was completed in December 1985. This design represents the next generation of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) to be introduced into commercial operation in the 1990s. The ABWR is the result of the continuing evolution of the BWR, incorporating state-of-the-art technologies and many new improvements based on an extensive accumulation of world-wide experience through design, construction and operation of BWRs. The ABWR development program was initiated in 1978, with subsequent design and test and development programs started in 1981. Most of the development and verification tests of the new features have been completed. The ABWR development objective focused on an optimized selection of advanced technologies and proven BWR technologies. The ABWR objectives were specific improvements such as operating and safety margins, enhanced availability and capacity factor, and reduced occupational exposure while at the same time achieving significant cost reduction in both capital and operating costs. The ABWR is characterized by an improved NSSS including ten internal recirculation pumps, fine motion electric-hydraulic control rod drives, optimized safety and auxiliary systems, advanced control and instrumentation systems, improved turbine-generator with moisture/separator reheater with plant output increased to 1350 MWe, and an integrated reinforced concrete containment vessel and compact Reactor and Turbine Building design. The turbine system also included improvements in the Turbine-Generator, feedwater/heater system, and condensate treatment systems. The radwaste system was also optimized taking advantage of the plant design improvements and advances in radwaste technology. The ABWR is a truly optimal design which utilizes advanced technologies, capabilities, performance improvements, and yet provides an economic advantage. (author)

  19. Boiling water reactor radiation shielded Control Rod Drive Housing Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baversten, B.; Linden, M.J. [ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Operations, Windsor, CT (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The Control Rod Drive (CRD) mechanisms are located in the area below the reactor vessel in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Specifically, these CRDs are located between the bottom of the reactor vessel and above an interlocking structure of steel bars and rods, herein identified as CRD Housing Supports. The CRD Housing Supports are designed to limit the travel of a Control Rod and Control Rod Drive in the event that the CRD vessel attachement went to fail, allowing the CRD to be ejected from the vessel. By limiting the travel of the ejected CRD, the supports prevent a nuclear overpower excursion that could occur as a result of the ejected CRD. The Housing Support structure must be disassembled in order to remove CRDs for replacement or maintenance. The disassembly task can require a significant amount of outage time and personnel radiation exposure dependent on the number and location of the CRDs to be changed out. This paper presents a way to minimize personal radiation exposure through the re-design of the Housing Support structure. The following paragraphs also delineate a method of avoiding the awkward, manual, handling of the structure under the reactor vessel during a CRD change out.

  20. Advanced boiling water reactors for the 90's and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, A.S.; Sawyer, C.D.; Qurik, J.F.; McCandless, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses how the advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) is being developed by an international team of BWR manufacturers to respond to worldwide utility needs in the 1990s. Major objectives of the ABWR program are design simplification; improved safety and reliability; reduced construction, fuel and operating costs; improved maneuverability and reduced occupational exposure and radwaste. International cooperative efforts are also under way aimed at development of a simplified BWR employing natural circulation and passive safety systems. The SBWR conceptual design is complete. This BWR concept shows technical and economic promise. The SBWR program is aimed at providing a U.S. NRC certified design in an investor-ready state by 1995. With its short construction schedule, the 600 MWe SBWR will provide an option for commercial operation worldwide by the mid-to-late 1990s

  1. Boiling water reactor stability analysis in the time domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Boiling water nuclear reactors may experience density wave instabilities. These instabilities cause the density, and consequently the mass flow rate, to oscillate in the shrouded fuel bundles. This effect causes the nuclear power generation to oscillate due to the tight coupling of flow to power, especially under gravity-driven circulation. In order to predict the amplitude of the power oscillation, a time domain transient analysis tool may be employed. The modeling tool must have sufficient hydrodynamic detail to model natural circulation in two-phase flow as well as the coupled nuclear feedback. TRAC/BF1 is a modeling code with such capabilities. A dynamic system model has been developed for a typical boiling water reactor. Using this tool it has been demonstrated that density waxes may be modeled in this fashion and that their resultant hydrodynamic and nuclear behavior correspond well to simple theory. Several cases have been analyzed using this model, the goal being to determine the coupling between the channel hydrodynamics and the nuclear power. From that study it has been concluded that two-phase friction controls the extent of the oscillation and that the existing conventional methodologies of implementing two-phase friction into analysis codes of this type can lead to significant deviation in results from case to case. It has also been determined that higher dimensional nuclear feedback models reduce the extent of the oscillation. It has also been confirmed from a nonlinear dynamic standpoint that the birth of this oscillation may be described as a Hopf Bifurcation

  2. Boiling-Water Reactor internals aging degradation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of an aging assessment study for boiling water reactor (BWR) internals. Major stressors for BWR internals are related to unsteady hydrodynamic forces generated by the primary coolant flow in the reactor vessel. Welding and cold-working, dissolved oxygen and impurities in the coolant, applied loads and exposures to fast neutron fluxes are other important stressors. Based on results of a component failure information survey, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and fatigue are identified as the two major aging-related degradation mechanisms for BWR internals. Significant reported failures include SCC in jet-pump holddown beams, in-core neutron flux monitor dry tubes and core spray spargers. Fatigue failures were detected in feedwater spargers. The implementation of a plant Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC) program is considered as a promising method for controlling SCC problems in BWR. More operating data are needed to evaluate its effectiveness for internal components. Long-term fast neutron irradiation effects and high-cycle fatigue in a corrosive environment are uncertainty factors in the aging assessment process. BWR internals are examined by visual inspections and the method is access limited. The presence of a large water gap and an absence of ex-core neutron flux monitors may handicap the use of advanced inspection methods, such as neutron noise vibration measurements, for BWR

  3. Critical Power Response to Power Oscillations in Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farawila, Yousef M.; Pruitt, Douglas W.

    2003-01-01

    The response of the critical power ratio to boiling water reactor (BWR) power oscillations is essential to the methods and practice of mitigating the effects of unstable density waves. Previous methods for calculating generic critical power response utilized direct time-domain simulations of unstable reactors. In this paper, advances in understanding the nature of the BWR oscillations and critical power phenomena are combined to develop a new method for calculating the critical power response. As the constraint of the reactor state - being at or slightly beyond the instability threshold - is removed, the new method allows the calculation of sensitivities to different operation and design parameters separately, and thus allows tighter safety margins to be used. The sensitivity to flow rate and the resulting oscillation frequency change are given special attention to evaluate the extension of the oscillation 'detect-and-suppress' methods to internal pump plants where the flow rate at natural circulation and oscillation frequency are much lower than jet pump plants

  4. Technical report on operating experience with boiling water reactor offgas systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, R.; Barrett, L.; Grimes, B.; Eisenhut, D.

    1978-03-01

    Over 100 reactor years of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) operating experience have been accumulated since the first commercial operation of BWRs. A number of incidents have occurred involving the ''offgas'' of these Boiling Water Reactors. This report describes the generation and processing of ''offgas'' in Boiling Water Reactors, the safety considerations regarding systems processing the ''offgas'', operating experience involving ignitions or explosions of ''offgas'' and possible measures to reduce the likelihood of future ignitions or explosions and to mitigate the consequences of such incidents should they occur

  5. Study and application of boiling water reactor jet pump characteristic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Lihyih

    1992-01-01

    RELAP5/MOD2 is an advanced thermal-hydraulic computer code used to analyze plant response to postulated transient and loss-of-coolant accidents in light water nuclear reactors. Since this computer code was originally developed for pressurized water reactor transient analysis, some of its capabilities are questioned when the methods are applied to a boiling water reactor. One of the areas which requires careful assessment is the jet pump model. In this paper, the jet pump models of RELAP5/MOD2, RETRAN-02/MOD3, and RELAP4/MOD3 are compared. From an investigation of the momentum equations, it is found that the jet pump models of these codes are not exactly the same. However, the effects of the jet pump models on the M-N characteristic curve are negligible. In this study, it is found that the relationship between the flow ratio, M, and the head ratio, N, is uniquely determined for a given jet pump geometry provided that the wall friction and gravitational head are neglected. In other words, under the given assumptions, the M-N characteristic curve will not change with power, level, recirculation pump speed or loop flow rate. When the effects of wall friction and gravitational head are included, the shape of the M-N curve will change. For certain conditions, the slope of the M-N curve can even change from negative to positive. The changes in the M-N curve caused by the separate effects of the wall friction and gravitational head will be presented. Sensitivity studies on the drive flow nozzle form loss coefficients, K d , the suction flow junction form loss coefficients, K s , the diffuser form loss coefficient, K c , and the ratio of different flow areas in the jet pump are performed. Finally, useful guidelines will be presented for plants without a plant specific M-N curve. (orig.)

  6. Stability analysis on natural circulation boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Peter

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of the study is a stability analysis of the simplified boiling water reactor concept. A fluid dynamics code, DYNOS, was developed and successfully validated against FRIGG and DESIRE data and a stability benchmark on the Ringhals 1 forced circulation BWR. Three simplified desings were considered in the analysis: The SWRIOOO by Siemens and the SBWR and ESBWR from the General Electric Co. For all three design operational characteristics, i.e. power versus flow rate maps, were calculated. The effects which different geometric and operational parameters, such as the riser height, inlet subcooling etc., have on the characteristics have been investigated. Dynamic simulations on the three simplified design revealed the geysering and the natural circulation oscillations modes only. They were, however, only encountered at pressure below 0.6 MPa. Stability maps for all tree simplified BWRs were calculated and plotted. The study concluded that a fast pressurisation of the reactor vessel is necessary to eliminate the possibility of geysering or natural circulation oscillations mode instability. (au) 26 tabs., 88 ills.

  7. Stability analysis on natural circulation boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, Peter

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of the study is a stability analysis of the simplified boiling water reactor concept. A fluid dynamics code, DYNOS, was developed and successfully validated against FRIGG and DESIRE data and a stability benchmark on the Ringhals 1 forced circulation BWR. Three simplified desings were considered in the analysis: The SWRIOOO by Siemens and the SBWR and ESBWR from the General Electric Co. For all three design operational characteristics, i.e. power versus flow rate maps, were calculated. The effects which different geometric and operational parameters, such as the riser height, inlet subcooling etc., have on the characteristics have been investigated. Dynamic simulations on the three simplified design revealed the geysering and the natural circulation oscillations modes only. They were, however, only encountered at pressure below 0.6 MPa. Stability maps for all tree simplified BWRs were calculated and plotted. The study concluded that a fast pressurisation of the reactor vessel is necessary to eliminate the possibility of geysering or natural circulation oscillations mode instability. (au)

  8. Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, C.F.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200 degrees C (2,200 degrees F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed

  9. The development of fuel elements for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, R.; Kilian, P.

    1984-01-01

    The longevity of today's standard fuel elements constitutes a sound basis for designing advanced fuel elements for higher discharge burnups. Operating experience as well as postirradiation examinations of discharged fuel elements indicate that the technical limits have not reached by far. However, measures to achieve an economic and reliable fuel cycle are not restricted to the design of fuel elements, but also extend into such fields as fuel management and the mode of reactor operation. Fuel elements can be grouped together in zones in the core as a function of burnup and reactivity. The loading scheme can be aligned to this approach by concentrating on typical control rod positions. Reloads can also be made up of two sublots of fuel elements with different gadolinium contents. Longer cycles, e.g., of eighteen instead of twelve months, are easy to plan reactivitywise by increasing the quantity to be replaced from at present one quarter to one third. In fuel elements designed for higher burnups, the old scheme of reloading one quarter of the fuel inventory can be retained. The measures already introduced or in the planning stage incorporate a major potential for technical and economic optimization of the fuel cycle in boiling water reactors. (orig.) [de

  10. Activity buildup in the recirculation system of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1987-05-01

    The deposition of activated corrosion products in the recirculation system of boiling water reactors produces increased radiation levels which lead to a corresponding increase in personnel irradiation dose rates during shut down and maintenance. The major part of this dose rate is due to Co-60. Based on a comprehensive literature study concerning this theme, the author has attempted to identify the individual stages of the activity build up and to classify their importance. The following areas are discussed in detail: - the origins of the corrosion products and of Co-59 in the reactor feedwater; - the consolidation of the cobalt in the fuel element crud deposits (activation); - the release and transport of the Co-60; - the build up of Co-60 in the corrosion products of the primary circuit. Existing models for the build up of cirquit radioactivity are discussed and the operating experience from selected reactors are summarized. Finally the state of the art of knowledge concerning the individual stages in the development of the activation build up is depicted. This highlights the existing gaps and thus identifies areas for possible R+D activities. Corrosion chemistry aspects of the cobald build up in the primary cirquit have already been studied on a broad basis and are continuing to be researched in a number of centers. The crystal chemistry of austenitic steel corrosion products poses a number of yet unanswered questions. There are major loopholes associated with an understanding of the activation processes of the cobalt deposited on the fuel elements and in the mass transfer of Co-60. For these processes, the most important influence stems from factors associated with colloid chemistry. In this respect there is ample room for new and original research contributions. It is recommended that sections 8 and 9 of this report should be read as an 'Executive Summary'. (author)

  11. High conversion pressurized water reactor with boiling channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margulis, M., E-mail: maratm@post.bgu.ac.il [The Unit of Nuclear Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shwageraus, E., E-mail: es607@cam.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, CB2 1PZ Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Conceptual design of partially boiling PWR core was proposed and studied. • Self-sustainable Th–{sup 233}U fuel cycle was utilized in this study. • Seed-blanket fuel assembly lattice optimization was performed. • A coupled Monte Carlo, fuel depletion and thermal-hydraulics studies were carried out. • Thermal–hydraulic analysis assured that the design matches imposed safety constraints. - Abstract: Parametric studies have been performed on a seed-blanket Th–{sup 233}U fuel configuration in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) with boiling channels to achieve high conversion ratio. Previous studies on seed-blanket concepts suggested substantial reduction in the core power density is needed in order to operate under nominal PWR system conditions. Boiling flow regime in the seed region allows more heat to be removed for a given coolant mass flow rate, which in turn, may potentially allow increasing the power density of the core. In addition, reduced moderation improves the breeding performance. A two-dimensional design optimization study was carried out with BOXER and SERPENT codes in order to determine the most attractive fuel assembly configuration that would ensure breeding. Effects of various parameters, such as void fraction, blanket fuel form, number of seed pins and their dimensions, on the conversion ratio were examined. The obtained results, for which the power density was set to be 104 W/cm{sup 3}, created a map of potentially feasible designs. It was found that several options have the potential to achieve end of life fissile inventory ratio above unity, which implies potential feasibility of a self-sustainable Thorium fuel cycle in PWRs without significant reduction in the core power density. Finally, a preliminary three-dimensional coupled neutronic and thermal–hydraulic analysis for a single seed-blanket fuel assembly was performed. The results indicate that axial void distribution changes drastically with burnup. Therefore

  12. Analysis of water hammer in control rod drive systems of boiling water reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safwat, H.H.; Arastu, A.H.; Lau, S.

    1983-01-01

    The method of characteristics is applied to analyze water hammer in BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) Control Rod Drive (CRD) Systems following fast opening of scram valves. The modelling of the CRD mechanism is presented. Numerical predictions are compared to experimental data. (author)

  13. Models and Stability Analysis of Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorning, John

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic stability of boiling water reactors (BWRs) using a model that includes: space-time modal neutron kinetics based on spatial w-modes; single- and two-phase flow in parallel boiling channels; fuel rod heat conduction dynamics; and a simple model of the recirculation loop. The BR model is represented by a set of time-dependent nonlinear ordinary differential equations, and is studied as a dynamical system using the modern bifurcation theory and nonlinear dynamical systems analysis. We first determine the stability boundary (SB) - or Hopf bifurcation set- in the most relevant parameter plane, the inlet-subcooling-number/external-pressure-drop plane, for a fixed control rod induced external reactivity equal to the 100% rod line value; then we transform the SB to the practical power-flow map used by BWR operating engineers and regulatory agencies. Using this SB, we show that the normal operating point at 100% power is very stable, that stability of points on the 100% rod line decreases as the flow rate is reduced, and that operating points in the low-flow/high-power region are least stable. We also determine the SB that results when the modal kinetics is replaced by simple point reactor kinetics, and we thereby show that the first harmonic mode does not have a significant effect on the SB. However, we later show that it nevertheless has a significant effect on stability because it affects the basin of attraction of stable operating points. Using numerical simulations we show that, in the important low-flow/high-power region, the Hopf bifurcation that occurs as the SB is crossed is subcritical; hence, growing oscillations can result following small finite perturbations of stable steady-states on the 100% rod line at points in the low-flow/high-power region. Numerical simulations are also performed to calculate the decay ratios (DRs) and frequencies of oscillations for various points on the 100% rod line. It is

  14. Models and Stability Analysis of Boiling Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Dorning

    2002-04-15

    We have studied the nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic stability of boiling water reactors (BWRs) using a model that includes: space-time modal neutron kinetics based on spatial w-modes; single- and two-phase flow in parallel boiling channels; fuel rod heat conduction dynamics; and a simple model of the recirculation loop. The BR model is represented by a set of time-dependent nonlinear ordinary differential equations, and is studied as a dynamical system using the modern bifurcation theory and nonlinear dynamical systems analysis. We first determine the stability boundary (SB) - or Hopf bifurcation set- in the most relevant parameter plane, the inlet-subcooling-number/external-pressure-drop plane, for a fixed control rod induced external reactivity equal to the 100% rod line value; then we transform the SB to the practical power-flow map used by BWR operating engineers and regulatory agencies. Using this SB, we show that the normal operating point at 100% power is very stable, that stability of points on the 100% rod line decreases as the flow rate is reduced, and that operating points in the low-flow/high-power region are least stable. We also determine the SB that results when the modal kinetics is replaced by simple point reactor kinetics, and we thereby show that the first harmonic mode does not have a significant effect on the SB. However, we later show that it nevertheless has a significant effect on stability because it affects the basin of attraction of stable operating points. Using numerical simulations we show that, in the important low-flow/high-power region, the Hopf bifurcation that occurs as the SB is crossed is subcritical; hence, growing oscillations can result following small finite perturbations of stable steady-states on the 100% rod line at points in the low-flow/high-power region. Numerical simulations are also performed to calculate the decay ratios (DRs) and frequencies of oscillations for various points on the 100% rod line. It is

  15. Knowledge-Based operation planning system for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsuya Iwamoto; Shungo Sakurai; Hitoshi Uematsu; Makoto Tsuiki

    1987-01-01

    A knowledge-Based Boiling Water Reactor operation planning system was developed to support core operators or core management engineers in making core operation plans, by automatically generating suboptimum core operation procedures. The procedures are obtained by searching a branching tree of the possible core status (nodes) and the elementary operations to change the core status (branches). A path that ends at the target node, and contains only operationally feasible nodes can be a candidate of the solution. The core eigenvalue, the power distribution and the thermal limit parameters at key points are calculated by running a three-dimensional (3-D) BWR core physics simulator to examine the feasibility of the nodes and the performance of candidates. To obtain a practically acceptable solution within a reasonable time rather than making a time-consuming effort to get the optimum one, the Depth-First-Search method, together with the heuristic branch-bounding, was used to search the branching tree. The system was applied to actual operation plannings with real plant data, and gave satisfactory results. It can be concluded that the system can be applied to generate core operation procedures as a substitute for core management experts

  16. Efficient characterization of fuel depletion in boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.

    1980-01-01

    An efficient fuel depletion method for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies has been developed for fuel cycle analysis. A computer program HISTORY based on this method was designed to carry out accurate and rapid fuel burnup calculation for the fuel assembly. It has been usefully employed to study the depletion characteristics of the fuel assemblies for the preparation of nodal code input data and the fuel management study. The adequacy and the effectiveness of the assessment of this method used in HISTORY were demonstrated by comparing HISTORY results with more detailed CASMO results. The computing cost of HISTORY typically has been less than one dollar for the fuel assembly-level depletion calculations over the full life of the assembly, in contrast to more than $1000 for CASMO. By combining CASMO and HISTORY, a large number of expensive CASMO calculations can be replaced by inexpensive HISTORY. For the depletion calculations via CASMO/HISTORY, CASMO calculations are required only for the reference conditions and just at the beginning of life for other cases such as changes in void fraction, control rod condition and temperature. The simple and inexpensive HISTORY is sufficienty accurate and fast to be used in conjunction with CASMO for fuel cycle analysis and some BWR design calculations

  17. Recent computer applications in boiling water reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraga, Shoji; Joge, Toshio; Kiyokawa, Kazuhiro; Kato, Kanji; Nigawara, Seiitsu

    1976-01-01

    Process computers in boiling water reactor power plants have won the position of important equipments for the calculation of the core and plant performances and for data logging. Their application technique is growing larger and larger every year. Here, two systems are introduced; plant diagnostic system and computerized control panel. The plant diagnostic system consists of the part processing the signals from a plant, the operation part mainly composed of a computer to diagnose the operating conditions of each system component using input signal, and the result display (CRT or typewriter). The concept on the indications on control panels in nuclear power plants is changing from ''Plant parameters and to be indicated on panel meters as much as possible'' to ''Only the data required for operation are to be indicated.'' Thus the computerized control panel is attracting attention, in which the process computer for processing the operating information and CRT display are introduced. The experimental model of that panel comprises and operator's console and a chief watchmen's console. Its functions are dialogic data access and the automatic selection of preferential information. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Invited talk on ageing management of boiling water reactors (BWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Y.S.R.; Srinivasan, V.S.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear power plant is built with a certain design life but by managing the operation of the plant with a well designed in-service inspection, repair and replacement programme of the equipment as required we will be able to extend the operation of the plant well beyond it's design life. This is also economically a paying proposition in view of the astronomical cost of construction of a new plant of equivalent capacity. In view of this, there is a growing trend the world over to study the ageing phenomena, especially in respect of nuclear power plant equipment and system which will contribute towards the continued operation of the nuclear power plants beyond their economic life which is fixed mainly to amortize the investments over a period. Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) which consists of 2 nos. of Boiling Water Reactor (BWRs) with the presently rated capacity of 160 MWe each has been operating for the past 24 years and is completing its 25th year of service by the year 1994 which was considered as its economic life and the plant depreciation as well as fuel supply agreement were based on this period of 25 years. I will be discussing about the available residual life which is much more than the above (25 years) and the studies we have undertaken in respect of the assessment of this residual life. (author). 2 tabs., 6 figs

  19. LOGOS. HX: a core simulator for high conversion boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuiki, Makoto; Sakurada, Koichi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional physics simulator 'LOGOS. HX' has been developed for the designing analysis of high conversion boiling water reactor (HCBWR) cores. Its functions, calculational methods, and verification results will briefly be discussed. (author)

  20. Effect of water impurities on stress corrosion cracking in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungbery, L.G.; Cubicciotti, D

    1985-01-01

    A series of stress corrosion tests, including corrosion potential and water chemistry measurements, has been performed in the Swedish Ringhals-1 boiling water reactor. Tests have been run under reactor start-up and reactor power operation with normal reactor water conditions and with alternate water chemistry in which hydrogen is added to the feedwater to suppress stress corrosion cracking. During one alternate water chemistry test, there was significant intergranular corrosion cracking of sensitized stainless specimens. It is shown that nitrate and sulfate, arising from an accidental resin intrusion, are likely causes. Nitrate increases the oxidizing power of the water, and sulfate enhances cracking under oxidizing conditions. During another test under start-up conditions, enhanced transgranular stress corrosion cracking in low alloy steels and possibly initiation of cracking in a nickel base alloy was observed as a result of resin intrusion into the reactor water. The intrusion produced acid and sulfate, which are believed to enhance hydrogen cracking conditions

  1. Passive gamma analysis of the boiling-water-reactor assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vo, D., E-mail: ducvo@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Favalli, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grogan, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jansson, P. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Liljenfeldt, H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mozin, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Schwalbach, P. [European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), Luxemburg (Luxembourg); Sjöland, A. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, Stockholm (Sweden); Tobin, S.; Trellue, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vaccaro, S. [European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), Luxemburg (Luxembourg)

    2016-09-11

    This research focused on the analysis of a set of stationary passive gamma measurements taken on the spent nuclear fuel assemblies from a boiling water reactor (BWR) using pulse height analysis data acquisition. The measurements were performed on 25 different BWR assemblies in 2014 at Sweden's Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab). This study was performed as part of the Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative–Spent Fuel project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies. The NGSI–SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. The final objective of this project is to quantify the capability of several integrated NDA instruments to meet the aforementioned goals using the combined signatures of neutrons, gamma rays, and heat. This report presents a selection of the measured data and summarizes an analysis of the results. Specifically, trends in the count rates measured for spectral lines from the following isotopes were analyzed as a function of the declared burnup and cooling time: {sup 137}Cs, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 134}Cs, and to a lesser extent, {sup 106}Ru and {sup 144}Ce. From these measured count rates, predictive algorithms were developed to enable the estimation of the burnup and cooling time. Furthermore, these algorithms were benchmarked on a set of assemblies not included in the standard assemblies set used by this research team.

  2. A review of boiling water reactor water chemistry: Science, technology, and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, M.J.

    1989-02-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) water chemistry (science, technology, and performance) has been reviewed with an emphasis on the relationships between BWR water quality and corrosion fuel performance, and radiation buildup. A comparison of Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.56, the Boiling Water Reactor Owners Group (BWROG) Water Chemistry Guidelines, and Plant Technical Specifications showed that the BWROG Guidelines are more stringent than the NRC Regulatory Guide, which is almost identical to Plant Technical Specifications. Plant performance with respect to BWR water chemistry has shown dramatic improvements in recent years. Up until 1979 BWRs experienced an average of 3.0 water chemistry incidents per reactor-year. Since 1979 the water chemistry technical specifications have been violated an average of only 0.2 times per reactor-year, with the most recent data from 1986-1987 showing only 0.05 violations per reactor-year. The data clearly demonstrate the industry-wide commitment to improving water quality in BWRs. In addition to improving water quality, domestic BWRs are beginning to switch to hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), a remedy for intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Three domestic BWRs are presently operating on HWC, and fourteen more have either performed HWC mini tests or are in various stages of HWC implementation. This report includes a detailed review of HWC science and technology as well as areas in which further research on BWR chemistry may be needed. 43 refs., 30 figs., 8 tabs

  3. Feedwater processing method in a boiling water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumitani, M; Tanno, K

    1976-09-06

    The purpose of the invention is to decrease a quantity of corrosion products moving from the feedwater system to the core. Water formed into vapor after heated in a reactor is fed to the turbine through a main steam line to drive a generator to return it to liquid-state water in a condenser. The water is then again cycled into the reactor via the condensate pump, desalting unit, low pressure feedwater heater, medium pressure feedwater heater, and high pressure feedwater heater. The reactor water is recycled by a recycling pump. At this time, the reactor water recycled by the recycling pump is partially poured into a middle point between the desalting unit and the low pressure feedwater heater through a reducing valve or the like. With the structure described above, the quantity of the corrosion products from the feedwater system may be decreased by the function of a large quantity of active oxygen contained in the reactor water.

  4. Overview of activities for the reduction of dose rates in Swiss boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Schenker, E.

    1993-01-01

    Since March 1990, zinc has been added to the reactor water of the boiling water reactor (BWR) Leibstadt (KKL) and, since January 1991, iron has been added to the BWR Muehleberg (KKM). These changes in reactor water chemistry were accompanied by a comprehensive R+D programme. This paper covers three selected topics: a) the statistical analysis of KKL reactor water data before and after zinc addition; b) the analysis of the KKL reactor water during the 1991 annual shutdown; c) laboratory autoclave tests to clarify the role of water additives on the cobalt deposition on austenitic steel surfaces. (author) 2 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Startup transient simulation for natural circulation boiling water reactors in PUMA facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuran, S.; Xu, Y.; Sun, X.; Cheng, L.; Yoon, H.J.; Revankar, S.T.; Ishii, M.; Wang, W.

    2006-01-01

    In view of the importance of instabilities that may occur at low-pressure and -flow conditions during the startup of natural circulation boiling water reactors, startup simulation experiments were performed in the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA) facility. The simulations used pressure scaling and followed the startup procedure of a typical natural circulation boiling water reactor. Two simulation experiments were performed for the reactor dome pressures ranging from 55 kPa to 1 MPa, where the instabilities may occur. The experimental results show the signature of condensation-induced oscillations during the single-phase-to-two-phase natural circulation transition. The results also suggest that a rational startup procedure is needed to overcome the startup instabilities in natural circulation boiling water reactor designs

  6. Standard Technical Specifications for General Electric Boiling Water Reactors (BWR/5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottimore, R.R.

    1980-12-01

    The Standard Technical Specifications for General Electric Boiling Water Reactors (GE-STS) is a generic document prepared by the US NRC for use in the licensing process of current General Electric Boiling Water Reactors. The GE-STS sets forth the limits, operating conditions, and other requirements applicable to nuclear reactor facility operation as set forth by Section 50.36 of 10 CFR Part 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public. The document is revised periodically to reflect current licensing requirements

  7. Coarse mesh finite element method for boiling water reactor physics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, P.G.

    1983-01-01

    A coarse mesh method is formulated for the solution of Boiling Water Reactor physics problems using two group diffusion theory. No fuel assembly cross-section homogenization is required; water gaps, control blades and fuel pins of varying enrichments are treated explicitly. The method combines constrained finite element discretization with infinite lattice super cell trial functions to obtain coarse mesh solutions for which the only approximations are along the boundaries between fuel assemblies. The method is applied to bench mark Boiling Water Reactor problems to obtain both the eigenvalue and detailed flux distributions. The solutions to these problems indicate the method is useful in predicting detailed power distributions and eigenvalues for Boiling Water Reactor physics problems

  8. Construction of the advanced boiling water reactor in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natsume, Nobuo; Noda, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Boiling Reactor (ABWR) has been developed with international cooperation between Japan and the US as the generation of plants for the 1990s and beyond. It incorporates the best BWR technologies from the world in challengeable pursuit of improved safety and reliability, reduced construction and operating cost, reduced radiation exposure and radioactive waste. Tokyo Electric Power Company (MPCO) decided to apply the first ABWRs to unit No. 6 and 7 of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station (K-6 and 7). These units are scheduled to commence commercial operation in December 1996 and July 1997 respectively. Particular attention is given in this discussion to the construction period from rock inspection for the reactor building to commercial operation, which is to be achieved in only 52 months through innovative and challenging construction methods. To date, construction work is advancing ahead of the original schedule. This paper describes not only how to shorten the construction period by adoption of a variety of new technologies, such as all-weather construction method and large block module construction method, but also how to check and test the state of the art technologies during manufacturing and installation of new equipment for K-6 and 7

  9. Hydrogen peroxide and radiation water chemistry of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, E.; Watanabe, A.; Endo, M.; Takahashi, M.; Karasawa, H.

    1991-01-01

    G-values and rate constants at elevated temperature are reviewed and updated for computer simulation of water radiolysis in BWRs. Quantitative relationship between g-values of H 2 and OH was found out to govern numerically the radiolytic environment in the BWR primary system. Thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was measured in stagnant water in a quartz cell and the rate constant was determined at 2.4 x 10 -7 s -1 with the activation energy of 53.3 kJ/mol. Behaviors of hydrogen peroxide under HWC simulated with updated variables were consistent with plant observation at Forsmark 1 and 2. The most likely decomposition scheme of hydrogen peroxide at surface was identified as H 2 O 2 → H + HO 2 . Based on the surface decomposition process, actual level of hydrogen peroxide was estimated at 200-400 ppb under NWC condition from measured at BWR sampling stations. The estimation was consistent with the numerical simulation of BWR water radiolysis with updated variables. (author)

  10. Electrochemical potential measurements in boiling water reactors; relation to water chemistry and stress corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indig, M.E.; Cowan, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Electrochemical potential measurements were performed in operating boiling water reactors to determine the range of corrosion potentials that exist from cold standby to full power operation and the relationship of these measurements to reactor water chemistry. Once the corrosion potentials were known, experiments were performed in the laboratory under electrochemical control to determine potentials and equivalent dissolved oxygen concentrations where intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) would and would not occur on welded Type-304 stainless steel. At 274 0 C, cracking occurred at potentials that were equivalent to dissolved oxygen concentration > 40 to 50 ppb. With decreasing temperature, IGSCC became more difficult and only severely sensitized stainless steel would crack. Recent in-reactor experiments combined with the previous laboratory data, have shown that injection of small concentrations of hydrogen during reactor operation can cause a significant decrease in corrosion potential which should cause immunity to IGSCC. (author)

  11. Basic philosophy of the safety design of the Toshiba boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the safety design of the Toshiba Boiling Water Reactor (TOSBWR) which was created ∼8 years ago. The design concept is intermediate between conventional boiling water reactors (BWRs) and the advanced BWR (ABWR). It utilizes internal pumps and fine motion control rod drive, but the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) configuration is different from both conventional BWRs and the ABWR. The plant output is 1350 MW (electric). The design is based on two important philosophies: the positive cost reduction philosophy and the constant risk philosophy

  12. On the determination of boiling water reactor characteristics by noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleiss, J.

    1983-01-01

    In boiling water reactors the main noise source is the boiling process in the core and the most important variable is the neutron flux, thus the effect of the steam bubbles on the neutron flux is studied in detail. An experiment has been performed in a small subcritical reactor to measure the response of a neutron detector to the passage of a single air bubble. A mathematical model for the description of the response was tested and the results agree very well with the experiment. Noise measurements in the Dodewaard boiling water reactor are discussed. The construction of a twin self-powered neutron detector, developed to perform steam velocity measurements in the core is described. The low-frequency part of the neutron noise characteristics is considered. The transfer functions exhibit a good agreement with ones obtained by independent means: control rod step experiments and model calculations. (Auth.)

  13. An Investigation into Water Chemistry in Primary Coolant Circuit of an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Bing-Jhen; Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Wang, Mei-Ya; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2012-09-01

    To ensure operation safety, an optimization on the coolant chemistry in the primary coolant circuit of a nuclear reactor is essential no matter what type or generation the reactor belongs to. For a better understanding toward the water chemistry in an advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR), such as the one being constructed in the northern part of Taiwan, and for a safer operation of this ABWR, we conducted a proactive, thorough water chemistry analysis prior to the completion of this reactor in this study. A numerical simulation model for water chemistry analyses in ABWRs has been developed, based upon the core technology we established in the past. This core technology for water chemistry modeling is basically an integration of water radiolysis, thermal-hydraulics, and reactor physics. The model, by the name of DEMACE - ABWR, is an improved version of the original DEMACE model and was used for radiolysis and water chemistry prediction in the Longmen ABWR in Taiwan. Predicted results pertinent to the water chemistry variation and the corrosion behavior of structure materials in the primary coolant circuit of this ABWR under rated-power operation were reported in this paper. (authors)

  14. 78 FR 63516 - Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for New Boiling-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0134] Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling....79.1, ``Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for New Boiling-Water Reactors.'' This... emergency core cooling systems (ECCSs) for boiling- water reactors (BWRs) whose licenses are issued after...

  15. Decontamination flange film characterization for a boiling water reactor under hydrogen water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, V.F.; Garbauskas, M.F.; Bozeman, J.

    1996-01-01

    Stainless steel artifacts removed from a boiling water reactor class 4 plant that operated under hydrogen water chemistry and experienced a difficult decontamination were submitted for oxide film characterization. The results reported for the corrosion film composition and structure are consistent with existing theoretical concepts for stainless steel corrosion, spinel structure site preferences (octahedral or tetrahedral) for transition metal ions, and potential-pH diagrams. The observed zinc effects on film stability and lower cobalt incorporation are also consistent with these theoretical concepts

  16. Water chemistry in boiling water reactors - A Leibstadt-specific overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarott, F.-A.

    2005-01-01

    The boiling water reactor (BWR) consists of two main water circuits: the water-steam cycle and the main cooling water system. In the introduction, the goals and tasks of the BWR plant chemistry are described. The most important objectives are the prevention of system degradation by corrosion and the minimisation of radiation fields. Then a short description of the BWR operation principle, including the water steam cycle, the transport of various impurities by the steam, removing impurities from the condensate, the reactor water clean-up system, the balance of plant and the main cooling water system, is given. Subsequently, the focus is set on the water-steam cycle chemistry. In order to fulfil the somewhat contradictory requirements, the chemical parameters must be well balanced. This is achieved by the water chemistry control method called 'normal water chemistry'. Other additional methods are used for the solution to different problems. The 'zinc addition method' is applied to reduce high radiation levels around the recirculation loops. The 'hydrogen water chemistry method' and the 'noble metal chemical addition method' are used to protect the reactor core components and piping made of stainless steel against stress corrosion cracking. This phenomenon has been observed for about 40 years and is partly due to the strong oxidising conditions in the BWR water. Both mitigation methods are used by the majority of the BWR plants all over the world (including the two Swiss NPPs Muehleberg and Leibstadt). (author)

  17. Generic risk insights for General Electric boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, R.; Taylor, J.; Chung, J.

    1991-05-01

    A methodology has been developed to extract generic risk-based information from probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) of General Electric boiling water rectors and applying the insights gained to plants that have not been subjected to a PRA. The available risk assessments (six plants) were examined to identify the most probable, i.e., dominant accident sequences at each plants. The goal was to include all sequences which represented at least 80% of core damage frequency. If the same plant specific dominant accident sequence appeared within this boundary in at least two plant PRAs, the sequence was considered to be a representative sequence. Eight sequences met this definition. From these sequences, the most important component failures and human error that contributed to each sequence have been prioritized. Guidance is provided to prioritize the representative sequences and modify selected basic events that have been shown to be sensitive to the plant specific design or operating variations of the contributing PRAs. This risk-based guidance can be used for utility and NRC activities including operator training, maintenance, design review, and inspections. 13 refs., 6 tabs

  18. A real-time BWR [boiling water reactor] stability measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; King, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of a portable, real-time system used for nonperturbational measurements of stability in boiling water reactors. The algorithm used in this system estimates the closed-loop asymptotic decay ratio using only the naturally occurring neutron noise and it is based on the univariate autoregressive methodology

  19. 76 FR 14437 - Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0055] Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of Final Design Approval The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a final design approval (FDA) to GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy (GEH) for the economic...

  20. Aging assessment of Residual Heat Removal systems in Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lofaro, R.J.; Aggarwal, S.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of aging on Residual Heat Removal systems in Boiling Water Reactors have been studied as part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. The aging phenomena has been characterized by analyzing operating experience from various national data bases. In addition, actual plant data was obtained to supplement and validate the data base findings

  1. Instrumenting a pressure suppression experiment for a MK I boiling water reactor: another measurements engineering challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shay, W.M.; Brough, W.G.; Miller, T.B.

    1977-01-01

    A scale test facility of a pressure suppression system from a boiling water reactor was instrumented with seven types of transducers to obtain high-accuracy experimental data during a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident. The instrumentation verified the analysis of the dynamic loading of the pressure suppression system

  2. 77 FR 36014 - Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0134] Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling... for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1277, ``Initial Test Program of Emergency Core..., entitled, ``Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors,'' is...

  3. Drift flux formulation of a boiling water reactor channel with subcooled boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, E.E.; Shak, D.P.; May, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    The channel formulation used in the BWR module of the Modular Modeling System MMS-02 is presented. The purpose of channel model is to accurately predict the transient response of the enthalpy void and flow rate. Accurate prediction of the two-phase enthalpy, and void fraction distributions along the channel is important since they are key input parameters to the neutronic model, and have direct effect on the core and overall reactor response. In order to model the channel response correctly, the physical phenomena had to be realistically represented. The model accounts for subcooled boiling and slip through the use of an empirical subcooled void-quality model. Simplifying assumptions are made so that only one differential equation, the energy equation, is integrated along the channel. A consistent use of semi-empirical correlations enables a complete representation of the channel flow and void fraction with the bulk enthalpy as the only state variable. The differential equation and the constitutive relations of this two-phase flow model are presented. Several numerical examples are given, and finally, come conclusions are presented

  4. Use of adaptive diffusion theory based monitors in optimizing boiling water reactor core designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congdon, S.P.; Martin, C.L.; Crowther, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional coarse mesh models are routinely used to predict the performance of boiling water reactors. In the adaptive monitory model, the three-dimensional solutions are permanently adapted to incore probe data. The corrections resulting from the adaptive process lead to reliable predictions of future reactor states. The corrections can also be carried forward to future operating cycles. This can shorten the time required to introduce an validate new design and operating strategy improvements. (orig.) [de

  5. Physical characteristics of GE [General Electric] BWR [boiling-water reactor] fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.S.; Notz, K.J.

    1989-06-01

    The physical characteristics of fuel assemblies manufactured by the General Electric Company for boiling-water reactors are classified and described. The classification into assembly types is based on the GE reactor product line, the Characteristics Data Base (CDB) assembly class, and the GE fuel design. Thirty production assembly types are identified. Detailed physical data are presented for each assembly type in an appendix. Descriptions of special (nonstandard) fuels are also reported. 52 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs

  6. Evaluation of damages of airplane crash in European Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (EU-ABWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamei, Kazuhiro; Tanoue, Tetsuharu; Kataoka, Kazuyoshi; Jimbo, Masakazu

    2011-01-01

    European Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (EU-ABWR) is developed by Toshiba. EU-ABWR accommodates an armored reactor building against Airplane Crash (APC), severe accident mitigation systems, N+2 principle in safety systems and a large output of 1600 MWe. Thanks to above mentioned features, EU-ABWR's design objectives and principles are consistent with safety requirements in an European market. In this paper, evaluation of damages induced by APC has been summarized. (author)

  7. Determining the void fraction in draught sections of a boiling water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedulin, V.N.; Barolomej, G.G.; Solodkij, V.A.; Shmelev, V.E.

    1987-01-01

    Consideration is being given to the problem of improving methods for calculation of the void fraction in large channels of cooling system of the boiling water cooled reactor during two-phase unsteady flow. Investigation of the structure of two-phase flow was conducted in draught section of the VK-50 reactor (diameter D=2 m, height H=3). The method for calculation of the void fraction in channels with H/D ratio close to 1 is suggested

  8. Technical Basis for Water Chemistry Control of IGSCC in Boiling Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Barry; Garcia, Susan

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) operate with very high purity water. However, even the utilization of near theoretical conductivity water cannot prevent intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized stainless steel, wrought nickel alloys and nickel weld metals under oxygenated conditions. IGSCC can be further accelerated by the presence of certain impurities dissolved in the coolant. The goal of this paper is to present the technical basis for controlling various impurities under both oxygenated, i.e., normal water chemistry (NWC) and deoxygenated, i.e., hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) conditions for mitigation of IGSCC. More specifically, the effects of typical BWR ionic impurities (e.g., sulfate, chloride, nitrate, borate, phosphate, etc.) on IGSCC propensities in both NWC and HWC environments will be discussed. The technical basis for zinc addition to the BWR coolant will also provided along with an in-plant example of the most severe water chemistry transient to date.

  9. Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction Failure Threshold for Reactivity Initiated Accidents for Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Carl E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geelhood, Kenneth J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been requested by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to evaluate the reactivity initiated accident (RIA) tests that have recently been performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) and CABRI (French research reactor) on uranium dioxide (UO2) and mixed uranium and plutonium dioxide (MOX) fuels, and to propose pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) failure thresholds for RIA events. This report discusses how PNNL developed PCMI failure thresholds for RIA based on least squares (LSQ) regression fits to the RIA test data from cold-worked stress relief annealed (CWSRA) and recrystallized annealed (RXA) cladding alloys under pressurized water reactor (PWR) hot zero power (HZP) conditions and boiling water reactor (BWR) cold zero power (CZP) conditions.

  10. A potential of boiling water power reactors with a natural circulation of a coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmachkin, V.S.; Sokolov, I.N.

    1998-01-01

    The use of the natural circulation of coolant in the boiling water reactors simplifies a reactor control and facilities the service of the equipment components. The moderated core power loads allows the long fuel burnup, good control ability and large water stock set up the enhancement of safety level. That is considered to be very important for isolated regions or small countries. In the paper a high safety level and effectiveness of BWRs with natural circulation are reviewed. The limitations of flow stability and protection measures are being discussed. Some recent efforts in designing of such reactors are described.(author)

  11. Fuel Element Experience at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aas, S. [OECD Halden Reactor Project, Halden (Norway); Videm, K.; Hanevik, A. [Institutt for Atomenergi, Kjeller (Norway)

    1968-04-15

    The penalty for neutron absorbing materials is higher for a reactor moderated with heavy water than one with light water. As Zircaloy and enriched uranium were not readily available in 1954 when the design of the first fuel charge for HBWR was frozen, fuel elements of natural uranium metal clad in a specially developed aluminium alloy (A 1 0.3% Fe, 0.03% Si) were used. The temperature was limited to 150 Degree-Sign C and with this limitation the general behaviour of the elements was good. In I960, in another effort to maintain a good neutron economy, a couple of elements with as thin cladding as 0.25 mm A1S1 316, stainless steel with an unsegmented length of 2 m supported by wire grid spacers were tested. These elements with 1.5% enriched UO{sub 2} behaved satisfactorily at 150'C. Elements of a rather similar construction failed due to stress corrosion during the later operation at 230 'C. The reason for the different behaviour is probably the higher stresses in the cladding, due to the increased pressure, possibly combined with a short period with a high chloride content in the heavy water. The second fuel core with 1.5% enriched UO{sub 2} clad in Zircaloy-2 was installed in order to permit an increase in temperature to 230 Degree-Sign C and in power from 5 to 20 MW(th). The maximum burnup obtained is 11000 MWd/t and the maximum heat rating 375 W/cm with no fracture failure and practically no change in appearance according to the post-irradiation examination. One element was deliberately taken to burn-out conditions by throttling the water flow. After a series of burn-outs, the element finally failed because of over-temperature. The successful use of aluminium cladding at 150 Degree-Sign C mitiated an effort for making aluminium alloys suitable for normal power reactor operation. Promising properties were found for an alloy (designated IFA 3 aluminium) with A1 10% Si, 1% Ni, 1% Mg, 0.3% Fe + Ti. Despite increase in corrosion rate under heat transfer conditions

  12. Project plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory Experimental Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.

    1989-12-01

    In 1956, the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) Facility was first operated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as a test reactor to demonstrate the feasibility of operating an integrated power plant using a direct cycle boiling water reactor as a heat source. In 1967, ANL permanently shut down the EBWR and placed it in dry lay-up. This project plan presents the schedule and organization for the decontamination and decommissioning of the EBWR Facility which will allow it to be reused by other ANL scientific research programs. The project total estimated cost is $14.3M and is projected to generate 22,000 cubic feet of low-level radioactive waste which will be disposed of at an approved DOE burial ground. 18 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Project plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory Experimental Boiling Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L.E.

    1989-12-01

    In 1956, the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) Facility was first operated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as a test reactor to demonstrate the feasibility of operating an integrated power plant using a direct cycle boiling water reactor as a heat source. In 1967, ANL permanently shut down the EBWR and placed it in dry lay-up. This project plan presents the schedule and organization for the decontamination and decommissioning of the EBWR Facility which will allow it to be reused by other ANL scientific research programs. The project total estimated cost is $14.3M and is projected to generate 22,000 cubic feet of low-level radioactive waste which will be disposed of at an approved DOE burial ground. 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Using largest Lyapunov exponent to confirm the intrinsic stability of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavilian-Moreno, Carlos; Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the study of instability state of boiling water reactors with a method based in largest Lyapunov exponents (LLEs). Detecting the presence of chaos in a dynamical system is an important problem that is solved by measuring the LLE. Lyapunov exponents quantify the exponential divergence of initially close state-space trajectories and estimate the amount of chaos in a system. This method was applied to a set of signals from several nuclear power plant (NPP) reactors under commercial operating conditions that experienced instabilities events, apparently each of a different nature. Laguna Verde and Forsmark NPPs with in-phase instabilities, and Cofrentes NPP with out-of-phases instability. This study presents the results of intrinsic instability in the boiling water reactors of three NPPs. In the analyzed cases the limit cycle was not reached, which implies that the point of equilibrium exerts influence and attraction on system evolution

  15. Using largest Lyapunov exponent to confirm the intrinsic stability of boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavilian-Moreno, Carlos [Iberdrola Generacion, S.A., Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant, Project Engineering Department, Paraje le Plano S/N, Valencia (Spain); Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto [Area de ingeniera en Recursos Energeticos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Mexico city (Mexico)

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this paper is the study of instability state of boiling water reactors with a method based in largest Lyapunov exponents (LLEs). Detecting the presence of chaos in a dynamical system is an important problem that is solved by measuring the LLE. Lyapunov exponents quantify the exponential divergence of initially close state-space trajectories and estimate the amount of chaos in a system. This method was applied to a set of signals from several nuclear power plant (NPP) reactors under commercial operating conditions that experienced instabilities events, apparently each of a different nature. Laguna Verde and Forsmark NPPs with in-phase instabilities, and Cofrentes NPP with out-of-phases instability. This study presents the results of intrinsic instability in the boiling water reactors of three NPPs. In the analyzed cases the limit cycle was not reached, which implies that the point of equilibrium exerts influence and attraction on system evolution.

  16. Using Largest Lyapunov Exponent to Confirm the Intrinsic Stability of Boiling Water Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J. Gavilán-Moreno

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is the study of instability state of boiling water reactors with a method based in largest Lyapunov exponents (LLEs. Detecting the presence of chaos in a dynamical system is an important problem that is solved by measuring the LLE. Lyapunov exponents quantify the exponential divergence of initially close state-space trajectories and estimate the amount of chaos in a system. This method was applied to a set of signals from several nuclear power plant (NPP reactors under commercial operating conditions that experienced instabilities events, apparently each of a different nature. Laguna Verde and Forsmark NPPs with in-phase instabilities, and Cofrentes NPP with out-of-phases instability. This study presents the results of intrinsic instability in the boiling water reactors of three NPPs. In the analyzed cases the limit cycle was not reached, which implies that the point of equilibrium exerts influence and attraction on system evolution.

  17. Thermal analysis and design of a passive reflux condenser for the simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijlani, C.; Patti, F.; Prasad, V.

    1993-01-01

    At present, the advanced light water reactors (ALWRS) in the United States are being designed to remove reactor decay heat for a period of 72 h following a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The water in the pools external to the containment is evaporated or boiled off to remove the decay heat. It is presumed that the water in the pools can be replenished within 72 h through operator actions or outside assistance. Some countries in Europe require that the plant be designed to remove the reactor decay heat for a much longer duration than 72 h without external assistance. This paper presents an analysis and design of a passive heat exchanger called a reflux condenser (RC), which was considered for an ALWR-the 600-MW(electric) simplified boiling water reactor. The RC is required to condense the steam formed when the water in the pool in which the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) is immersed boils following a LOCA. The RCs are nuclear non-safety related. This paper presents steady-state performance of an RC at various outdoor air dry-bulb temperatures under still air conditions

  18. Boiling in the presence of boron compounds in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakath, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The scope of the thesis on boiling in the presence of boron compounds in light water reactors was to study the effects of the boron compound addition on the heat removal from the fuel elements. For an effective cooling of the fuel elements in case of boiling processes a high heat transfer coefficient is of importance. Up to now experimental studies were not performed under reactor specific conditions, for instance with respect to the geometry of the flow conditions, high temperature and pressure levels were not represented. Therefore the experiments in the frame of the thesis were using reactor specific parameters. The test facility SECA (study into the effects of coolant additives) was designed and constructed. The experiments simulated the conditions of normal PWR operation, accidental PWR and accidental BWR conditions.

  19. Investigation of water films on fuel rods in boiling water reactors using neutron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanthen, Jonas

    2006-09-01

    In a boiling water reactor, thin films of liquid water around the fuel rods play a very important role in cooling the fuel, and evaporation of the film can lead to fuel damage. If the thickness of the water film could be measured accurately the reactor operation could be both safer and more economical. In this thesis, the possibility to use neutron tomography, to study thin water films on fuel rods in an experimental nuclear fuel set-up, has been investigated. The main tool for this has been a computer simulation software. The simulations have shown that very thin water films, down to around 20 pm, can be seen on fuel rods in an experimental set-up using neutron tomography. The spatial resolution needed to obtain this result is around 300 pm. A suitable detector system for this kind of experiment would be plastic fiber scintillators combined with a CCD camera. As a neutron source it would be possible to use a D-D neutron generator, which generates neutrons with energies of 2.5 MeV. Using a neutron generator with a high enough neutron yield and a detector with high enough detection efficiency, a neutron tomography to measure thin water films should take no longer than 25 - 30 minutes

  20. Investigation of water films on fuel rods in boiling water reactors using neutron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanthen, Jonas

    2006-09-15

    In a boiling water reactor, thin films of liquid water around the fuel rods play a very important role in cooling the fuel, and evaporation of the film can lead to fuel damage. If the thickness of the water film could be measured accurately the reactor operation could be both safer and more economical. In this thesis, the possibility to use neutron tomography, to study thin water films on fuel rods in an experimental nuclear fuel set-up, has been investigated. The main tool for this has been a computer simulation software. The simulations have shown that very thin water films, down to around 20 pm, can be seen on fuel rods in an experimental set-up using neutron tomography. The spatial resolution needed to obtain this result is around 300 pm. A suitable detector system for this kind of experiment would be plastic fiber scintillators combined with a CCD camera. As a neutron source it would be possible to use a D-D neutron generator, which generates neutrons with energies of 2.5 MeV. Using a neutron generator with a high enough neutron yield and a detector with high enough detection efficiency, a neutron tomography to measure thin water films should take no longer than 25 - 30 minutes.

  1. Power distribution monitoring system in the boiling water cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leshchenko, Yu.I.; Sadulin, V.P.; Semidotskij, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    Consideration is being given to the system of physical power distribution monitoring, used during several years in the VK-50 tank type boiling water cooled reactor. Experiments were conducted to measure the ratios of detector prompt and activation currents, coefficients of detector relative sensitivity with respect to neutrons and effective cross sections of 103 Rh interaction with thermal and epithermal neutrons. Mobile self-powered detectors (SPD) with rhodium emitters are used as the power distribution detectors in the considered system. All detectors move simultaneously with constant rate in channels, located in fuel assembly central tubes, when conducting the measurements. It is concluded on the basis of analyzing the obtained data, that investigated system with calibrated SPD enables to monitor the absolute power distribution in fuel assemblies under conditions of boiling water cooled reactor and is independent of thermal engineering measurements conducted by in core instruments

  2. Effect of ionite decomposition products on the reactor coolant pH in a boiling-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredikhin, V.Ya.; Moskvin, L.N.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of products resulting from thermal radiolysis of ionites on water-chemical regime of NPP with RBMK is considered basing on investigations conducted in a boiling type experimental reactor. Data are presented on dynamics of changes in the specific electric conductivity and pH of the coolant following destruction of ion exchange groups and ionite matrix under the effect of reactor radiation. The authors draw a conclusion that radiation destruction of ionito fine disperse suspension or high-molecular soluble compounds in the reactor are, probably, one of the main reasons for variations in pH values of the coolant at NPP in non-correction water chemical regime

  3. Multi-physical developments for safety related investigations of low moderated boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlenker, Markus Thomas

    2014-12-19

    The main objective of this dissertation is the development and optimization of a low moderated boiling water reactor (BWR) core with improved fuel utilization to be incorporated in a Gen II BWR nuclear power plant. The assessment of the new core design is done by comparing it with a full MOX BWR core design regarding neutron physical and thermal-hydraulic design and safety criteria (e.g. inherent reactivity coefficients) and different sustainability parameters (e.g. conversion ratio).

  4. Multi-physical Developments for Safety Related Investigations of Low Moderated Boiling Water Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Schlenker, Markus Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this dissertation is the development and optimization of a low moderated boiling water reactor (BWR) core with improved fuel utilization to be incorporated in a Gen II BWR nuclear power plant. The assessment of the new core design is done by comparing it with a full MOX BWR core design regarding neutron physical and thermal-hydraulic design and safety criteria (e.g. inherent reactivity coefficients) and different sustainability parameters (e.g. conversion ratio).

  5. Mark I 1/5-scale boiling water reactor pressure suppresion experiment quick-look report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, W.; Collins, E.K.

    1977-01-01

    This report is intended as a ''quick-look'' report summarizing the experimental results obtained from pressure suppression experiment numbers 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3 that were performed on the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's 1/5-scale boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark I pressure suppression experimental facility on April 26, 1977. A brief description of the general nature of the tests and a summary of the actual tests that were performed are given

  6. Passive depressurization accident management strategy for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Maolong; Erkan, Nejdet; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Okamoto, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We proposed two passive depressurization systems for BWR severe accident management. • Sensitivity analysis of the passive depressurization systems with different leakage area. • Passive depressurization strategies can prevent direct containment heating. - Abstract: According to the current severe accident management guidance, operators are required to depressurize the reactor coolant system to prevent or mitigate the effects of direct containment heating using the safety/relief valves. During the course of a severe accident, the pressure boundary might fail prematurely, resulting in a rapid depressurization of the reactor cooling system before the startup of SRV operation. In this study, we demonstrated that a passive depressurization system could be used as a severe accident management tool under the severe accident conditions to depressurize the reactor coolant system and to prevent an additional devastating sequence of events and direct containment heating. The sensitivity analysis performed with SAMPSON code also demonstrated that the passive depressurization system with an optimized leakage area and failure condition is more efficient in managing a severe accident

  7. Passive depressurization accident management strategy for boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Maolong, E-mail: liuml@vis.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Erkan, Nejdet [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Ishiwatari, Yuki [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan); Okamoto, Koji [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • We proposed two passive depressurization systems for BWR severe accident management. • Sensitivity analysis of the passive depressurization systems with different leakage area. • Passive depressurization strategies can prevent direct containment heating. - Abstract: According to the current severe accident management guidance, operators are required to depressurize the reactor coolant system to prevent or mitigate the effects of direct containment heating using the safety/relief valves. During the course of a severe accident, the pressure boundary might fail prematurely, resulting in a rapid depressurization of the reactor cooling system before the startup of SRV operation. In this study, we demonstrated that a passive depressurization system could be used as a severe accident management tool under the severe accident conditions to depressurize the reactor coolant system and to prevent an additional devastating sequence of events and direct containment heating. The sensitivity analysis performed with SAMPSON code also demonstrated that the passive depressurization system with an optimized leakage area and failure condition is more efficient in managing a severe accident.

  8. Investigation of the resonant power oscillation in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor by autoregressive modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, Ritsuo

    1980-01-01

    In the HBWR (Halden Boiling Water Reactor), there exists a resonant power oscillation with period about 0.04 Hz at power levels higher than about 9.5 MWt. While the resonant oscillation in not so large as to affect the normal reactor operation, it is significant, from the viewpoint of reactor diagnosis, to grasp its characteristics and find the cause. Noise analysis based on the autoregressive (AR) modeling technique has been made to reveal the driving source for this oscillation which led to the suggestion that it is attributed to the dynamic interference of heat exchange process between two parallel-connected steam transformers against the reactor. The present study demonstrates that the method used here is highly effective for tracing back to a noise source inducing the variation of quantities in a system, and also applicable to problems of reactor noise analysis and diagnosis. (author)

  9. Severe accident sequence assessment for boiling water reactors: program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, M.H.

    1980-10-01

    The Severe Accident Sequence Assessment (SASA) Program was started at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in June 1980. This report documents the initial planning, specification of objectives, potential uses of the results, plan of attack, and preliminary results. ORNL was assigned the Brown's Ferry Unit 1 Plant with the station blackout being the initial sequence set to be addressed. This set includes: (1) loss of offsite and onsite ac power with no coolant injection; and (2) loss of offsite and onsite ac power with high pressure coolant injection (HPCI) and reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) as long as dc power supply lasts. This report includes representative preliminary results for the former case

  10. Searching for full power control rod patterns in a boiling water reactor using genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, Jose Luis [Departamento Sistemas Nucleares, ININ, Carr. Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, Ocoyoacac, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: jlmt@nuclear.inin.mx; Ortiz, Juan Jose [Departamento Sistemas Nucleares, ININ, Carr. Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, Ocoyoacac, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: jjortiz@nuclear.inin.mx; Requena, Ignacio [Departamento Ciencias Computacion e I.A. ETSII, Informatica, Universidad de Granada, C. Daniel Saucedo Aranda s/n. 18071 Granada (Spain)]. E-mail: requena@decsai.ugr.es; Perusquia, Raul [Departamento Sistemas Nucleares, ININ, Carr. Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, Ocoyoacac, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: rpc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-11-01

    One of the most important questions related to both safety and economic aspects in a nuclear power reactor operation, is without any doubt its reactivity control. During normal operation of a boiling water reactor, the reactivity control of its core is strongly determined by control rods patterns efficiency. In this paper, GACRP system is proposed based on the concepts of genetic algorithms for full power control rod patterns search. This system was carried out using LVNPP transition cycle characteristics, being applied too to an equilibrium cycle. Several operation scenarios, including core water flow variation throughout the cycle and different target axial power distributions, are considered. Genetic algorithm fitness function includes reactor security parameters, such as MLHGR, MCPR, reactor k{sub eff} and axial power density.

  11. Investigation of boiling water reactor stability and limit-cycle amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damiano, B.; March-Leuba, J.A.; Euler, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Galerkin's method has been applied to a boiling water reactor (BWR) dynamics model consisting of the point kinetics equations, which describe the neutronics, and a feedback transfer function, which describes the thermal hydraulics. The result is a low-order approximate solution describing BWR behavior during small-amplitude limit-cycle oscillations. The approximate solution has been used to obtain a stability condition, show that the average reactor power must increase during limit-cycle oscillations, and qualitatively determine how changes in transfer function values affect the limit-cycle amplitude. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Technical support to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the boiling water reactor blowdown heat transfer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, R.E.

    1976-09-01

    Results are presented of studies conducted by Aerojet Nuclear Company (ANC) in FY 1975 to support the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the boiling water reactor blowdown heat transfer (BWR-BDHT) program. The support provided by ANC is that of an independent assessor of the program to ensure that the data obtained are adequate for verification of analytical models used for predicting reactor response to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident. The support included reviews of program plans, objectives, measurements, and actual data. Additional activity included analysis of experimental system performance and evaluation of the RELAP4 computer code as applied to the experiments

  13. Piping benchmark problems for the General Electric Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezler, P.; DeGrassi, G.; Braverman, J.; Wang, Y.K.

    1993-08-01

    To satisfy the need for verification of the computer programs and modeling techniques that will be used to perform the final piping analyses for an advanced boiling water reactor standard design, three benchmark problems were developed. The problems are representative piping systems subjected to representative dynamic loads with solutions developed using the methods being proposed for analysis for the advanced reactor standard design. It will be required that the combined license holders demonstrate that their solutions to these problems are in agreement with the benchmark problem set

  14. The effects of aging on Boiling Water Reactor core isolation cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bom Soon.

    1994-01-01

    A study was performed to assess the effects of aging on the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling system in commercial Boiling Water Reactors. This study is part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The failure data, from national databases, as well as plant specific data were reviewed and analyzed to understand the effects of aging on the RCIC system. This analysis identified important components that should receive the highest priority in terms of aging management. The aging characterization provided information on the effects of aging on component failure frequency, failure modes, and failure causes

  15. Halden Boiling Water Reactor. Plant Performance and Heavy-Water Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aas, S.; Jamne, E.; Wullum, T.; Fjellestad, K. [Institutt for Atomenergi, OECD Halden Reactor Project, Halden (Norway)

    1968-04-15

    The Halden boiling heavy-water reactor, designed and built by the Norwegian Institutt for Atomenergi, has since June 1958 been operated as an international project. On its second charge the reactor was operated at power levels up to 25 MW and most of the time at a pressure of 28.5 kg/cm{sup 2}. During the period from July 1964 to December 1966 the plant availability was close to 64% including shutdowns because of test fuel failures and loading/unloading of fuel. Disregarding such stops, the availability was close to 90%. The average burnup of the core is about 6200 MWd/t UO{sub 2} : the most highly exposed elements have reached 10000 MWd/t UO{sub 2}. The transition temperature of the reactor tank has been followed closely. The results of the surveillance programme and the implication on the reactor operation are discussed. The reactor is located in a cave in a rock. Some experiences with such a containment are given. To locate failed test-fuel elements a fuel failure location system has been installed. A fission gas collection system has saved valuable reactor time during clean-up of the reactor system following test fuel failures. Apart from one incident with two of the control stations, the plant control and instrumentation systems have functioned satisfactorily. Two incidents with losses of 150 and 200 kg of heavy water have occurred. However, after improved methods for leakage detection had been developed, the losses have been kept better than 50 g/h . Since April 1962 the isotopic purity of the heavy water (14 t) has decreased from 99.75 to 99.62%. The tritium concentration is now slightly above 700 {mu}C/cm{sup 3}. This activity level has not created any serious operational or maintenance problems. An extensive series of water chemistry experiments has been performed to study the influence of various operating parameters on radiolytic gas formation. The main results of these experiments will be reported. Different materials such as mild steel, ferritic steel

  16. Non normal modal analysis of oscillations in boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Antola, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.suarez@miem.gub.uy [Ministerio de Industria, Energia y Mineria (MIEM), Montevideo (Uruguay); Flores-Godoy, Jose-Job, E-mail: job.flores@ibero.mx [Universidad Iberoamericana (UIA), Mexico, DF (Mexico). Dept. de Fisica Y Matematicas

    2013-07-01

    The first objective of the present work is to construct a simple reduced order model for BWR stability analysis, combining a two nodes nodal model of the thermal hydraulics with a two modes modal model of the neutronics. Two coupled non-linear integral-differential equations are obtained, in terms of one global (in phase) and one local (out of phase) power amplitude, with direct and cross feedback reactivities given as functions of thermal hydraulics core variables (void fractions and temperatures). The second objective is to apply the effective life time approximation to further simplify the nonlinear equations. Linear approximations for the equations of the amplitudes of the global and regional modes are derived. The linearized equation for the amplitude of the global mode corresponds to a decoupled and damped harmonic oscillator. An analytical closed form formula for the damping coefficient, as a function of the parameters space of the BWR, is obtained. The coefficient changes its sign (with the corresponding modification in the decay ratio) when a stability boundary is crossed. This produces a supercritical Hopf bifurcation, with the steady state power of the reactor as the bifurcation parameter. However, the linearized equation for the amplitude of the regional mode corresponds always to an over-damped and always coupled (with the amplitude of the global mode) harmonic oscillator, for every set of possible values of core parameters (including the steady state power of the reactor) in the framework of the present mathematical model. The equation for the above mentioned over damped linear oscillator is closely connected with a non-normal operator. Due to this connection, there could be a significant transient growth of some solutions of the linear equation. This behavior allows a significant shrinking of the basin of attraction of the equilibrium state. The third objective is to apply the above approach to partially study the stability of the regional mode and

  17. Technical features of advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Tetsuo; Takashima, Yoshie; Yokomi, Michiro

    1986-01-01

    As the final stage of the development of ABWRs of 1300 MWe output class carried out since 1984, the design for optimizing the plants has been performed, but it was completed at the end of 1985. Hereafter, the ABWRs will advance to the development of the actual project toward the permission and approval and the construction. By the optimization, the simplification, compacting and the heightening of thermal efficiency of the ABWRs were further promoted. The above promotion was attained by a cylindrical concrete containment vessel constructed in one body with the structure of a reactor building, the optimization of the redundancy of facilities, the optimization of equipment size, the combination of a two-stage reheating, 52 in blade turbine and the recovery of heater drain and so on. The plant characteristics such as the capacity factor, operability and the radiation exposure dose of workers were examined in detail in the process of optimization. As the results, it was shown that the ABWRs have the excellent economical efficiency and the performance characteristics of high level. The technical features of the ABWRs are large capacity and high efficiency plants, the improved core adopting internal pumps and new control rod driving mechanism, rational waste treatment facilities and so on. (Kako, I.)

  18. U.S. experience with hydrogen water chemistry in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.L.; Head, R.A.; Indig, M.E.; Ruiz, C.P.; Simpson, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrogen water chemistry in boiling water reactors is currently being adopted by many utilities in the U.S., with eleven units having completed preimplementation test programs, four units operating permanently with hydrogen water chemistry, and six other units in the process of installing permanent equipment. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking protection is required for the recirculation piping system and other regions of the BWR systems. The present paper explores progress in predicting and monitoring hydrogen water chemistry response in these areas. Testing has shown that impurities can play an important role in hydrogen water chemistry. Evaluation of their effects are also performed. Both computer modeling and in plant measurements show that each plant will respond uniquely to feedwater hydrogen addition. Thus, each plant has its own unique hydrogen requirement for recirculation system protecion. Furthermore, the modeling, and plant measurements show that different regions of the BWR respond differently to hydrogen injection. Thus, to insure protection of components other than the recirculation systems may require more (or less) hydrogen demand than indicated by the recirculation system measurements. In addition, impurities such as copper can play a significant role in establishing hydrogen demand. (Nogami, K.)

  19. Advanced analytical techniques for boiling water reactor chemistry control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alder, H P; Schenker, E [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-02-01

    The analytical techniques applied can be divided into 5 classes: OFF-LINE (discontinuous, central lab), AT-LINE (discontinuous, analysis near loop), ON-LINE (continuous, analysis in bypass). In all cases pressure and temperature of the water sample are reduced. In a strict sense only IN-LINE (continuous, flow disturbance) and NON-INVASIVE (continuous, no flow disturbance) techniques are suitable for direct process control; - the ultimate goal. An overview of the analytical techniques tested in the pilot loop is given. Apart from process and overall water quality control, standard for BWR operation, the main emphasis is on water impurity characterization (crud particles, hot filtration, organic carbon); on stress corrosion crackling control for materials (corrosion potential, oxygen concentration) and on the characterization of the oxide layer on austenites (impedance spectroscopy, IR-reflection). The above mentioned examples of advanced analytical techniques have the potential of in-line or non-invasive application. They are different stages of development and are described in more detail. 28 refs, 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  20. Predicted effect of power uprating on the water chemistry of commercial boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Wang, Mei-Ya; Chu, Charles F.; Chang Ching

    2009-01-01

    The approach of power uprating has been adopted by operators of light water reactors in the past few decades in order to increase the power generation efficiency of nuclear reactors. The power uprate strategy is apparently applicable to the three nuclear reactors in Taiwan as well. When choosing among the three types of power uprating, measurement uncertainty, stretch power uprating, and extended power uprating, a deliberate and thorough evaluation is required before a final decision and an optimal selection can be made. One practical way of increasing the reactor power is to deliberately adjust the fuel loading pattern and the control rod pattern and thus to avoid replacing the primary coolant pump with a new one of larger capacity. The power density of the reactor will increase with increasing power, but the mass flow rate in the primary coolant circuit (PCC) of a light water reactor will slightly increase (usually by less than 5 %) or even remain unchanged. Accordingly, an uprated power would induce higher neutron and gamma photon dose rates in the reactor coolant but have a minor or no effect on the mass flow rate of the primary coolant. The radiolysis product concentrations and the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) values differ largely in the PCC of a boiling water reactor (BWR). It is very difficult to measure the water chemistry data directly at various locations of an actual reactor. Thus the impact of power uprating on the water chemistry of a BWR operating under hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) can only be theoretically evaluated through computer modelling. In this study, the DEMACE computer code was modified to investigate the impact of power uprating on the water chemistry under a fixed mass flow rate in the primary coolant circuit of a BWR/6 type plant. Simulations were carried out for hydrogen concentrations in feedwater ranging from 0.0 to 2.0 mg . kg -1 and for power levels ranging from 100 % to 120 %. The responses of water chemistry and ECP

  1. The Nuclear option for U.S. electrical generating capacity additions utilizing boiling water reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrity, T.F.; Wilkins, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The technology status of the Advanced Boiling Water (ABWR) and Simplified Boiling Water (SBWR) reactors are presented along with an analysis of the economic potential of advanced nuclear power generation systems based on BWR technology to meet the projected domestic electrical generating capacity need through 2005. The forecasted capacity needs are determined for each domestic North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region. Extensive data sets detailing each NERC region's specific generation and load characteristics, and capital and fuel cost parameters are utilized in the economic analysis of the optimal generation additions to meet this need by use of an expansion planning model. In addition to a reference case, several sensitivity cases are performed with regard to capital costs and fuel price escalation

  2. Verification of HELIOS-MASTER system through benchmark of Halden boiling water reactor (HBWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ha Yong; Song, Jae Seung; Cho, Jin Young; Kim, Kang Seok; Lee, Chung Chan; Zee, Sung Quun

    2004-01-01

    To verify the HELIOS-MASTER computer code system for a nuclear design, we have been performed benchmark calculations for various reactor cores. The Halden reactor is a boiling, heavy water moderated reactor. At a full power of 18-20MWt, the moderator temperature is 240 .deg. C and the pressure is 33 bar. This study describes the verification of the HELIOS-MASTER computer code system for a nuclear design and the analysis of a hexagonal and D 2 O moderated core through a benchmark of the Halden reactor core. HELIOS, developed by Scandpower A/S, is a two-dimensional transport program for the generation of group cross-sections, and MASTER, developed by KAERI, is a three-dimensional nuclear design and analysis code based on the two-group diffusion theory. It solves the neutronics model with the TPEN (Triangle based Polynomial Expansion Nodal) method for a hexagonal geometry

  3. Potential uses of high gradient magnetic filtration for high-temperature water purification in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, H.H.; Holloway, J.H.; Abbott, D.G.

    1979-01-01

    Studies of various high-temperature filter devices indicate a potentially positive impact for high gradient magnetic filtration on boiling water reactor radiation level reduction. Test results on in-plant water composition and impurity crystallography are presented for several typical boiling water reactors (BWRs) on plant streams where high-temperature filtration may be particularly beneficial. An experimental model on the removal of red iron oxide (hematite) from simulated reactor water with a high gradient magnetic filter is presented, as well as the scale-up parameters used to predict the filtration efficiency on various high temperature, in-plant streams. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the crud removal potential of high gradient magnetic filters installed at alternative stream locations under typical, steady-state, plant operating conditions

  4. Improvement of steam separator in boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Jan Peter; Cremer, Ingo; Lorenz, Maik [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The potential to improve the function of the steam separator is identified and explored by scaled air-water tests and validated CFD calculations. It can be outlined that requirements on a modern steam separator for BWR plants will be fulfilled, combined with very good operational experience of the existing separator designs (e.g. material, layout). With the new steam separator design, modern high performance fuel assembly designs can be used for various core loading strategies (e.g. low leakage). This allows an increased thermal power of up to +50 % for the fuel element clusters in the center of the core with high radial peaking factors. In addition, any problems with unallowable high moisture at the turbine are solved with the new design, which have been identified for running BWR plants with the old steam separator design after applying new core loading patterns (e.g. after power uprates). A compatible steam separator design for all running BWRs is ready to launch. (orig.)

  5. Electrochemical corrosion potential monitoring in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.L.; Hettiarachchi, S.; Hale, D.H.; Law, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) is defined as the measured voltage between a metal and a standard reference electrode converted to the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) scale. This concept is shown schematically in Figure 1. The measurement of ECP is of primary importance for both evaluating the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of a component and for assuring that the specification for hydrogen water chemistry, ECP < -230 mV, SHE is being met. In practice, only a limited number of measurement locations are available in the BWR and only a few reference electrode types are robust enough for BWR duty. Because of the radiolysis inherent in the BWR, local environment plays an important role in establishing the ECP of a component. This paper will address the strategies for obtaining representative measurements, given these stated limitations and constraints. The paper will also address the ECP monitoring strategies for the noble metal chemical addition process that is being implemented in BWRs to meet the ECP specification at low hydrogen injection rates. (author)

  6. Possibilities of crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) measurement under boiling and pressurized water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehling, W.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture mechanics investigations carried out so far in laboratory conditions cover only part of the material stresses, as effects which occur in nuclear powerstations, in particular, such as corrosion and radioactive radiation are largely left out of account. Therefore experiments including these effects were recently carried out in autoclaves, test rigs simulating reactors (HRD experimental plant) and in experimental reactors. An important parameter of experimental fracture mechanics is the measurement of crack opening displacement (COD). The crack opening is measured with socalled clip gauges (transmitters based on strain gauges, which convert mechanical deformation of springs into electrical signals) on standard samples in the laboratory. It was therefore sensible to use these high temperature strain gauges (HTD) for the development of a measuring system for travel for pressurized water and boiling water reactor conditions. (orig.) [de

  7. Limiting factor analysis of high availability nuclear plants (boiling water reactors). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederick, L.G.; Brady, R.M.; Shor, S.W.W.; McCusker, J.T.; Alden, W.M.; Kovacs, S.

    1979-08-01

    The pertinent results are presented of a 16-month study conducted for Electric Power Research Institute by General Electric Company, Bechtel Power Corporation, and Philadelphia Electric Company. The study centered around the Peach Bottom 2 Atomic Power Station, but also included limited study of operations at 20 additional operating boiling water reactors. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate key factors limiting plant availability, and to identify potential improvements for eliminating or alleviating those limitations. The key limiting factors were found to be refueling activities; activities related to the reactor fuel; reactor scrams; activities related to 20 operating systems or major components; delays due to radiation, turbid water during refueling operations, facilities/working conditions, and dirt/foreign material; and general maintenance/repair of valves and piping. Existing programs to reduce the effect on plant unavailability are identified, and suggestions for further action are made

  8. On Stability of Natural-circulation-cooled Boiling Water Reactors during Start-up (Experimental Results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manera, A.; Van der Hagen, T.H.J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The characteristics of flashing-induced instabilities, which are of importance during the start-up phase of natural-circulation Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs), are studied. Experiments at typical start-up conditions (low power and low pressure) are carried out on a steam/water natural circulation loop. The mechanism of flashing-induced instability is analyzed in detail and it is found that non-equilibrium between phases and enthalpy transport plays an important role in the instability process. Pressure and steam volume in the steam dome are found to have a stabilizing effect. The main characteristics of the instabilities have been analyzed. (authors)

  9. Materials behavior in alternate (hydrogen) water chemistry in the Ringhals-1 boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungberg, L.G.; Cubicciotti, D.; Trolle, M.

    1986-01-01

    In-plant studies on the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized austenitic stainless steel (SS) have been performed at the Swedish Ringhals-1 boiling water reactor (BWR). The studies have covered the present [full-temperature (normal)] water chemistry (PWC) and the alternate (primary) water chemistry (AWC) with hydrogen addition. The test techniques applied were constant extension rate testing (CERT) and electrochemical potential (ECP) measurements. The program was covered by extensive environment monitoring. The results verify earlier laboratory studies which show that sensitized austenitic SS is susceptible to IGSCC in PWC, but not in AWC. Other pressure-bearing BWR construction materials are not adversely affected by AWC. The boundary conditions in Ringhals-1 have been established for an AWC, which is defined as an environment that does not produce IGSCC in sensitized SS. The results are compared with a similar program at Dresden-2, and the points of agreement and discordance in the results are discussed. The relevance of ECP measurements for the control of AWC is discussed

  10. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors. Evaluation of GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-13

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE`s 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology.

  11. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R.; Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W.

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs

  12. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. (Nuclear Energy Services, Inc., Danbury, CT (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

  13. Corrosion products, activity transport and deposition in boiling water reactor recirculation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Buckley, D.; Grauer, R.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    The deposition of activated corrosion products in the recirculation loops of Boiling Water Reactors produces increased radiation levels which lead to a corresponding increase in personnel radiation dose during shut down and maintenance. The major part of this dose rate is due to cobalt-60. Based on a comprehensive literature study concerning this theme, it has been attempted to identify the individual stages of the activity build-up and to classify their importance. The following areas are discussed in detail: The origins of the corrosion products and of cobalt-59 in the reactor feedwaters; the consolidation of the cobalt in the fuel pins deposits (activation); the release and transport of cobalt-60; the build-up of cobalt-60 in the corrosion products in the recirculation loops. Existing models of the build-up of circuit radioactivity are discussed and the operating experiences from selected reactors are summarized. 90 refs, figs and tabs

  14. Fuel performance in the Barsebeck boiling water reactors (Unit 1 and 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, B.

    1979-01-01

    Sydkraft is the largest privately owned utility in Sweden. It serves about 20% of the Swedish population with about 12 TWh of electric power per year, of which 64% is nuclear (1978 figures). The two identical 590 MWE ASEA-ATOM boiling water reactors in Barsebeck have been in operation since 1975 and 1977 respectively. Fission product activity in the primary circuits and in the off-gas systems is extremely low and indicate a near perfect fuel condition. Operating restrictions limiting the effect of pellet cladding interaction have been in use since initial start-up and testing. A few events involving rapid power increases above the preconditioned power level have occurred without causing fuel failures. It is believed that an analysis of power reactor operational transients, which did not cause fuel failures, can be useful to design more adequate and less conservative rules for the operation of nuclear reactor cores

  15. TRAC-B thermal-hydraulic analysis of the Black Fox boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.P.

    1993-05-01

    Thermal-hydraulic analyses of six hypothetical accident scenarios for the General Electric Black Fox Nuclear Project boiling water reactor were performed using the TRAC-BF1 computer code. This work is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and is being done in conjunction with future analysis work at the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Technical Training Center in Chattanooga, Tennessee. These accident scenarios were chosen to assess and benchmark the thermal-hydraulic capabilities of the Black Fox Nuclear Project simulator at the Technical Training Center to model abnormal transient conditions

  16. Dynamic analysis of the condensate feedwater system in boiling water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanji, J.; Omori, T.

    1982-01-01

    The computer code, CONFAC, has been developed for dynamic analysis of the condensate feedwater system in boiling water reactor plants. This code simulates the hydrodynamics in the piping system, the pump dynamics, and the feedwater controller in order to clarify the system transient characteristics in such cases as pump trip incidents. Code verification was performed by comparison between analytical results and actual plant operational data. Satisfactory agreement was obtained. With the code, appropriate pump start/stop interlocks were estimated for preventing pump cavitation in pump trip incidents

  17. Electrochemical measurements and modeling predictions in boiling water reactors under various operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indig, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    One important issue for providing life extension to operating boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRs) is the control of stress corrosion cracking in all sections of the primary coolant circuit. This paper links experimental and theoretical methods that provide understanding and measurements of the critical parameter, the electrochemical potential (ECP), and its application to determining crack growth rate among and within the family of BWRs. Measurement of in-core ECP required the development of a new family of radiation-resistant sensors. With these sensors, ECPs were measured in the core and piping of two operating BWRs. Concurrent crack growth measurements were used to benchmark a crack growth prediction algorithm with measured ECPs

  18. Design and performance of General Electric boiling water reactor main steam line isolation valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, D.A.; van Zylstra, E.H.

    1976-08-01

    An extensive test program has been completed by the General Electric Company in cooperation with the Commonwealth Edison Company on the basic design type of large main steam line isolation valves used on General Electric Boiling Water Reactors. Based on a total of 40 tests under simulated accident conditions covering a wide range of mass flows, mixture qualities, and closing times, it was concluded that the commercially available valves of this basic type will close completely and reliably as required. Analytical methods to predict transient effects in the steam line and valve after postulated breaks were refined and confirmed by the test program

  19. Instrumentation availability during severe accidents for a boiling water reactor with a Mark I containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcieri, W.C.; Hanson, D.J.

    1992-02-01

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Accident Management Research Program, the availability of instruments to supply accident management information during a broad range of severe accidents is evaluated for a Boiling Water Reactor with a Mark I containment. Results from this evaluation include: (1) the identification of plant conditions that would impact instrument performance and information needs during severe accidents; (2) the definition of envelopes of parameters that would be important in assessing the performance of plant instrumentation for a broad range of severe accident sequences; and (3) assessment of the availability of plant instrumentation during severe accidents

  20. Instrumenting a pressure suppression experiment for a Mark I boiling water reactor: another measurements engineering challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shay, W.M.; Brough, W.G.; Miller, T.B.

    1978-01-01

    A 1 / 5 -scale test facility of a pressure-suppression system from a Mark I boiling water reactor was instrumented with seven types of transducers to obtain high-accuracy, dynamic loading data during a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident. A total of 27 air tests have been completed with an average of 175 transducers recorded for each test. An end-to-end calibration of the total measurement system was run to establish accuracy of the data. The instrumentation verified the analysis of the dynamic loading of the pressure-suppression system

  1. Accident sequence analysis for a BWR [Boiling Water Reactor] during low power and shutdown operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, D.W.; Hake, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    Most previous Probabilistic Risk Assessments have excluded consideration of accidents initiated in low power and shutdown modes of operation. A study of the risk associated with operation in low power and shutdown is being performed at Sandia National Laboratories for a US Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). This paper describes the proposed methodology for the analysis of the risk associated with the operation of a BWR during low power and shutdown modes and presents preliminary information resulting from the application of the methodology. 2 refs., 2 tabs

  2. Calculation of optimum control rod operation programme for boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehr, L.

    1978-01-01

    Control rod operation programmes are calculated based on a three dimensional Boiling Water Reactor situation model. The position of the control rods at variosu burn-ups is chosen by an optimisation so that the sum of the square deviations of the load density distribution from an optimum distribution ('Haling' distribution) are minimised. Other conditions are remaining critical and observing the thermal limits for central fuel element melting and critical heat surface loading. As an example, an optimum control rod operation programme for the first cycle in Lengen nuclear power station is calculated and is compared with the programme actually used. (orig.) 891 HP [de

  3. Nuclear power plant with boiling water reactor VK-300 for district heating and electricity supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Y.N.; Lisitza, F.D.; Romenkov, A.A.; Tokarev, Y.I.

    1998-01-01

    The paper considers specific design features of a pressure vessel boiling water reactor with coolant natural circulation and three-step in-vessel steam separation (at draught tube outlet of the upcomer, within zone of overflow from the upcomer to downcomer and in cyclon-type separators). Design description and analytical study results are presented for the passive core cooling system in the case of loss of preferred power and rupture in primary circuit pipeline. Specific features of a primary containment (safeguard vessel) are given for an underground NPP sited in a rock ground. (author)

  4. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWR) (NUREG-1123) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog and Examiners' Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Examinations (NUREG-1121) will cover those topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55. The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at boiling water reactors. Each K/A statement has been rated for its importance to the safe operation of the plant in a manner ensuring personnel and public health and safety. The BWR K/A Catalog is organized into five major sections: Plant-wide Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Function, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. The BWR Catalog represents a modification of the form and content of the K/A Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Pressurized Water Reactors (NUREG-1122). First, categories of knowledge and ability statements have been redefined. Second, the scope of the definition of emergency and abnormal plant evolutions has been revised in line with a symptom-based approach. Third, K/As related to the operational applications of theory have been incorporated into the delineations for both plant systems and emergency and abnormal plant evolutions, while K/As pertaining to theory fundamental to plant operation have been delineated in a separate theory section. Finally, the components section has been revised

  5. Benchmark of the CASMO-3G/MICROBURN-B codes for Commonwealth Edison boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, J.K.; Pallotta, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    The Commonwealth Edison Company has performed an extensive benchmark against measured data from three boiling water reactors using the Studsvik lattice physics code CASMO-3G and the Siemens Nuclear Power three-dimensional simulator code MICROBURN-B. The measured data of interest for this benchmark are the hot and cold reactivity, and the core power distributions as measured by the traversing incore probe system and gamma scan data for fuel pins and assemblies. A total of nineteen unit-cycles were evaluated. The database included fuel product lines manufactured by General Electric and Siemens Nuclear Power, wit assemblies containing 7 x 7 to 9 x 9 pin configurations, several water rod designs, various enrichments and gadolina loadings, and axially varying lattice designs throughout the enriched portion of the bundle. The results of the benchmark present evidence that the CASMO-3G/MICROBURN-B code package can adequately model the range of fuel and core types in the benchmark, and the codes are acceptable for performing neutronic analyses of Commonwealth Edison's boiling water reactors

  6. Fuzzy logic control of water level in advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chaung; Lee, Chi-Szu; Raghavan, R.; Fahrner, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    The feedwater control system in the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is more challenging to design compared to other control systems in the plant, due to the possible change in level from void collapses and swells during transient events. A basic fuzzy logic controller is developed using a simplified ABWR mathematical model to demonstrate and compare the performance of this controller with a simplified conventional controller. To reduce the design effort, methods are developed to automatically tune the scaling factors and control rules. As a first step in developing the fuzzy controller, a fuzzy controller with a limited number of rules is developed to respond to normal plant transients such as setpoint changes of plant parameters and load demand changes. Various simulations for setpoint and load demand changes of plant performances were conducted to evaluate the modeled fuzzy logic design against the simplified ABWR model control system. The simulation results show that the performance of the fuzzy logic controller is comparable to that of the Proportional-Integral (PI) controller, However, the fuzzy logic controller produced shorter settling time for step setpoint changes compared to the simplified conventional controller

  7. Variation of the Effectiveness of Hydrogen Water Chemistry in a Boiling Water Reactor during Startup Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Wang, Mei-Ya

    2012-09-01

    For mitigating intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in an operating boiling water reactor (BWR), the technology of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) aiming at coolant chemistry improvement has been adopted worldwide. However, the hydrogen injection system employed in this technology was designed to operate only at power levels greater than 30% of the rated power or at coolant temperatures of greater than 450 deg. F. This system is usually in an idle and standby mode during a startup operation. The coolant in a BWR during a cold shutdown normally contains a relatively high level of dissolved oxygen from intrusion of atmospheric air. Accordingly, the structural materials in the primary coolant circuit (PCC) of a BWR could be exposed to a strongly oxidizing environment for a short period of time during a subsequent startup operation. At some plants, the feasibility of hydrogen water chemistry during startup operations has been studied, and its effectiveness on suppressing SCC initiation was evaluated. It is technically difficult to directly procure water chemistry data at various locations of an operating reactor. Accordingly, the impact of startup operation on water chemistry in the PCC of a BWR operating under normal water chemistry (NWC) or HWC can only be theoretically evaluated through computer modelling. In this study, a well-developed computer code DEMACE was used to investigate the variations in redox species concentration and in electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) of components in the PCC of a domestic BWR during startup operations in the presence of HWC. Simulations were carried out for [H2] FW s ranging from 0.0 to 2.0 parts per million (ppm) and for power levels ranging from 2.5% to 11.3% during startup operations. Our analyses indicated that for power levels with steam generation in the core, a higher power level would tend to promote a more oxidizing coolant environment for the structural components and therefore lead to less HWC

  8. Modeling and numerical simulation of oscillatory two-phase flows, with application to boiling water nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, M.P. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados - CTA, Sao Paolo (Brazil); Podowski, M.Z. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the analysis of dynamics and stability of boiling channels and systems. The specific objectives are two-fold. One of them is to present the results of a study aimed at analyzing the effects of various modeling concepts and numerical approaches on the transient response and stability of parallel boiling channels. The other objective is to investigate the effect of closed-loop feedback on stability of a boiling water reactor (BWR). Various modeling and computational issues for parallel boiling channels are discussed, such as: the impact of the numerical discretization scheme for the node containing the moving boiling boundary on the convergence and accuracy of computations, and the effects of subcooled boiling and other two-phase flow phenomena on the predictions of marginal stability conditions. Furthermore, the effects are analyzed of local loss coefficients around the recirculation loop of a boiling water reactor on stability of the reactor system. An apparent paradox is explained concerning the impact of changing single-phase losses on loop stability. The calculations have been performed using the DYNOBOSS computer code. The results of DYNOBOSS validation against other computer codes and experimental data are shown.

  9. A method of simulating voids in experimental studies of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Down, H.J.; Dickie, J.; Fox, W.N.

    1963-11-01

    The coolant density in boiling water reactors may vary from 3 at pressures up to 1000 p.s.i. In order to study the effect of reduced water density on reactivity in unpressurized experimental systems, the effective water density is reduced by packing small beads of highly expanded polystyrene into the fuel clusters and flooding the interstices with water. Coolant densities of from 0.4 to 0.6 gm/cm 3 may be produced with the introduction of only about 0.4 gm/cm 3 of non-hydrogeneous material. This memorandum describes the production, properties and handling of polystyrene beads and the tests carried out to establish the validity of the technique. (author)

  10. Real-time stability monitoring method for boiling water reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunishi, K.; Suzuki, S.

    1987-01-01

    A method for real-time stability monitoring is developed for supervising the steady-state operation of a boiling water reactor core. The decay ratio of the reactor power fluctuation is determined by measuring only the output neutron noise. The concept of an inverse system is introduced to identify the dynamic characteristics of the reactor core. The adoption of an adaptive digital filter is useful in real-time identification. A feasibility test that used measured output noise as an indication of reactor power suggests that this method is useful in a real-time stability monitoring system. Using this method, the tedious and difficult work for modeling reactor core dynamics can be reduced. The method employs a simple algorithm that eliminates the need for stochastic computation, thus making the method suitable for real-time computation with a simple microprocessor. In addition, there is no need to disturb the reactor core during operation. Real-time stability monitoring using the proposed algorithm may allow operation under less stable margins

  11. Operating experience of natural circulation core cooling in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kullberg, C.; Jones, K.; Heath, C.

    1993-01-01

    General Electric (GE) has proposed an advanced boiling water reactor, the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR), which will utilize passive, gravity-driven safety systems for emergency core coolant injection. The SBWR design includes no recirculation loops or recirculation pumps. Therefore the SBWR will operate in a natural circulation (NC) mode at full power conditions. This design poses some concerns relative to stability during startup, shutdown, and at power conditions. As a consequence, the NRC has directed personnel at several national labs to help investigate SBWR stability issues. This paper will focus on some of the preliminary findings made at the INEL. Because of the broad range of stability issues this paper will mainly focus on potential geysering instabilities during startup. The two NC designs examined in detail are the US Humboldt Bay Unit 3 BWR-1 plant and Dodewaard plant in the Netherlands. The objective of this paper will be to review operating experience of these two plants and evaluate their relevance to planned SBWR operational procedures. For completeness, experimental work with early natural circulation GE test facilities will also be briefly discussed

  12. An Order Coding Genetic Algorithm to Optimize Fuel Reloads in a Nuclear Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, Juan Jose; Requena, Ignacio

    2004-01-01

    A genetic algorithm is used to optimize the nuclear fuel reload for a boiling water reactor, and an order coding is proposed for the chromosomes and appropriate crossover and mutation operators. The fitness function was designed so that the genetic algorithm creates fuel reloads that, on one hand, satisfy the constrictions for the radial power peaking factor, the minimum critical power ratio, and the maximum linear heat generation rate while optimizing the effective multiplication factor at the beginning and end of the cycle. To find the values of these variables, a neural network trained with the behavior of a reactor simulator was used to predict them. The computation time is therefore greatly decreased in the search process. We validated this method with data from five cycles of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant in Mexico

  13. TRAC-BD1: transient reactor analysis code for boiling-water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spore, J.W.; Weaver, W.L.; Shumway, R.W.; Giles, M.M.; Phillips, R.E.; Mohr, C.M.; Singer, G.L.; Aguilar, F.; Fischer, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) version of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to provide an advanced best-estimate predictive capability for the analysis of postulated accidents in BWRs. The TRAC-BD1 program provides the Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis capability for BWRs and for many BWR related thermal hydraulic experimental facilities. This code features a three-dimensional treatment of the BWR pressure vessel; a detailed model of a BWR fuel bundle including multirod, multibundle, radiation heat transfer, leakage path modeling capability, flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment, reflood tracking capability for both falling films and bottom flood quench fronts, and consistent treatment of the entire accident sequence. The BWR component models in TRAC-BD1 are described and comparisons with data presented. Application of the code to a BWR6 LOCA is also presented

  14. Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, P.R.

    1994-12-27

    A boiling water reactor is described having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit. 4 figures.

  15. Fission product model for lattice calculation of high conversion boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, S.; Yoshida, T.; Yamamoto, T.

    1988-01-01

    A high precision fission product model for boiling water reactor (BWR) lattice calculation was developed, which consists of 45 nuclides to be treated explicitly and one nonsaturating pseudo nuclide. This model is applied to a high conversion BWR lattice calculation code. From a study based on a three-energy-group calculation of fission product poisoning due to full fission products and explicitly treated nuclides, the multigroup capture cross sections and the effective fission yields of the pseudo nuclide are determined, which do not depend on fuel types or reactor operating conditions for a good approximation. Apart from nuclear data uncertainties, the model and the derived pseudo nuclide constants would predict the fission product reactivity within an error of 0.1% Δk at high burnup

  16. Passive containment cooling system performance in the simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Gamble, R.E.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1997-01-01

    The Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) incorporates a passive system for decay heat removal from the containment in the event of a postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA). Decay heat is removed by condensation of the steam discharged from the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in three condensers which comprise the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS). These condensers are designed to carry the heat load while transporting a mixture of steam and noncondensible gas (primarily nitrogen) from the drywell to the suppression chamber. This paper describes the expected LOCA response of the SBWR with respect to the PCCS performance, based on analysis and test results. The results confirm that the PCCS has excess capacity for decay heat removal and that overall system performance is very robust. 12 refs., 8 figs

  17. Final environmental statement for La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor: (Docket No. 50-409)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-04-01

    A Final Environmental Statement for the Dairyland Power Cooperative for the conversion from a provisional to a full-term operating license for the La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor, located in Vernon County, Wisconsin, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. This statement provides a summary of environmental impacts and adverse effects of operation of the facility, and a consideration of principal alternatives (including removal of LACBWR from service, alternative cooling methodology, and alternative waste treatment systems). Also included are the comments of federal, state, and local governmental agencies and certain non-governmental organizations on the La Crosse Draft Environmental Statement and staff responses to these comments. After weighing environmental, economic, and technical benefits and liabilities, the staff recommends conversion from a provisional operating license to a full-term operating license, subject to specific environmental protection limitations. An operational monitoring program shall be established as part of the Environmental Technical Specifications. 64 refs., 20 figs., 48 tabs

  18. Analysis of boiling water reactors capacities for the 100% MOX fuel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoche, Dietrich

    1999-01-01

    The electro-nuclear park exploitation leads to plutonium production. The plutonium recycling in boiling water reactors performs a use possibility. The difference between the neutronic characteristics of the uranium and the plutonium need to evaluate the substitution impact of UOX fuel by MOX fuel on the reactor operating and safety. The analysis of the main points reached to the following conclusions: the reactivity coefficients are negative, during a cooling accident the re-divergence depends on the isotopic vector of the used plutonium, the efficiency lost of control cross resulting from the plutonium utilization can be compensate by the increase of the B 4C enrichment by 10 B and the change of the steel structure by an hafnium structure, the reactivity control in evolution can be obtained by the fuel poisoning (gadolinium, erbium) and the power map control by the plutonium content monitoring. (A.L.B.)

  19. evelopment of a boiling water reactor fault diagnostic system with a signed directed graph method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, M.; Yu, C.C.; Liou, C.T.; Liao, L.Y.

    1990-01-01

    The fault diagnostic system for a nuclear power reactor is expected to be a useful decision support system for the operators during transients and accident conditions. A considerable research effort has been devoted to the development of automated fault diagnostic systems. One major approach, which has been widely used in chemical engineering, is to identify the possible causes of process disturbance using a logic-oriented method called signed directed graph (SDG). A knowledge based system was developed with the rules derived from the SDG representation. The SDG for the Chinshan nuclear power plant, which is a typical boiling water reactor, is established. The personal consultant system is used as the expert system development tool in this paper

  20. Stability monitoring of a natural-circulation-cooled boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for monitoring the stability of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are discussed. Surveillance of BWR stability is of importance as problems were encountered in several large reactors. Moreover, surveying stability allows plant owners to operate at high power with acceptable stability margins. The results of experiments performed on the Dodewaard BWR (the Netherlands) are reported. This type reactor is cooled by natural circulation, a cooling principle that is also being considered for new reactor designs. The stability of this reactor was studied both with deterministic methods and by noise analysis. Three types of stability are distinguished and were investigated separately: reactor-kinetic stability, thermal-hydraulic stability and total-plant stability. It is shown that the Dodewaard reactor has very large stability margins. A simple yet reliable stability criterion is introduced. It can be derived on-line from thhe noise signal of ex-vessel neutron detectors during normal operation. The sensitivity of neutron detectors to in-core flux perturbations - reflected in the field-of-view of the detector - was calculated in order to insure proper stability surveillance. A novel technique is presented which enables the determination of variations of the in-core coolant velocity by noise correlation. The velocity measured was interpreted on the basis of experiments performed on the air/water flow in a model of a BWR coolant channel. It appeared from this analysis that the velocity measured was much higher than the volume-averaged water and air velocities and the volumetric flux. The applicability of the above-mentioned technique to monitoring of local channel-flow stability was tested. It was observed that stability effects on the coolant velocity are masked by other effects originating from the local flow pattern. Experimental and theoretical studies show a shorter effective fuel time constant in a BWR than was assumed. (author). 118 refs.; 73 figs.; 21 tabs

  1. Stainless steels in boiling water reactors. Corrosion problems and possible solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combrade, P.; Desestret, A.; Leroy, F.; Coriou, H.

    1977-01-01

    In boiling water reactors, the heat-carrying water may have an up to 0.1 or even 0.2 ppm oxygen content, which can make it highly agressive at operating temperature for stainless steels subject to high physical stresses. Several metallurgical solutions can be considered, and in particular the use of stainless steels having a mixed austenitic-ferritic structure or of standard austenitic steels (18.10 or 18.10 Mo, such as AISI 304 and 316) with carefully controlled carbon and alloy element contents. The behavior of these steels during prolonged tests in water at 288 0 C with a 30 and even 100 ppm oxygen content turned out to be quite satisfactory [fr

  2. Simulation of the automatic depressurization system (Ads) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez G, C.; Chavez M, C.

    2012-10-01

    The automatic depressurization system (Ads) of the boiling water reactor (BWR) like part of the emergency cooling systems is designed to liberate the vapor pressure of the reactor vessel, as well as the main vapor lines. At the present time in the Engineering Faculty, UNAM personnel works in the simulation of the Laguna Verde reactor based on the nuclear code RELAP/SCADAP and in the incorporation to the same of the emergency cooling systems. The simulation of the emergency cooling systems began with the inclusion of two hydrodynamic volumes, one source and another drain, and the incorporation of the initiation logic for each emergency system. In this work is defined and designed a simplified model of Ads of the reactor, considering a detail level based on the main elements that compose it. As tool to implement the proposed model, the RELAP code was used. The simulated main functions of Ads are centered in the quick depressurization of the reactor by means of the vapor discharge through the relief/safety valves to the suppression pool, and, in the event of break of the main vapor line, the reduction of the vessel pressure operates for that the cooling systems of the core to low pressure (Lpcs and Lpci) they can begin their operation. (Author)

  3. Status report on the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, L.; Garlock, G.; Mencarelli, R.; Fellhauer, C.

    1994-01-01

    ALARON Corporation is under contract, to Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E), to complete the decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR). The project, begun, in 1986 by ANL-E personnel, is projected to be completed by the end of 1994. The final phase of work was awarded to ALARON in December 1993 with the scope of work including the disassembly and removal of all remaining reactor internals, the reactor vessel, the lead bio-shield, the core liner, and the activated portion of the concrete bio-shield. This paper discusses the work undertaken beginning in January 1994 and continuing through July 1994. During this period the required pre-mobilization documentation was prepared and approved, mobilization was completed, and the reactor internals, reactor vessel, lead bio-shield and core liner were removed. The paper will compare the planned schedule to the actual schedule, discuss problems encountered, review volume reduction techniques and health and safety issues including radiological aspects of the project

  4. Variations in the chemical speciation behaviour of radioiodines in the Tarapur Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswaran, G.; Gokhale, A.S.; Moorthy, P.N.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical behaviour of radioiodines in the primary coolant of the Tarapur Boiling Water Reactor has been studied under different operating conditions. During normal operation, radioiodines speciated mainly as I - (≅60%) and IO 3 - (≅35%) with 2 . At 1-5 h into reactor shutdown conditions, radioiodines existed predominantly as IO 3 - species (>80%). Beyond 5 h after shutdown, quantitative conversion of IO 3 - to I - was observed to occur in about 20 h duration. Long time after reactor shutdown, radioiodines were present in the coolant as I - species only. A quantitative conversion of near carrier-free IO 3 - to I - was observed in laboratory low dose rate (0.95 kGy/h), low and high dose gamma irradiation experiments in near neutral solutions both in absence and presence of externally added H 2 O 2 . However, near carrier-free I - solutions irradiated under the same conditions yielded ≅15% IO 3 - species only which is in agreement with the literature data. The radioiodine speciation behaviour in reactor water has been explained by a qualitative model coupling iodine release from defective fuel elements and the associated gamma irradiation effects. (author)

  5. A boiling-water reactor concept for low radiation exposure based on operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koine, Y.; Uchida, S.; Izumiya, M.; Miki, M.

    1983-01-01

    A review of boiling-water reactor (BWR) operating experience indicates the significant role of water chemistry in determining the radiation dose rate contributing to occupational exposure. The major contributor among the radioactive species involved is identified as 60 Co, produced by neutron activation of 59 Co originating from structural materials. Iron crud, a fine solid form of corrosion product in the reactor water, is also shown to enhance the radiation dose rate. A theoretical study, supported by the operating experience and an extensive confirmatory test, led to the computerized analytical model called DR CRUD which is capable of predicting long-term radiation dose buildup. It accounts for the mechanism of radiation buildup through corrosion products such as irons, cobalts and other radioactive elements; their generation, transport, activation, interaction and deposition in the reactor coolant system are simulated. A scoping analysis, using this model as a tool, establishes the base line of the BWR concept for low occupational exposure. The base line consists of a set of target values for an annual exposure of 200 man.rem in an 1100 MW(e) BWR unit. They are the parameters that will be built into the design such as iron and cobalt inputs to the reactor water, and the capability of the reactor and the condensate purification system. Applicable means of technology are identified to meet the targets, ranging from improved water chemistry to the purification technique, optimized material selection and the recommended operational procedure. Extensive test programmes provide specifications of these means for use in BWRs. Combinations of their application are reviewed to define the concept of reduced exposure. Analytical study verifies the effectiveness of the proposed BWR concept in achieving a low radiation dose rate; occupational exposure is reduced to 200 man.rem/a. (author)

  6. Design-development and operation of the Experimental Boiling-Water Reactor (EBWR) facility, 1955--1967

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.; Wimunc, E.A.; Whittington, G.A.

    1990-11-01

    The Experimental Boiling-Water Reactor (EBWR) was designed, built, and operated to provide experience and engineering data that would demonstrate the feasibility of the direct-cycle, boiling-water reactor and be applicable to improved, larger nuclear power stations; and was based on information obtained in the first test boiling-water reactors, the BORAX series. EBWR initially produced 20 MW(t), 5 MW(e); later modified and upgraded, as described and illustrated, it was operated at up to 100 MW(t). The facility fulfilled its primary mission -- demonstrating the practicality of the direct-boiling concept -- and, in fact, was the prototype of some of the first commercial plants and of reactor programs in some other countries. After successful completion of the Water-Cooled Reactor Program, EBWR was utilized in the joint Argonne-Hanford Plutonium Recycle Program to develop data for the utilization of plutonium as a fuel in light- water thermal systems. Final shutdown of the EBWR facility followed the termination of the latter program. 13 refs., 12 figs

  7. Study of Pu consumption in advanced light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants - compilation of Phase 1B task reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains an extensive evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants prepared for United State Department of Energy. The general areas covered in this report are: core and system performance; fuel cycle; infrastructure and deployment; and safety and environmental approval

  8. Study of Pu consumption in advanced light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants - compilation of Phase 1B task reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-09-15

    This report contains an extensive evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants prepared for United State Department of Energy. The general areas covered in this report are: core and system performance; fuel cycle; infrastructure and deployment; and safety and environmental approval.

  9. Mark I 1/5-scale boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment facility report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altes, R.G.; Pitts, J.H.; Ingraham, R.F.; Collins, E.K.; McCauley, E.W.

    1977-01-01

    An accurate Mark I 1 / 5 -scale, boiling water reactor (BWR), pressure suppression facility was designed and constructed at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) in 11 months. Twenty-seven air tests using the facility are described. Cost was minimized by utilizing equipment borrowed from other LLL programs. The total value of borrowed equipment exceeded the program's budget of $2,020,000. Substantial flexibility in the facility was used to permit independent variation in the drywell pressure-time history, initial pressure in the drywell and toroidal wetwells, initial toroidal wetwell water level and downcomer length, vent line flow resistance, and vent line flow asymmetry. The two- and three-dimensional sectors of the toroidal wetwell provided significant data

  10. Review of boiling water reactor small break loss of coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gururaj, P.M.; Dua, S.S.; Rao, A.S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the analytical and the experimental work performed by the General Electric Company to determine the performance of boiling water reactors (BWR) following postulated small break accidents (SBA). This review paper addresses the following issues: (1) the response of the BWR following small loss of inventory events; (2) methods of analysis and their justification; (3) necessity, if any, of operator action and the length of time available in which such action can be performed; and (4) operator interface following the SBA event. The results from these SBA studies for different BWR product lines show that even with the multiple system failures assumed, the BWR can successfully withstand an SBA. For a typical BWR/6, it takes the failure of 13 water delivery pumps to cause any significant core heatup. The only operator actions determined to be necessary are simple ones and ample time is available to the operator to perform these actions, if needed

  11. CIRCUS and DESIRE: Experimental facilities for research on natural-circulation-cooled boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de; Haden, T.H.J.J. van der; Zboray, R.; Manera, A.; Mudde, R.F.

    2002-01-01

    At the Delft University of Technology two thermohydraulic test facilities are being used to study the characteristics of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) with natural circulation core cooling. The focus of the research is on the stability characteristics of the system. DESIRE is a test facility with freon-12 as scaling fluid in which one fuel bundle of a natural-circulation BWR is simulated. The neutronic feedback can be simulated artificially. DESIRE is used to study the stability of the system at nominal and beyond nominal conditions. CIRCUS is a full-height facility with water, consisting of four parallel fuel channels and four parallel bypass channels with a common riser or with parallel riser sections. It is used to study the start-up characteristics of a natural-circulation BWR at low pressures and low power. In this paper a description of both facilities is given and the research items are presented. (author)

  12. Modelling of crack chemistry in sensitized stainless steel in boiling water reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, A.

    1997-01-01

    An advanced model has been used to predict the chemistry and potential in a stress corrosion crack in sensitized stainless steel in a boiling water reactor (BWR) environment. The model assumes trapezoidal crack geometry, incorporates anodic reaction and cathodic reduction within the crack, and takes into account the limited solubility of cations in high temperature water. The results indicate that the crack tip potential is not independent of the external potential, and that the reactions on the walls of the crack must be included for reliable prediction. Accordingly, both the modelling assumptions of Ford and Andresen and of Macdonald and Urquidi-Macdonald, whilst having merit, are not fully satisfactory. Extended application of the model for improved prediction of stress corrosion crack growth rate is constrained by limitations in electrochemical data which are currently inadequate. (author)

  13. Safety design of Pb-Bi-cooled direct contact boiling water fast reactor (PBWFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Uchida, Shoji; Yamada, Yumi; Koyama, Kazuya

    2008-01-01

    In Pb-Bi-cooled direct contact boiling water small fast reactor (PBWFR), steam is generated by direct contact of feedwater with primary Pb-Bi coolant above the core, and Pb-Bi coolant is circulated by steam lift pump in chimneys. Safety design has been developed to show safety features of PBWFR. Negative void reactivity is inserted even if whole of the core and upper plenum are voided hypothetically by steam intrusion from above. The control rod ejection due to coolant pressure is prevented using in-vessel type control rod driving mechanism. At coolant leak from reactor vessel and feedwater pipes, Pb-Bi coolant level in the reactor vessel required for decay heat removal is kept using closed guard vessel. Dual pipes for feedwater are employed to avoid leak of water. Although there is no concern of loss of flow accident due to primary pump trip, feedwater pump trip initiates loss of coolant flow (LOF). Injection of high pressure water slows down the flow coast down of feedwater at the LOF event. The unprotected loss of flow and heat sink (ATWS) has been evaluated, which shows that the fuel temperatures are kept lower than the safety limits. (author)

  14. Investigation of the noble metal deposition behaviour in boiling water reactors - the NORA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Karastoyanov, V.; Abolhassani-Dadras, S.; Guenther-Leopold, I.; Kivel, N.

    2010-01-01

    NobleChem™ is a technology developed by General Electric to reduce stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in reactor internals and recirculation pipes of boiling water reactors (BWRs) while preventing the negative side effects of classical hydrogen water chemistry. Noble metals (Pt, Rh) acting as electrocatalysts for the recombination of O 2 and H 2 O 2 with H 2 to H 2 O and thus reducing the corrosion potential more efficiently are injected into the feed water during reactor shut-down (classical method) or on-line during power operation. They are claimed to deposit as very fine metallic particles on all water-wetted surfaces including the most critical regions inside existing cracks and to stay electrocatalytic over long periods of time. The effectiveness of this technology in plants remains still to be demonstrated. Based on highly credible laboratory experiments down to the sub-ppb Pt concentration range, SCC mitigation may be expected, provided that a stoichiometric excess of H 2 and a sufficient surface coverage with very fine Pt particles exist simultaneously at the critical locations. Very little is known about the deposition and (re-)distribution behaviour of the Pt in the reactor. For the validation of this technique the research project NORA (noble metal deposition behaviour in BWRs) has been started at PSI with two main objectives: (i) to gain phenomenological insights and a better basic understanding of the Pt distribution and deposition behaviour in BWRs; (ii) to develop and qualify a non-destructive technique to characterise the size and distribution of the Pt particles and its local concentration on reactor components. This paper presents the objectives of the project, the planned work and a brief description of the status of the project. (author)

  15. Application of hydrogen water chemistry to moderate corrosive circumstances around the reactor pressure vessel bottom of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Ibe, Eishi; Nakata, Kiyatomo; Fuse, Motomasa; Ohsumi, Katsumi; Takashima, Yoshie

    1995-01-01

    Many efforts to preserve the structural integrity of major piping, components, and structures in a boiling water reactor (BWR) primary cooling system have been directed toward avoiding intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Application of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) to moderate corrosive circumstances is a promising approach to preserve the structural integrity during extended lifetimes of BWRs. The benefits of HWC application are (a) avoiding the occurrence of IGSCC on structural materials around the bottom of the crack growth rate, even if microcracks are present on the structural materials. Several disadvantage caused by HWC are evaluated to develop suitable countermeasures prior to HWC application. The advantages and disadvantages of HWC are quantitatively evaluated base on both BWR plant data and laboratory data shown in unclassified publications. Their trade-offs are discussed, and suitable applications of HWC are described. It is concluded that an optimal amount of Hydrogen injected into the feedwater can moderate corrosive circumstances, in the region to be preserved, without serious disadvantages. The conclusions have been drawn by combining experimental and theoretical results. Experiments in BWR plants -- e.g., direct measurements of electrochemical corrosion potential and crack growth rate at the RPV bottom -- are planned that would collect data to support the theoretical considerations

  16. TARMS, an on-line boiling water reactor operation management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, T.; Sakurai, S.; Uematsu, H.; Tsuiki, M.; Makino, K.

    1984-01-01

    The TARMS (Toshiba Advanced Reactor Management System) software package was developed as an effective on-line, on-site tool for boiling water reactor core operation management. It was designed to support a complete function set to meet the requirement to the current on-line process computers. The functions can be divided into two categories. One is monitoring of the present core power distribution as well as related limiting parameters. The other is aiding site engineers or reactor operators in making the future reactor operating plan. TARMS performs these functions with a three-dimensional BWR core physics simulator LOGOS 2, which is based on modified one-group, coarse-mesh nodal diffusion theory. A method was developed to obtain highly accurate nodal powers by coupling LOGOS 2 calculations with the readings of an in-core neutron flux monitor. A sort of automated machine-learning method also was developed to minimize the errors caused by insufficiency of the physics model adopted in LOGOS 2. In addition to these fundamental calculational methods, a number of core operation planning aid packages were developed and installed in TARMS, which were designed to make the operator's inputs simple and easy. (orig.) [de

  17. Investigation of noble metal deposition behaviour in boiling water reactors. The NORA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, Stefan; Karastoyanov, Vasil; Abolhassani-Dadras, Sousan; Guenther-Leopold, Ines; Kivel, Niko

    2010-01-01

    NobleChem trademark is a technology developed by General Electric to reduce stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in reactor internals and recirculation pipes of boiling water reactors (BWRs) while preventing the negative side effects of classic hydrogen water chemistry. Noble metals (Pt, Rh) acting as electrocatalysts for the recombination of O 2 and H 2 O 2 with H 2 to H 2 O and thus reducing the corrosion potential more efficiently are injected into the feedwater during reactor shutdown (classic method) or on-line during power operation. They are claimed to deposit as very fine metallic particles on all water-wetted surfaces, including the most critical regions inside existing cracks, and to stay electrocatalytic over long periods of time. The effectiveness of this technology in plants still remains to be demonstrated. Based on highly credible laboratory experiments down to the sub-μg . kg -1 Pt concentration range, SCC mitigation may be expected, provided that a stoichiometric excess of H 2 and a sufficient surface coverage with very fine Pt particles exist simultaneously at the critical locations [1]. Very little is known about the deposition and (re-)distribution behaviour of the Pt in the reactor. For the validation of this technique the research project NORA (noble metal deposition behaviour in BWRs) has been started at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) with two main objectives: (i) to gain phenomenological insights and a better basic understanding of the Pt distribution and deposition behaviour in BWRs; (ii) to develop and qualify a non-destructive technique to characterise the size and distribution of the Pt particles and the local concentration of Pt on reactor components. This paper presents the objectives of the project, the planned work and a brief description of the status of the project. (orig.)

  18. Investigation and examination on the cracking of pipings in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This is the report made by the Reactor Safety Technology Expert Committee to the Atomic Energy Commission regarding the investigation and examination on stress corrosion cracking which seems to be the cause of the cracking of pipings in boiling water reactors, the measures to reduce it, and the subjects of research hereafter. Recently, the stress corrosion cracking of primary coolant pipings has been often observed, and this phenomenon occurred in the pressure boundary of primary coolant, consequently it is possible to be linked to the troubles of large scale. The Reactor Material Subcommittee was established on May 14, 1975, and investigated the cracking phenomena in the recirculating system and core spray system of BWRs in Japan and foreign countries. The recent cases have been concentrated to the heat-affected part due to welding of 304 type austenitic stainless steel pipings of from 4 in to 10 in diameter for BWRs. They are the stress corrosion cracking at grain boundaries occurred under the loaded condition and in the environment of high temperature, high pressure water. The cracking of this kind was never experienced in PWRs. The results of the technical examination, the consideration of the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking, and the countermeasures are described. (Kako, I.)

  19. Best estimate approach for the evaluation of critical heat flux phenomenon in the boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaliatka, Tadas; Kaliatka, Algirdas; Uspuras, Eudenijus; Vaisnoras, Mindaugas [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Kaunas (Lithuania); Mochizuki, Hiroyasu; Rooijen, W.F.G. van [Fukui Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. of Nuclear Engineering

    2017-05-15

    Because of the uncertainties associated with the definition of Critical Heat Flux (CHF), the best estimate approach should be used. In this paper the application of best-estimate approach for the analysis of CHF phenomenon in the boiling water reactors is presented. At first, the nodalization of RBMK-1500, BWR-5 and ABWR fuel assemblies were developed using RELAP5 code. Using developed models the CHF and Critical Heat Flux Ratio (CHFR) for different types of reactors were evaluated. The calculation results of CHF were compared with the well-known experimental data for light water reactors. The uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of ABWR 8 x 8 fuel assembly CHFR calculation result was performed using the GRS (Germany) methodology with the SUSA tool. Finally, the values of Minimum Critical Power Ratio (MCPR) were calculated for RBMK-1500, BWR-5 and ABWR fuel assemblies. The paper demonstrate how, using the results of sensitivity analysis, to receive the MCPR values, which covers all uncertainties and remains best estimated.

  20. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Boiling water reactors, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWRs) (NUREG-1123, Revision 1) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examiner Standards (NUREG-1021) and the Examiner's Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Written Examinations (NUREG/BR-0122), will cover the topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (10 CFR 55). The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7,000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at BWRs. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Organization of the Catalog, Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Functions, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. Revision 1 to the BWR Catalog represents a modification in form and content of the original catalog. The K/As were linked to their applicable 10 CFR 55 item numbers. SRO level K/As were identified by 10 CFR 55.43 item numbers. The plant-wide generic and system generic K/As were combined in one section with approximately one hundred new K/As. Component Cooling Water and Instrument Air Systems were added to the Systems Section. Finally, High Containment Hydrogen Concentration and Plant Fire On Site evolutions added to the Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions section

  1. Numerical simulation in a subcooled water flow boiling for one-sided high heat flux in reactor divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, P., E-mail: pinliu@aust.edu.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan 232001 (China); Peng, X.B., E-mail: pengxb@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Song, Y.T. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Fang, X.D. [Institute of Air Conditioning and Refrigeration, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Huang, S.H. [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Mao, X. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The Eulerian multiphase models coupled with Non-equilibrium Boiling model can effectively simulate the subcooled water flow boiling. • ONB and FDB appear earlier and earlier with the increase of heat fluxes. • The void fraction increases gradually along the flow direction. • The inner CuCrZr tube deteriorates earlier than the outer tungsten layer and the middle OFHC copper layer. - Abstract: In order to remove high heat fluxes for plasma facing components in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) divertor, a numerical simulation of subcooled water flow boiling heat transfer in a vertically upward smooth tube was conducted in this paper on the condition of one-sided high heat fluxes. The Eulerian multiphase model coupled with Non-equilibrium Boiling model was adopted in numerical simulation of the subcooled boiling two-phase flow. The heat transfer regions, thermodynamic vapor quality (x{sub th}), void fraction and temperatures of three components on the condition of the different heat fluxes were analyzed. Numerical results indicate that the onset of nucleate boiling (ONB) and fully developed boiling (FDB) appear earlier and earlier with increasing heat flux. With the increase of heat fluxes, the inner CuCrZr tube will deteriorate earlier than the outer tungsten layer and the middle oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper layer. These results provide a valuable reference for the thermal-hydraulic design of a water-cooled W/Cu divertor.

  2. Crack formation in ferritic screws of main steam isolation valves in German boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinmill, H.

    1992-01-01

    In connection with crack formations at screws of main steam isolation valves in boiling water reactors, detected for the first time in 1988 in the Federal Republic of Germany, metallographic and fractographic investigations and coating analyses of screw surfaces and crack flanks were performed in order to find out the causes. These and other investigations of damaged screws were accompanied in the years 1989 and 1990 by autoclave tests made in several laboratories. With a view to the mechanical stress of the screws, tightening tests and stress analyses were performed by means of FEM. Repeated autoclave tests were concluded recently by the Stuttgart MPA. Although these tests are not reported here, it can be stated that the results obtained fit in with the overall framework of the results summed up in this report. With regard to the kind of sample stress and the results obtained, two cases have to be distinguished in the autoclave tests discussed in this report. (orig.) [de

  3. Replacement of outboard main steam isolation valves in a boiling water reactor plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlereth, J.R.; Pennington, D.

    1996-12-01

    Most Boiling Water Reactor plants utilize wye pattern globe valves for main steam isolation valves for both inboard and outboard isolation. These valves have required a high degree of maintenance attention in order to pass the plant local leakage rate testing (LLRT) requirements at each outage. Northern States Power made a decision in 1993 to replace the outboard valves at it`s Monticello plant with double disc gate valves. The replacement of the outboard valves was completed during the fall outage in 1994. During the spring outage in April of 1996 the first LLRT testing was performed with excellent results. This presentation will address the decision process, time requirements and planning necessary to accomplish the task as well as the performance results and cost effectiveness of replacing these components.

  4. Failure analysis of cracked head spray piping from the Dresden Unit 2 Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.; Dragel, G.M.

    1983-07-01

    Several sections of Type 304 stainless steel head spray piping, 6.25 cm (2.5 in.) in diameter, from the Dresden Unit 2 Boiling Water Reactor were examined to determine the nature and causes of coolant leakages detected during hydrostatic tests. Extensive pitting was observed on the outside surface of the piping, and three cracks, all located at a helical stripe apparently rubbed onto the outer surface of the piping, were also noted. Metallographic examination revealed that the cracking had initiated at the outer surface of the pipe, and showed it to be transgranular and highly branched, characteristic of chloride stress corrosion cracking. The surface pitting also appeared to have been caused by chlorides. A scanning electron microprobe x-ray analysis of the corrosion product in the cracks confirmed the presence of chlorides and also indicated the presence of calcium

  5. Approximation model of three-dimensional power distribution in boiling water reactor using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Aiyoshi, Eitaro

    2001-01-01

    Fast and accurate prediction of three-dimensional (3D) power distribution is essential in a boiling water reactor (BWR). The prediction method of 3D power distribution in BWR is developed using the neural network. Application of the neural network starts with selecting the learning algorithm. In the proposed method, we use the learning algorithms based on a class of Quasi-Newton optimization techniques called Self-Scaling Variable Metric (SSVM) methods. Prediction studies were done for a core of actual BWR plant with octant symmetry. Compared to classical Quasi-Newton methods, it is shown that the SSVM method reduces the number of iterations in the learning mode. The results of prediction demonstrate that the neural network can predict 3D power distribution of BWR reasonably well. The proposed method will be very useful for BWR loading pattern optimization problems where 3D power distribution for a huge number of loading patterns (LPs) must be performed. (author)

  6. A decision support system for maintenance management of a boiling-water reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, J.H.; Ray, A.; Levin, S.

    1996-01-01

    This article reports the concept and development of a prototype expert system to serve as a decision support tool for maintenance of boiling-water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The code of the expert system makes use of the database derived from the two BWR units operated by the Pennsylvania Power and Light Company in Berwick, Pennsylvania. The operations and maintenance information from a large number of plant equipment and sub-systems that must be available for emergency conditions and in the event of an accident is stored in the database of the expert system. The ultimate goal of this decision support tool is to identify the relevant Technical Specifications and management rules for shutting down any one of the plant sub-systems or removing a component from service to support maintenance. 6 refs., 7 figs

  7. A symptom based decision tree approach to boiling water reactor emergency operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobel, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a Decision Tree approach to development of BWR Emergency Operating Procedures for use by operators during emergencies. This approach utilizes the symptom based Emergency Procedure Guidelines approved for implementation by the USNRC. Included in the paper is a discussion of the relative merits of the event based Emergency Operating Procedures currently in use at USBWR plants. The body of the paper is devoted to a discussion of the Decision Tree Approach to Emergency Operating Procedures soon to be implemented at two United States Boiling Water Reactor plants, why this approach solves many of the problems with procedures indentified in the post accident reviews of Three Mile Island procedures, and why only now is this approach both desirable and feasible. The paper discusses how nuclear plant simulators were involved in the development of the Emergency Operating Procedure decision trees, and in the verification and validation of these procedures. (orig./HP)

  8. Boiling water reactor containment modeling and analysis at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, E.E. III; Wilson, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Under the auspices of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, severe accidents are being studied at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The boiling water reactor (BWR) studies have focused on postulated anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) accidents which might contribute to severe core damage or containment failure. A summary of the containment studies is presented in the context of the analytical tools (codes) used, typical transient simulation results and the need for prototypical containment data. All of these are related to current and future analytical capabilities. It is shown that torus temperatures during the ATWS depart from limiting conditions for BWR T-quencher operation, outside of which stable steam condensation has not been proven

  9. Aging assessment of the boiling-water reactor (BWR) standby liquid control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, R.D.; Johnson, A.B.; Buckley, G.D.; Larson, L.L.

    1992-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a Phase I aging assessment of the standby liquid control (SLC) system used in boiling-water reactors. The study was based on detailed reviews of SLC system component and operating experience information obtained from the Nuclear Plant Reliability Database System, the Nuclear Document System, Licensee Event Reports, and other databases. Sources dealing with sodium pentaborate, borates, boric acid, and the effects of environment and corrosion in the SLC system were reviewed to characterize chemical properties and corrosion characteristics of borated solutions. The leading aging degradation concern to date appears to be setpoint drift in relief valves, which has been discovered during routine surveillance and is thought to be caused by mechanical wear. Degradation was also observed in pump seals and internal valves. In general, however, the results of the Phase I study suggest that age-related degradation of SLC systems has not been serious

  10. Replacement of outboard main steam isolation valves in a boiling water reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlereth, J.R.; Pennington, D.

    1996-01-01

    Most Boiling Water Reactor plants utilize wye pattern globe valves for main steam isolation valves for both inboard and outboard isolation. These valves have required a high degree of maintenance attention in order to pass the plant local leakage rate testing (LLRT) requirements at each outage. Northern States Power made a decision in 1993 to replace the outboard valves at it's Monticello plant with double disc gate valves. The replacement of the outboard valves was completed during the fall outage in 1994. During the spring outage in April of 1996 the first LLRT testing was performed with excellent results. This presentation will address the decision process, time requirements and planning necessary to accomplish the task as well as the performance results and cost effectiveness of replacing these components

  11. Experimental determination of residual stress by neutron diffraction in a boiling water reactor core shroud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payzant, A.; Spooner, S.; Zhu, Xiaojing; Hubbard, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    Residual strains in a 51 mm (2-inch) thick 304L stainless steel plate have been measured by neutron diffraction and interpreted in terms of residual stress. The plate, measuring (300 mm) in area, was removed from a 6m (20-ft.) diameter unirradiated boiling water reactor core shroud, and included a multiple-pass horizontal weld which joined two of the cylindrical shells which comprise the core shroud. Residual stress mapping was undertaken in the heat affected zone, concentrating on the outside half of the plate thickness. Variations in residual stresses with location appeared consistent with trends expected from finite element calculations, considering that a large fraction of the residual hoop stress was released upon removal of the plate from the core shroud cylinder

  12. A study of implementing In-Cycle-Shuffle strategy to a decommissioning boiling water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chung-Yuan, E-mail: tuckjason@iner.gov.tw; Tung, Wu-Hsiung; Yaur, Shyun-Jung

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A loading pattern strategy ICS (In-Cycle-Shuffle) was implemented to the last cycle of the boiling water reactor. • The best power sharing distribution and ICS timing was found. • A new parameter “Burnup sharing” is presented to evaluate ICS strategy. - Abstract: In this paper, a loading pattern strategy In-Cycle-Shuffle (ICS) is implemented to the last cycle of the boiling water reactor (BWR) before decommissioning to save the fuel cycle cost. This method needs a core shutdown during the operation of a cycle to change the loading pattern to gain more reactivity. The reactivity model is used to model the ICS strategy in order to find out the best ICS timing and the optimum power sharing distribution before ICS and after ICS. Several parameters of reactivity model are modified and the effect of burnable poison, gadolinium (Gd), is considered in this research. Three cases are presented and it is found that the best ICS timing is at about two-thirds of total cycle length no matter the poisoning effect of Gd is considered or not. According to the optimum power sharing distribution result, it is suggested to decrease the once burnt power and increase the thrice burnt fuel power as much as possible before ICS. After ICS, it is suggested to increase the positive reactivity fuel power and decrease the thrice burnt fuel power as much as possible. A new parameter “Burnup sharing” is presented to evaluate the special case whose EOC power weighting factor and the burnup accumulation factor in the reactivity model are quite different.

  13. A study of implementing In-Cycle-Shuffle strategy to a decommissioning boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chung-Yuan; Tung, Wu-Hsiung; Yaur, Shyun-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A loading pattern strategy ICS (In-Cycle-Shuffle) was implemented to the last cycle of the boiling water reactor. • The best power sharing distribution and ICS timing was found. • A new parameter “Burnup sharing” is presented to evaluate ICS strategy. - Abstract: In this paper, a loading pattern strategy In-Cycle-Shuffle (ICS) is implemented to the last cycle of the boiling water reactor (BWR) before decommissioning to save the fuel cycle cost. This method needs a core shutdown during the operation of a cycle to change the loading pattern to gain more reactivity. The reactivity model is used to model the ICS strategy in order to find out the best ICS timing and the optimum power sharing distribution before ICS and after ICS. Several parameters of reactivity model are modified and the effect of burnable poison, gadolinium (Gd), is considered in this research. Three cases are presented and it is found that the best ICS timing is at about two-thirds of total cycle length no matter the poisoning effect of Gd is considered or not. According to the optimum power sharing distribution result, it is suggested to decrease the once burnt power and increase the thrice burnt fuel power as much as possible before ICS. After ICS, it is suggested to increase the positive reactivity fuel power and decrease the thrice burnt fuel power as much as possible. A new parameter “Burnup sharing” is presented to evaluate the special case whose EOC power weighting factor and the burnup accumulation factor in the reactivity model are quite different.

  14. Experimental study of the hydrodynamic instabilities occurring in boiling-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabreca, S.

    1964-10-01

    The subjects is an experimental out-of pile loop study of the hydrodynamic oscillations occurring in boiling-water reactors. The study was carried out at atmospheric pressure and at pressure of about 8 atmospheres, in channels heated electrically by a constant and uniform specified current. In the test at 8 atmospheres the channel was a round tube of approximately 6 mm interior diameter. At 1 atmosphere a ring-section channel was used, 10 * 20 mm in diameter, with an inner heating tube and an outer tube of pyrex. It was possible to operate with natural convection and also with forced convection with test-channel by-pass. The study consists of 3 parts: 1. Preliminary determination of the laws governing pressure-drop during boiling. 2. Determination of the fronts at which oscillation appears, within a wide range of the parameters involved. 3. A descriptive study of the oscillations and measurement of the periods. The report gives the oscillation fronts with natural and forced convection for various values of the singular pressure drop at the channel inlet and for various riser lengths. The results are presented in non-dimensional form, which is available, in first approximation, for all geometric scales and for all fluids. Besides the following points were observed: - the wall (nature and thickness) can be an important factor ; - oscillation can occur in a horizontal channel. (author) [fr

  15. Topics to be covered in safety analysis reports for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors or boiling water reactors in the F.R.G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, H.A.G.

    1977-01-01

    This manual aims at defining the standards to be used in Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants with Pressurized Water Reactors or Boiling Water Reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany. The topics to be covered are: Information about the site (geographic situation, settlement, industrial and military facilities, transport and communications, meteorological conditions, geological, hydrological and seismic conditions, radiological background), description of the power plant (building structures, safety vessel, reactor core, cooling system, ventilation systems, steam power plant, electrical facilities, systems for measurement and control), indication of operation (commissioning, operation, safety measures, radiation monitoring, organization), incident analysis (reactivity incidents, loss-of-coolant incidents, external impacts). (HP) [de

  16. Steady state thermal hydraulic analysis of a boiling water reactor core, for various power distributions, using computer code THABNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkat Raj, V.; Saha, D.

    1976-01-01

    The core of a boiling water reactor may see different power distributions during its operational life. How some of the typical power distributions affect some of the thermal hydraulic parameters such as pressure drop minimum critical heat flux ratio, void distribution etc. has been studied using computer code THABNA. The effect of an increase in the leakage flow has also been analysed. (author)

  17. The physico-chemical 131I species in the stack exhaust air of a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.

    1982-07-01

    In the stack exhaust air of a German boiling water reactor, the fractions of elemental, particulate and organic 131 I were determined over a period of three years. The average fraction of elemental 131 I, which is decisive for the ingestion dose, was about 20% during the first two years and about 50% during the third year. (orig.) [de

  18. Three-Dimensional Modeling of a Steam-Line Break in a Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinoco, Hernan

    2002-01-01

    Because of weld problems, the core grids of Units 1 and 2 at the Forsmark nuclear power plant have been replaced by grids of a new design, consisting of a single machined piece without welds. The qualifying structural analysis has been carried out considering dynamic loads, which implies that even loss-of-coolant accidents have to be included. Therefore, a detailed time description of the loads acting on the different internal parts of the reactor is needed. To achieve sufficient space and time resolution, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was considered to be a viable alternative.A CFD analysis of a steam-line break in the boiling water reactor of Unit 2 is the subject of this work. The study is based on the assumption that the timescale of the transient analysis is smaller than the relaxation time of the water-steam system. Therefore, a simulation of only the upper, steam part of the reactor with no two-phase effects (flashing) is feasible.The results obtained display a rather complex behavior of the decompression process, forcing the analysis of the pressure field to be accomplished through animation. In contrast, the computed instantaneous forces over different internal parts oscillate regularly and are approximately twice the forces estimated in the past by simpler methods, with frequencies of 30 to 40 Hz; top amplitudes of ∼1.64 MN; and relatively low damping, ∼25% after 0.5 s.According to the present results, this type of modeling is physically meaningful for simulation timescales smaller than the water-steam relaxation time, i.e., ∼0.5 s at reactor conditions. At larger times, a two-phase model is necessary to describe the decompression process since two-phase effects are dominant. The results have not yet been validated with experiments, but validation computations will be run in the future for comparison with results of the Marviken tests

  19. Development of a real-time stability measurement system for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; King, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a portable, real time system for boiling water reactor (BWR) stability measurements. The system provides a means for the operator to monitor the reactor stability using existing plant instrumentation and commercially available hardware. The noise component (i.e., perturbations around steady state) of the neutron signal in BWRs has been shown to contain information about reactor stability, and several algorithms have been developed to extract that information. For the present work, the authors have used an algorithm that has been implemented on a portable personal computer. This algorithm uses the autocorrelation function of naturally occurring neutron noise (measured without special plant perturbations) and an autoregressive modeling technique to produce the asymptotic DR. For this real-time implementation, neutron noise data is preconditioned (i.e., filtered and amplified) and sampled at a 5-Hz sampling rate using a commercial data-acquisition system. Approximately every 1.5 min, the current (snapshot) autocorrelation function is computed directly from the data, and the average autocorrelation is updated. The current and average DR estimates are evaluated with the same periodicity and are displayed on the screen along with the autocorrelations and average power spectrum of the neutron noise

  20. Nonlinear dynamics and stability of boiling water reactors: qualitative and quantitative analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Cacuci, D.G.; Perez, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    A phenomenological model has been developed to simulate the qualitative behavior of boiling water reactors (BWRs) in the nonlinear regime under deterministic and stochastic excitations. After the linear stability threshold is crossed, limit cycle oscillations appear due to interactions between two unstable equilibrium points and the phase-space trajectories. This limit cycle becomes unstable when the feedback gain exceeds a certain critical value. Subsequent limit cycle instabilities produce a cascade of period-doubling bifurcations that leads to a periodic pulsed behavior. Under stochastic excitations, BWRs exhibit a single characteristic resonance, at approx.0.5 Hz, in the linear regime. By contrast, this work shows that harmonics of this characteristic frequency appear in the nonlinear regime. Furthermore, this work also demonstrates that amplitudes of the limit cycle oscillations do not depend on the variance of the stochastic excitation and remain bounded at all times. A physical model of nonlinear BWR dynamics has also been developed and employed to calculate the amplitude of limit cycle oscillations and their effects on fuel integrity over a wide range of operating conditions in the Vermont Yankee reactor. These calculations have confirmed that, beyond the threshold for linear stability, the reactor's state variable undergo limit cycle oscillations

  1. On-line test of power distribution prediction system for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Y.; Kiguchi, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Takumi, K.; Tanaka, H.; Tsutsumi, R.; Yokomi, M.

    1982-01-01

    A power distribution prediction system for boiling water reactors has been developed and its on-line performance test has proceeded at an operating commercial reactor. This system predicts the power distribution or thermal margin in advance of control rod operations and core flow rate change. This system consists of an on-line computer system, an operator's console with a color cathode-ray tube, and plant data input devices. The main functions of this system are present power distribution monitoring, power distribution prediction, and power-up trajectory prediction. The calculation method is based on a simplified nuclear thermal-hydraulic calculation, which is combined with a method of model identification to the actual reactor core state. It has been ascertained by the on-line test that the predicted power distribution (readings of traversing in-core probe) agrees with the measured data within 6% root-mean-square. The computing time required for one prediction calculation step is less than or equal to 1.5 min by an HIDIC-80 on-line computer

  2. Variation of the effectiveness of hydrogen water chemistry in a boiling water reactor during power coastdown operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh Tsungkuang; Wang Meiya; Chu, Charles F.; Chang Ching

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model was adapted to evaluate the impact of power coastdown on the water chemistry of a commercial boiling water reactor (BWR) in this work. In principle, the power density of a nuclear reactor upon a power level decrease would immediately be lowered, followed by water chemistry variations due to reduced radiolysis of water and extended coolant residence times in the core and near-core regions. It is currently a common practice for a commercial BWR to adopt hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) for corrosion mitigation. The optimal feedwater hydrogen concentration may be different after a power coastdown is implemented in a BWR. A computer code DEMACE was used in the current study to investigate the impact of various power coastdown levels on major radiolytic species concentrations and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) behavior of components in the primary coolant circuit of a domestic reactor operating under either normal water chemistry or HWC. Our analyses indicated that under a rated core flow rate the chemical species concentrations and the ECP did not vary monotonously with decreases in reactor power level at a fixed feedwater hydrogen concentration. In particular, ECP variations basically followed the patterns of hydrogen peroxide in the select regions and exhibited high values at power level of 90% for Reactor X. (author)

  3. Analysis of a main steam isolation valve closure anticipated transient without scram in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, T.J.; Pan, C.; Chen, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) could be a major accident sequence with possible core melt and containment damage in a boiling water reactor (BWR). The behavior of a BWR/6 during a main stream isolation valve closure ATWS is investigated using the best-estimate computer program, RETRAN-02. The effects of both makeup coolant and boron injection on the reactor behavior are studied. It is found that the BWR/6 behaves similarly to the BWR/2 and BWR/4

  4. Numerical evaluation of fluid mixing phenomena in boiling water reactor using advanced interface tracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Takase, Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic design of the current boiling water reactor (BWR) is performed with the subchannel analysis codes which incorporated the correlations based on empirical results including actual-size tests. Then, for the Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) core, an actual size test of an embodiment of its design is required to confirm or modify such correlations. In this situation, development of a method that enables the thermal-hydraulic design of nuclear reactors without these actual size tests is desired, because these tests take a long time and entail great cost. For this reason, we developed an advanced thermal-hydraulic design method for FLWRs using innovative two-phase flow simulation technology. In this study, a detailed Two-Phase Flow simulation code using advanced Interface Tracking method: TPFIT is developed to calculate the detailed information of the two-phase flow. In this paper, firstly, we tried to verify the TPFIT code by comparing it with the existing 2-channel air-water mixing experimental results. Secondary, the TPFIT code was applied to simulation of steam-water two-phase flow in a model of two subchannels of a current BWRs and FLWRs rod bundle. The fluid mixing was observed at a gap between the subchannels. The existing two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing is evaluated using detailed numerical simulation data. This data indicates that pressure difference between fluid channels is responsible for the fluid mixing, and thus the effects of the time average pressure difference and fluctuations must be incorporated in the two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing. When inlet quality ratio of subchannels is relatively large, it is understood that evaluation precision of the existing two-phase flow correlations for fluid mixing are relatively low. (author)

  5. Coolability of degraded core under reflooding conditions in Nordic boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, I; Pekkarinen, E [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Nilsson, L [Studsvik EcoSafe AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Sjoevall, H [Teollisuuden Voima Oy, Olkiluoto (Finland)

    1995-09-01

    Present work is part of the first phase of subproject RAK-2.1 of the new Nordic Co-operative Reactor Safety Program, NKS. The first phase comprises reflooding calculations for the boiling water reactors (BWRs) TVO I/II in Finland and Forsmark 3 in Sweden, as a continuation of earlier severe accident analyses which were made in the SIK-2 project. The objective of the core reflooding studies is to evaluate when and how the core is still coolable with water and what are the probable consequences of water cooling. In the following phase of the RAK-2.1 project, recriticality studies will be performed. Conditions for recriticality might occur if control rods have melted away with the fuel rods intact in a shape that critical conditions can be created in reflooding with insufficiently borated water. Core coolability was investigated for two reference plants, TVO I/II and Forsmark 3. The selected accident cases were anticipated station blackout with or without successful depressurization of reactor coolant system (RCS). The effects of the recovery of emergency core cooling (ECC) were studied by varying the starting time of core reflooding. The start of ECC systems were assigned to reaching a maximum cladding temperature: 1400 K, 1600 K, 1800 K and 2000 K in the core. Cases with coolant injection through the downcomer were studied for TVO I/II and both downcomer injection and core top spray were investigated for Forsmark 3. Calculations with three different computer codes: MAAP 4, MELCOR 1.8.3 and SCDA/RELAP5/MOD 3.1 for the basis for the presented reflooding studies. Presently, and experimental programme on core reflooding phenomena has been started in Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe in QUENCH test facility. (EG) 17 refs.

  6. Expert system for maintenance management of a boiling water reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Shen; Liou, L.W.; Levine, S.; Ray, A.; Detamore, M.

    1992-01-01

    An expert system code has been developed for the maintenance of two boiling water reactor units in Berwick, Pennsylvania, that are operated by the Pennsylvania Power and Light Company (PP and L). The objective of this expert system code, where the knowledge of experienced operators and engineers is captured and implemented, is to support the decisions regarding which components can be safely and reliably removed from service for maintenance. It can also serve as a query-answering facility for checking the plant system status and for training purposes. The operating and maintenance information of a large number of support systems, which must be available for emergencies and/or in the event of an accident, is stored in the data base of the code. It identifies the relevant technical specifications and management rules for shutting down any one of the systems or removing a component from service to support maintenance. Because of the complexity and time needed to incorporate a large number of systems and their components, the first phase of the expert system develops a prototype code, which includes only the reactor core isolation coolant system, the high-pressure core injection system, the instrument air system, the service water system, and the plant electrical system. The next phase is scheduled to expand the code to include all other systems. This paper summarizes the prototype code and the design concept of the complete expert system code for maintenance management of all plant systems and components

  7. Study of plutonium disposition using existing GE advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the US to dispose of 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in a safe and proliferation resistant manner. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing permanent conversion and long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium identified Light Water Reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a US disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a typical 1155 MWe GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. A companion study of the Advanced BWR has recently been submitted. The MOX core design work that was conducted for the ABWR enabled GE to apply comparable fuel design concepts and consequently achieve full MOX core loading which optimize plutonium throughput for existing BWRs.

  8. Study of plutonium disposition using existing GE advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the US to dispose of 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in a safe and proliferation resistant manner. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing permanent conversion and long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study ''Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium identified Light Water Reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a US disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a typical 1155 MWe GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. A companion study of the Advanced BWR has recently been submitted. The MOX core design work that was conducted for the ABWR enabled GE to apply comparable fuel design concepts and consequently achieve full MOX core loading which optimize plutonium throughput for existing BWRs

  9. A novel start-up procedure for natural-circulation boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annalisa Manera; Frank Schaefer

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The elimination of recirculation pumps and associated systems, as proposed for natural-circulation Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs), allow a great simplification in the design of BWRs. On the other hand, it has been shown both experimentally and analytically that such a new reactor configuration makes the system susceptible to thermal-hydraulic instabilities during the start-up phase (so-called flashing-induced instabilities). Therefore, appropriate start-up procedures have to be planned to avoid instabilities in natural-circulation BWRs. Not many proposals of start-up procedures for natural-circulation BWRs are reported in literature, but all authors agree on the fact that the system should be pressurized before the transition to two-phase circulation is allowed. Nayak [1] and Jiang and coauthors [2] proposed to externally pressurize the system by injecting in the pressure vessel respectively steam produced in a separate boiler or nitrogen. Once the pressure in the reactor vessel is high enough, the reactor power can be increased to achieve two-phase natural circulation. Unfortunately, the procedure suggested by Nayak requires an external boiler of adequate volume and power and the related connecting piping to the reactor vessel, while the procedure suggested by Jiang and coauthors requires an additional system for the nitrogen storage and the related connecting piping to the reactor vessel. The external pressurization does not accomplish to the requirements of simplicity that are at the very base of natural circulation BWRs design and it is thus not recommendable. Cheung and Rao [3] suggested a start-up procedure in which the reactor is first filled with water at 80 deg. C at a pressure of 0.55 bar. The reactor is made critical and is pressurized in conditions of single-phase circulation up to a pressure of 63 bar. At this pressure a sudden transition to two-phase operation is achieved by opening the MSIVs (Main Steam Isolation

  10. Numerical simulation of progressive inlet orifices in boiling water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, Sara

    2004-07-01

    This thesis was carried out at Forsmark Nuclear Power Plant. The power plant in Forsmark consists of three boiling water reactors (BWR) which produce about 17% of Swedish electricity. In a BWR the nuclear reactions are used to boil water inside the reactor vessel. The water works both as a coolant and as a moderator and the resulting steam is used directly to run the turbines. A problem when running a BWR at low flow conditions is the density wave oscillations that might occur to the water flow inside the fuel assemblies. These oscillations arise due to the connection between power and flow rate in a heated channel with two-phase flow. In order to improve the stability performance of the channel an orifice plate is placed at the inlet of each fuel assembly. Today these orifice plates have sharp edges and a constant resistance coefficient. Experimental work has been done with progressive orifices, the edge of which is half-oval in shape. The advantage of progressive orifices is the lower pressure losses with an increase of the Reynolds number, a similar phenomenon that appears in external flow around curved bodies. Since there are high costs associated with experimental generation of high- temperature and high-pressure data, it is of some interest to be able to reproduce and generate data using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). This work deals with the possibility to use the CFD-code Fluent to do numerical simulations of the flow through progressive orifices. The following conclusions may be drawn from the numerical results: All simulations using Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models, two-dimensional and three-dimensional, capture an abrupt decrease of the resistance coefficient at higher Reynolds numbers. Two-equation models seem to under-predict the critical Reynolds number. The five-equation Reynolds Stress Model (RSM) gives a critical Reynolds number of the same order of magnitude of that measured in experiments. No major differences have

  11. Feasibility of core management system by data communication for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motoda, H.; Tanisaka, S.; Kiguchi, T.; Yonenaga, H.

    1977-01-01

    A core management system by data communication has been designed and proposed for more efficient operation of boiling water reactor (BWR) plants by faster transmission and centralized management of information. The system comprises three kinds f computers: a process computer for monitoring purposes at the reactor site, a center computer for administration purposes at the head office, and a large scientific computer for planning and evaluation purposes. The process and the large computers are connected to the center computer by a data transmission line. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a system, the operating history evaluation system, which is one of the subsystems of the core management system, has been developed along the above concept. Application to the evaluation of the operating history of a commercial BWR shows a great deal of merit. Quick response and a significant manpower reduction can be expected by data communication and minimized intervention of human labor. Visual display is also found to be very useful in understanding the core characteristics

  12. Bayesian optimization analysis of containment-venting operation in a boiling water reactor severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Xiaoyu; Ishikawa, Jun; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Maryyama, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Containment venting is one of several essential measures to protect the integrity of the final barrier of a nuclear reactor during severe accidents, by which the uncontrollable release of fission products can be avoided. The authors seek to develop an optimization approach to venting operations, from a simulation-based perspective, using an integrated severe accident code, THALES2/KICHE. The effectiveness of the containment-venting strategies needs to be verified via numerical simulations based on various settings of the venting conditions. The number of iterations, however, needs to be controlled to avoid cumbersome computational burden of integrated codes. Bayesian optimization is an efficient global optimization approach. By using a Gaussian process regression, a surrogate model of the “black-box” code is constructed. It can be updated simultaneously whenever new simulation results are acquired. With predictions via the surrogate model, upcoming locations of the most probable optimum can be revealed. The sampling procedure is adaptive. Compared with the case of pure random searches, the number of code queries is largely reduced for the optimum finding. One typical severe accident scenario of a boiling water reactor is chosen as an example. The research demonstrates the applicability of the Bayesian optimization approach to the design and establishment of containment-venting strategies during severe accidents

  13. Bayesian optimization analysis of containment-venting operation in a boiling water reactor severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Xiaoyu; Ishikawa, Jun; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Maryyama, Yu [Nuclear Safety Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Containment venting is one of several essential measures to protect the integrity of the final barrier of a nuclear reactor during severe accidents, by which the uncontrollable release of fission products can be avoided. The authors seek to develop an optimization approach to venting operations, from a simulation-based perspective, using an integrated severe accident code, THALES2/KICHE. The effectiveness of the containment-venting strategies needs to be verified via numerical simulations based on various settings of the venting conditions. The number of iterations, however, needs to be controlled to avoid cumbersome computational burden of integrated codes. Bayesian optimization is an efficient global optimization approach. By using a Gaussian process regression, a surrogate model of the “black-box” code is constructed. It can be updated simultaneously whenever new simulation results are acquired. With predictions via the surrogate model, upcoming locations of the most probable optimum can be revealed. The sampling procedure is adaptive. Compared with the case of pure random searches, the number of code queries is largely reduced for the optimum finding. One typical severe accident scenario of a boiling water reactor is chosen as an example. The research demonstrates the applicability of the Bayesian optimization approach to the design and establishment of containment-venting strategies during severe accidents.

  14. Optimization of Boiling Water Reactor Loading Pattern Using Two-Stage Genetic Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Aiyoshi, Eitaro

    2002-01-01

    A new two-stage optimization method based on genetic algorithms (GAs) using an if-then heuristic rule was developed to generate optimized boiling water reactor (BWR) loading patterns (LPs). In the first stage, the LP is optimized using an improved GA operator. In the second stage, an exposure-dependent control rod pattern (CRP) is sought using GA with an if-then heuristic rule. The procedure of the improved GA is based on deterministic operators that consist of crossover, mutation, and selection. The handling of the encoding technique and constraint conditions by that GA reflects the peculiar characteristics of the BWR. In addition, strategies such as elitism and self-reproduction are effectively used in order to improve the search speed. The LP evaluations were performed with a three-dimensional diffusion code that coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic models. Strong axial heterogeneities and constraints dependent on three dimensions have always necessitated the use of three-dimensional core simulators for BWRs, so that optimization of computational efficiency is required. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated by successfully generating LPs for an actual BWR plant in two phases. One phase is only LP optimization applying the Haling technique. The other phase is an LP optimization that considers the CRP during reactor operation. In test calculations, candidates that shuffled fresh and burned fuel assemblies within a reasonable computation time were obtained

  15. Artificial neural networks versus conventional methods for boiling water reactor stability monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der

    1995-01-01

    The application of an artificial neural network (ANN) for boiling water reactor (BWR) stability monitoring was studied. A three-layer perceptron was trained on synthetic autocorrelation functions to estimate the decay ratio and the resonance frequency from measured neutron noise. Training of the ANN was improved by adding noise to the training patterns and by applying nonconventional error definitions in the generalized delta rule. The performance of the developed ANN was compared with those of conventional stability monitoring techniques. Explicit care was taken for generating unbiased test data. It is found that the trained ANN is capable of monitoring the stability of the Dodewaard BWR for four specific cases. By comparing properties such as the false alarm ratio, the alarm failure ratio, and the average time to alarm, it is shown that it performs worse than model-based methods in stability monitoring of exact second-order systems but that it is more robust (better resistant to corruptions of the input data and to deviations of the system at issue from an exact second-order system) than other methods. The latter explains its good performance on the Dodewaard BWR and is promising for the application of an ANN for stability monitoring of other reactors and for other operating conditions

  16. Fact and fiction in ECP measurement and control in boiling water reactor primary coolant circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.D.

    2005-01-01

    A review is presented of various electrochemical potentials, including the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), that are used in the mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in the primary coolant circuits of boiling water reactors (BWRs). Attention is paid to carefully defining each potential in terms of fundamental electrochemical concepts, so as to counter the confusion that has arisen due to the misuse of previously accepted terminology. A brief discussion is also included of reference electrodes and it is shown on the basis of experimental data that the use of a platinum redox sensor as a reference electrode in the monitoring of ECP in BWR primary coolant circuits is inappropriate and should be discouraged. If platinum is used as a reference electrode, because of extenuating circumstances (e.g., potential measurements in high dose regions in a reactor core), the onus must be placed on the user to demonstrate quantitatively that the electrode behaves as an equilibrium electrode under the specified conditions and/or that its potential is invariant with changes in the independent variables of the system. Preferably, a means should also be demonstrated of transferring the measured potential to the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) scale. (orig.)

  17. Development of a MELCOR self-initialization algorithm for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien, C.S.; Wang, S.J.; Cheng, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    The MELCOR code, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, is suitable for calculating source terms and simulating severe accident phenomena of nuclear power plants. Prior to simulating a severe accident transient with MELCOR, the initial steady-state conditions must be generated in advance. The current MELCOR users' manuals do not provide a self-initialization procedure; this is the reason users have to adjust the initial conditions by themselves through a trial-and-error approach. A MELCOR self-initialization algorithm for boiling water reactor plants has been developed, which eliminates the tedious trial-and-error procedures and improves the simulation accuracy. This algorithm adjusts the important plant variable such as the dome pressure, downcomer level, and core flow rate to the desired conditions automatically. It is implemented through input with control functions provided in MELCOR. The reactor power and feedwater temperature are fed as input data. The initialization work of full-power conditions of the Kuosheng nuclear power station is cited as an example. These initial conditions are generated successfully with the developed algorithm. The generated initial conditions can be stored in a restart file and used for transient analysis. The methodology in this study improves the accuracy and consistency of transient calculations. Meanwhile, the algorithm provides all MELCOR users an easy and correct method for establishing the initial conditions

  18. Evaluation of a severe accident management strategy for boiling water reactors -- Drywell flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, D.; Xing, L.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Okrent, D.

    1994-01-01

    Flooding of the drywell has been suggested as a strategy to prevent reactor vessel and containment failure in boiling water reactors. To evaluate the candidate strategy, this study considers accident management as a decision problem (''drywell flooding'' versus ''do nothing'') and develops a decision-oriented framework, namely, the influence diagram approach. This analysis chooses the long-term station blackout sequence for a Mark 1 nuclear power plant (Peach Bottom), and an influence diagram with a single decision node is constructed. The node probabilities in the influence diagram are obtained from US Nuclear Regulatory Commission reports or estimated by probabilistic risk assessment methodology. In assessing potential benefits compared with adverse effects, this analysis uses two consequence measures, i.e., early and late fatalities, as decision criteria. The analysis concludes that even though potential adverse effects exist, such as ex-vessel steam explosions and containment isolation failure, the drywell flooding strategy is preferred to ''do nothing'' when evaluated in terms of these consequence measures

  19. A two-step method for developing a control rod program for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taner, M.S.; Levine, S.H.; Hsiao, M.Y.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a two-step method that is established for the generation of a long-term control rod program for boiling water reactors (BWRs). The new method assumes a time-variant target power distribution in core depletion. In the new method, the BWR control rod programming is divided into two steps. In step 1, a sequence of optimal, exposure-dependent Haling power distribution profiles is generated, utilizing the spectral shift concept. In step 2, a set of exposure-dependent control rod patterns is developed by using the Haling profiles generated at step 1 as a target. The new method is implemented in a computer program named OCTOPUS. The optimization procedure of OCTOPUS is based on the method of approximation programming, in which the SIMULATE-E code is used to determine the nucleonics characteristics of the reactor core state. In a test in cycle length over a time-invariant, target Haling power distribution case because of a moderate application of spectral shift. No thermal limits of the core were violated. The gain in cycle length could be increased further by broadening the extent of the spetral shift

  20. Operating data monitoring and fatigue evaluation systems and findings for boiling water reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, O.; Kanazawa, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Tani, M.

    1995-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is one of the most critical components of a boiling water reactor (BWR) when utilities think about plant life extension (PLEX). Design stress analysis sometimes reports very high fatigue usage factors for such portions of RPVs as stud bolt, feedwater nozzle and support skirt.In order to evaluate design margin and to eliminate excessive conservatism in this design analysis to pave the way for PLEX, Japanese BWR utilities jointly with BWR manufacturers in Japan established a programme (1) to acquire plant operational data on line for specific parameters used in stress analysis, (2) to evaluate margin in the design using measured plant data best estimate boundary conditions for stress analysis, and (3) to establish a simplified fatigue analysis method for BWR RPV.A plant data acquisition system, named OPEDAS, has been developed and installed in Tokyo Electric Power Company's 1100MWe BWR at its Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant. Best estimate stress analysis using measured in-plant data has been carried out and the results show considerable margin in fatigue usage factor over the design. A simplified fatigue analysis method using in-plant data has been developed with the Green's function, although some limitations have been identified for its use. ((orig.))

  1. Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents from boiling water reactors (BWR-GALE Code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangart, R.L.; Bell, L.G.; Boegli, J.S.; Burke, W.C.; Lee, J.Y.; Minns, J.L.; Stoddart, P.G.; Weller, R.A.; Collins, J.T.

    1978-12-01

    The calculational procedures described in the report reflect current NRC staff practice. The methods described will be used in the evaluation of applications for construction permits and operating licenses docketed after January 1, 1979, until this NUREG is revised as a result of additional staff review. The BWR-GALE (Boiling Water Reactor Gaseous and Liquid Effluents) Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the release of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents from boiling water reactors (BWRs). The calculations are based on data generated from operating reactors, field tests, laboratory tests, and plant-specific design considerations incorporated to reduce the quantity of radioactive materials that may be released to the environment

  2. Cycle studies: material balance estimation in the domain of pressurized water and boiling water reactors. Experimental qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabert, Christine

    1994-01-01

    This study is concerned with the physics of the fuel cycle the aim being to develop and make recommendations concerning schemes for calculating the neutronics of light water reactor fuel cycles. A preliminary study carried out using the old fuel cycle calculation scheme APOLLO1- KAFKA and the library SERMA79 has shown that for the compositions of totally dissolved assemblies from Pressurized Water Reactors (type 17*17) and also for the first time, for Boiling Water Reactor assemblies (type 8*8), the differences between calculation and measurement are large and must be reduced. The integration of the APOLLO2 neutronics code into the fuel cycle calculation scheme improves the results because it can model the situation more precisely. A comparison between APOLLO1 and APOLLO2 using the same options, demonstrated the consistency of the two methods for PWR and BWR geometries. Following this comparison, we developed an optimised scheme for PWR applications using the library CEA86 and the code APOLLO2. Depending on whether the information required is the detailed distribution of the composition of the irradiated fuel or the average composition (estimation of the total material balance of the fuel assembly), the physics options recommended are different. We show that the use of APOLLO2 and the library CEA86 improves the results and especially the estimation of the Pu 239 content. Concerning the Boiling Water Reactor, we have highlighted the need to treat several axial sections of the fuel assembly (variation of the void-fraction, heterogeneity of composition). A scheme using Sn transport theory, permits one to obtain a better coherence between the consumption of U 235 , the production of plutonium and burnup, and a better estimation of the material balance. (author) [fr

  3. Photographic and video techniques used in the 1/5-scale Mark I boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.; Lord, D.

    1978-01-01

    The report provides a description of the techniques and equipment used for the photographic and video recordings of the air test series conducted on the 1/5 scale Mark I boiling water reactor (BWR) pressure suppression experimental facility at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) between March 4, 1977, and May 12, 1977. Lighting and water filtering are discussed in the photographic system section and are also applicable to the video system. The appendices contain information from the photographic and video camera logs

  4. Noise analysis of the Dodewaard boiling water reactor: characteristics and time history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veer, J.H.C. v.d.; Kema, N.V.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor noise measurements have been performed in the Dodewaard BWR since the eighth fuel cycle (1978). Analysis of the noise characteristics of the ex-core neutron detectors are reported. As a result characteristics of the global component of the boiling noise and the influence of oscillatory effects in reactor pressure control and steam flow rate are described. The influence of power feedback effects on the detection of global noise at low frequencies is given using point kinetic reactor theory. Results are reported on the behaviour of the neutron noise characteristics during one fuel cycle and on the behaviour from fuel cycle 8 to 11. (author)

  5. An advanced frequency-domain code for boiling water reactor (BWR) stability analysis and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrooz, A.

    2008-01-01

    The two-phase flow instability is of interest for the design and operation of many industrial systems such as boiling water reactors (BWRs), chemical reactors, and steam generators. In case of BWRs, the flow instabilities are coupled to the power instabilities via neutronic-thermal hydraulic feedbacks. Since these instabilities produce also local pressure oscillations, the coolant flashing plays a very important role at low pressure. Many frequency-domain codes have been used for two-phase flow stability analysis of thermal hydraulic industrial systems with particular emphasis to BWRs. Some were ignoring the effect of the local pressure, or the effect of 3D power oscillations, and many were not able to deal with the neutronics-thermal hydraulics problems considering the entire core and all its fuel assemblies. The new frequency domain tool uses the best available nuclear, thermal hydraulic, algebraic and control theory methods for simulating BWRs and analyzing their stability in either off-line or on-line fashion. The novel code takes all necessary information from plant files via an interface, solves and integrates, for all reactor fuel assemblies divided into a number of segments, the thermal-hydraulic non-homogenous non-equilibrium coupled linear differential equations, and solves the 3D, two-energy-group diffusion equations for the entire core (with spatial expansion of the neutron fluxes in Legendre polynomials).It is important to note that the neutronics equations written in terms of flux harmonics for a discretized system (nodal-modal equations) generate a set of large sparse matrices. The eigenvalue problem associated to the discretized core statics equations is solved by the implementation of the implicit restarted Arnoldi method (IRAM) with implicit shifted QR mechanism. The results of the steady state are then used for the calculation of the local transfer functions and system transfer matrices. The later are large-dense and complex matrices, (their size

  6. Safety problems of nuclear power plants with channel-type graphite boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emel'yanov, I.Ya.; Vasilevskij, V.P.; Volkov, V.P.; Gavrilov, P.A.; Kramerov, A.Ya.; Kuznetsov, S.P.; Kunegin, E.P.; Rybakov, N.Z.

    1977-01-01

    Construction of nuclear power plants in a highly populated region near large industrial centres necessitates to pay a special attention to their nuclear and radiation safety. Safety problems of nuclear reactor operation are discussed, in particular, they are: reliable stoppage of fission chain reaction at any emergency cases; reliable core cooling with failure of various equipment; emergency core cooling with breached pipes of a circulating circuit; and prevention of radioactive coolant release outside the nuclear power plant in amount exceeding the values adopted. Channel-type water boiling reactors incorporate specific features requiring a new approach to safety operation of a reactor and a nuclear power plant. These include primarily a rather large steam volume in the coolant circuit, large amount of accumulated heat, void reactivity coefficient. Channel-type reactors characterized by fair neutron balance and flexible fuel cycle, have a series of advantages alleviating the problem of ensuring their safety. The possibility of reliable control over the state of each channel allows to replace failed fuel elements by the new ones, when operating on-load, to increase the number of circulating loops and reduce the diameter of main pipelines, simplifies significantly the problem of channel emergency cooling and localization of a radioactive coolant release from a breached circuit. The concept of channel-type reactors is based on the solution of three main problems. First, plant safety should be assured in emergency switch off of separate units and, if possible, energy conditions should be maintained, this is of particular importance considering the increase in unit power. Second, the system of safety and emergency cooling should eliminate a great many failures of fuel elements in case of potential breaches of any tube in the circulating circuit. Finally, rugged boxes and localizing devices should be provided to exclude damage of structural elements of the nuclear power

  7. Corrosion products, activity transport and deposition in boiling water reactor recirculation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Buckley, D.; Grauer, R.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1989-09-01

    The deposition of activated corrosion products in the recirculation loops of Boiling Water Reactors produces increased radiation levels which lead to a corresponding increase in personnel radiation dose during shut down and maintenance. The major part of this dose rate is due to cobalt-60. The following areas are discussed in detail: - the origins of the corrosion products and of cobalt-59 in the reactor feedwaters, - the consolidation of the cobalt in the fuel pin deposits (activation), - the release and transport of cobalt-60, - the build-up of cobalt-60 in the corrosion products in the recirculation loops. Existing models of the build-up of circuit radioactivity are discussed and the operating experiences from selected reactors are summarised. Corrosion chemistry aspects of the cobalt build-up in the primary circuit have already been studied on a broad basis and are continuing to be researched in a number of centers. The crystal chemistry of chromium-nickel steel corrosion products poses a number of yet unanswered questions. There are major loopholes associated with the understanding of activation processes of cobalt deposited on the fuel pins and in the mass transfer of cobalt-60. For these processes, the most important influence stems from factors associated with colloid chemistry. Accumulation of data from different BWRs contributes little to the understanding of the activity build-up. However, there are examples that the problem of activity build-up can be kept under control. Although many details for a quantitative understanding are still missing, the most important correlations are visible. The activity build-up in the BWR recirculation systems cannot be kept low by a single measure. Rather a whole series of measures is necessary, which influences not only cobalt-60 deposition but also plant and operation costs. (author) 26 figs., 13 tabs., 90 refs

  8. BWR [boiling water reactor] core criticality versus water level during an ATWS [anticipated transient without scram] event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Peng, C.M.; Maly, J.

    1988-01-01

    The BWR [boiling water reactor] emergency procedures guidelines recommend management of core water level to reduce the power generated during an anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) event. BWR power level variation has traditionally been calculated in the system codes using a 1-D [one-dimensional] 2-group neutron kinetics model to determine criticality. This methodology used also for calculating criticality of the partially covered BWR cores has, however, never been validated against data. In this paper, the power level versus water level issues in an ATWS severe accident are introduced and the accuracy of the traditional methodology is investigated by comparing with measured data. It is found that the 1-D 2-group treatment is not adequate for accurate predictions of criticality and therefore the system power level for the water level variations that may be encountered in a prototypical ATWS severe accident. It is believed that the current predictions for power level may be too high

  9. Anticipated transient without scram analysis of the simplified boiling water reactor following main steam isolation valve closure with boron injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, H.J.; Cheng, H.S.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1996-01-01

    The simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) operating in natural circulation is designed with many passive safety features. An anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) initiated by inadvertent closure of the main steam isolation valve (MSIV) in an SBWR has been analyzed using the RAMONA-4B code of Brookhaven National Laboratory. This analysis demonstrates the predicted performance of the SBWR during an MSIV closure ATWS, followed by shutdown of the reactor through injection of boron into the reactor core from the standby liquid control system

  10. Two-phase flow in the upper plenum of a boiling water nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinoco, Hernan

    2003-01-01

    The end part of the Emergency Core Spray System (ECSS) of the Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) at Forsmark Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is situated in the Upper Plenum. It consists of a pipe network equipped with water injection nozzles. In case of Lost-of-Coolant Accidents (LOCAs), the ECSS should maintain the core covered by water and, at the same time, rapidly cool and decompress the reactor by means of cold water injection. In similar reactors, some welds belonging to the ECSS support have, after a period of time, shown crack indications. Inspection, repair or replacement of these welds is time consuming and expensive. For this reason, it has now been decided to permanently remove the end part of the ECSS and to replace it by water injection in the Downcomer. However, this removal should not be accompanied by undesirable effects like an increase in the moisture of the steam used for operating the turbines. To investigate the effect of this removal on the steam moisture, a CFD analysis of the two-phase flow in the Upper Plenum of Unit 3, with and without ECSS, has been carried out by means of a two-phase Euler model in FLUENT 6.0. The inlet conditions are given by an analysis of the core kinetics and thermal hydraulics by mean of the POLCA-code. The outlet conditions, i. e. the steam separator pressure drops, are given by empirical correlations from the experiments carried out at the SNORRE facility. The predicted the mass flow-rates to each separator, together with empirical correlations for the moisture content of the steam leaving the separators and the steam dryer, indicate a slight decrease in the steam moisture when the ECSS is removed. Also, a minor decrease in pressure losses over the Upper Plenum is achieved with this removal. On the other hand, rounding the sharp edges of the inlet openings to the steam separators at the shroud cover may give a large reduction in pressure losses

  11. Study of plutonium disposition using the GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-04-30

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the U.S. to disposition 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in parallel with a similar program in Russia. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study {open_quotes}Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium{close_quotes} identified light water reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a U.S. disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a 1350 MWe GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. The ABWR represents the integration of over 30 years of experience gained worldwide in the design, construction and operation of BWRs. It incorporates advanced features to enhance reliability and safety, minimize waste and reduce worker exposure. For example, the core is never uncovered nor is any operator action required for 72 hours after any design basis accident. Phase 1 of this study was documented in a GE report dated May 13, 1993. DOE`s Phase 1 evaluations cited the ABWR as a proven technical approach for the disposition of plutonium. This Phase 2 study addresses specific areas which the DOE authorized as appropriate for more in-depth evaluations. A separate report addresses the findings relative to the use of existing BWRs to achieve the same goal.

  12. Corrosion product deposition on fuel element surfaces of a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, A.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade the problem of corrosion products deposition on light water reactor fuel elements has been extensively investigated in relation to the possibility of failures caused by them. The goal of the present study is to understand in a quantitative way the formation of such kind of deposits and to analytically understand the mechanism of formation and deposition with help of the quasi-steady state concentrations of a number of 3d metals in reactor water. Recent investigations on the complex corrosion product deposits on a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel cladding have shown that the observed layer locally presents unexpected magnetic properties. The buildup of magnetic corrosion product deposits (crud) on the fuel cladding of the BWR, Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt (KKL) Switzerland has hampered the Eddy-current based measurements of ZrO 2 layer thickness. The magnetic behavior of this layer and its axial variation on BWR fuel cladding is of interest with respect to non-destructive cladding characterization. Consequently, a cladding from a BWR was cut at elevations of 810 mm, where the layer was observed to be magnetic, and of 1810 mm where it was less magnetic. The samples were subsequently analyzed using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), magnetic analysis and X-ray techniques (μXRF, μXRD and μXAFS). Both EPMA and μXRF have shown that the observed corrosion deposit layer which is situated on the Zircaloy corrosion layer consists mostly of 3-d elements’ oxides (Fe, Zn, Ni and Mn). The distribution of these elements within the investigated layer is rather complex and not homogeneous. The main components identified by 2D μXRD mapping inside the layer were hematite and spinel phases with the common formula (M x Fe y )[M (1-x) Fe (2-y) ]O 4 , where M = Zn, Ni, Mn. With μXRD it was clearly shown that the cell parameter of analyzed spinel is different from the one of the pure endmembers (ZnFe 2 O 4 , NiFe 2 O 4 and MnFe 2 O 4 ) proving the existence of

  13. Parametric study of recriticality in a boiling water reactor severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamoun, B.I.; Witt, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Recriticality is possible in a severe accident if unborated or low boron concentration water is added to a damaged core after control rod melting but before fuel melting. Recriticality in a severe accident in a boiling water reactor was parametrically investigated using the TWODANT code. Eigenvalue calculations for a unit central fuel cell with reflective boundary conditions were performed by solving the two-dimensional multigroup steady-state Boltzman transport equation using TWODANT. Two sets of calculations were performed in this work. The first set of calculations was carried out under three types of normal operating conditions to provide reference values for the accident calculations: (a) cold rodded condition, (b) cold unrodded condition, and (c) hot full-power condition. The eigenvalues at these conditions were found to be 1.055, 1.208, and 1.098, respectively. The second set of calculations was carried out after the melting of the control element and during the reflood phase, under the following reflood conditions: (a) reflood with unborated water and (b) reflood with borated water. For the reflood case with unborated water, five values of void fractions were considered (100, 60, 40, 20, and 0%). Decreasing void fractions represent greater refill levels during the reflood process. The system pressure was taken to be 7 MPa, while the moderator temperature was set to 560 K. Plotting the eigenvalue compared with the fraction of control materials lost indicates recriticality is only possible if nearly 100% of the control material is lost from the core. Eigenvalue calculations were repeated for short- and long-term recovery conditions of the reflood phase corresponding to maximum moderator density at 4 MPa pressure and 525 K moderator temperature and for 1 MPa pressure and 325 K moderator temperature, respectively. Recriticality was again observed to be a concern only after losing 95% ore more of control materials from the unit cell

  14. Intelligent information data base of flow boiling characteristics in once-through steam generator for integrated type marine water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inasaka, Fujio; Nariai, Hideki

    1998-01-01

    Valuable experimental knowledge with flow boiling characteristics of the helical-coil type once-through steam generator was converted into an intelligent information data base program. The program was created as a windows application using the Visual Basic. Main functions of the program are as follows: (1) steady state flow boiling analysis of any helical-coil type once-through steam generator, (2) analysis and comparison with the experimental data, (3) reference and graph display of the steady state experimental data, (4) reference of the flow instability experimental data and display of the instability threshold correlated by each parameter, (5) summary of the experimental apparatus. (6) menu bar such as a help and print. In the steady state analysis, the region lengths of subcooled boiling, saturated boiling, and super-heating, and the temperature and pressure distributions etc. for secondary water calculated. Steady state analysis results agreed well with the experimental data, with the exception of the pressure drop at high mass velocity. The program will be useful for the design of not only the future integrated type marine water reactor but also the small sized water reactor with helical-coil type steam generator

  15. Cracks propagation by stress corrosion cracking in conditions of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes C, P.

    2003-01-01

    This work presents the results of the assays carried out in the Laboratory of Hot Cells of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) to a type test tube Compact Tension (CT), built in steel austenitic stainless type 304L, simulating those conditions those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), at temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa, to determine the speed to which the cracks spread in this material that is of the one that different components of a reactor are made, among those that it highlights the reactor core vessel. The application of the Hydrogen Chemistry of the Water is presented (HWC) that is one alternative to diminish the corrosion effect low stress in the component, this is gets controlling the quantity of oxygen and of hydrogen as well as the conductivity of the water. The rehearsal is made following the principles of the Mechanics of Elastic Lineal Fracture (LEFM) that considers a crack of defined size with little plastic deformation in the tip of this; the measurement of crack advance is continued with the technique of potential drop of direct current of alternating signal, this is contained inside the standard Astm E-647 (Method of Test Standard for the Measurement of Speed of Growth of Crack by fatigue) that is the one that indicates us as carrying out this test. The specifications that should complete the test tubes that are rehearsed as for their dimensions, it forms, finish and determination of mechanical properties (tenacity to the fracture mainly) they are contained inside the norm Astm E-399, the one which it is also based on the principles of the fracture mechanics. The obtained results were part of a database to be compared with those of other rehearsals under different conditions, Normal Chemistry of the Water (NWC) and it dilutes with high content of O 2 ; to determine the conditions that slow more the phenomena of stress corrosion cracking, as well as the effectiveness of the used chemistry and of the method of

  16. Boiling water reactor with innovative safety concept: The Generation III+ SWR-1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stosic, Zoran V. [AREVA NP GmbH, Koldestr. 16, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)], E-mail: Zoran.Stosic@areva.com; Brettschuh, Werner; Stoll, Uwe [AREVA NP GmbH, Koldestr. 16, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    AREVA NP has developed an innovative boiling water reactor (BWR) SWR-1000 in close cooperation with German nuclear utilities and with support from various European partners. This Generation III+ reactor design marks a new era in the successful tradition of BWR and, with a net electrical output of approximately 1250 MWe, is aimed at ensuring competitive power generating costs compared to gas and coal fired stations. It is particularly suitable for countries whose power networks cannot facilitate large power plants. At the same time, the SWR-1000 meets the highest safety standards, including control of core melt accidents. These objectives are met by supplementing active safety systems with passive safety equipment of various designs for accident detection and control and by simplifying systems needed for normal plant operation on the basis of past operating experience. The plant is also protected against airplane crash loads. The functional capabilities and capacities of all new systems and components were successfully tested under realistic and conservative boundary conditions in large-scale test facilities in Finland, Switzerland and Germany. In general, the SWR-1000 design is based on well-proven analytical codes and design tools validated for BWR applications through recalculation of relevant experiments and independent licensing activities performed by authorities or their experts. The overview of used analytical codes and design tools as well as performed experimental validation programs is presented. Effective implementation of passive safety systems is demonstrated through the numerical simulation of transients and loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) as well as through analytical simulation of a severe accident associated with the core melt. In the LOCA simulation presented the existing active core flooding systems were not used for emergency control: only passive systems were relevant for the analyses. Despite this - no core heat-up occurred. In the case of

  17. Remote mechanized equipment for the repair and replacement of boiling water reactor recirculation loop piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauser, D.; Busch, D.F.

    1983-01-01

    Equipment has been assembled for the remote repair or replacement of boiling water reactor nuclear plant piping in the diameter range of 4 to 28 inches (10-71 cm). The objectives of this program were to produce high-quality pipe welds, reduce plant downtime, and reduce man-rem exposure. The repair strategy was to permit repair personnel to install and check out the repair subsystems and then leave the radiation zone allowing the operations to be conducted at a distance of up to 300 feet (91 m) from the operator. The complete repair system comprises subsystems for pipe severing, dimensional gaging, joint preparation, counterboring, welding, postweld nondestructive inspection (conceptual design), and audio, electronic, and visual monitoring of all operations. Components for all subsystems, excluding those for postweld nondestructive inspection, were purchased and modified as needed for integration into the repair system. Subsystems were designed for two sizes of Type 304 stainless steelpipe. For smaller, 12-inch-diameter (30.5 cm) pipe, severing is accomplished by a power hack saw and joint preparation and counterboring by an internally mounted lathe. The 22-inch-diameter (56 cm) pipe is severed, prepared, and counterbored using an externally mounted, single-point machining device. Dimensional gaging is performed to characterize the pipe geometry relative to a fixed external reference surface, allowing the placement of the joint preparation and the counterbore to be optimized. For both pipe sizes, a track-mounted gas tungsten-arc welding head with filler wire feed is used

  18. Measurement on the effect of sound wave in upper plenum of boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Kosuke; Someya, Satoshi; Okamoto, Koji

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the power uprate of Boiling Water Reactors have been conducted at several existing power plants as a way to improve plant economy. In one of the power uprated plants (117.8% uprates) in the United States, the steam dryer breakages due to fatigue fracture occurred. It is conceivable that the increased steam flow passing through the branches caused a self-induced vibration with the propagation of sound wave into the steam-dome. The resonance among the structure, flow and the pressure fluctuation resulted in the breakages. To understand the basic mechanism of the resonance, previous researches were done by a point measurement of the pressure and by a phase averaged measurement of the flow, while it was difficult to detect the interaction among them by the conventional method. In this study, Dynamic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) System was applied to investigate the effect of sound on natural convection and forced convection. Especially, when the phases of acoustic sources were different, various acoustic wave effects were checked. (author)

  19. Optimization of fuel exchange machine operation for boiling water reactors using an artificial intelligence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, K.; Araki, T.; Tatemichi, S.I.

    1987-01-01

    Optimization of fuel assembly exchange machine movements during periodic refueling outage is discussed. The fuel assembly movements during a fuel shuffling were examined, and it was found that the fuel assembly movements consist of two different movement sequences;one is the ''PATH,'' which begins at a discharged fuel assembly and terminates at a fresh fuel assembly, and the other is the ''LOOP,'' where fuel assemblies circulate in the core. It is also shown that fuel-loading patterns during the fuel shuffling can be expressed by the state of each PATH, which is the number of elements already accomplished in the PATH actions. Based on this fact, a scheme to determine a fuel assembly movement sequence within the constraint was formulated using the artificial intelligence language PROLOG. An additional merit to the scheme is that it can simultaneously evaluate fuel assembly movement, due to the control rods and local power range monitor exchange, in addition to normal fuel shuffling. Fuel assembly movements, for fuel shuffling in a 540-MW(electric) boiling water reactor power plant, were calculated by this scheme. It is also shown that the true optimization to minimize the fuel exchange machine movements would be costly to obtain due to the number of alternatives that would need to be evaluated. However, a method to obtain a quasi-optimum solution is suggested

  20. Automatic boiling water reactor loading pattern design using ant colony optimization algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.-D. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2 Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Nuclear Engineering Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, No. 1000, Wenhua Rd., Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jdwang@iner.gov.tw; Lin Chaung [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2 Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2009-08-15

    An automatic boiling water reactor (BWR) loading pattern (LP) design methodology was developed using the rank-based ant system (RAS), which is a variant of the ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm. To reduce design complexity, only the fuel assemblies (FAs) of one eight-core positions were determined using the RAS algorithm, and then the corresponding FAs were loaded into the other parts of the core. Heuristic information was adopted to exclude the selection of the inappropriate FAs which will reduce search space, and thus, the computation time. When the LP was determined, Haling cycle length, beginning of cycle (BOC) shutdown margin (SDM), and Haling end of cycle (EOC) maximum fraction of limit for critical power ratio (MFLCPR) were calculated using SIMULATE-3 code, which were used to evaluate the LP for updating pheromone of RAS. The developed design methodology was demonstrated using FAs of a reference cycle of the BWR6 nuclear power plant. The results show that, the designed LP can be obtained within reasonable computation time, and has a longer cycle length than that of the original design.

  1. Data Reconciliation in the Steam-Turbine Cycle of a Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunde, Svein; Berg, Oivind; Dahlberg, Lennart; Fridqvist, Nils-Olof

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model for a boiling water reactor steam-turbine cycle was assembled by means of a configurable, steady-state modeling tool TEMPO. The model was connected to live plant data and intermittently fitted to these by minimization of a weighted least-squares object function. The improvement in precision achieved by this reconciliation was assessed from quantities calculated from the model equations linearized around the minimum and from Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that the inclusion of the flow-passing characteristics of the turbines in the model equations significantly improved the precision as compared to simple mass and energy balances, whereas heat transfer calculations in feedwater heaters did not. Under the assumption of linear model equations, the quality of the fit can also be expressed as a goodness-of-fit Q. Typical values for Q were in the order of 0.9. For a validated model Q may be used as a fault detection indicator, and Q dropped to very low values in known cases of disagreement between the model and the plant state. The sensitivity of Q toward measurement faults is discussed in relation to redundancy. The results of the linearized theory and Monte Carlo simulations differed somewhat, and if a more accurate analysis is required, this is better based on the latter. In practical application of the presently employed techniques, however, assessment of uncertainties in raw data is an important prerequisite

  2. A study on boiling water reactor regional stability from the viewpoint of higher harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Yutaka; Takigawa, Yukio; Uematsu, Hitoshi

    1994-01-01

    A quantitative study on a mechanism for boiling water reactor regional stability has been carried out from the viewpoint of higher harmonics. In the mechanism, the gain decrease in the void-to-power transfer function can be explained by the higher harmonics mode subcriticality. It is shown that the thermal-hydraulic feedback effect can compensate for the gain decrease, and regional oscillation can be sustained that way. For quantitative evaluations, a three-dimensional higher harmonics analysis model has been developed. The results show that the first azimuthal harmonics subcriticality has a relatively small value under a regionally unstable condition. Comparing the subcriticality and the steady-state power distribution, it is shown that the distribution exists whose first azimuthal harmonics subcriticality takes a small value. A method of decomposition for the oscillated power responses into the harmonics modes is presented. The results show that the corewide oscillation power response consists almost entirely of the fundamental mode, and the regional oscillation power response consists almost entirely of the first azimuthal harmonics mode. This indicates that regional oscillation is a phenomenon in which the first azimuthal harmonics mode oscillates on the basis of the fundamental mode

  3. Higher order generalized perturbation theory for boiling water reactor in-core fuel management optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, B.R.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) loading pattern assessment requires solving the two-group, nodal form of the neutron diffusion equation and drift-flux form of the fluid equations simultaneously because these equation sets are strongly coupled via nonlinear feedback. To reduce the computational burden associated with the calculation of the core attributes (that is, core eigenvalue and thermal margins) of a perturbed BWR loading pattern, the analytical and numerical aspects of a higher order generalized perturbation theory (GPT) method, which correctly addresses the strong nonlinear feedbacks of two-phase flow, have been established. Inclusion of Jacobian information in the definition of the generalized flux adjoints provides for a rapidly convergent iterative method for solution of the power distribution and eigenvalue of a loading pattern perturbed from a reference state. Results show that the computational speedup of GPT compared with conventional forward solution methods demanding consistent accuracy is highly dependent on the number of spatial nodes utilized by the core simulator, varying from superior to inferior performance as the number of nodes increases

  4. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR): Project final report, Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E.; Aldana, J.

    1997-03-01

    The Final Report for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) of the Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) facility contains the descriptions and evaluations of the activities and the results of the EBWR D ampersand D project. It provides the following information: (1) An overall description of the ANL-E site and EBWR facility. (2) The history of the EBWR facility. (3) A description of the D ampersand D activities conducted during the EBWR project. (4) A summary of the final status of the facility, including the final and confirmation surveys. (5) A summary of the final cost, schedule, and personnel exposure associated with the project, including a summary of the total waste generated. This project report covers the entire EBWR D ampersand D project, from the initiation of Phase I activities to final project closeout. After the confirmation survey, the EBWR facility was released as a open-quotes Radiologically Controlled Area,close quotes noting residual elevated activity remains in inaccessible areas. However, exposure levels in accessible areas are at background levels. Personnel working in accessible areas do not need Radiation Work Permits, radiation monitors, or other radiological controls. Planned use for the containment structure is as an interim transuranic waste storage facility (after conversion)

  5. Interfacing systems LOCAs [Loss of Coolant Accidents] at boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Tsong-Lun; Fitzpatrick, R.; Stoyanov, S.

    1987-01-01

    The work presented in this paper was performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) effort towards the resolution of Generic Issue 105 ''Interfacing System Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCAs) at Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs).'' For BWRs, intersystem LOCA have typically either not been considered in probabilistic risk analyses, or if considered, were judged to contribute little to the risk estimates because of their perceived low frequency of occurrence. However, recent operating experience indicates that the pressure isolation valves (PIVs) in BWRs may not adequately protect against overpressurization of low pressure systems. The objective of this paper is to present the results of a study which analyzed interfacing system LOCA at several BWRs. The BWRs were selected to best represent a spectrum of BWRs in service using industry operating event experience and plant-specific information/configurations. The results presented here include some possible changes in test requirements/practices as well as an evaluation of their reduction potential in terms of core damage frequency

  6. Automatic boiling water reactor control rod pattern design using particle swarm optimization algorithm and local search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Cheng-Der, E-mail: jdwang@iner.gov.tw [Nuclear Engineering Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, No. 1000, Wenhua Rd., Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Chaung [National Tsing Hua University, Department of Engineering and System Science, 101, Section 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► The PSO algorithm was adopted to automatically design a BWR CRP. ► The local search procedure was added to improve the result of PSO algorithm. ► The results show that the obtained CRP is the same good as that in the previous work. -- Abstract: This study developed a method for the automatic design of a boiling water reactor (BWR) control rod pattern (CRP) using the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. The PSO algorithm is more random compared to the rank-based ant system (RAS) that was used to solve the same BWR CRP design problem in the previous work. In addition, the local search procedure was used to make improvements after PSO, by adding the single control rod (CR) effect. The design goal was to obtain the CRP so that the thermal limits and shutdown margin would satisfy the design requirement and the cycle length, which is implicitly controlled by the axial power distribution, would be acceptable. The results showed that the same acceptable CRP found in the previous work could be obtained.

  7. Studies on improvements in the control methods of boiling water reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankin, Shuichi

    1982-08-01

    In order to improve the performance of regulation and load following control of boiling water reactor plant, optimal control theory is applied and new types of control method are developed. Case-α controller is first formulated on the basis of the optimal linear regulator theory applied to the linealized model of the system; it is then modified by adding a integration-type action in a feed back loop and by the use of variable gain and reference for adapting to the power level requested. Case-#betta# controller consists of a hierarchical control scheme which has classical P.I. type sub-loop controllers at the first level and a linear optimal regulator at the second level. The controller is designed on the basis of the optimal regulator theory applied to the multivariate autoregressive system model which is obtained from the identification experiments, where the system model is determined with the conventional sub-loop controllers included. The results of the simulation experiments show these control methods proposed have performed fairly well and will be useful for the improvement of the performance of nuclear power plant control. In addition, it is suggested that these control methods will be also attractive for the control of other production plants because these were developed in the attempt to solve the problems deviated from so called 'The gap between the optimal contro theory and actual systems.' (author)

  8. A diagnostic expert system for a boiling water reactor using a dynamic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Y.; Kanemoto, S.; Imaruoka, H.

    1990-01-01

    A diagnostic expert system for abnormal disturbances in a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) plant has been developed. The peculiar feature of this system is a diagnostic method which combines artificial intelligence technique with numerical analysis technique. The system has three diagnostic functions, 1) identification of anomaly position (device or sensor), 2) identification of anomaly mode and 3) identification of anomaly cause. Function 1) is implemented as follows. First, a hypothesis about anomaly propagation paths is built up by qualitative reasoning, using knowledge of causal relations among observed signals. Next, the abnormal device or sensor is found by applying model reference method and fuzzy set theory to test the hypothesis, using knowledge of plant structure and function, heuristic strategy of diagnosis and module type dynamic simulator. This simulator is composed of basic transfer function modules. The simulation model for the testing region is built up automatically, according to the requirement from the diagnostic task. Function 2) means identification of dynamic characteristics for an anomaly. It is realized by tuning model parameters so as to reproduce the abnormal signal behavior using the non-linear programing method. Function 3) derives probable anomaly causes from heuristic rules between anomaly mode and cause. A basic plant dynamic model was built up and adjusted to dynamic characteristics for one BWR plant (1100MWe). In order to verify the diagnostic functions of this system, data for several abnormal events was compiled by modifying this model. The diagnostic functions were proved useful, through the simulated abnormal data

  9. Cryogenic system for collecting noble gases from boiling water reactor off-gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmauch, G.E.

    1973-01-01

    In boiling water reactors, noncondensible gases are expelled from the main condenser. This off-gas stream is composed largely of radiolytic hydrogen and oxygen, air in-leakage, and traces of fission product krypton and xenon. In the Air Products' treatment system, the stoichiometric hydrogen and oxygen are reacted to form water in a catalytic recombiner. The design of the catalytic recombiner is an extension of industrial gas technology developed for purification of argon and helium. The off-gas after the recombiner is processed by cryogenic air-separation technology. The gas is compressed, passed into a reversing heat exchanger where water vapor and carbon dioxide are frozen out, further cooled, and expanded into a distillation column where refrigeration is provided by addition of liquid nitrogen. More than 99.99 percent of the krypton and essentially 100 percent of the xenon entering the column are accumulated in the column bottoms. Every three to six months, the noble-gas concentrate accumulated in the column bottom is removed as liquid, vaporized, diluted with steam, mixed with hydrogen in slight excess of oxygen content, and fed to a small recombiner where all the oxygen reacts to form water. The resulting gas stream, containing from 20 to 40 percent noble gases, is compressed into small storage cylinders for indefinite retention or for decay of all fission gases except krypton-85, followed by subsequent release under controlled conditions and favorable meteorology. This treatment system is based on proven technology that is practiced throughout the industrial gas industry. Only the presence of radioactive materials in the process stream and the application in a nuclear power plant environment are new. Adaptations to meet these new conditions can be made without sacrificing performance, reliability, or safety

  10. Study of the radiotoxicity of actinides recycling in boiling water reactors fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, J.L.; Guzman, J.R.; Martin-del-Campo, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the production and destruction, as well as the radiotoxicity of plutonium and minor actinides (MA) obtained from the multi-recycling of boiling water reactors (BWR) fuel are analyzed. A BWR MOX fuel assembly, with uranium (from enrichment tails), plutonium and minor actinides is designed and studied using the HELIOS code. The actinides mass and the radiotoxicity of the spent fuel are compared with those of the once-through or direct cycle. Other type of fuel assembly is also analyzed: an assembly with enriched uranium and minor actinides; without plutonium. For this study, the fuel remains in the reactor for four cycles, where each cycle is 18 months length, with a discharge burnup of 48 MWd/kg. After this time, the fuel is placed in the spent fuel pool to be cooled during 5 years. Afterwards, the fuel is recycled for the next fuel cycle; 2 years are considered for recycle and fuel fabrication. Two recycles are taken into account in this study. Regarding radiotoxicity, results show that in the period from the spent fuel discharge until 1000 years, the highest reduction in the radiotoxicity related to the direct cycle is obtained with a fuel composed of MA and enriched uranium. However, in the period after few thousands of years, the lowest radiotoxicity is obtained using the fuel with plutonium and MA. The reduction in the radiotoxicity of the spent fuel after one or two recycling in a BWR is however very small for the studied MOX assemblies, reaching a maximum reduction factor of 2.

  11. Bifurcation analysis of the simplified models of boiling water reactor and identification of global stability boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Vikas; Singh, Suneet, E-mail: suneet.singh@iitb.ac.in

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Non-linear stability analysis of nuclear reactor is carried out. • Global and local stability boundaries are drawn in the parameter space. • Globally stable, bi-stable, and unstable regions have been demarcated. • The identification of the regions is verified by numerical simulations. - Abstract: Nonlinear stability study of the neutron coupled thermal hydraulics instability has been carried out by several researchers for boiling water reactors (BWRs). The focus of these studies has been to identify subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcations. Supercritical Hopf bifurcation are soft or safe due to the fact that stable limit cycles arise in linearly unstable region; linear and global stability boundaries are same for this bifurcation. It is well known that the subcritical bifurcations can be considered as hard or dangerous due to the fact that unstable limit cycles (nonlinear phenomena) exist in the (linearly) stable region. The linear stability leads to a stable equilibrium in such regions, only for infinitesimally small perturbations. However, finite perturbations lead to instability due to the presence of unstable limit cycles. Therefore, it is evident that the linear stability analysis is not sufficient to understand the exact stability characteristics of BWRs. However, the effect of these bifurcations on the stability boundaries has been rarely discussed. In the present work, the identification of global stability boundary is demonstrated using simplified models. Here, five different models with different thermal hydraulics feedback have been investigated. In comparison to the earlier works, current models also include the impact of adding the rate of change in temperature on void reactivity as well as effect of void reactivity on rate of change of temperature. Using the bifurcation analysis of these models the globally stable region in the parameter space has been identified. The globally stable region has only stable solutions and

  12. Implementation of automated, on-line fatigue monitoring in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takeshi; Tokunaga, Katsumi; Stevens, G.L.; Ranganath, S.

    1993-01-01

    A workstation-based, on-line fatigue monitoring system for tracking fatigue usage applied to a Japanese operating boiling water reactor (BWR), Tsuruga Unit 1, is described. The system uses the influence function approach and rainflow cycle counting methodology, operates on a workstation computer, and determines component stresses using temperature, pressure, and flow rate data that are made available via signal taps from previously existing plant sensors. Using plant-unique influence functions developed specifically for the feedwater nozzle location, the system calculates stresses as a function of time and computes the fatigue usage. The analysis method used to compute fatigue usage complies with MITI Code Notification number-sign 501. Fatigue values are saved automatically on files at times defined by the user for use at a later time. Of particular note, this paper describes some of the details involved with implementing such a system from the utility perspective. Utility installation details, as well as why such a system was chosen for implementation are presented. Fatigue results for an entire fuel cycle are presented and compared to assumed design basis events to confirm that actual plant thermal duty is significantly less severe than originally estimated in the design basis stress report. Although the system is specifically set up to address fatigue duty for the feedwater nozzle location, a generic shell structure was implemented so that any other components could be added at a future time without software modifications. As a result, the system provides the technical basis to more accurately evaluate actual reactor conditions as well as the justification for plant life extension

  13. Bifurcation analysis of the simplified models of boiling water reactor and identification of global stability boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Vikas; Singh, Suneet

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Non-linear stability analysis of nuclear reactor is carried out. • Global and local stability boundaries are drawn in the parameter space. • Globally stable, bi-stable, and unstable regions have been demarcated. • The identification of the regions is verified by numerical simulations. - Abstract: Nonlinear stability study of the neutron coupled thermal hydraulics instability has been carried out by several researchers for boiling water reactors (BWRs). The focus of these studies has been to identify subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcations. Supercritical Hopf bifurcation are soft or safe due to the fact that stable limit cycles arise in linearly unstable region; linear and global stability boundaries are same for this bifurcation. It is well known that the subcritical bifurcations can be considered as hard or dangerous due to the fact that unstable limit cycles (nonlinear phenomena) exist in the (linearly) stable region. The linear stability leads to a stable equilibrium in such regions, only for infinitesimally small perturbations. However, finite perturbations lead to instability due to the presence of unstable limit cycles. Therefore, it is evident that the linear stability analysis is not sufficient to understand the exact stability characteristics of BWRs. However, the effect of these bifurcations on the stability boundaries has been rarely discussed. In the present work, the identification of global stability boundary is demonstrated using simplified models. Here, five different models with different thermal hydraulics feedback have been investigated. In comparison to the earlier works, current models also include the impact of adding the rate of change in temperature on void reactivity as well as effect of void reactivity on rate of change of temperature. Using the bifurcation analysis of these models the globally stable region in the parameter space has been identified. The globally stable region has only stable solutions and

  14. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a Reference Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. Main report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWe.

  15. Coupled thermo-mechanical creep analysis for boiling water reactor pressure vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, Walter; Tran, Chi-Thanh; Kudinov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We consider a severe accident in a BWR with melt pool formation in the lower head. ► We study the influence of pool depth on vessel failure mode with creep analysis. ► There are two modes of failure; ballooning of vessel bottom and a localized creep. ► External vessel cooling can suppress creep and subsequently prevent vessel failure. - Abstract: In this paper we consider a hypothetical severe accident in a Nordic-type boiling water reactor (BWR) at the stage of relocation of molten core materials to the lower head and subsequent debris bed and then melt pool formation. Nordic BWRs rely on reactor cavity flooding as a means for ex-vessel melt coolability and ultimate termination of the accident progression. However, different modes of vessel failure may result in different regimes of melt release from the vessel, which determine initial conditions for melt coolant interaction and eventually coolability of the debris bed. The goal of this study is to define if retention of decay-heated melt inside the reactor pressure vessel is possible and investigate modes of the vessel wall failure otherwise. The mode of failure is contingent upon the ultimate mechanical strength of the vessel structures under given mechanical and thermal loads and applied cooling measures. The influence of pool depth and respective transient thermal loads on the reactor vessel failure mode is studied with coupled thermo-mechanical creep analysis. Efficacy of control rod guide tube (CRGT) cooling and external vessel wall cooling as potential severe accident management measures is investigated. First, only CRGT cooling is considered in simulations revealing two different modes of vessel failure: (i) a ‘ballooning’ of the vessel bottom and (ii) a ‘localized creep’ concentrated within the vicinity of the top surface of the melt pool. Second, possibility of in-vessel retention with CRGT and external vessel cooling is investigated. We found that the external vessel

  16. Stress analyses for reactor pressure vessels by the example of a product line '69 boiling water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mkrtchyan, Lilit; Schau, Henry [TUEV SUED Energietechnik GmbH, Mannheim (Germany). Abt. Strukturverhalten; Wolf, Werner; Holzer, Wieland [TUEV SUED Industrie Service GmbH, Muenchen (Germany). Abt. Behaelter und Turbosatz; Wernicke, Robert; Trieglaff, Ralf [TUEV NORD SysTec GmbH und Co. KG, Hamburg (Germany). Abt. Festigkeit und Konstruktion

    2011-08-15

    The reactor pressure vessels (RPV) of boiling water reactors (BWR) belonging to the product line '69 have unusually designed heads. The spherical cap-shaped bottom head of the vessel is welded directly to the support flange of the lower shell course. This unusual construction has led repeatedly to controversial discussions concerning the limits and admissibility of stress intensities arising in the junction of the bottom head to the cylindrical shell. In the present paper, stress analyses for the design conditions are performed with the finite element method in order to determine and categorize the occurring stresses. The procedure of stress classification in accordance with the guidelines of German KTA 3201.2 and Section III of the ASME Code (Subsection NB) is described and subsequently demonstrated by the example of a typical BWR vessel. The accomplished investigations yield allowable stress intensities in the considered area. Additionally, limit load analyses are carried out to verify the obtained results. Complementary studies, performed for a torispherical head, prove that the determined maximum peak stresses in the junction between the bottom head and the cylindrical shell are not unusual also for pressure vessels with regular bottom head constructions. (orig.)

  17. Stress analyses for reactor pressure vessels by the example of a product line '69 boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mkrtchyan, Lilit; Schau, Henry; Wolf, Werner; Holzer, Wieland; Wernicke, Robert; Trieglaff, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessels (RPV) of boiling water reactors (BWR) belonging to the product line '69 have unusually designed heads. The spherical cap-shaped bottom head of the vessel is welded directly to the support flange of the lower shell course. This unusual construction has led repeatedly to controversial discussions concerning the limits and admissibility of stress intensities arising in the junction of the bottom head to the cylindrical shell. In the present paper, stress analyses for the design conditions are performed with the finite element method in order to determine and categorize the occurring stresses. The procedure of stress classification in accordance with the guidelines of German KTA 3201.2 and Section III of the ASME Code (Subsection NB) is described and subsequently demonstrated by the example of a typical BWR vessel. The accomplished investigations yield allowable stress intensities in the considered area. Additionally, limit load analyses are carried out to verify the obtained results. Complementary studies, performed for a torispherical head, prove that the determined maximum peak stresses in the junction between the bottom head and the cylindrical shell are not unusual also for pressure vessels with regular bottom head constructions. (orig.)

  18. Development of an in-core fuel management tool for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilli, Luca; Wakker, Pieter H.; Elder, Brian R.

    2017-01-01

    The in-core fuel management of a nuclear reactor is a challenging task due to the virtually infinite number of loading patterns one could theoretically adopt. The ROSA (Reloading Optimization by Simulated Annealing) code is an optimization tool that has been successfully used in the last two decades to facilitate the core design of several Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). It is designed to perform a stochastic search for an optimal Loading Pattern (LP) using a simulated annealing algorithm. This corresponds to performing a depletion calculation for each one of the hundreds of thousands of unique LPs generated during the stochastic search. Therefore, speed is one of the most important requirements that the solvers used by the depletion tool must fulfill. ROSA's depletion analysis tool makes use of a particularly fast nodal method (known as the kernel method) for the evaluation of the power distribution associated with a particular LP. One of the strongest assumptions behind the kernel method is that the neutron migration length does not change considerably between the point where a neutron is generated and the point where the same neutron is absorbed. Although strong, this assumption is quite compatible with the neutronic characteristics of PWRs cores. In this paper we give an overview of the work done in order to develop a version of ROSA capable of performing the core design of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). We focus the discussion on the development of the depletion analysis tool by outlining the modifications of the kernel methods implemented in order to make the solver accurate for BWR cores. An improvement of the definition of the transport kernel is necessary to take the strong anisotropies characterizing the neutronic problem into account. These anisotropies arise due to the presence of strong changes in the moderator density and due to the presence of control blades. Furthermore, we are going to discuss how the boundary conditions are adopted by the

  19. Advanced methodology to simulate boiling water reactor transient using coupled thermal-hydraulic/neutron-kinetic codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Christoph Oliver

    2016-06-13

    Coupled Thermal-hydraulic/Neutron-kinetic (TH/NK) simulations of Boiling Water Reactor transients require well validated and accurate simulation tools. The generation of cross-section (XS) libraries, depending on the individual thermal-hydraulic state parameters, is of paramount importance for coupled simulations. Problem-dependent XS-sets for 3D core simulations are being generated mainly by well validated, fast running commercial and user-friendly lattice codes such as CASMO and HELIOS. In this dissertation a computational route, based on the lattice code SCALE6/TRITON, the cross-section interface GenPMAXS, the best-estimate thermal-hydraulic system code TRACE and the core simulator PARCS, for best-estimate simulations of Boiling Water (BWR) transients has been developed and validated. The computational route has been supplemented by a subsequent uncertainty and sensitivity study based on Monte Carlo sampling and propagation of the uncertainties of input parameters to the output (SUSA code). The analysis of a single BWR fuel assembly depletion problem with PARCS using SCALE/TRITON cross-sections has been shown a good agreement with the results obtained with CASMO cross-section sets. However, to compensate the deficiencies of the interface program GenPMAXS, PYTHON scripts had to be developed to incorporate missing data, as the yields of Iodine, Xenon and Promethium, into the cross-section-data sets (PMAXS-format) generated by GenPMAXS from the SCALE/TRITON output. The results of the depletion analysis of a full BWR core with PARCS have indicated the importance of considering history effects, adequate modeling of the reflector region and the control rods, as the PARCS simulations for depleted fuel and all control rods inserted (ARI) differs significantly at the fuel assembly top and bottom. Systematic investigations with the coupled codes TRACE/PARCS have been performed to analyse the core behaviour at different thermal conditions using nuclear data (XS

  20. MODULAR AND FULL SIZE SIMPLIFIED BOILING WATER REACTOR DESIGN WITH FULLY PASSIVE SAFETY SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, M.; Revankar, S. T.; Downar, T.; Xu, Y.; Yoon, H. J.; Tinkler, D.; Rohatgi, U. S.

    2003-01-01

    OAK B204 The overall goal of this three-year research project was to develop a new scientific design of a compact modular 200 MWe and a full size 1200 MWe simplified boiling water reactors (SBWR). Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to perform scientific designs of the core neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics for a small capacity and full size simplified boiling water reactor, (2) to develop a passive safety system design, (3) improve and validate safety analysis code, (4) demonstrate experimentally and analytically all design functions of the safety systems for the design basis accidents (DBA) and (5) to develop the final scientific design of both SBWR systems, 200 MWe (SBWR-200) and 1200 MWe (SBWR-1200). The SBWR combines the advantages of design simplicity and completely passive safety systems. These advantages fit well within the objectives of NERI and the Department of Energy's focus on the development of Generation III and IV nuclear power. The 3-year research program was structured around seven tasks. Task 1 was to perform the preliminary thermal-hydraulic design. Task 2 was to perform the core neutronic design analysis. Task 3 was to perform a detailed scaling study and obtain corresponding PUMA conditions from an integral test. Task 4 was to perform integral tests and code evaluation for the DBA. Task 5 was to perform a safety analysis for the DBA. Task 6 was to perform a BWR stability analysis. Task 7 was to perform a final scientific design of the compact modular SBWR-200 and the full size SBWR-1200. A no cost extension for the third year was requested and the request was granted and all the project tasks were completed by April 2003. The design activities in tasks 1, 2, and 3 were completed as planned. The existing thermal-hydraulic information, core physics, and fuel lattice information was collected on the existing design of the simplified boiling water reactor. The thermal-hydraulic design were developed. Based on a detailed integral

  1. A non-linear reduced order methodology applicable to boiling water reactor stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prill, Dennis Paul

    2013-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic coupling between power, flow rate and density, intensified by neutronics feedback are the main drivers of boiling water reactor (BWR) stability behavior. High-power low-flow conditions in connection with unfavorable power distributions can lead the BWR system into unstable regions where power oscillations can be triggered. This important threat to operational safety requires careful analysis for proper understanding. Analyzing an exhaustive parameter space of the non-linear BWR system becomes feasible with methodologies based on reduced order models (ROMs), saving computational cost and improving the physical understanding. Presently within reactor dynamics, no general and automatic prediction of high-dimensional ROMs based on detailed BWR models are available. In this thesis a systematic self-contained model order reduction (MOR) technique is derived which is applicable for several classes of dynamical problems, and in particular to BWRs of any degree of details. Expert knowledge can be given by operational, experimental or numerical transient data and is transfered into an optimal basis function representation. The methodology is mostly automated and provides the framework for the reduction of various different systems of any level of complexity. Only little effort is necessary to attain a reduced version within this self-written code which is based on coupling of sophisticated commercial software. The methodology reduces a complex system in a grid-free manner to a small system able to capture even non-linear dynamics. It is based on an optimal choice of basis functions given by the so-called proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). Required steps to achieve reliable and numerical stable ROM are given by a distinct calibration road-map. In validation and verification steps, a wide spectrum of representative test examples is systematically studied regarding a later BWR application. The first example is non-linear and has a dispersive character

  2. The physico-chemical 131I species in the exhaust air of a boiling water reactor (BWR 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.

    1982-12-01

    In a German boiling water reactor, the physico-chemical 131 I species were determined in the plant exhaust and in the individual exhausts during 12 months. These measurements aimed in particular at determining the percentage and the source of the radiologically decisive elemental 131 I released to the environment. The retention of the 131 I species by iodine filters was also investigated. On an average, 45% of the 131 I discharged with the plant exhaust consisted of elemental iodine. This was largely released with the exhaust from the reactor building and from the turbine building. The other 55% consisted almost entirely of organic I. (orig./HP) [de

  3. The physico-chemical I-131 species in the exhaust air of a boiling water reactor (BWR 5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.

    1984-02-01

    In a German boiling water reactor, the pysico-chemical I-131 species were determined in the plant exhaust and in the individual exhausts during four months. These measurements aimed in particular at determining the percentage and the source of the radiologically decisive elemental I-131 released to the environment. On an average 13% of the I-131 discharged with the plant exhaust consisted of elemental iodine. This was largely released with the exhausts from the reactor building and from the turbine building. The main component was organic-bound I. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Calculation of steam content in a draught section of a tank-type boiling water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panajotov, D.P.; Gorburov, V.I.

    1989-01-01

    Structural and hydrodynamic features of a two-phase flow in a draught section of a tank-type boiling water cooled reactor are considered. A calculated model of the steady flow and methods for determining steam content and phase rate profiles under the maximum steam content at the section axis and at some distance from it are proposed. Steam content distribution by height quantitatively agrees with experimental data for the VK-50 reactor. Calculation technique allows one to obtain steam content and phase rate profiles at the section outlet

  5. Channel Bow in Boiling Water Reactors - Hot Cell Examination Results and Correlation to Measured Bow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, S.T.; Lin, Y.P.; Dubecky, M.A.; Edsinger, K.; Mader, E.V.

    2007-01-01

    An increase in frequency of fuel channel-control blade interference has been observed in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) in recent years. Many of the channels leading to interference were found to bow towards the control blade in a manner that was inconsistent with the expected bow due to other effects. The pattern of bow appeared to indicate a new channel bow mechanism that differed from the predominant bow mechanism caused by differential growth due to fast-fluence gradients. In order to investigate this new type of channel bow, coupons from several channels with varying degrees of bow were returned to the GE Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) for Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE). This paper describes the characteristics of channel corrosion and hydrogen pickup observed, and relates the observations to the channel exposure level, control history, and measured channel bow. The channels selected for PIE had exposures in the range of 36-48 GWd/MTU and covered a wide range of measured bow. The coupons were obtained at 4 elevations from opposing channel sides adjacent and away from the control blade. The PIE performed on these coupons included visual examination, metallography, and hydrogen concentration measurements. A new mechanism of control-blade shadow corrosion-induced channel bow was found to correlate with differences in the extent of corrosion and corresponding differences in the hydrogen concentration between opposite sides of the channels. The increased corrosion on the control blade sides was found to be dependent on the level of control early in the life of the channel. The contributions of other potential factors leading to increased channel bow and channel-control blade interference are also discussed in this paper. (authors)

  6. An investigation of decreasing reactor coolant inventory as a mechanism to reduce power during a boiling water reactor anticipated transient without scram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, C.E.; Chexal, V.K.; Gose, G.C.; Hentzen, R.D.; Layman, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Under certain anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) sequences for a boiling water reactor, it would be desirable to reduce system power, particularly where the primary system has been isolated by closure of all main steam isolation valves and is discharging steam through its safety/relief valve system to the suppression pool. Reducing reactor power increases the time available to shut down the reactor by minimizing the heat dumped to the suppression pool and by helping to keep the suppression pool temperature within limits. Under proposed emergency procedure guidelines for the ATWS event, the reactor water level would be lowered to reduce reactor power. The analyses provide an assessment of the power level that would be attained, assuming the reactor operators were to reduce the the downcomer level down to the top of the active fuel

  7. Sloshing of water in annular pressure-suppression pool of boiling water reactors under earthquake ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Godden, W.G.; Scalise, D.T.

    1979-10-01

    This report presents an analytical investigation of the sloshing response of water in annular-circular as well as simple-circular tanks under horizontal earthquake ground motions, and the results are verified with tests. This study was motivated because of the use of annular tanks for pressure-suppression pools in Boiling Water Reactors. Such a pressure-suppression pool would typically have 80 ft and 120 ft inside and outside diameters and a water depth of 20 ft. The analysis was based upon potential flow theory and a computer program was written to obtain time-history plots of sloshing displacements of water and the dynamic pressures. Tests were carried out on 1/80th and 1/15th scale models under sinusoidal as well as simulated earthquake ground motions. Tests and analytical results regarding the natural frequencies, surface water displacements, and dynamic pressures were compared and a good agreement was found for relatively small displacements. The computer program gave satisfactory results as long as the maximum water surface displacements were less than 30 in., which is roughly the value obtained under full intensity of El Centro earthquake

  8. Sampling system for a boiling reactor NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabelin, A.I.; Yakovleva, E.D.; Solov'ev, Yu.A.

    1976-01-01

    Investigations and pilot running of the nuclear power plant with a VK-50 boiling reactor reveal the necessity of normalizing the design system of water sampling and of mandatory replacement of the needle-type throttle device by a helical one. A method for designing a helical throttle device has been worked out. The quantitative characteristics of depositions of corrosion products along the line of reactor water sampling are presented. Recommendations are given on the organizaton of the sampling system of a nuclear power plant with BWR type reactors

  9. Early hydrogen water chemistry in the boiling water reactor: industry-first demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Odell, Andrew D.; Giannelli, Joseph F.

    2012-09-01

    Hydrogen injection into the BWR feedwater during power operation has resulted in significant IGSCC reductions. Further, noble metal application (NMCA) during shutdown or On-line NobleChem TM (OLNC) during power operation has greatly reduced the required hydrogen injection rate by catalyzing the hydrogen-oxygen reaction on the metal surfaces, reducing the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) at operating temperature to well below the mitigation ECP of -230 mV (SHE) at reactor water hydrogen to oxidant (O 2 + H 2 O 2 ) molar ratios of ≥2. Since IGSCC rates increase markedly at reduced temperature, and the potential for crack initiation exists, additional crack mitigation was desired. To close this gap in mitigation, the EPRI BWR Startup ECP Reduction research and development program commenced in 2008 to undertake laboratory and feasibility studies for adding a reductant to the reactor water system during start-ups. Under this program, ECP reductions of noble metal treated stainless steel sufficient to mitigate IGSCC at startup temperatures were achieved in the laboratory in the absence of radiation at hydrogen, hydrazine and carbohydrazide to oxygen molar ratios of ≥ 2, ≥1.5 and ≥0.7, respectively. Based on the familiarity of operating BWRs with using hydrogen, a demonstration of hydrogen injection during the startup of an actual BWR using noble metals was planned. This process, named EHWC (Early Hydrogen Water Chemistry), differs from the HDS (Hydrogen During Startup) approach that has been successful in Japan in that HDS injects sufficient hydrogen for bulk oxidant reduction whereas EHWC injects a smaller amount of hydrogen, sufficient to achieve a hydrogen:oxidant molar ratio of at least two at noble metal treated surfaces. The industry-first EHWC demonstration was performed at Exelon's Peach Bottom 3 nuclear power plant in October 2011. Prior to EHWC, Peach Bottom 3 had one NMCA (October 1999) and five annual OLNC applications (starting in 2007

  10. Sloshing of water in torus pressure-suppression pool of boiling water reactors under earthquake ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Godden, W.G.; Scalise, D.T.

    1978-08-01

    This report presents an analytical and experimental investigation into the sloshing of water in torus tanks under horizontal earthquake ground motions. This study was motivated because of the use of torus tanks for pressure-suppression pools in Boiling Water Reactors. Such a pressure-suppression pool would typically have 80 ft and 140 ft inside and outside diameters, a 30 ft diameter section, and a water depth of 15 ft. A general finite element analysis was developed for all axisymmetric tanks and a computer program was written to obtain time-history plots of sloshing displacements of water and dynamic pressures. Tests were carried out on a 1/60th scale model under sinusoidal as well as simulated earthquake ground motions. Tests and analytical results regarding natural frequencies, surface water displacements, and dynamic pressures were compared and a good agreement was found within the range of displacements studied. The computer program gave satisfactory results within a maximum range of sloshing displacements in the full-size prototype of 30 in. which is greater than the value obtained under the full intensity of the El Centro earthquake (N-S component 1940). The range of linear behavior was studied experimentally by subjecting the torus model to increasing intensities of the El Centro earthquake

  11. Design and Analysis of Thorium-fueled Reduced Moderation Boiling Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Phillip Michael

    The Resource-renewable Boiling Water Reactors (RBWRs) are a set of light water reactors (LWRs) proposed by Hitachi which use a triangular lattice and high void fraction to incinerate fuel with an epithermal spectrum, which is highly atypical of LWRs. The RBWRs operate on a closed fuel cycle, which is impossible with a typical thermal spectrum reactor, in order to accomplish missions normally reserved for sodium fast reactors (SFRs)--either fuel self-sufficiency or waste incineration. The RBWRs also axially segregate the fuel into alternating fissile "seed" regions and fertile "blanket" regions in order to enhance breeding and leakage probability upon coolant voiding. This dissertation focuses on thorium design variants of the RBWR: the self-sufficient RBWR-SS and the RBWR-TR, which consumes reprocessed transuranic (TRU) waste from PWR used nuclear fuel. These designs were based off of the Hitachi-designed RBWR-AC and the RBWR-TB2, respectively, which use depleted uranium (DU) as the primary fertile fuel. The DU-fueled RBWRs use a pair of axially segregated seed sections in order to achieve a negative void coefficient; however, several concerns were raised with this multi-seed approach, including difficulty with controlling the reactor and unacceptably high axial power peaking. Since thorium-uranium fuel tends to have much more negative void feedback than uranium-plutonium fuels, the thorium RBWRs were designed to use a single elongated seed to avoid these issues. A series of parametric studies were performed in order to find the design space for the thorium RBWRs, and optimize the designs while meeting the required safety constraints. The RBWR-SS was optimized to maximize the discharge burnup, while the RBWR-TR was optimized to maximize the TRU transmutation rate. These parametric studies were performed on an assembly level model using the MocDown simulator, which calculates an equilibrium fuel composition with a specified reprocessing scheme. A full core model was

  12. SWR 1000: the main design features of the advanced boiling water reactor with passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsten, Pasler

    2007-01-01

    The SWR-1000 (1000 MW) is a boiling water reactor whose economic efficiency in comparison with large-capacity designs is achieved by deploying very simple passive safety equipment, simplified systems for plant operation, and a very simple plant configuration in which systems engineering is optimized and dependence on electrical and instrumentation and control systems is reduced. In addition, systems and components that require protection against natural and external man-made hazards are accommodated in such a way that as few buildings as possible have to be designed to withstand the loads from such events. The fuel assemblies have been enlarged from a 10*10 rod array to a 12*12 array. This reduces the total number of fuel assemblies in the core and thus also the number of control rods and control rod drives, as well as in-core neutron flux monitors. The design owes its competitiveness to the fact that investment costs, maintenance costs and fuel cycle costs are all lower. In addition, refueling outages are shorter, thanks to the reduced scope of outage activities. The larger fuel assemblies have been extensively and successfully tested, as have all of the other new components and systems incorporated into the plant design. As in existing plants, the forced coolant circulation method is deployed, ensuring problem-free startup, and enabling plant operators to adjust power rapidly in the high power range (70%-100%) without moving the control rods, as well as allowing spectral-shift and stretch-out operation. The plant safety concept is based on a combination of passive safety systems and a reduced number of active safety systems. All postulated accidents can be controlled using passive systems alone. Control of a postulated core melt accident is assured with considerable safety margins thanks to passive flooding of the containment for in-vessel melt retention. The SWR-1000 is compliant with international nuclear codes and standards, and is also designed to withstand

  13. Measurement station for interim inspections of Lightbridge metallic fuel rods at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, C.; Totemeier, A.; Holcombe, S.; Liverud, J.; Limi, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Navestad, E. AB(; )

    2018-01-01

    Lightbridge Corporation has developed a new Uranium-Zirconium based metallic fuel. The fuel rods aremanufactured via a co-extrusion process, and are characterized by their multi-lobed (cruciform-shaped) cross section. The fuel rods are also helically-twisted in the axial direction. Two experimental fuel assemblies, each containing four Lightbridge fuel rods, are scheduled to be irradiated in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) starting in 2018. In addition to on-line monitoring of fuel rod elongation and critical assembly conditions (e.g. power, flow rates, coolant temperatures, etc.) during the irradiation, several key parameters of the fuel will be measured out-of-core during interim inspections. An inspection measurement station for use in the irradiated fuel handling compartment at the HBWR has therefore been developed for this purpose. The multi-lobed cladding cross section combined with the spiral shape of the Lightbridge metallic fuel rods requires a high-precision guiding system to ensure good position repeatability combined with low-friction guiding. The measurement station is equipped with a combination of instruments and equipment supplied from third-party vendors and instruments and equipment developed at Institute for Energy Technology (IFE). Two sets of floating linear voltage differential transformer (LVDT) pairs are used to measure swelling and diameter changes between the lobes and the valleys over the length of the fuel rods. Eddy current probes are used to measure the thickness of oxide layers in the valleys and on the lobe tips and also to detect possible surface cracks/pores. The measurement station also accommodates gamma scans. Additionally, an eddy-current probe has been developed at IFE specifically to detect potential gaps or discontinuities in the bonding layer between the metallic fuel and the Zirconium alloy cladding. Potential gaps in the bonding layer will be hidden behind a 0.5-1.0 mm thick cladding wall. It has therefore been

  14. Air scaling and modeling studies for the 1/5-scale mark I boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-01-04

    Results of table-top model experiments performed to investigate pool dynamics effects due to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) for the Peach Bottom Mark I boiling water reactor containment system guided subsequent conduct of the 1/5-scale torus experiment and provided new insight into the vertical load function (VLF). Pool dynamics results were qualitatively correct. Experiments with a 1/64-scale fully modeled drywell and torus showed that a 90/sup 0/ torus sector was adequate to reveal three-dimensional effects; the 1/5-scale torus experiment confirmed this.

  15. Preliminary phenomena identification and ranking tables for simplified boiling water reactor Loss-of-Coolant Accident scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, P.G.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, J.H.; Slovik, G.C.

    1998-04-01

    For three potential Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenarios in the General Electric Simplified Boiling Water Reactors (SBWR) a set of Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRT) is presented. The selected LOCA scenarios are typical for the class of small and large breaks generally considered in Safety Analysis Reports. The method used to develop the PIRTs is described. Following is a discussion of the transient scenarios, the PIRTs are presented and discussed in detailed and in summarized form. A procedure for future validation of the PIRTs, to enhance their value, is outlined. 26 refs., 25 figs., 44 tabs

  16. Radiotoxicity study of a boiling water reactor core design based on a thorium-uranium fuel concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez C, A.; Espinosa P, G.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The innovative design of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using the thorium-uranium (blanket-seed) concept in the same integrated fuel assembly is presented in this paper. The lattice design uses the thorium conversion capability to 233 U in a BWR spectrum. A core design was developed to achieve an equilibrium cycle of one effective full power year in a standard BWR. A comparison of the toxicity of the spent fuel showed that toxicity is lower in the thorium cycle than other commercial fuels as UO 2 and MOX (uranium and plutonium) in case of the one-through cycle for LWR. (Author)

  17. Air scaling and modeling studies for the 1/5-scale mark I boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    Results of table-top model experiments performed to investigate pool dynamics effects due to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) for the Peach Bottom Mark I boiling water reactor containment system guided subsequent conduct of the 1/5-scale torus experiment and provided new insight into the vertical load function (VLF). Pool dynamics results were qualitatively correct. Experiments with a 1/64-scale fully modeled drywell and torus showed that a 90 0 torus sector was adequate to reveal three-dimensional effects; the 1/5-scale torus experiment confirmed this

  18. Thermal-hydraulic instabilities in pressure tube graphite - moderated boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsiklauri, G.; Schmitt, B.

    1995-09-01

    Thermally induced two-phase instabilities in non-uniformly heated boiling channels in RBMK-1000 reactor have been analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3 code. The RELAP5 model of a RBMK-1000 reactor was developed to investigate low flow in a distribution group header (DGH) supplying 44 fuel pressure tubes. The model was evaluated against experimental data. The results of the calculations indicate that the period of oscillation for the high power tube varied from 3.1s to 2.6s, over the power range of 2.0 MW to 3.0 MW, respectively. The amplitude of the flow oscillation for the high powered tube varied from +100% to -150% of the tube average flow. Reverse flow did not occur in the lower power tubes. The amplitude of oscillation in the subcooled region at the inlet to the fuel region is higher than in the saturated region at the outlet. In the upper fuel region and outlet connectors the flow oscillations are dissipated. The threshold of flow instability for the high powered tubes of a RBMK reactor is compared to Japanese data and appears to be in good agreement.

  19. Thermal-hydraulic instabilities in pressure tube graphite-moderated boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiklauri, G.; Schmitt, B.

    1995-09-01

    Thermally induced two-phase instabilities in non-uniformly heated boiling charmers in RBMK-1000 reactor have been analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3 code. The RELAP5 model of a RBMK-1000 reactor was developed to investigate low flow in a distribution group header (DGH) supplying 44 fuel pressure tubes. The model was evaluated against experimental data. The results of the calculations indicate that the period of oscillation for the high power tube varied from 3.1s to 2.6s, over the power range of 2.0 MW to 3.0 MW, respectively. The amplitude of the flow oscillation for the high powered tube varied from +100% to -150% of the tube average flow. Reverse flow did not occur in the lower power tubes. The amplitude of oscillation in the subcooled region at the inlet to the fuel region is higher than in the saturated region at the outlet. In the upper fuel region and outlet connectors the flow oscillations are dissipated. The threshold of flow instability for the high powered tubes of a RBMK reactor is compared to Japanese data and appears to be in good agreement

  20. Analysis of a main steam isolation value closure anticipated transient without scram in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, T.J.; Pan, C.; Chen, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) could be a major accident sequence with possible core melt and containment damage in a boiling water reactor (BWR). The behavior of a BWR/6 during a main steam isolation valve closure ATWS is investigated using the best-estimate computer program, RETRAN-02. The effects of both makeup coolant and boron injection on the reactor behavior are studied. It is found that the BWR/6 behaves similarly to the BWR/2 and BWR/4. Without boron injection and makeup coolant, the reactor loses its coolant inventory very quickly and the reactor power drops rapidly to ∼ 16% of rated power due to negative void reactivity. With coolant makeup from the high-pressure core spray and the reactor core isolation cooling systems, the rector reaches a quasi-steady-state condition after an initially rapidly changing transient. The dome pressure, downcomer water level, and core power oscillate around a mean value; the average core power is ∼ 15%, which is approximately equal to the power needed to heat and evaporate the subcooled makeup coolant. Lower boron concentrations in the core tend to complicate reactor behavior due to the combination of two competing phenomena: the negative boron reactivity and the positive reactivity caused by a void collapse

  1. Branch-and-Bound algorithm applied to uncertainty quantification of a Boiling Water Reactor Station Blackout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Joseph, E-mail: joseph.nielsen@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, 1955 N. Fremont Avenue, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); University of Idaho, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Program, 1776 Science Center Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83402-1575 (United States); Tokuhiro, Akira [University of Idaho, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Program, 1776 Science Center Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83402-1575 (United States); Hiromoto, Robert [University of Idaho, Department of Computer Science, 1776 Science Center Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83402-1575 (United States); Tu, Lei [University of Idaho, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Program, 1776 Science Center Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83402-1575 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    state. Dynamic PRA (DPRA) methods provide a more rigorous analysis of complex dynamic systems. Unfortunately DPRA methods introduce issues associated with combinatorial explosion of states. This paper presents a methodology to address combinatorial explosion using a Branch-and-Bound algorithm applied to Dynamic Event Trees (DET), which utilize LENDIT (L – Length, E – Energy, N – Number, D – Distribution, I – Information, and T – Time) as well as a set theory to describe system, state, resource, and response (S2R2) sets to create bounding functions for the DET. The optimization of the DET in identifying high probability failure branches is extended to create a Phenomenological Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) methodology to evaluate modeling parameters important to safety of those failure branches that have a high probability of failure. The PIRT can then be used as a tool to identify and evaluate the need for experimental validation of models that have the potential to reduce risk. In order to demonstrate this methodology, a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Station Blackout (SBO) case study is presented.

  2. Branch-and-Bound algorithm applied to uncertainty quantification of a Boiling Water Reactor Station Blackout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Joseph; Tokuhiro, Akira; Hiromoto, Robert; Tu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    state. Dynamic PRA (DPRA) methods provide a more rigorous analysis of complex dynamic systems. Unfortunately DPRA methods introduce issues associated with combinatorial explosion of states. This paper presents a methodology to address combinatorial explosion using a Branch-and-Bound algorithm applied to Dynamic Event Trees (DET), which utilize LENDIT (L – Length, E – Energy, N – Number, D – Distribution, I – Information, and T – Time) as well as a set theory to describe system, state, resource, and response (S2R2) sets to create bounding functions for the DET. The optimization of the DET in identifying high probability failure branches is extended to create a Phenomenological Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) methodology to evaluate modeling parameters important to safety of those failure branches that have a high probability of failure. The PIRT can then be used as a tool to identify and evaluate the need for experimental validation of models that have the potential to reduce risk. In order to demonstrate this methodology, a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Station Blackout (SBO) case study is presented.

  3. In reactor performance of defected zircaloy-clad U3Si fuel elements in pressurized and boiling water coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feraday, M.A.; Allison, G.M.; Ambler, J.F.R.; Chalder, G.H.; Lipsett, J.J.

    1968-05-01

    The results of two in-reactor defect tests of Zircaloy-clad U 3 Si are reported. In the first test, a previously irradiated element (∼5300 MWd/ tonne U) was defected then exposed to first pressurized water then boiling water at ∼270 o C. In the second test, an unirradiated element containing a central void was defected, waterlogged, then exposed to pressurized water for 50 minutes. Both tests were terminated because of high activity in the loop coolant detected by both gamma and delayed neutron monitors. Post-irradiation examination showed that both elements had suffered major sheath failures which were attributed to the volume increase accompanying the formation of large quantities of corrosion product formed by the reaction of water with the hot central part of the fuel. It was concluded that the corrosion resistance of U 3 Si at 300 o C is not seriously affected by irradiation, but the corrosion rate increases rapidly with temperature. (author)

  4. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 1: Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR section 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE's application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design

  5. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 2: Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR section 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE's application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design

  6. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 1: Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design.

  7. An overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Experimental Boiling Water Reactor Decontamination and Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphie, W.E.; Mckernan, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Project. Physical decommissioning work started in 1986 and is scheduled for completion in 1994. The project total estimated cost is 14.3 million (1990, U.S.) dollars. The reactor pressure vessel will be removed by segmentation. Another notable project feature is that D and D operations were planned for and carried out with a small work force comprised of four to six D and D laborers, one or two health physics technicians, an engineer, and a project manager. When the D and D work is completed the facility will be recycled for other productive uses. (author)

  8. SWR 1000: An Advanced, Medium-Sized Boiling Water Reactor, Ready for Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brettschuh, Werner

    2006-01-01

    The latest developments in nuclear power generation technology mainly concern large-capacity plants in the 1550 -1600 MW range, or very small plants (100 - 350 MW). The SWR 1000 boiling water reactor (BWR), by contrast, offers all of the advantages of an advanced plant design, with excellent safety performance and competitive power generation costs, in the medium-capacity range (1000 - 1250 MW). The SWR 1000 is particularly suitable for countries whose power systems are not designed for large-capacity generating facilities. The economic efficiency of this medium-sized plant in comparison with large-capacity designs is achieved by deploying very simple passive safety equipment, simplified systems for plant operation, and a very simple plant configuration in which systems engineering is optimized and dependence on electrical and instrumentation and control (I and C) systems is reduced. In addition, systems and components that require protection against natural and external man-made hazards are accommodated in such a way that as few buildings as possible have to be designed to withstand the loads from such events. The fuel assemblies to be deployed in the SWR 1000 core, meanwhile, have been enlarged from a 10 x 10 rod array to a 12 x 12 array. This reduces the total number of fuel assemblies in the core and thus also the number of control rods and control rod drives, as well as in-core neutron flux monitors. The design owes its competitiveness to the fact that investment costs, maintenance costs and fuel cycle costs are all lower. In addition, refueling outages are shorter, thanks to the reduced scope of outage activities. The larger fuel assemblies have been extensively and successfully tested, as have all of the other new components and systems incorporated into the plant design. As in existing plants, the forced coolant circulation method is deployed, ensuring problem-free startup, and enabling plant operators to adjust power rapidly in the high power range (70

  9. SWR 1000: A Next-Generation Boiling Water Reactor Ready for Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brettschuh, W.

    2006-01-01

    The latest developments in nuclear power generation technology mainly concern large-capacity plants in the 1550 -1600 MW range, or very small plants (100 - 350 MW). The SWR 1000 boiling water reactor (BWR), by contrast, offers all of the advantages of an advanced plant design, with excellent safety performance and competitive power generation costs, in the medium-capacity range (1000 - 1250 MW). The SWR 1000 design is particularly suitable for countries whose power systems do not include any large power plants. The economic efficiency of this medium-sized plant in comparison with large-capacity designs is achieved by deploying very simple passive safety equipment, simplified systems for plant operation, and a very simple plant configuration in which systems engineering is optimized and dependence on electrical and instrumentation and control (IandC) systems is reduced. In addition, systems and components that require protection against natural and external man-made hazards are accommodated in such a way that as few buildings as possible have to be designed to withstand the loads from such events. The fuel assemblies to be deployed in the SWR 1000 core, meanwhile, have been enlarged from a 10x10 rod array to a 12x12 array. This reduces the total number of fuel assemblies in the core and thus also the number of control rods and control rod drives, as well as in-core neutron flux monitors. The design owes its competitiveness to the fact that investment costs, maintenance costs and fuel cycle costs are all lower. In addition, refueling outages are shorter, thanks to the reduced scope of outage activities. The larger fuel assemblies have been extensively and successfully tested, as have all of the other new components and systems incorporated into the plant design. As in existing plants, the forced coolant circulation method is deployed, ensuring problem-free start-up, and enabling plant operators to adjust power rapidly in the high power range (70%-100%) without moving

  10. Experimental and Thermalhydraulic Code Assessment of the Transient Behavior of the Passive Condenser System in an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.T. Revankar; W. Zhou; Gavin Henderson

    2008-07-08

    The main goal of the project was to study analytically and experimentally the condensation heat transfer for the passive condenser system such as GE Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). The effect of noncondensable gas in condenser tube and the reduction of secondary pool water level to the condensation heat transfer coefficient was the main focus in this research. The objectives of this research were to : 1) obtain experimental data on the local and tube averaged condensation heat transfer rates for the PCCS with non-condensable and with change in the secondary pool water, 2) assess the RELAP5 and TRACE computer code against the experimental data, and 3) develop mathematical model and ehat transfer correlation for the condensation phenomena for system code application. The project involves experimentation, theoretical model development and verification, and thermal- hydraulic codes assessment.

  11. Experimental and Thermalhydraulic Code Assessment of the Transient Behavior of the Passive Condenser System in an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S.T. Revankar; W. Zhou; Gavin Henderson

    2008-01-01

    The main goal of the project was to study analytically and experimentally the condensation heat transfer for the passive condenser system such as GE Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). The effect of noncondensable gas in condenser tube and the reduction of secondary pool water level to the condensation heat transfer coefficient was the main focus in this research. The objectives of this research were to: (1) obtain experimental data on the local and tube averaged condensation heat transfer rates for the PCCS with non-condensable and with change in the secondary pool water, (2) assess the RELAP5 and TRACE computer code against the experimental data, and (3) develop mathematical model and heat transfer correlation for the condensation phenomena for system code application. The project involves experimentation, theoretical model development and verification, and thermal-hydraulic codes assessment

  12. Advanced core physics and thermal hydraulics analysis of boiling water reactors using innovative fuel concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    The economical operation of a boiling water reactor (BWR) is mainly achieved by the axially uniform utilization of the nuclear fuel in the assemblies which is challenging because the neutron spectrum in the active reactor core varies with the axial position. More precisely, the neutron spectrum becomes harder the higher the position is resulting in a decrease of the fuel utilization because the microscopic fission cross section is smaller by several orders of magnitude. In this work, the use of two fuel concepts based on a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and an innovative thorium-plutonium (ThPu) fuel is investigated by a developed simulation model encompassing thermal hydraulics, neutronics, and fuel burnup. The main feature of these fuel concepts is the axially varying enrichment in plutonium which is, in this work, recycled from spent nuclear fuel and shows a high fission fraction of the absorption cross section for fast incident neutron energies. The potential of balancing the overall fuel utilization by an increase of the fission rate in the upper part of the active height with a combination of the harder spectrum and the higher fission fraction of the absorption cross section in the BWR core is studied. The three particular calculational models for thermal hydraulics, neutronics, and fuel burnup provide results at fuel assembly and/or at core level. In the former case, the main focus lies on the thermal hydraulics analysis, fuel burnup, and activity evolution after unloading from the core and, in the latter case, special attention is paid to reactivity safety coefficients (feedback effects) and the optimization of the operational behavior. At both levels (assembly and core), the isotopic buildup and depletion rates as a function of the active height are analyzed. In addition, a comparison between the use of conventional fuel types with homogeneous enrichments and the use of the innovative fuel types is made. In the framework of the simulations, the ThPu and the MOX

  13. An analysis of the water-level monitoring system for a boiling-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.W.; Belblidia, L.A.; Russell, J.L. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The water-level instrumentation system is very important to the overall safety of a BWR. This system is being monitored by the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS) that is being installed in Georgia Power Company's Plant Hatch. One of the most significant functions of the SPDS is the comparison of redundant instrument readings and formation of the best estimate of each parameter from those readings which are consistent. When comparing water-level instrument readings, it is necessary to correct the individual readings for differences between current and calibration conditions as well as for differences between calibration conditions for the multiple instruments. This paper documents the examination of the water-level instrumentation system at Plant Hatch and presents the development of the equations that were used to determine the differences between indicated and actual water levels. (author)

  14. Improving the neutronic characteristics of a boiling water reactor by using uranium zirconium hydride fuel instead of uranium dioxide fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galahom, Ahmed Abdelghafar [Higher Technological Institute, Ramadan (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    The present work discusses two different models of boiling water reactor (BWR) bundle to compare the neutronic characteristics of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) and uranium zirconium hydride (UZrH{sub 1.6}) fuel. Each bundle consists of four assemblies. The BWR assembly fueled with UO{sub 2} contains 8 × 8 fuel rods while that fueled with UZrH{sub 1.6} contains 9 × 9 fuel rods. The Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport code, based on the Mont Carlo method, is used to design three dimensional models for BWR fuel bundles at typical operating temperatures and pressure conditions. These models are used to determine the multiplication factor, pin-by-pin power distribution, axial power distribution, thermal neutron flux distribution, and axial thermal neutron flux. The moderator and coolant (water) are permitted to boil within the BWR core forming steam bubbles, so it is important to calculate the reactivity effect of voiding at different values. It is found that the hydride fuel bundle design can be simplified by eliminating water rods and replacing the control blade with control rods. UZrH{sub 1.6} fuel improves the performance of the BWR in different ways such as increasing the energy extracted per fuel assembly, reducing the uranium ore, and reducing the plutonium accumulated in the BWR through burnup.

  15. Source term attenuation by water in the Mark I boiling water reactor drywell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Mechanistic models of aerosol decontamination by an overlying water pool during core debris/concrete interactions and spray removal of aerosols from a Mark I drywell atmosphere are developed. Eighteen uncertain features of the pool decontamination model and 19 uncertain features of the model for the rate coefficient of spray removal of aerosols are identified. Ranges for values of parameters that characterize these uncertain features of the models are established. Probability density functions for values within these ranges are assigned according to a set of rules. A Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis of the decontamination factor produced by water pools 30 and 50 cm deep and subcooled 0--70 K is performed. An uncertainty analysis for the rate constant of spray removal of aerosols is done for water fluxes of 0.25, 0.01, and 0.001 cm{sup 3} H{sub 2}O/cm{sup 2}-s and decontamination factors of 1.1, 2, 3.3, 10, 100, and 1000.

  16. A Compilation of Boiling Water Reactor Operational Experience for the United Kingdom's Office for Nuclear Regulation's Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Generic Design Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Timothy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Liao, Huafei [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    United States nuclear power plant Licensee Event Reports (LERs), submitted to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under law as required by 10 CFR 50.72 and 50.73 were evaluated for reliance to the United Kingdom’s Health and Safety Executive – Office for Nuclear Regulation’s (ONR) general design assessment of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) design. An NRC compendium of LERs, compiled by Idaho National Laboratory over the time period January 1, 2000 through March 31, 2014, were sorted by BWR safety system and sorted into two categories: those events leading to a SCRAM, and those events which constituted a safety system failure. The LERs were then evaluated as to the relevance of the operational experience to the ABWR design.

  17. Calculation model for predicting concentrations of radioactive corrostion products in the primary coolant of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, S.; Kikuchi, M.; Asakura, Y.; Yusa, H.; Ohsumi, K.

    1978-01-01

    A calculation model was developed to predict the shutdown dose rate around the recirculation pipes and their components in boiling water reactors (BWRs) by simulating the corrosion product transport in primary cooling water. The model is characterized by separating cobalt species in the water into soluble and insoluble materials and then calculating each concentration using the following considerations: (1) Insoluble cobalt (designated as crud cobalt is deposited directly on the fuel surface, while soluble cobalt (designated as ionic cobalt) is adsorbed on iron oxide deposits on the fuel surface. (2) Cobalt-60 activated on the fuel surface is dissolved in the water in an ionic form, and some is released with iron oxide as crud. The model can follow the reduction of 60 Co in the primary cooling water caused by the control of the iron feed rate into the reactor, which decreases the iron oxide deposits on the fuel surface and then reduces the cobalt adsorption rate. The calculated results agree satisfactorily with the measurements in several BWR plants

  18. Specific features of phase distribution in a draught part of the tank type boiling water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedulin, V.N.; Bartolomej, G.G.; Solodkij, V.A.; Shmelev, V.E.

    1984-01-01

    The results of experimental investigation of the two-phase flow structure in a draught part of the VK-50 boiling water cooled reactor are presented. A qualitative physical model of steam-water mixture flow in the large diameter draught part is suggested. It is shown that for hydrodynamically unstable two-phase flows a considerable nonuniformity in steam content distribution over the draught part volume which determines the possibility of the recirculating coolant flow formation in the peripheral zone is observed. At the draught part inlet the radial distribution of steam content is determined by the complex effects of power distribution and coolant flow rate change over the core radius. The flow structure in the lower section of the draught part adjoining to the core is determined to a considerable degree by a coolant jet outflow from fuel assembly (FA) nozzels Jet height depends on the velocity of outgoing two-phase flow, working pressure and hydrodynamics of the draught part. The jet height does not exceed 0.4 m for the K-50 reactor. Due to the increased steam outflow from the central FAs and the existence of radial pressure gradient the water-steam mixture is turned from the draught part periphery to its central part, where accelerated water steam flow with an increased steam content is formed. When a certain height is achieved a graduel expansion of the water-steam flow begins leading to equalizing the steam content over the draught part cross section

  19. TARMS, an on-line boiling water reactor operation management system. [3 D core simulator LOGOS 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, T.; Sakurai, S.; Uematsu, H.; Tsuiki, M.; Makino, K.

    1984-12-01

    The TARMS (Toshiba Advanced Reactor Management System) software package was developed as an effective on-line, on-site tool for boiling water reactor core operation management. It was designed to support a complete function set to meet the requirement to the current on-line process computers. The functions can be divided into two categories. One is monitoring of the present core power distribution as well as related limiting parameters. The other is aiding site engineers or reactor operators in making the future reactor operating plan. TARMS performs these functions with a three-dimensional BWR core physics simulator LOGOS 2, which is based on modified one-group, coarse-mesh nodal diffusion theory. A method was developed to obtain highly accurate nodal powers by coupling LOGOS 2 calculations with the readings of an in-core neutron flux monitor. A sort of automated machine-learning method also was developed to minimize the errors caused by insufficiency of the physics model adopted in LOGOS 2. In addition to these fundamental calculational methods, a number of core operation planning aid packages were developed and installed in TARMS, which were designed to make the operator's inputs simple and easy.

  20. Coupled thermohydraulic-neutronic instabilities in boiling water nuclear reactors: a review of the state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Rey, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the current state of the art on the topic of coupled neutronic-thermohydraulic instabilities in boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRs). The topic of BWR instabilities is of great current relevance since it affects the operation of a large number of commercial nuclear reactors. The recent trends towards introduction of high efficiency fuels that permit reactor operation at higher power densities with increased void reactivity feedback and decreased response times, has resulted in a decrease of the stability margin in the low-flow, high-power region of the operating map. This trend has resulted in a number of 'unexpected' instability events. For instance, United States plants have experienced two instability events recently, one of them resulted in an automatic reactor scram; in Spain, two BWR plants have experienced unstable limit cycle oscillations that required operator action to suppress. Similar events have been experienced in other European countries. In recent years, BWR instabilities has been one of the more exciting topics of work in the area of transient thermohydraulics. As a result, significant advances in understanding the physics behind these events have occurred, and a 'new and improved' state of the art has emerged recently. (authors). 6 figs., 57 refs., 1 appendix

  1. Investigation of two-phase flow structure in model of draught pipe of water boiling reactor VK-300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efanov, A.D.; Kuznetzov, Y.N.; Kaliakin, S.G.; Lisitza, F.D.; Remizov, O.V.; Serdun, N.P.

    2001-01-01

    VK-300 reactor represents a vessel-type boiling reactor with integral arrangement of assemblies and in-vessel steam separation at one-circuit scheme. The circuit consists of core, draught pipes, and separation facilities. The vessel of VK-300 reactor is chosen on the base of the dimensions of that of VVER-1000 reactor. The following thermal-hydraulic parameters of nuclear power plant (NPP) were investigated experimentally: dependence of void fraction upon the steam quality in mixing chamber (on the draught section input); pressure losses at different, specific zones of up-flow and down-flow sections of the circuit with free circulation; degree of steam separation in the separating chamber (at the first step of phase separation) and its dependence upon steam quality; structure of steam-water flow in draught pipes (distribution of phases over the draught pipe cross- section); presence of steam hovering and height of this hovering in inter-pipe space of draught section. (author)

  2. Assessment of water hammer effects on boiling water nuclear reactor core dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bousbia-Salah Anis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex phenomena, as water hammer transients, occurring in nuclear power plants are still not very well investigated by the current best estimate computational tools. Within this frame work, a rapid positive reactivity addition into the core generated by a water hammer transient is considered. The numerical simulation of such phenomena was carried out using the coupled RELAP5/PARCS code. An over all data comparison shows good agreement between the calculated and measured core pressure wave trends. However, the predicted power response during the excursion phase did not correctly match the experimental tendency. Because of this, sensitivity studies have been carried out in order to identify the most influential parameters that govern the dynamics of the power excursion. After investigating the pressure wave amplitude and the void feed back responses, it was found that the disagreement between the calculated and measured data occurs mainly due to the RELAP5 low void condensation rate which seems to be questionable during rapid transients. .

  3. Comparison of Standard Light Water Reactor Cross-Section Libraries using the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Boiling Water Reactor Benchmark Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulesza Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a comparison of contemporary and historical light water reactor shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry cross-section libraries for a boiling water reactor calculational benchmark problem. The calculational benchmark problem was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the request of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The benchmark problem was originally evaluated by Brookhaven National Laboratory using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discrete ordinates code DORT and the BUGLE-93 cross-section library. In this paper, the Westinghouse RAPTOR-M3G three-dimensional discrete ordinates code was used. A variety of cross-section libraries were used with RAPTOR-M3G including the BUGLE93, BUGLE-96, and BUGLE-B7 cross-section libraries developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ALPAN-VII.0 developed at Westinghouse. In comparing the calculated fast reaction rates using the four aforementioned cross-section libraries in the pressure vessel capsule, for six dosimetry reaction rates, a maximum relative difference of 8% was observed. As such, it is concluded that the results calculated by RAPTOR-M3G are consistent with the benchmark and further that the different vintage BUGLE cross-section libraries investigated are largely self-consistent.

  4. Implementation of multiple measures to improve reactor recirculation pump sealing performance in nuclear boiling water reactor service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loenhout, Gerard van [Flowserve B.V., Etten-Leur (Netherlands). Nuclear Services and Solutions Engineering; Hurni, Juerg

    2014-07-01

    A modern reactor recirculation pump circulates a large volume of high temperature, very pure water from the reactor pressure vessel back to the core. A crucial technical problem with a recirculation pump, such as a mechanical seal indicating loss of sealing pressure, may result in a power station having to shut down for repair. The paper describes the sudden increase in stray current phenomenon leading to rapid and severe deterioration of the mechanical end face shaft seal in a reactor recirculation pump. This occurred after the installation of a variable frequency converter replacing the original motorgenerator set.

  5. Implementation of multiple measures to improve reactor recirculation pump sealing performance in nuclear boiling water reactor service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loenhout, Gerard van; Hurni, Juerg

    2014-01-01

    A modern reactor recirculation pump circulates a large volume of high temperature, very pure water from the reactor pressure vessel back to the core. A crucial technical problem with a recirculation pump, such as a mechanical seal indicating loss of sealing pressure, may result in a power station having to shut down for repair. The paper describes the sudden increase in stray current phenomenon leading to rapid and severe deterioration of the mechanical end face shaft seal in a reactor recirculation pump. This occurred after the installation of a variable frequency converter replacing the original motorgenerator set.

  6. Subchannel analysis program for boiling water reactor fuel bundles based on five conservation equations of two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessho, Y.; Uchikawa, S.

    1985-01-01

    A subchannel analysis program, MENUETT, is developed for evaluation of thermal-hydraulic characteristics in boiling water reactor fuel bundles. This program is based on five conservation equations of two-phase flow with the drift-flux correlation. The cross flows are calculated separately for liquid and vapor phases from the lateral momentum conservation equation. The effects of turbulent mixing and void drift are accounted for in the program. The conservation equations are implicitly differentiated with the convective terms by the donor-cell method, and are solved iteratively in the axial and lateral directions. Data of the 3 X 3 rod bundle experiments are used for program verification. The lateral distributions of equilibrium quality and mass flow rate at the bundle exit calculated by the program compare satisfactorily with the experimental results

  7. A study of thermal-hydraulic requirements for increasing the power rates for natural-circulation boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuo, A.; Inada, F.; Hidaka, M.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of higher power rates for natural-circulation boiling water reactors (BWRs) is studied with the objective of examining the flexibility of the plant power rate in constructing such plants to cope with the increasing demand for electricity. By applying existing one-dimensional design codes, the riser heights necessary to meet two major thermal-hydraulic requirements, i.e., critical power and core stability, are systematically calculated. Several restrictions on the maximum diameter and height of the pressure vessel are also considered because these restrictions could make construction impossible or drastically increase the construction costs. A very simple map of the dominant parameters for higher power rates is obtained. It is concluded that natural-circulation BWRs of >1000 MW (electric) will be feasible within the restrictions considered here

  8. Analytic solution to verify code predictions of two-phase flow in a boiling water reactor core channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.; Olson, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    One reliable method that can be used to verify the solution scheme of a computer code is to compare the code prediction to a simplified problem for which an analytic solution can be derived. An analytic solution for the axial pressure drop as a function of the flow was obtained for the simplified problem of homogeneous equilibrium two-phase flow in a vertical, heated channel with a cosine axial heat flux shape. This analytic solution was then used to verify the predictions of the CONDOR computer code, which is used to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic performance of boiling water reactors. The results show excellent agreement between the analytic solution and CONDOR prediction

  9. Method for optimum determination of adjustable parameters in the boiling water reactor core simulator using operating data on flux distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiguchi, T.; Kawai, T.

    1975-01-01

    A method has been developed to optimally and automatically determine the adjustable parameters of the boiling water reactor three-dimensional core simulator FLARE. The steepest gradient method is adopted for the optimization. The parameters are adjusted to best fit the operating data on power distribution measured by traversing in-core probes (TIP). The average error in the calculated TIP readings normalized by the core average is 0.053 at the rated power. The k-infinity correction term has also been derived theoretically to reduce the relatively large error in the calculated TIP readings near the tips of control rods, which is induced by the coarseness of mesh points. By introducing this correction, the average error decreases to 0.047. The void-quality relation is recognized as a function of coolant flow rate. The relation is estimated to fit the measured distributions of TIP reading at the partial power states

  10. A proof-of-concept transient diagnostic expert system for BWRs [Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Naser, J.A.

    1988-05-01

    A proof-of-concept transient diagnostic expert system has been developed to identify the cause and the type of an abnormal transient in a boiling water nuclear power plant. For this expert system development, the calculational results of the simulation code RETRAN were used as the knowledge source. The knowledge extracted from the RETRAN analyses was transformed into IF-THEN rules in the knowledge base for the expert system. An important feature of this expert system is the introduction of certainty factors to allow diagnosis even in the cases where data may be either missing or marked as invalid. To increase the capability of this diagnostic system to distinguish between similiar transients, backward chaining reasoning is used to support the forward chaining reasoning with certainty factors. Through this effort, it has been demonstrated that an expert system can be successfully used to create a transient diagnostic system. It has also successfully demonstrated that RETRAN can be used as the knowledge source for developing the knowledge base of the diagnostic system

  11. In-core power sharing and fuel requirement study for a decommissioning Boiling Water Reactor using the linear reactivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chung-Yuan; Tung, Wu-Hsiung; Yaur, Shung-Jung; Kuo, Weng-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Linear reactivity model (LRM) was modified and applied to Boiling Water Reactor. • The power sharing and fuel requirement study of the last cycle and two cycles before decommissioning was implemented. • The loading pattern design concept for the cycles before decommissioning is carried out. - Abstract: A study of in-core power sharing and fuel requirement for a decommissioning BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) was carried out using the linear reactivity model (LRM). The power sharing of each fuel batch was taken as an independent variable, and the related parameters were set and modified to simulate actual cases. Optimizations of the last cycle and two cycles before decommissioning were both implemented; in the last-one-cycle optimization, a single cycle optimization was carried out with different upper limits of fuel batch power, whereas, in the two-cycle optimization, two cycles were optimized with different cycle lengths, along with two different optimization approaches which are the simultaneous optimization of two cycles (MO) and two successive single-cycle optimizations (SO). The results of the last-one-cycle optimization show that it is better to increase the fresh fuel power and decrease the thrice-burnt fuel power as much as possible. It also shows that relaxing the power limit is good to the fresh fuel requirement which will be reduced under lower power limit. On the other hand, the results of the last-two-cycle (cycle N-1 and N) optimization show that the MO is better than SO, and the power of fresh fuel batch should be decreased in cycle N-1 to save its energy for the next cycle. The results of the single-cycle optimization are found to be the same as that in cycle N of the multi-cycle optimization. Besides that, under the same total energy requirement of two cycles, a long-short distribution of cycle length design can save more fresh fuel

  12. The effect of chromate on IGSCC in boiling water reactors - a SSRT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullberg, M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of chromate on IGSCC in Type 304 stainless steel was investigated using the Slow Strain Rate Technique (SSRT). It was found that low concentrations of chromate raises the corrosion potential of SS and causes IGSCC. The effect of chromate was compared to that of the main oxidant in BWRs, hydrogen peroxide. Chromate was found to have less tendency than hydrogen peroxide, at one and the same corrosion potential, to cause IGSCC in SSRT tests. This is interpreted as due to chromate being a better anodic inhibitor than hydrogen peroxide. As a consequence, initiation of IGSCC is slower in the presence of chromate. At least during normal water chemistry, chromate is a secondary oxidant in all of the BWR reactor coolant system. The ECP is then determined by the primary oxidant, hydrogen peroxide. Therefore, the chromate transients which may occur in BWR reactor coolant systems should have no significant effect on IGSCC

  13. Checking technical measurements on climatic data during sand blasting and spraying work in the condensation chamber of the boiling water reactor Gundremmingen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rausch, D.; Unte, U.

    1986-01-01

    During sand blasting and spraying work in the condensation chambers of boiling water reactors prescribed climatic data must be adhered to. For this purpose temporary air conditioners are used. The technical measurement examination here should provide information as to whether the air conditioners used were to fulfill the parameter curve specifications. (orig.) [de

  14. Azcaxalli: A system based on Ant Colony Optimization algorithms, applied to fuel reloads design in a Boiling Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel-Estrada, Jaime, E-mail: jaime.esquivel@fi.uaemex.m [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Cerro de Coatepec S/N, Toluca de Lerdo, Estado de Mexico 50000 (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carr. Mexico Toluca S/N, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico 52750 (Mexico); Ortiz-Servin, Juan Jose, E-mail: juanjose.ortiz@inin.gob.m [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carr. Mexico Toluca S/N, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico 52750 (Mexico); Castillo, Jose Alejandro; Perusquia, Raul [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carr. Mexico Toluca S/N, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico 52750 (Mexico)

    2011-01-15

    This paper presents some results of the implementation of several optimization algorithms based on ant colonies, applied to the fuel reload design in a Boiling Water Reactor. The system called Azcaxalli is constructed with the following algorithms: Ant Colony System, Ant System, Best-Worst Ant System and MAX-MIN Ant System. Azcaxalli starts with a random fuel reload. Ants move into reactor core channels according to the State Transition Rule in order to select two fuel assemblies into a 1/8 part of the reactor core and change positions between them. This rule takes into account pheromone trails and acquired knowledge. Acquired knowledge is obtained from load cycle values of fuel assemblies. Azcaxalli claim is to work in order to maximize the cycle length taking into account several safety parameters. Azcaxalli's objective function involves thermal limits at the end of the cycle, cold shutdown margin at the beginning of the cycle and the neutron effective multiplication factor for a given cycle exposure. Those parameters are calculated by CM-PRESTO code. Through the Haling Principle is possible to calculate the end of the cycle. This system was applied to an equilibrium cycle of 18 months of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant in Mexico. The results show that the system obtains fuel reloads with higher cycle lengths than the original fuel reload. Azcaxalli results are compared with genetic algorithms, tabu search and neural networks results.

  15. Implementation of multiple measures to improve reactor recirculation pump sealing performance in nuclear boiling water reactor service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loenhout, Gerard van [Flowserve B.V., Etten-Leur (Netherlands). Nuclear Services and Solutions Engineering; Hurni, Juerg

    2015-05-15

    A modern reactor recirculation pump circulates a large volume of high temperature, very pure water from the reactor pressure vessel back to the core by feeding into multiple stationary jet pumps inside the vessel. Together with the jet pumps, they allow station operators to vary coolant flow and variable pump speed provides the best and most stable reactor power control. A crucial technical problem with a recirculation pump, such as a mechanical seal indicating loss of sealing pressure, may result in a power station having to shut down for repair. This article describes the sudden increase in stray current phenomenon leading to rapid and severe deterioration of the mechanical end face shaft seal in a reactor recirculation pump. This occurred after the installation of a variable frequency converter replacing the original motor-generator set. This article will also discuss the 2,500 hour laboratory test results conducted under reactor recirculation pump sealing conditions using a newly developed seal face technology recently implemented to overcome challenges when sealing neutral, ultra-pure water. In addition, the article will describe the elaborate shaft grounding arrangement and the preliminary measurement results achieved in order to eliminate potential damages to both pump and mechanical seal.

  16. Model for cobalt 60/58 deposition on primary coolant piping in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehollander, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    A first principles model for deposition of radioactive metals into the corrosion films of primary coolant piping is proposed. It is shown that the predominant mechanism is the inclusion of the radioactive species such as Cobalt 60 into the spinel structure of the corrosion film during the act of active corrosion. This deposition can occupy only a defined fraction of the available plus 2 valence sites of the spinel. For cobalt ions, this ratio is roughly 4.6 x 10 -3 of the total iron sites. Since no distinction is made between Cobalt 60, Cobalt 58, and Cobalt 59 in this process, the radioactivity associated with this inclusion is a function of the ratio of the radioactive species to the nonradioactive species in the water causing the corrosion of the pipe metal. The other controlling parameter is the corrosion rate of the pipe material. This can be a function of time, for example, and it shown that freshly descaled metal when exposed to the cobalt containing water can incorporate as much as 10 x 10 -3 cobalt ions per iron atom in the initial corrosion period. This has implications for the problem of decontaminating nuclear reactor piping. Equations and selected observations are presented without reference to any specifically identified reactor or utility, so as to protect any proprietary interest

  17. Verification of the CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 pin power accuracy by comparison with operating boiling water reactor measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uegata, T.; Saji, E.; Tanaka, H.

    1993-01-01

    Intranodal pin power distributions calculated by the CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 code have been compared with pin gamma scan measurements. These data were obtained from the depleted core of an operating boiling water reactor (BWR), which is more complicated than a pressurized water reactor to calculate because of the existence of coolant void distributions and cruciform control blades. Furthermore, measured bundles include mixed-oxide (MOX) bundles in which steep thermal flux gradients occur. Both UO 2 and MOX bundles have been calculated in the same manner based on the standard CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 methods. The total pin power root-mean-square (rms) error is 2.7%, which includes measurement error, from an 896-point comparison. There is no obvious dependency on axial elevations (void fractions) and no significant difference between fuel types (UO 2 or MOX), although the errors in a peripheral bundle, which is less important from the standpoint of core design, are somewhat larger than those in the internal bundles. If the peripheral bundle is excluded, the total rms error is reduced to 2.2%. From these results, it is concluded that excellent agreement has been obtained between the calculations and measurements and that the calculational capability of CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 for the intranodal pin power distribution is quite satisfactory and useful for BWR core design

  18. Final air test results for the 1/5-scale Mark I boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, E.K.; Lai, W.

    1977-01-01

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a boiling-water reactor (BWR) power plant has never occurred. However, because this type of accident is particularly severe, it is used as a principal basis for design. During a hypothetical LOCA in a Mark I BWR, air followed by steam is injected from a drywell into a toroidal wetwell about half-filled with water. A series of consistent, versatile, and accurate air-water tests simulating LOCA conditions was completed in the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory 1/5-Scale Mark I BWR Pressure Suppression Experimental Facility. Results from this test series were used to quantify the vertical loading function and to study the associated fluid dynamic phenomena. Detailed histories of vertical loads on the wetwell are shown. In particular, variations of hydrodynamic-generated vertical loads with changes in drywell pressurization rate, downcomer submergence, and the vent-line loss coefficient are established. Initial drywell overpressure, which partially preclears the downcomers of water, substantially reduces the peak vertical loads. Scaling relationships, developed from dimensional analysis and verified by bench-top experiments, allow the 1/5-scale results to be applied to a full-scale BWR power plant. This analysis leads to dimensionless groupings which are invariant. These groupongs show that if water is used as the working fluid, the magnitude of the forces in a scaled facility is reduced by the cube of the scale factor; the time when these forces occur is reduced by the square root of the scale factor

  19. Calculation scheme for boiling water reactors cores; Methode de calcul des coeurs de reacteurs a eau bouillante par le systeme saphyr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsault, Ph [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Reacteurs (DER/SERSI), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Nicolas, A; Lenain, R; Richebois, E; Royer, E; Caruge, D [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie (DMT/SERMA), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Blaise, P [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Reacteurs (DER/SPEX), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Gastaldi, B; Delpech, M [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Reacteurs (DER/SPRC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1999-07-01

    Boiling Water Reactors represent one third of the world's reactors. They are presently evolving towards greater simplification, allowing a reduction in the costs of operation, improved safety and a relative flexibility in their capacity to accommodate 100% MOX cores. The CEA, in a combined effort with its partners, the COGEMA and the EDF, would like to assess the interest of this reactor type, especially on this last point. A definition program and subsequent qualification of the calculation scheme have been undertaken. We are presenting here the specific features inherent in the calculation of these reactors, in comparison to PWRs, as well as the first results of the program. (authors)

  20. Effects of a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident on a Mark I Boiling Water Reactor pressure-suppression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.; McCauley, E.W.

    1977-01-01

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a boiling-water-reactor (BWR) power plant has never occurred. However, because this type of accident could be particularly severe, it is used as a principal theoretical basis for design. A series of consistent, versatile, and accurate air-water tests that simulate LOCA conditions has been completed on a 1 / 5 -scale Mark I BWR pressure-suppression system. Results from these tests are used to quantify the vertical-loading function and to study the associated fluid dynamics phenomena. Detailed histories of vertical loads on the wetwell are shown. In particular, variation of hydrodynamic-generated vertical loads with changes in drywell-pressurization rate, downcomer submergence, and the vent-line loss coefficient are established. Initial drywell overpressure, which partially preclears the downcomers of water, substantially reduces the peak vertical loads. Scaling relationships, developed from dimensional analysis and verified by bench-top experiments, allow the 1 / 5 -scale results to be applied to a full-scale BWR power plant. This analysis leads to dimensionless groupings that are invariant. These groupings show that, if water is used as the working fluid, the magnitude of the forces in a scaled facility is reduced by the cube of the scale factor and occurs in a time reduced by the square root of the scale factor

  1. Advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR). Design, construction, operation and maintenance experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idesawa, M.

    1998-01-01

    The ABWR has experienced all phases of design, construction, operation and maintenance at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station Units No.6 and 7 and confirmed that originally intended development targets have been achieved with highly satisfactory results. This is the fruit of a project that collected wisdom from various sources under a international cooperative organization, with Tokyo Electric Power Company taking the leading role from the onset. These two units have not only demonstrated that ABWRs have superior performance as the first standard units of advanced light water reactor but also aroused a hope for the big potential advantages that ABWRs can provide us. The ABWR has already been awarded a U.S. standard license for having proved that it can comply with the requirements of international regulatory systems with an ample margin. There are also many construction programs with ABWRs progressing both domestically and abroad, suggesting that it has won recognition as an international standard plant. We will do our utmost to perfect the operation and maintenance records of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Units No.6 and 7, which is the top runner among ABWRs, and to make known the superiority of this reactor to the world. (J.P.N.)

  2. Application of hydrogen water chemistry to moderate corrosive circumstances around the reactor pressure vessel bottom of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shunsuke Uchida; Eishi Ibe; Katsumi Ohsumi

    1994-01-01

    Application of hydrogen water chemistry to moderate corrosive circumstances is a promising approach to preserve structural integrities of major components and structures in the primary cooling system of BWRs. The benefits of HWC application are usually accompanied by several disadvantages. After evaluating merits and demerits of HWC application, it is concluded that optimal amounts of hydrogen injected into the feed water can moderate corrosive circumstances, in the region to be preserved, without serious disadvantages. (authors). 1 fig., 4 refs

  3. Feasibility assessment of burnup credit in the criticality analysis of shipping casks with boiling water reactor spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1991-08-01

    Considerable interest in the allowance of reactivity credit for the exposure history of power reactor fuel currently exists. This ''burnup credit'' issue has the potential to greatly reduce risk and cost when applied to the design and certification of spent fuel casks used for transportation and storage. Recently, analyses have demonstrated the technical feasibility and estimated the risk and economic incentives for allowing burnup credit in pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel shipping cask applications. This report summarizes the extension of the previous PWR technical feasibility assessment to boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel. This feasibility analysis aims to apply simple methods that adequately characterize the time-dependent isotopic compositions of typical BWR fuel. An initial analysis objective was to identify a simple and reliable method for characterizing BWR spent fuel. Two different aspects of fuel characterization were considered:l first, the generation of burn- up dependent material interaction probabilities; second, the prediction of material inventories over time (depletion). After characterizing the spent fuel at various stages of exposure and decay, three dimensional (3-D) models for an infinite array of assemblies and, in several cases, infinite arrays of assemblies in a typical shipping cask basket were analyzed. Results for assemblies without a basket provide reactivity control requirements as a function of burnup and decay, while results including the basket allow assessment of typical basket configurations to provide sufficient reactivity control for spent BWR fuel. Resulting basket worths and reactivity trends over time are then evaluated to determine whether burnup credit is needed and feasible in BWR applications

  4. Steam drum level dynamics in a multiple loop natural circulation system of a pressure-tube type boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Vikas; Kulkarni, P.P.; Nayak, A.K.; Vijayan, P.K.; Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We have highlighted the problem of drum level dynamics in a multiple loop type NC system using RELAP5 code. → The need of interconnections in steam and liquid spaces close to drum is established. → The steam space interconnections equalize pressure and liquid space interconnections equalize level. → With this scheme, the system can withstand anomalous conditions. → However, the controller is found to be inevitable for inventory balance. - Abstract: Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a pressure tube type boiling water reactor employing natural circulation as the mode of heat removal under all the operating conditions. Main heat transport system (MHTS) of AHWR is essentially a multi-loop natural circulation system with all the loops connected to each other. Each loop of MHTS has a steam drum that provides for gravity based steam-water separation. Steam drum level is a very critical parameter especially in multi-loop natural circulation systems as large departures from the set point may lead to ineffective separation of steam-water or may affect the driving head. However, such a system is susceptible to steam drum level anomalies under postulated asymmetrical operating conditions among the different quadrants of the core like feedwater flow distribution anomaly among the steam drums or power anomaly among the core quadrants. Analyses were carried out to probe such scenarios and unravel the underlying dynamics of steam drum level using system code RELAP5/Mod3.2. In addition, a scheme to obviate such problem in a passive manner without dependence on level controller was examined. It was concluded that steam drums need to be connected in the liquid as well as steam space to make the system tolerant to asymmetrical operating conditions.

  5. The predicted effectiveness of noble metal treatment at the Chinshan boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh Tsungkuang; Chu Fang; Chang Ching; Huang Chiashen

    2000-01-01

    The technique of noble metal treatment (NMT) available in a form of noble metal cooling (NMC) or noble metal chemical addition (NMCA), was introduced to enhance effectiveness of hydrogen water chemistry. Since it is technically difficult to gain access to an entire primary heat transport circuit (PHTC) of a BWR and monitor variation on electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), a question whether the NMC technology is indeed effective for lowering the ECP of every location in a BWR is not still well understood at the moment. Then, computer modeling is so far the best tool to help investigate effectiveness of the NMT along PHCT of the BWR. Here was discussed on how the computer model was calibrated by using measured chemistry data obtained from No. 2 unit (BWR) in the Kuosheng Plant. The effect of noble metal treatment coupled with hydrogen water chemistry has been quantitatively molded, on a base of two different sets of ECD enhancement data. It was predicted that No. 1 unit in the Chinshan could be protected by noble metal treatment with lower [H 2 ] FW . In the case of competitive enhancing factors for the ECDs of oxygen reduction, hydrogen peroxide reduction, and hydrogen oxidation reactions, HWC had always to be present for noble metal treatment to be effective for protecting a reactor. Otherwise, according to a model calculation based upon the results from Kim's work, the ECP might instead be increased due to the enhanced reduction reaction rate of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, especially in the near core regions. (G.K.)

  6. Outline of design, manufacturing and installation experience of pressure vessel structure for the prototype heavy water moderated boiling light water cooled reactor 'FUGEN'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibato, Eizo; Oguchi, Isao; Kishi, Toshikazu; Kitagawa, Yuji

    1977-01-01

    After component installation completed in June 1977 and various functional tests to be conducted later, the prototype heavy water moderated, boiling light water cooled reactor ''FUGEN'' is scheduled to reach first criticality in March 1978. Since the pressure vessel of ''FUGEN'' is completely different from that of a light water reactor in structure and materials, through research and development work was carried out prior to fabrication and construction. Based on these studies, installation of the actual pressure vessel was completed. Functional tests are now under way. This article describes examples in which our research and development results are reflected on design, manufacture, and installation of the pressure vessel. Also it introduces noteworthy achievements relevant to production techniques in manufacture and installation. (auth.)

  7. SWR 1000: an advanced boiling water reactor with passive safety features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brettschuh, W.

    1999-01-01

    The SWR 1000, an advanced BWR, is being developed by Siemens under contract from Germany's electric utilities and with the support of European partners. The project is currently in the basic design phase to be concluded in mid-1999 with the release of a site-independent safety report and costing analysis. The development goals for the project encompass competitive costs, use of passive safety systems to further reduce probabilities of occurrence of severe accidents, assured control of accidents so no emergency response actions for evacuation of the local population are needed, simplification of plant systems based on operator experience, and planning and design based on German codes, standards and specifications put forward by the Franco-German Reactor Safety Commission for future nuclear power plants equipped with PWRs, as well as IAEA specifications and the European Utility Requirements. These goals led to a plant concept with a low power density core, with large water inventories stored above the core inside the reactor pressure vessel, in the pressure suppression pool, and in other locations. All accident situations arising from power operation can be controlled by passive safety features without rise in core temperature and with a grace period of more than three days. In addition, postulated core melt is controlled by passive equipment. All new passive systems have been successfully tested for function and performance using large-scale components in experimental testing facilities at PSI in Switzerland and at the Juelich Research Centre in Germany. In addition to improvements of the safety systems, the plant's operating systems have been simplified based on operating experience. The design's safety concept, simplified operating systems and 48 months construction time yield favourable plant construction costs. The level of concept maturity required to begin offering the SWR 1000 on the power generation market is anticipated to be reached, as planned in the year

  8. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Support and Modeling for the Boiling Water Reactor Station Black Out Case Study Using RELAP and RAVEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Riley, Thomas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schroeder, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Aldrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nielsen, Joe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Dan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Bie [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pascucci, Valerio [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated. In order to evaluate the impact of these two factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insight to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This report focuses, in particular, on the impact of power uprate on the safety of a boiled water reactor system. The case study considered is a loss of off-site power followed by the loss of diesel generators, i.e., a station black out (SBO) event. Analysis is performed by using a thermo-hydraulic code, i.e. RELAP-5, and a stochastic analysis tool currently under development at INL, i.e. RAVEN. Starting from the event tree models contained in SAPHIRE, we built the input file for RELAP-5 that models in great detail system dynamics under SBO conditions. We also interfaced RAVEN with RELAP-5 so that it would be possible to run multiple RELAP-5 simulation runs by changing specific keywords of the input file. We both employed classical statistical tools, i.e. Monte-Carlo, and more advanced machine learning based algorithms to perform uncertainty quantification in order to quantify changes in system performance and limitations as a consequence of power uprate. We also employed advanced data analysis and visualization tools that helped us to correlate simulation outcome such as maximum core temperature with a set of input uncertain parameters. Results obtained gave a detailed overview of the issues associated to power uprate for a SBO accident scenario. We were able to quantify how timing of safety related events were impacted by a higher reactor core power. Such insights can provide useful material to the decision makers to perform risk-infomed safety margins management.

  9. Feasibility of underwater welding of highly irradiated in-vessel components of boiling-water reactors: A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, A.L.

    1997-11-01

    In February 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES), initiated a literature review to assess the state of underwater welding technology. In particular, the objective of this literature review was to evaluate the viability of underwater welding in-vessel components of boiling water reactor (BWR) in-vessel components, especially those components fabricated from stainless steels that are subjected to high neutron fluences. This assessment was requested because of the recent increased level of activity in the commercial nuclear industry to address generic issues concerning the reactor vessel and internals, especially those issues related to repair options. This literature review revealed a preponderance of general information about underwater welding technology, as a result of the active research in this field sponsored by the U.S. Navy and offshore oil and gas industry concerns. However, the literature search yielded only a limited amount of information about underwater welding of components in low-fluence areas of BWR in-vessel environments, and no information at all concerning underwater welding experiences in high-fluence environments. Research reported by the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and researchers from the DOE fusion reactor program proved more fruitful. This research documented relevant experience concerning welding of stainless steel materials in air environments exposed to high neutron fluences. It also addressed problems with welding highly irradiated materials, and primarily attributed those problems to helium-induced cracking in the material. (Helium is produced from the neutron irradiation of boron, an impurity, and nickel.) The researchers found that the amount of helium-induced cracking could be controlled, or even eliminated, by reducing the heat input into the weld and applying a compressive stress perpendicular to the weld path

  10. Contribution to the multidimensional modelling of convective high pressure boiling flows for pressurised water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueguen, J.

    2013-01-01

    This study is a contribution to the modelling of multidimensional high pressure boiling flows relative to PWR. Numerical simulation of such two-phase flows is considered to be an interesting way for the DNB understanding. The first part of this study exposes a two-dimensional steady state two-phase flows model able to predict velocity and temperature profiles in tube. The mixture balanced equations are used with the eddy diffusivity concept to close the turbulent transport terms. The second part is devoted to the development of the model in the general two dimensional case. Contrary to the steady state model, this model is independent of experimental data and implies the use of an original local homogeneous relaxation model (HRM). The results obtained from the comparison with the data bank DEBORA reveals that in a mixture approach two sub models are sufficient to obtain a physical good description of turbulent boiling flows. Some limitations appear at conditions close to DNB conditions. The turbulent closures and the relaxation time in the HRM model have been clearly identified as the most important and sensitive parameters in the model. (author) [fr

  11. Method for removing cesium from aqueous liquid, method for purifying the reactor coolant in boiling water and pressurized water reactors and a mixed ion exchanged resin bed, useful in said purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otte, J.N.A.; Liebmann, D.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for removing cesium from an aqueous liquid, and to a resin bed containing a mixture of an anion exchange resin and cation exchange resin useful in said purification. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention is a method for purifying the reactor coolant of a presurized water or boiling water reactor. Said method, which is particularly advantageously employed in purifying the reactor coolant in the primary circuit of a pressurized reactor, comprises contacting at least a portion of the reactor coolant with a strong base anion exchange resin and the strong acid cation exchange resin derived from a highly cross-linked, macroporous copolymer of a monovinylidene aromatic and a cross-linking monomer copolymerizable therewith. Although the reactor coolant can sequentially be contacted with one resin type and thereafter with the second resin type, the contact is preferably conducted using a resin bed comprising a mixture of the cation and anion exchange resins. 1 fig., refs

  12. Dynamics analysis of a boiling water reactor based on multivariable autoregressive modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, Ritsuo; Matsubara, Kunihiko

    1980-01-01

    The establishment of the highly reliable mathematical model for the dynamic characteristics of a reactor is indispensable for the achievement of safe operation in reactor plants. The authors have tried to model the dynamic characteristics of a reactor based on the identification technique, taking the JPDR (Japan Power Demonstration Reactor) as the object, as one of the technical studies for diagnosing BWR anomaly, and employed the multivariable autoregressive modeling (MAR method) as one of the useful methods for forwarding the analysis. In this paper, the outline of the system analysis by MAR modeling is explained, and the identification experiments and their analysis results performed in the phase 4 of the power increase test of the JPDR are described. The authors evaluated the results of identification based on only reactor noises, making reference to the results of identification in the case of exciting the system by applying artificial irregular disturbance, in order to clarify the extent in which the modeling is possible by reactor noises only. However, some difficulties were encountered. The largest problem is the one concerning the separation and identification of the noise sources exciting the variables from the dynamic characteristics among the variables. If the effective technique can be obtained to this problem, the approach by the identification technique based on the probability model might be a powerful tool in the field of reactor noise analysis and the development of diagnosis technics. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  13. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor design. Supplement 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This report supplements the final safety evaluation report (FSER) for the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design. The FSER was issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff as NUREG-1503 in July 1994 to document the NRC staff's review of the US ABWR design. The US ABWR design was submitted by GE Nuclear Energy (GE) in accordance with the procedures of Subpart B to Part 52 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This supplement documents the NRC staff's review of the changes to the US ABWR design documentation since the issuance of the FSER. GE made these changes primarily as a result of first-of-a-kind-engineering (FOAKE) and as a result of the design certification rulemaking for the ABWR design. On the basis of its evaluations, the NRC staff concludes that the confirmatory issues in NUREG-1503 are resolved, that the changes to the ABWR design documentation are acceptable, and that GE's application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B to 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR design

  14. Design of a boiling water reactor core based on an integrated blanket-seed thorium-uranium concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez-Carrera, Alejandro; Francois, Juan Luis; Martin-del-Campo, Cecilia; Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the design of a boiling water reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using thorium as a nuclear material in an integrated blanket-seed (BS) assembly. The integrated BS concept comes from the fact that the blanket and the seed rods are located in the same assembly, and are burned out in a once-through cycle. The idea behind the lattice design is to use the thorium conversion capability in a BWR spectrum, taking advantage of the 233 U build-up. A core design was developed to achieve an equilibrium cycle of 365 effective full power days in a standard BWR with a reload of 104 fuel assemblies designed with an average 235 U enrichment of 7.5 w/o in the seed sub-lattice. The main operating parameters, like power, linear heat generation rate and void distributions were obtained as well as the shutdown margin. It was observed that the analyzed parameters behave like those obtained in a standard BWR. The shutdown margin design criterion was fulfilled by addition of a burnable poison region in the fuel assembly

  15. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor design. Supplement 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report supplements the final safety evaluation report (FSER) for the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design. The FSER was issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff as NUREG-1503 in July 1994 to document the NRC staff`s review of the US ABWR design. The US ABWR design was submitted by GE Nuclear Energy (GE) in accordance with the procedures of Subpart B to Part 52 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This supplement documents the NRC staff`s review of the changes to the US ABWR design documentation since the issuance of the FSER. GE made these changes primarily as a result of first-of-a-kind-engineering (FOAKE) and as a result of the design certification rulemaking for the ABWR design. On the basis of its evaluations, the NRC staff concludes that the confirmatory issues in NUREG-1503 are resolved, that the changes to the ABWR design documentation are acceptable, and that GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B to 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR design.

  16. Automatic fuel lattice design in a boiling water reactor using a particle swarm optimization algorithm and local search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Chaung; Lin, Tung-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The automatic procedure was developed to design the radial enrichment and gadolinia (Gd) distribution of fuel lattice. ► The method is based on a particle swarm optimization algorithm and local search. ► The design goal were to achieve the minimum local peaking factor. ► The number of fuel pins with Gd and Gd concentration are fixed to reduce search complexity. ► In this study, three axial sections are design and lattice performance is calculated using CASMO-4. - Abstract: The axial section of fuel assembly in a boiling water reactor (BWR) consists of five or six different distributions; this requires a radial lattice design. In this study, an automatic procedure based on a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm and local search was developed to design the radial enrichment and gadolinia (Gd) distribution of the fuel lattice. The design goals were to achieve the minimum local peaking factor (LPF), and to come as close as possible to the specified target average enrichment and target infinite multiplication factor (k ∞ ), in which the number of fuel pins with Gd and Gd concentration are fixed. In this study, three axial sections are designed, and lattice performance is calculated using CASMO-4. Finally, the neutron cross section library of the designed lattice is established by CMSLINK; the core status during depletion, such as thermal limits, cold shutdown margin and cycle length, are then calculated using SIMULATE-3 in order to confirm that the lattice design satisfies the design requirements.

  17. Recent experiences with ultrasonic inservice inspection systems with phased array probes on spherical bottoms of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wustenberg, H.; Brekow, G.; Erhard, A.; Hein, E.

    1988-01-01

    The special geometry of the spherical bottom of boiling water reactors with control rods and measuring nozzles requires a very special surveillance technique during the in-service inspection. Reside visual inspection an ultrasonic inspection has been established due to the requirements of German authorities. A first application of a new phased array system took place August 1987. The 100% inspection of a spherical bottom had been enabled by the application of phased array probes with electronically controlled skewing angles. The data acquisition had been based on the storage of whole A-scans, which had been pixellized into 256 points. This A-scan storage procedure makes possible the application of a simple and fast algorithm to present the data as TD-(time displacement)-scans. Defect reconstruction by echotomographique approaches are under development. This paper presents the ultrasonic technique applied including the phased array probes, the electronic system, as well as the software package used for the control of the inspection parameters depending on the probe position

  18. Preliminary Feasibility, Design, and Hazard Analysis of a Boiling Water Test Loop Within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstner, Douglas M.

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A Boiling Water Test Loop (BWTL) is being designed for one of the irradiation test positions within the. The objective of the new loop will be to simulate boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions to support clad corrosion and related reactor material testing. Further it will accommodate power ramping tests of candidate high burn-up fuels and fuel pins/rods for the commercial BWR utilities. The BWTL will be much like the pressurized water loops already in service in 5 of the 9 'flux traps' (region of enhanced neutron flux) in the ATR. The loop coolant will be isolated from the primary coolant system so that the loop's temperature, pressure, flow rate, and water chemistry can be independently controlled. This paper presents the proposed general design of the in-core and auxiliary BWTL systems; the preliminary results of the neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses; and the preliminary hazard analysis for safe normal and transient BWTL and ATR operation

  19. Vent clearing during a simulated loss-of-coolant accident in Mark I boiling-water-reactor pressure-suppression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    The response of the pressure-suspension containment system of Mark I boiling-water reactors to a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is being studied. This response is a design basis for light-water nuclear reactors. Part of the study is being carried out on a 1 / 5 -scale experimental facility that models the pressure-suppression containment system of the Peach Bottom 2 nuclear power plant. The test series reported here focused on the initial or air-clearing phase of a hypothetical LOCA. Measured forces, measured pressures, and the hydrodynamic phenomena (observed with high-speed cameras) show a logical interrelationship

  20. Development of natural circulation small and medium sized boiling water reactor: HSBWR-600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Minoru; Horiuchi, Tetsuo; Yoshimoto, Yuichiro; Sumida, Isao; Murase, Michio; Akita, Minoru; Niino, Tsuyoshi

    1988-01-01

    In nuclear power generation, the development of large reactors has been promoted as the main energy source in Japan. However, world economy entered low growth age, and the growth of electric power demand slowed down. Accordingly, attention has been paid to the medium and small reactors that can cope with whatever needs by serializing their types in addition to the nuclear power plants of medium output matching to electric power demand. In order to cope with these new needs, the economical efficiency of medium and small reactors must be as close as possible to that of large reactors, and as the countermeasures to the demerits due to small size, those must be made into the plants having simplified systems and the safety easily acceptable to public. Hitachi Ltd. plans to develop the natural circulation type medium and small BWRs of 600 NWe output class, HSBWR-600, on the basis of the nuclear power plant technology based on the rich results of design and operation of BWRs obtained so far, and to rank them as one of the BWR series. The target of their development design, the circumstance of their development, the core design and the thermo-hydraulic characteristics, the reactor pressure vessel and in-core structures, the safety design, system design, building layout and the evaluation are reported. (Kako, I.)

  1. Study on dual plant concept for the next generation boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi; Oikawa, Hirohide

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the study results on the basic concept of dual BWRs. For the convenience, we call the concept here as Trial Study on BWR dual concept (TSBWR dual). The concept is general and applicable to all BWRs which have internal recirculation pumps (RIP). The TSBWR dual is a plant concept of dual BWRs contained in a same secondary containment building. The plant output is from 2 x l,350 MWe up to 2 x 1,700 MWe. This concept is mainly aiming at safety improvement and cost savings of the next generation BWRs. The TSBWR dual has two RPVs and two dry wells (DW). It has, however, only one wet well (WW) and only one R/B. The WW and the R/B are shared by the dual reactors. The operating floor is also shared by the two reactors. The TSBWR dual has both passive safety systems and active safety systems. They are also shared between the two reactors. A lot of sharing between the dual reactors enables significant cost savings accompanied by the power increase up to 3,400 MWe. Although the TSBWR dual consists of two reactors, the simplified cylindrical configuration of the key structures and reduction of the R/B height can minimize the plant construction period. The TSBWR dual provides a concept with which we can challenge to construct a dual BWR plant in the near future. (author)

  2. Application of reliability-centered maintenance to boiling water reactor emergency core cooling systems fault-tree analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.A.; Feltus, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    Reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) methods are applied to boiling water reactor plant-specific emergency core cooling system probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) fault trees. The RCM is a technique that is system function-based, for improving a preventive maintenance (PM) program, which is applied on a component basis. Many PM programs are based on time-directed maintenance tasks, while RCM methods focus on component condition-directed maintenance tasks. Stroke time test data for motor-operated valves (MOVs) are used to address three aspects concerning RCM: (a) to determine if MOV stroke time testing was useful as a condition-directed PM task; (b) to determine and compare the plant-specific MOV failure data from a broad RCM philosophy time period compared with a PM period and, also, compared with generic industry MOV failure data; and (c) to determine the effects and impact of the plant-specific MOV failure data on core damage frequency (CDF) and system unavailabilities for these emergency systems. The MOV stroke time test data from four emergency core cooling systems [i.e., high-pressure coolant injection (HPCI), reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC), low-pressure core spray (LPCS), and residual heat removal/low-pressure coolant injection (RHR/LPCI)] were gathered from Philadelphia Electric Company's Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Units 2 and 3 between 1980 and 1992. The analyses showed that MOV stroke time testing was not a predictor for eminent failure and should be considered as a go/no-go test. The failure data from the broad RCM philosophy showed an improvement compared with the PM-period failure rates in the emergency core cooling system MOVs. Also, the plant-specific MOV failure rates for both maintenance philosophies were shown to be lower than the generic industry estimates

  3. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE

  4. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE.

  5. E-chem page: A Support System for Remote Diagnosis of Water Quality in Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naohiro Kusumi; Takayasu Kasahara; Kazuhiko Akamine; Kenji Tada; Naoshi Usui; Nobuyuki Oota

    2002-01-01

    It is important to control and maintain water quality for nuclear power plants. Chemical engineers sample and monitor reactor water from various subsystems and analyze the chemical quality as routine operations. With regard to controlling water quality, new technologies have been developed and introduced to improve the water quality from both operation and material viewpoints. To maintain the quality, it is important to support chemical engineers in evaluating the water quality and realizing effective retrieval of stored data and documents. We have developed a remote support system using the Internet to diagnose BWR water quality, which we call e-chem page. The e-chem page integrates distributed data and information in a Web server, and makes it easy to evaluate the data on BWR water chemistry. This system is composed of four functions: data transmission, water quality evaluation, inquiry and history retrieval system, and reference to documents on BWR water chemistry. The developed system is now being evaluated in trial operations by Hitachi, Ltd. and an electric power company. In addition diagnosis technology applying independent component analysis (ICA) is being developed to improve predictive capability of the system. This paper describes the structure and function of the e-chem page and presents results of obtained with the proposed system for the prediction of chemistry conditions in reactor water. (authors)

  6. Benchmarking lattice physics data and methods for boiling water reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciapouti, R.J.; Edenius, M.; Harris, D.R.; Hebert, M.J.; Kapitz, D.M.; Pilat, E.E.; VerPlanck, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of the work reported was to verify the adequacy of lattice physics modeling for the analysis of the Vermont Yankee BWR using a multigroup, two-dimensional transport theory code. The BWR lattice physics methods have been benchmarked against reactor physics experiments, higher order calculations, and actual operating data

  7. 77 FR 3009 - Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0010] Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power... comment a draft NUREG, NUREG-2104, Revision 0, ``Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant... developed using this Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examination Standards for Power Reactors...

  8. Damage analysis of ceramic boron absorber materials in boiling water reactors and initial model for an optimum control rod management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.

    2000-01-01

    concept - to calculate the control rod's working life both in the control position and the shut-down position - will automatically lead to an optimization of the control rod strategy. Control rod optimisation is demonstrated by accumulating the total amount of control rods required in a medium-sized BWR up to the total reactor holding period. At least 60% of the first core inventory - for this control rod type an existing EMPIRICAL MODEL is already available - may be used up to the total operating period without any safety loss. Looking to the present disposal situation this concept represents a practical way to reduce all high level waste. In addition benefit of utilizing this concept is that it minimizes tritium emission. Control-rods utilized within Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are designed for the purpose to control and shape the neutron flux profile in the reactor, to adjust the range of regulation referring to the weight rate of the reactor coolant and thirdly by- shutting down the reactor at any time and under any conditions with regard to nuclear aspects, mechanical integrity and control rod history. The designation control- or shut down rod characterize the particular field of activity for a given control rod. The focal point of my work had shown to be a calculation of the nuclear working life of any control rod design as well as an optimisation method with reference to the holding period for a given control rod inventory as a result of measuring data and a theoretical analysis describing the parameters in a general validity form. (author)

  9. Optimization of boiling water reactor control rod patterns using linear search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiguchi, T.; Doi, K.; Fikuzaki, T.; Frogner, B.; Lin, C.; Long, A.B.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program for searching the optimal control rod pattern has been developed. The program is able to find a control rod pattern where the resulting power distribution is optimal in the sense that it is the closest to the desired power distribution, and it satisfies all operational constraints. The search procedure consists of iterative uses of two steps: sensitivity analyses of local power and thermal margins using a three-dimensional reactor simulator for a simplified prediction model; linear search for the optimal control rod pattern with the simplified model. The optimal control rod pattern is found along the direction where the performance index gradient is the steepest. This program has been verified to find the optimal control rod pattern through simulations using operational data from the Oyster Creek Reactor

  10. Flaw density examinations of a clad boiling water reactor pressure vessel segment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.V.; McClung, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Flaw density is the greatest uncertainty involved in probabilistic analyses of reactor pressure vessel failure. As part of the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program, studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in a section of reactor pressure vessel cut from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessel [nominally 0.7 by 3 m (2 by 10 ft)]. This section (removed from the scrapped vessel that was never in service) was evaluated nondestructively to determine the as-fabricated status. We had four primary objectives: (1) evaluate longitudinal and girth welds for flaws with manual ultrasonics, (2) evaluate the zone under the nominal 6.3-mm (0.25-in.) clad for cracking (again with manual ultrasonics), (3) evaluate the cladding for cracks with a high-sensitivity fluorescent penetrant method, and (4) determine the source of indications detected

  11. Pellet-clad interaction observations in boiling water reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, K.C.; Bahl, J.K.; Sivaramakrishnan, K.S.; Roy, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    Under a programme to assess the performance of fuel elements of Tarapur Atomic Power Station, post-irradiation examination has been carried out on 18 fuel elements in the first phase. Pellet-clad mechanical interaction behaviour in 14 elements with varying burnup and irradiation history has been studied using eddy current testing technique. The data has been analysed to evaluate the role of pellet-clad mechanical interaction in PCI/SCC failure in power reactor operating conditions. (author)

  12. Evolution of processing of GE fuel clad tubing for corrosion resistance in boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C.D. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Adamson, R.B. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Marlowe, M.O. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Plaza-Meyer, E. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Proebstle, R.A. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); White, D.W. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The current modification of the primary GE in-process solution-quench heat treatment, an (alpha+beta) solution-quench carried out at a tube diameter requiring only two subsequent reduction and anneal cycles, is applicable to Zr barrier fuel clad tubing, to non-barrier fuel clad tubing, and to the TRICLAD tubing product. A combination of good in-reactor corrosion performance and degradation resistance is anticipated for these products, based on knowledge of metallurgical characteristics and supported by the demonstrated performance capability of the Zircaloy-2 materials used. (orig.)

  13. The influence of ppb levels of chloride impurities on the stress corrosion crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels under simulated boiling water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Chloride effects on SCC crack growth in RPV steels under boiling water reactor conditions. • ppb-levels of chloride may result in fast SCC in normal water chemistry environment. • Much higher chloride tolerance for SCC in hydrogen water chemistry environment. • Potential long-term (memory) effects after severe and prolonged temporary chloride transients. - Abstract: The effect of chloride on the stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth behaviour in low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels was evaluated under simulated boiling water reactor conditions. In normal water chemistry environment, ppb-levels of chloride may result in fast SCC after rather short incubation periods of few hours. After moderate and short-term chloride transients, the SCC crack growth rates return to the same very low high-purity water values within few 100 h. Potential long-term (memory) effects on SCC crack growth cannot be excluded after severe and prolonged chloride transients. The chloride tolerance for SCC in hydrogen water chemistry environment is much higher.

  14. Singular system analysis of the Local Power Range Monitor (LPRM) readings of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) in an unstable event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginestar Peiro, D.; Verdu, G.; Miro, R.

    2006-01-01

    Singular system analysis is a successful technique to separate oscillating components from a given signal. A methodology is proposed to apply this technique to the signals obtained from the LPRMs of a boiling water reactor core and extract the contributions of the in-phase oscillation and the out-of-phase oscillations from the LPRM readings during an unstable event. This methodology has been validated with synthetic signals and simulations of in-phase and out-of-phase oscillations of the Leibstadt reactor. Finally, one case of Ringhals I Stability Benchmark has been analysed. (author)

  15. Improved control rod drive handling equipment for BWRs [boiling-water reactors]: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, A.P.L.; Gorman, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    Improved equipment for removing and replacing control rod drives (CRDs) in BWR plants has been designed, built and tested. Control rod drives must be removed from the reactor periodically for servicing. Removal and replacement of CRDs using equipment originally supplied with the plant has long been recognized as one of the more difficult and highest radiation exposure maintenance operations that must be performed at BWR plants. The improved equipment was used for the first time at Quad Cities, Unit 2, during a Fall 1986 outage. The trial of the equipment was highly successful, and it was shown that the new equipment significantly improves CRD handling operations. The new equipment significantly simplifies the sequence of operations required to lower a CRD from its housing, upend it to a horizontal orientation, and transport it out of the reactor containment. All operations of the new equipment are performed from the undervessel equipment handling platform, thus, eliminating the requirement for a person to work on the lower level of the undervessel gallery which is often highly contaminated. Typically, one less person is required to operate the equipment than were used with the older equipment. The new equipment incorporates a number of redundant and fail safe features that improve operations and reduce the chances for accidents

  16. Lifetime Neutron Fluence Analysis of the Ringhals Unit 1 Boiling Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulesza Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a neutron fluence assessment considering the entire commercial operating history (35 cycles or ∼ 25 effective full power years of the Ringhals Unit 1 reactor pressure vessel beltline region. In this assessment, neutron (E >1.0 MeV fluence and iron atom displacement distributions were calculated on the moderator tank and reactor pressure vessel structures. To validate those calculations, five in-vessel surveillance chain dosimetry sets were evaluated as well as material samples taken from the upper core grid and wide range neutron monitor tubes to act as a form of retrospective dosimetry. During the analysis, it was recognized that delays in characterizing the retrospective dosimetry samples reduced the amount of reactions available to be counted and complicated the material composition determination. However, the comparisons between the surveillance chain dosimetry measurements (M and calculated (C results show similar and consistent results with the linear average M/C ratio of 1.13 which is in good agreement with the resultant least squares best estimate (BE/C ratios of 1.10 for both neutron (E >1.0 MeV flux and iron atom displacement rate.

  17. Improvement of daily load-following operation for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiguchi, Takashi; Kurihara, Kunitoshi; Sakurai, Mikio; Joge, Toshio; Asami, Kazuo.

    1980-01-01

    Recently, with the increase of the proportion of nuclear power generation to the total amount of power generation of electric power systems, the needs of daily load-following operation of nuclear power stations have heightened, accordingly the study on the method of daily load-following operation has been carried out for BWRs. In this study, by the combined use of the flow rate control of core coolnat being operated easily and the operation of control rods, the BWR system with the daily load-following performance of 100% power output in daytime and 50% power output at night was the target of development. For the purpose, the change of core characteristics during load-following was grasped analytically, and the range of load change was investigated. At the same time, as the first stage of developing operation control and monitoring system, the reactor output-adjusting device which makes generator output automatically follow the target load change pattern by the flow rate control of core coolnat, and the equipment for monitoring core performance on line were developed. The analysis of the method of daily load-following operation in present-day BWRs, the study on the improvement of load-following operation performance, the reactor output-adjusting device are described. (Kako, I.)

  18. Environmentally-Assisted Cracking of Low-Alloy Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels under Boiling Water Reactor Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S

    2002-02-01

    The present report summarizes the experimental work performed by PSI on the environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) of low-alloy steels (LAS) in the frame of the RIKORR-project during the period from January 2000 to August 2001. Within this project, the EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, weld filler and weld heat-affected zone materials is investigated under simulated transient and steady-state BWR/NWC power operation conditions. The EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy RPV steels was characterized by slow rising load (SRL) / low-frequency corrosion fatigue (LFCF) and constant load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens in oxygenated high-temperature water at temperatures of either 288, 250, 200 or 150 C. These tests revealed the following important interim results: Under low-flow and highly oxidizing (ECP >= 100 mV SHE) conditions, the ASME XI 'wet' reference fatigue crack growth curve could be significantly exceeded by cyclic fatigue loading at low frequencies (<0.001 Hz), at high and low load-ratios R, and by ripple loading near to DKth fatigue thresholds. The BWR VIP 60 SCC disposition lines may be significantly or slightly exceeded (even in steels with a low sulphur content) in the case of small load fluctuations at high load ratios (ripple loading) or at intermediate temperatures (200 -250 C) in RPV materials, which show a distinct susceptibility to dynamic strain ageing (DSA). (author)

  19. Dynamics of a BWR with inclusion of boiling nonlinearity, clad temperature and void-dependent core power removal: Stability and bifurcation characteristics of advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Dinkar, E-mail: dinkar@iitk.ac.in [Nuclear Engineering and Technology Program, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India); Kalra, Manjeet Singh, E-mail: drmanjeet.singh@dituniversity.edu.in [DIT University, Dehradun 248 009 (India); Wahi, Pankaj, E-mail: wahi@iitk.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Simplified models with inclusion of the clad temperature are considered. • Boiling nonlinearity and core power removal have been modeled. • Method of multiple time scales has been used for nonlinear analysis to get the nature and amplitude of oscillations. • Incorporation of modeling complexities enhances the stability of system. • We find that reactors with higher nominal power are more desirable from the point of view of global stability. - Abstract: We study the effect of including boiling nonlinearity, clad temperature and void-dependent power removal from the primary loop in the mathematical modeling of a boiling water reactor (BWR) on its dynamic characteristics. The advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR) is taken as a case study. Towards this end, we have analyzed two different simplified models with different handling of the clad temperature. Each of these models has the necessary modifications pertaining to boiling nonlinearity and power removal from the primary loop. These simplified models incorporate the neutronics and thermal–hydraulic coupling. The effect of successive changes in the modeling assumptions on the linear stability of the reactor has been studied and we find that incorporation of each of these complexities in the model increases the stable operating region of the reactor. Further, the method of multiple time scales (MMTS) is exploited to carry out the nonlinear analysis with a view to predict the bifurcation characteristics of the reactor. Both subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcations are present in each model depending on the choice of operating parameters. These analytical observations from MMTS have been verified against numerical simulations. A parametric study on the effect of changing the nominal reactor power on the regions in the parametric space of void coefficient of reactivity and fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity with sub- and super-critical Hopf bifurcations has been performed for all

  20. Summary of the First Workshop on OECD/NRC boiling water reactor turbine trip benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-11-01

    The reference problem chosen for simulation in a BWR is a Turbine Trip transient, which begins with a sudden Turbine Stop Valve (TSV) closure. The pressure oscillation generated in the main steam piping propagates with relatively little attenuation into the reactor core. The induced core pressure oscillation results in dramatic changes of the core void distribution and fluid flow. The magnitude of the neutron flux transient taking place in the BWR core is strongly affected by the initial rate of pressure rise caused by pressure oscillation and has a strong spatial variation. The correct simulation of the power response to the pressure pulse and subsequent void collapse requires a 3-D core modeling supplemented by 1-D simulation of the remainder of the reactor coolant system. A BWR TT benchmark exercise, based on a well-defined problem with complete set of input specifications and reference experimental data, has been proposed for qualification of the coupled 3-D neutron kinetics/thermal-hydraulic system transient codes. Since this kind of transient is a dynamically complex event with reactor variables changing very rapidly, it constitutes a good benchmark problem to test the coupled codes on both levels: neutronics/thermal-hydraulic coupling and core/plant system coupling. Subsequently, the objectives of the proposed benchmark are: comprehensive feedback testing and examination of the capability of coupled codes to analyze complex transients with coupled core/plant interactions by comparison with actual experimental data. The benchmark consists of three separate exercises: Exercise 1 - Power vs. Time Plant System Simulation with Fixed Axial Power Profile Table (Obtained from Experimental Data). Exercise 2 - Coupled 3-D Kinetics/Core Thermal-Hydraulic BC Model and/or 1-D Kinetics Plant System Simulation. Exercise 3 - Best-Estimate Coupled 3-D Core/Thermal-Hydraulic System Modeling. This first workshop was focused on technical issues connected with the first draft of

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of L-grade stainless steels in boiling water reactor (BWR) plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shunichi; Fukuda, Toshihiko; Yamashita, Hironobu

    2004-01-01

    L-grade stainless steels as 316NG, SUS316L and SUS304L have been used for the BWR reactor internals and re-circulation pipes as SCC resistant materials. However, SCC of the L-grade material components were reported recently in many Japanese BWR plants. The detail investigation of the components showed the fabrication process such as welding, machining and surface finishing strongly affected SCC occurrence. In this paper, research results of SCC of L-grade stainless steels, metallurgical investigation of core shrouds and re-circulation pipings, and features of SCC morphology were introduced. Besides, the structural integrity of components with SCC, countermeasures for SCC and future R and D planning were introduced. (author)

  2. Once-through thorium fuel cycle evaluation for TVA's Browns Ferry-3 Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, G.C.

    1982-05-01

    This report documents benchmark evaluations to test thorium lattice predictive methods and neutron cross sections against available data and summarizes specific evaluations of the once-through thorium cycle when applied to the Browns Ferry-3 BWR. It was concluded that appreciable uncertainties in thorium cycle nuclear data cloud the ability to reliably predict the fuel cycle performance and that power reactor irradiations of ThO 2 rods in BWRs are desirable to resolve uncertainties. Benchmark evaluations indicated that the ENDF/B-IV data used in the evaluations should cause an underprediction of U-233/ThO 2 fuel reactivity, and, therefore, the results of the preliminary evaluations completed under the program should be conservative

  3. Analysis of the rotation accident of assemblies in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becerril-Gonzalez M, J. J.; Fuentes M, L.; Castillo M, J. A.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Perusquia de Cueto, R.

    2012-10-01

    For this work was analyzed the impact that would cause the load of a rotated fuel assembly in the behaviour of the core in the Cycle 14 of the Unit 1 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. To carry out this analysis the code Simulate-3 was used, with which was possible to analyze the behavior of the effective multiplication factor and the thermal limits (MAPRAT, MFLPD and MFLCPR). The rotation of fuel assemblies to 90, 180 and 270 grades was analyzed with regard to the design position, with 0, 1, 2 and 3 burnt cycles for these assemblies. The results show that the thermal limits remain inside the allowed values, therefore if this accident type happened the reactor could continue operating in a sure way. (Author)

  4. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station: Comparison of two decommissioning cost estimates developed for the same commercial nuclear reactor power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

    1990-12-01

    This study presents the results of a comparison of a previous decommissioning cost study by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and a recent decommissioning cost study of TLG Engineering, Inc., for the same commercial nuclear power reactor station. The purpose of this comparative analysis on the same plant is to determine the reasons why subsequent estimates for similar plants by others were significantly higher in cost and external occupational radiation exposure (ORE) than the PNL study. The primary purpose of the original study by PNL (NUREG/CR-0672) was to provide information on the available technology, the safety considerations, and the probable costs and ORE for the decommissioning of a large boiling water reactor (BWR) power station at the end of its operating life. This information was intended for use as background data and bases in the modification of existing regulations and in the development of new regulations pertaining to decommissioning activities. It was also intended for use by utilities in planning for the decommissioning of their nuclear power stations. The TLG study, initiated in 1987 and completed in 1989, was for the same plant, Washington Public Supply System's Unit 2 (WNP-2), that PNL used as its reference plant in its 1980 decommissioning study. Areas of agreement and disagreement are identified, and reasons for the areas of disagreement are discussed. 31 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs

  5. The BWR [Boiling Water Reactor] Emergency Operating Procedures Tracking System (EOPTS): Evaluation by control-room operating crews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurgin, A.J.; Orvis, D.D.; Spurgin, J.P.; Luna, C.J.

    1990-05-01

    This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Taiwan Power Company (TPC) and conducted by APG and TPC to perform evaluation of the Emergency Operating Procedures Tracking System (EOPTS). The EOPTS is an expert system employing artificial intelligence techniques developed by EPRI for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants based on emergency operating procedures (EOPs). EOPTS is a computerized decision aid used to assist plant operators in efficient and reliable use of EOPs. The main objective of this project was to evaluate the EOPTS and determine how an operator aid of this type could noticeably improve the response time and the reliability of control room crews to multi-failure scenarios. A secondary objective was to collect data on how crew performance was affected. Experiments results indicate that the EOPTS measurably improves crew performance over crews using the EOP flow charts. Time-comparison measurements indicate that crews using the EOPTS perform required actions more quickly than do those using the flowcharts. The results indicate that crews using the EOPTS are not only faster and more consistent in their actions but make fewer errors. In addition, they have a higher likelihood of recovering from the errors that they do make. Use of the EOPTS in the control room should result in faster termination and mitigation of accidents and reduced risk of power plant operations. Recommendations are made towards possible applications of the EOPTS to operator training and evaluation, and for the applicability of the evaluation methodology developed for this project to the evaluation of similar operator aides. 17 refs., 14 figs., 14 tabs

  6. Effects of torus wall flexibility on forces in the Mark I Boiling Water Reactor Pressure Suppression System. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1977-09-01

    The authors investigated the effects of torus wall flexibility in the pressure suppression system of a Mark I boiling water reactor (BWR) when the torus wall is subjected to hydrodynamic loadings. Using hypothetical models, they examined these flexibility effects under two hydrodynamic loading conditions: (1) a steam relief valve (SRV) discharge pulse, and (2) a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) chugging pulse. In the analyses of these events they used a recently developed two-dimensional finite element computer code. Taking the basic geometry and dimensions of the Monticello Mark I BWR nuclear power plant (in Monticello, Minnesota, U.S.A.), they assessed the effects of flexibility in the torus wall by changing values of the inside-diameter-to-wall-thickness ratio. Varying the torus wall thickness (t) with respect to the inside diameter (D) of the torus, they assigned values to the ratio D/t ranging from 0 (infinitely rigid) to 600 (highly flexible). In the case of a modeled steam relief valve (SRV) discharge pulse, they found the peak vertical reaction force on the torus was reduced from that of a rigid wall response by a factor of 3 for the most highly flexible, plant-simulated wall (D/t = 600). The reduction factor for a modeled loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) chugging pulse was shown to be 1.5. The two-dimensional analyses employed overestimate these reduction factors but have provided, as intended, definition of the effect of torus boundary stiffness. In the work planned for FY79, improved modeling of the structure and of the source is expected to result in factors more directly applicable to actual pressure suppression systems

  7. Application of reliability techniques to prioritize BWR [boiling water reactor] recirculation loop welds for in-service inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, G.S.

    1989-12-01

    In January 1988 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Generic Letter 88-01 together with NUREG-0313, Revision 2, ''Technical Report on Material Selection and Processing Guidelines for BWR Coolant Pressure Boundary Piping,'' to implement NRC long-range plans for addressing the problem of stress corrosion cracking in boiling water reactor piping. NUREG-0313 presents guidelines for categorizing BWR pipe welds according to their SCC condition (e.g., presence of known cracks, implementation of measures for mitigating SCC) as well as recommended inspection schedules (e.g., percentage of welds inspected, inspection frequency) for each weld category. NUREG-0313 does not, however, specify individual welds to be inspected. To address this issue, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed two recommended inspection samples for welds in a typical BWR recirculation loop. Using a probabilistic fracture mechanics model, LLNL prioritized loop welds on the basis of estimated leak probabilities. The results of this evaluation indicate that riser welds and bypass welds should be given priority attention over other welds. Larger-diameter welds as a group can be considered of secondary importance compared to riser and bypass welds. A ''blind'' comparison between the probability-based inspection samples and data from actual field inspections indicated that the probabilistic analysis generally captured the welds which the field inspections identified as warranting repair or replacement. Discrepancies between the field data and the analytic results can likely be attributed to simplifying assumptions made in the analysis. The overall agreement between analysis and field experience suggests that reliability techniques -- when combined with historical experience -- represent a sound technical basis on which to define meaningful weld inspection programs. 13 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Optimization of operation schemes in boiling water reactors using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz S, J. J.; Castillo M, A.; Pelta, D. A.

    2012-10-01

    In previous works were presented the results of a recurrent neural network to find the best combination of several groups of fuel cells, fuel load and control bars patterns. These solution groups to each problem of Fuel Management were previously optimized by diverse optimization techniques. The neural network chooses the partial solutions so the combination of them, correspond to a good configuration of the reactor according to a function objective. The values of the involved variables in this objective function are obtained through the simulation of the combination of partial solutions by means of Simulate-3. In the present work, a multilayer neural network that learned how to predict some results of Simulate-3 was used so was possible to substitute it in the objective function for the neural network and to accelerate the response time of the whole system of this way. The preliminary results shown in this work are encouraging to continue carrying out efforts in this sense and to improve the response quality of the system. (Author)

  9. Model engineering for piping layout of boiling water reactor nuclear station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Koji; Uchiyama, Masayuki; Wada, Takanao; Jibu, Noboru.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear power station is made up of a wide variety of equipment, piping, ventilation ducts, conduits, and cable trays, etc. Even if equipment arrangement and piping layout are carefully planned on drawings, troubles such as interference often occur at field installation. Accordingly, it is thought very useful to make thorough examinations with plastic three-dimensional models in addition to drawings in reducing troubles at field, shortening the construction period, and improving economics. Examination with plastic models offers the following features: (1) It permits visual three-dimensional examination. (2) Group thinking and examination is possible. (3) Troubles due to failure to understand complicated drawings can be reduced drastically. Manufacturing a 1/20 scale model of the reactor building of the Tokai No. 2 Power Station of the Japan Atomic Power Co., Hitachi has performed model engineering-solution of interference troubles related to equipment and piping, securing of work space for in-service inspection (ISI), carry-in/installation of various equipment and piping, and determination of the piping route of which only the starting and terminating points were given under the complicated ambient conditions. Success with this procedure has confirmed that model engineering is an effective technique for future plant engineering. (auth.)

  10. Systems for controlling the electric power of a boiling water reactor power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunishi, Koyu; Kiyokawa, Kazuhiro.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To achieve automatic increase and decrease of electric output in accordance with a predetermined rate of increase or decrease in output when the power output is raised or lowered. Structure: An electric output signal from an atomic power plant is led to a differentiating circuit through a smoothing circuit to produce a signal for rate of change of time, and an error signal between this signal and a preset signal produced from a circuit for a preset rate of change of output with time is supplied to an analog adjuster through a limiter. In this way, the flow rate in the reactor core is adjusted by a speed controller to obtain an output of a predetermined rate of increase. The difference signal between the electric output signal and a desired value signal is passed through an absolute circuit to a comparator circuit for comparison with a predetermined threshold value setting signal. The output signal of the comparator is used to operate a relay to open the contact so as to prevent an increase or decrease in the output beyond the required level. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. A model of Alto Lazio boiling water reactor using the LEGO code balance of plant simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelta, S.; Garbossa, G.B.

    1989-01-01

    An extensive effort has been made at the Italian National Electricity Board (ENEL) to construct and validate a LEGO model capable of simulating the operational transients of the Alto Lazio Nuclear Station, a two twin-units site with BWR/6 class reactors, rated at 2894 MWt and with Mark III containment. LEGO is a modular package developed at the Research and development Department of the Italian National Electricity Board (CRA-ENEL) for computer aided modeling of fossil-fired and nuclear steam power plants. In this paper a system analysis model capable of describing steady-state and transient performance of the Balance of Plant (BOP) of the Alto Lazio Power Station is presented. This is one of two companion papers devoted to the description of the overall plant model including both the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) and the BOP. In the paper, after a brief summary of the main LEGO characteristics, a description of the BOP lay-out is presented. The overall model, which has been set-up, including control systems and automation, is very detailed and consists of almost 2000 differential or algebraic equations. After a brief description of the mathematical model, two significant transients obtained using the overall model are presented and discussed

  12. Identification of the two-phase flow in the upper part of a boiling water reactor core using reactor noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miteff, L.

    1983-08-01

    The starting point of this work were neutron flux correlation measurements in the core of the Muehleberg boiling water reactor. During these measurements a new effect was observed i.e. that the cross power spectral density (CPSD) phases could be approximated by two straight lines of different slopes. The two linear domains of the CPSD-phases are separated along the frequency axis by a transition interval. It was supposed that such CPSD-phases could account for the propagation in the axial direction of two different thermohydraulic perturbations in the upper part of the Muehleberg BWR-core. It was also assumed that the second linear domain of these CPSD-phases could be related to a characteristic property of an annular flow regime of the steam-water two-phase flows in the bundles around the neutron detectors. The author attempts to give an explanation for the existence of a second transport phenomenon. This was achieved by in-core and out-core correlation measurements as well as by theoretical work. The out-core measurements were performed on an water-air simulation loop by use of laser beams. (Auth.)

  13. Calculation of mass flow and steam quality distribution on fuel elements of light-water cooled boiling water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermanns, H.J.

    1977-04-01

    By the example of light-water cooled nuclear reactors, the state of the calculation methods at disposal for calculating mass flow and steam quality distribution (sub-channel analysis) is indicated. Particular regard was paid to the transport phenomena occurring in reactor fuel elements in the range of two phase flow. Experimentally determined values were compared with recalculations of these experiments with the sub-channel code COBRA; from the results of these comparing calculations, conclusions could be drawn on the suitability of this code for defined applications. Limits of reliability could be determined to some extent. Based on the experience gained and the study of individual physical model concepts, recognized as being important, a sub-channel model was drawn up and the corresponding numerical computer code (SIEWAS) worked out. Experiments made at GE could be reproduced with the code SIEWAS with sufficient accuracy. (orig.) [de

  14. Steam chugging in a boiling water reactor pressure-suppression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Results of a transient analysis predicting the general characteristics of steam chugging compare well with the results of two large scale experiments: GKM II, test 21 and GKSS, test 16. Predicted fundamental periods of chugging are within 5 and 16 per cent of the respective experimental values. The results of the analysis include effects of air in the drywell, momentum loss and heat transfer in the condensation pipe, direct contact condensation heat transfer at the gas-water interface and momentum and heat transfer in the wetwell water pool. Bubble shape is calculated in two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates. Required inputs to the analysis include the geometry, initial conditions and constants to determine both the steam inlet mass flowrate to the drywell as a function of time and conduction heat transfer through the wall of the condensation pipe. There are no arbitrary free parameters which must be specified to predict specific experiments. Rather, the analysis is based on fundamental physical phenomena, experimental coefficients documented for general heat transfer and fluid mechanics characteristics and standard analytical techniques. The random nature of steam chugging observed in some experiments is partially explained by predicted regimes of chugging and changes in the maximum extent of a bubble below the condensation pipe exit during each regime. (orig.)

  15. Methods for leak detection for KWU pressurized and boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.; Preusser, G.

    1991-01-01

    Leakage monitoring is an essential criterion to rule out the possibility of double ended pipe rupture in the primary coolant system. Subcritical cracks can be detected with a considerable margin before they extend to critical crack lengths resulting in spontaneous failure. In those KWU PWRs which went into operation recently, a Leakage Monitoring System was installed that is based on thermodynamic analysis. It utilizes the following measured parameters: dew point temperature, accumulated condensate inside aircoolers, air temperature, sump water level, gully monitoring. In KWU's BWRs although the measurement concept has to be slightly changed because of a different approaches design of buildings and components, the same instrumentation will be used. Besides this installed monitoring system, different like acoustic leak detection systems or the application of moisture sensitive instrumentation have been considered. Both systems have been successfully tested. (orig.)

  16. The Behavior of Corrosion Products in Sampling Systems under Boiling Water Reactor Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansson, Hans-Peter

    1977-08-15

    A high pressure loop has been used to simulate sampling systems employed under BWR conditions. The reliability of the sampling method was studied in a series of six test runs. A variety of parameters that are thought to influence the reliability of the sampling was investigated. These included piping geometry, water oxygen content, flow, temperature and temperature gradients. Amongst other things the results indicate that the loss by deposition of iron containing corrosion products does not exceed 50 %; this figure is only influenced to a minor extent by the above mentioned parameters. The major part of the corrosion products thus deposited is found along the first few meters of the piping and cooler coil. A moderate prolongation of a pipe which is already relatively long should thus be incapable of producing a major influence on the sampling error

  17. Hydrazine and hydrogen coinjection to mitigate stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in boiling water reactors (7). Effects of bulk water chemistry on ECP distribution inside a crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Yoichi; Ishida, Kazushige; Tachibana, Masahiko; Aizawa, Motohiro; Fuse, Motomasa

    2007-01-01

    Water chemistry in a simulated crack (crack) has been studied to understand the mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking in a boiling water reactor environment. Electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) in a crack made in an austenite type 304 stainless steel specimen was measured. The ECP distribution along the simulated crack was strongly affected by bulk water chemistry and bulk flow. When oxygen concentration was high in the bulk water, the potential difference between the crack tip and the outside of the crack (ΔE), which must be one motive force for crack growth, was about 0.3V under a stagnant condition. When oxygen was removed from the bulk water, ECP inside and outside the crack became low and uniform and ΔE became small. The outside ECP was also lowered by depositing platinum on the steel specimen surface and adding stoichiometrically excess hydrogen to oxygen to lower ΔE. This was effective only when bulk water did not flow. Under the bulk water flow condition, water-borne oxygen caused an increase in ECP on the untreated surface inside the crack. This also caused a large ΔE. The ΔE effect was confirmed by crack growth rate measurements with a catalyst-treated specimen. Therefore, lowering the bulk oxidant concentration by such measures as hydrazine hydrogen coinjection, which is currently under development, is important for suppressing the crack growth. (author)

  18. Cracks propagation by stress corrosion cracking in conditions of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR); Propagacion de grietas por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en condiciones de reactor de agua hirviente (BWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes C, P

    2003-07-01

    This work presents the results of the assays carried out in the Laboratory of Hot Cells of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) to a type test tube Compact Tension (CT), built in steel austenitic stainless type 304L, simulating those conditions those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), at temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa, to determine the speed to which the cracks spread in this material that is of the one that different components of a reactor are made, among those that it highlights the reactor core vessel. The application of the Hydrogen Chemistry of the Water is presented (HWC) that is one alternative to diminish the corrosion effect low stress in the component, this is gets controlling the quantity of oxygen and of hydrogen as well as the conductivity of the water. The rehearsal is made following the principles of the Mechanics of Elastic Lineal Fracture (LEFM) that considers a crack of defined size with little plastic deformation in the tip of this; the measurement of crack advance is continued with the technique of potential drop of direct current of alternating signal, this is contained inside the standard Astm E-647 (Method of Test Standard for the Measurement of Speed of Growth of Crack by fatigue) that is the one that indicates us as carrying out this test. The specifications that should complete the test tubes that are rehearsed as for their dimensions, it forms, finish and determination of mechanical properties (tenacity to the fracture mainly) they are contained inside the norm Astm E-399, the one which it is also based on the principles of the fracture mechanics. The obtained results were part of a database to be compared with those of other rehearsals under different conditions, Normal Chemistry of the Water (NWC) and it dilutes with high content of O{sub 2}; to determine the conditions that slow more the phenomena of stress corrosion cracking, as well as the effectiveness of the used chemistry and of the method of

  19. Boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckardt, B.; Queiser, H.

    1986-01-01

    On BWR's, the turbine condenser is connected to a waste gas system with redundancy, which has the following in sequence in each of two parallel circuits: a steam jet pump, a valve, a recombiner with steam heating, a condenser and a gas outlet. Steam and air are fed in a ratio of 1:10 or more between the valve and the recombiner. A steam jet pump is used for this purpose. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Process and device for measuring the level in a reactor pressure vessel of a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walleser, A.

    1987-01-01

    The differential pressure is measured between the lower space filled with liquid and a comparison column which is connected to the upper part space filled with steam. From this measurement and the liquid and steam densities in the pressure vessel and in the comparison column and the effects of flow at the pressure sampling positions, the level is determined in an evaluation unit. To determine the densities of liquids and steam, the reactor pressure or the change of pressure with time for transient processes is measured. The density of the comparison column is determined by temperature measurement. The effects of flow are determined by flow measurements. All the measurements are taken to an evaluation unit. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 2. Appendices. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE. This volume contains the appendices

  2. Planned experimental studies on natural-circulation and stability performance of boiling water reactors in four experimental facilities and first results (NACUSP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de E-mail: kruijf@iri.tudelft.nl; Ketelaar, K.C.J.; Avakian, G.; Gubernatis, P.; Caruge, D.; Manera, A.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Yadigaroglu, G.; Dominicus, G.; Rohde, U.; Prasser, H.-M.; Castrillo, F.; Huggenberger, M.; Hennig, D.; Munoz-Cobo, J.L.; Aguirre, C

    2003-04-01

    Within the 5th Euratom framework programme the NACUSP project focuses on natural-circulation and stability characteristics of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). This paper gives an overview of the research to be performed. Moreover, it shows the first results obtained by one of the four experimental facilities involved. Stability boundaries are given for the low-power low-pressure operating range, measured in the CIRCUS facility. The experiments are meant to serve as a future validation database for thermohydraulic system codes to be applied for the design and operation of BWRs.

  3. Planned experimental studies on natural-circulation and stability performance of boiling water reactors in four experimental facilities and first results (NACUSP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de; Ketelaar, K.C.J.; Avakian, G.; Gubernatis, P.; Caruge, D.; Manera, A.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Yadigaroglu, G.; Dominicus, G.; Rohde, U.; Prasser, H.-M.; Castrillo, F.; Huggenberger, M.; Hennig, D.; Munoz-Cobo, J.L.; Aguirre, C.

    2003-01-01

    Within the 5th Euratom framework programme the NACUSP project focuses on natural-circulation and stability characteristics of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). This paper gives an overview of the research to be performed. Moreover, it shows the first results obtained by one of the four experimental facilities involved. Stability boundaries are given for the low-power low-pressure operating range, measured in the CIRCUS facility. The experiments are meant to serve as a future validation database for thermohydraulic system codes to be applied for the design and operation of BWRs

  4. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 2. Appendices. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE. This volume contains the appendices.

  5. Passive cooling of condensate chambers as retrofitting measure in boiling water reactors; Passive Kuehlung der Kondensationskammern in Siedewasserreaktoren als Nachruestmassnahme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freis, Daniel; Nachtrodt, Frederik; Sporn, Michael; Tietsch, Wolfgang; Sassen, Felix [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Mannheim (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH has developed a concept for passive cooling of condensate chambers of BWR-type reactors. Due to its compactness the system is feasible as retrofitting measure. The passive condensate chamber cooling system is based on a cooling module with ascending and down pipe that are connected with the evaporation condenser to form a cooling circuit. Based on the consequent use of high-effective heat transport mechanisms, as boiling, condensation without non-condensable gases and mass transport a high cooling performance and compact construction is possible. The system is completely passive and completely diverse to existing active cooling systems. In the frame of a true-scale experiment the significant cooling performance was demonstrated. RELAP5 calculations confirmed the functionality of the cooling module.

  6. When water does not boil at the boiling point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hasok

    2007-03-01

    Every schoolchild learns that, under standard pressure, pure water always boils at 100 degrees C. Except that it does not. By the late 18th century, pioneering scientists had already discovered great variations in the boiling temperature of water under fixed pressure. So, why have most of us been taught that the boiling point of water is constant? And, if it is not constant, how can it be used as a 'fixed point' for the calibration of thermometers? History of science has the answers.

  7. Observations of the boiling process from a downward-facing torispherical surface: Confirmatory testing of the heavy water new production reactor flooded cavity design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.H.; Simpson, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    Reactor-scale ex-vessel boiling experiments were performed in the CYBL facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The boiling flow pattern outside the RPV bottom head shows a center pulsating region and an outer steady two-phase boundary layer region. The local heat transfer data can be correlated in terms of a modified Rohsenow correlation

  8. Oxygen suppression in boiling water reactors. Phase 2. Annual report 1981, December 2, 1980-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burley, E.L.

    1982-07-01

    A hydrogen addition test will be performed in the Dresden-2 reactor of Commonwealth Edison Company during 1982. Up to 2 ppM hydrogen will be added to and dissolved in the reactor feedwater to reverse the radiolysis reaction in the reactor core and suppress oxgen concentration in the primary coolant. At low oxygen levels the propensity of stressed and sensitized 304 stainless steel toward intergranular stress corrosion cracking is greatly reduced. The test will answer outstanding questions and uncertainties in the areas of water chemistry, equipment design and materials performance. Nine special sample facilities will be prepared in the primary coolant, main stream, feedwater/condensate, and offgas systems. Instrumentation will be available to measure hydrogen, oxygen, conductivity, pH, soluble and insoluble corrosion products, and electrochemical potentials. In addition, an autoclave in which confirming constant extension rate tests can be conducted in reactor water will be provided

  9. The use of the average plutonium-content for criticality evaluation of boiling water reactor mixed oxide-fuel transport and storage packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattera, C.

    2003-01-01

    Currently in France, criticality studies in transport configurations for Boiling Water Reactor Mixed Oxide fuel assemblies are based on conservative hypothesis assuming that all rods (Mixed Oxide (Uranium and Plutonium), Uranium Oxide, Uranium and (Gadolinium Oxide rods) are Mixed Oxide rods with the same Plutonium-content, corresponding to the maximum value. In that way, the real heterogeneous mapping of the assembly is masked and covered by an homogenous Plutonium-content assembly, enriched at the maximum value. As this calculation hypothesis is extremely conservative, Cogema Logistics (formerly Transnucleaire) has studied a new calculation method based on the use of the average Plutonium-content in the criticality studies. The use of the average Plutonium-content instead of the real Plutonium-content profiles provides a highest reactivity value that makes it globally conservative. This method can be applied for all Boiling Water Reactor Mixed Oxide complete fuel assemblies of type 8 x 8, 9 x 9 and 10 x 10 which Plutonium-content in mass weight does not exceed 15%; it provides advantages which are discussed in the paper. (author)

  10. Integrated plant safety assessment. Systematic Evaluation Program. La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor. Dairyland Power Cooperative, Docket No. 50-409. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    The Systematic Evaluation Program was initiated in February 1977 by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to confirm and document their safety. The review provides (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with current licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. This report documents the review of the La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor, operated by Dairyland Power Cooperative. The La Crosse plant is one of 10 plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review

  11. Boiling water reactors with uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel. Report 2: A survey of the accuracy of the Studsvik of America CMS codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaziere, C.

    1999-02-01

    This report is a part of the project titled 'Boiling Water Reactors With Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxide (MOx) Fuel'. The aim of this study is to model the impact of a core loading pattern containing MOx bundles upon the main characteristics of a BWR (reactivity coefficients, stability, etc.). The tools that are available to perform a modeling in the Department of Reactor Physics in Chalmers are CASMO-4/TABLES-3/SIMULATE-3 from Studsvik of America. Thus, before performing any kind of calculation with MOx fuels, it is necessary to be able to establish the reliability and the accuracy of these Core Management System (CMS) codes. This report presents a quantitative analysis of the models used in the package. A qualitative presentation is realized in a coming report

  12. Integrated plant safety assessment: Systematic Evaluation Program. LaCrosse Boiling Water Reactor, Dairyland Power Cooperative, Docket No. 50-409

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    The Systematic Evaluation Program was initiated in February 1977 by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to confirm and document their safety. The review provides: (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with current licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. This report documents the review of the La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor, operated by Dairyland Power Cooperative. The La Crosse plant is one of 10 plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addresed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review

  13. Development and validation of models for simulation of supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycles and application to self-propelling heat removal systems in boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venker, Jeanne

    2015-03-31

    The objective of the current work was to develop a model that is able to describe the transient behavior of supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO{sub 2}) Brayton cycles, to be applied to self-propelling residual heat removal systems in boiling water reactors. The developed model has been implemented into the thermohydraulic system code ATHLET. By means of this improved ATHLET version, novel residual heat removal systems, which are based on closed sCO{sub 2} Brayton cycles, can be assessed as a retrofit measure for present light water reactors. Transient simulations are hereby of great importance. The heat removal system has to be modeled explicitly to account for the interaction between the system and the behavior of the plant during different accident conditions. As a first step, transport and thermodynamic fluid properties of supercritical carbon dioxide have been implemented in ATHLET to allow for the simulation of the new working fluid. Additionally, a heat transfer correlation has been selected to represent the specific heat transfer of supercritical carbon dioxide. For the calculation of pressure losses due to wall friction, an approach for turbulent single phase flow has been adopted that is already implemented in ATHLET. In a second step, a component model for radial compressors has been implemented in the system code. Furthermore, the available model for axial turbines has been adapted to simulate the transient behavior of radial turbines. All extensions have been validated against experimental data. In order to simulate the interaction between the self-propelling heat removal system and a generic boiling water reactor, the components of the sCO{sub 2} Brayton cycle have been dimensioned with first principles. An available input deck of a generic BWR has then been extended by the residual heat removal system. The modeled application has shown that the extended version of ATHLET is suitable to simulate sCO{sub 2} Brayton cycles and to evaluate the introduced

  14. Development and validation of models for simulation of supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycles and application to self-propelling heat removal systems in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venker, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to develop a model that is able to describe the transient behavior of supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO 2 ) Brayton cycles, to be applied to self-propelling residual heat removal systems in boiling water reactors. The developed model has been implemented into the thermohydraulic system code ATHLET. By means of this improved ATHLET version, novel residual heat removal systems, which are based on closed sCO 2 Brayton cycles, can be assessed as a retrofit measure for present light water reactors. Transient simulations are hereby of great importance. The heat removal system has to be modeled explicitly to account for the interaction between the system and the behavior of the plant during different accident conditions. As a first step, transport and thermodynamic fluid properties of supercritical carbon dioxide have been implemented in ATHLET to allow for the simulation of the new working fluid. Additionally, a heat transfer correlation has been selected to represent the specific heat transfer of supercritical carbon dioxide. For the calculation of pressure losses due to wall friction, an approach for turbulent single phase flow has been adopted that is already implemented in ATHLET. In a second step, a component model for radial compressors has been implemented in the system code. Furthermore, the available model for axial turbines has been adapted to simulate the transient behavior of radial turbines. All extensions have been validated against experimental data. In order to simulate the interaction between the self-propelling heat removal system and a generic boiling water reactor, the components of the sCO 2 Brayton cycle have been dimensioned with first principles. An available input deck of a generic BWR has then been extended by the residual heat removal system. The modeled application has shown that the extended version of ATHLET is suitable to simulate sCO 2 Brayton cycles and to evaluate the introduced heat removal system

  15. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  16. Calculation system for physical analysis of boiling water reactors; Modelisation des phenomenes physiques specifiques aux reacteurs a eau bouillante, notamment le couplage neutronique-thermohydraulique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouveret, F

    2001-07-01

    Although Boiling Water Reactors generate a quarter of worldwide nuclear electricity, they have been only little studied in France. A certain interest now shows up for these reactors. So, the aim of the work presented here is to contribute to determine a core calculation methodology with CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) codes. Vapour production in the reactor core involves great differences in technological options from pressurised water reactor. We analyse main physical phenomena for BWR and offer solutions taking them into account. BWR fuel assembly heterogeneity causes steep thermal flux gradients. The two dimensional collision probability method with exact boundary conditions makes possible to calculate accurately the flux in BWR fuel assemblies using the APOLLO-2 lattice code but induces a very long calculation time. So, we determine a new methodology based on a two-level flux calculation. Void fraction variations in assemblies involve big spectrum changes that we have to consider in core calculation. We suggest to use a void history parameter to generate cross-sections libraries for core calculation. The core calculation code has also to calculate the depletion of main isotopes concentrations. A core calculation associating neutronics and thermal-hydraulic codes lays stress on points we still have to study out. The most important of them is to take into account the control blade in the different calculation stages. (author)

  17. Calculation system for physical analysis of boiling water reactors; Modelisation des phenomenes physiques specifiques aux reacteurs a eau bouillante, notamment le couplage neutronique-thermohydraulique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouveret, F

    2001-07-01

    Although Boiling Water Reactors generate a quarter of worldwide nuclear electricity, they have been only little studied in France. A certain interest now shows up for these reactors. So, the aim of the work presented here is to contribute to determine a core calculation methodology with CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) codes. Vapour production in the reactor core involves great differences in technological options from pressurised water reactor. We analyse main physical phenomena for BWR and offer solutions taking them into account. BWR fuel assembly heterogeneity causes steep thermal flux gradients. The two dimensional collision probability method with exact boundary conditions makes possible to calculate accurately the flux in BWR fuel assemblies using the APOLLO-2 lattice code but induces a very long calculation time. So, we determine a new methodology based on a two-level flux calculation. Void fraction variations in assemblies involve big spectrum changes that we have to consider in core calculation. We suggest to use a void history parameter to generate cross-sections libraries for core calculation. The core calculation code has also to calculate the depletion of main isotopes concentrations. A core calculation associating neutronics and thermal-hydraulic codes lays stress on points we still have to study out. The most important of them is to take into account the control blade in the different calculation stages. (author)

  18. Dynamic PIV measurement of the effect of sound waves in the upper plenum of the boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Kosuke; Someya, Satoshi; Okamoto, Koji

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, power uprating of boiling power reactors has been conducted at several existing power plants in order to improve plant economy. In one power uprated plant (117.8% uprate) in the United States, steam dryer breakages due to fatigue fracture occurred. It is conceivable that the increased steam flow passing through the branches caused a self-induced vibration with the propagation of sound waves into the steam-dome. The resonance among the structure, the flow, and the pressure fluctuation resulted in the breakages. In order to clarify the basic mechanism of the resonance, previous studies were performed by conducting a point measurement of the pressure and a phase averaged measurement of the flow, although detecting the interaction among the structure, the flow, and the pressure fluctuation by the conventional method was difficult. In a preliminary study, a dynamic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to investigate the effect of sound on the flow. A dynamic PIV system is the newest entrant to the field of fluid flow measurement. Its paramount advantage is the instantaneous global evaluation of conditions over a plane extended across the entire velocity field. Using the dynamic PIV system, the influence of sound waves on the flow field was measured. As a result, when two speakers were placed diagonally and sound waves were presented in the same phase, vertical motion was strongly observed compared to horizontal motion. (author)

  19. Studies on validation possibilities for computational codes for criticality and burnup calculations of boiling water reactor fuel; Untersuchungen zu Validierungsmoeglichkeiten von Rechencodes fuer Kritikalitaets- und Abbrandrechnungen von Siedewasserreaktor-Brennstoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behler, Matthais; Hannstein, Volker; Kilger, Robert; Sommer, Fabian; Stuke, Maik

    2017-06-15

    The Application of the method of Burn-up Credit on Boiling Water Reactor fuel is much more complex than in the case of Pressurized Water Reactors due to the increased heterogeneity and complexity of the fuel assemblies. Strongly varying enrichments, complex fuel assembly geometries, partial length fuel rods, and strong axial variations of the moderator density make the verification of conservative irradiation conditions difficult. In this Report, it was investigated whether it is possible to take into account the burn-up in criticality analyses for systems with irradiated Boiling Water Reactor fuel on the basis of freely available experimental data and by additionally applying stochastic methods. In order to achieve this goal, existing methods for stochastic analysis were adapted and further developed in order to being applicable to the specific conditions needed in Boiling Water Reactor analysis. The aim was to gain first insight whether a workable scheme for using burn-up credit in Boiling Water Reactor applications can be derived. Due to the fact that the different relevant quantities, like e.g. moderator density and the axial power profile, are strongly correlated, the GRS-tool SUnCISTT for Monte-Carlo uncertainty quantification was used in the analysis. This tool was coupled to a simplified, consistent model for the irradiation conditions. In contrast to conventional methods, this approach allows to simultaneously analyze all involved effects.

  20. Experimental investigation of boiling-water nuclear-reactor parallel-channel effects during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlon, W.M.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1982-12-01

    This report describes an experimental study of the influence of parallel channel effects (PCE) on the distribution of emergency core spray cooling water in a Boiling Water Nuclear Reactor (BWR) following a postulated design basis loss of coolant accident (LCA). The experiments were conducted in a scaled test section in which the reactor coolant was simulated by Freon-114 at conditions similar to those postulated to occur in the reactor vessel shortly after a LOCA. A BWR/4 was simulated by a (PCE) test section which contained three parallel heated channels to simulate fuel assemblies; a core bypass channel, and a jet pump channel. The test section also inlcuded scaled regions to simulate the lower and upper plena, downcomer, and steam separation regions of a BWR. A series of nine transient experiments were conducted, in which the lower plenum vaporization rate and heater rod power were varied while the core spray flow rate was held constant to simulate that of a BWR/4. During these experiments the flow distribution and heat transfer phenomena were observed and measured

  1. Decontamination of the reactor pressure vessel and further internals and auxiliary systems in the German boiling water reactor Isar-1; Dekontamination des RDB inkl. der Einbauten wie Dampftrockner und Wasserabscheider sowie der angeschlossenen Hilfssysteme im deutschen Siedewasserreaktor ISAR 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Michael; Sempere Belda, Luis; Basu, Ashim; Topf, Christian [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany). Abt. Chemistry Services; Erbacher, Thomas; Hiermer, Thomas; Schnurr, Bernhard; Appeldorn, Thomas van [E.ON Kernkraft GmbH, Kernkraftwerk ISAR, Essenbach (Germany). Abt. Maschinentechnik; Volkmann, Christian [ESG Engineering Services GmbH, Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    The German nuclear power plant ISAR 1 (KKI 1), a 878 MWe boiling water reactor of KWU design, was shut down on March 17{sup th}, 2011. With the objective to minimize the plants activity inventory accompanied by the reduction of contact dose rates of systems and components the project 'decontamination of the RPV incl. steam dryer and water separator and the connected auxiliary systems' was implemented in the first quarter of 2015. One major focus within the project was the specific in-situ decontamination of the steam dryer.

  2. Comparison of finite element and influence function methods for three-dimensional elastic analysis of boiling water reactor feedwater nozzle cracks. Phase report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besuner, P.M.; Caughey, W.R.

    1976-11-01

    The finite element (FE) and influence function (IF) methods are compared for a three-dimensional elastic analysis of postulated circular-shaped surface cracks in the feedwater nozzle of a typical boiling water reactor (BWR). These are two of the possible methods for determining stress intensity factors for nozzle corner cracks. The FE method is incorporated in a direct manner. The IF method is used to compute stress intensity factors only when the uncracked stress field (i.e., the stress in the uncracked solid at the locus of the crack to be eventually considered) has been computed previously. Both the IF and FE methods are described in detail and are applied to several test cases chosen for their similarity to the nozzle crack problem and for the availablility of an accurate published result obtained from some recognized third method of solution

  3. An evaluation of the influence of fuel design parameters and burnup on pellet/cladding interaction for boiling water reactor fuel rod through in-core diameter measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, K.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of design parameters and burning on pellet/cladding interaction (PCI) of current boiling water reactor fuel rods was studied through in-core diameter measurement. Thinner cladding and a smaller diametral gap enhanced the PCI during startup. At constant power, fuel with SiO 2 added greatly reduced PCI due to relaxation. The fuel with a small grain size greatly reduced PCI due to densification. Preirradiation of rods up to 23 MWd/kgU caused a large PCI not only in a small gap but also in a large gap rod. Relaxation and permanent deformation was small. In the power increase experiment, one rod experienced PCI failure. The spurt times of coolant radioactivity coincided well with the sudden drop of cladding axial strain and marked crack opening at the rod surface. The estimated hoop stress predicted by FEMAXI-III was 350 MPa at the failure

  4. Thermodynamic analysis of behaviour of boiling water reactor coolant on the basis of solubility in Fe3O4-H2O-O2 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarembo, V.I.; Slobodov, A.A.; Kritskij, V.G.; Puchkov, L.V.; Sedov, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    The thermodynamic analysis of the behaviour of boiling water reactor coolant on the basis of solubility in Fe 3 O 4 -H 2 O-O 2 system is performed for the purpose of establishing the iron existence forms in non-sedimentated suspended corrosion product particles as well as iron concentration of corrosion origin in power plants. It is shown that the iron solubility in the considered system with temperature variation occurs through the maximum at 423 K. Below this temperature the crystal Fe(OH) 3 is responsible for its value, at higher temperatures - magnetite. The growth of equilibrium oxygen concentration from 0.1 to 1000 μg/kg H 2 O only slightly increases the magnetite solubility

  5. A simplified, coarse-mesh, three-dimensional diffusion scheme for calculating the gross power distribution in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borresen, S.

    1995-01-01

    A simplified, finite-difference diffusion scheme for a three-dimensional calculation of the gross power distribution in the core of a boiling water reactor (BWR) is presented. Results obtained in a series of one- and two-dimensional test cases indicate that this method may be of sufficient accuracy and simplicity for implementation in BWR-simulator computer programs. Computer requirements are very modest; thus, only 3N memory locations are required for in-core treatment of the inner iteration in the solution of a problem with N mesh points. The mesh width may be chosen equal to the fuel assembly pitch. Input data are in the form of conventional 2-group diffusion parameters. It is concluded that the method presented has definite advantages in comparison with the nodal coupling method. (author)

  6. Enhancing load-following and/or spectral shift capability in single-sparger natural circulation boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method for obtaining load-following capability in a coiling water reactor (BWR) wherein housed within a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a nuclear core disposed within a shroud having a shroud head and which with the RPV defines an annulus region disposed beneath the nuclear core, an upper steam dome connected to a steam outlet in the RPV, a core upper plenum formed within the shroud head and disposed atop the nuclear core, a chimney mounted atop the shroud head and in fluid communication with the core upper plenum and with a steam separator having a skirt which is in fluid communication with the steam dome, the region outside of the chimney defining a downcomer region, there being a water level established therein under normal operation of the BWR, and the RPV containing a feedwater inlet. It comprises: disposing a single sparger connected to the feedwater inlet above the steam separator skirt bottom about the interior circumference of the RPV at an elevation at approximately the water level established during normal operation of the BWR; and adjusting the feedwater flow through the inlet and into the sparger to vary the water level to be above, at or below the elevational location of the sparger in response to load-following need

  7. Development of NUFREQ-N, an analytical model for the stability analysis of nuclear coupled density-wave oscillations in boiling water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    A state-of-the-art one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic model has been developed to be used for the linear analysis of nuclear-coupled density-wave oscillations in a boiling water nuclear reactor (BWR). The model accounts for phasic slip, distributed spacers, subcooled boiling, space/time-dependent power distributions and distributed heated wall dynamics. In addition to a parallel channel stability analysis, a detailed model was derived for the BWR loop analysis of both the natural and forced circulation modes of operation. In its final form, this model constitutes a multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) linear system, which features a general nodal neutron kinetics model. Kinetics parameters for use in the kinetics model have been obtained by utilizing self-consistent nodal data and power distributions. The stability characteristics of a typical BWR/4 has been investigated with the Nyquist criterion. The computer implementation of this mode, NUFREQ-N, was used for the parametric study of a typical BWR/4 and comparison were made with existing in-core and out-of-core data. Also, NUFREQ-N was used to analyze the expected stability characteristics of a typical BWR/4. The parametric results revealed important factors influencing BWR stability margin. It was found that NUFREQ-N generally agreed well with out-of-core data. This was especially true for the predicted power-to-flow transfer function, which is the most important transfer function in thermal-hydraulic stability analysis

  8. A Robust Multivariable Feedforward/Feedback Controller Design for Integrated Power Control of Boiling Water Reactor Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyu, S.-S.; Edwards, Robert M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a methodology for synthesizing a robust multivariable feedforward/feedback control (FF/FBC) strategy is proposed for an integrated control of turbine power, throttle pressure, and reactor water level in a nuclear power plant. In the proposed method, the FBC is synthesized by the robust control approach. The feedforward control, which is generated via nonlinear programming, is added to the robust FBC system to further improve the control performance. The plant uncertainties, including unmodeled dynamics, linearization, and model reduction, are characterized and estimated. The comparisons of simulation responses based on a nonlinear reactor model demonstrate the achievement of the proposed controller with specified performance and endurance under uncertainty. It is also important to note that all input variables are manipulated in an orchestrated manner in response to a single output's setpoint change

  9. Assumptions used for evaluating the potential radiological consequences of a loss of coolant accident for boiling water reactors - June 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1974-01-01

    Section 50.34 of 10 CFR Part 50 requires that each applicant for a construction permit or operating license provide an analysis and evaluation of the design and performance of structures, systems, and components of the facility with the objective of assessing the risk to public health and safety resulting from operation of the facility. The design basis loss of coolant accident is one of the postulated accidents used to evaluate the adequacy of these structures, systems, and components with respect to the public health and safety. This guide gives acceptable assumptions that may be used in evaluating the radiological consequences of this accident for a pressurized water reactor. In some cases, unusual site characteristics, plant design features, or other factors may require different assumptions which will be considered on an individual case basis. The Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards has been consulted concerning this guide and has concurred in the regulatory position

  10. Mark I 1/5-scale boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment. Quick-look report for test numbers 1.0(a) and 1.0(b) performed on March 4 and 8, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCauley, E.W.; Pitts, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    The experimental results obtained from pressure suppression experiment numbers 1.0(a) and 1.0(b) that were performed on the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's 1 / 5 -scale boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark I pressure suppression experimental facility are summarized

  11. Economic simplified boiling water reactor (ESBWR) response to an extended station blackout/ loss of all AC power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, A.J.; Marquino, W.

    2013-01-01

    U.S. federal regulations require light water cooled nuclear power plants to cope with Station Blackout for a predetermined amount of time based on design factors for the plant. U.S. regulations define Station Blackout (SBO) as a loss of the offsite electric power system concurrent with turbine trip and unavailability of the onsite emergency AC power system. According to U.S. regulations, typically the coping period for an SBO is 4 hours and can be as long as 16 hours for currently operating BWR plants. Being able to cope with an SBO and loss of all AC power is required by international regulators as well. The U.S. licensing basis for the ESBWR is a coping period of 72 hours for an SBO based on U.S. NRC requirements for passive safety plants. In the event of an extended SBO (viz., greater than 72 hours), the ESBWR response shows that the design is able to cope with the event for at least 7 days without AC electrical power or operator action. ESBWR is a Generation III+ reactor design with an array of passive safety systems. The ESBWR primary success path for mitigation of an SBO event is the Isolation Condenser System (ICS). The ICS is a passive, closed loop, safety system that initiates automatically on a loss of power. Upon Station Blackout or loss of all AC power, the ICS begins removing decay heat from the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) by (i) condensing the steam into water in heat exchangers located in pools of water above the containment, and (ii) transferring the decay heat to the atmosphere. The condensed water is then returned by gravity to cool the reactor again. The ICS alone is capable of maintaining the ESBWR in a safe shutdown condition after an SBO for an extended period. The fuel remains covered throughout the SBO event. The ICS is able to remove decay heat from the RPV for at least 7 days and maintains the reactor in a safe shutdown condition. The water level in the RPV remains well above the top of active fuel for the duration of the SBO event

  12. Early hydrogen water chemistry project review, improvement opportunities and conceptural design options at Exelon boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Odell, Andrew D.; Giannelli, Joseph F.

    2012-09-01

    Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) and its impacts have been a major concern to the BWR fleet since the mid-70's. Several alternative strategies have been employed to reduce the negative impacts, however, the newest being Early Hydrogen Water Chemistry (EHWC). The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the BWRVIP (Vessel Internals Project) has strongly supported the development of EHWC, including laboratory testing and a demonstration program that was performed at Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station in October 2011. This paper will review the impacts of a 'Special Test Program' on a BWR plant including: Project management findings; technical reviews and documents required to support such a demonstration program; temporary equipment design, installation and testing; keeping the demonstration progressing along with the plant return from a refuel outage; and lessons learned that can be applied to EHWC implementation during future start-ups. Details will be compared between various Exelon BWRs in support of conceptual designs for EHWC systems and operation. Some comparisons on operational impacts will be provided between various types of BWR plants with differing 'Balance of Plant' designs. (authors)

  13. Pool Boiling of Hydrocarbon Mixtures on Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boee, R.

    1996-09-01

    In maritime transport of liquefied natural gas (LNG) there is a risk of spilling cryogenic liquid onto water. The present doctoral thesis discusses transient boiling experiments in which liquid hydrocarbons were poured onto water and left to boil off. Composition changes during boiling are believed to be connected with the initiation of rapid phase transition in LNG spilled on water. 64 experimental runs were carried out, 14 using pure liquid methane, 36 using methane-ethane, and 14 using methane-propane binary mixtures of different composition. The water surface was open to the atmosphere and covered an area of 200 cm{sup 2} at 25 - 40{sup o}C. The heat flux was obtained by monitoring the change of mass vs time. The void fraction in the boiling layer was measured with a gamma densitometer, and a method for adapting this measurement concept to the case of a boiling cryogenic liquid mixture is suggested. Significant differences in the boil-off characteristics between pure methane and binary mixtures revealed by previous studies are confirmed. Pure methane is in film boiling, whereas the mixtures appear to enter the transitional boiling regime with only small amounts of the second component added. The results indicate that the common assumption that LNG will be in film boiling on water because of the high temperature difference, may be questioned. Comparison with previous work shows that at this small scale the results are influenced by the experimental apparatus and procedures. 66 refs., 76 figs., 28 tabs.

  14. Steam content of the two-phase flow in the Vk-50 boiling water cooled reactor draught section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedulin, V.N.; Shmelev, V.E.; Solodkij, V.A.; Bartolomej, G.G.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented of experimental investigation of the two-phase steam-water coolant flow hydrodynamics within the VK-50 reactor draught section. On the basis of the analysis of the obtained data a two-phase coolant flow model in a large diameter channel is proposed. It is shown that the steam-content distribution in the volume of the draught section has a pronounced non-equilibrium character manifested in the steam migration from the periphery to the central region. A minimum value of the steam content at the periphery is attained at the 0.7-1.0 m height; it is followed by a partial steam content levelling over the section. However the total steam content levelling over the cross section of the draught section does not take place. The steam distribution in the water layer over the draught section (overflow zone) is also nonuniform over the reactor section. The non-uniform steam distribution enchances with reduction nn pressure

  15. A New Computational Tool for Simulation of 3-D Flow and Heat Transfer in Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hudong

    2002-01-01

    This Phase I work has developed a novel hybrid Lattice Boltzmann Model for the simulation of nonideal fluid thermal dynamics and demonstrated that this model can be used to simulate fundamental two-phase flow processes including boiling initiation, bubble formation and coalescency, and flow-regime formation

  16. In reactor performance of defected zircaloy-clad U{sub 3}Si fuel elements in pressurized and boiling water coolants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feraday, M A; Allison, G M; Ambler, J F.R.; Chalder, G H; Lipsett, J J

    1968-05-15

    The results of two in-reactor defect tests of Zircaloy-clad U{sub 3}Si are reported. In the first test, a previously irradiated element ({approx}5300 MWd/ tonne U) was defected then exposed to first pressurized water then boiling water at {approx}270{sup o}C. In the second test, an unirradiated element containing a central void was defected, waterlogged, then exposed to pressurized water for 50 minutes. Both tests were terminated because of high activity in the loop coolant detected by both gamma and delayed neutron monitors. Post-irradiation examination showed that both elements had suffered major sheath failures which were attributed to the volume increase accompanying the formation of large quantities of corrosion product formed by the reaction of water with the hot central part of the fuel. It was concluded that the corrosion resistance of U{sub 3}Si at 300{sup o}C is not seriously affected by irradiation, but the corrosion rate increases rapidly with temperature. (author)

  17. The Swr 1000: a nuclear power plant concept with boiling water reactor for maximum safety and economy of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brettschuh, W.

    2001-01-01

    The SWR 1000 is a design concept for a light water reactor nuclear power plant that meets all requirements regarding plant safety, economic efficiency and environ-mental friendliness. As a result of the plant's safety concept, the occurrence of core damage can, for all practical intents and purposes, be ruled out. If a core melt accident should nevertheless occur, the molten core can be retained inside the RPV, thus ensuring that all consequences of such an accident remain restricted to the plant itself. The power generating costs of the SWR 1000 are lower than with those of coal-fired and combined-cycle power plants. Power generation using nuclear energy does not release carbon dioxide to the environment, thus meeting the need for sustainable protection of our global climate. (author)

  18. Some fundamental aspects of boiling in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondin, H.; Lavigne, P.; Semeria, R.

    1964-01-01

    The main results obtained at Grenoble during the last four years in the field of boiling mechanisms and related phenomena in nuclear reactors are reported. 1 - Observation Of Boiling: By the use of photography and ultrafast cinematography (8000 frames per second maximum), boiling in a vessel or a tube was observed up to 140 kg/cm 2 . The populations of bubble-generating seeds (sites) were counted, and a correlation established giving their number per unit of surface area as a function of the thermal flux and the pressure. The diameter of the bubbles breaking of from the wall was studied up to 140 kg/cm 2 : three types of bubble have been shown to exist: - those in equilibrium, their diameter following the formula of Fritz and Ende, - bubbles found by boiling, the diameters of which decrease rapidly with the pressure (1/100 mm to 140 kg/cm 2 ), - the coalescences which appear in saturated liquid above 15 W/cm 2 , their proportion being independent of the pressure. Strioscopic observations were made of the movements of the thermal film associated with the generation of the seeds, at the initiation and condensation of the bubbles, the mechanisms responsible for the highly efficient heat transfer could thus be defined. 2 - Pressure Losses In Two-Phase Flow: A physical model of the continuous variation of the free space content in a boiling channel has been proposed by means of which the pressure losses can be calculated without invoking a break in the coefficient of friction when free boiling begins. Agreement between theory and experiment is satisfactory. The various forms which total pressure loss in a boiling tube may present as a function of flow rate have been studied. Special features are observed at very low and very high speeds. 3 - Burn-Out: Under steady operating conditions, it is shown that in a uniformly heated channel the burn-out flux as a function of output rate is generally independent of the length. When burn-out is a result of output oscillation, the

  19. Status of sodium boiling noise detection programme at reactor research centre, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakar, R; Elumalai, G [Reactor Engineering Laboratory, Reactor Research Centre, Chingleput, Tamil Nadu (India)

    1982-01-01

    Acoustic detection of sodium boiling is a promising technique to monitor subassembly fault in a last reactor. This paper summarises the programme for developing this detection system and describes the design of a high temperature transducer for boiling detection. It is appreciated that the background noise from primary pumps can interfere with this detection. Noise measurements were therefore carried out during water testing of the primary pump of the Fast Breeder Test Reactor. Some preliminary results of these measurements are presented.

  20. Status of sodium boiling noise detection programme at reactor research centre, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakar, R.; Elumalai, G.

    1982-01-01

    Acoustic detection of sodium boiling is a promising technique to monitor subassembly fault in a last reactor. This paper summarises the programme for developing this detection system and describes the design of a high temperature transducer for boiling detection. It is appreciated that the background noise from primary pumps can interfere with this detection. Noise measurements were therefore carried out during water testing of the primary pump of the Fast Breeder Test Reactor. Some preliminary results of these measurements are presented

  1. Two-dimensional DORT discrete ordinates X-Y geometry neutron flux calculations for the Halden Heavy Boiling Water Reactor core configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, C.O.

    1990-07-01

    Results are reported for two-dimensional discrete ordinates, X-Y geometry calculations performed for seven Halden Heavy Boiling Water Reactor core configurations. The calculations were performed in support of an effort to reassess the neutron fluence received by the reactor vessel. Nickel foil measurement data indicated considerable underprediction of fluences by the previously used multigroup removal- diffusion method. Therefore, calculations by a more accurate method were deemed appropriate. For each core configuration, data are presented for (1) integral fluxes in the core and near the vessel wall, (2) neutron spectra at selected locations, (3) isoflux contours superimposed on the geometry models, (4) plots of the geometry models, and (5) input for the calculations. The initial calculations were performed with several mesh sizes. Comparisons of the results from these calculations indicated that the uncertainty in the calculated fluxes should be less than 10%. However, three-dimensional effects (such as axial asymmetry in the fuel loading) could contribute to much greater uncertainty in the calculated neutron fluxes. 7 refs., 22 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Boiling water reactors with Uranium-Plutonium mixed oxide fuel. Report 1: Accuracy of the nuclide concentrations calculated by CASMO-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaziere, C.

    1999-01-01

    This report is a part of the project titled 'Boiling Water Reactors With Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxide (MOx) Fuel'. The aim of this study is to model the impact of a core loading pattern containing MOx bundles upon the main characteristics of a BWR (reactivity coefficients, stability, etc.). The tools that are available to perform a modeling in the Department of Reactor Physics in Chalmers are CASMO-4/TABLES-3/SIMULATE-3 from Studsvik of America. These CMS (Core Management System) programs have been extensively compared with both measurements and reference codes. Nevertheless some data are proprietary in particular the comparison of the calculated nuclide concentrations versus experiments (because of the cost of this kind of experimental study). This is why this report describes such a comparative investigation carried out with a General Electric 7x7 BWR bundle. Unfortunately, since some core history parameters were unknown, a lot of hypotheses have been adopted. This invokes sometimes a significant discrepancy in the results without being able to determine the origin of the differences between calculations and experiments. Yet one can assess that, except for four nuclides - Plutonium-238, Curium-243, Curium-244 and Cesium-135 - for which the approximate power history (history effect) can be invoked, the accuracy of the calculated nuclide concentrations is rather good if one takes the numerous approximations into account

  3. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a refernce boiling water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

    1988-07-01

    Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies of conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference boiling water reactor (BWR) described in the earlier study; and defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in three areas concerning decommissioning of the reference BWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation

  4. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the decommissioning of the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R.; Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will detail (1) a brief overview of the current status of the EBWR D ampersand D Project, and (2) the results of a study performed to evaluate the metal cutting technologies available to size reduce the EBWR reactor vessel. The techniques evaluated were: Plasma arc, Arc saw, Oxyacetylene, Electric arc gouging, Mechanical cladding removal/flame cutting, Exothermic reaction, Diamond wire, Water jet, Laser, Mechanical milling, Controlled explosives, and Electrical discharge. After a detailed review of these 12 techniques, the decision was made by ANL that the most appropriate method for segmenting the EBWR reactor vessel would be to rift the vessel from the vessel cavity and use an abrasive water jet positioned on the main floor to perform the cutting of the reactor vessel

  5. Super critical water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumaz, P.; Antoni, O; Arnoux, P.; Bergeron, A; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.

    2005-01-01

    Water is used as a calori-porter and moderator in the most major nuclear centers which are actually in function. In the pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR), water is maintained under critical point of water (21 bar, 374 Centigrade) which limits the efficiency of thermodynamic cycle of energy conversion (yield gain of about 33%) Crossing the critical point, one can then use s upercritical water , the obtained pressure and temperature allow a significant yield gains. In addition, the supercritical water offers important properties. Particularly there is no more possible coexistence between vapor and liquid. Therefore, we don't have more boiling problem, one of the phenomena which limits the specific power of PWR and BWR. Since 1950s, the reactor of supercritical water was the subject of studies more or less detailed but neglected. From the early 1990s, this type of conception benefits of some additional interests. Therefore, in the international term G eneration IV , the supercritical water reactors had been considered as one of the big options for study as Generation IV reactors. In the CEA, an active city has engaged from 1930 with the participation to a European program: The HPWR (High Performance Light Water Reactor). In this contest, the R and D studies are focused on the fields of neutrons, thermodynamic and materials. The CEA intends to pursue a limited effort of R and D in this field, in the framework of international cooperation, preferring the study of versions of rapid spectrum. (author)

  6. Boiling water system of nuclear power plants (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martias Nurdin

    1975-01-01

    About 85% of the world electric generators are light water reactors. It shows that LWR is technologically and economically competitive with other generators. The Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is one of the two systems in the LWR group. The techniques of BWR operation in several countries, especially low and moderate power BWR, are presented. The discussion is made in relation with the interconnection problems of electric installation in developing countries, including Indonesia, where the total electric energy installation is low. The high reliability and great flexibility of the operation of a boiling water reactor for a sufficiently long period are also presented. Component standardization for BWR system is discussed to get a better technological and economical performance for further development. (author)

  7. Simulation of the automatic depressurization system (Ads) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP; Simulacion del sistema de despresurizacion automatica (ADS) para un reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR) basado en RELAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez G, C.; Chavez M, C., E-mail: ces.raga@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Circuito Interior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The automatic depressurization system (Ads) of the boiling water reactor (BWR) like part of the emergency cooling systems is designed to liberate the vapor pressure of the reactor vessel, as well as the main vapor lines. At the present time in the Engineering Faculty, UNAM personnel works in the simulation of the Laguna Verde reactor based on the nuclear code RELAP/SCADAP and in the incorporation to the same of the emergency cooling systems. The simulation of the emergency cooling systems began with the inclusion of two hydrodynamic volumes, one source and another drain, and the incorporation of the initiation logic for each emergency system. In this work is defined and designed a simplified model of Ads of the reactor, considering a detail level based on the main elements that compose it. As tool to implement the proposed model, the RELAP code was used. The simulated main functions of Ads are centered in the quick depressurization of the reactor by means of the vapor discharge through the relief/safety valves to the suppression pool, and, in the event of break of the main vapor line, the reduction of the vessel pressure operates for that the cooling systems of the core to low pressure (Lpcs and Lpci) they can begin their operation. (Author)

  8. International Benchmark based on Pressurised Water Reactor Sub-channel and Bundle Tests. Volume III: Departure from Nucleate Boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Adam; Avramova, Maria; Velazquez-Lozada, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    This report summarised the second phase of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Benchmark Based on NUPEC PWR Sub-channel and Bundle Tests (PSBT), which was intended to provide data for the verification of Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) prediction in existing thermal-hydraulics codes and provide direction in the development of future methods. This phase was composed of three exercises; Exercise 1: fluid temperature benchmark, Exercise 2: steady-state rod bundle benchmark and Exercise 3: transient rod bundle benchmark. The experimental data provided to the participants of this benchmark is from a series of void measurement tests using full-size mock-up tests for both BWRs and PWRs. These tests were performed from 1987 to 1995 by the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) in Japan and made available by the Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organisation (JNES) for the purposes of this benchmark, which was organised by Pennsylvania State University. Nine institutions from seven countries participated in this benchmark. Nine different computer codes were used in Exercise 1, 2 and 3. Among the computer codes were porous media, sub-channel and systems thermal-hydraulic code. The improvement between FLICA-OVAP (sub-channel) and FLICA (sub-channel) was noticeable. The main difference between the two was that FLICA-OVAP implicitly assigned flow regime based on drift flux, while FLICA assumes single phase flows. In Exercises 2 and 3, the codes were generally able to predict the Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) power as well as the axial location of the onset of DNB (for the steady-state cases) and the time of DNB (for the transient cases). It was noted that the codes that used the Electric-Power-Research- Institute (EPRI) Critical-Heat-Flux (CHF) correlation had the lowest mean error in Exercise 2 for the predicted DNB power

  9. Comparison of finite element and influence function methods for three-dimensional elastic analysis of boiling water reactor feedwater nozzle cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besuner, P.M.; Caughey, W.R.

    1976-11-01

    The paper compares the finite element (FE) and influence function (IF) methods for a three-dimensional elastic analysis of postulated circular-shaped surface cracks in the feedwater nozzle of a typical boiling water reactor (BWR). The FE method is incorporated in a direct manner. The nozzle and crack geometry and the complex loading are all included in the model which simulates the structural crack problem. The IF method is used to compute stress intensity factors only when the uncracked stress field (that is, the stress in the uncracked solid at the locus of the crack to be eventually considered) has been computed previously. The IF method evaluates correctly the disturbance of this uncracked stress field caused by the crack by utilizing a method of elastic superposition. Both the IF and FE methods are described in detail in the paper and are applied to several test cases chosen for their similarity to the nozzle crack problem and for the availability of an accurate published result obtained from some recognized third method of solution. Results are given which summarize both the accuracy and the direct computer costs of the two methods

  10. Comparison of depletion results for a boiling water reactor fuel element with CASMO and SCALE 6.1 (TRITON/NEWT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesado, C.; Morera, D.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G.; Soler, Amparo; Melara, Jose

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the results of depletion calculations with CASMO and SCALE 6.1 (TRITON) are compared. To achieve it, a region of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel element is modeled, using both codes. To take into account different operating conditions, the simulations are repeated with different void fraction, ranging from null void fraction to a void fraction closed to one. Special care was used to keep in mind that the homogenization of the materials and the two group approach was the same in both codes. Additionally, KENO-VI and MCDANCOFF modules are used. The k-effective calculated by KENO-VI is used to ensure that the starting point was correct and MCDANCOFF module is used to calculate the Dancoff factors in order to improve the model accuracy. To validate the whole process, a comparison of k eff , and cross-sections collapsed and homogenized is shown. The results show a very good agreement, with an average error around the 1.75%. Furthermore, an automatic process for translating CASMO data to SCALE input decks was developed. The reason for the translation is the fact that SCALE's TRITON module is a new code very powerful and continuously being developed. Thus, great advantage can be taken from the current and future SCALE features. This is hoped to produce more realistic models, and hence, increase the accuracy of neutronic libraries. (author)

  11. A new coupling kernel for the three-dimensional simulation of a boiling water reactor core by the nodal coupling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.K.

    1981-01-01

    A new coupling kernel is developed for the three-dimensional (3-D) simulation of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR's) by the nodal coupling method. The new kernel depends not only on the properties of the node under consideration but also on the properties of its neighbouring nodes. This makes the kernel more useful in particular for fuel bundles lying in a surrounding of different nuclear characteristics, e.g. for a controlled bundle in the surrounding of uncontrolled bundles or vice-versa. The main parameter in the new kernel is a space-dependent factor obtained from the ratio of thermal-to-fast flux. The average value of the above ratio for each node is evaluated analytically. The kernel is incorporated in a 3-D BWR core simulation program MOGS. As an experimental verification of the model, the cycle-6 operations of the two units of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) are simulated and the result of the simulation are compared with Travelling Incore Probe (TIP) data. (orig.)

  12. Study of Pu consumption in light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants, compilation of Phase 1C task reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the evaluations conducted during Phase 1C of the Pu Disposition Study have provided further results which reinforce the conclusions reached during Phase 1A ampersand 1B: These conclusions clearly establish the benefits of the fission option and the use of the ABWR as a reliable, proven, well-defined and cost-effective means available to disposition the weapons Pu. This project could be implemented in the near-term at a cost and on a schedule being validated by reactor plants currently under construction in Japan and by cost and schedule history and validated plans for MOX plants in Europe. Evaluations conducted during this phase have established that (1) the MOX fuel is licensable based on existing criteria for new fuel with limited lead fuel rod testing, (2) that the applicable requirements for transport, handling and repository storage can be met, and (3) that all the applicable safeguards criteria can be met

  13. Study of Pu consumption in light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants, compilation of Phase 1C task reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-15

    This report summarizes the evaluations conducted during Phase 1C of the Pu Disposition Study have provided further results which reinforce the conclusions reached during Phase 1A & 1B: These conclusions clearly establish the benefits of the fission option and the use of the ABWR as a reliable, proven, well-defined and cost-effective means available to disposition the weapons Pu. This project could be implemented in the near-term at a cost and on a schedule being validated by reactor plants currently under construction in Japan and by cost and schedule history and validated plans for MOX plants in Europe. Evaluations conducted during this phase have established that (1) the MOX fuel is licensable based on existing criteria for new fuel with limited lead fuel rod testing, (2) that the applicable requirements for transport, handling and repository storage can be met, and (3) that all the applicable safeguards criteria can be met.

  14. THYDE-B1/MOD2: a computer code for analysis of small-break loss-of-coolant accidents of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hideo; Muramatsu, Ken; Kukita, Yutaka; Tasaka, Kanji

    1988-04-01

    THYDE-B1/MOD2 is a fast-running best estimate (BE) computer code to analyze thermal-hydraulic behaviors of the reactor cooling system of a boiling water reactor (BWR), mainly, during a small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) with a special emphasis on the behavior of pressure and mixture level in the pressure vessel. The coolant behavior is simulated with a volume-and-junction method based on assumptions of thermal equilibrium and homogeneous conditions for two-phase flow. A characteristic feature of this code is a three-region representation of the state of the coolant in a control volume, in which three regions consist of subcooled liquid, saturated mixture and saturated steam regions from the volume bottom. The regions are separated by two horizontal moving boundaries which are tracked by mass and energy balances for each region. With this three region node model, the interior of the pressure vessel can be represented by only two volumes: one for inside of the shroud and the other for outside, while other portions of the system are treated with homogeneous node model. This method, although it seems to be very simple, has been verified to be adequate for cases of BWR SBLOCAs in which the thermal-hydraulic behavior is relatively slow and gravity controlled. The code has been improved and modified from the last version of the code, THYDE-B1/MOD1, especially in the phase separation model which is used in the mixture level calculation in the three region node model. Then, a good predictability of the code has been indicated through the comparison of calculated results with various SBLOCA test data including ROSA-III of JAERI and FIST of the General Electric Co. This report presents the code modifications and input data requirements of the THYDE-B1/MOD2 code. (author)

  15. Cold-neutron tomography of annular flow and functional spacer performance in a model of a boiling water reactor fuel rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zboray, Robert; Kickhofel, John; Damsohn, Manuel; Prasser, Horst-Michael

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Annular flows w/wo functional spacers are investigated by cold neutron imaging. → Liquid film thickness distribution on fuel pins and on spacer vanes is measured. → The influence of the spacers on the liquid film distributions has been quantified. → The cross-sectional averaged liquid hold-up significantly affected by the spacers. → The sapers affect the fraction of the entrained liquid hold up in the gas core. - Abstract: Dryout of the coolant liquid film at the upper part of the fuel pins of a boiling water reactor (BWR) core constitutes the type of heat transfer crisis relevant for the conditions of high void fractions. It is both a safety concern and a limiting factor in the thermal power and thus for the economy of BWRs. We have investigated adiabatic, air-water annular flows in a scaled-up model of two neighboring subchannels as found in BWR fuel assemblies using cold-neutron tomography. The imaging of the double suchannel has been performed at the ICON beamline at the neutron spallation source SINQ at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. Cold-neutron tomography is shown here to be an excellent tool for investigating air-water annular flows and the influence of functional spacers of different geometries on such flows. The high-resolution, high-contrast measurements provide the spatial distributions of the coolant liquid film thickness on the fuel pin surfaces as well as on the surfaces of the spacer vanes. The axial variations of the cross-section averaged liquid hold-up and its fraction in the gas core shows the effect of the spacers on the redistribution of the two phases.

  16. Simulation of the aspersion system of the core low pressure (LPCS) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrillo G, O. E.; Chavez M, C.

    2012-10-01

    The present work presents the modeling and simulation of the aspersion system to low pressure of reactor of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde using the nuclear code RELAP/SCDAP. The objective of the emergency systems inside a nuclear reactor is the cooling of the core, nor caring the performance of any other emergency system in the case of an accident design base for coolant loss. To obtain a simulation of the system is necessary to have a model based on their main components, pipes, pumps, valves, etc. This article describes the model for the simulation of the main line and the test line for the HPCS. At the moment we have the simulation of the reactor vessel and their systems associated to the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, this work will allow to associate the emergency system model LPCS to the vessel model. The simulation of the vessel and the emergency systems will allow knowing the behavior of the reactor in the stage of the coolant loos, giving the possibility to analyze diverse scenarios. The general model will provide an auxiliary tool for the training in classroom and at distance in the operation of nuclear power plants. (Author)

  17. Acoustic monitoring of sodium boiling in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor from autoregressive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldo, Issa Cherif; Bose, Tanmoy; Pekpe, Komi Midzodzi; Cassar, Jean-Philippe; Mohanty, A.R.; Paumel, Kévin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The work deals with sodium boiling detection in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. • The authors choose to use acoustic data instead of thermal data. • The method is designed to not to be disturbed by the environment noises. • A real time boiling detection methods are proposed in the paper. - Abstract: This paper deals with acoustic monitoring of sodium boiling in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) based on auto regressive (AR) models which have low computational complexities. Some authors have used AR models for sodium boiling or sodium–water reaction detection. These works are based on the characterization of the difference between fault free condition and current functioning of the system. However, even in absence of faults, it is possible to observe a change in the AR models due to the change of operating mode of the LMFBR. This sets up the delicate problem of how to distinguish a change in operating mode in absence of faults and a change due to presence of faults. In this paper we propose a new approach for boiling detection based on the estimation of AR models on sliding windows. Afterwards, classification of the models into boiling or non-boiling models is made by comparing their coefficients by two statistical methods, multiple linear regression (LR) and support vectors machines (SVM). The proposed approach takes into account operating mode information in order to avoid false alarms. Experimental data include non-boiling background noise data collected from Phenix power plant (France) and provided by the CEA (Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux énergies alternatives, France) and boiling condition data generated in laboratory. High boiling detection rates as well as low false alarms rates obtained on these experimental data show that the proposed method is efficient for boiling detection. Most importantly, it shows that the boiling phenomenon introduces a disturbance into the AR models that can be clearly detected

  18. The Results of Feasibility Study of Co-generation NPP With Innovative VK-300 Simplified Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Yury N.

    2006-01-01

    The co-generation nuclear power plant (CNPP) producing electricity and district heating heat is planned to be constructed in Archangelsk Region of Russia. Following the 'Letter of Intent' signed by Governor of Archangelsk region and by Minister of the Russian Federation for atomic energy the feasibility study of the Project has been done. The NPP will be based on the four co-generation nuclear power units with the Russian VK-300 SBWR. The innovative passive VK-300 reactor facility has been designed on the basis of well-established nuclear technologies, proven major components, the operating experience of the prototype VK-50 reactor in RIAR, Dimitrovgrad, and the experience in designing such reactors as SBWR (GE) and SWR-1000 (Siemens). The CNPP's total power is planned to be 1000 MW(e) and district-heating heat production capacity 1600 Gcal/h. A detailed description of the results of the feasibility study is presented in the report. The results of the feasibility study have shown that the Archangelsk CGNP is feasible in terms of engineering, economics and production. (authors)

  19. The results of feasibility study of co-generation NPP with innovative VK-300 simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Yu. N.; Gabaraev, B. A.

    2004-01-01

    The co-generation nuclear power plant (CNPP) producing electricity and district-heating heat is planned to be constructed in Archangelsk Region of Russia. Following the Letter of Intent signed by Governor of Archangelsk region and by Minister of the Russian Federation for atomic energy the feasibility study of the Project has been done. The NPP will be based on the four co-generation nuclear power units with the Russian VK-300 SBWR. The innovative passive VK-300 reactor facility has been designed on the basis of well-established nuclear technologies, proven major components, the operating experience of the prototype VK-50 reactor in RIAR, Dimitrovgrad, and the experience in designing such reactors as SBWR (GE) and SWR-1000 (Siemens). The CNPP's total power is planned to be 1000 MW(e) and district-heating heat production capacity 1600 Gcal /h. A detailed description of the results of the feasibility study is presented in the report. The results of the feasibility study have shown that the Archangelsk CGNP is feasible in terms of engineering, economics and production.(author)

  20. Post-irradiation examination of the vipac fuel assemblies IFA-104 and IFA-203, irradiated in the Halden boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, A. van der; Lucas Luyckx, H.J.B.

    1976-11-01

    Two seven pin assemblies, IFA-104 and IFA-203, have been irradiated in the Halding Boiling Water Reactor. The Zircaloy clad pins contained vibrationally compacted, sharp edged UO 2 particles with smear densities of 84-88% theoretical density and a fuel stack length of about 1520 mm. The IFA-104 pins operated satisfactorily during approximately 240 effective full power days at an average linear heat rating of about 340 W/cm, and a peak rating of about 480 W/cm. Ingress of water via a pressure transducer into one of the IFA-203 pins necessitated the premature termination of the irradiation after approximately 30 effective full power days at an average rating of about 460 W/cm, and a peak rating of about 550 W/cm. One IFA-104 pin and two IFA-203 pins failed early. The primary cause of these failures has been sought in the oxidation reaction of the tantalum tube which protected the W/Re thermocouples with the surrounding UO 2 or with moisture in the fuel at temperatures in excess of approximately 1700degC. The fuel centre temperature and the internal gas pressure measurements during the beginning of lifetime and the results of the post-irradiation chemical and microscopic analysis on fuel pin cross-sections have been correlated with corresponding data calculated on a Gapcon-Thermal computer programme written for pellet fuel pins. Fairly good agreement could be achieved between the measured data on the vipac pins and the calculated data of a pellet pin. During the corrosion of the Zircaloy-2 cladding of the IFA-104 pins which were autoclaved in 400degC steam prior to the irradiation, relatively large amounts of H 2 entered the cladding from the D 2 O coolant side. With 0.66 mole% H 2 O in the D 2 O the calculated hydrogen uptake preference ratio was 33

  1. The low-power low-pressure flow resonance in a natural circulation cooled boiling water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Stekelenburg, A.J.C. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1995-09-01

    The last few years the possibility of flow resonances during the start-up phase of natural circulation cooled BWRs has been put forward by several authors. The present paper reports on actual oscillations observed at the Dodewaard reactor, the world`s only operating BWR cooled by natural circulation. In addition, results of a parameter study performed by means of a simple theoretical model are presented. The influence of relevant parameters on the resonance characteristics, being the decay ratio and the resonance frequency, is investigated and explained.

  2. Fundamental study on thermo-hydraulics during start-up in natural circulation boiling water reactors, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aritomi, Masanori; Chiang Jing-Hsien; Takahashi, Tohru; Wataru, Masumi; Mori, Michitsugu.

    1992-01-01

    Recently, many concepts, in which passive and simplified functions are actively adapted, have been proposed for the next generation LWRs. The natural circulation BWR is one such considered from the requirements for next generation LWRs as compared with current BWRs. It is pointed out from this consideration that a thermo-hydraulic instability, which may appear during start-up, greatly influences concept feasibility because its occurence makes operation for raising power output difficult. Thermo-hydraulic instabilities are investigated experimentally under conditions simulating normal and abnormal start-up processes. It is clarified that three kinds of thermo-hydraulic instabilities may occur during start-up in the natural circulation BWR according to its procedure and reactor configuration, which are (1) geysering induced by condensation, (2) natural circulation instability induced by hydrostatic head fluctuation in steam separators and (3) density wave instability. Driving mechanisms of the geysering and the natural circulation instability, which have never understood enough, are inferred from the results. Finally, the difference of thermo-hydraulic behavior during start-up processes between thermal natural circulation boilers and the Dodewaard reactor is discussed. (author)

  3. Experimental study on hydrodynamics of the up-draught part of the VK-50 boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedulin, V.N.; Shmelev, V.E.; Solodkij, V.A.; Kharitonov, Yu.V.

    1982-01-01

    The investigation results on steam content distribution in the volume of the up-draught part of the VK 50 reactor on the basis of the electrical sounding method are presented. The operating conditions of the up-draught part of a large diameter and limited height is characterized by hydrodynamic non-uniformity of distribution of steam content field over its volume. In the up-draught part of the reactor owing to its limited height hydrodynamic flow stabilization over the section is not attained. The higher void fraction in the central region of the up-draught part (owing to higher energy release in the centre of the core) causes accelerated coolant motion upwatds which results in steam migration from the periphery to the centre and to increase of general non-uniformity of steam distribution. The revealed steam distribution non-uniformity over the height and radius of the up-draught part elucidates the discrepancy of experimental and calculation values of the average volumetric steam content and determines the necessity of the development of new calculation methods

  4. Summary of the OECD/NRC Boiling Water Reactor Turbine Trip Benchmark - Fourth Workshop (BWR-TT4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The reference problem chosen for simulation in a BWR is a Turbine Trip transient, which begins with a sudden Turbine Stop Valve (TSV) closure. The pressure oscillation generated in the main steam piping propagates with relatively little attenuation into the reactor core. The induced core pressure oscillation results in dramatic changes of the core void distribution and fluid flow. The magnitude of the neutron flux transient taking place in the BWR core is strongly affected by the initial rate of pressure rise caused by pressure oscillation and has a strong spatial variation. The correct simulation of the power response to the pressure pulse and subsequent void collapse requires a 3-D core modeling supplemented by 1-D simulation of the remainder of the reactor coolant system. A BWR TT benchmark exercise, based on a well-defined problem with complete set of input specifications and reference experimental data, has been proposed for qualification of the coupled 3-D neutron kinetics/thermal-hydraulic system transient codes. Since this kind of transient is a dynamically complex event with reactor variables changing very rapidly, it constitutes a good benchmark problem to test the coupled codes on both levels: neutronics/thermal-hydraulic coupling and core/plant system coupling. Subsequently, the objectives of the proposed benchmark are: comprehensive feedback testing and examination of the capability of coupled codes to analyze complex transients with coupled core/plant interactions by comparison with actual experimental data. The benchmark consists of three separate exercises: Exercise 1 - Power vs. Time Plant System Simulation with Fixed Axial Power Profile Table (Obtained from Experimental Data). Exercise 2 - Coupled 3-D Kinetics/Core Thermal-Hydraulic BC Model and/or 1-D Kinetics Plant System Simulation. Exercise 3 - Best-Estimate Coupled 3-D Core/Thermal-Hydraulic System Modeling. The purpose of this fourth workshop was to present and discuss final results of

  5. Summary of the OECD/NRC Boiling Water Reactor Turbine Trip Benchmark - Fifth Workshop (BWR-TT5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The reference problem chosen for simulation in a BWR is a Turbine Trip transient, which begins with a sudden Turbine Stop Valve (TSV) closure. The pressure oscillation generated in the main steam piping propagates with relatively little attenuation into the reactor core. The induced core pressure oscillation results in dramatic changes of the core void distribution and fluid flow. The magnitude of the neutron flux transient taking place in the BWR core is strongly affected by the initial rate of pressure rise caused by pressure oscillation and has a strong spatial variation. The correct simulation of the power response to the pressure pulse and subsequent void collapse requires a 3-D core modeling supplemented by 1-D simulation of the remainder of the reactor coolant system. A BWR TT benchmark exercise, based on a well-defined problem with complete set of input specifications and reference experimental data, has been proposed for qualification of the coupled 3-D neutron kinetics/thermal-hydraulic system transient codes. Since this kind of transient is a dynamically complex event with reactor variables changing very rapidly, it constitutes a good benchmark problem to test the coupled codes on both levels: neutronics/thermal-hydraulic coupling and core/plant system coupling. Subsequently, the objectives of the proposed benchmark are: comprehensive feedback testing and examination of the capability of coupled codes to analyze complex transients with coupled core/plant interactions by comparison with actual experimental data. The benchmark consists of three separate exercises: Exercise 1 - Power vs. Time Plant System Simulation with Fixed Axial Power Profile Table (Obtained from Experimental Data). Exercise 2 - Coupled 3-D Kinetics/Core Thermal-Hydraulic BC Model and/or 1-D Kinetics Plant System Simulation. Exercise 3 - Best-Estimate Coupled 3-D Core/Thermal-Hydraulic System Modeling. The purpose of this fifth workshop was to discuss the results from Phase III (best

  6. Simulation of the fault transitory of the feedwater controller in a Boiling water reactor with the Ramona-3B code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez M, J.L.; Ortiz V, J.

    2005-01-01

    The obtained results when carrying out the simulation of the fault transitory of the feedwater controller (FCAA) with the Ramona-3B code, happened in the Unit 2 of the Laguna Verde power plant (CNLV), in September of the year 2000 are presented. The transitory originates as consequence of the controller's fault of speed of a turbo pump of feedwater. The work includes a short description of the event, the suppositions considered for the simulation and the obtained results. Also, a discussion of the impact of the transitory event is presented on aspects of reactor safety. Although the carried out simulation is limited by the capacities of the code and for the lack of available information, it was found that even in a conservative situation, the power was incremented only in 12% above the nominal value, while that the thermal limit determined by the minimum reason of the critical power, MCPR, always stayed above the limit values of operation and safety. (Author)

  7. Activity build-up on the circulation loops of boiling water reactors: Basics for modelling of transport and deposition processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covelli, B.; Alder, H.P.

    1988-03-01

    In the past 20 years the radiation field of nuclear power plant loops outside the core zone was the object of investigations in many countries. In this context test loops were built and basic research done. At our Institute PSI the installation of a LWR-contamination loop is planned for this year. This experimental loop has the purpose to investigate the complex phenomena of activity deposition from the primary fluid of reactor plants and to formulate analytical models. From the literature the following conclusions can be drawn: The principal correlations of the activity build-up outside the core are known. The plant specific single phenomena as corrosion, crud-transport, activation and deposit of cobalt in the oxide layer are complex and only partially understood. The operational experience of particular plants with low contaminated loops (BWR-recirculation loops) show that in principle the problem is manageable. The reduction of the activity build-up in older plants necessitates a combination of measures to modify the crud balance in the primary circuit. In parallel to the experimental work several simulation models in the form of computer programs were developed. These models have the common feature that they are based on mass balances, in which the exchange of materials and the sedimentation processes are described by global empirical transport coefficients. These models yield satisfactory results and allow parameter studies; the application however is restricted to the particular installation. All programs lack models that describe the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic mechanisms on the surface of deposition layers. Analytical investigations on fouling of process equipment led to models that are also applicable to the activity build-up in reactor loops. Therefore it seems appropriate to combine the nuclear simulation models with the fundamental equations for deposition. 10 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs

  8. 'Thin walled' concept and a new top lid applied to the Scandinavian PCRV for a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotto, F.L.

    1975-01-01

    This research is carried out in the frame of an agreement between AB ATOMENERGI of Sweden and ENEL (Ente Nazionale per l'Energia Elettrica) of Italy, for an exchange of information in the field of PCPV for BWR, and takes as a reference the Scandinavian solution as far as the thermal insulation system and the geometry are concerned, proposing new solutions for the prestressed concrete structure (namely the Author's concept of thin walls and a new concept of top lid). The proposed top lid sealing system solution is in line with the one adopted for the conventional steel pressure vessel enclosures; furthermore the prestressed concrete lid is restricted to the prestressed concrete structure to form a continuous contrete structure, in line with th PCPV conventional solutions for gas reactors. The paper describes in detail the selected design philosophy that is slightly different from the one defined by the Scandinavian project. In fact, as far as the design limits are concerned, it refers mainly to steel pressure vessel philosophy and, as to the concrete behaviour, to the design philosophy proposed by the author for the PCPV 'thin walled' structures for gas-cooled power reactors. Rheological, mathematical and physical models had been suitably devised in order to check the reliability of the proposed assumption. This paper therefore, will also give a brief description of said tools and the main results acquired at the time of the conference, and technical and economical considerations made to support the interest of the research, showing the relevant cut down of the costs. The comparative reference steel pressure vessel belongs to Mark III ENEL VI and VIII BW plant to which design and construction the author gives his contribution

  9. Boiling water reactors with uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel. Report 5: Analysis of the reactivity coefficients and the stability of a BWR loaded with MOx fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaziere, C. [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires

    2000-01-01

    This report is a part of the project titled 'Boiling Water Reactors With Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxide (MOx) Fuel'. The aim of this study is to model the impact of a core loading pattern containing MOx bundles upon the main characteristics of a BWR (reactivity coefficients, stability, etc.). For this purpose, the Core Management System (CMS) codes of Studsvik Scandpower are used. This package is constituted by CASMO-4/TABLES-3/SIMULATE-3. It has been shown in previous reports that these codes are able to accurately represent and model MOx bundles. This report is thus devoted to the study of BWR cores loaded (partially or totally) with MOx bundles. The plutonium quality used is the Pu type 2016 (mostly Pu-239, 56 %, and Pu-240, 26 %), but a variation of the plutonium isotopic vector was also investigated, in case of a partial MOx loading. One notices that the reactivity coefficients do not present significant changes in comparison with a full UOx loading. Nevertheless, two main problems arise: the shutdown margin at BOC is lower than 1 % and the stability to in-phase oscillations is slightly decreased. (The SIMULATE-3 version used for this study does not contain the latest MOx enhancements described in literature, since these code developments have not been provided to the department. Nevertheless, as the nominal average enrichment of the MOx bundles is 5.41 % (total amount of plutonium), which can still be considered as a relatively low enrichment, the accuracy of the CMS codes is acceptable without the use of the MOx improvements for this level of Pu enrichment.

  10. Advanced Best-Estimate Methodologies for Thermal-Hydraulics Stability Analyses with TRACG code and Improvements on Operating Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedovi, J.; Trueba, M.; Ibarra, L; Espino, M.; Hoang, H.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years GE Hitachi has introduced two advanced methodologies to address the thermal-hydraulics instabilities in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs); the “Detect and Suppress Solution - Confirmation Density (DSS-CD)” and the “GEH Simplified Stability Solution (GS3).” These two methodologies are based on Best-Estimate Plus Uncertainty (BEPU) analyses and provide significant improvement on safety, plant maneuvering and fuel economics with respect to existing solutions. DSS-CD and GS3 solutions have been recently approved by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper describes the main characteristics of these two stability methodologies and shares the experience of their recent implementation in operating BWRs. The BEPU approach provided a much deeper understanding of the parameters affecting instabilities in operating BWRs and allowed for better calculation of plant setpoints by improving plant manoeuvring restrictions and reducing manual operator actions. DSS-CD and GS3 methodologies are both based on safety analyses performed with the best-estimate system code TRACG. The assessment of uncertainty is performed following the Code Scaling, Applicability and Uncertainty (CSAU) methodology documented in NUREG/CR-5249. The two solutions have been already implemented in a combined 18 BWR units with 7 more units in the process of transitioning. The main results demonstrate a significant decrease (>0.1) in the stability based Operating Limit Minimum Critical Power Ratio (OLMCPR), which possibly results in significant fuel savings and the increase in allowable stability plant setpoints that address instability events such as the one occurred at the Fermi 2 plant in 2015 and can help prevent unnecessary Scrams. The paper also describes the advantages of reduced plant manoeuvring as a result to transitioning to these solutions; in particular the history of a BWR/6 transition to DSS-CD is discussed.

  11. On the Modeling of Local Neutronically-Coupled Flow-Induced Oscillations in Advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aniel-Buchheit, Sylvie; Podowski, Michael Z.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development in progress of a complete space- and time-dependent model of the coupled neutron kinetic and reactor thermal-hydraulics. The neutron kinetics model is based on two-group diffusion equations with Doppler and void reactivity feedback effects. This model is coupled with the model of two-phase flow and heat transfer in parallel coolant channels. The modeling concepts considered for this purpose include one-dimensional drift flux and two-fluid models, as well a CFD model implemented in the NPHASE advanced computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) computer code. Two methods of solution for the overall model are proposed. One is based on direct numerical integration of the spatially-discretized governing equations. The other approach is based on a quasi-analytical modal approach to the neutronics model, in which a complete set of eigenvectors is found for step-wise temporal changes of the cross-sections of core materials (fuel and coolant/moderator). The issues investigated in the paper include details of model formulation, as well as the results of calculations for neutronically-coupled density-wave oscillations. (authors)

  12. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis of boiling water reactor vessel for cool-down and low temperature over-pressurization transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Soon; Choi, Young Hwan; Jhung, Myung Jo [Safety Research Division, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The failure probabilities of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) for low temperature over-pressurization (LTOP) and cool-down transients are calculated in this study. For the cool-down transient, a pressure-temperature limit curve is generated in accordance with Section XI, Appendix G of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code, from which safety margin factors are deliberately removed for the probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis. Then, sensitivity analyses are conducted to understand the effects of some input parameters. For the LTOP transient, the failure of the RPV mostly occurs during the period of the abrupt pressure rise. For the cool-down transient, the decrease of the fracture toughness with temperature and time plays a main role in RPV failure at the end of the cool-down process. As expected, the failure probability increases with increasing fluence, Cu and Ni contents, and initial reference temperature-nil ductility transition (RTNDT). The effect of warm prestressing on the vessel failure probability for LTOP is not significant because most of the failures happen before the stress intensity factor reaches the peak value while its effect reduces the failure probability by more than one order of magnitude for the cool-down transient.

  13. An assessment of BWR [boiling water reactor] Mark-II containment challenges, failure modes, and potential improvements in performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.L.; Jones, K.R.; Dallman, R.J.; Wagner, K.C.

    1990-07-01

    This report assesses challenges to BWR Mark II containment integrity that could potentially arise from severe accidents. Also assessed are some potential improvements that could prevent core damage or containment failure, or could mitigate the consequences of such failure by reducing the release of fission products to the environment. These challenges and improvements are analyzed via a limited quantitative risk/benefit analysis of a generic BWR/4 reactor with Mark II containment. Point estimate frequencies of the dominant core damage sequences are obtained and simple containment event trees are constructed to evaluate the response of the containment to these severe accident sequences. The resulting containment release modes are then binned into source term release categories, which provide inputs to the consequence analysis. The output of the consequences analysis is used to construct an overall base case risk profile. Potential improvements and sensitivities are evaluated by modifying the event tree spilt fractions, thus generating a revised risk profile. Several important sensitivity cases are examined to evaluate the impact of phenomenological uncertainties on the final results. 75 refs., 25 figs., 65 tabs

  14. A model of Altio Lazio boiling water reactor using the LEGO code nuclear steam supply system simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbossa, G.B.; Spelta, S.; Cori, R.; Mosca, R.; Cento, P.

    1989-01-01

    An extensive effort has been made at the Italian National Electricity Board (ENEL) to construct and validate a LEGO model capable of simulating the operational transients of the Alto Lazio Nuclear Station, a two-twin units site with BWR/6 class reactors, rated at 2894 MWt and with Mark III containment. The desired end-product of this effort is an overall plant model consisting of the Nuclear Steam Supply System model, described in this paper, and the Balance of Plant model, capable of simulating the transient response of Alto Lazio Station. The models utilize the in-house developed LEGO code, which is a modular package oriented to power plant modeling and suitable to perform transient analyses to assist during power plant design, control system design and operating procedure verification. The ability of the NSSS model to predict correctly the plant response is demonstrated through comparison with results calculated by the vendor, using REDY code, and by an in-house RETRAN-02 model

  15. Use of an influence diagram and fuzzy probability for evaluating accident management in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, D.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Okrent, D.

    1994-01-01

    A new approach is presented for evaluating the uncertainties inherent in severe accident management strategies. At first, this analysis considers accident management as a decision problem (i.e., applying a strategy compared with do nothing) and uses an influence diagram. To evaluate imprecise node probabilities in the influence diagram, the analysis introduces the concept of a fuzzy probability. When fuzzy logic is applied, fuzzy probabilities are easily propagated to obtain results. In addition, the results obtained provide not only information similar to the classical approach, which uses point-estimate values, but also additional information regarding the impact of using imprecise input data. As an illustrative example, the proposed methodology is applied to the evaluation of the drywell flooding strategy for a long-term station blackout sequence at the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant. The results show that the drywell flooding strategy is beneficial for preventing reactor vessel breach. It is also effective for reducing the probability of containment failure for both liner melt-through and late overpressurization. Even though uncertainty exists in the results, flooding is preferred to do nothing when evaluated in terms of two risk measures: early and late fatalities

  16. Solubility of magnetite in coolant of NPP boiling reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarembo, V.I.; Kritskij, V.G.; Slobodov, A.A.; Puchkov, L.V.

    1988-01-01

    To improve water-chemical NPP regimes calculations of iron solubility up to 600 K temperature in Fe 3 O 4 -H 2 O-O 2 and Fe(OH) 3 -H 2 O systems are performed using a system of selected and consistent values of thermal constants of various chemical iron forms in standard aqueous solution state. Calculations have shown that up to 423 K in aqueous medium containing oxygen, magnetite is unstable and is oxidized first up to Fe(OH) 3 and then - up to Fe OOH and Fe 2 O 3 . Calculations complying with experimental data have demonstrated the presence of maximum on the curve solubility-temperature in desalinized water containing 10 μkg/kg of oxygen. A sequence of processes of oxygen effect on water regime and corrosion prduct deposition in a condensate-feed circuit of NPP boiling reactor is proposed. It is proved that under oxygen water chemistry of condensate-feed circuit after magnetite transfomation into gematite, reduction of soluble iron form inlet to reactor loop occurs, which allows one to expect reduction of γ-radiation dose rate buildup around the primary loop pipelines

  17. Customer-operator partnership. A boiling water reactor developed jointly by AREVA NP and E.ON Kernkraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasler, Doris; Gauthier, Jean Claude; Diercks, Frank; Fuchs, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Many countries spread all over the world have publicly expressed their intention to pursue the construction of new nuclear power plants with improved safety, economy and more straight forwarded operation and maintenance. Reasons for the intention are: The world wide increasing demand for energy and hence the general necessity to build new power plants. The concerns for increased emissions of green house gases leading to a change in the climate have brought into question the primary reliance on plants utilizing fossil fuels. A new reactor type matching the previously stated issues is AREVA NP's further development of proven BWR design. Combining AREVA's and E.ON's expertise, a project was launched to customize the final basic design for this advanced nuclear power plant having a net power output of about 1,250 MW, a net efficiency of about 37% and a design service life of 60 years. Within this joint venture the overall plant design was simplified and additionally all active safety systems have passive safety related backup systems utilizing basic laws of physics, such as gravity, enabling them to function without electrical power supplies or activation by powered instrumentation and control systems. The development takes into account the technical and accumulated operating experience of the project partners. Based on the operating experience of the project partners a simplification of the overall system engineering was performed, flexible fuel cycle length (12 to 24 months) are possible as well as a reduction of process waste was achieved. These improvements regarding the operation and economics result on the one hand in lower investment cost and on the other hand in a high availability of the plant, hence in low maintenance costs. Generally, the electrical generation costs are accomplished, which are competitive to larger-capacity nuclear power plants and fossil-fired plants. (author)

  18. Boiling of subcooled water in forced convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricque, R.; Siboul, R.

    1970-01-01

    As a part of a research about water cooled high magnetic field coils, an experimental study of heat transfer and pressure drop is made with the following conditions: local boiling in tubes of small diameters (2 and 4 mm), high heat fluxes (about 1000 W/cm 2 ), high coolant velocities (up to 25 meters/s), low outlet absolute pressures (below a few atmospheres). Wall temperatures are determined with a good accuracy, because very thin tubes are used and heat losses are prevented. Two regimes of boiling are observed: the establishment regime and the established boiling regime and the inception of each regime is correlated. Important delays on boiling inception are also observed. The pressure drop is measured; provided the axial temperature distribution of the fluid and the axial distributions of the wall temperatures, in other words the axial distribution of the heat transfer coefficients under boiling and non boiling conditions, at the same heat flux or the same wall temperatures, are taken in account, then total pressure drop can be correlated, but probably under certain limits of void fraction only. Using the same parameters, it seems possible to correlate the experimental values on critical heat flux obtained previously, which show very important effect of length and hydraulic diameter of the test sections. (authors) [fr

  19. An innovative conceptual design of the safe and simplified boiling water reactor (SSBWR) with a super-long life core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, J. [Hitachi Ltd., Power and Industrial Systems Nuclear System Div., Ibaraki (Japan); Ohtsuka, M.; Fujimura, K.; Hidaka, M.; Nagayoshi, T. [Hitachi Ltd., Power and Industrial Systems R and D Lab., Ibaraki (Japan); Kato, Y. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors

    2001-07-01

    An innovative concept for the SSBWR has been developed to provide a super-long life core of 20 years with neutron spectrum shift due to dilution from heavy to light water for coolant and to represent a passive core safety system with infinite grace period. Operability and maintainability can be largely improved by the super-long life core, reduction of the number of active components, and RPV renewal with no exchange of fuel assemblies, which can also significantly reduce the possibility of nuclear proliferation. (author)

  20. Operating Experience in Nuclear Power Plants with Boiling-Water Reactors; Experience acquise dans l'exploitation des reacteurs a eau bouillante; Opyt ehkspluatatsii kipyashchago reaktora; Experiencia adquirida con la explotacion de reactores de agua hirviente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascherl, R. J. [General Electric Company, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1963-10-15

    Asignificant amount of operating experience has now been accumulated by boiling-water-reactor power plants. By the end of 1962, over 2200 million kWh of electricity have been generated by three plants operating on utility.system - Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Commonwealth Edison Company, Morris, Illinois; Vallecitos Atomic Power Plant, Pacific Gas and Electric Company and General Electric Company, Pleasanton, California; and Kahl Nuclear Power Station, Rheinisch Westfaelisches Elektrizitaetswerk and Bayernwerk, Kahl-am-Main, West Germany. Boiling-water-reactor power-plant performance, under routine electric-utility operating conditions, has been excellent. Reactor and plant availability and capacity factor provide a sound basis for anticipation of continuing reliable performance from boiling-water-reactor power stations. During 1963, four additional boiling-water-reactor plants will begin power operation: Big Rock Point Nuclear Plant, Consumers Power Company, Charlevoix, Michigan; Humboldt Bay Plant Nuclear Unit, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Eureka, California; Garigliano Nuclear Power Station, Societa Elettronucleare Nazionale, Scauri, Italy; and Japan Power Demonstration Reactor, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai Mura, Japan. The start-up and initial operation of these plants confirms the expectation of reliable performance established by Dresden, Kahl, and Vallecitos. Performance records of Dresden, Kahl and Vallecitos have clearly proved the stability and safety of boiling-water reactors. Additionally, radiation levels within the plant and in the environs have been significantly below limits established by operating licences. Simplicity and ease of operation of boiling-water reactors has been confirmed. Load following characteristics of the Dresden dual-cycle boiling-water reactor have been excellent. Major and minor maintenance and repair work can be accomplished by ordinary craft unions, and without undue hardship or time limits caused by

  1. Recent developments in powder resin precoat filtration for condensate clean-up at nuclear power plants with boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaisier, L.

    1990-01-01

    The necessity to optimize condensate clean-up by means of powder resin precoat filtration has gained more and more importance. Not only the cost of powder resins themselves is important in this regard, but even more so the disposal of used resins and replaced filter elements. The factors influencing direct filtration efficiency, resin consumption, and service life of filter elements (powder resin quality; way of preparing the water - resin mixture; precoating method; filter design and piping; type and quality of filter elements, and filtration speed) are outlined. A method designed to reduce filtration speed as much as possible, i.e. to enlarge the filter surface while maintaining its volume and avoiding adverse effects, is described in detail and substantiated by data obtained from pilot tests. (orig./BBR) [de

  2. Supercritical Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Latge, C.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.

    2014-01-01

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the 6 concepts selected for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. SCWR is a new concept, it is an attempt to optimize boiling water reactors by using the main advantages of supercritical water: only liquid phase and a high calorific capacity. The SCWR requires very high temperatures (over 375 C degrees) and very high pressures (over 22.1 MPa) to operate which allows a high conversion yield (44% instead of 33% for a PWR). Low volumes of coolant are necessary which makes the neutron spectrum shift towards higher energies and it is then possible to consider fast reactors operating with supercritical water. The main drawbacks of supercritical water is the necessity to use very high pressures which has important constraints on the reactor design, its physical properties (density, calorific capacity) that vary strongly with temperatures and pressures and its very high corrosiveness. The feasibility of the concept is not yet assured in terms of adequate materials that resist to corrosion, reactor stability, reactor safety, and reactor behaviour in accidental situations. (A.C.)

  3. New strategies of reloads design and models of control bars in boiling water reactors; Nuevas estrategias de diseno de recargas y de patrones de barras de control en reactores de agua en ebullicion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo M, J. A.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Perusquia del Cueto, R., E-mail: alejandro.castillo@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    In this work the results obtained when analyzing new strategies in the reload designs of nuclear fuel and models of control bars, for boiling water reactors are presented. The idea is to analyze the behaviour of the reactor during an operation cycle, when the heuristic rules are not used (commonly used by expert engineers in both designs). Specifically was analyzed the rule of low leak and the load strategy Control Cell Core for the design of a fuel reload. In a same way was analyzed the rule of prohibiting the use of the intermediate positions in the control bars, as well as the construction of bar models based on load strategies type Control Cell Core. In the first analysis a balance and transition cycle were used. For the second analysis only a transition cycle was used, firstly with the reloads designed in the first analysis and later on with reloads built by other methods. For the simulation of the different configurations proposed in both cases, was used the code Simulate-3. To obtain the designs in both studies, the heuristic techniques or neural networks and taboo search were used. The obtained results show that it can be omitted of some rules used in the ambit for the mentioned designs and even so to obtain good results. To carry out this investigation was used Dell work station under Li nux platform. (Author)

  4. Qualification of the Darwin code for the studies of the fuel cycle relative to the boiling water reactors; Qualification du formulaire Darwin pour les etudes du cycle du combustible pour les reacteurs a eau bouillante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allais, V

    1998-03-01

    This thesis was carried out in the framework of fuel cycles studies in partnership with COGEMA; the aim is to determine physics parameters characterising Boiling Reactor Assemblies. Those reactors Firstly distinguish themselves from Pressurised Water Reactor by the boiling of the moderator in the core and secondary by the strong neutronics heterogeneity due to complex design. The diphasic mixture formed is characterised by the void fraction parameter. The loss of information, and neutronic studies characteristics of Boiling Water Reactors led us to make preliminary studies having in view to quantify the void fraction impact on the isotopics evolution. Studies on neutronics influence of assemblies and control rods from the immediate environment allows to define the cluster size to describe. The radial description optimisation with APOLLO-2 is necessary to improve the calculation performance and to reduce the errors coming from the modelization. The following points were studied: pellet radial discretization, clustering of cells characterized by a similar behaviour, options in flux spatial calculation (interface current formalism), self-shielding optimisation (specific to each isotopes). The three dimensional modelization with CRONOS-2 and the simplified accounting of the thermohydraulics / neutronics coupling done by a procedure developed and written during this thesis, allow an evaluation of axial distribution of void fraction, power and burn-up during the irradiation. The comparison with experimental analytic results of complete assembly and pin samples dissolutions allows the qualification of this procedure and confirms the necessity to take into account the void fraction axial variation during the evolution. The application of an automatic coupling with the DARWIN cycle code will allow a precise burnup calculation to be utilized in an industrial procedure. (author)

  5. Experimental study of the hydrodynamic instabilities occurring in boiling-water reactors; Etude experimentale des instabilites hydrodynamiques survenant dans les reacteurs nucleaires a ebullition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabreca, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-10-01

    The subjects is an experimental out-of pile loop study of the hydrodynamic oscillations occurring in boiling-water reactors. The study was carried out at atmospheric pressure and at pressure of about 8 atmospheres, in channels heated electrically by a constant and uniform specified current. In the test at 8 atmospheres the channel was a round tube of approximately 6 mm interior diameter. At 1 atmosphere a ring-section channel was used, 10 * 20 mm in diameter, with an inner heating tube and an outer tube of pyrex. It was possible to operate with natural convection and also with forced convection with test-channel by-pass. The study consists of 3 parts: 1. Preliminary determination of the laws governing pressure-drop during boiling. 2. Determination of the fronts at which oscillation appears, within a wide range of the parameters involved. 3. A descriptive study of the oscillations and measurement of the periods. The report gives the oscillation fronts with natural and forced convection for various values of the singular pressure drop at the channel inlet and for various riser lengths. The results are presented in non-dimensional form, which is available, in first approximation, for all geometric scales and for all fluids. Besides the following points were observed: - the wall (nature and thickness) can be an important factor ; - oscillation can occur in a horizontal channel. (author) [French] II a ete effectue une etude experimentale, en boucle hors-pile, des oscillations hydrodynamiques survenant dans les reacteurs a ebullition. L'etude a ete effectuee a la pression atmospherique et a une pression voisine de 8 atmospheres dans des canaux chauffes electriquement a puissance imposee constante et uniforme. Dans les essais a 8 atmospheres le canal etait un tube circulaire de diametre interieur 6 mm environ. A 1 atmosphere le canal etait de section annulaire 10 * 20 mm avec un tube interieur chauffant et un tube exterieur en pyrex. Le fonctionnement etait possible

  6. Experimental study of the hydrodynamic instabilities occurring in boiling-water reactors; Etude experimentale des instabilites hydrodynamiques survenant dans les reacteurs nucleaires a ebullition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabreca, S [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-10-01

    The subjects is an experimental out-of pile loop study of the hydrodynamic oscillations occurring in boiling-water reactors. The study was carried out at atmospheric pressure and at pressure of about 8 atmospheres, in channels heated electrically by a constant and uniform specified current. In the test at 8 atmospheres the channel was a round tube of approximately 6 mm interior diameter. At 1 atmosphere a ring-section channel was used, 10 * 20 mm in diameter, with an inner heating tube and an outer tube of pyrex. It was possible to operate with natural convection and also with forced convection with test-channel by-pass. The study consists of 3 parts: 1. Preliminary determination of the laws governing pressure-drop during boiling. 2. Determination of the fronts at which oscillation appears, within a wide range of the parameters involved. 3. A descriptive study of the oscillations and measurement of the periods. The report gives the oscillation fronts with natural and forced convection for various values of the singular pressure drop at the channel inlet and for various riser lengths. The results are presented in non-dimensional form, which is available, in first approximation, for all geometric scales and for all fluids. Besides the following points were observed: - the wall (nature and thickness) can be an important factor ; - oscillation can occur in a horizontal channel. (author) [French] II a ete effectue une etude experimentale, en boucle hors-pile, des oscillations hydrodynamiques survenant dans les reacteurs a ebullition. L'etude a ete effectuee a la pression atmospherique et a une pression voisine de 8 atmospheres dans des canaux chauffes electriquement a puissance imposee constante et uniforme. Dans les essais a 8 atmospheres le canal etait un tube circulaire de diametre interieur 6 mm environ. A 1 atmosphere le canal etait de section annulaire 10 * 20 mm avec un tube interieur chauffant et un tube exterieur en pyrex. Le fonctionnement etait possible en

  7. Study of deposited crud composition on fuel surfaces in the environment of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) of a Boiling Water Reactor at Chinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Tsuey-Lin; Lin, Tzung-Yi; Su, Te-Yen; Wen, Tung-Jen; Men, Lee-Chung

    2012-09-01

    This paper aimed at the characterization of metallic composition and surface analysis on the crud of fuel rods for unit-1 of BWR-4 at Nuclear Power Plant. The inductively coupled plasma- atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES) and the gamma spectrometry were carried out to analyze the corrosion product distributions and to determine the elemental compositions along the fuel rod under conditions of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) switched from normal water chemistry (NWC) of reactor coolant in this study. Most of the crud consisted of the flakes and irregular shapes via SEM morphology. The loosely adhe