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Sample records for body wall muscle

  1. Action potentials drive body wall muscle contractions in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shangbang; Zhen, Mei

    2011-01-01

    The sinusoidal locomotion exhibited by Caenorhabditis elegans predicts a tight regulation of contractions and relaxations of its body wall muscles. Vertebrate skeletal muscle contractions are driven by voltage-gated sodium channel–dependent action potentials. How coordinated motor outputs are regulated in C. elegans, which does not have voltage-gated sodium channels, remains unknown. Here, we show that C. elegans body wall muscles fire all-or-none, calcium-dependent action potentials that are driven by the L-type voltage-gated calcium and Kv1 voltage-dependent potassium channels. We further demonstrate that the excitatory and inhibitory motoneuron activities regulate the frequency of action potentials to coordinate muscle contraction and relaxation, respectively. This study provides direct evidence for the dual-modulatory model of the C. elegans motor circuit; moreover, it reveals a mode of motor control in which muscle cells integrate graded inputs of the nervous system and respond with all-or-none electrical signals. PMID:21248227

  2. Planarian body-wall muscle: regeneration and function beyond a simple skeletal support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc eCebrià

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The body-wall musculature of adult planarians consists of intricately organized muscle fibers, which after amputation are regenerated rapidly and with great precision through the proliferation and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. These traits make the planarian body-wall musculature a potentially useful model for the study of cell proliferation, differentiation, and pattern formation. Planarian body-wall muscle shows some ambiguous features common to both skeletal and smooth muscle cells. However, its skeletal nature is implied by the expression of skeletal myosin heavy-chain genes and the myogenic transcription factor myoD. Where and when planarian stem cells become committed to the myogenic lineage during regeneration, how the new muscle cells are integrated into the pre-existing muscle net, and the identity of the molecular pathway controlling the myogenic gene program are key aspects of planarian muscle regeneration that need to be addressed. Expression of the conserved transcription factor myoD has been recently demonstrated in putative myogenic progenitors. Moreover, recent studies suggest that differentiated muscle cells may provide positional information to planarian stem cells during regeneration. Here, I review the limited available knowledge on planarian muscle regeneration.

  3. Heat-Induced Calcium Leakage Causes Mitochondrial Damage inCaenorhabditis elegansBody-Wall Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momma, Kenta; Homma, Takashi; Isaka, Ruri; Sudevan, Surabhi; Higashitani, Atsushi

    2017-08-01

    Acute onset of organ failure in heatstroke is triggered by rhabdomyolysis of skeletal muscle. Here, we showed that elevated temperature increases free cytosolic Ca 2+ [Ca 2+ ]f from RYR (ryanodine receptor)/UNC-68 in vivo in the muscles of an experimental model animal, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans This subsequently leads to mitochondrial fragmentation and dysfunction, and breakdown of myofilaments similar to rhabdomyolysis. In addition, treatment with an inhibitor of RYR (dantrolene) or activation of FoxO (Forkhead box O)/DAF-16 is effective against heat-induced muscle damage. Acute onset of organ failure in heatstroke is triggered by rhabdomyolysis of skeletal muscle. To gain insight into heat-induced muscle breakdown, we investigated alterations of Ca 2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial morphology in vivo in body-wall muscles of C. elegans exposed to elevated temperature. Heat stress for 3 hr at 35° increased the concentration of [Ca 2+ ]f, and led to mitochondrial fragmentation and subsequent dysfunction in the muscle cells. A similar mitochondrial fragmentation phenotype is induced in the absence of heat stress by treatment with a calcium ionophore, ionomycin. Mutation of the unc-68 gene, which encodes the ryanodine receptor that is linked to Ca 2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, could suppress the mitochondrial dysfunction, muscle degeneration, and reduced mobility and life span induced by heat stress. In addition, in a daf-2 mutant, in which the DAF-16/FoxO transcription factor is activated, resistance to calcium overload, mitochondrial fragmentation, and dysfunction was observed. These findings reveal that heat-induced Ca 2+ accumulation causes mitochondrial damage and consequently induces muscle breakdown. Copyright © 2017 Momma et al.

  4. A new Caenorhabditis elegans model of human huntingtin 513 aggregation and toxicity in body wall muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Lee

    Full Text Available Expanded polyglutamine repeats in different proteins are the known determinants of at least nine progressive neurodegenerative disorders whose symptoms include cognitive and motor impairment that worsen as patients age. One such disorder is Huntington's Disease (HD that is caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the human huntingtin protein (htt. The polyglutamine expansion destabilizes htt leading to protein misfolding, which in turn triggers neurodegeneration and the disruption of energy metabolism in muscle cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie htt proteotoxicity have been somewhat elusive, and the muscle phenotypes have not been well studied. To generate tools to elucidate the basis for muscle dysfunction, we engineered Caenorhabditis elegans to express a disease-associated 513 amino acid fragment of human htt in body wall muscle cells. We show that this htt fragment aggregates in C. elegans in a polyglutamine length-dependent manner and is toxic. Toxicity manifests as motor impairment and a shortened lifespan. Compared to previous models, the data suggest that the protein context in which a polyglutamine tract is embedded alters aggregation propensity and toxicity, likely by affecting interactions with the muscle cell environment.

  5. Miniature excitatory synaptic ion currents in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris body wall muscles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Volkov, E. M.; Nurullin, L. F.; Nikolsky, E.; Vyskočil, František

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 5 (2007), s. 655-658 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011411 Grant - others:RFBR(RU) 06-04-48458; Nsh(RU) 4444.2006.4 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : ion currents * muscle cells * acetylcholine receptor Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.505, year: 2007

  6. Body wall structure in the starfish Asterias rubens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blowes, Liisa M; Egertová, Michaela; Liu, Yankai; Davis, Graham R; Terrill, Nick J; Gupta, Himadri S; Elphick, Maurice R

    2017-09-01

    The body wall of starfish is composed of magnesium calcite ossicles connected by collagenous tissue and muscles and it exhibits remarkable variability in stiffness, which is attributed to the mechanical mutability of the collagenous component. Using the common European starfish Asterias rubens as an experimental animal, here we have employed a variety of techniques to gain new insights into the structure of the starfish body wall. The structure and organisation of muscular and collagenous components of the body wall were analysed using trichrome staining. The muscle system comprises interossicular muscles as well as muscle strands that connect ossicles with the circular muscle layer of the coelomic lining. The collagenous tissue surrounding the ossicle network contains collagen fibres that form loop-shaped straps that wrap around calcite struts near to the surface of ossicles. The 3D architecture of the calcareous endoskeleton was visualised for the first time using X-ray microtomography, revealing the shapes and interactions of different ossicle types. Furthermore, analysis of the anatomical organisation of the ossicles indicates how changes in body shape may be achieved by local contraction/relaxation of interossicular muscles. Scanning synchrotron small-angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD) scans of the starfish aboral body wall and ambulacrum were used to study the collagenous tissue component at the fibrillar level. Collagen fibrils in aboral body wall were found to exhibit variable degrees of alignment, with high levels of alignment probably corresponding to regions where collagenous tissue is under tension. Collagen fibrils in the ambulacrum had a uniformly low degree of orientation, attributed to macrocrimp of the fibrils and the presence of slanted as well as horizontal fibrils connecting antimeric ambulacral ossicles. Body wall collagen fibril D-period lengths were similar to previously reported mammalian D-periods, but were significantly different between the

  7. Limb body wall complex: A rare anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panduranga Chikkannaiah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present autopsy findings of a case of limb body wall complex (LBWC. The fetus had encephalocele, genitourinary agenesis, skeletal anomalies and body wall defects. The rare finding in our case is the occurrence of both cranial and urogenital anomalies. The presence of complex anomalies in this fetus, supports embryonal dysplasia theory of pathogenesis for LBWC.

  8. Prenatal MRI evaluation of limb-body wall complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre-Pascual, Elisa [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hospital Universitario Doce de Octubre, Department of Radiology, Madrid (Spain); Epelman, Monica [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Orlando, FL (United States); Johnson, Ann M.; Chauvin, Nancy A.; Coleman, Beverly G.; Victoria, Teresa [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The sonographic (US) features of limb-body wall complex have been well documented; however the literature regarding the findings on MRI in limb-body wall complex is scant. To characterize the prenatal MRI features of limb-body wall complex. We performed a retrospective review of all MRI scans of fetuses diagnosed with limb-body wall complex at our institution from 2001 to 2011. Fetuses without correlating US scans or follow-up information were excluded. Three pediatric radiologists blinded to the specific US findings reviewed the prenatal MRIs. Images were evaluated for the organ location and attachment, the body part affected, characterization of the body wall defect, and spinal, limb and umbilical cord abnormalities. Ten subjects met inclusion criteria. MRI was able to detect and characterize the body part affected and associated abnormalities. All fetuses had ventral wall defects, a small thorax and herniated liver and bowel. The kidneys were extracorporeal in three cases. The extruded organs were attached to the placenta or the uterine wall in all cases. Abnormal spinal curvatures of various degrees of severity were present in all cases. Eight cases had a short, uncoiled cord. Limb anomalies were present in 6 of the 10 cases. We illustrate the common fetal MRI findings of limb-body wall complex. The prenatal diagnosis of limb-body wall complex and the differentiation of this defect from treatable abdominal wall defects are crucial to providing appropriate guidance for patient counseling and management. (orig.)

  9. Wall temperature control of low-speed body drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. C.; Ash, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of thermal means to control drag under turbulent boundary layer conditions is examined. Numerical calculations are presented for both skin friction and (unseparated) pressure drag for turbulent boundary-layer flows over a fuselage-like body with wall heat transfer. In addition, thermal control of separation on a bluff body is investigated. It is shown that a total drag reduction of up to 20 percent can be achieved for wall heating with a wall-to-total-freestream temperature ratio of 2. For streamlined slender bodies, partial wall heating of the forebody can produce almost the same order of total drag reduction as the full body heating case. For bluff bodies, the separation delay from partial wall cooling of the afterbody is approximately the same as for the fully cooled body.

  10. Development of the ventral body wall in the human embryo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekonen, Hayelom K.; Hikspoors, Jill P. J. M.; Mommen, Greet; Köhler, S. Eleonore; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2015-01-01

    Migratory failure of somitic cells is the commonest explanation for ventral body wall defects. However, the embryo increases ~ 25-fold in volume in the period that the ventral body wall forms, so that differential growth may, instead, account for the observed changes in topography. Human embryos

  11. Quantitative CT: Associations between Emphysema, Airway Wall Thickness and Body Composition in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutten, Erica P A; Grydeland, Thomas B; Pillai, Sreekumar G

    2011-01-01

    , CT scans were performed to determine emphysema (%LAA), airway wall thickness (AWT-Pi10), and lung mass. Muscle wasting based on FFMI was assessed by bioelectrical impedance. In both the men and women with COPD, FFMI was negatively associated with %LAA. FMI was positively associated with AWT-Pi10......The objective of the present study was to determine the association between CT phenotypes-emphysema by low attenuation area and bronchitis by airway wall thickness-and body composition parameters in a large cohort of subjects with and without COPD. In 452 COPD subjects and 459 subjects without COPD...... in both subjects with and without COPD. Among the subjects with muscle wasting, the percentage emphysema was high, but the predictive value was moderate. In conclusion, the present study strengthens the hypothesis that the subgroup of COPD cases with muscle wasting have emphysema. Airway wall thickness...

  12. Dense-body aggregates as plastic structures supporting tension in smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Herrera, Ana M; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2010-11-01

    The wall of hollow organs of vertebrates is a unique structure able to generate active tension and maintain a nearly constant passive stiffness over a large volume range. These properties are predominantly attributable to the smooth muscle cells that line the organ wall. Although smooth muscle is known to possess plasticity (i.e., the ability to adapt to large changes in cell length through structural remodeling of contractile apparatus and cytoskeleton), the detailed structural basis for the plasticity is largely unknown. Dense bodies, one of the most prominent structures in smooth muscle cells, have been regarded as the anchoring sites for actin filaments, similar to the Z-disks in striated muscle. Here, we show that the dense bodies and intermediate filaments formed cable-like structures inside airway smooth muscle cells and were able to adjust the cable length according to cell length and tension. Stretching the muscle cell bundle in the relaxed state caused the cables to straighten, indicating that these intracellular structures were connected to the extracellular matrix and could support passive tension. These plastic structures may be responsible for the ability of smooth muscle to maintain a nearly constant tensile stiffness over a large length range. The finding suggests that the structural plasticity of hollow organs may originate from the dense-body cables within the smooth muscle cells.

  13. Relation between body mass index percentile and muscle strength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Noha Abdel Kader Abdel Kader Hasan

    2016-02-01

    Feb 1, 2016 ... a positive correlation between muscle strength and body mass index percentile while muscle endur- ance time had a negative correlation with it. Conclusion: The study shows that the BMI of children had a positive correlation with the muscle ... lar force in a specific movement pattern at definite velocity.

  14. Possible Genetic Origin of Limb-Body Wall Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajzer, David C; Hirzel, Alicia Cristina; Saigal, Gaurav; Rojas, Claudia Patricia; Rodriguez, Maria Matilde

    2015-01-01

    Limb body wall complex (LBWC) is characterized by multiple severe congenital malformations including an abdominal and/or thoracic wall defect covered by amnion, a short or absent umbilical cord with the placenta almost attached to the anterior fetal wall, intestinal malrotation, scoliosis, and lower extremity anomalies. There is no consensus about the etiology of LBWC and many cases with abnormal facial cleft do not meet the requirements for the true complex. We describe a series of four patients with LBWC and other malformations in an attempt to explain their etiology. There are several reports of fetuses with LBWC and absent gallbladder and one of our patients also had polysplenia. Absent gallbladder and polysplenia are associated with laterality genes including HOX, bFGF, transforming growth factor beta/activins/BMP4, WNT 1-8, and SHH. We postulate that this severe malformation may be due to abnormal genes involved in laterality and caudal development.

  15. Muscle fiber population and biochemical properties of whole body muscles in Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Minako; Minami, Yoshio; Sayama, Yukiko; Kuwano, Atsutoshi; Hiraga, Atsushi; Miyata, Hirofumi

    2009-10-01

    We examine the muscle fiber population and metabolic properties of skeletal muscles from the whole body in Thoroughbred horses. Postmortem samples were taken from 46 sites in six Thoroughbred horses aged between 3 and 6 years. Fiber type population was determined on muscle fibers stained with monoclonal antibody to each myosin heavy chain isoform and metabolic enzyme activities were determined spectrophotometrically. Histochemical analysis demonstrated that most of the muscles had a high percentage of Type IIa fibers. In terms of the muscle characteristic in several parts of the horse body, the forelimb muscles had a higher percentage of Type IIa fiber and a significantly lower percentage of Type IIx fiber than the hindlimb muscles. The muscle fiber type populations in the thoracic and trunk portion were similar to those in the hindlimb portion. Biochemical analysis indicated high succinate dehydrogenase activity in respiratory-related muscle and high phosphofructokinase activity in hindlimbs. We suggested that the higher percentage of Type IIa fibers in Thoroughbred racehorses is attributed to training effects. To consider further the physiological significance of each part of the body, data for the recruitment pattern of each muscle fiber type during exercise are needed. The muscle fiber properties in this study combined with the recruitment data would provide fundamental information for physiological and pathological studies in Thoroughbred horses.

  16. Functional electrical stimulation to the abdominal wall muscles synchronized with the expiratory flow does not induce muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Yukako; Takahashi, Ryoichi; Sewa, Yoko; Ohse, Hirotaka; Imura, Shigeyuki; Tomita, Kazuhide

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] Continuous electrical stimulation of abdominal wall muscles is known to induce mild muscle fatigue. However, it is not clear whether this is also true for functional electrical stimulation delivered only during the expiratory phase of breathing. This study aimed to examine whether or not intermittent electrical stimulation delivered to abdominal wall muscles induces muscle fatigue. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were nine healthy adults. Abdominal electrical stimulation was applied for 1.5 seconds from the start of expiration and then turned off during inspiration. The electrodes were attached to both sides of the abdomen at the lower margin of the 12th rib. Abdominal electrical stimulation was delivered for 15 minutes with the subject in a seated position. Expiratory flow was measured during stimulus. Trunk flexor torque and electromyography activity were measured to evaluate abdominal muscle fatigue. [Results] The mean stimulation on/off ratio was 1:2.3. The declining rate of abdominal muscle torque was 61.1 ± 19.1% before stimulus and 56.5 ± 20.9% after stimulus, not significantly different. The declining rate of mean power frequency was 47.8 ± 11.7% before stimulus and 47.9 ± 10.2% after stimulus, not significantly different. [Conclusion] It was found that intermittent electrical stimulation to abdominal muscles synchronized with the expiratory would not induce muscle fatigue.

  17. Rectus Abdominis Muscle Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma Causing a Large Abdominal Wall Defect: Reconstruction with Biological Mesh

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    Evangelos Falidas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH is a common soft tissue sarcoma usually involving limbs and retroperitoneum. MFH of the rectus abdominis muscle is extremely rare. Surgery in similar cases leads to large abdominal wall defects needing reconstruction. Biological and synthetic laminar absorbable prostheses are available for the repair of hernia defects in the abdominal wall. They share the important feature of being gradually degraded in the host, resulting the formation of a neotissue. We herein report the case of an 84-year-old man with MFH of the rectus abdominis muscle which was resected and the large abdominal wall defect was successfully repaired with a biological mesh.

  18. Exercise-Induced Abdominal Wall Muscle Injury Resulting in Rhabdomyolysis and Mimicking an Acute Abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echague, Charlene G; Csokmay, John M

    2018-03-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is characterized by muscle necrosis and release of intracellular constituents, causing muscle pain, weakness, and myoglobinuria. This can be attributed to muscle injury after strenuous exercise. If the abdominal wall is involved, clinical presentation may resemble an acute abdomen. A 27-year-old woman, gravida 4 para 2, presented with swelling and pain of the mons pubis and abdominal pain after intense powerlifting 2 days prior. A computed tomography scan was performed, revealing abdominal wall inflammation. Although myoglobinuria was absent, there was high suspicion for rhabdomyolysis, which was confirmed by an elevated creatine kinase level. The patient improved after receiving intravenous fluids and abstaining from physical activity. Abdominal wall muscle injury resulting in rhabdomyolysis can imitate an acute abdomen in a healthy woman presenting with abdominal pain and swelling.

  19. Does a muscle flap accelerate wound healing of gastric wall defects compared with an omental flap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishida, Masashi; Toriyama, Kazuhiro; Yagi, Shunjiro; Ebisawa, Katsumi; Morishita, Tsuyoshi; Takanari, Keisuke; Kamei, Yuzuru

    2015-06-01

    Most often used for reconstruction at superficial sites, a muscle flap recently was reported to promote clinical wound healing in a duodenal defect. We therefore examined whether a muscle flap could promote wound healing comparably to an omental flap in rats with gastric wall defects. After perforation of the centre of the anterior gastric wall, rats were divided into 2 groups. In the muscle group, a muscle flap was fixed to the defect; in the omentum group, an omental flap was placed over the defect. We histopathologically compared tissue responses during gastric wall healing. While stratified villi had completely covered the defect by day 7 in both groups, scar maturation differed. Scar tissue persisted in the muscle group, but was gradually replaced by adipose tissue in the omentum group. Both muscle and omental flaps accelerated gastric wall wound healing. A muscle flap is an excellent alternative for repair of gastric defects when no omental flap is available. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Relation between body mass index percentile and muscle strength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relation between body mass index percentile and muscle strength and endurance. ... Egyptian Journal of Medical Human Genetics ... They were divided into three groups according to their body mass index percentile where group (a) is equal to or more than 5% percentile yet less than 85% percentile, group (b) is equal to ...

  1. Body Fat and Muscle Mass as Functions of Body Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, R. A.; Miller, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Hydrostatic weighing and chemical dilution are well accepted methods for measuring body composition. Recently, Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) has become the preferred method. The two compartment algorithms used by these methods assume a fixed constant for lean body tissue. This constant has long been suspect of variations due to many…

  2. Muscle Fibre Type Composition and Body Composition in Hammer Throwers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Gerasimos; Spengos, Konstantinos; Kavouras, Stavros; Manta, Panagiota; Georgiadis, Giorgos

    2010-01-01

    Aim of the present study was to describe the muscle fibre type composition and body composition of well-trained hammer throwers. Six experienced hammer throwers underwent the following measurements: one repetition maximum in squat, snatch, and clean, standing broad jump, backward overhead shot throw and the hammer throw. Dual x-ray absorptiometry was used for body composition analysis. Fibre type composition and cross sectional area was determined in muscle biopsy samples of the right vastus lateralis. Eight physical education students served as a control group. One repetition maximum in squat, snatch and clean for the hammer throwers was 245 ± 21, 132 ± 13 and 165 ± 12kg, respectively. Lean body mass was higher in hammer throwers (85.9 ± 3. 9kg vs. 62.7 ± 5.1kg (p < 0.01). The percentage area of type II muscle fibres was 66.1 ± 4% in hammer throwers and 51 ± 8% in the control group (p < 0.05). Hammer throwers had significantly larger type IIA fibres (7703 ± 1171 vs. 5676 ± 1270μm2, p < 0.01). Hammer throwing performance correlated significantly with lean body mass (r = 0.81, p < 0.05). These data indicate that hammer throwers have larger lean body mass and larger muscular areas occupied by type II fibres, compared with relatively untrained subjects. Moreover, it seems that the enlarged muscle mass of the hammer throwers contributes significantly to the hammer throwing performance. Key points Well-trained hammer throwers had increased lean body mass, higher type IIA muscle fibres cross sectional areas, as well as higher bone mineral density, compared to controls. Increased lean body mass was closely related with hammer throwing performance. The relative high percentage of type IIX muscle fibres in vastus lateralis in hammer throwers warrants further investigation. PMID:24149393

  3. Effects of whole-body vibration after eccentric exercise on muscle soreness and muscle strength recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timon, Rafael; Tejero, Javier; Brazo-Sayavera, Javier; Crespo, Carmen; Olcina, Guillermo

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not a single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise can reduce muscle soreness and enhance muscle recovery. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty untrained participants were randomly assigned to two groups: a vibration group (n=10) and control group (n=10). Participants performed eccentric quadriceps training of 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 120% 1RM, with 4 min rest between sets. After that, the vibration group received 3 sets of 1 min whole body vibration (12 Hz, 4 mm) with 30 s of passive recovery between sets. Serum creatine kinase, blood urea nitrogen, muscle soreness (visual analog scale) and muscle strength (peak isometric torque) were assessed. [Results] Creatine kinase was lower in the vibration group than in the control group at 24 h (200.2 ± 8.2 vs. 300.5 ± 26.1 U/L) and at 48 h (175.2 ± 12.5 vs. 285.2 ± 19.7 U/L) post-exercise. Muscle soreness decreased in vibration group compared to control group at 48 h post-exercise (34.1 ± 11.4 vs. 65.2 ± 13.2 mm). [Conclusion] Single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise reduced delayed onset muscle soreness but it did not affect muscle strength recovery.

  4. Muscle fibre type composition and body composition in hammer throwers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Gerasimos; Spengos, Konstantinos; Kavouras, Stavros; Manta, Panagiota; Georgiadis, Giorgos

    2010-01-01

    Aim of the present study was to describe the muscle fibre type composition and body composition of well-trained hammer throwers. Six experienced hammer throwers underwent the following measurements: one repetition maximum in squat, snatch, and clean, standing broad jump, backward overhead shot throw and the hammer throw. Dual x-ray absorptiometry was used for body composition analysis. Fibre type composition and cross sectional area was determined in muscle biopsy samples of the right vastus lateralis. Eight physical education students served as a control group. One repetition maximum in squat, snatch and clean for the hammer throwers was 245 ± 21, 132 ± 13 and 165 ± 12kg, respectively. Lean body mass was higher in hammer throwers (85.9 ± 3. 9kg vs. 62.7 ± 5.1kg (p hammer throwers and 51 ± 8% in the control group (p Hammer throwers had significantly larger type IIA fibres (7703 ± 1171 vs. 5676 ± 1270μm(2), p Hammer throwing performance correlated significantly with lean body mass (r = 0.81, p hammer throwers have larger lean body mass and larger muscular areas occupied by type II fibres, compared with relatively untrained subjects. Moreover, it seems that the enlarged muscle mass of the hammer throwers contributes significantly to the hammer throwing performance. Key pointsWell-trained hammer throwers had increased lean body mass, higher type IIA muscle fibres cross sectional areas, as well as higher bone mineral density, compared to controls.Increased lean body mass was closely related with hammer throwing performance.The relative high percentage of type IIX muscle fibres in vastus lateralis in hammer throwers warrants further investigation.

  5. MUSCLE FIBRE TYPE COMPOSITION AND BODY COMPOSITION IN HAMMER THROWERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimos Terzis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the present study was to describe the muscle fibre type composition and body composition of well-trained hammer throwers. Six experienced hammer throwers underwent the following measurements: one repetition maximum in squat, snatch, and clean, standing broad jump, backward overhead shot throw and the hammer throw. Dual x-ray absorptiometry was used for body composition analysis. Fibre type composition and cross sectional area was determined in muscle biopsy samples of the right vastus lateralis. Eight physical education students served as a control group. One repetition maximum in squat, snatch and clean for the hammer throwers was 245 ± 21, 132 ± 13 and 165 ± 12kg, respectively. Lean body mass was higher in hammer throwers (85.9 ± 3. 9kg vs. 62.7 ± 5.1kg (p < 0.01. The percentage area of type II muscle fibres was 66.1 ± 4% in hammer throwers and 51 ± 8% in the control group (p < 0.05. Hammer throwers had significantly larger type IIA fibres (7703 ± 1171 vs. 5676 ± 1270μm2, p < 0.01. Hammer throwing performance correlated significantly with lean body mass (r = 0.81, p < 0.05. These data indicate that hammer throwers have larger lean body mass and larger muscular areas occupied by type II fibres, compared with relatively untrained subjects. Moreover, it seems that the enlarged muscle mass of the hammer throwers contributes significantly to the hammer throwing performance

  6. Muscle activity and spine load during anterior chain whole body linkage exercises: the body saw, hanging leg raise and walkout from a push-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Stuart; Andersen, Jordan; Cannon, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined anterior chain whole body linkage exercises, namely the body saw, hanging leg raise and walkout from a push-up. Investigation of these exercises focused on which particular muscles were challenged and the magnitude of the resulting spine load. Fourteen males performed the exercises while muscle activity, external force and 3D body segment motion were recorded. A sophisticated and anatomically detailed 3D model used muscle activity and body segment kinematics to estimate muscle force, and thus sensitivity to each individual's choice of motor control for each task. Gradations of muscle activity and spine load characteristics were observed across tasks. On average, the hanging straight leg raise created approximately 3000 N of spine compression while the body saw created less than 2500 N. The hanging straight leg raise created the highest challenge to the abdominal wall (>130% MVC in rectus abdominis, 88% MVC in external oblique). The body saw resulted in almost 140% MVC activation of the serratus anterior. All other exercises produced substantial abdominal challenge, although the body saw did so in the most spine conserving way. These findings, along with consideration of an individual's injury history, training goals and current fitness level, should assist in exercise choice and programme design.

  7. Physical function and muscle strength in sporadic inclusion body myositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders N; Aagaard, Per; Nielsen, Jakob L

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this study, self-reported physical function, functional capacity, and isolated muscle function were investigated in sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) patients. METHODS: The 36-item Short Form (SF-36) Health Survey and 2-min walk test (2MWT), timed up & go test (TUG), and 30-s...... chair stand performance were evaluated. In addition, patients were tested for knee extensor muscle strength (isokinetic dynamometer) and leg extension power (Nottingham power rig). RESULTS: TUG performance was the strongest predictor of self-reported physical function (r(2) = 0.56, P ... to sensitively predict self-perceived physical function in sIBM patients. Notably, between-limb asymmetry in lower limb muscle strength had a substantial negative impact on motor tasks involving gait function. Muscle Nerve, 2017....

  8. The effect of whole body vibration exercise on muscle activation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences ... The effect of whole body vibration exercise (WBV) on muscle activation has recently been a topic for discussion amongst some researchers. ... Participants then performed two different exercises: standing calf raises and prone bridging, without and with WBV.

  9. Chloride cotransport in the membrane of earthworm body wall muscles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Volkov, E. M.; Nurullin, L. F.; Nikolsky, E.; Krůšek, Jan; Vyskočil, František

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 5 (2003), s. 587-592 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/02/1333; GA ČR GA202/02/1213 Grant - others:RBRF(RU) 98-04-48044; RBRF(RU) 99-04-48286; RBRF(RU) 99-04-4306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : earthworm * ouabain * furosemide Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.939, year: 2003

  10. Giant ventral hernia-relationship between abdominal wall muscle strength and hernia area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strigård, K; Clay, L; Stark, B; Gunnarsson, U; Falk, P

    2016-08-02

    Symptoms arising from giant ventral hernia have been considered to be related to weakening of the abdominal muscles. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the area of the abdominal wall defect and abdominal wall muscle strength measured by the validated BioDex system together with a back/abdominal unit. Fifty-two patients with giant ventral hernia (>10 cm wide) underwent CT scan, clinical measurement of hernia size and BioDex measurement of muscle strength prior to surgery. The areas of the hernia derived from CT scan and from clinical measurement were compared with BioDex forces in the modalities extension, flexion and isometric contraction. The Spearman rank test was used to calculate correlations between area, BMI, gender, age, and muscle strength. The hernia area calculated from clinical measurements correlated to abdominal muscle strength measured with the Biodex for all modalities (p-values 0.015-0.036), whereas no correlation was seen with the area calculated by CT scan. No relationship was seen between BMI, gender, age and the area of the hernia. The inverse correlation between BioDex abdominal muscle strength and clinically assessed hernia area, seen in all modalities, was so robust that it seems safe to conclude that the area of the hernia is an important determinant of the degree of loss of abdominal muscle strength. Results using hernia area calculated from the CT scan showed no such correlation and this would seem to concur with the results from a previous study by our group on patients with abdominal rectus diastasis. In that study, defect size assessed clinically, but not that measured by CT scan, was in agreement with the size of the diastasis measured intra-operatively. The point at which the area of a hernia begins to correlate with loss of abdominal wall muscle strength remains unknown since this study only included giant ventral hernias.

  11. Arterial wall mechanics as a function of heart rate: role of vascular smooth muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvucci, Fernando Pablo; Schiavone, Jonathan; Craiem, Damian; Barra, Juan Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    Vascular wall viscoelasticity can be evaluated using a first-order lumped model. This model consists of a spring with elastic constant E and a dashpot with viscous constant η. More importantly, this viscoelastic model can be fitted in-vivo measuring arterial pressure and diameter. The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of heart rate over E and η. In two anesthetized sheep, diameter in thoracic aorta and intravascular pressure has been registered. The right atrium was connected to a programmable stimulator through a pair of pace-maker wires to produce changes in stimulation heart rate (HR) from 80 to 160 bpm. Additionally, local activation of vascular smooth muscle was induced with phenylephrine. After converting pressure and diameter signals into stress and strain respectively, E y η were calculated in control state and during muscle activation. The elastic modulus E did not present significant changes with heart rate. The viscous modulus η decreased 49% with a two-fold acceleration in heart rate from 80 to 160 bpm. However, the product η HR remained stable. The viscous modulus η increased 39% with smooth muscle activation. No significant pressure changes were registered during the experiment. The contractile action of vascular smooth muscle could contribute to increasing arterial wall viscosity. The decrease of η when HR increased might be related to smooth muscle relaxation mediated by endothelium activity, which was stimulated by flow increase. We conclude that HR can modulate arterial wall viscoelasticity through endothelium-dependent mechanisms

  12. Contraction of Abdominal Wall Muscles Influences Incisional Hernia Occurrence and Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Samuel C.; Hu, Yaxi; Wollstein, Adi; Franz, Michael G.; Patel, Shaun P.; Kuzon, William M.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Incisional hernias are a complication in 10% of all open abdominal operations and can result in significant morbidity. The purpose of this study is to determine if inhibiting abdominal muscle contraction influences incisional hernia formation during laparotomy healing. We hypothesize that reducing abdominal musculature deformation reduces incisional hernia occurrence and size. Study Design Using an established rat model for incisional hernia, a laparotomy through the linea alba was closed with one mid-incision, fast-absorbing suture. Three groups were compared: a SHAM group (SHAM; n = 6) received no laparotomies while the Saline Hernia (SH; n = 6) and Botox Hernia (BH; n = 6) groups were treated once with equal volume saline or Botulinum Toxin (Botox®, Allergan) before the incomplete laparotomy closure. On post-operative day 14, the abdominal wall was examined for herniation and adhesions and contractile forces were measured for abdominal wall muscles. Results No hernias developed in SHAM rats. Rostral hernias developed in all SH and BH rats. Caudal hernias developed in all SH rats, but in only 50% of the BH rats. Rostral hernias in the BH group were 35% shorter and 43% narrower compared to those in the SH group (p abdominal muscles compared to the SHAM and SH groups (p abdominal muscles reduces the number and size of incisional hernias. These results confirm abdominal wall muscle contractions play a significant role in the pathophysiology of incisional hernia formation. PMID:25817097

  13. Immediate effects of respiratory muscle stretching on chest wall kinematics and electromyography in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, Rafaela Barros; Pessoa, Maíra Florentino; Cavalcanti, Ana Gabriela Leal; Campos, Shirley Lima; Amorim, César; Dornelas de Andrade, Armèle

    2017-08-01

    This study evaluated the immediate effects of respiratory muscle stretching on chest wall kinematics and electromyographic activity in COPD patients. 28 patients with COPD were randomized into two groups: 14 to the treatment group (TG) and 14 to the control group (CG). The TG underwent a stretching protocol of the rib cage muscles, while the CG remained at rest under similar conditions. After a single session, TG increased the tidal volume of the pulmonary rib cage (Vrcp) (p=0.020) and tidal volume of abdominal rib cage (Vrca) (p=0.043) variations and their percentages in relation to the thoracic wall, Vrcp% (p=0.044) and Vrca% (p=0.022). Also, TG decreased the end-expiratory Vrcp (p=0.013) and the end-inspiratory Vrcp (p=0.011) variations. In addition, there was a reduction in respiratory rate (RR) (p=0.011) and minute volume (MV) (p=0.035), as well as an increase in expiratory time (Te) (p=0.026). There was also an immediate reduction in sternocleidomastoid (p=0.043) and upper trapezium (p=0.034) muscle electrical activity. Then, the study supports the use of stretching to improve COPD chest wall mobility with positive effects on chest wall mechanics, on volume distribution and electromyography. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Muscle sonography in six patients with hereditary inclusion body myopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, Ronald S. [Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Division of Ultrasound and Body Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Garolfalo, Giovanna [Ospedale Residenza Sanitaria Riabilitativa, Fermo, AP (Italy); Paget, Stephen; Kagen, Lawrence [Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Rheumatology Division, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2008-01-15

    To evaluate the morphological changes of muscle with sonography in six patients affected by hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM). We studied a group of six Persian Jews diagnosed with HIBM. All were homozygous for the GNE mutation M712T. Ultrasonographic examinations of the quadriceps femoris and hamstring muscle groups were performed. A follow-up ultrasound examination was performed, after an interval of 3 years, in four of these patients. Muscles were assessed subjectively as to echogenicity, determined by gray-scale assessment, and loss of normal muscle morphology. Power Doppler sonography (PDS) was used to assess vascularity. A sonographic finding of central atrophy and peripheral sparing resulting in a target-like appearance was noted in the hamstring compartment of all six patients. The quadriceps compartment also showed involvement of the rectus femoris of all patients, which, in some cases, was the only muscle involved in the quadriceps. Vascularity was markedly reduced in the affected areas, with blood flow demonstrated in the peripherally spared areas. The severity of atrophy increased with disease duration. In this case series, we describe a new sonographic finding as well as document progression of HIBM disease, which has generally been described as quadriceps sparing. The myopathic target lesion, as well as isolated rectus femoris atrophy, may provide a useful adjunct to disease diagnosis. (orig.)

  15. Contraction of abdominal wall muscles influences size and occurrence of incisional hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Samuel C; Hu, Yaxi; Wollstein, Adi; Franz, Michael G; Patel, Shaun P; Kuzon, William M; Urbanchek, Melanie G

    2015-07-01

    Incisional hernias are a complication in 10% of all open abdominal operations and can result in substantial morbidity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether inhibiting abdominal muscle contraction influences incisional hernia formation during the fascial healing after laparotomy. We hypothesized that decreasing the deformation of the abdominal musculature would decrease the size or occurrence of an incisional hernia. Using an established rat model for incisional hernia, a laparotomy through the linea alba was closed with 1 mid-incision, fast-absorbing suture. Three groups were compared: a sham group (sham; n = 6) received no laparotomy, and the saline hernia (SH; n = 6) and Botox hernia (BH; n = 6) groups were treated once with equal volumes of saline or botulinum toxin (Botox, Allergan) before the incomplete laparotomy closure. On postoperative day 14, the abdominal wall was examined for herniation and adhesions, and contractile forces were measured for abdominal wall muscles. No hernias developed in the sham rats. Rostral hernias developed in all SH and BH rats. Caudal hernias developed in all SH rats, but in only 50% of the BH rats. Rostral hernias in the BH group were 35% shorter and 43% narrower compared with those in the SH group (P abdominal muscles compared with the sham and SH groups (P abdominal muscles decreases the number and size of incisional hernias. These results suggest that contractions of the abdominal wall muscle play a role in the pathophysiology of the formation of incisional hernias. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Abdominal wall muscle elasticity and abdomen local stiffness on healthy volunteers during various physiological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, D; Podwojewski, F; Beillas, P; Ottenio, M; Voirin, D; Turquier, F; Mitton, D

    2016-07-01

    The performance of hernia treatment could benefit from more extensive knowledge of the mechanical behavior of the abdominal wall in a healthy state. To supply this knowledge, the antero-lateral abdominal wall was characterized in vivo on 11 healthy volunteers during 4 activities: rest, pullback loading, abdominal breathing and the "Valsalva maneuver". The elasticity of the abdominal muscles (rectus abdominis, obliquus externus, obliquus internus and transversus abdominis) was assessed using ultrasound shear wave elastography. In addition, the abdomen was subjected to a low external load at three locations: on the midline (linea alba), on the rectus abdominis region and on lateral muscles region in order to evaluate the local stiffness of the abdomen, at rest and during "Valsalva maneuver". The results showed that the "Valsalva maneuver" leads to a statistically significant increase of the muscle shear modulus compared to the other activities. This study also showed that the local stiffness of the abdomen was related to the activity. At rest, a significant difference has been observed between the anterior (0.5N/mm) and the lateral abdomen locations (1N/mm). Then, during the Valsalva maneuver, the local stiffness values were similar for all locations (ranging from 1.6 to 2.2N/mm). This work focuses on the in vivo characterization of the mechanical response of the human abdominal wall and abdomen during several activities. In the future, this protocol could be helpful for investigation on herniated patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Beam, vacuum and walls, a 3-body interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arianer, J.

    2002-11-01

    The interactions between beams of accelerated particles, residual gas and walls involve complex physical processes. In most cases these interactions affect the quality of the vacuum and the value of the pressure. This course reviews all these interactions in a pedagogical and practical way that may be useful for any user of devices involving beams of particles. This document is made up of 6 chapters: 1) basic notions (Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, kinematics of charged particles, collisions, excitation and ionization), 2) properties of beams (emittance, local effects, and synchrotron radiation), 3) interactions between residual gas and particle beams (Bremsstrahlung radiation, energy loss due to ionization, charge shift of ion beams, photo-absorption and photo-ionization, and slowing-down in a plasma), 4) surface properties (crystal structure, and interaction between surface and the residual gas), 5) interaction between the beam and walls (reflection and diffraction of electrons, secondary emission of electrons, desorption induced by electron and ion impacts, photon production, ion-wall interaction, sputtering, ion penetration, surface ionization and thermal-ionization), and 6) radiation-wall interaction (diffusion, damping, photo-electric effect, desorption induced by photons, pair production and laser-surface interaction). (A.C.)

  18. Quantitative CT: Associations between Emphysema, Airway Wall Thickness and Body Composition in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutten, Erica P A; Grydeland, Thomas B; Pillai, Sreekumar G

    2011-01-01

    , CT scans were performed to determine emphysema (%LAA), airway wall thickness (AWT-Pi10), and lung mass. Muscle wasting based on FFMI was assessed by bioelectrical impedance. In both the men and women with COPD, FFMI was negatively associated with %LAA. FMI was positively associated with AWT-Pi10...

  19. Independent Aftereffects of Fat and Muscle: Implications for neural encoding, body space representation, and body image disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturman, Daniel; Stephen, Ian D; Mond, Jonathan; Stevenson, Richard J; Brooks, Kevin R

    2017-01-10

    Although research addressing body size misperception has focused on socio-cognitive processes, such as internalization of the "ideal" images of bodies in the media, the perceptual basis of this phenomenon remains largely unknown. Further, most studies focus on body size per se even though this depends on both fat and muscle mass - variables that have very different relationships with health. We tested visual adaptation as a mechanism for inducing body fat and muscle mass misperception, and assessed whether these two dimensions of body space are processed independently. Observers manipulated the apparent fat and muscle mass of bodies to make them appear "normal" before and after inspecting images from one of four adaptation conditions (increased fat/decreased fat/increased muscle/decreased muscle). Exposure resulted in a shift in the point of subjective normality in the direction of the adapting images along the relevant (fat or muscle) axis, suggesting that the neural mechanisms involved in body fat and muscle perception are independent. This supports the viability of adaptation as a model of real-world body size misperception, and extends its applicability to clinical manifestations of body image disturbance that entail not only preoccupation with thinness (e.g., anorexia nervosa) but also with muscularity (e.g., muscle dysmorphia).

  20. Tropomyosin isoforms differentially affect muscle contractility in the head and body regions in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Dawn E; Watabe, Eichi; Ono, Kanako; Kwak, Euiyoung; Kuroyanagi, Hidehito; Ono, Shoichiro

    2018-03-01

    Tropomyosin, one of major actin-filament binding proteins, regulates actin-myosin interaction and actin filament stability. Multicellular organisms express a number of tropomyosin isoforms, but understanding of isoform-specific tropomyosin functions is incomplete. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has a single tropomyosin gene, lev-11 , which has been reported to express four isoforms by using two separate promoters and alternative splicing. Here, we report a fifth tropomyosin isoform, LEV-11O, which is produced by alternative splicing which includes a newly identified seventh exon, exon 7a. By visualizing specific splicing events in vivo , we find that exon 7a is predominantly selected in a subset of the body wall muscles in the head, while exon 7b, which is alternative to exon 7a, is utilized in the rest of the body. Point mutations in exon 7a and exon 7b cause resistance to levamisole-induced muscle contraction specifically in the head and the main body, respectively. Overexpression of LEV-11O, but not LEV-11A, in the main body results in weak levamisole resistance. These results demonstrate that specific tropomyosin isoforms are expressed in the head and body regions of the muscles and differentially contribute to the regulation of muscle contractility. © 2018 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  1. Skeletal muscle O-GlcNAc transferase is important for muscle energy homeostasis and whole-body insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Hao; Munk, Alexander; Nielsen, Thomas Svava

    2018-01-01

    of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in obese, type 2 diabetic people compared with well-matched obese and lean controls. Muscle-specific OGT knockout mice were lean, and whole body energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity were increased in these mice, consistent with enhanced glucose uptake and elevated...... mediates transcriptional repression of Il15 by O-GlcNAcylating Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2). CONCLUSIONS: Elevated muscle O-GlcNAc levels paralleled insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in humans. Moreover, OGT-mediated signaling is necessary for proper skeletal muscle metabolism and whole-body......-GlcNAcylation, in skeletal muscle. METHODS: We assessed O-GlcNAcylation levels in skeletal muscle from obese, type 2 diabetic people, and we characterized muscle-specific OGT knockout (mKO) mice in metabolic cages and measured energy expenditure and substrate utilization pattern using indirect calorimetry. Whole body...

  2. Evidence of active transport (filtration?) of plasma proteins across the capillary walls in muscle and subcutis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Ivan; Lassen, N A

    1979-01-01

    Under slight lymphatic stasis (tilting the body 15 degrees) we measured the arrival of locally injected 131I-albumin in the plasma pool. From 30 min to 90 min after the injection the return rate was zero, i.e. local back transport in the two tissues studied, muscle and subcutaneous fat, is very...

  3. Aging human body: changes in bone, muscle and body fat with consequent changes in nutrient intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JafariNasabian, Pegah; Inglis, Julia E; Reilly, Wendimere; Kelly, Owen J; Ilich, Jasminka Z

    2017-07-01

    Aging affects almost all physiological processes, but changes in body composition and body phenotype are most observable. In this review, we focus on these changes, including loss of bone and muscle and increase in body fat or redistribution of the latter, possibly leading to osteosarcopenic obesity syndrome. We also address low-grade chronic inflammation, prevalent in aging adults and a cause of many disorders including those associated with body composition. Changes in dietary intake and nutritional requirements of older individuals, that all may lead to some disturbances on tissue and organ levels, are discussed as well. Finally, we discuss the hormonal changes in the aging body, considering each of the tissues, bone, muscle and fat as separate endocrine organs, but yet in the continuous interface and communication with each other. Although there are still many unanswered questions in this field, this review will enable the readers to better understand the aging human body and measures needing to be implemented toward reducing impaired health and disability in older individuals. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  4. Wall effect on fluid–structure interactions of a tethered bluff body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Sumant; Raghav, Vrishank, E-mail: vrishank@gatech.edu; Komerath, Narayanan, E-mail: komerath@gatech.edu; Smith, Marilyn

    2013-11-01

    Wind tunnel experiments have shown an unexplained amplification of the free motion of a tethered bluff body in a small wind tunnel relative to that in a large wind tunnel. The influence of wall proximity on fluid–structure interaction is explored using a compound pendulum motion in the plane orthogonal to a steady freestream with a doublet model for aerodynamic forces. Wall proximity amplifies a purely symmetric single degree of freedom oscillation with the addition of an out-of-phase force. The success of this simple level of simulation enables progress to develop metrics for unsteady wall interference in dynamic testing of tethered bluff bodies.

  5. Effect of volume-oriented versus flow-oriented incentive spirometry on chest wall volumes, inspiratory muscle activity, and thoracoabdominal synchrony in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardi, Adriana C; Porras, Desiderio C; Barbosa, Renata Cc; Paisani, Denise M; Marques da Silva, Cibele C B; Tanaka, Clarice; Carvalho, Celso R F

    2014-03-01

    Aging causes physiological and functional changes that impair pulmonary function. Incentive spirometry is widely used for lung expansion, but the effects of volume-oriented incentive spirometry (VIS) versus flow-oriented incentive spirometry (FIS) on chest wall volumes, inspiratory muscle activity, and thoracoabdominal synchrony in the elderly are poorly understood. We compared VIS and FIS in elderly subjects and healthy adult subjects. Sixteen elderly subjects (9 women, mean ± SD age 70.6 ± 3.9 y, mean ± SD body mass index 23.8 ± 2.5 kg/m(2)) and 16 healthy adults (8 women, mean ± age 25.9 ± 4.3 y, mean ± body mass index 23.6 ± 2.4 kg/m(2)) performed quiet breathing, VIS, and FIS in randomized sequence. Chest wall kinematics (via optoelectronic plethysmography) and inspiratory muscle activity (via surface electromyography) were assessed simultaneously. Synchrony between the superior thorax and abdominal motion was calculated (phase angle). In the elderly subjects both types of incentive spirometry increased chest wall volumes similarly, whereas in the healthy adult subjects VIS increased the chest wall volume more than did FIS. FIS and VIS triggered similar lower thoracoabdominal synchrony in the elderly subjects, whereas in the healthy adults FIS induced lower synchrony than did VIS. FIS required more muscle activity in the elderly subjects to create an increase in chest wall volume. Incentive spirometry performance is influenced by age, and the differences between elderly and healthy adults response should be considered in clinical practice.

  6. Mirror, mirror on the wall: how women learn body dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev-Ari, Lilac; Baumgarten-Katz, Inbar; Zohar, Ada H

    2014-08-01

    Extensive research indicates that exposure to media as well as pressure and modeling by sociocultural agents, such as peers and family, are predictive of the development of body image dissatisfaction (BID). This influence is mediated by social comparison and internalization of the thin-ideal. In the current study we assessed comparisons between participants and other women with whom they were in close relationships, (e.g. mother, sister and close female friend), and hypothesized that these would influence women's BID and drive-to-thinness. 283 women between the ages of 18-42 (mean=25.04; SD=3.53) sampled through social networking completed an online self-report which included the original Figure Rating Scale, which yielded self-ideal disparity, as well as a modified version comparing self to mother, self to sister closest-in-age, and self to best friend and then were asked to directly compare themselves to these women. In addition they completed the EDI-2's drive-for-thinness and body dissatisfaction subscales, and reported on Body Mass Index (BMI). Results indicate that comparisons to mothers, sisters, and best friend, were all associated with self-ideal disparity. BMI only slightly mediated this effect. Comparison to sister and to best friend, but not to mother, influenced drive-for-thinness and body dissatisfaction. Positive correlations were found between direct and indirect comparisons to others. Comparison to best friend was the most influential on body ideal. We conclude that comparison to others in close proximity greatly influences women's body ideal and may have a formative role in the development of women's body dissatisfaction. While women cannot choose their mother and sister closest in age, they do choose their best friend; and it is interesting that the comparison to the best friend is so influential. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Isometric abdominal wall muscle strength assessment in individuals with incisional hernia: a prospective reliability study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K. K.; Kjær, Michael; Jorgensen, L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the reliability of measurements obtained by the Good Strength dynamometer, determining isometric abdominal wall and back muscle strength in patients with ventral incisional hernia (VIH) and healthy volunteers with an intact abdominal wall. Methods Ten patients with VIH and ten...... and extension showed excellent test–retest reliability for both patients with VIH (ICC 0.91 and 0.99) and healthy controls (ICC 0.97 and 0.96). Bland and Altman plots showed that no systematic bias was present for neither truncal flexion nor extension when assessing reliability. For patients with VIH...... and IPAQ was found. Conclusions The Good Strength dynamometer provided a reliable, low-cost measure of truncal flexion and extension in patients with VIH....

  8. Genetic analysis of Hedgehog signaling in ventral body wall development and the onset of omphalocele formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsumaru, D.; Haraguchi, R.; Miyagawa, S.; Motoyama, J.; Nakagata, N.; Meijlink, F.; Yamada, G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An omphalocele is one of the major ventral body wall malformations and is characterized by abnormally herniated viscera from the body trunk. It has been frequently found to be associated with other structural malformations, such as genitourinary malformations and digit abnormalities. In

  9. Predicting Chest Wall Pain From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Different Fractionation Schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woody, Neil M.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Djemil, Toufik; Kim, Yongbok; Xia Ping

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recent studies with two fractionation schemes predicted that the volume of chest wall receiving >30 Gy (V30) correlated with chest wall pain after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the lung. This study developed a predictive model of chest wall pain incorporating radiobiologic effects, using clinical data from four distinct SBRT fractionation schemes. Methods and Materials: 102 SBRT patients were treated with four different fractionations: 60 Gy in three fractions, 50 Gy in five fractions, 48 Gy in four fractions, and 50 Gy in 10 fractions. To account for radiobiologic effects, a modified equivalent uniform dose (mEUD) model calculated the dose to the chest wall with volume weighting. For comparison, V30 and maximum point dose were also reported. Using univariable logistic regression, the association of radiation dose and clinical variables with chest wall pain was assessed by uncertainty coefficient (U) and C statistic (C) of receiver operator curve. The significant associations from the univariable model were verified with a multivariable model. Results: 106 lesions in 102 patients with a mean age of 72 were included, with a mean of 25.5 (range, 12–55) months of follow-up. Twenty patients reported chest wall pain at a mean time of 8.1 (95% confidence interval, 6.3–9.8) months after treatment. The mEUD models, V30, and maximum point dose were significant predictors of chest wall pain (p < 0.0005). mEUD improved prediction of chest wall pain compared with V30 (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.11). The mEUD with moderate weighting (a = 5) better predicted chest wall pain than did mEUD without weighting (a = 1) (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.14). Body mass index (BMI) was significantly associated with chest wall pain (p = 0.008). On multivariable analysis, mEUD and BMI remained significant predictors of chest wall pain (p = 0.0003 and 0.03, respectively). Conclusion: mEUD with moderate weighting better predicted chest wall pain

  10. [Migration and proliferation of smooth muscle cells in the vessel wall].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, E

    1990-03-01

    1. Intimal migration and proliferation causing artery stenoses in the course of atherogenesis can be inhibited by various drugs. 2. Secondary stenoses after ballooning of arteries are caused mainly by proliferation of smooth muscle cells. 3. Ballooning of arteries or repeated transmural electrical stimulations of artery walls with weak electrical current is followed by an increased mitotic activity of smooth muscle cells in the ballooned resp. stimulated area which reaches a maximal value about one week following the onset of the experiment. The mitotic activity returns then slowly to initial levels. 4. Adaptations to proliferation-inducing stimuli are possible. The experiments demonstrate that the proliferative phases in atherogenesis can be explained as a sequence of adaptations and deadaptations (= change of disposition) to the proliferation-inducing stimuli. 5. To select qualified drugs for an inhibition of the development of intimal proliferates in the course of atherogenesis makes it necessary to combine in vivo tests in animal experiments with tests on cell cultures of human cells from artery walls.

  11. Evidence of active transport (filtration?) of plasma proteins across the capillary walls in muscle and subcutis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Ivan; Lassen, N A

    1978-01-01

    Under slight lymphatic stasis (tilting the body 15 degrees) we measured the arrival of locally injected I-albumin to the plasma pool. From 30 min. to 90 min. after the injection the return rate was zero i.e. local back transport in the two tissues studied viz.muscle and subcutaneous fat is very...... small. Compared to a suggested steady state total 131 I-albumin clearance of 1.7%/hour in the horizontal body position we conclude that maximally one percent of the interstitial albumin can have a local transendothetial escape i.e. can be handled by passive forces as is diffusion and pinocytosis...

  12. Evidence of active transport (filtration?) of plasma proteins across the capillary walls in muscle and subcutis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Ivan; Lassen, N A

    1979-01-01

    Under slight lymphatic stasis (tilting the body 15 degrees) we measured the arrival of locally injected 131I-albumin in the plasma pool. From 30 min to 90 min after the injection the return rate was zero, i.e. local back transport in the two tissues studied, muscle and subcutaneous fat, is very...... small. Compared with a suggested steady state total 131I-albumin clearance of 1.7%/hour in the horizontal body position, we conclude that a maximum of 1% of the interstitial albumin can have a local transendothelial escape, i.e. can be handled by passive forces, such as diffusion and pinocytosis. Since...

  13. A multiscale active structural model of the arterial wall accounting for smooth muscle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccarelli, Alberto; Edwards, David Hughes; Aggarwal, Ankush; Nithiarasu, Perumal; Parthimos, Dimitris

    2018-02-01

    Arterial wall dynamics arise from the synergy of passive mechano-elastic properties of the vascular tissue and the active contractile behaviour of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) that form the media layer of vessels. We have developed a computational framework that incorporates both these components to account for vascular responses to mechanical and pharmacological stimuli. To validate the proposed framework and demonstrate its potential for testing hypotheses on the pathogenesis of vascular disease, we have employed a number of pharmacological probes that modulate the arterial wall contractile machinery by selectively inhibiting a range of intracellular signalling pathways. Experimental probes used on ring segments from the rabbit central ear artery are: phenylephrine, a selective α 1-adrenergic receptor agonist that induces vasoconstriction; cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), a specific inhibitor of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase; and ryanodine, a diterpenoid that modulates Ca 2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. These interventions were able to delineate the role of membrane versus intracellular signalling, previously identified as main factors in smooth muscle contraction and the generation of vessel tone. Each SMC was modelled by a system of nonlinear differential equations that account for intracellular ionic signalling, and in particular Ca 2+ dynamics. Cytosolic Ca 2+ concentrations formed the catalytic input to a cross-bridge kinetics model. Contractile output from these cellular components forms the input to the finite-element model of the arterial rings under isometric conditions that reproduces the experimental conditions. The model does not account for the role of the endothelium, as the nitric oxide production was suppressed by the action of L-NAME, and also due to the absence of shear stress on the arterial ring, as the experimental set-up did not involve flow. Simulations generated by the integrated model closely matched experimental

  14. Baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity after carotid body tumor resection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, Henri J. L. M.; Karemaker, John M.; Wieling, Wouter; Marres, Henri A. M.; Lenders, Jacques W. M.

    2003-01-01

    Bilateral carotid body tumor resection causes a permanent attenuation of vagal baroreflex sensitivity. We retrospectively examined the effects of bilateral carotid body tumor resection on the baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve traffic. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was recorded in 5

  15. Impact of ghrelin on body composition and muscle function in a long-term rodent model of critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Neil E; Murphy, Kevin G; Saeed, Saima; Phadke, Rahul; Chambers, Darren; Wilson, Duncan R; Brett, Stephen J; Singer, Mervyn

    2017-01-01

    Patients with multiple injuries or sepsis requiring intensive care treatment invariably develop a catabolic state with resultant loss of lean body mass, for which there are currently no effective treatments. Recovery can take months and mortality is high. We hypothesise that treatment with the orexigenic and anti-inflammatory gastric hormone, ghrelin may attenuate the loss of body mass following critical illness and improve recovery. Male Wistar rats received an intraperitoneal injection of the fungal cell wall derivative zymosan to induce a prolonged peritonitis and consequent critical illness. Commencing at 48h after zymosan, animals were randomised to receive a continuous infusion of ghrelin or vehicle control using a pre-implanted subcutaneous osmotic mini-pump, and continued for 10 days. Zymosan peritonitis induced significant weight loss and reduced food intake with a nadir at Day 2 and gradual recovery thereafter. Supra-physiologic plasma ghrelin levels were achieved in the treated animals. Ghrelin-treated rats ate more food and gained more body mass than controls. Ghrelin increased adiposity and promoted carbohydrate over fat metabolism, but did not alter total body protein, muscle strength nor muscle morphology. Muscle mass and strength remained significantly reduced in all zymosan-treated animals, even at ten days post-insult. Continuous infusion of ghrelin increased body mass and food intake, but did not increase muscle mass nor improve muscle function, in a long-term critical illness recovery model. Further studies with pulsatile ghrelin delivery or additional anabolic stimuli may further clarify the utility of ghrelin in survivors of critical illness.

  16. The Body Action Coding System I : Muscle activations during the perception and expression of emotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huis In 't Veld, E.M.J.; van Boxtel, G.J.M.; de Gelder, B.

    2014-01-01

    Body postures provide clear signals about emotional expressions, but so far it is not clear what muscle patterns are associated with specific emotions. This study lays the groundwork for a Body Action Coding System by investigating what combinations of muscles are used for emotional bodily

  17. Testosterone and growth hormone improve body composition and muscle performance in older men

    Science.gov (United States)

    CONTEXT: Impairments in the pituitary-gonadal axis with aging are associated with loss of muscle mass and function and accumulation of upper body fat. OBJECTIVES: We tested the hypothesis that physiological supplementation with testosterone and GH together improves body composition and muscle perfor...

  18. Longevity, life history, and relative body wall size in sea urchins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, T.A.

    1982-12-01

    Annual survival rates in 38 populations of 17 sea urchin species in the Indo-West Pacific were related to relative size of the body wall and exposure to the surf. Populations were studied at Hawaii, Enewetak Atok, Queensland, New South Wales and Western Australia, Sri Lanka, Seychelles, Kenya, Zanzibar, and Isaerl (Eilat). Live animals were dissected to determine the size of body components. Parameters of the Richards growth function were determined from animals tagged with tetracycline. Tagged animals were collected after they had been in the field for 1 yr. Growth parameters were used with parameters from size-frequency distributions to estimate Z, the mortality coefficient. Stepwise multiple regression was used to examine the relationship between annual survival probability (p) and two indepencent variables, ..cap alpha.. and E, where E is a subjective measure of exposure to surf (1 = most exposed). Survivorship increases with increased relative size of the body wall and with increased protection from the surf. The positive relationship between survival probability and relative body wall size supports the hypothesis that survival is related to allocation of resources to maintenance. The significane of longevity in urchins probably is that it is related to the predictability of survival of prereproductive individuals. The greater the unpredictability, the longer life must be. Long life requires a greater investment in maintenance mechanisms and hence, among other adaptations, a more massive body wall.

  19. Genetic Analysis of Hedgehog Signaling in Ventral Body Wall Development and the Onset of Omphalocele Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumaru, Daisuke; Haraguchi, Ryuma; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Motoyama, Jun; Nakagata, Naomi; Meijlink, Frits; Yamada, Gen

    2011-01-01

    Background An omphalocele is one of the major ventral body wall malformations and is characterized by abnormally herniated viscera from the body trunk. It has been frequently found to be associated with other structural malformations, such as genitourinary malformations and digit abnormalities. In spite of its clinical importance, the etiology of omphalocele formation is still controversial. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is one of the essential growth factor signaling pathways involved in the formation of the limbs and urogenital system. However, the relationship between Hh signaling and ventral body wall formation remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings To gain insight into the roles of Hh signaling in ventral body wall formation and its malformation, we analyzed phenotypes of mouse mutants of Sonic hedgehog (Shh), GLI-Kruppel family member 3 (Gli3) and Aristaless-like homeobox 4 (Alx4). Introduction of additional Alx4Lst mutations into the Gli3Xt/Xt background resulted in various degrees of severe omphalocele and pubic diastasis. In addition, loss of a single Shh allele restored the omphalocele and pubic symphysis of Gli3Xt/+; Alx4Lst/Lst embryos. We also observed ectopic Hh activity in the ventral body wall region of Gli3Xt/Xt embryos. Moreover, tamoxifen-inducible gain-of-function experiments to induce ectopic Hh signaling revealed Hh signal dose-dependent formation of omphaloceles. Conclusions/Significance We suggest that one of the possible causes of omphalocele and pubic diastasis is ectopically-induced Hh signaling. To our knowledge, this would be the first demonstration of the involvement of Hh signaling in ventral body wall malformation and the genetic rescue of omphalocele phenotypes. PMID:21283718

  20. Intraperitoneal granulomatous foreign body reaction after accidental perforation of the abdominal wall. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanng, C; Winther-Nielsen, H; Hougen, H P

    2013-01-01

    After an accidental perforation by a wooden stake of the abdominal wall and distal ileum a 28-year-old man developed an aggressive granulomatous foreign body reaction of the greater omentum with high fever and abdominal pain. The patient was cured by omental resection and prednisone treatment....

  1. Quantitative CT: Associations between Emphysema, Airway Wall Thickness and Body Composition in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutten, Erica P A; Grydeland, Thomas B; Pillai, Sreekumar G

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the association between CT phenotypes-emphysema by low attenuation area and bronchitis by airway wall thickness-and body composition parameters in a large cohort of subjects with and without COPD. In 452 COPD subjects and 459 subjects without CO...

  2. Amniotic band syndrome and/or limb body wall complex: split or lump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Halder

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Ashutosh HalderDepartment of Reproductive Biology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, IndiaAbstract: Six cases of amniotic band syndrome/limb body wall complex were studied in respect to clinicopathologic characteristics. The diagnosis was based on two out of three of the following manifestations: cranio facial clefts; limb body wall defects and amniotic band attachment. Four cases were stillborn and associated with internal defects, including central nervous system. Two cases had facial and limb defects and were live born (3–5 years old at examination. Phenotypic features of the stillborn cases were craniofacial clefting, thoracoabdominoschisis, amputation, ring constriction, amniotic band adhesion, placental adhesions, and internal malformations. Histology of bands revealed fibroconnective tissue as well as flattened epithelial cells together with neuroectodermal elements. Umbilical cord section revealed an abnormal number of vessels. When analyzing the observed data in relation to their etiology, it was found that amniotic disruption, vascular disruption or genetic disruption could explain the amniotic band syndrome/limb body wall complexes, alone or in combinations. A brief review of literature in search of pathogenesis is offered along with an etiopathogenetic model.Keywords: amniotic band syndrome, limb body wall complex and pathogenesis

  3. Avian pectoral muscle size rapidly tracks body mass changes during flight, fasting and fuelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, A; Kvist, A; Piersma, T; Dekinga, A; Dietz, M W

    2000-03-01

    We used ultrasonic imaging to monitor short-term changes in the pectoral muscle size of captive red knots Calidris canutus. Pectoral muscle thickness changed rapidly and consistently in parallel with body mass changes caused by flight, fasting and fuelling. Four knots flew repeatedly for 10 h periods in a wind tunnel. Over this period, pectoral muscle thickness decreased in parallel with the decrease in body mass. The change in pectoral muscle thickness during flight was indistinguishable from that during periods of natural and experimental fasting and fuelling. The body-mass-related variation in pectoral muscle thickness between and within individuals was not related to the amount of flight, indicating that changes in avian muscle do not require power-training as in mammals. Our study suggests that it is possible for birds to consume and replace their flight muscles on a time scale short enough to allow these muscles to be used as part of the energy supply for migratory flight. The adaptive significance of the changes in pectoral muscle mass cannot be explained by reproductive needs since our knots were in the early winter phase of their annual cycle. Instead, pectoral muscle mass changes may reflect (i) the breakdown of protein during heavy exercise and its subsequent restoration, (ii) the regulation of flight capacity to maintain optimal flight performance when body mass varies, or (iii) the need for a particular protein:fat ratio in winter survival stores.

  4. Isometric abdominal wall muscle strength assessment in individuals with incisional hernia: a prospective reliability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, K K; Kjaer, M; Jorgensen, L N

    2016-12-01

    To determine the reliability of measurements obtained by the Good Strength dynamometer, determining isometric abdominal wall and back muscle strength in patients with ventral incisional hernia (VIH) and healthy volunteers with an intact abdominal wall. Ten patients with VIH and ten healthy volunteers with an intact abdominal wall were each examined twice with a 1 week interval. Examination included the assessment of truncal flexion and extension as measured with the Good Strength dynamometer, the completion of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and the self-assessment of truncal strength on a visual analogue scale (SATS). The test-retest reliability of truncal flexion and extension was assessed by interclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and Bland and Altman graphs. Finally, correlations between truncal strength, and IPAQ and SATS were examined. Truncal flexion and extension showed excellent test-retest reliability for both patients with VIH (ICC 0.91 and 0.99) and healthy controls (ICC 0.97 and 0.96). Bland and Altman plots showed that no systematic bias was present for neither truncal flexion nor extension when assessing reliability. For patients with VIH, no significant correlations between objective measures of truncal strength and IPAQ or SATS were found. For healthy controls, both truncal flexion (τ 0.58, p = 0.025) and extension (τ 0.58, p = 0.025) correlated significantly with SATS, while no other significant correlation between truncal strength measures and IPAQ was found. The Good Strength dynamometer provided a reliable, low-cost measure of truncal flexion and extension in patients with VIH.

  5. Glycogen synthesis in human gastrocnemius muscle is not representative of whole-body muscle glycogen synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serlie, Mireille J. M.; de Haan, Jacco H.; Tack, Cees J.; Verberne, Hein J.; Ackermans, Mariette T.; Heerschap, Arend; Sauerwein, Hans P.

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of C-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has enabled noninvasive measurement of muscle glycogen synthesis in humans. Conclusions based on measurements by the MRS technique assume that glucose metabolism in gastrocnemius muscle is representative for all skeletal muscles and thus

  6. Glycogen synthesis in human gastrocnemius muscle is not representative of whole-body muscle glycogen synthesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serlie, M.J.; Haan, J.H.A. de; Tack, C.J.J.; Verberne, H.J.; Ackermans, M.T.; Heerschap, A.; Sauerwein, H.P.

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has enabled noninvasive measurement of muscle glycogen synthesis in humans. Conclusions based on measurements by the MRS technique assume that glucose metabolism in gastrocnemius muscle is representative for all skeletal muscles and thus

  7. Relationships Between Lower-Body Muscle Structure and, Lower-Body Strength, Explosiveness and Eccentric Leg Stiffness in Adolescent Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Secomb, Josh L.; Nimphius, Sophia; Farley, Oliver R.L.; Lundgren, Lina E.; Tran, Tai T.; Sheppard, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether any relationships were present between lower-body muscle structure and, lower-body strength, variables measured during a countermovement jump (CMJ) and squat jump (SJ), and eccentric leg stiffness, in adolescent athletes. Thirty junior male (n = 23) and female (n = 7) surfing athletes (14.8 ± 1.7 y; 1.63 ± 0.09 m; 54.8 ± 12.1 kg) undertook lower-body muscle structure assessment with ultrasonography and performed a; CMJ, SJ and an isome...

  8. Relationships among muscle dysmorphia characteristics, body image quality of life, and coping in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tod, D; Edwards, C

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine relationships among bodybuilding dependence, muscle satisfaction, body image-related quality of life and body image-related coping strategies, and test the hypothesis that muscle dysmorphia characteristics may predict quality of life via coping strategies. Participants (294 males, Mage=20.5 years, SD=3.1) participated in a cross-sectional survey. Participants completed questionnaires assessing muscle satisfaction, bodybuilding dependence, body image-related quality of life and body image-related coping. Quality of life was correlated positively with muscle satisfaction and bodybuilding dependence but negatively with body image coping (Pbodybuilding dependence and negatively with muscle satisfaction (Pbodybuilding dependence and muscle satisfaction predicted quality of life both directly and indirectly via body image coping strategies (as evidenced by the bias corrected and accelerated bootstrapped confidence intervals). These results provide preliminary evidence regarding the ways that muscularity concerns might influence body image-related quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of whole-body vibration on muscle strength, spasticity, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marwa M. Ibrahim

    Abstract Background and purpose: Spastic diplegia is a common form of cerebral palsy (CP) and is characterized by spasticity and muscle weakness of both lower limbs resulting in decreased walk- ing ability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) training on muscle strength, ...

  10. Avian pectoral muscle size rapidly tracks body mass changes during flight, fasting and fuelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindstrom, A; Kvist, A; Piersma, T; Dekinga, A; Dietz, MW; Lindström, Åke

    We used ultrasonic imaging to monitor short-term changes in the pectoral muscle size of captive red knots Calidris canutus. Pectoral muscle thickness changed rapidly and consistently in parallel with body mass changes caused by flight, fasting;and fuelling. Four knots hew repeatedly for 10h periods

  11. Relationships of 35 lower limb muscles to height and body mass quantified using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handsfield, Geoffrey G; Meyer, Craig H; Hart, Joseph M; Abel, Mark F; Blemker, Silvia S

    2014-02-07

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant tissue in the body and serves various physiological functions including the generation of movement and support. Whole body motor function requires adequate quantity, geometry, and distribution of muscle. This raises the question: how do muscles scale with subject size in order to achieve similar function across humans? While much of the current knowledge of human muscle architecture is based on cadaver dissection, modern medical imaging avoids limitations of old age, poor health, and limited subject pool, allowing for muscle architecture data to be obtained in vivo from healthy subjects ranging in size. The purpose of this study was to use novel fast-acquisition MRI to quantify volumes and lengths of 35 major lower limb muscles in 24 young, healthy subjects and to determine if muscle size correlates with bone geometry and subject parameters of mass and height. It was found that total lower limb muscle volume scales with mass (R(2)=0.85) and with the height-mass product (R(2)=0.92). Furthermore, individual muscle volumes scale with total muscle volume (median R(2)=0.66), with the height-mass product (median R(2)=0.61), and with mass (median R(2)=0.52). Muscle volume scales with bone volume (R(2)=0.75), and muscle length relative to bone length is conserved (median s.d.=2.1% of limb length). These relationships allow for an arbitrary subject's individual muscle volumes to be estimated from mass or mass and height while muscle lengths may be estimated from limb length. The dataset presented here can further be used as a normative standard to compare populations with musculoskeletal pathologies. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of sea Cucumber (Stichopus variegatus) body wall extract in Chabahar Bay, Oman Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Shakouri, Arash; Shoushizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Nematpour, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Seas and oceans have been recognized as a rich source of metabolites and bioactive compounds with biodiversity and drug activity. These compounds have accumulated in various organisms. Bioactive compounds can be extracted from various animal groups, such as coral, crabs, moss animals, Echinodermata, case-bearers, fishes, and sponges. Objectives: Antimicrobial extracts of the sea cucumber body wall (Stichopus variegatus), collected from Chabahar Bay, were tested for four bacterial,...

  13. Limb-body wall complex: Prenatal sonographic findings versus autopsy findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Mi Jin; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Young Ho

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate prenatal ultrasonographic findings of limb-body wall complex and to correlate them with autopsy findings. From October 1995 to June 2000, a retrospectively review of prenatal ultrasonography (US) of 11 patients with pathologically proven limb-body wall complex was done. US findings were then compared with autopsy findings. Prenatal ultrasonography revealed thoraco-abdominoschists (n=7.64%), kyphoscoliosis (n=7.64%), cranial defect (n=5.45%), limb defect (n=4.36%), facial defect (n=1.10%), amniotic band (n=5.45%), and umbilical cord anomaly (n=3.27%). Meanwhile, autopsy findings showed thoraco-abdominoschisis (n=8.72%), limb defect (n=7.64%), facial defect (n=7.64%), kyphoscoliosis (n=5.45%), cranial defect (n=5.45%), amniotic band (n=5.45%) and umbilical cord anomaly (n=4.36%). The most common ultrasonography features of limb-body wall complex were thoraco-abdominoschisis and kyphoscoliosis while the thoraco-abdominoschisis and limb defects were the most frequent findings at autopsy.

  14. Chemical Profiling and Bioactivity of Body Wall Lipids from Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Shikov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The lipids from gonads and polyhydroxynaphthoquinone pigments from body walls of sea urchins are intensively studied. However, little is known about the body wall (BW lipids. Ethanol extract (55 °C contained about equal amounts of saturated (SaFA and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA representing 60% of total fatty acids, with myristic, palmitic and eicosenoic acids as major SaFAs and MUFAs, respectively. Non-methylene-interrupted dienes (13% were composed of eicosadienoic and docosadienoic acids. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA included two main components, n6 arachidonic and n3 eicosapentaenoic acids, even with equal concentrations (15 μg/mg and a balanced n6/n3 PUFA ratio (0.86. The UPLC-ELSD analysis showed that a great majority of the lipids (80% in the ethanolic extract were phosphatidylcholine (60 μg/mg and phosphatidylethanolamine (40 μg/mg, while the proportion of neutral lipids remained lower than 20%. In addition, alkoxyglycerol derivatives—chimyl, selachyl, and batyl alcohols—were quantified. We have assumed that the mechanism of action of body wall lipids in the present study is via the inhibition of MAPK p38, COX-1, and COX-2. Our findings open the prospective to utilize this lipid fraction as a source for the development of drugs with anti-inflammatory activity.

  15. Double standards in body evaluation? The influence of identification with body stimuli on ratings of attractiveness, body fat, and muscle mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voges, Mona M; Giabbiconi, Claire-Marie; Schöne, Benjamin; Waldorf, Manuel; Hartmann, Andrea S; Vocks, Silja

    2017-10-20

    Although it is well documented that women evaluate their own body differently from other bodies, it remains unclear whether this discrepancy is based on double standards because of identity or on objective differences between these bodies. The aim of this study was therefore to test whether women apply double standards depending on a body's identity when evaluating the same bodies presented with different faces. Average-weight women (N = 104) rated body attractiveness, body fat, and muscle mass of thin, average-weight, overweight, athletic, and hypermuscular bodies with either another female's face or their own face. With their own face, subjects rated overweight bodies as more unattractive, higher in body fat and lower in muscle mass than with another female's face. However, for non-overweight bodies, body ratings did not differ depending on body identity. Based on the self-deprecating double standards for overweight bodies, a body-related identity bias might be considered in theoretical models of body image. Level of evidence Level V, descriptive study.

  16. Airway smooth muscle cell culture: application to studies of airway wall remodelling and phenotype plasticity in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, S J

    1996-04-01

    Chronic persistent asthma is characterized by poorly reversible airway obstruction. Histopathological studies of airways removed postmortem from patients with severe asthma reveal marked inflammatory and architectural changes associated with airway wall thickening. Increased airway smooth muscle content, occurring as a result of hyperplastic and/or hypertrophic growth, is believed to be one of the principal contributors to airway wall thickening. Intense interest is building to discover the mechanisms responsible for these long-term structural changes. In vitro cell culture offers a powerful and exacting approach to cellular and molecular studies of the long-term regulation of airway smooth muscle function. This review discusses the methodologies for establishing and maintaining cell cultures of airway smooth muscle. It also describes the characteristics of these cells in culture and addresses the potential importance of phenotype plasticity and its possible relationship to altered smooth muscle function in vivo. Drawing on parallels from vascular studies, this review focuses, in particular, on the synthetic nature of the airway smooth muscle cell, emphasizing its potential to alter the composition of the extracellular matrix environment and orchestrate key events in the process of chronic airway remodelling.

  17. Smooth Muscle-Targeted Overexpression of Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor-γ Disrupts Vascular Wall Structure and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Kleinhenz

    Full Text Available Activation of the nuclear hormone receptor, PPARγ, with pharmacological agonists promotes a contractile vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype and reduces oxidative stress and cell proliferation, particularly under pathological conditions including vascular injury, restenosis, and atherosclerosis. However, pharmacological agonists activate both PPARγ-dependent and -independent mechanisms in multiple cell types confounding efforts to clarify the precise role of PPARγ in smooth muscle cell structure and function in vivo. We, therefore, designed and characterized a mouse model with smooth muscle cell-targeted PPARγ overexpression (smPPARγOE. Our results demonstrate that smPPARγOE attenuated contractile responses in aortic rings, increased aortic compliance, caused aortic dilatation, and reduced mean arterial pressure. Molecular characterization revealed that compared to littermate control mice, aortas from smPPARγOE mice expressed lower levels of contractile proteins and increased levels of adipocyte-specific transcripts. Morphological analysis demonstrated increased lipid deposition in the vascular media and in smooth muscle of extravascular tissues. In vitro adenoviral-mediated PPARγ overexpression in human aortic smooth muscle cells similarly increased adipocyte markers and lipid uptake. The findings demonstrate that smooth muscle PPARγ overexpression disrupts vascular wall structure and function, emphasizing that balanced PPARγ activity is essential for vascular smooth muscle homeostasis.

  18. Effect of bladder wall thickness on miniature pneumatic artificial muscle performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillsbury, Thomas E; Kothera, Curt S; Wereley, Norman M

    2015-09-28

    Pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs) are actuators known for their high power to weight ratio, natural compliance and light weight. Due to these advantages, PAMs have been used for orthotic devices and robotic limbs. Small scale PAMs have the same advantages, as well as requiring greatly reduced volumes with potential application to prostheses and small scale robotics. The bladder of a PAM affects common actuator performance metrics, specifically: blocked force, free contraction, hysteresis, and dead-band pressure. This paper investigates the effect that bladder thickness has on static actuation performance of small scale PAMs. Miniature PAMs were fabricated with a range of bladder thicknesses to quantify the change in common actuator performance metrics specifically: blocked force, free contraction, and dead-band pressure. These PAMs were then experimentally characterized in quasi-static conditions, where results showed that increasing bladder wall thickness decreases blocked force and free contraction, while dead-band pressure increases. A nonlinear model was then applied to determine the structure of the stress-strain relationship that enables accurate modeling and the minimum number of terms. Two nonlinear models are compared and the identified parameters are analyzed to study the effect of the bladder thickness on the model.

  19. Relationships Between Lower-Body Muscle Structure and, Lower-Body Strength, Explosiveness and Eccentric Leg Stiffness in Adolescent Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secomb, Josh L; Nimphius, Sophia; Farley, Oliver R L; Lundgren, Lina E; Tran, Tai T; Sheppard, Jeremy M

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether any relationships were present between lower-body muscle structure and, lower-body strength, variables measured during a countermovement jump (CMJ) and squat jump (SJ), and eccentric leg stiffness, in adolescent athletes. Thirty junior male (n = 23) and female (n = 7) surfing athletes (14.8 ± 1.7 y; 1.63 ± 0.09 m; 54.8 ± 12.1 kg) undertook lower-body muscle structure assessment with ultrasonography and performed a; CMJ, SJ and an isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP). In addition, eccentric leg stiffness was calculated from variables of the CMJ and IMTP. Moderate to very large relationships (r = 0.46-0.73) were identified between the thickness of the vastus lateralis (VL) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscles, and VL pennation angle and; peak force (PF) in the CMJ, SJ and IMTP. Additionally, moderate to large relationships (r = 0.37-0.59) were found between eccentric leg stiffness and; VL and LG thickness, VL pennation angle, and LG fascicle length, with a large relationship (r = 0.59) also present with IMTP PF. These results suggest that greater thickness of the VL and LG were related to improved maximal dynamic and isometric strength, likely due to increased hypertrophy of the extensor muscles. Furthermore, this increased thickness was related to greater eccentric leg stiffness, as the associated enhanced lower-body strength likely allowed for greater neuromuscular activation, and hence less compliance, during a stretch-shortening cycle. Key pointsGreater thickness of the VL and LG muscles were significantly related to an enhanced ability to express higher levels of isometric and dynamic strength, and explosiveness in adolescent athletes.Isometric strength underpinned performance in the CMJ and SJ in these athletes.Greater lower-body isometric strength was significantly related to eccentric leg stiffness, which is potentially the result of greater neuromuscular activation in the muscle-tendon unit.

  20. Inclusion-body myositis, a multifactorial muscle disease associated with aging: current concepts of pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askanas, Valerie; Engel, W King

    2007-11-01

    Sporadic inclusion-body myositis, the most common muscle disease of older persons, has no known cause or persistently beneficial treatment. The unfolding pathogenesis could lead to new treatment strategies and it is now of growing interest among clinicians and basic scientists. About 100 papers related to the subject were published in 2006 and the first part of 2007 (we cite only articles most relevant to this review). This review focuses on the current concepts of the pathogenesis of sporadic inclusion-body myositis. Both degeneration and mononuclear-cell inflammation are components of the pathology, but how each relates to the pathogenesis remains unclear. We suggest that an intramuscle fiber degenerative component is primary, leading to muscle-fiber destruction, while the lymphocytic inflammatory component may only slightly contribute to sporadic inclusion-body myositis muscle-fiber damage. Intracellular accumulation of amyloid-beta precursor protein, amyloid-beta, and amyloid-beta oligomers in an aging muscle-fiber cellular milieu, and other abnormalities, appear to be key pathogenic factors. We summarize intracellular molecular events and their consequences, and correlate findings in sporadic inclusion-body myositis muscle biopsies with inclusion-body myositis experimental models in tissue culture and in transgenic mice. Treatment of sporadic inclusion-body myositis remains a challenge. Antiinflammatory approaches used so far are without major or enduring benefit. Possible new treatment avenues are suggested.

  1. TUNING IN TO FISH SWIMMING WAVES - BODY FORM, SWIMMING MODE AND MUSCLE FUNCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WARDLE, CS; VIDELER, JJ; ALTRINGHAM, JD

    Most fish species swim with lateral body undulations running from head to tail, These waves run more slowly than the waves of muscle activation causing them, reflecting the effect of the interaction between the fish's body and the reactive forces from the water, The coupling between both waves

  2. Acute effects of incremental inspiratory loads on compartmental chest wall volume and predominant activity frequency of inspiratory muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Gama, Alana Elza Fontes; de Andrade Carvalho, Larissa; Feitosa, Larissa Andrade; do Nascimento Junior, Jasiel Frutuoso; da Silva, Marilú Gomes Netto Monte; Amorim, César F; Aliverti, Andréa; Lambertz, Daniel; Rodrigues, Marco Aurélio Benedetti; de Andrade, Armèle Dornelas

    2013-12-01

    This research aims to analyze the acute effect of incremental inspiratory loads on respiratory pattern and on the predominant activity frequency of inspiratory muscle, taking into account differences in gender responses. Optoelectronic Plethysmography was performed during loads in 39 healthy subjects (20 women), placing 89 markers on the thoracic-abdominal wall to obtain total and regional volumes. Surface electromyography (SEMG) was taken simultaneously on the Sternocleidomastoid and Diaphragm muscles, to calculate the predominant muscle activity frequency through wavelet analysis. Inspiratory loads were performed using Threshold(®)with 2 min of breathing at different levels, ranging from a load of 10 cmH(2)O plus 5 cmH(2)O to 40 cmH(2)O or fatigue. Inspiratory Time increased during loads. Total and compartmental volumes increased with different regions, changing at different loads. These changes in volume occur earlier in women (20 cmH(2)O) than in men (30 cmH(2)O). The predominant activity frequency of Sternocleidmastoid muscle decreased at 30 cmH(2)O, while Diaphragm activity decreased at 40 cmH(2)O. The acute effects of incremental inspiratory loads are increases of total and regional volumes and inspiratory time. As for muscle activity, the predominant activity frequency declined in Sternocleidomastoid and Diaphragm muscles, but at different loads. Such respiratory and SEMG patterns and gender differences should be considered when clinical interventions are performed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Criterion-Related Validity of a Simple Muscle Strength Test to Assess Whole Body Muscle Strength in Chinese Children Aged 10 to 12 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liqin; Tang, Changfa; Tao, Xia

    2018-01-01

    To study the criterion-related validity of simple muscle strength test (SMST) indicators and assess whole body muscle strength in Chinese children aged 10 to 12 years old. Two hundred and forty children were equally divided into four groups in different genders and residences. The SMST indicators (hand-grip, knee bent push-up, back muscle strength, sit-up, leg muscle strength, and standing long jump) were tested. We set up the total level of the whole-body muscle strength ( F total ) through testing isokinetic muscle strength of the six joints' flexion and extension movements. Pearson correlation analyses were used to analyze the correlation between the SMST indicators and the F total . (1) Leg muscle strength and back muscle strength demonstrated the highest validity scores. Sit-ups, hand grip, and standing long jump demonstrated the lowest validity scores. (2) Leg muscle strength had the highest validity for males, but back muscle strength had the highest validity for females. Back muscle strength and leg muscle strength can give the highest validity of assessing whole body muscle strength, and also has higher validity in both the urban and rural children. For urban children, but not rural, the knee bent push-up also has a high validity indicator.

  4. Criterion-Related Validity of a Simple Muscle Strength Test to Assess Whole Body Muscle Strength in Chinese Children Aged 10 to 12 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqin Yin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the criterion-related validity of simple muscle strength test (SMST indicators and assess whole body muscle strength in Chinese children aged 10 to 12 years old. Methods. Two hundred and forty children were equally divided into four groups in different genders and residences. The SMST indicators (hand-grip, knee bent push-up, back muscle strength, sit-up, leg muscle strength, and standing long jump were tested. We set up the total level of the whole-body muscle strength (Ftotal through testing isokinetic muscle strength of the six joints’ flexion and extension movements. Pearson correlation analyses were used to analyze the correlation between the SMST indicators and the Ftotal. Results. (1 Leg muscle strength and back muscle strength demonstrated the highest validity scores. Sit-ups, hand grip, and standing long jump demonstrated the lowest validity scores. (2 Leg muscle strength had the highest validity for males, but back muscle strength had the highest validity for females. Conclusions. Back muscle strength and leg muscle strength can give the highest validity of assessing whole body muscle strength, and also has higher validity in both the urban and rural children. For urban children, but not rural, the knee bent push-up also has a high validity indicator.

  5. Body Composition Assessment in Axial CT Images Using FEM-Based Automatic Segmentation of Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popuri, Karteek; Cobzas, Dana; Esfandiari, Nina; Baracos, Vickie; Jägersand, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The proportions of muscle and fat tissues in the human body, referred to as body composition is a vital measurement for cancer patients. Body composition has been recently linked to patient survival and the onset/recurrence of several types of cancers in numerous cancer research studies. This paper introduces a fully automatic framework for the segmentation of muscle and fat tissues from CT images to estimate body composition. We developed a novel finite element method (FEM) deformable model that incorporates a priori shape information via a statistical deformation model (SDM) within the template-based segmentation framework. The proposed method was validated on 1000 abdominal and 530 thoracic CT images and we obtained very good segmentation results with Jaccard scores in excess of 90% for both the muscle and fat regions.

  6. Electromyographic activity of the anterolateral abdominal wall muscles during the vesical filling and evacuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Shafik

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available

    BACKGROUND: The role of the anterolateral abdominal wall muscles (AAWMs during the vesical filling and evacuation has not been sufficiently addressed in the literature. We have investigated the hypothesis that the AAWMs exhibit the increased electromyographic (EMG activity on the vesical distension and contraction which presumably assists vesical evacuation.

    METHODS: The effects of the vesical balloon distension on the vesical pressure (VP, vesical neck (VNP pressures and the AAWMs' EMG activity were studied in 28 healthy volunteers aged 40.7 ± 9.7 years (18 men, 10 women. These effects were tested after the individual anesthetization of the bladder and AAWMs and after saline infiltration.

    RESULTS: The VP and the VNP showed a gradual increase upon the incremental vesical balloon distension which started at a distending volume of 120–140 ml. At a mean volume of 364.6 ± 23.8 ml, the VP increased to a mean of 36.6 ± 3.2 cmH2O, the VNP decreased to 18.4 ± 2.4 cmH2O, and the AAWMs EMG registered a significant increase. This effect disappeared in the individual bladder and in the AAWMs' anesthetization. However, it did not disappear in the saline administration.

    CONCLUSIONS: The AAWMs appear to contract simultaneously with vesical contraction. This action presumably increases the IAP and it

  7. Pelvic floor muscle strength and body self-perception among Brazilian pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacomori, Cinara; Cardoso, Fernando Luiz; Vanderlinde, Cristiane

    2010-12-01

    To examine the relationship between pelvic floor muscle strength and body self-perception variables in pregnant women; and, more specifically, to determine the influence of the number of pregnancies (primigravidas vs multigravidas) on the strength of contraction of the pelvic floor muscles and on the body self-perception of pregnant women. Comparative cross-sectional research. Public health centres from Florianópolis, Brazil. Thirty-five pregnant women (18 primigravidas, 17 multigravidas) with a mean age of 25.5 (standard deviation 5.7) years. Pelvic floor strength measured through manual palpation, and body self-perception using the Questionnaire of Corporeality and Human Sexuality. Pelvic floor muscle strength was positively correlated with schooling [rho (ρ)=0.496] and body self-perception variables: finding the body beautiful (ρ=0.476), finding the body sexy (ρ=0.520), feeling that others find them sexy (ρ=0.364), finding the body proportional (ρ=0.412), touching the body generally (ρ=0.554) and recognising the smell of the body (ρ=0.454). Primigravidas found their bodies more beautiful and were more satisfied with their bodies. On a scale of 0 to 6, multigravid participants expressed a greater wish than primigravid participants to be thinner (median difference 2, 95% confidence interval 0-3, P=0.03). Pelvic floor strength did not differ between groups. The results suggest a relationship between pelvic floor muscle strength and body self-perception. Professionals involved in women's health may have a role in helping their patients to understand their bodies. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. On the potential of lower limb muscles to accelerate the body's centre of mass during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Tomas A; Pandy, Marcus G

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of lower limb muscle function during gait or other common activities may be achieved using an induced acceleration analysis, which determines the contributions of individual muscles to the accelerations of the body's centre of mass. However, this analysis is reliant on a mathematical optimisation for the distribution of net joint moments among muscles. One approach that overcomes this limitation is the calculation of a muscle's potential to accelerate the centre of mass based on either a unit-force or maximum-activation assumption. Unit-force muscle potential accelerations are determined by calculating the accelerations induced by a 1 N muscle force, whereas maximum-activation muscle potential accelerations are determined by calculating the accelerations induced by a maximally activated muscle. The aim of this study was to describe the acceleration potentials of major lower limb muscles during normal walking obtained from these two techniques, and to evaluate the results relative to absolute (optimisation-based) muscle-induced accelerations. Dynamic simulations of walking were generated for 10 able-bodied children using musculoskeletal models, and potential- and absolute induced accelerations were calculated using a perturbation method. While the potential accelerations often correctly identified the major contributors to centre-of-mass acceleration, they were noticeably different in magnitude and timing from the absolute induced accelerations. Potential induced accelerations predicted by the maximum-activation technique, which accounts for the force-generating properties of muscle, were no more consistent with absolute induced accelerations than unit-force potential accelerations. The techniques described may assist treatment decisions through quantitative analyses of common gait abnormalities and/or clinical interventions.

  9. Computation of trunk muscle forces, spinal loads and stability in whole-body vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazrgari, B.; Shirazi-Adl, A.; Kasra, M.

    2008-12-01

    Whole-body vibration has been indicated as a risk factor in back disorders. Proper prevention and treatment management, however, requires a sound knowledge of associated muscle forces and loads on the spine. Previous trunk model studies have either neglected or over-simplified the trunk redundancy with time-varying unknown muscle forces. Trunk stability has neither been addressed. A novel iterative dynamic kinematics-driven approach was employed to evaluate muscle forces, spinal loads and system stability in a seated subject under a random vertical base excitation with ˜±1 g peak acceleration contents. This iterative approach satisfied equations of motion in all directions/levels while accounting for the nonlinear passive resistance of the ligamentous spine. The effect of posture, co-activity in abdominal muscles and changes in buttocks stiffness were also investigated. The computed vertical accelerations were in good agreement with measurements. The input base excitation, via inertial and muscle forces, substantially influenced spinal loads and system stability. The flexed posture in sitting increased the net moment, muscle forces and passive spinal loads while improving the trunk stability. Similarly, the introduction of low to moderate antagonistic coactivity in abdominal muscles increased the passive spinal loads and improved the spinal stability. A trade-off, hence, exists between lower muscle forces and spinal loads on one hand and more stable spine on the other. Base excitations with larger peak acceleration contents substantially increase muscle forces/spinal loads and, hence, the risk of injury.

  10. Effect of botulinum toxin type A in lateral abdominal wall muscles thickness and length of patients with midline incisional hernia secondary to open abdomen management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Hurtado, T R; Nuño-Guzmán, C M; Miranda-Díaz, A G; Troyo-Sanromán, R; Navarro-Ibarra, R; Bravo-Cuéllar, L

    2014-10-01

    Abdominal wall hernia secondary to open abdomen management represents a surgical challenge. The hernia worsens due to lateral muscle retraction. Our objective was to evaluate if Botulinum Toxin Type A (BTA) application in lateral abdominal wall muscles modifies its thickness and length. A clinical trial of male trauma patients with hernia secondary to open abdomen management was performed from January 2009 to July 2011. Thickness and length of lateral abdominal muscles were measured by a basal Computed Tomography and 1 month after BTA application. A dosage of 250 units of BTA was applied at five points at each side between the external and internal oblique muscles under ultrasonographic guidance. Statistical analysis for differences between basal and after BTA application measures was performed by a paired Student's t test (significance: p abdominal muscles decreases its thickness and increases its length in abdominal wall hernia patients secondary to open abdomen management.

  11. Automated segmentation and recognition of abdominal wall muscles in X-ray torso CT images and its application in abdominal CAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, X.; Kamiya, N.; Hara, T.; Fujita, H.; Chen, H.; Yokoyama, R.; Hoshi, H.

    2007-01-01

    The information of abdominal wall is very important for the planning of surgical operation and abdominal organ recognition. In research fields of computer assisted radiology and surgery and computer-aided diagnosis, the segmentation and recognition of the abdominal wall muscles in CT images is a necessary pre-processing step. Due to the complexity of the abdominal wall structure and indistinctive in CT images, the automated segmentation of abdominal wall muscles is a difficult issue and has not been solved completely. We propose an approach to segment the abdominal wall muscles and divide it into three categories (front abdominal muscles including rectus abdominis; left and right side abdominal muscles including external oblique, internal oblique and transversus abdominis muscles) automatically. The approach, first, makes an initial classification of bone, fat, and muscles and organs based on the CT number. Then a layer structure is generated to describe the 3-D anatomical structures of human torso by stretching the torso region onto a thin-plate for easy recognition. The abdominal wall muscles are recognized on the layer structures using the spatial relations to the skeletal structure and CT numbers. Finally, the recognized regions are mapped back to the 3-D CT images using an inverse transformation of the stretching process. This method is applied to 20 cases of torso CT images and evaluations are based on visual comparison of the recognition results and the original CT images by an expert in anatomy. The results show that our approach can segment and recognize abdominal wall muscle regions effectively. (orig.)

  12. Automated segmentation and recognition of abdominal wall muscles in X-ray torso CT images and its application in abdominal CAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.; Kamiya, N.; Hara, T.; Fujita, H. [Dept. of Intelligent Image Information, Div. of Regeneration and Advanced Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu Univ., Gifu (Japan); Chen, H. [Dept. of Anatomy, Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu Univ., Gifu (Japan); Yokoyama, R.; Hoshi, H. [Dept. of Radiology, Gifu Univ. Graduate School of Medicine and Univ. Hospital, Gifu (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    The information of abdominal wall is very important for the planning of surgical operation and abdominal organ recognition. In research fields of computer assisted radiology and surgery and computer-aided diagnosis, the segmentation and recognition of the abdominal wall muscles in CT images is a necessary pre-processing step. Due to the complexity of the abdominal wall structure and indistinctive in CT images, the automated segmentation of abdominal wall muscles is a difficult issue and has not been solved completely. We propose an approach to segment the abdominal wall muscles and divide it into three categories (front abdominal muscles including rectus abdominis; left and right side abdominal muscles including external oblique, internal oblique and transversus abdominis muscles) automatically. The approach, first, makes an initial classification of bone, fat, and muscles and organs based on the CT number. Then a layer structure is generated to describe the 3-D anatomical structures of human torso by stretching the torso region onto a thin-plate for easy recognition. The abdominal wall muscles are recognized on the layer structures using the spatial relations to the skeletal structure and CT numbers. Finally, the recognized regions are mapped back to the 3-D CT images using an inverse transformation of the stretching process. This method is applied to 20 cases of torso CT images and evaluations are based on visual comparison of the recognition results and the original CT images by an expert in anatomy. The results show that our approach can segment and recognize abdominal wall muscle regions effectively. (orig.)

  13. DNA and RNA analysis of blood and muscle from bodies with variable postmortem intervals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob; Lesnikova, Iana; Funder, Anette Mariane Daa

    2014-01-01

    The breakdown of DNA and RNA in decomposing human tissue represents a major obstacle for postmortem forensic molecular analysis. This study investigated the feasibility of performing PCR-based molecular analysis of blood and muscle tissue from 45 autopsy cases with defined postmortem intervals...... ranging from one to more than 14 days. It was not possible to collect blood from 38 % of the autopsy cases due to severe coagulation and hemolysis, whereas muscle tissue was available for all cases. PCR-amplifiable DNA could be extracted from 96 % of the frozen muscle specimens and from 93...... % of the formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) muscle specimens. A quality assessment of muscle-derived DNA showed increased fragmentation with advancing body decomposition and generally more fragmentation in DNA from FFPE tissue than in DNA from frozen tissue. It was possible to amplify 1,000 basepair (bp...

  14. On the positive correlation between the percentage of acute fracture of medial orbital wall and the degree of injury of affected medial rectus muscle by CT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lei; Wang Jue

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To study the correlation between the percentage of acute fracture of unilateral medial orbital wall and the degree of injury of medial rectus muscle on the same side and to explore the possibility of evaluating the degree of injury of medial rectus muscle according to the percentage of fracture of medial orbital wall on the same side undergoing examination and diagnosis of ocular trauma by use of CT scan. Method: To measure the span length of fracture of medial orbital wall, to calculate the fracture percentage, to measure the maximum widths of muscle belly of medial rectus muscle on affected and contralateral sides on CT images and to analyse statistically. Results: There is a significant positive correlation between the fracture percentage of medial orbital wall and the increase in amplitude of width of medial rectus muscle on the same side. Conclusion: The injury of medial rectus muscle was aggravated by the greater percentage of fracture of medial orbital wall, which could be used to assess the degree of injury of medial rectus muscle suffering fracture of lamina orbitalis.

  15. Reducing body fat with altitude hypoxia training in swimmers: role of blood perfusion to skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Michael; Liao, Chin-An; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Wen-Chih; Hou, Chien-Wen; Yu, Szu-Hsien; Harris, M Brennan; Hsu, Tung-Shiung; Lee, Shin-Da; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2013-02-28

    Swimmers tend to have greater body fat than athletes from other sports. The purpose of the study was to examine changes in body composition after altitude hypoxia exposure and the role of blood distribution to the skeletal muscle in swimmers. With a constant training volume of 12.3 km/day, young male swimmers (N = 10, 14.8 ± 0.5 years) moved from sea-level to a higher altitude of 2,300 meters. Body composition was measured before and after translocation to altitude using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) along with 8 control male subjects who resided at sea level for the same period of time. To determine the effects of hypoxia on muscle blood perfusion, total hemoglobin concentration (THC) was traced by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in the triceps and quadriceps muscles under glucose-ingested and insulin-secreted conditions during hypoxia exposure (16% O2) after training. While no change in body composition was found in the control group, subjects who trained at altitude had unequivocally decreased fat mass (-1.7 ± 0.3 kg, -11.4%) with increased lean mass (+0.8 ± 0.2 kg, +1.5%). Arterial oxygen saturation significantly decreased with increased plasma lactate during hypoxia recovery mimicking 2,300 meters at altitude (~93% versus ~97%). Intriguingly, hypoxia resulted in elevated muscle THC, and sympathetic nervous activities occurred in parallel with greater-percent oxygen saturation in both muscle groups. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence that increased blood distribution to the skeletal muscle under postprandial condition may contribute to the reciprocally increased muscle mass and decreased body mass after a 3-week altitude exposure in swimmers.

  16. Skeletal muscle PGC-1α modulates systemic ketone body homeostasis and ameliorates diabetic hyperketonemia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Kristoffer; Albert, Verena; Cardel, Bettina; Salatino, Silvia; Handschin, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Ketone bodies (KBs) are crucial energy substrates during states of low carbohydrate availability. However, an aberrant regulation of KB homeostasis can lead to complications such as diabetic ketoacidosis. Exercise and diabetes affect systemic KB homeostasis, but the regulation of KB metabolism is still enigmatic. In our study in mice with either knockout or overexpression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α in skeletal muscle, PGC-1α regulated ketolytic gene transcription in muscle. Furthermore, KB homeostasis of these mice was investigated during withholding of food, exercise, and ketogenic diet feeding, and after streptozotocin injection. In response to these ketogenic stimuli, modulation of PGC-1α levels in muscle affected systemic KB homeostasis. Moreover, the data demonstrate that skeletal muscle PGC-1α is necessary for the enhanced ketolytic capacity in response to exercise training and overexpression of PGC-1α in muscle enhances systemic ketolytic capacity and is sufficient to ameliorate diabetic hyperketonemia in mice. In cultured myotubes, the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor-α was a partner of PGC-1α in the regulation of ketolytic gene transcription. These results demonstrate a central role of skeletal muscle PGC-1α in the transcriptional regulation of systemic ketolytic capacity.-Svensson, K., Albert, V., Cardel, B., Salatino, S., Handschin, C. Skeletal muscle PGC-1α modulates systemic ketone body homeostasis and ameliorates diabetic hyperketonemia in mice. © FASEB.

  17. [Muscle dysmorphia, body image and eating behaviors in two male populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Rosa; Molinari, Daniela

    2010-11-01

    Muscle dysmorphia or vigorexia is a disorder in which a person becomes obsessed with the idea that he or she is not muscular enough. To assess physical exercise, eating behaviors and the presence of muscle dysmorphia among weightlifters and medical students. Cross sectional evaluation of 88 male weightlifters aged 27 ± 7 years and 84 male medical students aged 22 ± 1 year was made. Eating behaviors were evaluated using the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40) and the Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI). The perception of body image was assessed using the Graduate Hannover Scale (GHS). Prevalence of muscle dysmorphia among weightlifters was 13.6%. Both groups did not differ in body dissatisfaction. Interest in appearance among weightlifters was significantly higher than in students and ranged significantly higher in EAT-40 and EDI (p < 0.001). Other sports were practiced with the same frequency by weightlifters and students. Weightlifters expended more time than students exercising to improve their appearance (p < 0.005). Forty two percent of weightlifters with muscle dysmorphia displayed abuse of anabolics and 67% used other substances to improve their performance (p < 0.005). The presence of muscle dysmorphia among weightlifters was confirmed. They were dissatisfied with their body image and more concerned with their physical appearance than those without muscle dysmorphia and/or students. Their anabolic abuse rate was high. Our findings were similar to those reported in the international literature.

  18. Muscle function and body composition profile in adolescents with restrictive anorexia nervosa: does resistance training help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-del-Valle, Maria; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Morande-Lavin, Gonzalo; Perez Ruiz, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of short-term resistance training on the body composition profile and muscle function in a group of Anorexia Nervosa restricting type (AN-R) patients. The sample consisted of AN-R female adolescents (12.8 ± 0.6 years) allocated into the control and intervention groups (n = 18 each). Body composition and relative strength were assessed at baseline, after 8 weeks and 4 weeks following the intervention. Body mass index (BMI) increased throughout the study (p = 0.011). Significant skeletal muscle mass (SMM) gains were found in the intervention group (p = 0.045, d = 0.6) that correlated to the change in BMI (r = 0.51, p  0.60) with change in BMI in both the groups. Significant relative strength increases (p Anorexia Nervosa Restricting Type (AN-R) AN-R is a psychiatric disorder that has a major impact on muscle mass content and function. However, little or no attention has been paid to muscle recovery. High intensity resistance training is safe for AN-R after hospitalization and enhances the force generating capacity as well as muscle mass gains. Skeletal muscle mass content and muscular function improvements are partially maintained for a short period of time when the exercise program ceases.

  19. Effect of armor and carrying load on body balance and leg muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Huiju; Branson, Donna; Kim, Seonyoung; Warren, Aric; Jacobson, Bert; Petrova, Adriana; Peksoz, Semra; Kamenidis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of weight and weight distribution of body armor and load carriage on static body balance and leg muscle function. A series of human performance tests were conducted with seven male, healthy, right-handed military students in seven garment conditions with varying weight and weight distributions. Static body balance was assessed by analyzing the trajectory of center of plantar pressure and symmetry of weight bearing in the feet. Leg muscle functions were assessed by analyzing the peak electromyography amplitude of four selected leg muscles during walking. Results of this study showed that uneven weight distribution of garment and load beyond an additional 9 kg impaired static body balance as evidenced by increased sway of center of plantar pressure and asymmetry of weight bearing in the feet. Added weight on non-dominant side of the body created greater impediment to static balance. Increased garment weight also elevated peak EMG amplitude in the rectus femoris to maintain body balance and in the medial gastrocnemius to increase propulsive force. Negative impacts on balance and leg muscle function with increased carrying loads, particularly with an uneven weight distribution, should be stressed to soldiers, designers, and sports enthusiasts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Urinary Incontinence in Older Women: The Role of Body Composition and Muscle Strength: From the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suskind, Anne M.; Cawthon, Peggy M.; Nakagawa, Sanae; Subak, Leslee L.; Reinders, I.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Cummings, Steve; Cauley, Jane A.; Harris, Tamara B; Huang, Alison J.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate prospective relationships between body composition and muscle strength with predominantly stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) in older women. DESIGN: Prospective community-dwelling observational cohort study (Health, Aging, and Body

  1. Dose rate evaluation of body phantom behind ITER bio-shield wall using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beheshti, A.; Jabbari, I.; Karimian, A.; Abdi, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most critical risks to humans in reactors environment is radiation exposure. Around the tokamak hall personnel are exposed to a wide range of particles, including neutrons and photons. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a nuclear fusion research and engineering project, which is the most advanced experimental tokamak nuclear fusion reactor. Dose rates assessment and photon radiation due to the neutron activation of the solid structures in ITER is important from the radiological point of view. Therefore, the dosimetry considered in this case is based on the Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasma burning with neutrons production rate at 14.1 MeV. The aim of this study is assessment the amount of radiation behind bio-shield wall that a human received during normal operation of ITER by considering neutron activation and delay gammas. To achieve the aim, the ITER system and its components were simulated by Monte Carlo method. Also to increase the accuracy and precision of the absorbed dose assessment a body phantom were considered in the simulation. The results of this research showed that total dose rates level near the outside of bio-shield wall of the tokamak hall is less than ten percent of the annual occupational dose limits during normal operation of ITER and It is possible to learn how long human beings can remain in that environment before the body absorbs dangerous levels of radiation. (authors)

  2. Sintering behavior of porous wall tile bodies during fast single-firing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidnei José Gomes Sousa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In ceramic wall tile processing, fast single-firing cycles have been widely used. In this investigation a fast single-firing porous wall tile mixture was prepared using raw materials from the North Fluminense region.Specimens were obtained by uniaxial pressing and sintered in air at various temperatures (1080 - 1200 °C using a fast-firing cycle (60 minutes. Evolution of the microstructure was followed by XRD and SEM. The results revealed that the main phases formed during the sintering step are anorthite, gehlenite and hematite. It appears that the sintering process is characterized by the presence of a small amount of a liquid phase below 1140 °C. As a result, the microstructure of the ceramic bodies showed a network of small dense zones interconnected with a porous phase. In addition, the strength of the material below 1140 °C appeared to be related to the type and quantity of crystalline phases in the sintered bodies.

  3. A lumbar body support (KBS 2000) alters lumbar muscle recruitment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    back pain. K. L. Derman, E. w. Derman, T. D. Noakes. Objective. To determine the effects of a locally designed lumbar body support (LBS) on integrated ... surface, patients with chronic low back pain have higher. IEMG activity of the erector spinae ... It has also been shown that changes in sitting posture can alter LBP.6 The ...

  4. Potential of lower-limb muscles to accelerate the body during cerebral palsy gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Tomas A; Schache, Anthony G; Graham, H Kerr; Baker, Richard; Thomason, Pam; Pandy, Marcus G

    2012-06-01

    Two of the most common gait patterns in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP) are termed 'crouch gait' and 'jump gait'. While outcomes of surgical interventions designed to improve functional mobility are generally positive, many children displaying these gait patterns show minimal or no improvement post-surgery. A poor response to treatment may be partially attributable to incorrect interpretations of muscle function. Computational techniques that assess muscle function may help address this issue, but before studying specific surgeries, the gait patterns themselves must be better understood. The aim of this study was to identify differences in lower-limb muscle function when comparing crouch, jump and able-bodied gait patterns by quantifying the potential of lower-limb muscles to accelerate the body's center of mass. A muscle's potential acceleration was defined as the acceleration induced by a unit of muscle force. Dynamic simulations of walking using musculoskeletal models were developed for eight children with crouch gait, ten with jump gait, and ten controls. There were significant differences (pmuscle potential accelerations between crouch and able-bodied gait patterns, and between jump and able-bodied gait patterns, for most of the major muscles of the hip, knee, and ankle. One important outcome was the identification of the significantly reduced potential of gluteus medius to extend the hip in both crouch gait and jump gait. Potential acceleration analyses appear to be suitable for evaluating differences between common gait patterns and may also be applied to study the effects of surgical treatments. The results of such studies may lead to improved treatment outcomes for individuals with impaired mobility. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Sporadic inclusion-body myositis: A degenerative muscle disease associated with aging, impaired muscle protein homeostasis and abnormal mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askanas, Valerie; Engel, W King; Nogalska, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Sporadic inclusion-body myositis (s-IBM) is the most common degenerative muscle disease in which aging appears to be a key risk factor. In this review we focus on several cellular molecular mechanisms responsible for multiprotein aggregation and accumulations within s-IBM muscle fibers, and their possible consequences. Those include mechanisms leading to: a) accumulation in the form of aggregates within the muscle fibers, of several proteins, including amyloid-β42 and its oligomers, and phosphorylated tau in the form of paired helical filaments, and we consider their putative detrimental influence; and b) protein misfolding and aggregation, including evidence of abnormal myoproteostasis, such as increased protein transcription, inadequate protein disposal, and abnormal posttranslational modifications of proteins. Pathogenic importance of our recently demonstrated abnormal mitophagy is also discussed. The intriguing phenotypic similarities between s-IBM muscle fibers and the brains of Alzheimer and Parkinson's disease patients, the two most common neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging, are also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Muscle strength and body composition in severe obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Vieira Gadducci

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to evaluate associations between maximum voluntary contraction torques of the lower limbs and body composition for subjects with severe obesity. METHODS: Body composition was evaluated by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and maximum voluntary contraction torques of the lower limbs were measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. One hundred thirty-two patients were enrolled (100 females and 32 males. Eighty-seven patients had a body mass index between 40 and 49.9 kg/m2 (the A group, and 45 patients had a body mass index between 50 and 59.9 kg/m2 (the B group. RESULTS: Absolute extension and flexion torques had weak associations with fat-free mass but a moderate association with absolute extension torque and fat-free mass of the lower limbs. There were no significant differences between the A and B groups with respect to absolute extension and flexion torques. For the A group, absolute extension and flexion torques were moderately associated with fat-free mass and with fat-free mass of the lower limbs. For the B group, there were only moderate associations between absolute extension and flexion torques with fat-free mass of the lower limbs. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate that both groups exhibited similar absolute torque values. There were weak to moderate associations between absolute extension and flexion torques and fat-free mass but a moderate association with fat-free mass of the lower limbs. Individuals with severe obesity should strive for greater absolute torques, fat-free mass and especially fat-free mass of the lower limbs to prevent functional limitations and physical incapacity.

  7. Muscle strength and body composition in severe obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadducci, Alexandre Vieira; de Cleva, Roberto; de Faria Santarém, Gabriela Correia; Silva, Paulo Roberto Santos; Greve, Julia Maria D'Andréa; Santo, Marco Aurélio

    2017-05-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate associations between maximum voluntary contraction torques of the lower limbs and body composition for subjects with severe obesity. Body composition was evaluated by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and maximum voluntary contraction torques of the lower limbs were measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. One hundred thirty-two patients were enrolled (100 females and 32 males). Eighty-seven patients had a body mass index between 40 and 49.9 kg/m2 (the A group), and 45 patients had a body mass index between 50 and 59.9 kg/m2 (the B group). Absolute extension and flexion torques had weak associations with fat-free mass but a moderate association with absolute extension torque and fat-free mass of the lower limbs. There were no significant differences between the A and B groups with respect to absolute extension and flexion torques. For the A group, absolute extension and flexion torques were moderately associated with fat-free mass and with fat-free mass of the lower limbs. For the B group, there were only moderate associations between absolute extension and flexion torques with fat-free mass of the lower limbs. Our findings demonstrate that both groups exhibited similar absolute torque values. There were weak to moderate associations between absolute extension and flexion torques and fat-free mass but a moderate association with fat-free mass of the lower limbs. Individuals with severe obesity should strive for greater absolute torques, fat-free mass and especially fat-free mass of the lower limbs to prevent functional limitations and physical incapacity.

  8. INSULIN HORMONE EFFECTS ON FT&ST MUSCLES OF BODY BULDING ATHLETS AND DIABETIC PEOPLE TYPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEHDI GHORBANI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Insulin is a Hormone that is secreted from pancreas and has an undeniable role in regulating blood - suger. In medicine, the injection samples of this Hormone are used for controlling diabetes disease. But recently, it has been used by athletes for driving G lucose and Amino Acids in to muscle - cells in industrial and injection forms for fast development of muscle volume and power among potency athletes specially body - builders. The present study, is reviewing consumption consequences of this drug by athletes and it’s important and of course hidden hazards. In this study, the Hormone’s impression and it’s high secretion and mechanism imbalance in body - builders bodies are analyzed by following Dosage and period of Insulin consumption among athletes and body - b uilders and studying different forms and injection amounts of Insulin, and comparing them with diabetes disease. Results show that Insulin is a Hormone with high Anabolic effect and it is responsible for nutrient materials transmission into blood stream an d muscle - cells. The blood - suger is saved as glycogen in muscles on this hormone effect and Amino acid transmission is developed in body’s muscle system. This features by muscle manufacturing apparent of athletes and muscle exhausting delay in fast contra cting muscle fibers and enthusiasm of practicing for hours, dosen’t cause to ignore the dangerous disadvantageous of this hormone including: imbalance of metabolism such as extra lipid burning and glycogen saving in body. Because of Insulin long consumptio n body produces little amount of glycogen and adrenaline hormones to re increase the amount of blood - suger, therefore increasing blood - suger isn’t declared with warning signals such as: trembling and nervousness, and athletes encounter with the shock of decreasing blood - suger (Hyper - glysemia and die. This study shows that in correct consumption of diabetes drugs are hazardous in body. Builders in different

  9. COMPARISSON OF DIFFERENT IN VIVO ESTIMATORS OF BODY FAT AND MUSCLE CONTENT IN ADULT CREOLE GOATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hania Vilar-Martinez

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of ultrasound measurements (ULT, body condition score (BCS and body mass index (BMI to predict body fat and muscle in goats. Twenty-four adult, ovariectomized, creole goats were fed individually to achieve dissimilar stable body weights (26 to 66 kg. After a six-week period of stabilization BCS was evaluated (average of 4 separate evaluations and BMI calculated (BW/(length x heightx10; average of 2 independent length and height measurements. Fat and muscle coverage over the dorsal (12-13th, lumbar (1st and coxal (1st vertebrae were measured by ultrasound imaging. Animals were slaughtered and visceral fat dissected and weighed. Left half carcass weights were obtained and muscle and fat were dissected and weighed. Left half carcass data were adjusted to whole carcass data. Simple  regression analyses were performed with ULT, BCS and BMI as predictors and visceral (VF, carcass (CF and total fat (TF, and muscle (MU as response variables. Coefficients of variation (CV were calculated for BCS and BMI estimations. ULT measurement of total tissue (fat + muscle coverage over dorsal vertebrae presented the highest predictive value for ULT measurements; thus this measurement is the only reported. Coefficients of determination (R2 for VF, CF and TF were .55, .76 and .68; .78, .82 and .87; .81, .81 and .88 for ULT, BCS and BMI as predictors. R2 for MU were .67, .84 and .76 using ULT, BCS and BMI as predictors. R2 for proportions of VF/BW, CF/BW and TF/BW were .47, .73 and .65; .75, .78 and .88; .74, .71 and .85; when ULT, BCS and BMI were used as predictors. R2 for MS/BW were ≤ .10 using ULT, BCS and BMI as predictors. CV was greater in BCS estimation as compared to BMI estimation (9.7 vs. 3.1 %. BCS and BMI were more accurate in vivo predictors than ULT for body fat content, fat as proportion of BW and body muscle content. ULT, BCS and BMI were completely worthless for predicting

  10. Relationships Between Lower-Body Muscle Structure and, Lower-Body Strength, Explosiveness and Eccentric Leg Stiffness in Adolescent Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh L. Secomb, Sophia Nimphius, Oliver R.L. Farley, Lina E. Lundgren, Tai T. Tran, Jeremy M. Sheppard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to determine whether any relationships were present between lower-body muscle structure and, lower-body strength, variables measured during a countermovement jump (CMJ and squat jump (SJ, and eccentric leg stiffness, in adolescent athletes. Thirty junior male (n = 23 and female (n = 7 surfing athletes (14.8 ± 1.7 y; 1.63 ± 0.09 m; 54.8 ± 12.1 kg undertook lower-body muscle structure assessment with ultrasonography and performed a; CMJ, SJ and an isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP. In addition, eccentric leg stiffness was calculated from variables of the CMJ and IMTP. Moderate to very large relationships (r = 0.46-0.73 were identified between the thickness of the vastus lateralis (VL and lateral gastrocnemius (LG muscles, and VL pennation angle and; peak force (PF in the CMJ, SJ and IMTP. Additionally, moderate to large relationships (r = 0.37-0.59 were found between eccentric leg stiffness and; VL and LG thickness, VL pennation angle, and LG fascicle length, with a large relationship (r = 0.59 also present with IMTP PF. These results suggest that greater thickness of the VL and LG were related to improved maximal dynamic and isometric strength, likely due to increased hypertrophy of the extensor muscles. Furthermore, this increased thickness was related to greater eccentric leg stiffness, as the associated enhanced lower-body strength likely allowed for greater neuromuscular activation, and hence less compliance, during a stretch-shortening cycle.

  11. Nonlinear muscles, passive viscoelasticity and body taper conspire to create neuromechanical phase lags in anguilliform swimmers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T McMillen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Locomotion provides superb examples of cooperation among neuromuscular systems, environmental reaction forces, and sensory feedback. As part of a program to understand the neuromechanics of locomotion, here we construct a model of anguilliform (eel-like swimming in slender fishes. Building on a continuum mechanical representation of the body as an viscoelastic rod, actuated by a traveling wave of preferred curvature and subject to hydrodynamic reaction forces, we incorporate a new version of a calcium release and muscle force model, fitted to data from the lamprey Ichthyomyzon unicuspis, that interactively generates the curvature wave. We use the model to investigate the source of the difference in speeds observed between electromyographic waves of muscle activation and mechanical waves of body curvature, concluding that it is due to a combination of passive viscoelastic and geometric properties of the body and active muscle properties. Moreover, we find that nonlinear force dependence on muscle length and shortening velocity may reduce the work done by the swimming muscles in steady swimming.

  12. Closing the Loop: Integrating Body, Muscle and Environment with Locomotion Central Pattern Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-30

    between the neural circuitry, body, and fluid environment for swimming locomotion , where the lamprey serves as a model system1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8. Our...REPORT Final Report: Closing the Loop: Integrating Body, Muscle and Environment with Locomotion Central Pattern Generators 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...CLASSIFICATION OF: The role of sensory feedback is a central question in understanding vertebrate locomotion . Sensory feedback related to movement of

  13. Evidence for a Saponin Biosynthesis Pathway in the Body Wall of the Commercially Significant Sea Cucumber Holothuria scabra

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    Shahida Akter Mitu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The sea cucumber (phylum Echinodermata body wall is the first line of defense and is well known for its production of secondary metabolites; including vitamins and triterpenoid glycoside saponins that have important ecological functions and potential benefits to human health. The genes involved in the various biosynthetic pathways are unknown. To gain insight into these pathways in an echinoderm, we performed a comparative transcriptome analysis and functional annotation of the body wall and the radial nerve of the sea cucumber Holothuria scabra; to define genes associated with body wall metabolic functioning and secondary metabolite biosynthesis. We show that genes related to signal transduction mechanisms were more highly represented in the H. scabra body wall, including genes encoding enzymes involved in energy production. Eight of the core triterpenoid biosynthesis enzymes were found, however, the identity of the saponin specific biosynthetic pathway enzymes remains unknown. We confirm the body wall release of at least three different triterpenoid saponins using solid phase extraction followed by ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight-mass spectrometry. The resource we have established will help to guide future research to explore secondary metabolite biosynthesis in the sea cucumber.

  14. Body uneasiness, eating disorders, and muscle dysmorphia in individuals who overexercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-García, Cristina; Ammendolia, Antonio; Procopio, Leonardo; Papaianni, Maria C; Sinopoli, Flora; Bianco, Carmelina; De Fazio, Pasquale; Capranica, Laura

    2010-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate exercise dependence, body and eating concerns of active individuals in relation to muscle dysmorphia (MD) and eating disorders (EDs). One hundred and thirty-four active individuals (86 men, 48 women) and 20 ED women were divided into 4 groups according to their sex and the difference between their actual and desired body weight (group A: men who wanted to gain weight; group B: men who wanted to lose weight; group C: women who wanted to lose weight; group D: ED women). The Eating Disorder Inventory 2, Body Uneasiness Test, and Muscle Dysmorphia Inventory questionnaires were administered. All women desired to reduce their body weight, whereas 55% of men wanted to increase their muscle mass, also using anabolic steroids and food integrators. All groups showed a similar use of diuretics and laxatives (range 10-21%). The findings highlighted the presence of minor body image disorders in groups B and C. Conversely, body image was remarkably altered in groups D and A. Recognizing main MD traits, physical trainers should recommend further psychological counseling. Information should also be provided to gym clients regarding the health risks associated with purgative behaviors, use of steroids, and abuse of food supplements.

  15. Ultrasonic Thickness of Lateral Abdominal Wall Muscles in Response to Pelvic Floor Muscle Contraction in women with stress incontinency with and without Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Dehghan-Manshadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Urinary Incontinence (UI as a common lower urinary tract dysfunction , results from Pelvic Floor Muscle's (PFM underactivity.Because of co-activation of PFM and the Lateral Abdominal Wall Muscles (LAWM, this study was aimed to investigate the changes in the ultrasonic thickness of the LAWM in response to PFM contraction in stress urinary incontinent (SUIwomen with and without Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP. Materials & Methods: A total of 28 women, 10 healthy, 18 SUI with and without CLBP (9 in each group participated in this quasi-experimental study. After collecting demographic information and assessment of PFM function, changes in ultrasonic thickness of right LAWM were measured in response to PFM contraction. One way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and Pearson’s correlation tests were performed to analyze the data. Values of P0.05. There was a significant increase in thickness of the Traversus Abdominis Muscle (TrA during PFM contraction in control group comparing experimental groups (P=0.03. Women in control group showed significantly higher PFM strength and more intravaginal pressure (P=0.001. Conclusion: Changes in ultrasonic thickness of the TrA during PFM contraction revealed disturbance of co-activation of the LAWM and the PFM in women with and without SUI CLBP.

  16. Effect of whole body vibration exercise on muscle strength and proprioception in females with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trans, T; Aaboe, J; Henriksen, M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) exercise on muscle strength and proprioception in female patients with osteoarthritis in the knee (knee-OA). A single blinded, randomised, controlled trial was performed in an outpatient clinic on 52 female patients...

  17. Analysis of Muscle Activity Utilizing Bench Presses in the AnyBody Simulation Modelling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongqiu Ji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the AnyBody human modeling system with identical weights and varying grip distance (40.0 cm, 50.0 cm, and 60.0 cm, the stress distribution for the pectoralis and the muscle of upper extremity during a bench press was simulated, and the surface myoelectricity (EMG method was validated. Methods. The physical parameters driving the model of the human body were selected as weights of 35.0% (25.0 kg and grip distances. Conclusion. The validation of AnyBody software was proved as a high validity by using EMG test of four muscles’ activity compared to AnyBody software. During a bench press, the pectoralis major is the main muscle, the pectoralis major discharge increases with the height of barbell increases, and the pectoralis major discharge decreases as the short grip width increases. When the grip width equals the shoulder width, the value of pectoralis minor is lowest; when the grip width is smaller or larger than the shoulder width, the value is larger. As the short grip distance increases, the discharge of posterior deltoid muscle and triceps surface myoelectricity increases; thus, as the short grip distance increases, the deltoid muscle and triceps assist the pectoralis major during a bench press.

  18. Body, heart, thyroid gland and skeletal muscle weight changes in rats with altered thyroid status

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Tomáš; Zachařová, Gisela; Smerdu, V.; Jirmanová, Isa

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 6 (2001), s. 619-626 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/00/1653 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : thyroid state * skeletal muscles * body and organ weight Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.027, year: 2001

  19. Association between fitness and changes in body composition and muscle strength.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, A.; Visser, M.; Simonsick, E.M.; Yu, B.; Allison, D.B.; Newman, A.B.; van Eijk, J.T.; Schwartz, A.V.; Satterfield, S.; Harris, T.B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the association between physical fitness, assessed according to ability and time to complete a 400-m walk, on changes in body composition and muscle strength over a 7-year period. Design: Prospective observational cohort study. Setting: Memphis, Tennessee, and Pittsburgh,

  20. Smooth muscle cell function and organization of the resistance artery wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güvenç Tuna, B.

    2014-01-01

    Remodeling of the vascular wall occurs in several cardiovascular pathologies. A structural change in diameter necessarily involves reorganization in both cellular and extracellular matrix components. The significance of matrix remodeling in vascular pathologies is well appreciated, while plasticity

  1. Whole-Body Vibration and Blood Flow and Muscle Oxygenation: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Games, Kenneth E.; Sefton, JoEllen M.; Wilson, Alan E.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The use and popularity of whole-body vibration (WBV) has increased in recent years, but there is a lack of consensus in the literature about the effectiveness of the treatment. Objective: To quantitatively examine the effects of WBV on muscle oxygenation and peripheral blood flow in healthy adults. Data Sources: We searched Web of Science and PubMed databases and reference lists from relevant articles using the key terms whole body vibration, whole-body vibration, WBV, blood flow, peripheral blood flow, oxygenation, muscle oxygenation, circulation, circulatory, near infrared spectroscopy, NIRS, and power Doppler. Key terms were searched using single word and combination searches. No date range was specified. Study Selection: Criteria for inclusion were (1) use of a commercially available WBV device, (2) a human research model, (3) a pre-WBV condition and at least 1 WBV experimental condition, and (4) reporting of unstandardized means and standard deviations of muscle oxygenation or peripheral blood flow. Data Extraction: Means, standard deviations, and sample sizes were extracted from the text, tables, and figures of included studies. A total of 35 and 90 data points were extracted for the muscle-oxygenation and blood-flow meta-analyses, respectively. Data for each meta-analysis were combined and analyzed using meta-analysis software. Weighted, random-effects meta-analyses using the Hedges g metric were completed for muscle oxygenation and blood flow. We then conducted follow-up analyses using the moderator variables of vibration type, vibration time, vibration frequency, measurement location, and sample type. Data Synthesis: We found 18 potential articles. Further examination yielded 10 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Whole-body vibration was shown to positively influence peripheral blood flow. Additionally, the moderators of vibration type and frequency altered the influence of WBV on blood flow. Overall, WBV did not alter muscle oxygenation

  2. Whole-body vibration and blood flow and muscle oxygenation: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Games, Kenneth E; Sefton, JoEllen M; Wilson, Alan E

    2015-05-01

    The use and popularity of whole-body vibration (WBV) has increased in recent years, but there is a lack of consensus in the literature about the effectiveness of the treatment. To quantitatively examine the effects of WBV on muscle oxygenation and peripheral blood flow in healthy adults. We searched Web of Science and PubMed databases and reference lists from relevant articles using the key terms whole body vibration, whole-body vibration, WBV, blood flow, peripheral blood flow, oxygenation, muscle oxygenation, circulation, circulatory, near infrared spectroscopy, NIRS, and power Doppler. Key terms were searched using single word and combination searches. No date range was specified. Criteria for inclusion were (1) use of a commercially available WBV device, (2) a human research model, (3) a pre-WBV condition and at least 1 WBV experimental condition, and (4) reporting of unstandardized means and standard deviations of muscle oxygenation or peripheral blood flow. Means, standard deviations, and sample sizes were extracted from the text, tables, and figures of included studies. A total of 35 and 90 data points were extracted for the muscle-oxygenation and blood-flow meta-analyses, respectively. Data for each meta-analysis were combined and analyzed using meta-analysis software. Weighted, random-effects meta-analyses using the Hedges g metric were completed for muscle oxygenation and blood flow. We then conducted follow-up analyses using the moderator variables of vibration type, vibration time, vibration frequency, measurement location, and sample type. We found 18 potential articles. Further examination yielded 10 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Whole-body vibration was shown to positively influence peripheral blood flow. Additionally, the moderators of vibration type and frequency altered the influence of WBV on blood flow. Overall, WBV did not alter muscle oxygenation; however, when the measurement site was considered, muscle oxygenation increased or

  3. Additional double-wall roof in single-wall, closed, convective incubators: Impact on body heat loss from premature infants and optimal adjustment of the incubator air temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanaud, Stéphane; Decima, Pauline; Pelletier, Amandine; Libert, Jean-Pierre; Stephan-Blanchard, Erwan; Bach, Véronique; Tourneux, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Radiant heat loss is high in low-birth-weight (LBW) neonates. Double-wall or single-wall incubators with an additional double-wall roof panel that can be removed during phototherapy are used to reduce Radiant heat loss. There are no data on how the incubators should be used when this second roof panel is removed. The aim of the study was to assess the heat exchanges in LBW neonates in a single-wall incubator with and without an additional roof panel. To determine the optimal thermoneutral incubator air temperature. Influence of the additional double-wall roof was assessed by using a thermal mannequin simulating a LBW neonate. Then, we calculated the optimal incubator air temperature from a cohort of human LBW neonate in the absence of the additional roof panel. Twenty-three LBW neonates (birth weight: 750-1800g; gestational age: 28-32 weeks) were included. With the additional roof panel, R was lower but convective and evaporative skin heat losses were greater. This difference can be overcome by increasing the incubator air temperature by 0.15-0.20°C. The benefit of an additional roof panel was cancelled out by greater body heat losses through other routes. Understanding the heat transfers between the neonate and the environment is essential for optimizing incubators. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of body weight support gait training system using antagonistic bi-articular muscle model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yoshiyuki; Imai, Shingo; Nobutomo, Tatsuya; Miyoshi, Tasuku; Yamamoto, Shin-Ichiroh

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a body weight support gait training system for stroke and spinal cord injury. This system consists of a powered orthosis, treadmill and equipment of body weight support. Attachment of the powered orthosis is able to fit subject who has difference of body size. This powered orthosis is driven by pneumatic McKibben actuator. Actuators are arranged as pair of antagonistic bi-articular muscle model and two pairs of antagonistic mono-articular muscle model like human musculoskeletal system. Part of the equipment of body weight support suspend subject by wire harness, and body weight of subject is supported continuously by counter weight. The powered orthosis is attached equipment of body weight support by parallel linkage, and movement of the powered orthosis is limited at sagittal plane. Weight of the powered orthosis is compensated by parallel linkage with gas-spring. In this study, we developed system that has orthosis powered by pneumatic McKibben actuators and equipment of body weight support. We report detail of our developed body weight support gait training system.

  5. Structural and biochemical changes in dermis of sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus) during autolysis in response to cutting the body wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Xin; Zhou, Da-Yong; Liu, Zi-Qiang; Lu, Ting; Song, Liang; Li, Dong-Mei; Dong, Xiu-Ping; Qi, Hang; Zhu, Bei-Wei; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2018-02-01

    The autolysis of sea cucumber body wall is caused by endogenous proteolysis of its structural elements. However, changes in collagen fibrils, collagen fibres and microfibrils, the major structural elements in sea cucumber body wall during autolysis are less clear. Autolysis of sea cucumber (S. japonicus) was induced by cutting the body wall, and the structural and biochemical changes in its dermis were investigated using electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy, electrophoresis, and chemical analysis. During autolysis, both collagen fibres and microfibrils gradually degraded. In contrast, damage to microfibrils was more pronounced. Upon massive autolysis, collagen fibres disaggregated into collagen fibril bundles and individual fibrils due to the fracture of interfibrillar bridges. Meanwhile, excessive unfolding of collagen fibrils occurred. However, there was only slight damage to collagen monomers. Therefore, structural damage in collagen fibres, collagen fibrils and microfibrils rather than monomeric collagen accounts for autolysis of S. japonicus dermis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Osmotic relations of the coelomic fluid and body wall tissues in Arenicola marina subjected to salinity change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.; Spaargaren, D.H.

    1979-01-01

    . In the body wall extracts, however, NPS accounts for at least one third of the osmotic concentration and for most of the substantial non-electrolyte fraction. There is no evidence from coelomic NPS measurements for extrusion of cellular amino acids during adaptation to lowered salinity. In diluted sea water...... nitrogenous organic molecules (ninhydrin-positive substances, NPS) in the body wall tissues and in the coelomic fluid of specimens of Arenicola in response to sudden changes in salinity. The coelomic solutes consist almost entirely of electrolytes and the osmotic contribution of NPS is essentially negligible...... the concentrations of the different solutes (including NPS) decrease by approximately similar rates and proportions, indicating responses to a common factor, such as tissue hydration. The concentration of chloride in the body wall tissues, however, showed distinctly greater decreases than that of other solutes...

  7. Body-building without power training: endogenously regulated pectoral muscle hypertrophy in confined shorebirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz; Piersma; Dekinga

    1999-10-01

    Shorebirds such as red knots Calidris canutus routinely make migratory flights of 3000 km or more. Previous studies on this species, based on compositional analyses, suggest extensive pectoral muscle hypertrophy in addition to fat storage before take-off. Such hypertrophy could be due to power training and/or be effected by an endogenous circannual rhythm. Red knots of two subspecies with contrasting migration patterns were placed in a climate-controlled aviary (12 h:12 h L:D photoperiod) where exercise was limited. Using ultrasonography, we measured pectoral muscle size as the birds stored fat in preparation for migration. At capture, there were no differences in body mass and pectoral muscle mass between the two subspecies. As they prepared for southward and northward migration, respectively, the tropically wintering subspecies (C. c. canutus) gained 31 g and the temperate wintering subspecies (C. c. islandica) gained 41 g. During this time, pectoral mass increased by 43-44 % of initial mass, representing 39 % (C. c. canutus) and 29 % (C. c. islandica) of the increase in body mass. The gizzard showed atrophy in conjunction with a diet change from molluscs to food pellets. Although we cannot exclude the possibility that the birds' limited movement may still be a prerequisite for pectoral muscle hypertrophy, extensive power training is certainly not a requirement. Muscle hypertrophy in the absence of photoperiod cues suggests the involvement of an endogenous circannual process.

  8. Abdominal bracing during lifting alters trunk muscle activity and body kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, Pieter; Campbell, Amity; Kemp-Smith, Kevin; O'Sullivan, Peter; Straker, Leon

    2017-09-01

    We assessed whether participants are able to perform abdominal bracing during lifting, and described its effects on trunk muscle activity and body kinematics. Fourteen participants performed 10 lifts (symmetrical lifting of a 15 kg load from floor level), 5 with abdominal bracing and 5 without. Activity of the lumbar multifidus (LM) and internal oblique (IO) muscles, and trunk and lower body kinematics were obtained. During non-bracing lifting, IO activity did not increase beyond rested standing levels (with average muscle activity ranging between 8.2 and 9.1% maximum voluntary contraction; %MVC), while LM activity did (range: 8.5-21.0 %MVC). During bracing lifting, muscle activity was higher compared to non-bracing in IO and LM at the start of the lift (with average between condition differences up to 10.9 %MVC). Upper leg, pelvis and lumbar spine angles were smaller, but thorax flexion angles were larger while lifting with bracing compared to without (with average between condition differences ranging from 0.7° to 4.3°). Although participants do not typically brace their abdominal muscles while lifting, they can be trained to do so. There appears to be no clear advantage of abdominal bracing during lifting, leaving its value for low-back pain prevention unclear. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Muscle function and body composition profile in adolescents with restrictive anorexia nervosa: Does resistance training help?

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández del Valle, María; Larumbe Zabala, Eneko; Morandé Lavín, Gonzalo; Pérez Ruiz, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of short-term resistance training on the body composition profile and muscle function in a group of Anorexia Nervosa restricting type (AN-R) patients. The sample consisted of AN-R female adolescents (12.8 ± 0.6 years) allocated into the control and intervention groups (n¼18 each). Body composition and relative strength were assessed at baseline, after 8 weeks and 4 weeks following the intervention. Body mass index (BMI) increased throughout...

  10. Manipulation of Muscle Creatine and Glycogen Changes Dual X-ray Absorptiometry Estimates of Body Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, Julia L; Ross, Megan L; Tomcik, Kristyen A; Jeacocke, Nikki A; Hopkins, Will G; Burke, Louise M

    2017-05-01

    Standardizing a dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) protocol is thought to provide a reliable measurement of body composition. We investigated the effects of manipulating muscle glycogen and creatine content independently and additively on DXA estimates of lean mass. Eighteen well-trained male cyclists undertook a parallel group application of creatine loading (n = 9) (20 g·d for 5 d loading; 3 g·d maintenance) or placebo (n = 9) with crossover application of glycogen loading (12 v 6 g·kg BM per day for 48 h) as part of a larger study involving a glycogen-depleting exercise protocol. Body composition, total body water, muscle glycogen and creatine content were assessed via DXA, bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy and standard biopsy techniques. Changes in the mean were assessed using the following effect-size scale: >0.2 small, >0.6, moderate, >1.2 large and compared with the threshold for the smallest worthwhile effect of the treatment. Glycogen loading, both with and without creatine loading, resulted in substantial increases in estimates of lean body mass (mean ± SD; 3.0% ± 0.7% and 2.0% ± 0.9%) and leg lean mass (3.1% ± 1.8% and 2.6% ± 1.0%) respectively. A substantial decrease in leg lean mass was observed after the glycogen depleting condition (-1.4% ± 1.6%). Total body water showed substantial increases after glycogen loading (2.3% ± 2.3%), creatine loading (1.4% ± 1.9%) and the combined treatment (2.3% ± 1.1%). Changes in muscle metabolites and water content alter DXA estimates of lean mass during periods in which minimal change in muscle protein mass is likely. This information needs to be considered in interpreting the results of DXA-derived estimates of body composition in athletes.

  11. Computational method for the real-time calculation of the full-body muscle load distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shippen, James

    2016-01-01

    A method is described for minimising a quadratic function subject to equality and inequality constraints. This approach is applicable to solving the full-body muscle load distribution problem and calculating joint contact loads. It has been found that this approach can provide the solution on modest computing facilities and in significantly less time than using active set and interior point quadratic programming techniques. Hence the approach is suitable for providing real-time feedback to subjects undergoing biomechanical analysis of muscle, skeletal and joint loadings.

  12. Development and embryonic pattern of body wall musculature in the crassiclitellate Eisenia andrei (Annelida, Clitellata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnekuhl, Vera S; Bergter, Annette; Purschke, Günter; Paululat, Achim

    2009-09-01

    During early development of Eisenia andrei (Crassiclitellata), a loose arrangement of primary circular and longitudinal muscles encloses the whole embryo. Circular muscles differentiate in an anterior-posterior progression creating a segmental pattern. Primary circular muscles emerge at the segmental borders while later in development the central part of each segment is filled with circular strands. Longitudinal muscles develop in an anterio-posterior manner as well, but by continuous lengthening. Muscle growth is not restricted by segmental boundaries. The development begins with one pair of prominent longitudinal muscles differentiating ventrally along the right and the left germ band. These first muscles provide a guiding structure for the parallel organization of the afterwards differentiating longitudinal musculature. Additional primary longitudinal muscles emerge and form, together with the initial circular muscles, the primary muscle grid of the embryo. During the following development, secondary longitudinal muscle strands develop and integrate themselves into the primary grid. Meanwhile the primary circular muscles split into thin strands in a ventral to dorsal progression. Thus, a fine structured mesh of circular and longitudinal muscles is generated. Compared to other "Oligochaeta", embryonic muscle patterns in E. andrei are adapted to the development of a lecithotrophic embryo. Nevertheless, two general characteristics of annelid muscle development become evident. The first is the segmental development of the circular muscles from a set of initial muscles situated at the segment borders. Second, there is a continuous development of primary longitudinal muscles starting at the anterior pole. At least one pair of main primary longitudinal strands is characteristic in Annelida. The space between all primary strands is filled with secondary longitudinal strands during further development. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Rib cage deformities alter respiratory muscle action and chest wall function in patients with severe osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoMauro, Antonella; Pochintesta, Simona; Romei, Marianna; D'Angelo, Maria Grazia; Pedotti, Antonio; Turconi, Anna Carla; Aliverti, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by bone fragility, multiple fractures and significant chest wall deformities. Cardiopulmonary insufficiency is the leading cause of death in these patients. Seven patients with severe OI type III, 15 with moderate OI type IV and 26 healthy subjects were studied. In addition to standard spirometry, rib cage geometry, breathing pattern and regional chest wall volume changes at rest in seated and supine position were assessed by opto-electronic plethysmography to investigate if structural modifications of the rib cage in OI have consequences on ventilatory pattern. One-way or two-way analysis of variance was performed to compare the results between the three groups and the two postures. Both OI type III and IV patients showed reduced FVC and FEV(1) compared to predicted values, on condition that updated reference equations are considered. In both positions, ventilation was lower in OI patients than control because of lower tidal volume (pfunction was normal, OI type III patients were characterized by reduced (prespiratory pattern of Osteogenesis Imperfecta is closely related to the severity of the disease and to the sternal deformities. Pectus carinatum characterizes OI type III patients and alters respiratory muscles coordination, leading to chest wall and rib cage distortions and an inefficient ventilator pattern. OI type IV is characterized by lower alterations in the respiratory function. These findings suggest that functional assessment and treatment of OI should be differentiated in these two forms of the disease.

  14. Whole body heat stress attenuates the pressure response to muscle metaboreceptor stimulation in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; Blaha, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    The effects of whole body heat stress on sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to stimulation of muscle metaboreceptors and mechanoreceptors remains unclear. We examined the muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), blood pressure, and heart rate in 14 young healthy subjects during fatiguing isometric handgrip exercise, postexercise circulatory occlusion (PECO), and passive muscle stretch during PECO. The protocol was performed under normothermic and whole body heat stress (increase internal temperature ~0.6°C via a heating suit) conditions. Heat stress increased the resting MSNA and heart rate. Heat stress did not alter the mean blood pressure (MAP), heart rate, and MSNA responses (i.e., changes) to fatiguing exercise. During PECO, whole body heat stress accentuated the heart rate response [change (Δ) of 5.8 ± 1.5 to Δ10.0 ± 2.1 beats/min, P = 0.03], did not alter the MSNA response (Δ16.4 ± 2.8 to Δ17.3 ± 3.8 bursts/min, P = 0.74), and lowered the MAP response (Δ20 ± 2 to Δ12 ± 1 mmHg, P heat stress prevented the MAP and MSNA responses to stretch during PECO (both P > 0.05). These data suggest that whole body heat stress attenuates the pressor response due to metaboreceptor stimulation, and the sympathetic nerve response due to mechanoreceptor stimulation. PMID:27763873

  15. Body Composition and Muscle Characteristics of Division I Track and Field Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Katie R.; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E.; Trexler, Eric T.; Roelofs, Erica J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate event-specific body composition and muscle characteristics of track and field athletes, and to assess body composition changes after one year. Sixty collegiate track and field athletes (Mean ± SD; Age = 19.2 ± 1.4 yrs, Height = 174.6 ± 9.0 cm, Weight = 71.5 ± 12.5 kg) were stratified into six event groups. Total and regional body composition measurements were assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. A panoramic scan of the vastus lateralis was taken with B-mode ultrasound to determine muscle cross sectional area (mCSA) and echo intensity (EI). Body composition measurements were repeated a year later in a subset of returning athletes (n=33). Throwers had significantly more absolute fat mass (FM; 21.6 ± 11.0 kg), total body mass (89.7 ± 17.4 kg), percent fat (23.6 ± 7.8) and trunk fat (9.4 ± 5.8 kg) than all other event groups (p0.05), but relative to body mass had relatively less LM (0.72 ± 0.08 kg; ptrack and field athletes may be able to minimize losses in LM and gains in FM between seasons. PMID:27100166

  16. Rib cage deformities alter respiratory muscle action and chest wall function in patients with severe osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella LoMauro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is an inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by bone fragility, multiple fractures and significant chest wall deformities. Cardiopulmonary insufficiency is the leading cause of death in these patients. METHODS: Seven patients with severe OI type III, 15 with moderate OI type IV and 26 healthy subjects were studied. In addition to standard spirometry, rib cage geometry, breathing pattern and regional chest wall volume changes at rest in seated and supine position were assessed by opto-electronic plethysmography to investigate if structural modifications of the rib cage in OI have consequences on ventilatory pattern. One-way or two-way analysis of variance was performed to compare the results between the three groups and the two postures. RESULTS: Both OI type III and IV patients showed reduced FVC and FEV(1 compared to predicted values, on condition that updated reference equations are considered. In both positions, ventilation was lower in OI patients than control because of lower tidal volume (p<0.01. In contrast to OI type IV patients, whose chest wall geometry and function was normal, OI type III patients were characterized by reduced (p<0.01 angle at the sternum (pectus carinatum, paradoxical inspiratory inward motion of the pulmonary rib cage, significant thoraco-abdominal asynchronies and rib cage distortions in supine position (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, the restrictive respiratory pattern of Osteogenesis Imperfecta is closely related to the severity of the disease and to the sternal deformities. Pectus carinatum characterizes OI type III patients and alters respiratory muscles coordination, leading to chest wall and rib cage distortions and an inefficient ventilator pattern. OI type IV is characterized by lower alterations in the respiratory function. These findings suggest that functional assessment and treatment of OI should be differentiated in these two forms of the

  17. Muscle activity during backward and forward running with body weight support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumoto, Kenji; Soucy, Michael T; Bailey, Joshua P; Mercer, John A

    2017-10-01

    We investigated muscle activity during backward (BR) and forward (FR) running with body weight support (BWS). Ten participants completed BR and FR on a lower body positive pressure treadmill while selecting a preferred speed (PS) for different BWS conditions (0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, and 80%BWS). Muscle activity from the rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior (TA), and gastrocnemius (GA), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), preferred stride frequency (PSF), and PS were measured. Magnitude of muscle activity (BF, TA, and GA), RPE, PSF, and PS were not influenced by the interaction of direction and BWS (P>0.05). BF, TA, and GA were not different between directions (P>0.05) but were different between BWS conditions (P<0.01). RF was influenced by the interaction of direction and BWS (P<0.01). RF, BF, TA, and GA during BR were lower with increasing BWS. RF during BR was 59-86% higher than that of FR within BWS condition. RPE was lower with increasing BWS (P<0.001), regardless of direction of locomotion. PSF was lower and PS was higher during BR and FR with increasing BWS (both P<0.001). PSF during BR was 6-9% higher than that of FR. PS during BR was 24-31% lower than that of FR. These observations demonstrate that a change in BWS influences magnitude of muscle activity, PS, PSF, and RPE for both BR and FR. However, a change in direction of locomotion may not influence magnitude of muscle activity or RPE during running for a given BWS, even though muscle activity pattern, PS, and PSF were different between BR and FR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A novel neuromuscular form of glycogen storage disease type IV with arthrogryposis, spinal stiffness and rare polyglucosan bodies in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfatti, Edoardo; Barnerias, Christine; Hedberg-Oldfors, Carola; Gitiaux, Cyril; Benezit, Audrey; Oldfors, Anders; Carlier, Robert-Yves; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Romero, Norma B

    2016-10-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is an autosomal recessive disorder causing polyglucosan storage in various tissues. Neuromuscular forms present with fetal akinesia deformation sequence, lethal myopathy, or mild hypotonia and weakness. A 3-year-old boy presented with arthrogryposis, motor developmental delay, weakness, and rigid spine. Whole body MRI revealed fibroadipose muscle replacement but sparing of the sartorius, gracilis, adductor longus and vastus intermedialis muscles. Polyglucosan bodies were identified in muscle, and GBE1 gene analysis revealed two pathogenic variants. We describe a novel neuromuscular GSD IV phenotype and confirm the importance of muscle morphological studies in early onset neuromuscular disorders. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Effect of muscle length on cross-bridge kinetics in intact cardiac trabeculae at body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Xu, Ying; Davis, Jonathan P; Campbell, Kenneth S; Janssen, Paul M L

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic force generation in cardiac muscle, which determines cardiac pumping activity, depends on both the number of sarcomeric cross-bridges and on their cycling kinetics. The Frank-Starling mechanism dictates that cardiac force development increases with increasing cardiac muscle length (corresponding to increased ventricular volume). It is, however, unclear to what extent this increase in cardiac muscle length affects the rate of cross-bridge cycling. Previous studies using permeabilized cardiac preparations, sub-physiological temperatures, or both have obtained conflicting results. Here, we developed a protocol that allowed us to reliably and reproducibly measure the rate of tension redevelopment (k(tr); which depends on the rate of cross-bridge cycling) in intact trabeculae at body temperature. Using K(+) contractures to induce a tonic level of force, we showed the k(tr) was slower in rabbit muscle (which contains predominantly β myosin) than in rat muscle (which contains predominantly α myosin). Analyses of k(tr) in rat muscle at optimal length (L(opt)) and 90% of optimal length (L(90)) revealed that k(tr) was significantly slower at L(opt) (27.7 ± 3.3 and 27.8 ± 3.0 s(-1) in duplicate analyses) than at L(90) (45.1 ± 7.6 and 47.5 ± 9.2 s(-1)). We therefore show that k(tr) can be measured in intact rat and rabbit cardiac trabeculae, and that the k(tr) decreases when muscles are stretched to their optimal length under near-physiological conditions, indicating that the Frank-Starling mechanism not only increases force but also affects cross-bridge cycling kinetics.

  20. Whole-body muscle MRI to detect myopathies in non-extrapyramidal bent spine syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohana, Mickael; Durand, Marie-Christine; Marty, Catherine; Lazareth, Jean-Philippe; Maisonobe, Thierry; Mompoint, Dominique; Carlier, Robert-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Bent spine syndrome (BSS), defined as an abnormal forward flexion of the trunk resolving in supine position, is usually related to parkinsonism, but can also be encountered in myopathies. This study evaluates whole-body muscle MRI (WB-mMRI) as a tool for detecting underlying myopathy in non-extrapyramidal BSS. Forty-three patients (90 % women; 53-86 years old) with a non-extrapyramidal BSS were prospectively included. All underwent a 1.5-T WB-mMRI and a nerve conduction study. Muscle biopsy was performed if a myopathy could not be eliminated based on clinical examination and all tests. Systematic MRI interpretation focused on peripheral and axial muscle injury; spinal posture and incidental findings were also reported. WB-mMRI was completed for all patients, with 13 muscle biopsies ultimately needed and myopathy revealed as the final etiological diagnosis in five cases (12 %). All biopsy-proven myopathies were detected by the WB-mMRI. Relevant incidental MRI findings were made in seven patients. This study supports WB-mMRI as a sensitive and feasible tool for detecting myopathy in BSS patients. Associated with electroneuromyography, it can better indicate when a muscle biopsy is needed and guide it when required. Rigorous radiological interpretation is mandatory, so as not to miss incidental findings of clinical consequence. (orig.)

  1. Perceived body discomfort and trunk muscle activity in three prolonged sitting postures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waongenngarm, Pooriput; Rajaratnam, Bala S.; Janwantanakul, Prawit

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the perceived discomfort and trunk muscle activity in three different 1-hour sitting postures. [Subjects] A repeated-measures design study was conducted on 10 healthy subjects. [Methods] Each subject sat for an hour in three sitting postures (i.e., upright, slumped, and forward leaning sitting postures). Subjects rated perceived body discomfort using Borg’s CR-10 scale at the beginning and after 1 hour sitting. The electromyographic activity of the trunk muscle activity was recorded during the 1-hour period of sitting. [Results] The forward leaning sitting posture led to higher Borg scores in the low back than those in the upright (p = 0.002) and slumped sitting postures (p sitting postures. The upright sitting posture was significantly associated with increased internal oblique (IO)/transversus abdominis (TrA) and ICL muscle activity compared with the slumped sitting posture. [Conclusion] The sitting posture with the highest low back discomfort after prolonged sitting was the forward leaning posture. Sitting in an upright posture is recommended because it increases IO/TrA muscle activation and induces only relatively moderate ICL and MF muscle activation. PMID:26311951

  2. Whole-body muscle MRI to detect myopathies in non-extrapyramidal bent spine syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohana, Mickael [Nouvel Hopital Civil - Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Radiologie B, Strasbourg (France); Durand, Marie-Christine [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Neurologie, Garches (France); Marty, Catherine; Lazareth, Jean-Philippe [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Rhumatologie, Garches (France); Maisonobe, Thierry [APH-HP - Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere, Service de Neuropathologie, Paris (France); Mompoint, Dominique; Carlier, Robert-Yves [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Radiologie, Garches (France)

    2014-08-15

    Bent spine syndrome (BSS), defined as an abnormal forward flexion of the trunk resolving in supine position, is usually related to parkinsonism, but can also be encountered in myopathies. This study evaluates whole-body muscle MRI (WB-mMRI) as a tool for detecting underlying myopathy in non-extrapyramidal BSS. Forty-three patients (90 % women; 53-86 years old) with a non-extrapyramidal BSS were prospectively included. All underwent a 1.5-T WB-mMRI and a nerve conduction study. Muscle biopsy was performed if a myopathy could not be eliminated based on clinical examination and all tests. Systematic MRI interpretation focused on peripheral and axial muscle injury; spinal posture and incidental findings were also reported. WB-mMRI was completed for all patients, with 13 muscle biopsies ultimately needed and myopathy revealed as the final etiological diagnosis in five cases (12 %). All biopsy-proven myopathies were detected by the WB-mMRI. Relevant incidental MRI findings were made in seven patients. This study supports WB-mMRI as a sensitive and feasible tool for detecting myopathy in BSS patients. Associated with electroneuromyography, it can better indicate when a muscle biopsy is needed and guide it when required. Rigorous radiological interpretation is mandatory, so as not to miss incidental findings of clinical consequence. (orig.)

  3. Omphalocele, exstrophy of cloaca, imperforate anus and spinal defect (OEIS Complex) with overlapping features of body stalk anomaly (limb body wall complex).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrekar, Suresh R S; Amoncar, Sangeeta; Banaulikar, Siddhartha; Sawant, Vishal; Pinto, R G W

    2014-04-01

    OEIS is an extremely rare constellation of malformations, which includes omphalocele, exstrophy of cloaca, imperforate anus, and spinal defect. We report here autopsy findings in a case of OEIS complex, which apart from the major anomalies of the complex had bilateral club foot that is, congenital talipes equinovarus, right hydroureter, and body stalk anomaly. The umbilical cord was absent, and the umbilical vessels were embedded in an amniotic sheet, which connected the skin margin of the anterior body wall defect to the placenta, this feature being the hallmark of limb body wall complex (LBWC). This case further supports the view that OEIS and LBWC represent a continuous spectrum of abnormalities rather than separate conditions and may share a common etiology and pathogenetic mechanism as proposed by some authors.

  4. Muscle MRI / whole-body MRI in diagnosis and dynamic evaluation of neuro-muscular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Carlier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of MRI in myopathies dates back to more than 20 years. The first investigations were slow and only allowed segmental and limited studies. Whole-body MRI has emerged over the past twelve years and became a useful diagnostic tool in the etiological diagnosis of myopathies and muscular dystrophies. This study must always be confronted with clinical and whichever other paraclinical data without being able to replace them. Indications to perform such an investigation are getting better and better defined and the diagnostic efficacy has progressed with the increasing number of cases, communications, publications and discussions within multidisciplinary working groups. Its noninvasive nature, the radiation-free exposure and its reasonable cost also enable this technique to be easily accepted by the patient. It also provides a valuable tool for monitoring the natural disease progression or the effectiveness of therapies. The radiology team must be acquainted with the management of neuromuscular patients. Interpreting muscle whole-body MRI requires an excellent knowledge of muscle anatomy whichever body part is examined. The radiologist performing these studies is ideally a specialist of musculoskeletal disorders or a neuroradiologist well trained in muscle anatomy.

  5. Etonogestrel implant migration to the vasculature, chest wall, and distant body sites: cases from a pharmacovigilance database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sarah; Niak, Ali; Gada, Neha; Brinker, Allen; Jones, S Christopher

    2017-12-01

    To describe clinical outcomes of etonogestrel implant patients with migration to the vasculature, chest wall and other distant body sites spontaneously reported to the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database. We performed a standardized Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) query in the FAERS database (through November 15, 2015), with reports coded with one or more MedDRA preferred terms that indicate complications with device placement or migration of the device from the original site of insertion to the vasculature, chest wall and other distant body sites. We excluded any cases previously described in the medical literature. We identified 38 cases of pronounced etonogestrel implant migration. Migration locations included the lung/pulmonary artery (n=9), chest wall (n=1), vasculature at locations other than the lung/pulmonary artery (n=14) and extravascular migrations (n=14) to other body sites (e.g., the axilla and clavicle/neck line/shoulder). The majority of cases were asymptomatic and detected when the patient desired implant removal; however, seven cases reported symptoms such as pain, discomfort and dyspnea in association with implant migration. Three cases also describe pulmonary fibrosis and skin reactions as a result of implant migration to the vasculature, chest wall and other distant body sites. Sixteen cases reported surgical removal in an operating room setting. Our FAERS case series demonstrates etonogestrel implant migration to the vasculature, chest wall and other body sites distant from the site of original insertion. As noted by the sponsor in current prescribing information, a key determinant in the risk for etonogestrel contraceptive implant migration appears to be improper insertion technique. Although migration of etonogestrel implants to the vasculature is rare, awareness of migration and education on proper insertion technique may reduce the risk. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. QTL for microstructural and biophysical muscle properties and body composition in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murani Eduard

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proportion of muscle fibre types and their size affect muscularity as well as functional properties of the musculature and meat quality. We aimed to identify QTL for microstructural muscle properties including muscle fibre size, their numbers and fibre type proportions as well as biophysical parameters of meat quality and traits related to body composition, i.e. pH, conductivity, area of M. longissimus dorsi and lean meat content. A QTL scan was conducted in a porcine experimental population that is based on Duroc and Berlin Miniature Pig. Results Least square regression interval mapping revealed five significant and 42 suggestive QTL for traits related to muscle fibre composition under the line-cross model as well as eight significant and 40 suggestive QTL under the half-sib model. For traits related to body composition and biophysical parameters of meat quality five and twelve significant plus nine and 22 suggestive QTL were found under the line-cross and half-sib model, respectively. Regions with either significant QTL for muscle fibre traits or significant QTL for meat quality and muscularity or both were detected on SSC1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 13, 14, 15, and 16. QTL for microstructural properties explained a larger proportion of variance than did QTL for meat quality and body composition. Conclusion Microstructural properties of pig muscle and meat quality are governed by genetic variation at many loci distributed throughout the genome. QTL analysis under both, the line-cross and half-sib model, allows detecting QTL in case of fixation or segregation of the QTL alleles among the founder populations and thus provide comprehensive insight into the genetic variation of the traits under investigation. Genomic regions affecting complex traits of muscularity and meat quality as well as microstructural properties might point to QTL that in first instance affect muscle fibre traits and by this in second instance meat quality

  7. Assessment of Whole Body and Local Muscle Fatigue Using Electromyography and a Perceived Exertion Scale for Squat Lifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Imran; Kim, Jung-Yong

    2018-04-18

    This research study aims at addressing the paradigm of whole body fatigue and local muscle fatigue detection for squat lifting. For this purpose, a comparison was made between perceived exertion with the heart rate and normalized mean power frequency (NMPF) of eight major muscles. The sample consisted of 25 healthy males (age: 30 ± 2.2 years). Borg’s CR-10 scale was used for perceived exertion for two segments of the body (lower and upper) and the whole body. The lower extremity of the body was observed to be dominant compared to the upper and whole body in perceived response. First mode of principal component analysis (PCA) was obtained through the covariance matrix for the eight muscles for 25 subjects for NMPF of eight muscles. The diagonal entries in the covariance matrix were observed for each muscle. The muscle with the highest absolute magnitude was observed across all the 25 subjects. The medial deltoid and the rectus femoris muscles were observed to have the highest frequency for each PCA across 25 subjects. The rectus femoris, having the highest counts in all subjects, validated that the lower extremity dominates the sense of whole body fatigue during squat lifting. The findings revealed that it is significant to take into account the relation between perceived and measured effort that can help prevent musculoskeletal disorders in repetitive occupational tasks.

  8. Body composition of 80-years old men and women and its relation to muscle strength, physical activity and functional ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pederse, agnes N; Ovesen, Lars; Schroll, M

    2002-01-01

    in Glostrup, Denmark. SUBJECTS AND METHOD: 121 men and 113 women had their height and weight measured. Body fat mass and fat-free mass were assessed by bioelectrical impedance. Muscle strength was measured as handgrip, elbow flexion, knee extension, body flexion and body extension. Physical activity was self...

  9. Whole-Body Vibration While Squatting and Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbs, Nicole C; Black, Christopher D; Garner, John

    2015-12-01

    Research into alleviating muscle pain and symptoms in individuals after delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) has been inconsistent and unsuccessful in demonstrating a useful recovery modality. To investigate the effects of short-term whole-body vibration (WBV) on DOMS over a 72-hour period after a high-intensity exercise protocol. Randomized controlled clinical trial. University laboratory. Thirty women volunteered to participate in 4 testing sessions and were assigned randomly to a WBV group (n = 16; age = 21.0 ± 1.9 years, height = 164.86 ± 6.73 cm, mass = 58.58 ± 9.32 kg) or a control group (n = 14; age = 22.00 ± 1.97 years, height = 166.65 ± 8.04 cm, mass = 58.69 ± 12.92 kg). Participants performed 4 sets to failure of single-legged split squats with 40% of their body weight to induce muscle soreness in the quadriceps. The WBV or control treatment was administered each day after DOMS. Unilateral pressure-pain threshold (PPT), range of motion (ROM), thigh circumference, and muscle-pain ratings of the quadriceps were collected before and for 3 days after high-intensity exercise. Each day, we collected 3 sets of measures, consisting of 1 measure before the WBV or control treatment protocol (pretreatment) and 2 sets of posttreatment measures. We observed no interactions for PPT, thigh circumference, and muscle pain (P > .05). An interaction was found for active ROM (P = .01), with the baseline pretreatment measure greater than the measures at baseline posttreatment 1 through 48 hours posttreatment 2 in the WBV group. For PPT, a main effect for time was revealed (P .05). The WBV treatment approach studied did not aid in alleviating DOMS after high-intensity exercise. Further research is needed in various populations.

  10. Smooth Muscle Specific Overexpression of p22phox Potentiates Carotid Artery Wall Thickening in Response to Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Manogue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that transgenic mice overexpressing the p22phox subunit of the NADPH oxidase selectively in smooth muscle (Tgp22smc would exhibit an exacerbated response to transluminal carotid injury compared to wild-type mice. To examine the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS as a mediator of vascular injury, the injury response was quantified by measuring wall thickness (WT and cross-sectional wall area (CSWA of the injured and noninjured arteries in both Tgp22smc and wild-type animals at days 3, 7, and 14 after injury. Akt, p38 MAPK, and Src activation were evaluated at the same time points using Western blotting. WT and CSWA following injury were significantly greater in Tgp22smc mice at both 7 and 14 days after injury while noninjured contralateral carotids were similar between groups. Apocynin treatment attenuated the injury response in both groups and rendered the response similar between Tgp22smc mice and wild-type mice. Following injury, carotid arteries from Tgp22smc mice demonstrated elevated activation of Akt at day 3, while p38 MAPK and Src activation was elevated at day 7 compared to wild-type mice. Both increased activation and temporal regulation of these signaling pathways may contribute to enhanced vascular growth in response to injury in this transgenic model of elevated vascular ROS.

  11. [18F]FDG Uptake in the Aortic Wall Smooth Muscle of Atherosclerotic Plaques in the Simian Atherosclerosis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Iwaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a self-sustaining inflammatory fibroproliferative disease that progresses in discrete stages and involves a number of cell types and effector molecules. Recently, [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose- ([18F]FDG- positron emission tomography (PET has been suggested as a tool to evaluate atherosclerotic plaques by detecting accumulated macrophages associated with inflammation progress. However, at the cellular level, it remains unknown whether only macrophages exhibit high uptake of [18F]FDG. To identify the cellular origin of [18F]FDG uptake in atherosclerotic plaques, we developed a simian atherosclerosis model and performed PET and ex vivo macro- and micro-autoradiography (ARG. Increased [18F]FDG uptake in the aortic wall was observed in high-cholesterol diet-treated monkeys and WHHL rabbits. Macro-ARG of [18F]FDG in aortic sections showed that [18F]FDG was accumulated in the media and intima in the simian model as similar to that in WHHL rabbits. Combined analysis of micro-ARG with immunohistochemistry in the simian atherosclerosis model revealed that most cellular [18F]FDG uptake observed in the media was derived not only from the infiltrated macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques but also from the smooth muscle cells (SMCs of the aortic wall in atherosclerotic lesions.

  12. Changes of whole-body power, muscle function, and jump performance with prolonged cycling to exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Jordan P R; Mawston, Grant A; Cairns, Simeon P

    2012-12-01

    To quantify how whole-body power, muscle-function, and jump-performance measures change during prolonged cycling and recovery and determine whether there are relationships between the different fatigue measures. Ten competitive or recreationally active male cyclists underwent repeated 20-min stages of prolonged cycling at 70% VO2peak until exhaustion. Whole-body peak power output (PPO) was assessed using an all-out 30-s sprint 17 min into each cycle stage. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded throughout. Isometric and isokinetic muscle-function tests were made between cycle stages, over ~6 min, and during 30-min recovery. Drop-jump measures were tested at exhaustion and during recovery. PPO initially increased or was maintained in some subjects but fell to 81% of maximum at exhaustion. RPE was near maximal (18.7) at exhaustion, with the time to exhaustion related to the rate of rise of RPE. PPO first started to decline only when RPE exceeded 16 (ie, hard). Peak isometric and concentric isokinetic torque (180°/s) for the quadriceps fell to 86% and 83% of pretest at exhaustion, respectively. In contrast, the peak concentric isokinetic torque (180°/s) of the hamstrings increased by 10% before declining to 93% of maximum. Jump height fell to 92% of pretest at exhaustion and was correlated with the decline in PPO (r = .79). Muscle-function and jump-performance measures did not recover over the 30-min postexercise rest period. At exhaustion, whole-body power, muscle-function, and jump-performance measures had all fallen by 7-19%. PPO and drop-jump decrements were linearly correlated and are appropriate measures of maximal performance.

  13. Effects of real and sham whole-body mechanical vibration on spinal excitability at rest and during muscle contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hortobagyi, T.; Rider, P.; DeVita, P.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of whole-body mechanical vibration (WBV) on indices of motoneuronal excitability at rest and during muscle contraction in healthy humans. Real and sham WBV at 30Hz had no effect on reflexes measured during muscle contraction. Real WBV at 30 and 50Hz depressed the H-reflex

  14. Strength, but not muscle mass, is associated with mortality in the health, aging and body composition study cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newman, Anne B; Kupelian, Varant; Visser, Marjolein; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Goodpaster, Bret H; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Tylavsky, Frances A; Rubin, Susan M; Harris, Tamara B

    BACKGROUND: Although muscle strength and mass are highly correlated, the relationship between direct measures of low muscle mass (sarcopenia) and strength in association with mortality has not been examined. METHODS: Total mortality rates were examined in the Health, Aging and Body Composition

  15. Electronmicroscopical evaluation of short-term nerve regeneration through a thin-walled biodegradable poly(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guide filled with modified denatured muscle tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Robinson, PH; Stokroos, [No Value; Blaauw, EH; Kors, G; den Dunnen, WFA

    The aim of this study was to evaluate short-term peripheral nerve regeneration across a 15-mm gap in the sciatic nerve of the rat, using a thin-walled biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-epsilon -caprolactone) nerve guide filled with modified denatured muscle tissue (MDMT). The evaluation was performed

  16. Interleukin-6 release is higher across arm than leg muscles during whole-body exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn W; Klein, Ditte K; Andersen, Thor Munch

    2011-01-01

    ± 7 and 47 ± 7 µmol min(-1) (kg lean limb mass)(-1)) were lower, glucose uptake similar (51 ± 12 and 41 ± 8 mmol min(-1) (kg lean limb mass)(-1)) and lactate release higher (82 ± 32 and -2 ± 12 µmol min(-1) (kg lean limb mass)(-1)) in arms than legs, respectively, during exercise (P ....05). No correlations were present between IL-6 release and exogenous substrate uptakes. Muscle glycogen was similar in arms and legs before exercise (388 ± 22 and 428 ± 25 mmol (kg dry weight)(-1)), but after exercise it was only significantly lower in the leg (219 ± 29 mmol (kg dry weight)(-1)). The novel finding......Exercising muscle releases interleukin-6 (IL-6), but the mechanisms controlling this process are poorly understood. This study was performed to test the hypothesis that the IL-6 release differs in arm and leg muscle during whole-body exercise, owing to differences in muscle metabolism. Sixteen...

  17. Automated segmentation of muscle and adipose tissue on CT images for human body composition analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Howard; Cobzas, Dana; Birdsell, Laura; Lieffers, Jessica; Baracos, Vickie

    2009-02-01

    The ability to compute body composition in cancer patients lends itself to determining the specific clinical outcomes associated with fat and lean tissue stores. For example, a wasting syndrome of advanced disease associates with shortened survival. Moreover, certain tissue compartments represent sites for drug distribution and are likely determinants of chemotherapy efficacy and toxicity. CT images are abundant, but these cannot be fully exploited unless there exist practical and fast approaches for tissue quantification. Here we propose a fully automated method for segmenting muscle, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues, taking the approach of shape modeling for the analysis of skeletal muscle. Muscle shape is represented using PCA encoded Free Form Deformations with respect to a mean shape. The shape model is learned from manually segmented images and used in conjunction with a tissue appearance prior. VAT and SAT are segmented based on the final deformed muscle shape. In comparing the automatic and manual methods, coefficients of variation (COV) (1 - 2%), were similar to or smaller than inter- and intra-observer COVs reported for manual segmentation.

  18. Whole body muscle activity during the FIFA 11+ program evaluated by positron emission tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junsuke Nakase

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study investigated the effect of the FIFA 11+ warm-up program on whole body muscle activity using positron emission tomography. METHODS: Ten healthy male volunteers were divided into a control group and a group that performed injury prevention exercises (The 11+. The subjects of the control group were placed in a sitting position for 20 min and 37 MBq of (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG was injected intravenously. The subjects then remained seated for 45 min. The subjects of the exercise group performed part 2 of the 11+for 20 min, after which FDG was injected. They then performed part 2 of the 11+for 20 min, and rested for 25 min in a sitting position. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography images were obtained 50 min after FDG injection in each group. Regions of interest were defined within 30 muscles. The standardized uptake value was calculated to examine the FDG uptake of muscle tissue per unit volume. RESULTS: FDG accumulation within the abdominal rectus, gluteus medius and minimus were significantly higher in the exercise group than in the control group (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: The hip abductor muscles and abdominal rectus were active during part 2 of the FIFA 11+ program.

  19. Evaluation of upper body muscle activity during cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance in simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waye, A. B.; Krygiel, R. G.; Susin, T. B.; Baptista, R.; Rehnberg, L.; Heidner, G. S.; de Campos, F.; Falcão, F. P.; Russomano, T.

    2013-09-01

    Performance of efficient single-person cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is vital to maintain cardiac and cerebral perfusion during the 2-4 min it takes for deployment of advanced life support during a space mission. The aim of the present study was to investigate potential differences in upper body muscle activity during CPR performance at terrestrial gravity (+1Gz) and in simulated microgravity (μG). Muscle activity of the triceps brachii, erector spinae, rectus abdominis and pectoralis major was measured via superficial electromyography in 20 healthy male volunteers. Four sets of 30 external chest compressions (ECCs) were performed on a mannequin. Microgravity was simulated using a body suspension device and harness; the Evetts-Russomano (ER) method was adopted for CPR performance in simulated microgravity. Heart rate and perceived exertion via Borg scores were also measured. While a significantly lower depth of ECCs was observed in simulated microgravity, compared with +1Gz, it was still within the target range of 40-50 mm. There was a 7.7% decrease of the mean (±SEM) ECC depth from 48 ± 0.3 mm at +1Gz, to 44.3 ± 0.5 mm during microgravity simulation (p fatiguing than at +1Gz. Nevertheless, no significant difference in muscle activity between conditions was found, a result that is favourable for astronauts, given the inevitable muscular and cardiovascular deconditioning that occurs during space travel.

  20. Evolution of the turtle body plan by the folding and creation of new muscle connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Hiroshi; Sugahara, Fumiaki; Takechi, Masaki; Ericsson, Rolf; Kawashima-Ohya, Yoshie; Narita, Yuichi; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2009-07-10

    The turtle shell offers a fascinating case study of vertebrate evolution, based on the modification of a common body plan. The carapace is formed from ribs, which encapsulate the scapula; this stands in contrast to the typical amniote body plan and serves as a key to understanding turtle evolution. Comparative analyses of musculoskeletal development between the Chinese soft-shelled turtle and other amniotes revealed that initial turtle development conforms to the amniote pattern; however, during embryogenesis, lateral rib growth results in a shift of elements. In addition, some limb muscles establish new turtle-specific attachments associated with carapace formation. We propose that the evolutionary origin of the turtle body plan results from heterotopy based on folding and novel connectivities.

  1. Skeletal Muscle Thermogenesis and Its Role in Whole Body Energy Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthu Periasamy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes has become a major epidemic across the globe. Controlling obesity has been a challenge since this would require either increased physical activity or reduced caloric intake; both are difficult to enforce. There has been renewed interest in exploiting pathways such as uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1-mediated uncoupling in brown adipose tissue (BAT and white adipose tissue to increase energy expenditure to control weight gain. However, relying on UCP1-based thermogenesis alone may not be sufficient to control obesity in humans. On the other hand, skeletal muscle is the largest organ and a major contributor to basal metabolic rate and increasing energy expenditure in muscle through nonshivering thermogenic mechanisms, which can substantially affect whole body metabolism and weight gain. In this review we will describe the role of Sarcolipin-mediated uncoupling of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase (SERCA as a potential mechanism for increased energy expenditure both during cold and diet-induced thermogenesis.

  2. Muscle dysmorphia: could it be classified as an addiction to body image?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Andrew C; Shorter, Gillian W; Griffiths, Mark D

    2015-03-01

    Muscle dysmorphia (MD) describes a condition characterised by a misconstrued body image in which individuals who interpret their body size as both small or weak even though they may look normal or highly muscular.MD has been conceptualized as a type of body dysmorphic disorder, an eating disorder, and obsessive–compulsive disorder symptomatology. METHOD AND AIM: Through a review of the most salient literature on MD, this paper proposes an alternative classification of MD--the ‘Addiction to Body Image’ (ABI) model--using Griffiths (2005)addiction components model as the framework in which to define MD as an addiction. It is argued the addictive activity in MD is the maintaining of body image via a number of different activities such as bodybuilding, exercise,eating certain foods, taking specific drugs (e.g., anabolic steroids), shopping for certain foods, food supplements,and the use or purchase of physical exercise accessories). In the ABI model, the perception of the positive effects on the self-body image is accounted for as a critical aspect of the MD condition (rather than addiction to exercise or certain types of eating disorder). Based on empirical evidence to date, it is proposed that MD could be re-classified as an addiction due to the individual continuing to engage in maintenance behaviours that may cause long-term harm.

  3. Acute effects of whole-body vibration on peak isometric torque, muscle twitch torque and voluntary muscle activation of the knee extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, M; Norris, S; Smith, D; Herzog, W

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the acute effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) with a static squat on resting muscle twitch torque, peak isometric torque and voluntary muscle activation of the knee extensors during an isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Twenty-four healthy, strength-trained males were recruited for this randomized, cross-over design investigation. The WBV treatment consisted of three sets of 60 s of vibration (30 Hz, +/-4 mm) while standing in a semi-squat position. Voluntary muscle activation, peak isometric torque during MVC and resting muscle twitch torque (RTT) through percutaneous femoral nerve stimulation were obtained before and following the treatment. Change in peak isometric torque, voluntary muscle activation and the RTT were calculated as the difference between pre- and post-treatment values. There was no observable post-activation potentiation of muscle twitch torque or enhancement in voluntary muscle activation or peak isometric torque. However, decreases in the peak isometric torque (P=0.0094) and voluntary muscle activation (P=0.0252) were significantly smaller post WBV interventions compared with the control treatment. Based on the current data, it is unclear whether or not this was attributable to the effects of WBV but further research into this possibility is warranted.

  4. Sexting as the mirror on the wall: Body-esteem attribution, media models, and objectified-body consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Dora; Morelli, Mara; Baiocco, Roberto; Chirumbolo, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    Sexting motivations during adolescence are related to developmental dimensions-such as sexual identity and body-image development-or harmful intentions-such as aggression among peers and partners. Sociocultural and media models can affect explorations of sexuality and redefinitions of body image, which in turn are related to sexting behaviors and motivations. In this study, we investigated the roles of body-esteem attribution, the internalization of media models, and body objectification as predictors of three sexting motivations: sexual purposes, body-image reinforcement, and instrumental/aggravated reasons. The participants were 190 Italian adolescents aged from 13 to 20 years old (M age  = 17.4, SD age  = 1.8; 44.7% females). Sexual purposes were predicted by body-esteem attribution and body objectification; body-image reinforcement was predicted by the internalization of media models, and instrumental/aggravated reasons were not predicted by any variable. Thus, only sexual purposes and body-image reinforcement appeared to be affected by body-image concerns due to media models. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A human body model with active muscles for simulation of pretensioned restraints in autonomous braking interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osth, Jonas; Brolin, Karin; Bråse, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study driver and passenger kinematics in autonomous braking scenarios, with and without pretensioned seat belts, using a whole-body finite element (FE) human body model (HBM) with active muscles. Upper extremity musculature for elbow and shoulder flexion-extension feedback control was added to an HBM that was previously complemented with feedback controlled muscles for the trunk and neck. Controller gains were found using a radial basis function metamodel sampled by making 144 simulations of an 8 ms(-2) volunteer sled test. The HBM kinematics, interaction forces, and muscle activations were validated using a second volunteer data set for the passenger and driver positions, with and without 170 N seat belt pretension, in 11 ms(-2) autonomous braking deceleration. The HBM was then used for a parameter study in which seat belt pretension force and timing were varied from 170 to 570 N and from 0.25 s before to 0.15 s after deceleration onset, in an 11 ms(-2) autonomous braking scenario. The model validation showed that the forward displacements and interaction forces of the HBM correlated with those of corresponding volunteer tests. Muscle activations and head rotation angles were overestimated in the HBM when compared with volunteer data. With a standard seat belt in 11 ms(-2) autonomous braking interventions, the HBM exhibited peak forward head displacements of 153 and 232 mm for the driver and passenger positions. When 570 N seat belt pretension was applied 0.15 s before deceleration onset, a reduction of peak head displacements to 60 and 75 mm was predicted. Driver and passenger responses to autonomous braking with standard and pretensioned restraints were successfully modeled in a whole-body FE HBM with feedback controlled active muscles. Variations of belt pretension force level and timing revealed that belt pretension 0.15 s before deceleration onset had the largest effect in reducing forward head and torso movement caused

  6. Influence of Upper-Body Exercise on the Fatigability of Human Respiratory Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    TILLER, NICHOLAS B.; CAMPBELL, IAN G.; ROMER, LEE M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose Diaphragm and abdominal muscles are susceptible to contractile fatigue in response to high-intensity, whole-body exercise. This study assessed whether the ventilatory and mechanical loads imposed by high-intensity, upper-body exercise would be sufficient to elicit respiratory muscle fatigue. Methods Seven healthy men (mean ± SD; age = 24 ± 4 yr, peak O2 uptake [V˙O2peak] = 31.9 ± 5.3 mL·kg−1·min−1) performed asynchronous arm-crank exercise to exhaustion at work rates equivalent to 30% (heavy) and 60% (severe) of the difference between gas exchange threshold and V˙O2peak. Contractile fatigue of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles was assessed by measuring pre- to postexercise changes in potentiated transdiaphragmatic and gastric twitch pressures (Pdi,tw and Pga,tw) evoked by supramaximal magnetic stimulation of the cervical and thoracic nerves, respectively. Results Exercise time was 24.5 ± 5.8 min for heavy exercise and 9.8 ± 1.8 min for severe exercise. Ventilation over the final minute of heavy exercise was 73 ± 20 L·min−1 (39% ± 11% maximum voluntary ventilation) and 99 ± 19 L·min−1 (53% ± 11% maximum voluntary ventilation) for severe exercise. Mean Pdi,tw did not differ pre- to postexercise at either intensity (P > 0.05). Immediately (5–15 min) after severe exercise, mean Pga,tw was significantly lower than pre-exercise values (41 ± 13 vs 53 ± 15 cm H2O, P < 0.05), with the difference no longer significant after 25–35 min. Abdominal muscle fatigue (defined as ≥15% reduction in Pga,tw) occurred in 1/7 subjects after heavy exercise and 5/7 subjects after severe exercise. Conclusions High-intensity, upper-body exercise elicits significant abdominal, but not diaphragm, muscle fatigue in healthy men. The increased magnitude and prevalence of fatigue during severe-intensity exercise is likely due to additional (nonrespiratory) loading of the thorax. PMID:28288012

  7. Whole-body fat oxidation determined by graded exercise and indirect calorimetry: a role for muscle oxidative capacity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordby, P; Saltin, B; Helge, J W

    2006-01-01

    During whole-body exercise, peak fat oxidation occurs at a moderate intensity. This study investigated whole-body peak fat oxidation in untrained and trained subjects, and the presence of a relation between skeletal muscle oxidative enzyme activity and whole-body peak fat oxidation. Healthy male...... subjects were recruited and categorized into an untrained (N=8, VO(2max) 3.5+/-0.1 L/min) and a trained (N=8, VO(2max) 4.6+/-0.2 L/min) group. Subjects performed a graded exercise test commencing at 60 W for 8 min followed by 35 W increments every 3 min. On a separate day, muscle biopsies were obtained...... oxidation was determined. The body composition was determined by DEXA. Whole-body peak fat oxidation (250+/-25 and 462+/-33 mg/min) was higher (Ptrained compared with untrained subjects, respectively. Muscle...

  8. Body composition of 80-years old men and women and its relation to muscle strength, physical activity and functional ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Agnes Nadelmann; Ovesen, L.; Schroll, M.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure body composition and analyse the relation to muscle strength, physical activity and functional ability in healthy, old subjects, and to relate the results to an optimal BMI level for the elderly. SETTING: Subjects aged 80 years living at home from the 1914-population...... proposed guidelines for the elderly of an optimal BMI interval of 24-29 kg/m2. We found relations between body composition, muscle strength, physical activity and functional ability....... in Glostrup, Denmark. SUBJECTS AND METHOD: 121 men and 113 women had their height and weight measured. Body fat mass and fat-free mass were assessed by bioelectrical impedance. Muscle strength was measured as handgrip, elbow flexion, knee extension, body flexion and body extension. Physical activity was self...

  9. Estimation of 1RM for knee extension based on the maximal isometric muscle strength and body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanada, Yoshikiyo; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiura, Yoshito; Arai, Tomoaki; Koyama, Soichiro; Tanabe, Shigeo

    2017-11-01

    [Purpose] To create a regression formula in order to estimate 1RM for knee extensors, based on the maximal isometric muscle strength measured using a hand-held dynamometer and data regarding the body composition. [Subjects and Methods] Measurement was performed in 21 healthy males in their twenties to thirties. Single regression analysis was performed, with measurement values representing 1RM and the maximal isometric muscle strength as dependent and independent variables, respectively. Furthermore, multiple regression analysis was performed, with data regarding the body composition incorporated as another independent variable, in addition to the maximal isometric muscle strength. [Results] Through single regression analysis with the maximal isometric muscle strength as an independent variable, the following regression formula was created: 1RM (kg)=0.714 + 0.783 × maximal isometric muscle strength (kgf). On multiple regression analysis, only the total muscle mass was extracted. [Conclusion] A highly accurate regression formula to estimate 1RM was created based on both the maximal isometric muscle strength and body composition. Using a hand-held dynamometer and body composition analyzer, it was possible to measure these items in a short time, and obtain clinically useful results.

  10. Time- and dose-dependent effects of total-body ionizing radiation on muscle stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Masuda, Shinya; Hisamatsu, Tsubasa; Seko, Daiki; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Li, Tao-Sheng; Ono, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of genotoxic stress, such as high-dose ionizing radiation, increases both cancer and noncancer risks. However, it remains debatable whether low-dose ionizing radiation reduces cellular function, or rather induces hormetic health benefits. Here, we investigated the effects of total-body ?-ray radiation on muscle stem cells, called satellite cells. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed to ?-radiation at low- to high-dose rates (low, 2 or 10?mGy/day; moderate, 50?mGy/day; high,...

  11. Creatine monohydrate supplementation does not increase muscle strength, lean body mass, or muscle phosphocreatine in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnopolsky, Mark; Mahoney, Douglas; Thompson, Terry; Naylor, Heather; Doherty, Timothy J

    2004-01-01

    Creatine monohydrate (CrM) supplementation may increase strength in some types of muscular dystrophy. A recent study in myotonic muscular dystrophy type 1 (DM1) did not find a significant treatment effect, but measurements of muscle phosphocreatine (PCr) were not performed. We completed a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial using 34 genetically confirmed adult DM1 patients without significant cognitive impairment. Participants received CrM (5 g, approximately 0.074 g/kg daily) and a placebo for each 4-month phase with a 6-week wash-out. Spirometry, manual muscle testing, quantitative isometric strength testing of handgrip, foot dorsiflexion, and knee extension, handgrip and foot dorsiflexion endurance, functional tasks, activity of daily living scales, body composition (total, bone, and fat-free mass), serum creatine kinase activity, serum creatinine concentration and clearance, and liver function tests were completed before and after each intervention, and muscle PCr/beta-adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratios of the forearm flexor muscles were completed at the end of each phase. CrM supplementation did not increase any of the outcome measurements except for plasma creatinine concentration (but not creatinine clearance). Thus, CrM supplementation at 5 g daily does not have any effects on muscle strength, body composition, or activities of daily living in patients with DM1, perhaps because of a failure of the supplementation to increase muscle PCr/beta-ATP content.

  12. Reduced Chest and Abdominal Wall Mobility and Their Relationship to Lung Function, Respiratory Muscle Strength, and Exercise Tolerance in Subjects With COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hideo; Shiranita, Shuichi; Horie, Jun; Hayashi, Shinichiro

    2016-11-01

    Advanced air-flow limitation in patients with COPD leads to a reduction in vital capacity, respiratory muscle strength, and exercise capacity. However, its impact on chest and abdominal wall mobility is unknown. This study aimed to ascertain the prevalence of patients with COPD with reduced chest and abdominal wall mobility and to investigate the effect of reduced chest and abdominal wall mobility on pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength, and exercise capacity. In 51 elderly male subjects with COPD, chest and abdominal wall mobility, FVC, FEV 1 , FEV 1 /FVC, maximal inspiratory pressure (P Imax ), maximal expiratory pressure (P Emax ), and the 6-min walk distance (6MWD) were assessed. Chest and abdominal wall mobility were measured using the breathing movement scale (0-8) at the 3 regions (upper chest, lower chest, and abdomen). Reduced mobility was defined as a value lower than the lower limit of the normal scale. The unpaired t test, Mann-Whitney test, and multiple regression analysis were performed. The percentages of subjects with reduced mobility were 78% for the upper chest, 76% for the lower chest, and 53% for the abdomen. The subjects with reduced mobility had significantly low FVC, FEV 1 , and 6MWD in each region and significantly low FEV 1 /FVC, P Imax , and P Emax in the abdominal region compared with those with nonreduced mobility. FVC and 6MWD were independently associated with the scale values in each region and with the abdominal scale value, respectively. The majority of subjects with COPD had reduced chest and abdominal wall mobility, which was independently associated with FVC. Even though abdominal wall mobility was relatively preserved compared with chest wall mobility, it was also independently associated with 6MWD. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  13. Effects Of Whole Body Vibration On Vertical Jump Performance Following Exercise Induced Muscle Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole C. Dabbs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing vertical jump performance is critical for many sports. Following high intensity training, individuals often experience exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD. Many recovery modalities have been tested with conflicting results. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of whole-body vibration (WBV on vertical jump performance following EIMD. 27 females volunteered for 7 sessions and were randomly assigned to a treatment or control group and administered each testing day. Vertical jump performance was assessed via vertical jump height (VJH, peak power output (PPO, rate of force development (RFD, relative ground reaction force (GRFz, and peak activation ratio of the vastus medialis (VM via electromyography (EMG before and after 3 days of EIMD via split squats. Two testing sets were collected each day, consisting of pre measures followed by WBV or control, and then post second measures. A 2x8 (group x time mixed factor analysis of variance (ANOVA was conducted for each variable. No significant interactions or group differences were found in any variable. Significant main effects for time were found in any variable, indicating performance declined following muscle damage. These results indicate that WBV does not aid in muscle recovery or vertical jump performance following EIMD.

  14. No Change of Body Mass, Fat Mass, and Skeletal Muscle Mass in Ultraendurance Swimmers after 12 Hours of Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Kaul, Rene; Kohler, Gotz

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated whether ultraendurance swimmers suffer a change of body mass, fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, total body water, and specific gravity of urine during a 12-hr swim in 12 male Caucasian ultraswimmers. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance of urine samples before and after the race was performed to detect alanine, lactate, and…

  15. Relations Between Lower Body Isometric Muscle Force Characteristics and Start Performance in Elite Male Sprint Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Beretić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was twofold. The first aim was to examine the influence of absolute and relative lower body muscle force on kinematic component which determine the start performance. The second aim was to create multiregressional model which could use as a tool for swimming coaches with the purpose to start performance control and improvement. Twenty seven high-level trained male competitive swimmers all members of the Serbian National Youth and Senior Swimming Team (Age = 21.1 ± 4.3 yrs., Height = 1. 89 ± 0.10 m, Weight = 81.6 ± 8.4 kg, 50m freestyle - long course = 24.36 ± 0.86 s performed two trials of standing leg extensors isometric muscle force testing and three swimming start trials corresponding to 10m distance. The average start time significantly correlated with variables of leg extensors maximum voluntary force (Fmax, r = -0.559, p = 0.002, leg extensors relative muscle voluntary force (Frel, r = -0.727, p < 0.001, leg extensors specific rate of force development (RFD50%, r = -0.338, p = 0.047 and leg extensors relative value of specific rate of force development (RFD50%rel, r = -0.402, p = 0.040. Regression equation for t10m prediction was defined by following variables: maximum voluntary isometric force of leg extensors muscles at absolute and relative level (Fmax and Frel, as well as a specific rate of force development of the same muscle groups (RFD50% and RFD50%rel at absolute and relative level too with 74.4% of explained variance. Contractile abilities indicators of the leg extensors muscles included consideration: Fmax, RFD50%, Frel and RFD50%rel showed significant correlation with swimming start times on 10m. Additionally, the results suggest that swimmers, who possess greater isometric maximum force and specific rate of force development at absolute and relative levels, tend to be able to swim faster on initial 10m swim start perforamnce.

  16. Combination management by C-arm fluoroscopy and extraocular muscle severance for penetrating ocular trauma with a retrobulbar foreign body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Makoto; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Nomi, Norimasa; Teranishi, Shinichiro; Orita, Tomoko; Fujitsu, Youichiro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2016-06-01

    We report here the successful removal of a retrobulbar metallic foreign body in a patient with penetrating ocular trauma by a transconjunctival approach and combination management with C-arm fluoroscopy and extraocular muscle severance. A 37-year-old man sustained a penetrating injury to the right eye while using an iron hammer. Initial slitlamp examination revealed a corneoscleral laceration, iridocele, anterior chamber collapse, and a traumatic cataract. Visual acuity in the right eye was limited to the perception of hand motion. Computed tomography revealed an orbital foreign body in the retrobulbar area. The patient underwent corneoscleral suturing, severance of extraocular muscles, removal of the foreign body with guidance by C-arm fluoroscopy, pars plana lensectomy, and pars plana vitrectomy. Combination management with C-arm fluoroscopy and extraocular muscle severance may thus be a suitable approach to the removal of a retrobulbar metallic foreign body.

  17. Effect of caffeine ingestion on maximal voluntary contraction strength in upper- and lower-body muscle groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Tomas D; Saunders, David H

    2014-11-01

    The effect of caffeine on strength-power performance is equivocal, especially with regard to maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) strength. This is partly related to differences in upper- and lower-body musculature. However, there is no evidence to suggest whether this is a product of muscle group location, muscle group size, or both. Consequently, the primary aim of this study was to establish whether the effect of caffeine ingestion on MVC strength in upper- and lower-body muscle groups is significantly different, and if so, to determine whether this is a product of muscle group size. In a randomized, subject-blind crossover manner, 16 resistance-trained men (estimated caffeine intake [mean ± SD] 95.4 ± 80.0 mg·d) received either 6 mg·kg of caffeine (CAF) or a placebo (PLA). Isokinetic peak torque of the knee extensors, ankle plantar flexors, elbow flexors and wrist flexors were measured at an angular velocity of 60°·s. Statistical analyses revealed a significant increase in isokinetic peak torque from PLA to CAF (p = 0.011) and a significant difference in isokinetic peak torque between muscle groups (p caffeine increased with muscle group size. In conclusion, a moderate dose of caffeine improves MVC strength in resistance-trained men regardless of muscle group location, whereas the influence of muscle group size remains uncertain. This research may be useful for competitive and recreational athletes aiming to increase strength-power performance.

  18. Higher body mass index is associated with more adverse changes in calf muscle characteristics in peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Zankhana; Liu, Kiang; Tian, Lu; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M; Liao, Yihua; Criqui, Michael H; McDermott, Mary M

    2012-04-01

    This study investigated whether higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with more adverse lower extremity muscle characteristics at baseline and more adverse changes in muscle over time among participants with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD). This was a longitudinal, observational study of 425 men and women with PAD and 261 without PAD. Computed tomography was used to measure calf muscle characteristics at baseline and every 2 years. Knee extension isometric strength, power, and 6-minute walk distance were measured at baseline and annually. Baseline BMI (kg/m(2)) categories were ideal (20-25), overweight (>25-30), and obese (>30). Analyses adjust for age, race, sex, ankle brachial index, comorbidities, and other covariates. At baseline, higher BMI among participants with PAD was associated with greater calf muscle area (ideal BMI: 5181 mm(2); overweight: 5513 mm(2); obese: 5695 mm(2); P = .0009 for trend), higher calf muscle percentage of fat (6.38%, 10.28%, 17.44%, respectively, P calf muscle density (P calf muscle area (P = .030 for trend) and greater increases in calf muscle percentage of fat (P = .023 for trend). Among participants without PAD, there were no significant associations of baseline BMI with changes in lower extremity muscle outcomes over time. Among PAD participants, higher BMI is associated with greater calf muscle area at baseline. However, higher BMI is associated with more adverse calf muscle density and calf muscle percentage of fat at baseline and greater declines in calf muscle area over time. Copyright © 2012 Society for Vascular Surgery. All rights reserved.

  19. LOCALISED MUSCLE TISSUE OXYGENATION DURING DYNAMIC EXERCISE WITH WHOLE BODY VIBRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Robbins

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing use of whole body vibration during exercise an understanding of the exact role of vibration and the supporting physiological mechanisms is still limited. An important aspect of exercise analysis is the utilisation of oxygen, however, there have been limited studies considering tissue oxygenation parameters, particularly during dynamic whole body vibration (WBV exercise. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of adding WBV during heel raise exercises and assessing changes in tissue oxygenation parameters of the lateral gastrocnemius using Near Infra Red Spectroscopy (NIRS. Twenty healthy subjects completed ten alternating sets of 15 heel raises (vibration vs. no vibration. Synchronous oxygenation and motion data were captured prior to exercise to determine baseline levels, for the duration of the exercise and 20 sec post exercise for the recovery period. Both vibration and no vibration conditions elicited a characteristic increase in deoxyhaemoglobin and decreases in oxyhaemoglobin, total haemoglobin, tissue oxygenation index and normalised tissue haemoglobin index which are indicative of local tissue hypoxia. However, the addition of vibration elicited significantly lower (p < 0. 001 depletions in oxyhaemoglobin, total haemoglobin, normalised tissue haemoglobin index but no significant differences in deoxyhaemoglobin. These findings suggest that addition of vibration to exercise does not increase the cost of the exercise for the lateral gastrocnemius muscle, but does decrease the reduction in local muscle oxygenation parameters, potentially resulting from increased blood flow to the calf or a vasospastic response in the feet. However, further studies are needed to establish the mechanisms underlying these findings

  20. Correlation between Body Mass Index, Gender, and Skeletal Muscle Mass Cut off Point in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richi Hendrik Wattimena

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the average skeletal muscle mass (SMM value in young adults as a reference population; to analyze the correlation of gender, and body mass index to the cut off point; and to determine skeletal muscle mass cut off points of population in Bandung, Indonesia. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving 199 participants, 122 females and 77 males. The sampling technique used was the multistage random sampling. The participants were those who lived in four major regions in Bandung, Indonesia: Sukajadi, Cicadas, Buah Batu, and Cibaduyut. Results: The average appendicular skeletal mass index (ASMI in females and males based on body mass index (BMI were identified. The average ASMI values for normal BMI in females was 5.982±0.462 kg/m2 while the average ASMI values normal BMI for males was 7.581±0.744 kg/m2 Conclusions: A correlation between BMI and ASMI that was considered statistically significant was found in females (0.7712; p<0.05 and a very significant correlation was seen in males (0.870; p<0.05. The cut off points were defined by the normal BMI, which were 5.059 for females and 6.093 for males.

  1. Relationships among serum testosterone levels, body fat and muscle mass distribution in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douchi, T; Yoshimitsu, N; Nagata, Y

    2001-12-01

    We investigated the relationships among serum testosterone levels, body fat and muscle mass distribution in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Subjects were 67 women with PCOS (mean age +/- standard deviation, 28.8 +/- 6.6 years). Baseline characteristics included age and height. Trunk-leg fat ratio and trunk-leg muscle ratio were assessed with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were measured with radioimmunoassays. Relationships among serum testosterone levels, body fat and muscle mass distribution were investigated using Pearson and partial correlation tests. Serum testosterone levels were positively correlated with trunk-leg fat ratio (r = 0.398, P fat ratio (r = -0.360, P testosterone levels were still correlated with trunk-leg fat ratio (r = 0.500, P fat ratio was still correlated with trunk-leg muscle ratio, after adjusting for age, height, and serum testosterone levels. Based on these results, we concluded that higher serum testosterone levels may contribute to the upper body fat distribution and peripheral muscle mass distribution. In addition, peripheral muscle mass distribution may also contribute to the upper body fat distribution.

  2. Automated analysis of whole skeletal muscle for muscular atrophy detection of ALS in whole-body CT images: preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Naoki; Ieda, Kosuke; Zhou, Xiangrong; Yamada, Megumi; Kato, Hiroki; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hara, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Toshiharu; Inuzuka, Takashi; Matsuo, Masayuki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) causes functional disorders such as difficulty in breathing and swallowing through the atrophy of voluntary muscles. ALS in its early stages is difficult to diagnose because of the difficulty in differentiating it from other muscular diseases. In addition, image inspection methods for aggressive diagnosis for ALS have not yet been established. The purpose of this study is to develop an automatic analysis system of the whole skeletal muscle to support the early differential diagnosis of ALS using whole-body CT images. In this study, the muscular atrophy parts including ALS patients are automatically identified by recognizing and segmenting whole skeletal muscle in the preliminary steps. First, the skeleton is identified by its gray value information. Second, the initial area of the body cavity is recognized by the deformation of the thoracic cavity based on the anatomical segmented skeleton. Third, the abdominal cavity boundary is recognized using ABM for precisely recognizing the body cavity. The body cavity is precisely recognized by non-rigid registration method based on the reference points of the abdominal cavity boundary. Fourth, the whole skeletal muscle is recognized by excluding the skeleton, the body cavity, and the subcutaneous fat. Additionally, the areas of muscular atrophy including ALS patients are automatically identified by comparison of the muscle mass. The experiments were carried out for ten cases with abnormality in the skeletal muscle. Global recognition and segmentation of the whole skeletal muscle were well realized in eight cases. Moreover, the areas of muscular atrophy including ALS patients were well identified in the lower limbs. As a result, this study indicated the basic technology to detect the muscle atrophy including ALS. In the future, it will be necessary to consider methods to differentiate other kinds of muscular atrophy as well as the clinical application of this detection method for early ALS

  3. The utilization of waste clay from coal basin in the wall tile body formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isik, I.; Gocmez, H.; Yanik, G. [Dumlupinar Univ., Dept. of Ceramics Engineering, Kutahya (Turkey); Ceylantekin, R. [Anadolu Univ., Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2004-07-01

    In this study, the waste clays extracted from coal basin were used as a wall tile ingredient instead of the clay materials of the standardized biscuit formulation of the wall tile. XRD data show that waste clay contains major clay minerals such as illite, kaolinite and montmorillonite. It was found that clay-size particles (equal or less than 2{mu}m) distributed between 19.85 and 47%. The green and dry strength of the specimen containing illite and/or montmorillonite were increased 35% compared with the standard biscuit specimen. The fired strength of the samples having alkaline Earth oxides has been improved 20%, whereas water absorption reduced 28%. It was also found that the substitution of 5% waste clay in the wall tile biscuit formulation has revealed relatively better physical properties. (orig.)

  4. Effects of whole-body vibration on muscle strength and power of elderly: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Opuszcka Campos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this systematic review was to summarize available scientific evidence on the utilization of whole body vibration as an alternative method to promote effective modifications on muscle strength and power in the aging population.  Scientific studies were retrieved from the following databases: Medline, Scielo, Lillacs, Cochrane Library, PEDro and Science Citation Index. The PEDro scale was used to assess the quality of the included studies, while content went through a critical analysis. From the 91 studies retrieved, 75 were excluded and 16 attended the selection criteria. From the16, the majority (68.8% presented from moderate to high methodological quality. Whole-body vibration associated to both isometric and dynamic exercises seemed to constitute an alternative for therapeutic intervention to improve muscular strength and power of healthy elderly. However, due to the characteristics of the designs of the studies reviewed and the threats to their internal validity (i.e., the absence of the control condition to the vibratory stimulus it was challenging to establish the additional effects of the whole-body vibration on the target population. Divergent findings were found for the whole-body vibration effect on muscular power. It is still necessary to conduct randomized control trials to establish the real effectiveness of this kind of intervention.

  5. Attentional biases toward body images in males at high risk of muscle dysmorphia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhong Jin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Although research on muscle dysmorphia (MD, a body dysmorphic disorder subtype, has recently increased, the causes and mechanisms underlying this disorder remain unclear. Results from studies examining disorders associated with body image suggest the involvement of self-schema in biasing attention toward specific body information. The present study examined whether individuals at higher risk of MD also display attentional biases toward specific types of body images. Methods The validated Chinese version of the Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale was used to distinguish men at higher and lower risk of MD. Sixty-five adult Chinese men at higher (HRMD, n = 33 and lower risk of MD (LRMD, n = 32 performed a visual probe task. Initially, an image of a bodybuilder with either larger or smaller musculature was presented on one side of a central point, with a neutral image of a car exterior presented on the other side along the horizontal plane for 2,000 ms. The paired images were removed, and a visual target (a dot was displayed in the location of one of the previously shown images. Participants were asked to indicate the location of the target, and their eye movements were recorded during the entire visual presentation. Participant reaction time and three eye movement measurements (gaze direction, first saccade latency, and first fixation duration were recorded for use in determining attentional bias. Results The HRMD group revealed biases in orienting and maintaining their attention on images of bodybuilders with larger musculatures. Participants in this group consequently had a shorter reaction time in identifying the target that appeared at the location in which an image of a bodybuilder with a larger musculature had been previously displayed. They also directed their initial gaze more frequently, had shorter saccade latency, and had longer first fixation duration on images of bodybuilders with larger musculatures (all p < .0001

  6. Beam, vacuum and walls, a 3-body interaction; Faisceau et vide, un melodrame a trois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arianer, J

    2002-11-01

    The interactions between beams of accelerated particles, residual gas and walls involve complex physical processes. In most cases these interactions affect the quality of the vacuum and the value of the pressure. This course reviews all these interactions in a pedagogical and practical way that may be useful for any user of devices involving beams of particles. This document is made up of 6 chapters: 1) basic notions (Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, kinematics of charged particles, collisions, excitation and ionization), 2) properties of beams (emittance, local effects, and synchrotron radiation), 3) interactions between residual gas and particle beams (Bremsstrahlung radiation, energy loss due to ionization, charge shift of ion beams, photo-absorption and photo-ionization, and slowing-down in a plasma), 4) surface properties (crystal structure, and interaction between surface and the residual gas), 5) interaction between the beam and walls (reflection and diffraction of electrons, secondary emission of electrons, desorption induced by electron and ion impacts, photon production, ion-wall interaction, sputtering, ion penetration, surface ionization and thermal-ionization), and 6) radiation-wall interaction (diffusion, damping, photo-electric effect, desorption induced by photons, pair production and laser-surface interaction). (A.C.)

  7. The relationship between skeletal muscle mitochondrial citrate synthase activity and whole body oxygen uptake adaptations in response to exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigelsø, Andreas; Andersen, Nynne B; Dela, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Citrate synthase (CS) activity is a validated biomarker for mitochondrial density in skeletal muscle. CS activity is also used as a biochemical marker of the skeletal muscle oxidative adaptation to a training intervention, and a relationship between changes in whole body aerobic capacity and chan......Citrate synthase (CS) activity is a validated biomarker for mitochondrial density in skeletal muscle. CS activity is also used as a biochemical marker of the skeletal muscle oxidative adaptation to a training intervention, and a relationship between changes in whole body aerobic capacity...... and changes in CS activity is often assumed. However, this relationship and absolute values of CS and maximal oxygen uptake (V.O2max) has never been assessed across different studies. A systematic PubMed search on literature published from 1983 to 2013 was performed. The search profile included: citrate...... and CS activity. 70 publications with 97 intervention groups were included. There was a positive (r = 0.45) correlation (P

  8. Impact of different body positions on bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles in nulliparous continent women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewska, Daria; Stania, Magdalena; Sobota, Grzegorz; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Błaszczak, Edward; Taradaj, Jakub; Juras, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    We examined pelvic floor muscles (PFM) activity (%MVC) in twenty nulliparous women by body position during exercise as well as the activation of abdominal muscles and the gluteus maximus during voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Pelvic floor muscle activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during five experimental trials. Activation of transversus abdominis, rectus abdominis, and gluteus maximus during voluntary PFM contractions was also assessed. Significant differences in mean normalized amplitudes of baseline PFM activity were revealed between standing and lying (P activity seemed to depend on the body position and was the highest in standing. Pelvic floor muscles activity during voluntary contractions did not differ by position in continent women. Statistically significant differences between the supine lying and sitting positions were only observed during a sustained 60-second contraction of the PFMs.

  9. Importance of Lean Muscle Maintenance to Improve Insulin Resistance by Body Weight Reduction in Female Patients with Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaeko Fukushima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIt has recently been suggested that skeletal muscle has an important role in insulin resistance in obesity, in addition to exercise tolerance and the fat index. The aim of this study was to identify body composition factors that contribute to improvement of insulin resistance in female patients with obesity who reduce body weight.MethodsWe studied 92 female obese patients (age 40.9±10.4 years, body mass index 33.2±4.6 kg/m2 who reduced body weight by ≥5% after an intervention program including diet, exercise therapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy. Before and after the intervention, body composition was evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry to examine changes in skeletal muscle mass. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR was measured as an index of insulin resistance. Cardiopulmonary exercise was also performed by all patients.ResultsThere were significant improvements in body weight (–10.3%±4.5%, exercise tolerance (anaerobic threshold oxygen uptake 9.1%±18.4%, peak oxygen uptake 11.0%±14.2%, and HOMA-IR (–20.2%±38.3%. Regarding body composition, there were significant decreases in total body fat (–19.3%±9.6%, total fat-free mass (–2.7%±4.3%, and % body fat (–10.1%±7.5%, whereas % skeletal muscle significantly increased (8.9%±7.2%. In stepwise multiple linear regression analysis with change in HOMA-IR as the dependent variable, the change in % skeletal muscle was identified as an independent predictor (β=–0.280, R2=0.068, P<0.01.ConclusionImprovement of insulin resistance in female obese patients requires maintenance of skeletal muscle mass.

  10. Skeletal muscle mass adjusted by height correlated better with muscular functions than that adjusted by body weight in defining sarcopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Der-Sheng; Chang, Ke-Vin; Li, Chia-Ming; Lin, Yu-Hong; Kao, Tung-Wei; Tsai, Keh-Sung; Wang, Tyng-Grey; Yang, Wei-Shiung

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia, characterized by low muscle mass and function, results in frailty, comorbidities and mortality. However, its prevalence varies according to the different criteria used in its diagnosis. This cross-sectional study investigated the difference in the number of sarcopenia cases recorded by two different measurement methods of low muscle mass to determine which measurement was better. We recruited 878 (54.2% female) individuals aged over 65 years and obtained their body composition and...

  11. Whole-Body Vibration and the Prevention and Treatment of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminian-Far, Atefeh; Hadian, Mohammad-Reza; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Talebian, Saeed; Bakhtiary, Amir Hoshang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Numerous recovery strategies have been used in an attempt to minimize the symptoms of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been suggested as a viable warm-up for athletes. However, scientific evidence to support the protective effects of WBV training (WBVT) on muscle damage is lacking. Objective: To investigate the acute effect of WBVT applied before eccentric exercise in the prevention of DOMS. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 32 healthy, untrained volunteers were randomly assigned to either the WBVT (n  =  15) or control (n  =  17) group. Intervention(s): Volunteers performed 6 sets of 10 maximal isokinetic (60°/s) eccentric contractions of the dominant-limb knee extensors on a dynamometer. In the WBVT group, the training was applied using a vibratory platform (35 Hz, 5 mm peak to peak) with 100° of knee flexion for 60 seconds before eccentric exercise. No vibration was applied in the control group. Main Outcome Measure(s): Muscle soreness, thigh circumference, and pressure pain threshold were recorded at baseline and at 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 14 days postexercise. Maximal voluntary isometric and isokinetic knee extensor strength were assessed at baseline, immediately after exercise, and at 1, 2, 7, and 14 days postexercise. Serum creatine kinase was measured at baseline and at 1, 2, and 7 days postexercise. Results: The WBVT group showed a reduction in DOMS symptoms in the form of less maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength loss, lower creatine kinase levels, and less pressure pain threshold and muscle soreness (P < .05) compared with the control group. However, no effect on thigh circumference was evident (P < .05). Conclusions: Administered before eccentric exercise, WBVT may reduce DOMS via muscle function improvement. Further investigation should be undertaken to ascertain the effectiveness of WBVT in

  12. Dosimetric Implications of an Injection of Hyaluronic Acid for Preserving the Rectal Wall in Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.chapet@chu-lyon.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Udrescu, Corina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Tanguy, Ronan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Ruffion, Alain [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Fenoglietto, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Val d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France); Sotton, Marie-Pierre [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Devonec, Marian [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Colombel, Marc [Department of Urology, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France); Jalade, Patrice [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Val d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the contribution of ahyaluronic acid (HA) injection between the rectum and the prostate to reducing the dose to the rectal wall in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: As part of a phase 2 study of hypofractionated radiation therapy (62 Gy in 20 fractions), the patients received a transperineal injection of 10 cc HA between the rectum and the prostate. A dosimetric computed tomographic (CT) scan was systematically performed before (CT1) and after (CT2) the injection. Two 9-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy-SBRT plans were optimized for the first 10 patients on both CTs according to 2 dosage levels: 5 × 6.5 Gy (PlanA) and 5 × 8.5 Gy (PlanB). Rectal wall parameters were compared with a dose–volume histogram, and the prostate–rectum separation was measured at 7 levels of the prostate on the center line of the organ. Results: For both plans, the average volume of the rectal wall receiving the 90% isodose line (V90%) was reduced up to 90% after injection. There was no significant difference (P=.32) between doses received by the rectal wall on CT1 and CT2 at the base of the prostate. This variation became significant from the median plane to the apex of the prostate (P=.002). No significant differences were found between PlanA without HA and PlanB with HA for each level of the prostate (P=.77, at the isocenter of the prostate). Conclusions: HA injection significantly reduced the dose to the rectal wall and allowed a dose escalation from 6.5 Gy to 8.5 Gy without increasing the dose to the rectum. A phase 2 study is under way in our department to assess the rate of acute and late rectal toxicities when SBRT (5 × 8.5 Gy) is combined with an injection of HA.

  13. Dosimetric Implications of an Injection of Hyaluronic Acid for Preserving the Rectal Wall in Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapet, Olivier; Udrescu, Corina; Tanguy, Ronan; Ruffion, Alain; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Sotton, Marie-Pierre; Devonec, Marian; Colombel, Marc; Jalade, Patrice; Azria, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the contribution of ahyaluronic acid (HA) injection between the rectum and the prostate to reducing the dose to the rectal wall in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: As part of a phase 2 study of hypofractionated radiation therapy (62 Gy in 20 fractions), the patients received a transperineal injection of 10 cc HA between the rectum and the prostate. A dosimetric computed tomographic (CT) scan was systematically performed before (CT1) and after (CT2) the injection. Two 9-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy-SBRT plans were optimized for the first 10 patients on both CTs according to 2 dosage levels: 5 × 6.5 Gy (PlanA) and 5 × 8.5 Gy (PlanB). Rectal wall parameters were compared with a dose–volume histogram, and the prostate–rectum separation was measured at 7 levels of the prostate on the center line of the organ. Results: For both plans, the average volume of the rectal wall receiving the 90% isodose line (V90%) was reduced up to 90% after injection. There was no significant difference (P=.32) between doses received by the rectal wall on CT1 and CT2 at the base of the prostate. This variation became significant from the median plane to the apex of the prostate (P=.002). No significant differences were found between PlanA without HA and PlanB with HA for each level of the prostate (P=.77, at the isocenter of the prostate). Conclusions: HA injection significantly reduced the dose to the rectal wall and allowed a dose escalation from 6.5 Gy to 8.5 Gy without increasing the dose to the rectum. A phase 2 study is under way in our department to assess the rate of acute and late rectal toxicities when SBRT (5 × 8.5 Gy) is combined with an injection of HA

  14. The relationship between skeletal muscle mitochondrial citrate synthase activity and whole body oxygen uptake adaptations in response to exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas; Andersen, Nynne Bjerre; Dela, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Citrate synthase (CS) activity is a validated biomarker for mitochondrial density in skeletal muscle. CS activity is also used as a biochemical marker of the skeletal muscle oxidative adaptation to a training intervention, and a relationship between changes in whole body aerobic capacity and chan......Citrate synthase (CS) activity is a validated biomarker for mitochondrial density in skeletal muscle. CS activity is also used as a biochemical marker of the skeletal muscle oxidative adaptation to a training intervention, and a relationship between changes in whole body aerobic capacity......, synthase, human, skeletal, muscle, training, not electrical stimulation, not in-vitro, not rats. Studies that reported changes in CS activity and V.O2max were included. Different training types and subject populations were analyzed independently to assess correlation between relative changes in V.O2max.......4). Training induced changes in whole body oxidative capacity is matched by changes in muscle CS activity in a nearly 1:1 relationship. Absolute values of CS across different studies cannot be compared unless a standardized analytical method is used by all laboratories...

  15. Intermittent whole-body vibration attenuates a reduction in the number of the capillaries in unloaded rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneguchi, Akinori; Ozawa, Junya; Kawamata, Seiichi; Kurose, Tomoyuki; Yamaoka, Kaoru

    2014-09-26

    Whole-body vibration has been suggested for the prevention of muscle mass loss and muscle wasting as an attractive measure for disuse atrophy. This study examined the effects of daily intermittent whole-body vibration and weight bearing during hindlimb suspension on capillary number and muscle atrophy in rat skeletal muscles. Sixty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: control (CONT), hindlimb suspension (HS), HS + weight bearing (WB), and HS + whole-body vibration (VIB) (n = 15 each). Hindlimb suspension was applied for 2 weeks in HS, HS + WB, and HS + VIB groups. During suspension, rats in HS + VIB group were placed daily on a vibrating whole-body vibration platform for 20 min. In HS + WB group, suspension was interrupted for 20 min/day, allowing weight bearing. Untreated rats were used as controls. Soleus muscle wet weights and muscle fiber cross-sectional areas (CSA) significantly decreased in HS, HS + WB, and HS + VIB groups compared with CONT group. Both muscle weights and CSA were significantly greater in HS + WB and HS + VIB groups compared with HS group. Capillary numbers (represented by capillary-to-muscle fiber ratio) were significantly smaller in all hindlimb suspension-treated groups compared with CONT group. However, a reduction in capillary number by unloading hindlimbs was partially prevented by whole-body vibration. These findings were supported by examining mRNA for angiogenic-related factors. Expression levels of a pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor-A mRNA, were significantly lower in all hindlimb suspension-treated groups compared with CONT group. There were no differences among hindlimb suspension-treated groups. Expression levels of an anti-angiogenic factor, CD36 (receptor for thrombospondin-1) mRNA, were significantly higher in all hindlimb suspension-treated groups compared with CONT group. Among the hindlimb suspension-treated groups, expression of CD

  16. Attentional biases toward body images in males at high risk of muscle dysmorphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xinhong; Jin, Yahong; Zhou, Shi; Yang, Shun-Nan; Chang, Shuzhi; Li, Hui

    2018-01-01

    Although research on muscle dysmorphia (MD), a body dysmorphic disorder subtype, has recently increased, the causes and mechanisms underlying this disorder remain unclear. Results from studies examining disorders associated with body image suggest the involvement of self-schema in biasing attention toward specific body information. The present study examined whether individuals at higher risk of MD also display attentional biases toward specific types of body images. The validated Chinese version of the Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale was used to distinguish men at higher and lower risk of MD. Sixty-five adult Chinese men at higher (HRMD, n  = 33) and lower risk of MD (LRMD, n  = 32) performed a visual probe task. Initially, an image of a bodybuilder with either larger or smaller musculature was presented on one side of a central point, with a neutral image of a car exterior presented on the other side along the horizontal plane for 2,000 ms. The paired images were removed, and a visual target (a dot) was displayed in the location of one of the previously shown images. Participants were asked to indicate the location of the target, and their eye movements were recorded during the entire visual presentation. Participant reaction time and three eye movement measurements (gaze direction, first saccade latency, and first fixation duration) were recorded for use in determining attentional bias. The HRMD group revealed biases in orienting and maintaining their attention on images of bodybuilders with larger musculatures. Participants in this group consequently had a shorter reaction time in identifying the target that appeared at the location in which an image of a bodybuilder with a larger musculature had been previously displayed. They also directed their initial gaze more frequently, had shorter saccade latency, and had longer first fixation duration on images of bodybuilders with larger musculatures (all p  self-schema of specific body information. These

  17. Multi-Body Ski Jumper Model with Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Muscle Control for Trajectory Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Piprek

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach to model a ski jumper as a multi-body system for an optimal control application. The modeling is based on the constrained Newton-Euler-Equations. Within this paper the complete multi-body modeling methodology as well as the musculoskeletal modeling is considered. For the musculoskeletal modeling and its incorporation in the optimization model, we choose a nonlinear dynamic inversion control approach. This approach uses the muscle models as nonlinear reference models and links them to the ski jumper movement by a control law. This strategy yields a linearized input-output behavior, which makes the optimal control problem easier to solve. The resulting model of the ski jumper can then be used for trajectory optimization whose results are compared to literature jumps. Ultimately, this enables the jumper to get a very detailed feedback of the flight. To achieve the maximal jump length, exact positioning of his body with respect to the air can be displayed.

  18. Not just quantity: gluteus maximus muscle characteristics in able-bodied and SCI individuals--implications for tissue viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gary A; Bogie, Kath M

    2013-08-01

    Some individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) remain pressure ulcer (PU) free whilst others experience a recurring cycle of tissue breakdown. Detailed analysis of gluteal muscle characteristics may provide insights to local tissue viability variability. The study hypothesis was that SCI individuals have altered muscle composition compared to able-bodied (AB). Ten AB and ten SCI received a supine pelvic CT scan, with contrast. Cross-sectional area (CSA) and overall muscle volume were derived using image analysis. Gluteal muscle tissue type was classified at the S2/S3 sacral vertebrae midpoint, the superior greater trochanters margin (GT) and the inferior ischial tuberosities margin (IT) using the linear transformation Hounsfield Unit scale. SCI gluteal CSA was less than for AB throughout the muscle, with the greatest relative atrophy at the IT (48%). Average AB gluteal volume was nearly double SCI. Eight SCI had over 20% infiltrative adipose tissue, three with over 50%. SCI gluteal CSA and intramuscular fat infiltration were significantly negatively correlated (p < 0.05). SCI IT axial slices showed less lean muscle and higher intramuscular fat infiltration than more proximally (p < 0.05). SCI gluteal muscle characteristics were indicative of impaired tissue viability. SCI disuse muscle atrophy was anticipated; the analytic approach further indicated that intramuscular atrophy was not uniform. SCI muscle composition showed increased proportions of both low density muscle and adipose tissue. CT scan with contrast is effective for gluteal muscle characterization. This assessment technique may contribute to determination of personalized risk for PU development and other secondary complications. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Whole-body vibration induces distinct reflex patterns in human soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacan, Ilhan; Cidem, Muharrem; Cidem, Mehmet; Türker, Kemal S

    2017-06-01

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying whole body vibration (WBV)-induced muscular reflex (WBV-IMR) are not well understood. To define a possible pathway for WBV-IMR, this study investigated the effects of WBV amplitude on WBV-IMR latency by surface electromyography analysis of the soleus muscle in human adult volunteers. The tendon (T) reflex was also induced to evaluate the level of presynaptic Ia inhibition during WBV. WBV-IMR latency was shorter when induced by low- as compared to medium- or high-amplitude WBV (33.9±5.3msvs. 43.8±3.6 and 44.1±4.2ms, respectively). There was no difference in latencies between T-reflex elicited before WBV (33.8±2.4ms) and WBV-IMR induced by low-amplitude WBV. Presynaptic Ia inhibition was absent during low-amplitude WBV but was present during medium- and high-amplitude WBV. Consequently, WBV induces short- or long-latency reflexes depending on the vibration amplitude. During low-amplitude WBV, muscle spindle activation may induce the short- but not the long-latency WBV-IMR. Furthermore, unlike the higher amplitude WBV, low-amplitude WBV does not induce presynaptic inhibition at the Ia synaptic terminals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Different fatigue-resistant leg muscles and EMG response during whole-body vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Deniz

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of static whole-body vibration (WBV) on the Electromyograhic (EMG) responses of leg muscles, which are fatigue-resistant in different manner. The study population was divided into two groups according to the values obtained by the Fatigue Index [Group I: Less Fatigue Resistant (LFR), n=11; Group II: More Fatigue Resistant (MFR), n=11]. The repeated electromyographic (EMG) activities of four leg muscles were analyzed the following determinants: (1) frequency (30 Hz, 35 Hz and 40 Hz); (2) stance position (static squat position); (3) amplitude (2 mm and 4 mm) and (4) knee flexion angle (120°), (5) vertical vibration platform. Vibration data were analyzed using Minitab 16 (Minitab Ltd, State College, PA, USA). The significance level was set at pmuscle fatigue (pEMG activation at higher frequencies (max at 40 Hz) and amplitudes (4 mm) (p<.05). The present study can be used for the optimal prescription of vibration exercise and can serve to guide the development of training programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Skeletal muscle characterization of Japanese quail line selectively bred for lower body weight as an avian model of delayed muscle growth with hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Min; Suh, Yeunsu; Shin, Sangsu; Lee, Kichoon

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to extensively characterize the skeletal muscle development in the low weight (LW) quail selected from random bred control (RBC) Japanese quail in order to provide a new avian model of impaired and delayed growth in physically normal animals. The LW line had smaller embryo and body weights than the RBC line in all age groups (Pquail lines diminished with increasing age from 42 to 75 d post-hatch. This delayed muscle growth in the LW line is accompanied by higher levels of myogenin expression at 42 d (Pquail line provided a well-characterized avian model for future identification of the responsible genes and for studying mechanisms of hypoplasia and delayed muscle growth.

  2. Effects of experimental insoles on body posture, mandibular kinematics and masticatory muscles activity. A pilot study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Ida; Alessandri Bonetti, Giulio; Bortolotti, Francesco; Bartolucci, Maria Lavinia; Gatto, Maria Rosaria; Michelotti, Ambra

    2015-06-01

    It has been hypothesized that different plantar sensory inputs could influence the whole body posture and dental occlusion but there is a lack of evidence on this possible association. To investigate the effects of experimental insoles redistributing plantar pressure on body posture, mandibular kinematics and electromyographic (EMG) activity of masticatory muscles on healthy subjects. A pilot study was conducted on 19 healthy volunteers that wore custom-made insoles normalizing the plantar pressure distribution for 2 weeks. Body posture parameters were measured by means of an optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric analysis; mandibular kinematics was analyzed by means of gothic arch tracings; superficial EMG activity of head and neck muscles was performed. Measurements were carried out 10 days before the insertion of the insoles, immediately before the insertion, the day after, 7 and 14 days after, in four different exteroceptive conditions. The outcomes of the present study show that insoles do not modify significantly over time the parameters of body posture, SEMG activity of head and neck muscles and mandibular kinematics. In this pilot study the experimental insoles did not significantly influence the body posture, the mandibular kinematics and the activity of masticatory muscles during a 14-day follow up period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Changes in muscle cross-sectional area, muscle force, and jump performance during 6 weeks of progressive whole-body vibration combined with progressive, high intensity resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, A; Beijer, Å; Johannes, B; Schoenau, E; Mester, J; Rittweger, J; Zange, J

    2017-06-01

    We hypothesized that progressive whole-body vibration (WBV) superimposed to progressive high intensity resistance training has greater effects on muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), muscle force of leg muscles, and jump performance than progressive high intensity resistance training alone. Two groups of healthy male subjects performed either 6 weeks of Resistive Vibration Exercise (RVE, squats and heel raises with WBV, n=13) or Resistive Exercise (RE, squats and heel raises without WBV, n=13). Squats under RVE required indispensable weight loading on the forefoot to damp harmful vibrations to the head. Time, intervention, and interaction effects were analyzed. After 6 weeks of training, knee extensor CSA, isometric knee extension force, and counter movement jump height increased equally in both groups (time effect, P⟨0.001, P≤0.02, and P≤0.03, respectively), whereas only in RVE ankle plantar flexor CSA and isometric ankle plantar flexion force reached significance or a tendency, respectively, (time effect, P=0.015 and P=0.069, respectively; intervention effect also for the latter, P=0.006). Drop jump contact time did significantly more improve in RVE (interaction effect, P=0.042). RVE showed better training effects than RE only in plantar flexor muscles. RVE seems to be suitable in professional sports with a special focus on calf muscles.

  4. Immune responses of a wall lizard to whole-body exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Despoina; Sagonas, Kostas; Fragopoulou, Adamantia F; Pafilis, Panayiotis; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini; Margaritis, Lukas H; Tsitsilonis, Ourania E; Valakos, Efstratios D

    2016-01-01

    During the last three decades, the number of devices that emit non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at the wireless communication spectrum has rapidly increased and possible effects on living organisms have become a major concern. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of radiofrequency EMR emitted by a widely used wireless communication device, namely the Digital Enhanced Communication Telephony (DECT) base, on the immune responses of the Aegean wall lizard (Podarcis erhardii). Adult male lizards were exposed 24 h/day for 8 weeks to 1880-1900 MHz DECT base radiation at average electric field intensity of 3.2 V/m. Immune reactivity was assessed using the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin swelling and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) tests. Our results revealed a noticeable suppression (approximately 45%) of inflammatory responses in EMR-exposed lizards compared to sham-exposed animals. T cell-mediated responses were marginally affected. Daily radiofrequency EMR exposure seems to affect, at least partially, the immunocompetence of the Aegean wall lizard.

  5. Distinct Skeletal Muscle Gene Regulation from Active Contraction, Passive Vibration, and Whole Body Heat Stress in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Petrie

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle exercise regulates several important metabolic genes in humans. We know little about the effects of environmental stress (heat and mechanical stress (vibration on skeletal muscle. Passive mechanical stress or systemic heat stress are often used in combination with many active exercise programs. We designed a method to deliver a vibration stress and systemic heat stress to compare the effects with active skeletal muscle contraction.The purpose of this study is to examine whether active mechanical stress (muscle contraction, passive mechanical stress (vibration, or systemic whole body heat stress regulates key gene signatures associated with muscle metabolism, hypertrophy/atrophy, and inflammation/repair.Eleven subjects, six able-bodied and five with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI participated in the study. The six able-bodied subjects sat in a heat stress chamber for 30 minutes. Five subjects with SCI received a single dose of limb-segment vibration or a dose of repetitive electrically induced muscle contractions. Three hours after the completion of each stress, we performed a muscle biopsy (vastus lateralis or soleus to analyze mRNA gene expression.We discovered repetitive active muscle contractions up regulated metabolic transcription factors NR4A3 (12.45 fold, PGC-1α (5.46 fold, and ABRA (5.98 fold; and repressed MSTN (0.56 fold. Heat stress repressed PGC-1α (0.74 fold change; p < 0.05; while vibration induced FOXK2 (2.36 fold change; p < 0.05. Vibration similarly caused a down regulation of MSTN (0.74 fold change; p < 0.05, but to a lesser extent than active muscle contraction. Vibration induced FOXK2 (p < 0.05 while heat stress repressed PGC-1α (0.74 fold and ANKRD1 genes (0.51 fold; p < 0.05.These findings support a distinct gene regulation in response to heat stress, vibration, and muscle contractions. Understanding these responses may assist in developing regenerative rehabilitation interventions to improve muscle cell

  6. Dietary L-arginine supplementation increases muscle gain and reduces body fat mass in growing-finishing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bie; Yin, Yulong; Liu, Zhiqiang; Li, Xinguo; Xu, Haijun; Kong, Xiangfeng; Huang, Ruilin; Tang, Wenjie; Shinzato, Izuru; Smith, Stephen B; Wu, Guoyao

    2009-05-01

    Obesity in humans is a major public health crisis worldwide. In addition, livestock species exhibit excessive subcutaneous fat at market weight. However, there are currently few means of reducing adiposity in mammals. This study was conducted with a swine model to test the hypothesis that dietary L-arginine supplementation may increase muscle gain and decrease fat deposition. Twenty-four 110-day-old barrows were assigned randomly into two treatments, representing supplementation with 1.0% L-arginine or 2.05% L-alanine (isonitrogenous control) to a corn- and soybean meal-based diet. Growth performance was measured based on weight gain and food intake. After a 60-day period of supplementation, carcass and muscle composition were measured. Serum triglyceride concentration was 20% lower (P gain by 6.5% and carcass skeletal-muscle content by 5.5%, while decreasing (P muscle protein, glycogen, and fat contents by 4.8, 42, and 70%, respectively, as well as muscle pH at 45 min post-mortem by 0.32, while reducing muscle lactate content by 37%. These results support our hypothesis that dietary arginine supplementation beneficially promotes muscle gain and reduces body fat accretion in growing-finishing pigs. The findings have a positive impact on development of novel therapeutics to treat human obesity and enhance swine lean-tissue growth.

  7. VARIATIONS IN NEUROMUSCULAR ACTIVITY OF THIGH MUSCLES DURING WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION IN CONSIDERATION OF DIFFERENT BIOMECHANICAL VARIABLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Perchthaler

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The intention of this study was to systematically analyze the impact of biomechanical variables in terms of different vibration frequencies, amplitudes and knee angles on quadriceps femoris and hamstring activity during exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV. 51 healthy men and women (age 55 ± 8 years voluntary participated in the study and were randomly allocated to five different vibration-frequency groups. Each subject performed 9 static squat positions (3 amplitudes x 3 knee angles on a side alternating vibration platform. Surface electromyography (EMG was used to record the neuromuscular activity of the quadriceps femoris and hamstring muscles. Maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs were performed prior to the measurements to normalize the EMG signals. A three-way mixed ANOVA was performed to analyze the different effects of the biomechanical variables on muscle activity. Depending on the biomechanical variables, EMG muscle activity ranged between 18.2 and 74.1 % MVC in the quadriceps femoris and between 5.2 and 27. 3 % MVC in the hamstrings during WBV. The highest levels of muscle activation were found at high frequencies and large amplitudes. Especially in the quadriceps femoris muscle, a WBV frequency of 30 Hz led to a significant increase in muscle activity compared to the other tested frequencies. However, it seems that knee angle is only relevant for the quadriceps femoris muscle. The results of this study should give more information for developing individual training protocols for WBV treatment in different practical applications

  8. Effect of Body Mass Index on Postural Balance and Muscle Strength in Children Aged 8-10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucky Prasetiowati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:Childhood overweight and obesity, which are considered as global epidemic, can be assessed using Body Mass Index (BMI. BMI difference can lead to anatomic changes due to an increased body load. This increase might also affect motor performance, including changes in postural balance and muscle strength. Aims and Objectives: to explain the influence of BMI on postural balance and lower limb muscle strength and to assess the correlation between those two variables in children aged 8-10 years. Material and methods:The sample consisted of 63 children aged 8-10 years, which were divided in 3 groups: BMI-normal, BMI-overweight, and BMI-obese. The postural balance was assessed using single leg balance test on MatScan and the Center Of Pressure (COP area was recorded. Isometric muscle strength of hip extensor and knee extensor were measured using a hand-held dynamometer. Results: Obese children had significantly largerCOP area than overweight (p = 0.004 and normal weight children (p = 0.000.There were no significant differences in hip extensor muscle strength between obese children with overweight and normal weight children (p=0.527. The absolute knee extensor muscle strength in obese group was significantly higher than the overweight and normal group (p = 0.003. However the relative muscle strength of lower limb for obese children was significantly lower than for normal weight. There was no significant correlation between absolute hip extensor and knee extensor muscles strength with COP area. Conclusion: Obese children have decreased postural balance and increased absolute knee extensormuscle strength significantly when compared to overweight and normal children. There is no significant correlation between postural balance and muscle strength.

  9. Energy composition of diet affects muscle fiber recruitment, body composition, and growth trajectory in rainbow trout (Oncorhnychus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy composition of diet affects muscle fiber recruitment, body composition, and growth trajectory in rainbow trout (Oncorhnychus mykiss) The cost and scarcity of key ingredients for aquaculture feed formulation call for a wise use of resources, especially dietary proteins and energy. For years t...

  10. Strength and muscle quality in a well-functioning cohort of older adults : the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newman, Anne B; Haggerty, Catherine L; Goodpaster, Bret H; Harris, Tamara B; Kritchevsky, Steve; Nevitt, Michael; Miles, Toni P; Visser, Marjolein

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether lower lean mass and higher fat mass have independent effects on the loss of strength and muscle quality in older adults and might explain part of the effect of age. DESIGN: Single-episode, cross-sectional analyses of a cohort of subjects in the Health, Aging and Body

  11. Muscle activation and estimated relative joint force during running with weight support on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente Rona; Hovgaard-Hansen, Line; Cappelen, Katrine Louise

    2016-01-01

    Running on a lower-body positive pressure (LBPP) treadmill allows effects of weight support on leg muscle activation to be assessed systematically, and has the potential to facilitate rehabilitation and prevent overloading. The aim was to study the effect of running with weight support on leg mus...

  12. Effects of ankle foot orthoses on body functions and activities in people with floppy paretic ankle muscles : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilk, van der Dymphy; Dijkstra, Pieter Ubele; Postema, Klaas; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Hijmans, Juha Markus

    2015-01-01

    Background: People with floppy ankle muscles paresis use ankle foot orthoses to improve their walking ability. Ankle foot orthoses also limit ankle range of motion thereby introducing additional problems. Insight in effects of ankle foot orthoses on body functions and activities in people with

  13. Whole body 3-methylhistidine production and proteinase activities in porcine muscle after protein-free feeding and realimentation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemel-Grooten, van den H.N.A.; Rathmacher, J.A.; Garssen, G.J.; Schreurs, V.V.A.M.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    1998-01-01

    Whole body 3-methylhistidine (3MH) production rates and proteinase activities in porcine skeletal muscles were studied during a protein-free feeding period and subsequent realimentation. Out of 54 castrated male pigs (35 kg on day 0), six pigs were slaughtered on day 0, and 48 were randomly divided

  14. Dynamic bending of bionic flexible body driven by pneumatic artificial muscles(PAMs) for spinning gait of quadruped robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jingtao; Yu, Huangying; Wang, Tianmiao

    2016-01-01

    The body of quadruped robot is generally developed with the rigid structure. The mobility of quadruped robot depends on the mechanical properties of the body mechanism. It is difficult for quadruped robot with rigid structure to achieve better mobility walking or running in the unstructured environment. A kind of bionic flexible body mechanism for quadruped robot is proposed, which is composed of one bionic spine and four pneumatic artificial muscles(PAMs). This kind of body imitates the four-legged creatures' kinematical structure and physical properties, which has the characteristic of changeable stiffness, lightweight, flexible and better bionics. The kinematics of body bending is derived, and the coordinated movement between the flexible body and legs is analyzed. The relationship between the body bending angle and the PAM length is obtained. The dynamics of the body bending is derived by the floating coordinate method and Lagrangian method, and the driving force of PAM is determined. The experiment of body bending is conducted, and the dynamic bending characteristic of bionic flexible body is evaluated. Experimental results show that the bending angle of the bionic flexible body can reach 18°. An innovation body mechanism for quadruped robot is proposed, which has the characteristic of flexibility and achieve bending by changing gas pressure of PAMs. The coordinated movement of the body and legs can achieve spinning gait in order to improve the mobility of quadruped robot.

  15. Local Hypothermia as a Radioprotector of the Rectal Wall During Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrycushko, Brian A., E-mail: Brian.Hrycushko@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Chopra, Rajiv [Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sayre, James W. [Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Radiology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Richardson, James A. [Department of Pathology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Department of Molecular Biology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Folkert, Michael R.; Timmerman, Robert D.; Medin, Paul M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the single-fraction dose-related incidence of rectal obstruction and/or bleeding in normothermic and hypothermic rectums of a rat model. Methods and Materials: A 1.9-cm length of rectum was irradiated with a single fraction in 57 Sprague-Dawley rats using a dedicated image-guided small animal irradiator and Monte Carlo–based treatment planning system. All rats had a rectal temperature control apparatus placed during irradiation and were stratified to achieve either a normothermic (37°C) or hypothermic (15°C) rectal wall temperature. Radiation was delivered to a 1-cm-diameter cylindrical volume about the cooling device and rectal wall. The radiation dose was escalated from 16 Gy up to 37 Gy to assess the dose response in each arm. The primary endpoint of this study was rectal obstruction and/or bleeding during a follow-up of 180 to 186 days. Histologic scoring was performed on all study rats. Results: Probit analysis showed a dose associated with a 50% incidence of rectal obstruction of 24.6 Gy and 40.8 Gy for normothermic and hypothermic arms, respectively. The occurrence of obstruction and/or bleeding correlated with the posttreatment histologic score for normothermic rats; however, there was no difference in histologic score between normothermic and hypothermic rats at the highest dose levels evaluated. Conclusions: A significant radioprotective effect was observed using local hypothermia during a single large dose of radiation for the functional endpoint of rectal obstruction and/or bleeding. A confirmatory study in a large animal model with anatomic and physiologic similarities to humans is suggested.

  16. Assessment of respiratory muscle strength in children according to the classification of body mass index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Jung da Rosa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess and compare the respiratory muscle strength among eutrophic, overweight and obese school children, as well as to identify anthropometric and respiratory variables related to the results.METHODS: Cross-sectional survey with healthy schoolchildren aged 7-9 years old, divided into three groups: Normal weight, Overweight and Obese. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC questionnaire was applied. The body mass index (BMI was evaluated, as well as the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 with a portable digital device. The maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures (MIP and MEP were measured by a digital manometer. Comparisons between the groups were made by Kruskal-Wallis test. Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to analyze the correlations among the variables.RESULTS: MIP of eutrophic school children was higher than MIP found in overweight (p=0.043 and obese (p=0.013 children. MIP was correlated with BMI percentile and weight classification (r=-0.214 and r=-0.256 and MEP was correlated with height (r=0.328. Both pressures showed strong correlation with each other in all analyses (r≥0.773, and less correlation with FEV1 (MIP - r=0.362 and MEP - r=0.494. FEV1 correlated with MEP in all groups (r: 0.429 - 0.569 and with MIP in Obese Group (r=0.565. Age was correlated with FEV1 (r=0.578, MIP (r=0.281 and MEP (r=0.328.CONCLUSIONS: Overweight and obese children showed lower MIP values, compared to eutrophic ones. The findings point to the influence of anthropometric variables on respiratory muscle strength in children.

  17. Muscle type-specific responses to NAD+ salvage biosynthesis promote muscle function in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrablik, Tracy L; Wang, Wenqing; Upadhyay, Awani; Hanna-Rose, Wendy

    2011-01-15

    Salvage biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) from nicotinamide (NAM) lowers NAM levels and replenishes the critical molecule NAD(+) after it is hydrolyzed. This pathway is emerging as a regulator of multiple biological processes. Here we probe the contribution of the NAM-NAD(+) salvage pathway to muscle development and function using Caenorhabditis elegans. C. elegans males with mutations in the nicotinamidase pnc-1, which catalyzes the first step of this NAD(+) salvage pathway, cannot mate due to a spicule muscle defect. Multiple muscle types are impaired in the hermaphrodites, including body wall muscles, pharyngeal muscles and vulval muscles. An active NAD(+) salvage pathway is required for optimal function of each muscle cell type. However, we found surprising muscle-cell-type specificity in terms of both the timing and relative sensitivity to perturbation of NAD(+) production or NAM levels. Active NAD(+) biosynthesis during development is critical for function of the male spicule protractor muscles during adulthood, but these muscles can surprisingly do without salvage biosynthesis in adulthood under the conditions examined. The body wall muscles require ongoing NAD(+) salvage biosynthesis both during development and adulthood for maximum function. The vulval muscles do not function in the presence of elevated NAM concentrations, but NAM supplementation is only slightly deleterious to body wall muscles during development or upon acute application in adults. Thus, the pathway plays distinct roles in different tissues. As NAM-NAD(+) biosynthesis also impacts muscle differentiation in vertebrates, we propose that similar complexities may be found among vertebrate muscle cell types. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The effects of body weight unloading on kinetics and muscle activity of overweight males during Overground walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Arielle G; Wolf, Alon

    2018-02-01

    Excess body weight has become a major worldwide health and social epidemic. Training with body weight unloading, is a common method for gait corrections for various neuromuscular impairments. In the present study we assessed the effects of body weight unloading on knee and ankle kinetics and muscle activation of overweight subjects walking overground under various levels of body weight unloading. Ten overweight subjects (25 ≤ BMI weight unloading experimental conditions. Gait parameters assessed under these conditions included knee and ankle flexion moments and the Electromygraphic activity of the Tibialis Anterior, Lateral Gastrocnemius and Vastus Lateralis. Increasing body weight unloading levels from 0% to 30% was found to significantly reduce the peak knee flexion and ankle plantarflexion moments. Also observed was a significant reduction in muscle activity of the Tibialis Anterior, Lateral Gastrocnemius and Vastus Lateralis under the three body-weight unloading conditions. Our results demonstrate that a reduction of up to 30% overweight subjects' body weight during gait is conducive to a reduction in the knee and ankle flexion moments and in the balancing net quadriceps moment and ankle flexors moment. The newly devised body weight unloading device is therefore an effective method for reducing joint loads allowing overweight people who require controlled weight bearing scenarios to retrain their gait while engaging in sustained walking exercise. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Postmenopausal HRT and tibolone in relation to muscle strength and body composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobsen, D. E.; Samson, M. M.; Kezic, S.; Verhaar, H. J. J.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Sarcopenia, the loss of muscle mass with age, has a great impact on physical function, and especially in postmenopausal women, who experience a greater decline in muscle strength than do men of similar age. Conventional hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may diminish this loss of muscle

  20. Prevalence and distribution of muscle-imbalance in the human body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The phenomenon of muscle imbalance is pandemic, and may contribute to problems such as poor posture, low back pain. Significant is the fact that muscle imbalance may influence the motor patterning process. Key words: Muscle imbalance, low back pain, posture, malposture, withdrawal response. (Af. J. Physical, Health ...

  1. Effect of protein source on resistive-training-induced changes in body composition and muscle size in older men123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haub, Mark D; Wells, Amanda M; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Campbell, Wayne W

    2008-01-01

    Background Aging is associated with reductions in muscle mass and strength, but nutrition and exercise interventions can delay this progression and enhance the quality of life. Objective We examined whether the predominant source of protein consumed by older men influenced measures of muscle size and strength, body composition, resting energy expenditure, and skeletal muscle creatine concentrations in response to 12 wk of resistive training. Design After consuming a lactoovovegetarian (LOV) diet for 2 wk, 21 men aged 65 ± 5 y were randomly assigned to either consume a beef-containing (BC) diet (n = 10) or to continue the LOV diet (n = 11) throughout resistive training. The BC diet included 0.6 g protein · kg−1 · d−1 from beef and the LOV diet included 0.6 g protein · kg−1 · d−1 from textured vegetable protein (soy) sources. The remaining protein in the diets came from self-selected LOV sources. Results The mean total protein intake for both groups ranged from 1.03 to 1.17 g · kg−1 · d−1 during the intervention. Men in both groups had improvements (14–38%) in maximal dynamic strength of all the muscle groups trained with no significant difference between groups. With resistive training, cross-sectional muscle area of the vastus lateralis increased in both groups (4.2 ± 3.0% and 6.0 ± 2.6% for the LOV and BC groups, respectively) with no significant difference between groups. Body composition, resting energy expenditure, and concentrations of muscle creatine, phosphocreatine, and total creatine did not differ significantly between groups or change over time. Conclusions These data suggest that increases in muscle strength and size were not influenced by the predominant source of protein consumed by older men with adequate total protein intake. PMID:12197993

  2. Effects of Different Types of Exercise on Body Composition, Muscle Strength, and IGF-1 in the Elderly with Sarcopenic Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Ting; Chung, Yu-Chun; Chen, Yu-Jen; Ho, Sung-Yen; Wu, Huey-June

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the influence of resistance training (RT), aerobic training (AT), or combination training (CT) interventions on the body composition, muscle strength performance, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) of patients with sarcopenic obesity. Randomized controlled trial. Community center and research center. Sixty men and women aged 65-75 with sarcopenic obesity. Participants were randomly assigned to RT, AT, CT, and control (CON) groups. After training twice a week for 8 weeks, the participants in each group ceased training for 4 weeks before being examined for the retention effects of the training interventions. The body composition, grip strength, maximum back extensor strength, maximum knee extensor muscle strength, and blood IGF-1 concentration were measured. The skeletal muscle mass (SMM), body fat mass, appendicular SMM/weight %, and visceral fat area (VFA) of the RT, AT, and CT groups were significantly superior to those of the CON group at both week 8 and week 12. Regarding muscle strength performance, the RT group exhibited greater grip strength at weeks 8 and 12 as well as higher knee extensor performance at week 8 than that of the other groups. At week 8, the serum IGF-1 concentration of the RT group was higher than the CON group, whereas the CT group was superior to the AT and CON groups. Older adults with sarcopenic obesity who engaged in the RT, AT, and CT interventions demonstrated increased muscle mass and reduced total fat mass and VFA compared with those without training. The muscle strength performance and serum IGF-1 level in trained groups, especially in the RT group, were superior to the control group. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Effect of a combination of whole body vibration exercise and squat training on body balance, muscle power, and walking ability in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osugi T

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tomohiro Osugi,1 Jun Iwamoto,2 Michio Yamazaki,1 Masayuki Takakuwa3 1Department of Rehabilitation, Takakuwa Orthopaedic Nagayama Clinic, Asahikawa, Hokkaido, 2Institute for Integrated Sports Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Takakuwa Orthopaedic Nagayama Clinic, Asahikawa, Hokkaido, Japan Abstract: A randomized controlled trial was conducted to clarify the beneficial effect of whole body vibration (WBV exercise plus squat training on body balance, muscle power, and walking ability in the elderly with knee osteoarthritis and/or spondylosis. Of 35 ambulatory patients (14 men and 21 women who were recruited at our outpatient clinic, 28 (80.0%, 12 men and 16 women participated in the trial. The subjects (mean age 72.4 years were randomly divided into two groups (n=14 in each group, ie, a WBV exercise alone group and a WBV exercise plus squat training group. A 4-minute WBV exercise (frequency 20 Hz was performed 2 days per week in both groups; squat training (20 times per minute was added during the 4-minute WBV training session in the WBV exercise plus squat training group. The duration of the trial was 6 months. The exercise and training program was safe and well tolerated. WBV exercise alone improved indices of body balance and walking velocity from baseline values. However, WBV exercise plus squat training was more effective for improving tandem gait step number and chair-rising time compared with WBV exercise alone. These results suggest the benefit and safety of WBV exercise plus squat training for improving physical function in terms of body balance and muscle power in the elderly. Keywords: whole body vibration exercise, squat training, body balance, walking velocity, muscle power

  4. Changes in collagenous tissue microstructures and distributions of cathepsin L in body wall of autolytic sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Xin; Zhou, Da-Yong; Ma, Dong-Dong; Liu, Yan-Fei; Li, Dong-Mei; Dong, Xiu-Ping; Tan, Ming-Qian; Du, Ming; Zhu, Bei-Wei

    2016-12-01

    The autolysis of sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus) was induced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and the changes of microstructures of collagenous tissues and distributions of cathepsin L were investigated using histological and histochemical techniques. Intact collagen fibers in fresh S. japonicus dermis were disaggregated into collagen fibrils after UV stimuli. Cathepsin L was identified inside the surface of vacuoles in the fresh S. japonicus dermis cells. After the UV stimuli, the membranes of vacuoles and cells were fused together, and cathepsin L was released from cells and diffused into tissues. The density of cathepsin L was positively correlated with the speed and degree of autolysis in different layers of body wall. Our results revealed that lysosomal cathepsin L was released from cells in response to UV stimuli, which contacts and degrades the extracellular substrates such as collagen fibers, and thus participates in the autolysis of S. japonicus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2-induced heterotopic ossification of the retroperitoneum, psoas muscle, pelvis and abdominal wall following lumbar spinal fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Raj K.; Moncayo, Valeria M.; Pierre-Jerome, Claude; Terk, Michael R.; Smitson, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    A 45-year-old man presented with vertebral collapse at L5 as an initial manifestation of multiple myeloma and underwent spinal fusion surgery using recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). Subsequent computed tomography (CT) scans and X-rays revealed heterotopic ossification of the left psoas muscle, pelvis, and anterior abdominal wall. While the occurrence of heterotopic ossification has previously been reported when rhBMP-2 has been used for spinal fusion surgery, this case demonstrates that it can occur to a much greater degree than previously seen. (orig.)

  6. Mechanical Ventilation Weaning in Inclusion Body Myositis: Feasibility of Isokinetic Inspiratory Muscle Training as an Adjunct Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Cordeiro de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion body myositis is a rare myopathy associated with a high rate of respiratory complications. This condition usually requires prolonged mechanical ventilation and prolonged intensive care stay. The unsuccessful weaning is mainly related to respiratory muscle weakness that does not promptly respond to immunosuppressive therapy. We are reporting a case of a patient in whom the use of an inspiratory muscle-training program which started after a two-week period of mechanical ventilation was associated with a successful weaning in one week and hospital discharge after 2 subsequent weeks.

  7. Effects of body position and loading modality on muscle activity and strength in shoulder presses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeterbakken, Atle H; Fimland, Marius S

    2013-07-01

    Little is known about the effect of performing upper-body resistance exercises with dumbbells versus barbells and standing versus seated. Therefore, this study sought to compare electromyogram activity (EMG) and one-repetition maximum (1-RM) in barbell and dumbbell shoulder presses performed seated and standing. Fifteen healthy men volunteered for 1-RM and EMG testing with a load corresponding to 80% of the 1-RM. Electromyogram activity was measured in the anterior, medial, and posterior deltoids and biceps and triceps brachii. The following EMG differences or trends were observed: For deltoid anterior: ~11% lower for seated barbell versus dumbbell (p = 0.038), ~15% lower in standing barbell versus dumbbell (p dumbbells (p = 0.070); For medial deltoid, ~7% lower for standing barbell versus dumbbells (p = 0.050), ~7% lower for seated versus standing barbell (p = 0.062), 15% lower for seated versus standing dumbbell (p = 0.008); For posterior deltoid: ~25% lower for seated versus standing barbell (p dumbbells (p = 0.002); For biceps, ~33% greater for seated barbell versus dumbbells (p = 0.002), 16% greater for standing barbell versus dumbbell (p = 0.074), ~23% lower for seated versus standing dumbbells (p dumbbells (p dumbbells was ~7% lower than standing barbell (p = 0.002) and ~10% lower than seated dumbbells (p dumbbells) demonstrated the highest neuromuscular activity of the deltoid muscles, although this was the exercise with the lowest 1-RM strength.

  8. Effect of body weight support variation on muscle activities during robot assisted gait: a dynamic simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shahid; Jamwal, Prashant K; Ghayesh, Mergen H

    2017-05-01

    While body weight support (BWS) intonation is vital during conventional gait training of neurologically challenged subjects, it is important to evaluate its effect during robot assisted gait training. In the present research we have studied the effect of BWS intonation on muscle activities during robotic gait training using dynamic simulations. Two dimensional (2-D) musculoskeletal model of human gait was developed conjointly with another 2-D model of a robotic orthosis capable of actuating hip, knee and ankle joints simultaneously. The musculoskeletal model consists of eight major muscle groups namely; soleus (SOL), gastrocnemius (GAS), tibialis anterior (TA), hamstrings (HAM), vasti (VAS), gluteus maximus (GLU), uniarticular hip flexors (iliopsoas, IP), and Rectus Femoris (RF). BWS was provided at levels of 0, 20, 40 and 60% during the simulations. In order to obtain a feasible set of muscle activities during subsequent gait cycles, an inverse dynamics algorithm along with a quadratic minimization algorithm was implemented. The dynamic parameters of the robot assisted human gait such as joint angle trajectories, ground contact force (GCF), human limb joint torques and robot induced torques at different levels of BWS were derived. The patterns of muscle activities at variable BWS were derived and analysed. For most part of the gait cycle (GC) the muscle activation patterns are quite similar for all levels of BWS as is apparent from the mean of muscle activities for the complete GC. Effect of BWS variation during robot assisted gait on muscle activities was studied by developing dynamic simulation. It is expected that the proposed dynamic simulation approach will provide important inferences and information about the muscle function variations consequent upon a change in BWS during robot assisted gait. This information shall be quite important while investigating the influence of BWS intonation on neuromuscular parameters of interest during robotic gait training.

  9. Increased FDG uptake in the wall of the right atrium in people who participated in a cancer screening program with whole-body PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Hirofumi; Ide, Michiru; Yasuda, Seiei; Takahashi, Wakoh; Shohtsu, Akira; Kubo, Atsushi

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of patients who showed increased FDG uptake in the wall of the right atrium. We have encountered 10 patients with increased activity in the wall of the right atrium among a total of 2,367 examinees who participated in our cancer screening program with whole-body PET. The mean age of these examinees was 62.9 yr, higher than that of the total population. All suffered from cardiac disorders, especially atrial fibrillation. FDG accumulated almost exclusively in the wall of the right atrium, whereas only slight activity was seen in the wall of the left atrium. Although the average size of the right atria was significantly enlarged, left atria were more severely dilated than right ones. Therefore overload does not seem to account for the FDG accumulation in the wall of the right atrium. In conclusion, the increased activity in the wall of the right atrium was a rare finding that was made in older people who suffered from cardiac disease. Although the mechanism of induction of the high metabolic state of glucose in the wall of the right atrium remains unclear, this unusual activity would be another false positive finding in cancer screening with whole-body FDG PET. (author)

  10. The physiological role of fat body and muscle tissues in response to cold stress in the tropical cockroach Gromphadorhina coquereliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymon Chowański

    Full Text Available Protective mechanisms against cold stress are well studied in terrestrial and polar insects; however, little is known about these mechanisms in tropical insects. In our study, we tested if a tropical cockroach Gromphadorhina coquereliana, possesses any protective mechanisms against cold stress. Based on the results of earlier studies, we examined how short-term (3 h cold (4°C influences biochemical parameters, mitochondrial respiration activity, and the level of HSPs and aquaporins expression in the fat body and leg muscles of G. coquereliana. Following cold exposure, we found that the level of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins did not change significantly. Nevertheless, we observed significant changes in mitochondrial respiration activity. The oxygen consumption of resting (state 4 and phosphorylating (state 3 mitochondria was altered following cold exposure. The increase in respiratory rate in state 4 respiration was observed in both tissues. In state 3, oxygen consumption by mitochondria in fat body was significantly lower compared to control insects, whereas there were no changes observed for mitochondria in muscle tissue. Moreover, there were cold-induced changes in UCP protein activity, but the changes in activity differed in fat body and in muscles. Additionally, we detected changes in the level of HSP70 and aquaporins expression. Insects treated with cold had significantly higher levels of HSP70 in fat body and muscles. On the other hand, there were lower levels of aquaporins in both tissues following exposure to cold. These results suggest that fat body play an important role in protecting tropical insects from cold stress.

  11. When Closure Fails: What the Radiologist Needs to Know About the Embryology, Anatomy, and Prenatal Imaging of Ventral Body Wall Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ulysses S; Portela-Oliveira, Eduardo; Braga, Fernanda Del Campo Braojos; Werner, Heron; Daltro, Pedro Augusto Nascimento; Souza, Antônio Soares

    2015-12-01

    Ventral body wall defects (VBWDs) are one of the main categories of human congenital malformations, representing a wide and heterogeneous group of defects sharing a common feature, that is, herniation of one or more viscera through a defect in the anterior body wall. Gastroschisis and omphalocele are the 2 most common congenital VBWDs. Other uncommon anomalies include ectopia cordis and pentalogy of Cantrell, limb-body wall complex, and bladder and cloacal exstrophy. Although VBWDs are associated with multiple abnormalities with distinct embryological origins and that may affect virtually any system organs, at least in relation to anterior body wall defects, they are thought (except for omphalocele) to share a common embryologic mechanism, that is, a failure involving the lateral body wall folds responsible for closing the thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic portions of the ventral body wall during the fourth week of development. Additionally, many of the principles of diagnosis and management are similar for these conditions. Fetal ultrasound (US) in prenatal care allows the diagnosis of most of such defects with subsequent opportunities for parental counseling and optimal perinatal management. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging may be an adjunct to US, providing global and detailed anatomical information, assessing the extent of defects, and also helping to confirm the diagnosis in equivocal cases. Prenatal imaging features of VBWDs may be complex and challenging, often requiring from the radiologist a high level of suspicion and familiarity with the imaging patterns. Because an appropriate management is dependent on an accurate diagnosis and assessment of defects, radiologists should be able to recognize and distinguish between the different VBWDs and their associated anomalies. In this article, we review the relevant embryology of VBWDs to facilitate understanding of the pathologic anatomy and diagnostic imaging approach. Features will be illustrated with prenatal US

  12. The length-force behavior and operating length range of squid muscle vary as a function of position in the mantle wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joseph T; Shelton, Ryan M; Kier, William M

    2014-06-15

    Hollow cylindrical muscular organs are widespread in animals and are effective in providing support for locomotion and movement, yet are subject to significant non-uniformities in circumferential muscle strain. During contraction of the mantle of squid, the circular muscle fibers along the inner (lumen) surface of the mantle experience circumferential strains 1.3 to 1.6 times greater than fibers along the outer surface of the mantle. This transmural gradient of strain may require the circular muscle fibers near the inner and outer surfaces of the mantle to operate in different regions of the length-tension curve during a given mantle contraction cycle. We tested the hypothesis that circular muscle contractile properties vary transmurally in the mantle of the Atlantic longfin squid, Doryteuthis pealeii. We found that both the length-twitch force and length-tetanic force relationships of the obliquely striated, central mitochondria-poor (CMP) circular muscle fibers varied with radial position in the mantle wall. CMP circular fibers near the inner surface of the mantle produced higher force relative to maximum isometric tetanic force, P0, at all points along the ascending limb of the length-tension curve than CMP circular fibers near the outer surface of the mantle. The mean ± s.d. maximum isometric tetanic stresses at L₀ (the preparation length that produced the maximum isometric tetanic force) of 212 ± 105 and 290 ± 166 kN m(-2) for the fibers from the outer and inner surfaces of the mantle, respectively, did not differ significantly (P=0.29). The mean twitch:tetanus ratios for the outer and inner preparations, 0.60 ± 0.085 and 0.58 ± 0.10, respectively, did not differ significantly (P=0.67). The circular fibers did not exhibit length-dependent changes in contraction kinetics when given a twitch stimulus. As the stimulation frequency increased, L₀ was approximately 1.06 times longer than LTW, the mean preparation length that yielded maximum isometric twitch

  13. The effect of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on muscle strength, functional capacity and body composition in haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve, Vicent; Carneiro, José; Moreno, Fátima; Fulquet, Miquel; Garriga, Salud; Pou, Mónica; Duarte, Verónica; Saurina, Anna; Tapia, Irati; Ramírez de Arellano, Manel

    Haemodialysis (HD) patients are characterised by significant muscle loss. Recently, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has emerged as a new therapeutic alternative to improve these patients' physical condition. To date, no studies on the effects of NMES on body composition in HD patients have been published. To analyse the effect of NMES on muscle strength, functional capacity and body composition in our HD patients. A 12-week, single-centre, prospective study. The patients were assigned to an electrical stimulation (ES) or control (CO) group. The ES group was subjected to intradialytic electrical stimulation of the quadriceps (Compex® Theta 500i), while the CO group received standard HD care. We analysed the following: 1) nutritional parameters; 2) muscle composition of the quadriceps; 3) maximum quadriceps extension strength (mes) and hand-grip (HG); 4) «sit to stand to sit» (STS10) and «six-minute walking test» (6MWT); 5) body composition (bioelectrical impedance analysis). Of 20 patients, 55% were men. Mean age 67.7 years, 30.3 months in HD. Main aetiology: DM (35%). In the ES group were 13 patients, and 7 in the CO group. At the end of the study, an improvement was only observed in the ES group ( * P<.05): MES * (11.7±7.1 vs. 13.4±7.4kg), STS10 (39.3±15.5 vs. 35.8±13.7s) and 6MWT * (9.9%, 293.2 vs. 325.2m). Furthermore, increased quadriceps muscle area (QMA * : 128.6±30.2 vs. 144.6±22.4cm 2 ) and lowered quadriceps fat area (QFA * : 76.5±26.9 vs. 62.1±20.1cm 2 ) were observed. No relevant changes in body composition, nutritional parameters and dialysis adequacy were found. 1) NMES improved muscle strength, functional capacity and quadriceps muscle composition in our patients. 2) Based on the results obtained, NMES could be a new therapeutic alternative to prevent muscle atrophy and progressive physical deterioration. 3) However, future studies are necessary to establish the potential beneficial effects of NMES in HD patients. Copyright

  14. Impact of Different Body Positions on Bioelectrical Activity of the Pelvic Floor Muscles in Nulliparous Continent Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Chmielewska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined pelvic floor muscles (PFM activity (%MVC in twenty nulliparous women by body position during exercise as well as the activation of abdominal muscles and the gluteus maximus during voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Pelvic floor muscle activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during five experimental trials. Activation of transversus abdominis, rectus abdominis, and gluteus maximus during voluntary PFM contractions was also assessed. Significant differences in mean normalized amplitudes of baseline PFM activity were revealed between standing and lying (P<0.00024 and lying and ball-sitting positions (P<0.0053. Average peak, average time before peak, and average time after peak did not differ significantly during the voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Baseline PFM activity seemed to depend on the body position and was the highest in standing. Pelvic floor muscles activity during voluntary contractions did not differ by position in continent women. Statistically significant differences between the supine lying and sitting positions were only observed during a sustained 60-second contraction of the PFMs.

  15. Impact of Different Body Positions on Bioelectrical Activity of the Pelvic Floor Muscles in Nulliparous Continent Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewska, Daria; Stania, Magdalena; Sobota, Grzegorz; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Błaszczak, Edward; Taradaj, Jakub; Juras, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    We examined pelvic floor muscles (PFM) activity (%MVC) in twenty nulliparous women by body position during exercise as well as the activation of abdominal muscles and the gluteus maximus during voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Pelvic floor muscle activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during five experimental trials. Activation of transversus abdominis, rectus abdominis, and gluteus maximus during voluntary PFM contractions was also assessed. Significant differences in mean normalized amplitudes of baseline PFM activity were revealed between standing and lying (P < 0.00024) and lying and ball-sitting positions (P < 0.0053). Average peak, average time before peak, and average time after peak did not differ significantly during the voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Baseline PFM activity seemed to depend on the body position and was the highest in standing. Pelvic floor muscles activity during voluntary contractions did not differ by position in continent women. Statistically significant differences between the supine lying and sitting positions were only observed during a sustained 60-second contraction of the PFMs. PMID:25793212

  16. Interrelationships between body fat and skin blood flow and the current required for electrical stimulation of human muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, Jerrold S; Suh, Hye Jin; Gunda, Shashi; Prowse, Michelle; Batt, Jennifer

    2008-09-01

    There is variability between individuals in the current needed to elicit a contraction in human muscle with surface electrodes. To understand what might be causing some of this variability, 25 subjects whose average age was 24.4+/-2.3 years, whose height was 165.5+/-9.5 cm, and whose average weight was 70.3+/-21 kg were examined. Electrical stimulation was applied above the motor point of the quadriceps, biceps, and lateral gastrocnemius muscles. To assess body fat, 2D ultrasound was used with a 1cm stand off. Electrical stimulation was applied with sine wave stimulation at 100 micros pulse width and at a frequency of 30 Hz. To alter skin blood flow, aside from the natural difference in skin blood flow at rest, hot packs and cold packs were used for 5 min. The average fat thickness below the quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles was 0.75+/-0.13 cm and under the biceps was 0.48+/-0.16 cm. Without the use of hot or cold packs, the currents for the quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles were significantly higher than that of the biceps (phot or cold packs, when hot packs were applied, skin blood flow increased as did the current required to stimulate muscle to threshold. When cold packs were applied, there was a decrease in the current required to stimulate these muscles. In conclusion, there is a causal relationship between skin blood flow, the thickness of the fat layer below the skin, and the current required to stimulate the muscle.

  17. Effects of winter military training on energy balance, whole-body protein balance, muscle damage, soreness, and physical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Lee M; Murphy, Nancy E; Martini, Svein; Spitz, Marissa G; Thrane, Ingjerd; McGraw, Susan M; Blatny, Janet-Martha; Castellani, John W; Rood, Jennifer C; Young, Andrew J; Montain, Scott J; Gundersen, Yngvar; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2014-12-01

    Physiological consequences of winter military operations are not well described. This study examined Norwegian soldiers (n = 21 males) participating in a physically demanding winter training program to evaluate whether short-term military training alters energy and whole-body protein balance, muscle damage, soreness, and performance. Energy expenditure (D2(18)O) and intake were measured daily, and postabsorptive whole-body protein turnover ([(15)N]-glycine), muscle damage, soreness, and performance (vertical jump) were assessed at baseline, following a 4-day, military task training phase (MTT) and after a 3-day, 54-km ski march (SKI). Energy intake (kcal·day(-1)) increased (P soreness increased and performance decreased progressively (P < 0.05). The physiological consequences observed during short-term winter military training provide the basis for future studies to evaluate nutritional strategies that attenuate protein loss and sustain performance during severe energy deficits.

  18. Change of muscle architecture following body weight support treadmill training for persons after subacute stroke: evidence from ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Yanjun; Hu, Huijing; Mao, Yurong; Huang, Dongfeng; Li, Le

    2014-01-01

    Although the body weight support treadmill training (BWSTT) in rehabilitation therapy has been appreciated for a long time, the biomechanical effects of this training on muscular system remain unclear. Ultrasonography has been suggested to be a feasible method to measure muscle morphological changes after neurological diseases such as stroke, which may help to enhance the understanding of the mechanism underlying the impaired motor function. This study investigated the muscle architectural changes of tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius in patients after subacute stroke by ultrasound. As expected, we found the effect of BWSTT on the muscular system. Specifically, the results showed larger pennation angle and muscle thickness of tibialis anterior and longer fascicle length of medial gastrocnemius after the training. The findings of this study suggest that the early rehabilitation training of BWSTT in subacute stage of stroke provides positive changes of the muscle architecture, leading to the potential improvement of the force generation of the muscle. This may not only help us understand changes of subacute stroke in muscular system but also have clinical implications in the evaluation of rehabilitation training after neurological insults.

  19. Older Age Is Associated with Lower Optimal Vibration Frequency in Lower-Limb Muscles During Whole-Body Vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlucci, Flaminia; Orlando, Giorgio; Haxhi, Jonida; Laudani, Luca; Giombini, Arrigo; Macaluso, Andrea; Pigozzi, Fabio; Sacchetti, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the optimal vibration frequency (OVF), which corresponds to maximal electromyographic muscle response during whole-body vibration, between young, middle-aged, and older women in four muscles of the lower-limbs. OVF was measured as the frequency corresponding to maximal root mean square of the surface electromyogram (RMSmax) during a continuous incremental protocol, with a succession of vibration frequencies from 20 to 55 Hz (A = 2 mm), on the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, rectus femoris, and gastrocnemius lateralis muscles of the dominant lower-limb. Seventy-eight women were divided into three age groups, that is, young, 21.6 ± 2.4 yrs; middle aged, 43.0 ± 5.2 yrs; and older, 74.2 ± 6.0 yrs. OVF in the vastus medialis was lower in the older women than in the middle-aged and young women, whereas OVF in the vastus lateralis was lower in the older than in the young women. There were no differences in OVF between muscles within each group. RMSmax was higher in the older than in the young women in all muscles. Age range should be taken into consideration when determining OVF because it decreases with age. Properly individualizing the vibration protocol might greatly influence neuromuscular effects of vibration training.

  20. Skeletal muscle mass adjusted by height correlated better with muscular functions than that adjusted by body weight in defining sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Der-Sheng; Chang, Ke-Vin; Li, Chia-Ming; Lin, Yu-Hong; Kao, Tung-Wei; Tsai, Keh-Sung; Wang, Tyng-Grey; Yang, Wei-Shiung

    2016-01-20

    Sarcopenia, characterized by low muscle mass and function, results in frailty, comorbidities and mortality. However, its prevalence varies according to the different criteria used in its diagnosis. This cross-sectional study investigated the difference in the number of sarcopenia cases recorded by two different measurement methods of low muscle mass to determine which measurement was better. We recruited 878 (54.2% female) individuals aged over 65 years and obtained their body composition and functional parameters. Low muscle mass was defined as two standard deviations below either the mean height-adjusted (hSMI) or weight-adjusted (wSMI) muscle mass of a young reference group. The prevalence of sarcopenia was 6.7% vs. 0.4% (male/female) by hSMI, and 4.0% vs. 10.7% (male/female) by wSMI. The κ coefficients for these two criteria were 0.39 vs. 0.03 (male/female), and 0.17 in all subjects. Serum myostatin levels correlated positively with gait speed (r = 0.142, p = 0.007) after adjustment for gender. hSMI correlated with grip strength, cardiopulmonary endurance, leg endurance, gait speed, and flexibility. wSMI correlated with grip strength, leg endurance, gait speed, and flexibility. Since hSMI correlated more closely with grip strength and more muscular functions, we recommend hSMI in the diagnosis of low muscle mass.

  1. Heritability of body size and muscle strength in young adulthood: a study of one million Swedish men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Tynelius, Per; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rasmussen, Finn

    2008-05-01

    Moderate heritability for skeletal muscle strength has been reported in twin studies, but genetic co-variation between muscle strength at different parts of body and body size is not well known. Further, representativeness of twin cohorts needs to be critically evaluated. Height, weight, elbow flexion, hand grip and knee extension strength were measured in young adulthood in 1,139,963 Swedish men born between 1951 and 1976. We identified 154,970 full-brother pairs and 1582 monozygotic (MZ) and 1864 same-sex dizygotic (DZ) complete twin pairs. The data were analyzed using quantitative genetic modeling for twin and family data. Twins compared to singletons and MZ twins compared to DZ twins were shorter, lighter and had lower muscle strength. In singletons, there was more variation in weight and the strength measures compared to twins with known zygosity but not when compared to twins with unknown zygosity. Full-sib correlations for these traits were lower than DZ correlations. Additive genetic factors explained 81% of variation in height, 59% in body mass index and 50-60% in the strength measures. Additive genetic correlations varied from 0.13 between height and elbow flexion strength to 0.78 between elbow flexion and hand grip strength. Our results suggest that extra variation may exist in general populations not found in twin samples, probably because of selection due to non-participation. This may have inflated heritability estimates in previous twin studies. Nonetheless, we showed that genetic factors affect muscle strength and part of these genes are common to different strength indicators and body size.

  2. Free-running circadian rhythms of muscle strength, reaction time, and body temperature in totally blind people

    OpenAIRE

    Squarcini, Camila Fabiana Rossi; Pires, Maria Laura Nogueira [UNESP; Lopes, Cleide; Benedito-silva, Ana AmÉlia; Esteves, Andrea Maculano; Cornelissen-guillaume, Germaine; Matarazzo, Carolina; Garcia, Danilo; Silva, Maria Stella Peccin; Tufik, Sergio; Mello, Marco TÚlio

    2013-01-01

    Light is the major synchronizer of circadian rhythms. In the absence of light, as for totally blind people, some variables, such as body temperature, have an endogenous period that is longer than 24 h and tend to be free running. However, the circadian rhythm of muscle strength and reaction time in totally blind people has not been defined in the literature. The objective of this study was to determine the period of the endogenous circadian rhythm of the isometric and isokinetic contraction s...

  3. Comparison of muscles activity of abled bodied and amputee subjects for around shoulder movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amanpreet; Agarwal, Ravinder; Kumar, Amod

    2016-05-12

    Worldwide, about 56% of the amputees are upper limb amputees. This research deals a method with two-channel surface electromyogram (SEMG) signal recorded from around shoulder to estimate the changes in muscle activity in non-amputee and the residual limb of trans humeral amputees with different movements of arm. Identification of different muscles activity of near shoulder amputee and non-amputee persons. SEMG signal were acquired during three distinct exercises from three-selected muscles location around shoulder. The participants were asked to move their dominant arm from an assigned position to record their muscles activity recorded with change in position. Results shows the muscles activity in scalene is more than the other muscles like pectoralis and infraspinatus with the same shoulder motion. In addition, STFT (Short-Time Fourier Transform) spectrogram with window length of 256 samples at maximum of 512 frequency bins using hamming window has used to identify the signal for the maximum muscles activity with best resolution in spectrum plot. The results suggest that one can use this analysis for making a suitable device for around shoulder prosthetic users based on muscles activation of amputee persons.

  4. The Role of Muscle Mass, Muscle Quality, and Body Composition in Risk for the Metabolic Syndrome and Functional Decline in Older Adults: Topical Collection on Nutrition, Obesity, and Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.T. Mankowski (Robert T.); S.D. Anton (Stephen D.); M. Aubertin-Leheudre (Mylene)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Age-related body composition changes include both loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia) and increase in fat mass, which jointly contribute to a decline in metabolic functions. Muscle quality is positively related to functional capacity and a lower risk for the development of the

  5. Divergent selection on 63-day body weight in the rabbit: response on growth, carcass and muscle traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combes Sylvie

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effects of selection for growth rate on weights and qualitative carcass and muscle traits were assessed by comparing two lines selected for live body weight at 63 days of age and a cryopreserved control population raised contemporaneously with generation 5 selected rabbits. The animals were divergently selected for five generations for either a high (H line or a low (L line body weight, based on their BLUP breeding value. Heritability (h2 was 0.22 for 63-d body weight (N = 4754. Growth performance and quantitative carcass traits in the C group were intermediate between the H and L lines (N = 390. Perirenal fat proportion (h2 = 0.64 and dressing out percentage (h2 = 0.55 ranked in the order L Semitendinosus muscle, and the mean diameter of the constitutive myofibres were reduced in the L line only (N = 140. In the Longissimus muscle (N = 180, the ultimate pH (h2 = 0.16 and the maximum shear force reached in the Warner-Braztler test (h2 = 0.57 were slightly modified by selection.

  6. Design of lightweight multi-material automotive bodies using new material performance indices of thin-walled beams for the material selection with crashworthiness consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Xintao; Zhang, Hongwei; Wang, Shuxin; Zhang, Lianhong; Ko, Jeonghan

    2011-01-01

    Currently, automotive bodies are constructed usually using a single material, e.g. steel or aluminum. Compared to single-material automotive bodies, multi-material automotive bodies allow optimal material selection in each structural component for higher product performance and lower cost. This paper presents novel material performance indices and procedures developed to guide systematic material selection for multi-material automotive bodies. These new indices enable to characterize the crashworthiness performance of complex-shaped thin-walled beams in multi-material automotive bodies according to material types. This paper also illustrates the application of these performance indices and procedures by designing a lightweight multi-material automotive body. These procedures will help to design a lightweight and affordable body favored by the automotive industry, thus to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.

  7. Meal Distribution of Dietary Protein and Leucine Influences Long-Term Muscle Mass and Body Composition in Adult Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Layne E; Wilson, Gabriel J; Moulton, Christopher J; Layman, Donald K

    2017-02-01

    Protein quantity and quality at a meal affect muscle protein synthesis (MPS); however, long-term effects of protein distribution at individual meals on adult muscle mass remain unknown. We used a precise feeding protocol in adult rats to determine if optimizing postmeal MPS response by modifying the meal distribution of protein, and the amino acid leucine (Leu), would affect muscle mass. Two studies were conducted with the use of male Sprague-Dawley rats (∼300 g) trained to consume 3 meals/d, then assigned to diet treatments with identical macronutrient contents (16% of energy from protein, 54% from carbohydrates, and 30% from fat) but differing in protein quality or meal distribution. Study 1 provided 16% protein at each meal with the use of whey, egg white, soy, or wheat gluten, with Leu concentrations of 10.9%, 8.8%, 7.7%, and 6.8% (wt:wt), respectively. Study 2 used whey protein with 16% protein at each meal [balanced distribution (BD)] or meals with 8%, 8%, and 27% protein [unbalanced distribution (UD)]. MPS and translation factors 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and ribosomal protein p70S6 (S6K) were determined before and after breakfast meals at 2 and 11 wk. Muscle weights and body composition were measured at 11 wk. In study 1, the breakfast meal increased MPS and S6K in whey and egg treatments but not in wheat or soy treatments. Gastrocnemius weight was greater in the whey group (2.20 ± 0.03 g) than the soy group (1.95 ± 0.04 g) (P 20% more body fat than the soy, egg, or whey groups (P protein and Leu influences MPS and long-term changes in adult muscle mass. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Daily Overfeeding from Protein and/or Carbohydrate Supplementation for Eight Weeks in Conjunction with Resistance Training Does not Improve Body Composition and Muscle Strength or Increase Markers Indicative of Muscle Protein Synthesis and Myogenesis in Resistance-Trained Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, Mike; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2016-03-01

    This study determined the effects of heavy resistance training and daily overfeeding with carbohydrate and/or protein on blood and skeletal muscle markers of protein synthesis (MPS), myogenesis, body composition, and muscle performance. Twenty one resistance-trained males were randomly assigned to either a protein + carbohydrate [HPC (n = 11)] or a carbohydrate [HC (n = 10)] supplement group in a double-blind fashion. Body composition and muscle performance were assessed, and venous blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained before and after eight weeks of resistance training and supplementation. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). Total body mass, body water, and fat mass were significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training, but not supplementation (p 0.05). Muscle total DNA, total protein, and c-Met were not significantly affected (p > 0.05). In conjunction with resistance training, the peri-exercise and daily overfeeding of protein and/or carbohydrate did not preferentially improve body composition, muscle performance, and markers indicative of MPS and myogenic activation. Key pointsIn response to 56 days of heavy resistance training and HC or HPC supplementation, similar increases in muscle mass and strength in both groups occurred; however, the increases were not different between supplement groups.The supplementation of HPC had no preferential effect on augmenting serum IGF-1 GH, or HGF.The supplementation of HPC had no preferential effect on augmenting increases in total muscle protein content or the myogenic markers, total DNA and muscle cMet content.In response to 56 days of a daily supplemental dose of 94 g of protein and 196 g of carbohydrate, the HPC group was no more effective than 312 g of carbohydrate in the HC group in increasing muscle strength and mass due to its ability to elevate serum anabolic hormones and growth factors and markers of myogenic activation of satellite cells.

  9. Assessing Brain–Muscle Connectivity in Human Locomotion through Mobile Brain/Body Imaging: Opportunities, Pitfalls, and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Gennaro

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of the cortical role during bipedalism has been a methodological challenge. While surface electroencephalography (EEG is capable of non-invasively measuring cortical activity during human locomotion, it is associated with movement artifacts obscuring cerebral sources of activity. Recently, statistical methods based on blind source separation revealed potential for resolving this issue, by segregating non-cerebral/artifactual from cerebral sources of activity. This step marked a new opportunity for the investigation of the brains’ role while moving and was tagged mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI. This methodology involves simultaneous mobile recording of brain activity with several other body behavioral variables (e.g., muscle activity and kinematics, through wireless recording wearable devices/sensors. Notably, several MoBI studies using EEG–EMG approaches recently showed that the brain is functionally connected to the muscles and active throughout the whole gait cycle and, thus, rejecting the long-lasting idea of a solely spinal-driven bipedalism. However, MoBI and brain/muscle connectivity assessments during human locomotion are still in their fledgling state of investigation. Mobile brain/body imaging approaches hint toward promising opportunities; however, there are some remaining pitfalls that need to be resolved before considering their routine clinical use. This article discusses several of these pitfalls and proposes research to address them. Examples relate to the validity, reliability, and reproducibility of this method in ecologically valid scenarios and in different populations. Furthermore, whether brain/muscle connectivity within the MoBI framework represents a potential biomarker in neuromuscular syndromes where gait disturbances are evident (e.g., age-related sarcopenia remains to be determined.

  10. Effect of modified fasting therapy on body weight, fat and muscle mass, and blood chemistry in patients with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Koh-Woon; Song, Mi-Yeon; Chung, Seok-Hee; Chung, Won-Seok

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and safety of modified fasting therapy using fermented medicinal herbs and exercise on body weight, fat and muscle mass, and blood chemistry in obese subjects. Twenty-six patients participated in a 14-day fast, during which they ingested a supplement made from fermented medicinal herbs and carbohydrates (intake: 400-600 kcal/d). The schedule included 7 prefasting relief days and 14 days of stepwise reintroduction of food. The patients also took part in an exercise program that incorporated Qigong, weight training, and walking exercises. The efficacy of treatments was observed by assessing body fat mass and muscle mass, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), cholesterol, and triglycerides in each study period. Specific symptoms or side effects were reported. Body weight and body fat mass both decreased significantly by (5.16 ± 0.95) and (3.89 ± 0.79) kg (both P fasting therapy using fermented medicinal herbs and exercise could be effective and safe on obese patients.

  11. Soft-Body Muscles for Evolved Virtual Creatures: The Next Step on a Bio-Mimetic Path to Meaningful Morphological Complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lessin, Dan; Risi, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    In the past, evolved virtual creatures (EVCs) have been developed with rigid, segmented bodies, and with soft bodies, but never before with a combination of the two. In nature, however, creatures combining a rigid skeleton and non-rigid muscles are some of the most complex and successful examples...... of life on earth. Now, for the first time, creatures with fully evolved rigid-body skeletons and soft-body muscles can be developed in the virtual world, as well. By exploiting and re-purposing the capabilities of existing soft-body simulation systems, we can evolve complex and effective simulated muscles......, able to drive a rigid-body skeleton. In this way, we can begin to bridge the gap between articulated and softbodied EVCs, and take the next step on a nature-inspired path to meaningful morphological complexity for evolved virtual creatures....

  12. Validity of anthropometric measurements to assess body composition, including muscle mass, in 3-year-old children from the SKOT cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Signe Marie; Mølgaard, Christian; Ejlerskov, Katrine Tschentscher

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional status of children is commonly assessed by anthropometry both in under and overnutrition. The link between anthropometry and body fat, the body compartment most affected by overnutrition, is well known, but the link with muscle mass, the body compartment most depleted in undernutrition...... to estimate muscle mass. Overall, anthropometric measures were more effective to measure absolute size of fat, lean and muscle mass than their relative sizes. Proportion of the variance explained by anthropometry was 79% for lean mass, 76% for fat mass and 74% for muscle mass. For fat mass and lean mass......, which included only mid-upper arm circumference and subscapular skinfold. The power of height in the weight-to-height ratio to determine fat mass proportion was 1.71 with a 95% confidence interval (0.83-2.60) including the value of 2 used in body mass index (BMI). Limitations of anthropometry to assess...

  13. Effects of partial-body cryotherapy (- 110°C) on muscle recovery between high-intensity exercise bouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Junior, J B; Bottaro, M; Vieira, C A; Soares, S R S; Vieira, A; Cleto, V A; Cadore, E L; Coelho, D B; Simoes, H G; Brown, L E

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a single partial-body cryotherapy bout between training sessions on strength recovery. 12 young men (23.9±5.9 years) were randomly exposed to 2 different conditions separated by 7 days: 1) Partial-body cryotherapy (subjects were exposed to 3 min of partial-body cryotherapy at - 110 °C between 2 high-intensity training sessions); 2) Control (subjects were not exposed to partial-body cryotherapy between 2 high-intensity training sessions). Subjects were exposed to partial-body cryotherapy after the first training session. The 2 knee extension high-intensity training sessions were separated by a 40-min rest interval. Knee extension training consisted of 6 sets of 10 repetitions at 60°.s(-1) for concentric actions and 6 sets of 10 at 180.s(-1) for eccentric actions. The decrease in eccentric peak torque and total work was significantly (pcryotherapy (5.6 and 2%, respectively) when compared to control (16 and 11.6%, respectively). However, the decrease in concentric peak torque and total work was not different (p>0.05) between partial-body cryotherapy (9.4 and 6.5%, respectively) and control (7.5 and 5.2%, respectively). These results indicate that the use of partial-body cryotherapy between-training sessions can enhance eccentric muscle performance recovery. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Comparison between body mass index, triceps skin fold thickness and mid-arm muscle circumference in Saudi adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalkhail, B.; Shawky, S.

    2002-01-01

    Adolescence is an important period in an individual's life. Overweight and obesity are fraught with several health problems even late in life. The objective of this study was estimate the overweight, obesity, body fat and muscle content of Saudi adolescents as compared to a recognized reference population. Data were collected from a sample of Saudi adolescents in Jeddah from 42 boys' and 42 girls' school during the month of April 2000. Data collection was done by personal interviews to collect sociodemograhic factors and by direct measurement of weight, height, triceps skin fold thickness (TSF) and mid-arm circumference (MAC). The 50th, 85th and 95th percentiles(P50, P85 and P95) for body mass index (BMI) and triceps skin fold thickness (TSF) were taken, then the 50th, 90th, and 95th percentiles (P50, P90 and P95) for the mid-arm muscle circumference (MAMC) were calculated. These measurements were compared with corresponding values of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I (NHANES I). The P85 and P95 for the BMI and TSF were higher for Saudi adolescents than the NHANES I and the difference was wider for P95. Conversely, there was a lower MAMC at P90 and P95thane the NHANES I reference population curves. The lower MAMC curves were less marked in girls than in boys. On the other hand Saudi boys and girls showed on average similar body mass index indicated by MBI at P50, which was misleading, since those adolescents showing similar body mass index had more fatness than of average reference population indicated by TSF and P50, and less muscularity on average than reference population indicated MAMC at P-50. Overweight and obesity with increased body fat content and decreased body muscle content appear to be widespread among Saudi adolescents even among those adolescents showing average body index. Public health interventions are required to improve quality of food, encourage physical, activity and exercise, as well as correct the perception of

  15. Bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles during synchronous whole-body vibration--a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stania, Magdalena; Chmielewska, Daria; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Smykla, Agnieszka; Taradaj, Jakub; Juras, Grzegorz

    2015-10-24

    More and more frequently stress urinary incontinence affects young healthy women. Hence, early implementation of effective preventive strategies in nulliparous continent women is essential, including pelvic floor muscle training. An initial evaluation based on the bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) during whole-body vibration (WBV) would help to devise the best individualized training for prevention of stress urinary incontinence in woman. We hypothesized that synchronous WBV enhances bioelectrical activity of the PFM which depends on vibration frequency and peak-to-peak vibration displacement. The sample consisted of 36 nulliparous continent women randomly allocated to three comparative groups. Group I and II subjects participated in synchronous whole-body vibrations on a vibration platform; the frequency and peak-to-peak displacement of vibration were set individually for each group. Control participants performed exercises similar to those used in the study groups but without the concurrent application of vibrations. Pelvic floor surface electromyography (sEMG) activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during three experimental trials limited to 30s, 60s and 90 s. The mean amplitude and variability of the signal were normalized to the Maximal Voluntary Contraction - MVC. Friedman's two-way ANOVA revealed a statistically significant difference in the mean normalized amplitudes (%MVC) of the sEMG signal from the PFM during 60s- and 90 s-trials between the group exposed to high-intensity WBV and control participants (p continent women. Prolonged maintenance of a static position significantly decreases the variability of sEMG signal amplitude independent of whole-body vibrations. Single whole-body vibrations in nulliparous continent women does not cause pelvic floor muscle fatigue. The trial was registered in the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (no. ACTRN12615000966594); registration date: 15/09/2015.

  16. Mechanical muscle function and lean body mass during supervised strength training and testosterone therapy in aging men with low-normal testosterone levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvorning, Thue; Christensen, Louise L; Madsen, Klavs

    2013-01-01

    To examine the effect of strength training and testosterone therapy on mechanical muscle function and lean body mass (LBM) in aging men with low-normal testosterone levels in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 24-week study.......To examine the effect of strength training and testosterone therapy on mechanical muscle function and lean body mass (LBM) in aging men with low-normal testosterone levels in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 24-week study....

  17. Response of the muscles in the pelvic floor and the lower lateral abdominal wall during the Active Straight Leg Raise in women with and without pelvic girdle pain: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjödahl, Jenny; Gutke, Annelie; Ghaffari, Ghazaleh; Strömberg, Tomas; Öberg, Birgitta

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between activation of the stabilizing muscles of the lumbopelvic region during the Active Straight Leg Raise test and pelvic girdle pain remains unknown. Therefore, the aim was to examine automatic contractions in relation to pre-activation in the muscles of the pelvic floor and the lower lateral abdominal wall during leg lifts, performed as the Active Straight Leg Raise test, in women with and without persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain. Sixteen women with pelvic girdle pain and eleven pain-free women performed contralateral and ipsilateral leg lifts, while surface electromyographic activity was recorded from the pelvic floor and unilaterally from the lower lateral abdominal wall. As participants performed leg lifts onset time was calculated as the time from increased muscle activity to leg lift initiation. No significant differences were observed between the groups during the contralateral leg lift. During the subsequent ipsilateral leg lift, pre-activation in the pelvic floor muscles was observed in 36% of women with pelvic girdle pain and in 91% of pain-free women (P=0.01). Compared to pain-free women, women with pelvic girdle pain also showed significantly later onset time in both the pelvic floor muscles (P=0.01) and the muscles of the lower lateral abdominal wall (Pactivation patterns influence women's ability to stabilize the pelvis during leg lifts. This could be linked to provocation of pain during repeated movements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Repeated prolonged whole-body low-intensity exercise: effects on insulin sensitivity and limb muscle adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Mikael; Overgaard, Kristian; Damsgaard, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of prolonged whole-body low-intensity exercise on insulin sensitivity and the limb muscle adaptive response. Seven male subjects (weight, 90.2 ± 3.2 kg; age, 35 ± 3 years) completed a 32-day unsupported crossing of the Greenland icecap on cross-country skies...... was performed to establish maximal oxygen uptake. During the crossing, subjects skied for 342 ± 41 min/d. Peak oxygen uptake (4.6 ± 0.2 L/min) was decreased (P fat mass and 2.7 ± 0.2 kg lean body mass...... arbitrary units) than in the arm (54 ± 9 arbitrary units) and was not changed in the leg, but was increased (P loss of lean body mass...

  19. Acute interleukin-6 administration does not impair muscle glucose uptake or whole-body glucose disposal in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensberg, Adam; Fischer, Christian P; Sacchetti, Massimo

    2003-01-01

    The cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 has recently been linked with type 2 diabetes mellitus and has been suggested to affect glucose metabolism. To determine whether acute IL-6 administration affects whole-body glucose kinetics or muscle glucose uptake, 18 healthy young men were assigned to one of three...... and LoIL-6, respectively), followed by a rapid decline (P administration, but were asymptomatic during LoIL-6 administration. In addition, only HiIL-6 elevated (P ... adrenaline (epinephrine). IL-6 infusion, irrespective of dose, did not result in any changes to endogenous glucose production, whole-body glucose disposal or leg- glucose uptake. These data demonstrate that acute IL-6 administration does not impair whole-body glucose disposal, net leg-glucose uptake...

  20. Heavy resistance training and peri-exercise ingestion of a multi-ingredient ergogenic nutritional supplement in males: effects on body composition, muscle performance and markers of muscle protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, Mike; Schwarz, Neil; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2014-12-01

    This study determined the effects of heavy resistance training and peri-exercise ergogenic multi-ingredient nutritional supplement ingestion on blood and skeletal markers of muscle protein synthesis (MPS), body composition, and muscle performance. Twenty-four college-age males were randomly assigned to either a multi-ingredient SizeOn Maximum Performance (SIZE) or protein/carbohydrate/creatine (PCC) comparator supplement group in a double-blind fashion. Body composition and muscle performance were assessed, and venous blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained before and after 6 weeks of resistance training and supplementation. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). Total body mass, body water, and fat mass were not differentially affected (p > 0.05). However, fat-free mass was significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training (p = 0.037). Lower-body muscle strength (p = 0.029) and endurance (p = 0.027) were significantly increased with resistance training, but not supplementation (p > 0.05). Serum insulin, IGF-1, GH, and cortisol were not differentially affected (p > 0.05). Muscle creatine content was significantly increased in both groups from supplementation (p = 0.044). Total muscle protein (p = 0.038), MHC 1 (p = 0.041), MHC 2A, (p = 0.029), total IRS- (p = 0.041), and total Akt (p = 0.011) were increased from resistance training, but not supplementation. In response to heavy resistance training when compared to PCC, the peri-exercise ingestion of SIZE did not preferentially improve body composition, muscle performance, and markers indicative of MPS. Key pointsIn response to 42 days of heavy resistance training and either SizeOn Maximum Performance or protein/carbohydrate/creatine supplementation, similar increases in muscle mass and strength in both groups occurred; however, the increases were not different between supplement groups.The supplementation of SizeOn Maximum Performance had no preferential effect on augmenting

  1. Daily Overfeeding from Protein and/or Carbohydrate Supplementation for Eight Weeks in Conjunction with Resistance Training Does not Improve Body Composition and Muscle Strength or Increase Markers Indicative of Muscle Protein Synthesis and Myogenesis in Resistance-Trained Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Spillane, Darryn S. Willoughby

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the effects of heavy resistance training and daily overfeeding with carbohydrate and/or protein on blood and skeletal muscle markers of protein synthesis (MPS, myogenesis, body composition, and muscle performance. Twenty one resistance-trained males were randomly assigned to either a protein + carbohydrate [HPC (n = 11] or a carbohydrate [HC (n = 10] supplement group in a double-blind fashion. Body composition and muscle performance were assessed, and venous blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained before and after eight weeks of resistance training and supplementation. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05. Total body mass, body water, and fat mass were significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training, but not supplementation (p 0.05. Muscle total DNA, total protein, and c-Met were not significantly affected (p > 0.05. In conjunction with resistance training, the peri-exercise and daily overfeeding of protein and/or carbohydrate did not preferentially improve body composition, muscle performance, and markers indicative of MPS and myogenic activation.

  2. Heavy Resistance Training and Peri-Exercise Ingestion of a Multi-Ingredient Ergogenic Nutritional Supplement in Males: Effects on Body Composition, Muscle Performance and Markers of Muscle Protein Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Spillane, Neil Schwarz, Darryn S. Willoughby

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the effects of heavy resistance training and peri-exercise ergogenic multi-ingredient nutritional supplement ingestion on blood and skeletal markers of muscle protein synthesis (MPS, body composition, and muscle performance. Twenty-four college-age males were randomly assigned to either a multi-ingredient SizeOn Maximum Performance (SIZE or protein/carbohydrate/creatine (PCC comparator supplement group in a double-blind fashion. Body composition and muscle performance were assessed, and venous blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained before and after 6 weeks of resistance training and supplementation. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05. Total body mass, body water, and fat mass were not differentially affected (p > 0.05. However, fat-free mass was significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training (p = 0.037. Lower-body muscle strength (p = 0.029 and endurance (p = 0.027 were significantly increased with resistance training, but not supplementation (p > 0.05. Serum insulin, IGF-1, GH, and cortisol were not differentially affected (p > 0.05. Muscle creatine content was significantly increased in both groups from supplementation (p = 0.044. Total muscle protein (p = 0.038, MHC 1 (p = 0.041, MHC 2A, (p = 0.029, total IRS- (p = 0.041, and total Akt (p = 0.011 were increased from resistance training, but not supplementation. In response to heavy resistance training when compared to PCC, the peri-exercise ingestion of SIZE did not preferentially improve body composition, muscle performance, and markers indicative of MPS.

  3. Effect of scattered radiation in the total body irradiation technique: evaluation of the spoiler and wall dose component in the depthdose distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrowski, T.; Malicki, J.; Adamska, K.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the additional dose in layers of the body close to the skin during total body irradiation (TBI), due to radiation scattered off the treatment room walls and behind plexiglass spoilers applied to improve dose uniformity within the irradiated body. Large-field 6, 15 and 25 MV photon beams were generated by a Saturn 43 medical accelerator. A solid 30 x 30 x 30 cm 3 PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) phantom was used to represent radiation scattered from the body of the patient. Dose distributions were measured by a Farmer ionization chamber. The dose component arising from the spoiler was measured 5 mm below the phantom surface, over distances of 5-100 cm between the spoiler and the phantom surface. To measure the contribution of backscattered radiation from the walls, a small lead block was placed between the source and detector. Measurements were carried out in air with the PMMA phantom removed, to eliminate radiation backscattered from the phantom. As measured behind the spoiler, attenuation of the primary photon beam by the spoiler itself was by 8, 5 and 3% for 6, 15 and 25 MV beams, respectively. The highest dose contribution from the spoiler arose at 10 cm separation between the phantom surface and the spoiler. Assessed at a depth of 5 mm in the phantom, at spoiler-phantom separation of 10 cm, relative to case without spoiler and with wall backscatter subtracted, the dose enhancement due to the spoiler was by 8, 13 and 20% at beam energies 6, 15 and 25 MV, respectively. In these measurements, the distance between the source and the phantom surface was 300 cm and that between the source and the spoiler - 290 cm. The dose contributions due to radiation backscattered from the walls, relative to the case without any wall backscatter, estimated over the distal side of the phantom at a distance of 20 cm between the wall and that side of the phantom, were 5, 6 and 8% at beam energies 6, 15 and 25 MV, respectively. The use of a spoiler enhanced the dose in

  4. Effect of whey protein isolate on strength, body composition and muscle hypertrophy during resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Alan; Cribb, Paul J

    2008-01-01

    Sarcopenia (skeletal muscle wasting with aging) is thought to underlie a number of serious age-related health issues. While it may be seen as inevitable, decreasing this gradual loss of muscle is vital for healthy aging. Thus, it is imperative to investigate exercise and nutrition-based strategies designed to build a reservoir of muscle mass as early as possible. Elderly individuals are still able to respond to both resistance training and the anabolic signals provided by protein ingestion, provided specific amino acids, such as leucine, are present. Whey proteins are a rich source of these essential amino acids and rapidly elevate plasma amino acids, thus providing the foundations for preservation of muscle mass. Several studies involving supplementation with whey protein have been shown to be effective in augmenting the effects of resistance exercise, particularly when supplementation occurs in the hours surrounding the exercise training. While further work is required, particularly in elderly people, simple dietary and exercise strategies that may improve the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass will likely result in a decrease in the overall burden of a number of diseases and improve the quality of life as we age.

  5. Slow movement resistance training using body weight improves muscle mass in the elderly: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuku, S; Kajioka, T; Sakakibara, H; Shimaoka, K

    2018-04-01

    To examine the effect of a 12-week slow movement resistance training using body weight as a load (SRT-BW) on muscle mass, strength, and fat distribution in healthy elderly people. Fifty-three men and 35 women aged 70 years old or older without experience in resistance training participated, and they were randomly assigned to a SRT-BW group or control group. The control group did not receive any intervention, but participants in this group underwent a repeat measurement 12 weeks later. The SRT-BW program consisted of 3 different exercises (squat, tabletop push-up, and sit-up), which were designed to stimulate anterior major muscles. Initially, these exercises were performed by 2 sets of 10 repetitions, and subsequently, the number of repetitions was increased progressively by 2 repetitions every 4 weeks. Participants were instructed to perform each eccentric and concentric phase of movement slowly (spending 4 seconds on each movement), covering the full range of motion. We evaluated muscle mass, strength, and fat distribution at baseline and after 12 weeks of training. Changes over 12 weeks were significantly greater in the SRT-BW group than in the control group, with a decrease in waist circumference, hip circumference, and abdominal preperitoneal and subcutaneous fat thickness, and an increase in thigh muscle thickness, knee extension strength, and hip flexion strength. In conclusion, relatively short-term SRT-BW was effective in improving muscle mass, strength, and fat distribution in healthy elderly people. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Effects of muscle dysmorphia, social comparisons and body schema priming on desire for social interaction: an experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Catharina; Agthe, Maria; Yanagida, Takuya; Voracek, Martin; Hennig-Fast, Kristina

    2017-06-15

    Muscle dysmorphia (MD) is a relatively young diagnosis referring to the desire for a high degree in lean muscle mass, while simultaneously believing that one is insufficiently muscular, mostly found in men. It goes along with a risk for social withdrawal to maintain rigid exercise and dietary regimen. The aim of the current study was thus, to explore differences in men with and without a risk for muscle dysmorphia regarding their desire for social interaction. Furthermore, we investigated potential effects of individual social comparison tendencies (the tendency to compare oneself with persons who are perceived to be superior or inferior to oneself on a certain dimension) and of one's own body schema on the desire for social interaction. One hundred physically active, college aged Austrian men were recruited via social media and flyers at fitness centers and the sports department of the University of Vienna. Participants were randomly assigned to a priming condition evoking their own body schema or a control condition and had to state their desire for social interaction with male or female stimulus persons of high or average attractiveness. We conducted a 2 (group of participant; men with vs. without a risk for MD) × 2 (priming condition; priming vs. non-priming) × 2 (attractiveness of stimulus person; highly attractive vs. less attractive) experimental design with different social comparison tendencies as covariates. Men with a risk for muscle dysmorphia showed lesser desire for social interaction than men without this risk, which can be seen as a risk factor for psychopathological outcomes. Generally, men with and without a risk for muscle dysmorphia did not differ with regard to their preferences for attractive stimulus persons as subjects for social interaction. We confirmed the notion that a tendency for downward social comparisons goes along with a diminished desire for social interaction. This study showed that men with a risk for muscle dysmorphia

  7. Strategies for Optimizing Strength, Power, and Muscle Hypertrophy in Women: Contribution of Upper Body Resistance Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kraemer, William

    1999-01-01

    To determine the performance and physiological effects of various physical conditioning programs in women, total body, upper-body resistance training groups, field training and aerobic training groups (n = 11 to 21...

  8. Mass dynamics of wintering Pacific Black Brant: Body, adipose tissue, organ, and muscle masses vary with location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, D.D.; Barboza, P.S.; Ward, D.H.

    2007-01-01

    We compared body size and mass of the whole body, organs, adipose tissue, and muscles of adult Pacific Black Brant (Branta bernicla nigricans (Lawrence, 1846)) collected concurrently in Alaska and Baja California during the fall, winter, and spring of 2002–2003. Head and tarsal lengths of males were similar between sites and slightly larger for females in Alaska than in Baja California. Brant appear to operate under similar physiological bounds, but patterns of nutrient allocation differ between sites. Birds wintering in Alaska lost similar amounts of adipose tissue during early winter as birds in Baja California gained during late winter before migration. Masses of the body, adipose tissue, and flight muscles during mid-winter were similar between sites. Seasonal adipose tissue deposition may, therefore, equally favor winter residency or long-distance migration. Gonad and liver masses increased in late winter for birds in Alaska but not for those in Baja California, suggesting birds wintering in Baja may delay reproductive development in favor of allocating reserves needed for migration. Phenotypic flexibility allows Brant to use widely divergent wintering sites. The wintering location of Brant likely depends more upon changes in environmental conditions and food availability, than upon physiological differences between the two wintering populations.

  9. Dose–Volume Parameters Predict for the Development of Chest Wall Pain After Stereotactic Body Radiation for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutter, Robert W.; Liu Fan; Abreu, Andres; Yorke, Ellen; Jackson, Andrew; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Chest wall (CW) pain has recently been recognized as an important adverse effect of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We developed a dose–volume model to predict the development of this toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with primary, clinically node-negative NSCLC received three to five fractions of SBRT to doses of 40–60 Gy and were prospectively followed. The dose–absolute volume histograms of two different definitions of the CW as an organ at risk (CW3cm and CW2cm) were examined for all 126 patients. Results: With a median follow-up of 16 months, the 2-year estimated actuarial incidence of Grade ≥ 2 CW pain was 39%. The median time to onset of Grade ≥ 2 CW pain (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, Version 3.0) was 9 months. There was no predictive advantage for biologically corrected dose over physical dose. Neither fraction number (p = 0.07) nor prescription dose (p = 0.07) were significantly correlated with the development of Grade ≥ 2 CW pain. Cox Proportional Hazards analysis identified significant correlation with a broad range of dose-volume combinations, with the CW volume receiving 30 Gy (V30) as one of the strongest predictors (p 3 of CW2cm, there was a significant correlation with Grade ≥ 2 CW pain (p = 0.004). Conclusions: CW toxicity after SBRT is common and long-term follow-up is needed to identify affected patients. A volume of CW ≥ 70 cm 3 receiving 30 Gy is significantly correlated with Grade ≥ 2 CW pain. We are currently applying this constraint at our institution for patients receiving thoracic SBRT. An actuarial atlas of our data is provided as an electronic supplement to facilitate data-sharing and meta-analysis relating to CW pain.

  10. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of lectin gene cDNA isolated from sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus) body wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhuang; Li, Hui; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Wei; Sun, Jing; Wang, Xiuli

    2017-12-01

    As a `living fossil' of species origin and `rich treasure' of food and nutrition development, sea cucumber has received a lot of attentions from researchers. The cDNA library construction and EST sequencing of blood had been conducted previously in our lab. The bioinformatic analysis provided a gene fragment which is highly homologous with the genes of lectin family, named AjL ( Apostichopus japonicus lectin). To characterize and determine the phylogeny of AjL genes in early evolution, we isolated a full-length cDNA of lectin gene from the body wall of A. japonicus. The open reading frame of this gene contained 489 bp and encoded a 163 amino acids secretory protein being homologous to lectins of mammals and aquatic organisms. The deduced protein included a lectin-like domain. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that AjL migrated as a specific band (about 36.09 kDa under reducing), and agglutinated against rabbit red blood cells. AjL was similar to chain A of CEL-IV in space structure. We predicted that AjL may play the same role of CEL-IV. Our results suggested that more than one lectin gene functioned in sea cucumber and most of other species, which was fused by uncertain sequences during the evolution and encoded different proteins with diverse functions. Our findings provided the insights into the function and characteristics of lectin genes invertebrates. The results will also be helpful for the identification and structural, functional, and evolutionary analyses of lectin genes.

  11. Effects of blood-flow-restricted resistance training on muscle function in a 74-year-old male with sporadic inclusion body myositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders Nørkær; Aagaard, P; Nielsen, J L

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) is a systemic disease that is characterized by substantial skeletal muscle weakness and muscle inflammation, leading to impaired physical function. The objective was to investigate the effect of low-load resistance exercise with concurrent partial blood flow...... restriction to the working muscles (blood-flow-restricted (BFR) training) in a patient with sIBM. The training consisted of 12 weeks of lower extremity BFR training with low training loads (~25-RM). The patient was tested for mechanical muscle function and functional capacity before and after 6 and 12 weeks...... of training. Maximal horizontal gait speed increased by 19%, which was accompanied by 38-92% improvements in mechanical muscle function (maximal isometric strength, rate of force development and muscle power). In conclusion, BFR training was well tolerated by the patient with sIBM and led to substantial...

  12. Lean body mass and muscle function in head and neck cancer patients and healthy individuals - results from the DAHANCA 25 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønbro, Simon; Dalgas, Ulrik; Primdahl, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    speed, 30 s chair rise, 30 s arm curl, stair climb) from HNSCC patients from the DAHANCA 25 trials and data from 24 healthy individuals were included. Results. Lean body mass and maximal muscle strength were significantly associated according to the gender and age-adjusted linear regression model (p ...Introduction. Loss of lean body mass is common following radiotherapy in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and may reduce maximal muscle strength and functional performance. However, the associations between lean body mass, muscle strength and functional performance.......0001). In addition, maximal muscle strength were associated with 30 s arm curl performance, 10 m max gait speed and 30 s chair rise (p regression analyses showed that HNSCC patients expressed significant lower levels of the investigated variables after radiotherapy than healthy individuals (p

  13. Lower serum albumin concentration and change in muscle mass: the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.; Kritchevsky, S.B.; Newman, A.B.; Goodpaster, B.H.; Tylavsky, F.A.; Nevitt, M.C.; Harris, T.B.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low albumin concentrations in older persons increase the risk of poor health outcomes, including functional decline. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate the association between serum albumin concentration and skeletal muscle loss (sarcopenia) in old age. DESIGN: Serum

  14. Body-building without power training : Endogenously regulated pectoral muscle hypertrophy in confined shorebirds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, MW; Piersma, T; Dekinga, A

    1999-01-01

    Shorebirds such as red knots Calidris canutus routinely make migratory flights of 3000 km or more. Previous studies on this species, based on compositional analyses, suggest extensive pectoral muscle hypertrophy in addition to fat storage before take-off. Such hypertrophy could be due to power

  15. Serotonin modulates muscle function in the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerry, Shannon P; Ellerby, David J

    2011-12-23

    The body wall muscles of sanguivorous leeches power mechanically diverse behaviours: suction feeding, crawling and swimming. These require longitudinal muscle to exert force over an extremely large length range, from 145 to 46 per cent of the mean segmental swimming length. Previous data, however, suggest that leech body wall muscle has limited capacity for force production when elongated. Serotonin (5-HT) alters the passive properties of the body wall and stimulates feeding. We hypothesized that 5-HT may also have a role in allowing force production in elongated muscle by changing the shape of the length-tension relationship (LTR). LTRs were measured from longitudinal muscle strips in vitro in physiological saline with and without the presence of 10 µM 5-HT. The LTR was much broader than previously measured for leech muscle. Rather than shifting the LTR, 5-HT reduced passive muscle tonus and increased active stress at all lengths. In addition to modulating leech behaviour and passive mechanical properties, 5-HT probably enhances muscle force and work production during locomotion and feeding.

  16. Anterior vaginal wall repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have you: Learn pelvic floor muscle exercises ( Kegel exercises ) Use estrogen cream in your vagina Try ... repair; Urinary incontinence - vaginal wall repair Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Self catheterization - female Suprapubic catheter ...

  17. The effects of breathing exercise types on respiratory muscle activity and body function in patients with mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong-Il; Jeong, Dae-Keun; Choi, Hyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Fragmentary studies on characteristics of respiratory muscles are being done to increase respiratory capacity by classifying exercises into voluntary respiratory exercise which relieves symptoms and prevents COPD and exercise using breathing exercise equipment. But this study found changes on respiratory pattern through changes on the activity pattern of agonist and synergist respiratory muscles and studied what effect they can have on body function improvement. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen subjects in experimental group I that respiratory exercise of diaphragm and 15 subjects in experimental group II that feedback respiratory exercise were randomly selected among COPD patients to find the effective intervention method for COPD patients. And intervention program was conducted for 5 weeks, three times a week, once a day and 30 minutes a session. They were measured with BODE index using respiratory muscle activity, pulmonary function, the six-minute walking test, dyspnea criteria and BMI Then the results obtained were compared and analyzed. [Results] There was a significant difference in sternocleidomastoid muscle and scalene muscle and in 6-minute walk and BODE index for body function. Thus the group performing feedback respiratory had more effective results for mild COPD patients. [Conclusion] Therefore, the improvement was significant regarding the activity of respiratory muscles synergists when breathing before doing breathing exercise. Although, it is valuable to reduce too much mobilization of respiratory muscles synergists through the proper intervention it is necessary to study body function regarding improvement of respiratory function for patients with COPD.

  18. Comparative analysis of speed's impact on muscle demands during partial body weight support motor-assisted elliptical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnfield, Judith M; Irons, Sonya L; Buster, Thad W; Taylor, Adam P; Hildner, Gretchen A; Shu, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with walking limitations often experience challenges engaging in functionally relevant exercise. An adapted elliptical trainer (motor to assist pedal movement, integrated body weight harness, ramps/stairs, and grab rails) has been developed to help individuals with physical disabilities and chronic conditions regain/retain walking capacity and fitness. However, limited published studies are available to guide therapeutic interventions. This repeated measures study examined the influence of motor-assisted elliptical training speed on lower extremity muscle demands at four body weight support (BWS) levels commonly used therapeutically for walking. Electromyography (EMG) and pedal trajectory data were recorded as ten individuals without known disability used the motor-assisted elliptical trainer at three speeds [20,40, 60 revolutions per minute (RPM)] during each BWS level (0%, 20%, 40%, 60%). Overall, the EMG activity (peak, mean, duration) in key stabilizer muscles (i.e., gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, vastus lateralis, medial gastrocnemius and soleus) recorded at 60 RPM exceeded those at 40 RPM, which were higher than values at 20 RPM in all but three situations (gluteus medius mean at 0% BWS, vastus lateralis mean at 20% BWS, soleus duration at 40% BWS); however, these differences did not always achieve statistical significance. Slower motor-assisted speeds can be used to accommodate weakness of gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, vastus lateralis, medial gastrocnemius and soleus. As strength improves, training at faster motor-assisted speeds may provide a means to progressively challenge key lower extremity stabilizers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Perinatal programming of body weight control by leptin: putative roles of AMP kinase and muscle thermogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pico, C.; Macek Jílková, Zuzana; Kůs, Vladimír; Palou, A.; Kopecký, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 94, 6 suppl. (2011), 1830S-1837S ISSN 0002-9165. [International Conference on The Power of Programming - Developmental Origins of Health and Disease. Munich, 06.05.2010-08.05.2010] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : leptin * perinatal programming * AMPK * muscle thermogenesis Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 6.669, year: 2011

  20. The mitogen-activated protein kinase GlSlt2 regulates fungal growth, fruiting body development, cell wall integrity, oxidative stress and ganoderic acid biosynthesis in Ganoderma lucidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang; Sun, Zehua; Ren, Ang; Shi, Liang; Shi, Dengke; Li, Xiongbiao; Zhao, Mingwen

    2017-07-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are crucial signaling instruments in eukaryotes that play key roles in regulating fungal growth, development, and secondary metabolism and in adapting to the environment. In this study, we characterized an Slt2-type MAPK in Ganoderma lucidum, GlSlt2, which was transcriptionally induced during the primordium and fruiting body stages. RNA interference was used to examine the function of GlSlt2. Knockdown of GlSlt2 caused defects in growth and increased hyphal branching as well as hypersensitivity to cell wall-disturbing substances. Consistently, the chitin and β-1,3-d-glucan contents and the expression of cell wall biosynthesis genes were decreased and down-regulated, respectively, in GlSlt2 knockdown strains compared with those in the wild type (WT). In addition, no primordium or fruiting body could be observed in GlSlt2 knockdown strains. Furthermore, the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) content and ganoderic acid biosynthesis also decreased in GlSlt2 knockdown strains. Addition of H 2 O 2 could recover the decreased ganoderic acid content in GlSlt2 knockdown strains, indicating that GlSlt2 might regulate ganoderic acid biosynthesis via the intracellular ROS level. Overall, GlSlt2 is involved in hyphal growth, fruiting body development, cell wall integrity, oxidative stress and ganoderic acid biosynthesis in G. lucidum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The effects of quercetin supplementation on body composition, exercise performance and muscle damage indices in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Askari

    2013-01-01

    Results: Lean body mass, total body water, basal metabolic rate, and total energy expenditure increased significantly in the quercetin group after intervention. On the other hand, VO 2max increased in the "quercetin" and "quercetin + vitamin C" groups following the intervention, non-significantly. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that supplementation with quercetin in athletes may improve some indices of performance.

  2. The media's representation of the ideal male body: a cause for muscle dysmorphia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leit, Richard A; Gray, James J; Pope, Harrison G

    2002-04-01

    This study sought to examine the effects of media images on men's attitudes toward their body appearance. A group of college men viewed advertisements showing muscular men, whereas a control group viewed neutral advertisements. Immediately thereafter, participants performed a computerized test of body image perception while unaware of the hypotheses being tested in the study. The students exposed to the muscular images showed a significantly greater discrepancy between their own perceived muscularity and the level of muscularity that they ideally wanted to have. These findings suggest that media images, even in a brief presentation, can affect men's views of their bodies. Copyright 2002 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Asynchronous Alterations of Muscle Force and Tendon Stiffness Following 8 Weeks of Resistance Exercise with Whole-Body Vibration in Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seong-Won; Lee, Dae-Yeon; Choi, Dong-Sung; Han, Boram; Kim, Jin-Sun; Lee, Hae-Dong

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to examine whether muscle force and tendon stiffness in a muscle-tendon complex alter synchronously following 8-week whole-body vibration (WBV) training in older people. Forty older women aged 65 years and older were randomly assigned into control (CON, n = 15) and whole-body vibration (WBV) training groups (exposure time, n = 13; vibration intensity, n = 12). For the training groups, a 4-week detraining period was completed following the training period. Throughout the training/detraining period, force of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle and stiffness of the Achilles tendon were assessed four times (0, 4, 8, and 12 weeks) using a combined system of dynamometer and ultrasonography. While muscle force gradually increased throughout the training period (p force and tendon stiffness changed asynchronously, which might be a factor in possible musculotendinous injuries.

  4. Pixel-Level Deep Segmentation: Artificial Intelligence Quantifies Muscle on Computed Tomography for Body Morphometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunkwang; Troschel, Fabian M; Tajmir, Shahein; Fuchs, Georg; Mario, Julia; Fintelmann, Florian J; Do, Synho

    2017-08-01

    Pretreatment risk stratification is key for personalized medicine. While many physicians rely on an "eyeball test" to assess whether patients will tolerate major surgery or chemotherapy, "eyeballing" is inherently subjective and difficult to quantify. The concept of morphometric age derived from cross-sectional imaging has been found to correlate well with outcomes such as length of stay, morbidity, and mortality. However, the determination of the morphometric age is time intensive and requires highly trained experts. In this study, we propose a fully automated deep learning system for the segmentation of skeletal muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) on an axial computed tomography image taken at the third lumbar vertebra. We utilized a fully automated deep segmentation model derived from an extended implementation of a fully convolutional network with weight initialization of an ImageNet pre-trained model, followed by post processing to eliminate intramuscular fat for a more accurate analysis. This experiment was conducted by varying window level (WL), window width (WW), and bit resolutions in order to better understand the effects of the parameters on the model performance. Our best model, fine-tuned on 250 training images and ground truth labels, achieves 0.93 ± 0.02 Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and 3.68 ± 2.29% difference between predicted and ground truth muscle CSA on 150 held-out test cases. Ultimately, the fully automated segmentation system can be embedded into the clinical environment to accelerate the quantification of muscle and expanded to volume analysis of 3D datasets.

  5. The effects of breathing exercise types on respiratory muscle activity and body function in patients with mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Jeong-il; Jeong, Dae-Keun; Choi, Hyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Fragmentary studies on characteristics of respiratory muscles are being done to increase respiratory capacity by classifying exercises into voluntary respiratory exercise which relieves symptoms and prevents COPD and exercise using breathing exercise equipment. But this study found changes on respiratory pattern through changes on the activity pattern of agonist and synergist respiratory muscles and studied what effect they can have on body function improvement. [Subjects and Method...

  6. Restrictions in systemic and locomotor skeletal muscle perfusion, oxygen supply and VO2 during high-intensity whole-body exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, S.P.; Damsgaard, R.; Dawson, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    Perfusion to exercising skeletal muscle is regulated to match O(2) delivery to the O(2) demand, but this regulation might be compromised during or approaching maximal whole-body exercise as muscle blood flow for a given work rate is blunted. Whether muscle perfusion is restricted when there is an......Perfusion to exercising skeletal muscle is regulated to match O(2) delivery to the O(2) demand, but this regulation might be compromised during or approaching maximal whole-body exercise as muscle blood flow for a given work rate is blunted. Whether muscle perfusion is restricted when...... there is an extreme metabolic stimulus to vasodilate during supramaximal exercise remains unknown. To examine the regulatory limits of systemic and muscle perfusion in exercising humans, we measured systemic and leg haemodynamics, O(2) transport, and , and estimated non-locomotor tissue perfusion during constant load...... supramaximal cycling (498 +/- 16 W; 110% of peak power; mean +/- S.E.M.) in addition to both incremental cycling and knee-extensor exercise to exhaustion in 13 trained males. During supramaximal cycling, cardiac output (Q), leg blood flow (LBF), and systemic and leg O(2) delivery and reached peak values after...

  7. Association between insulin resistance, lean mass and muscle torque/force in proximal versus distal body parts in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gysel, T; Calders, P; Cambier, D; Roman de Mettelinge, T; Kaufman, J-M; Taes, Y; Zmierczak, H-G; Goemaere, S

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there is already an association of insulin resistance (IR) with muscle mass and -force/torque in an adult population and whether this relationship is the same in distal and proximal body parts. 358 Healthy young men were divided into a more insulin sensitive (MIS) (n=89) and a less insulin sensitive (LIS) group (n=89), respectively using lower and upper quartiles of HOMA-IR index (Homeostasis Model Assessment of IR). Muscle force/torque and lean mass, were compared between the two groups. LIS subjects had higher absolute thigh lean mass, but not higher thigh muscle torque, resulting in a lower torque per kg muscle. In upper arm, lean mass was higher in LIS subjects, but also absolute muscle torque resulted higher. For handgrip force, the LIS and MIS group had similar results, despite a trend towards higher forearm lean mass in LIS subjects. Lean mass % of total lean mass is lower in LIS subjects in more distal body parts. Already in a young healthy population, IR seems to be associated with lower force/torque per muscle mass and lower lean mass % of total lean mass predominantly in more distal body parts.

  8. Allosteric regulation of 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase activity of fat body and flight muscle from the bloodsucking bug Rhodnius prolixus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutemberg G. Alves

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (phosphofructokinase; PFK activity from Rhodnius prolixus, a haematophagous insect which is usually a poor flyer, was measured and compared in two metabolically active tissues - flight muscle and fat body. The activity of this important regulatory glycolytic enzyme was much more pronounced in muscle (15.1 ± 1.4 U/mg than in fat body extracts (3.6±0.4 U/mg, although the latter presented higher levels of enzyme per protein content, as measured by western-blotting. Muscle extracts are more responsible than fat body to ATP and fructose 6-phosphate, both substrates of PFK. Allosteric regulation exerted by different effectors such as ADP, AMP and fructose 2,6-phosphate presented a singular pattern for each tissue. Optimal pH (8.0-8.5 and sensitivity to pH variation was very similar, and citrate was unable to inhibit PFK activity in both extracts. Our results suggest the existence of a particular PFK activity for each tissue, with regulatory patterns that are consistent with their physiological roles.A atividade da fosfofrutocinase (PFK de Rodnius prolixus, um inseto hematófago, o qual vôa somente pequenas distâncias, foi medida e comparada em dois tecidos metabolicamente ativos - músculo de asa e corpo gorduroso. A atividade desta importante enzima glicolítica regulatória foi muito mais pronunciada em músculo de asa (15,1 ±1,4 U/mg do que em extrato de corpo gorduroso (3,6 ±0,4 U/mg embora este último tenha apresentado níveis mais altos da enzima por quantidade de proteína, como medido por western-blotting. Extratos de músculo foram mais responsivos do que corpo gorduroso para ATP e frutose-6-fosfato, ambos substratos da PFK. A regulação alostérica exercida por diferentes efetores tais como ADP, AMP, frutose-2,6-bisfosfato apresentou um padrão singular para cada tecido. O pH ótimo (8,0-8,5 e a sensibilidade a variações de pH, foram muito similares e o citrato foi incapaz de inibir a atividade da PFK em

  9. Changes in lean and skeletal muscle body mass in adult females with anorexia nervosa before and after weight restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghoch, Marwan; Pourhassan, Maryam; Milanese, Chiara; Müller, Manfred J; Calugi, Simona; Bazzani, Paola Vittoria; Dalle Grave, Riccardo

    2017-02-01

    Data on the deficits in lean body mass (LBM) and total body skeletal muscle mass (SM) in anorexia nervosa (AN) is scarce and inconsistent. Furthermore, the usefulness of the reported body mass index (BMI) severity cut-off for AN has not been tested with respect to these important parameters. The study had two aims, namely to study LBM patterns and SM in adult females with AN before and after weight restoration, and to examine the clinical usefulness of the 16.5 kg/m 2 BMI cut-off for assessing the protein status in terms of LBM and SM in AN patients. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) before and after weight gain in 90 adult female inpatients with AN, and 90 controls matched by post-treatment BMI and age. Patients were stratified into two groups using BMI 16.5 kg/m 2 as a cut-off. Before weight restoration, patients in the BMI≤16.5 kg/m 2 subgroup (n = 65) had lower LBM, SM and lean extremity mass percentage, but higher %LBM and lean trunk-to-extremity ratio on average than controls. However, those with BMI >16.5 kg/m 2 (n = 25) displayed lower lean extremity mass percentage and higher %LBM, but no significant differences in LBM and SM with respect to controls. Moreover the time × subgroup interaction was significant in terms of LBM and SM, meaning that, changes occur in different manner over time in the two AN subgroups. However no differences were found between the two AN subgroups in either demographic or other eating disorder characteristics. After weight gain, normalization of LBM, %LBM, lean extremity mass percentage and SM was achieved across the entire AN sample, and the BMI≤16.5 kg/m 2 subgroup. The fat mass was the major determinant of gain in LBM; the higher the FM at baseline, the greater the increase in LBM. Our results suggest a BMI cut-off ≤16.5 kg/m 2 as a clinical threshold for determining AN severity. As short-term weight restoration is associated with a normalization in LBM and SM, it

  10. Effect of physical exercise training on muscle strength and body composition, and their association with functional capacity and quality of life in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osbak, Philip Samuel; Mourier, Malene; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    2012-01-01

    at 70% of maximal exercise capacity vs control. Muscle strength, exercise capacity, 6-minute walk test, lean body mass, fat percentage, and quality of life were assessed. Results: Muscle strength increased in the training group (p = 0.01), but no change was observed in controls. Lean body mass......Objective: Atrial fibrillation diminishes cardiac function, exercise tolerance and quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine whether exercise training in atrial fibrillation affects muscle strength, body composition, maximal exercise capacity and walking capacity positively......, thus improving quality of life. Design: Randomized clinical trial. Twelve weeks of physical exercise training or control. Patients: Forty-nine patients in permanent atrial fibrillation were randomized to training or control. Methods: Intervention consisted of aerobic training for 1 h 3 times per week...

  11. Influence of Nordic Walking Training on Muscle Strength and the Electromyographic Activity of the Lower Body in Women With Low Bone Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ossowski Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Osteoporosis and osteopenia are related to changes in the quantity and quality of skeletal muscle and contribute to a decreased level of muscle strength. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of Nordic walking training on muscle strength and the electromyographic (EMG activity of the lower body in women with low bone mass. Material and methods. The participants of the study were 27 women with low bone mass. The sample was randomly divided into two groups: a control group and an experimental group. Women from the experimental group participated in 12 weeks of regular Nordic walking training. Functional strength was assessed with a 30-second chair stand test. The EMG activities of the gluteus maximus (GMax, rectus femoris (RF, biceps femoris (BF, soleus (SOL, and lumbar (LB muscles were measured using a surface electromyogram. Results. Nordic walking training induced a significant increase in the functional strength (p = 0.006 of the lower body and activity of GMax (p = 0.013 and a decrease in body mass (p = 0.006 in women with reduced bone mass. There was no statistically significant increase in the EMG activities of the RF, BF, SOL, or LB muscles. The study did not indicate any significant changes in functional muscle strength, the EMG activity of the lower body, or anthropometry in women from the control group. Conclusions. Nordic walking training induces positive changes in lower body strength and the electromyographic activity of the gluteus maximus as well as a decrease in body mass in women with low bone mass.

  12. Pelvic belt effects on pelvic morphometry, muscle activity and body balance in patients with sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odette Soisson

    Full Text Available The sacroiliac joint (SIJ is frequently involved in low back and pelvic girdle pain. However, morphometrical and functional characteristics related to SIJ pain are poorly defined. Pelvic belts represent one treatment option, but evidence still lacks as to their pain-reducing effects and the mechanisms involved. Addressing these two issues, this case-controlled study compares morphometric, functional and clinical data in SIJ patients and healthy controls and evaluates the effects of short-term pelvic belt application.Morphometric and functional data pertaining to pelvic belt effects were compared in 17 SIJ patients and 17 controls. Lumbar spine and pelvis morphometries were obtained from 3T magnetic resonance imaging. Functional electromyography data of pelvis and leg muscles and center of pressure excursions were measured in one-leg stance. The numerical rating scale was used to evaluate immediate pain-reducing effects.Pelvic morphometry was largely unaltered in SIJ patients and also by pelvic belt application. The angle of lumbar lateral flexion was significantly larger in SIJ patients without belt application. Muscle activity and center of pressure were unaffected by SIJ pain or by belt application in one-leg stance. Nine of 17 patients reported decreased pain intensities under moderate belt application, four reported no change and four reported increased pain intensity. For the entire population investigated here, this qualitative description was not confirmed on a statistical significant level.Minute changes were observed in the alignment of the lumbar spine in the frontal plane in SIJ patients. The potential pain-decreasing effects of pelvic belts could not be attributed to altered muscle activity, pelvic morphometry or body balance in a static short-term application. Long-term belt effects will therefore be of prospective interest.

  13. Effects of Eight Months of Whole-Body Vibration Training on the Muscle Mass and Functional Capacity of Elderly Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin-Medeiros, Fernanda; Rey-López, Juan P; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Cristi-Montero, Carlos S; Garatachea Vallejo, Nuria

    2015-07-01

    Few intervention studies have used whole-body vibration (WBV) training in the elderly, and there is inconclusive evidence about its health benefits. We examined the effect of 8 months of WBV training on muscle mass and functional capacity in elderly women. A total of 37 women (aged 82.4 ± 5.7 years) voluntarily participated in this study. Subjects were randomly assigned to a vibration group (n = 19) or a control group (n = 18). The vibration group trained on a vertical vibration platform twice a week. The control group was requested not to change their habitual lifestyle. The quadriceps femoris muscle cross-sectional area was determined by magnetic resonance imaging. All participants were evaluated by a battery of tests (Senior Fitness Test) to determine their functional capacity, as well as handgrip strength and balance/gait. General linear repeated-measure analysis of variance (group by time) was performed to examine the effect of the intervention on the outcomes variables. After 8 months, nonstatistically significant differences in the quadriceps CSA (pre-training: 8,516.16 ± 1,271.78 mm² and post-training: 8,671.63 ± 1,389.03 mm²) (p > 0.05) were found in the WBV group (Cohen's d: -0.12), whereas the CON group significantly decreased muscle mass (pre-training: 9,756.18 ± 1,420.07 mm² and post-training: 9,326.82 ± 1,577.53 mm²), with moderate effect size evident (Cohen's d: 0.29). In both groups, no changes were observed in the functional capacity, handgrip strength and balance/gait. The WBV training could prevent the loss of quadriceps CSA in elderly women.

  14. The role of muscle mass and body fat on disability among older adults: A cross-national analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrovolas, Stefanos; Koyanagi, Ai; Olaya, Beatriz; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis; Miret, Marta; Chatterji, Somnath; Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Beata; Koskinen, Seppo; Leonardi, Matilde; Haro, Josep Maria

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity with disability among older adults (≥65years old) in nine high-, middle- and low-income countries from Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Data were available for 53,289 people aged ≥18years who participated in the Collaborative Research on Ageing in Europe (COURAGE) survey conducted in Finland, Poland, and Spain, and the WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) survey conducted in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia, and South Africa, between 2007 and 2012. Skeletal muscle mass, skeletal muscle mass index, and percent body fat were calculated with specific population formulas. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity were defined by specific cut-offs used in previous studies. Disability was assessed with the WHODAS 2.0 score (range 0-100) with higher scores corresponding to higher levels of disability. Multivariable linear regression analysis was conducted with disability as the outcome. The analytical sample consisted of 18,363 people (males; n=8116, females; n=10247) aged ≥65years with mean (SD) age 72.9 (11.1) years. In the fully-adjusted overall analysis, sarcopenic obesity was associated with greater levels of disability [b-coefficient 3.01 (95% CI 1.14-4.88)]. In terms of country-wise analyses, sarcopenia was associated with higher WHODAS 2.0 scores in China [b-coefficient 4.56 (95% CI: 3.25-5.87)], Poland [b-coefficient 6.66 (95% CI: 2.17-11.14)], Russia [b-coefficient 5.60 (95% CI: 2.03-9.16)], and South Africa [b-coefficient 7.75 (95% CI: 1.56-13.94)]. Prevention of muscle mass decline may contribute to reducing the global burden of disability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Embryonic muscle development of Convoluta pulchra (Turbellaria-acoelomorpha, platyhelminthes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladurner, P; Rieger, R

    2000-06-15

    We studied the embryonic development of body-wall musculature in the acoel turbellarian Convoluta pulchra by fluorescence microscopy using phalloidin-bound stains for F-actin. During stage 1, which we define as development prior to 50% of the time between egg-laying and hatching, actin was visible only in zonulae adhaerentes of epidermal cells. Subsequent development of muscle occurred in two distinct phases: first, formation of an orthogonal grid of early muscles and, second, differentiation of other myoblasts upon this grid. The first elements of the primary orthogonal muscle grid appeared as short, isolated, circular muscle fibers (stage 2; 50% developmental time), which eventually elongated to completely encircle the embryo (stage 3; at 60% of total developmental time). The first primary longitudinal fibers appeared later, along with some new primary circular fibers, by 60-63% of total developmental time (stage 4). From 65 to 100% of total developmental time (stages 5 to 7), secondary fibers, using primary fibers as templates, arose; the number of circular and longitudinal muscles thus increased, and at the same time parenchymal muscles began appearing. Hatchlings (stage 8) possessed about 25 circular and 30 longitudinal muscles as well as strong parenchymal muscles. The remarkable feature of the body wall of many adult acoel flatworms is that longitudinal muscles bend medially and cross each other behind the level of the mouth. We found that this development starts shortly after the appearance of the ventral mouth opening within the body wall muscle grid. The adult organization of the body-wall musculature consists of a grid of several hundred longitudinal and circular fibers and a few diagonal muscles. Musculature of the reproductive organs developed after hatching. Thus, extensive myogenesis must occur also during postembryonic development. Comparison between the turbellarians and the annelids suggests that formation of a primary orthogonal muscle grid and

  16. Effects of resistance training, endurance training and whole-body vibration on lean body mass, muscle strength and physical performance in older people: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Chin; Tu, Yu-Kang; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Huang, Yi-Ting; Chien, Kuo-Liong

    2018-02-17

    A variety of different types of exercise are promoted to improve muscle strength and physical performance in older people. We aimed to determine the relative effects of resistance training, endurance training and whole-body vibration on lean body mass, muscle strength and physical performance in older people. A systematic review and network meta-analysis. Adults aged 60 and over. Evidence from randomised controlled trials of resistance training, endurance training and whole-body vibration were combined. The effects of exercise interventions on lean body mass, muscle strength and physical performance were evaluated by conducting a network meta-analysis to compare multiple interventions and usual care. Risk of bias of included studies was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. A meta-regression was performed to assess potential effect modifiers. Data were obtained from 30 trials involving 1,405 participants (age range: 60-92 years). No significant differences were found between the effects of exercise or usual care on lean body mass. Resistance training (minimum 6 weeks duration) achieved greater muscle strength improvement than did usual care (12.8 kg; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.5-17.0 kg). Resistance training and whole-body vibration were associated with greater physical performance improvement compared with usual care (2.6 times greater [95% CI: 1.3-3.9] and 2.1 times greater [95% CI: 0.5-3.7], respectively). Resistance training is the most effect intervention to improve muscle strength and physical performance in older people. Our findings also suggest that whole-body vibration is beneficial for physical performance. However, none of the three exercise interventions examined had a significant effect on lean body mass.

  17. Comparative effects of horse exercise versus traditional exercise programs on gait, muscle strength, and body balance in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda-García, Silvia; Iricibar, Albert; Planas, Antoni; Prat-Subiran, Joan A; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa M

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the separate effect and retention of 12-week traditional (TE) and horse (HE) exercise programs on physical function in healthy older participants (61 to 87 years old). Thirty-eight participants were randomly assigned to three groups: TE (n = 17), HE (n = 10), and control group (n = 11). TE and HE underwent a supervised exercise program (3 day/week). Maximal gait speed, muscle strength, and body balance were assessed at weeks 0, 12, and 16. Only TE and HE displayed significant improvements (P strength, and only HE had faster gait speed. Marginal balance improvements were found only in HE in the medial-lateral direction. However, TE showed larger improvements in handgrip than HE. The largest retention was in knee extensor strength but most of the exercise effects were lost in the follow-up. Besides TE, exercise with a horse may be an alternative option to older adults, provided that they want to interact with the animal.

  18. Effect of floorball training on blood lipids, body composition, muscle strength, and functional capacity of elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorup Petersen, Jacob; Pedersen, Mogens Theisen; Melcher, Pia Grethe Sandfeld

    2017-01-01

    the effect of floorball training on blood lipids, muscle strength, body composition, and functional capacity of men aged 65-76 years. Thirty-nine recreational active men were randomized into a floorball group (FG; n = 22) or petanque group (PG; n = 17), in which training was performed 1 h twice a week for 12...... functional capacity tests were better (P training period. No changes were observed in PG. In conclusion, 12 weeks of floorball training resulted in a number of favorable effects important for health and functional capacity, suggesting that floorball training can be used......Floorball training consists of intense repeated exercise and may offer a motivating and social stimulating team activity in elderly individuals. However, the effect of floorball training in elderly adults on physiological adaptations important for health is not known. Thus, this study examined...

  19. Symptoms of muscle dysmorphia, body dysmorphic disorder, and eating disorders in a nonclinical population of adult male weightlifters in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwoudt, Johanna E; Zhou, Shi; Coutts, Rosanne A; Booker, Ray

    2015-05-01

    The current study aimed to (a) determine the rates of symptoms of muscle dysmorphia (MD), body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), and eating disorder; (b) determine the relationships among symptoms of MD, BDD, and eating disorders; and (c) provide a comprehensive comparison of symptoms of MD, BDD, and eating disorders in a nonclinical population of adult male weightlifters in Australia. The participants (N = 648, mean age = 29.5 years, SD = 10.1) participated in an online survey, consisting of Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale, the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire, and the Eating Attitude Test-26. Results indicated that 110 participants (17%) were at risk of having MD, 69 participants (10.6%) were at risk of having BDD, and 219 participants (33.8%) were at risk of having an eating disorder. Furthermore, 36 participants (5.6%) were found at risk of having both MD and BDD, and 60 participants (9.3%) were at risk of having both MD and an eating disorder. Significant correlations and associations were found between symptoms of MD and BDD, and symptoms of MD and eating disorders. Support was provided for the comorbidity of, and symptomatic similarities between, symptoms of MD and BDD, and symptoms of MD and eating disorders. This may reflect a shared pathogenesis between symptoms of MD, BDD, and eating disorders. Strength and conditioning professionals, exercise scientists, athletic trainers, and personal trainers should be aware that adult males who are working out with weights (i.e., free weights or machines) may be at increased risk of having MD, BDD, and eating disorders.

  20. Immune Priming, Fat Reserves, Muscle Mass and Body Weight of the House Cricket is Affected by Diet Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Aguilar, A; Nava-Sánchez, A; González-Tokman, D M; Munguía-Steyer, R; Gutiérrez-Cabrera, A E

    2016-08-01

    Some insect species are capable of producing an enhanced immune response after a first pathogenic encounter, a process called immune priming. However, whether and how such ability is driven by particular diet components (protein/carbohydrate) have not been explored. Such questions are sound given that, in general, immune response is dietary dependent. We have used adults of the house cricket Acheta domesticus L. (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) and exposed them to the bacteria Serratia marcescens. We first addressed whether survival rate after priming and nonpriming treatments is dietary dependent based on access/no access to proteins and carbohydrates. Second, we investigated how these dietary components affected fat reserves, muscle mass, and body weight, three key traits in insect fitness. Thus, we exposed adult house crickets to either a protein or a carbohydrate diet and measured the three traits. After being provided with protein, primed animals survived longer compared to the other diet treatments. Interestingly, this effect was also sex dependent with primed males having a higher survival than primed females when protein was supplemented. For the second experiment, protein-fed animals had more fat, muscle mass, and body weight than carbohydrate-fed animals. Although we are not aware of the immune component underlying immune priming, our results suggest that its energetic demand for its functioning and/or consequent survival requires a higher demand of protein with respect to carbohydrate. Thus, protein shortage can impair key survival-related traits related to immune and energetic condition. Further studies varying nutrient ratios should verify our results.

  1. Implementation and validation of the extended Hill-type muscle model with robust routing capabilities in LS-DYNA for active human body models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinbach, Christian; Martynenko, Oleksandr; Promies, Janik; Haeufle, Daniel F B; Fehr, Jörg; Schmitt, Syn

    2017-09-02

    In the state of the art finite element AHBMs for car crash analysis in the LS-DYNA software material named *MAT_MUSCLE (*MAT_156) is used for active muscles modeling. It has three elements in parallel configuration, which has several major drawbacks: restraint approximation of the physical reality, complicated parameterization and absence of the integrated activation dynamics. This study presents implementation of the extended four element Hill-type muscle model with serial damping and eccentric force-velocity relation including [Formula: see text] dependent activation dynamics and internal method for physiological muscle routing. Proposed model was implemented into the general-purpose finite element (FE) simulation software LSDYNA as a user material for truss elements. This material model is verified and validated with three different sets of mammalian experimental data, taken from the literature. It is compared to the *MAT_MUSCLE (*MAT_156) Hill-type muscle model already existing in LS-DYNA, which is currently used in finite element human body models (HBMs). An application example with an arm model extracted from the FE ViVA OpenHBM is given, taking into account physiological muscle paths. The simulation results show better material model accuracy, calculation robustness and improved muscle routing capability compared to *MAT_156. The FORTRAN source code for the user material subroutine dyn21.f and the muscle parameters for all simulations, conducted in the study, are given at https://zenodo.org/record/826209 under an open source license. This enables a quick application of the proposed material model in LS-DYNA, especially in active human body models (AHBMs) for applications in automotive safety.

  2. Whole-body vibration training compared with resistance training: effect on spasticity, muscle strength and motor performance in adults with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborg, Lotta; Andersson, Christina; Julin, Per

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect on spasticity, muscle strength and motor performance after 8 weeks of whole-body vibration training compared with resistance training in adults with cerebral palsy. Fourteen persons with spastic diplegia (21-41 years) were randomized to intervention with either whole-body vibration training (n=7) or resistance training (n=7). Pre- and post-training measures of spasticity using the modified Ashworth scale, muscle strength using isokinetic dynamometry, walking ability using Six-Minute Walk Test, balance using Timed Up and Go test and gross motor performance using Gross Motor Function Measure were performed. Spasticity decreased in knee extensors in the whole-body vibration group. Muscle strength increased in the resistance training group at the velocity 30 degrees /s and in both groups at 90 degrees /s. Six-Minute Walk Test and Timed Up and Go test did not change significantly. Gross Motor Function Measure increased in the whole-body vibration group. These data suggest that an 8-week intervention of whole-body vibration training or resistance training can increase muscle strength, without negative effect on spasticity, in adults with cerebral palsy.

  3. Removal of foreign bodies embedded in the urinary bladder wall by a combination of laparoscopy and carbon dioxide cystoscopic assistance: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengyue Jin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of combined laparoscopic and carbon dioxide partial cystectomy and foreign body removal and to review the existing literature on the topic. Materials and Methods: A 43-year-old Asian woman was found to have an intrauterine device embedded in the bladder wall during evaluation for chronic pelvic pain and urinary tract infection. She underwent cystoscopic-laparoscopic partial cystectomy, with an uncomplicated postoperative course. She had normal renal function during the follow-up period. This case demonstrates the possibility and safety of performing cystoscopic-laparoscopic partial cystectomy for the removal of a partially implanted intravesical foreign body. Results: The patient recovered without incident and was discharged 7 days after surgery. No abnormalities were noted in the urine output or renal function in the postoperative follow-up period. No complications due to retrograde flow of carbon dioxide up the ureters or air embolism were noted during the procedure or postoperatively. Conclusions: The combination of laparoscopy and air cystoscopy has been shown to be an optimal method for retracting foreign bodies embedded in the bladder wall. Also, air cystoscopy can be used to give doctors a better view in cases in which vision is compromised under water-contrast cystoscopy.

  4. Removal of foreign bodies embedded in the urinary bladder wall by a combination of laparoscopy and carbon dioxide cystoscopic assistance: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chengyue; Fan, Yu; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Yu; Wu, Shiliang; Jin, Jie

    2016-11-01

    To report a case of combined laparoscopic and carbon dioxide partial cystectomy and foreign body removal and to review the existing literature on the topic. A 43-year-old Asian woman was found to have an intrauterine device embedded in the bladder wall during evaluation for chronic pelvic pain and urinary tract infection. She underwent cystoscopic-laparoscopic partial cystectomy, with an uncomplicated postoperative course. She had normal renal function during the follow-up period. This case demonstrates the possibility and safety of performing cystoscopic-laparoscopic partial cystectomy for the removal of a partially implanted intravesical foreign body. The patient recovered without incident and was discharged 7 days after surgery. No abnormalities were noted in the urine output or renal function in the postoperative follow-up period. No complications due to retrograde flow of carbon dioxide up the ureters or air embolism were noted during the procedure or postoperatively. The combination of laparoscopy and air cystoscopy has been shown to be an optimal method for retracting foreign bodies embedded in the bladder wall. Also, air cystoscopy can be used to give doctors a better view in cases in which vision is compromised under water-contrast cystoscopy.

  5. Whole-body cryotherapy (extreme cold air exposure) for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Joseph T; Baker, Philip R A; Minett, Geoffrey M; Bieuzen, Francois; Stewart, Ian B; Bleakley, Chris

    2015-09-18

    Recovery strategies are often used with the intention of preventing or minimising muscle soreness after exercise. Whole-body cryotherapy, which involves a single or repeated exposure(s) to extremely cold dry air (below -100 °C) in a specialised chamber or cabin for two to four minutes per exposure, is currently being advocated as an effective intervention to reduce muscle soreness after exercise. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of whole-body cryotherapy (extreme cold air exposure) for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise in adults. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the British Nursing Index and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database. We also searched the reference lists of articles, trial registers and conference proceedings, handsearched journals and contacted experts.The searches were run in August 2015. We aimed to include randomised and quasi-randomised trials that compared the use of whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) versus a passive or control intervention (rest, no treatment or placebo treatment) or active interventions including cold or contrast water immersion, active recovery and infrared therapy for preventing or treating muscle soreness after exercise in adults. We also aimed to include randomised trials that compared different durations or dosages of WBC. Our prespecified primary outcomes were muscle soreness, subjective recovery (e.g. tiredness, well-being) and adverse effects. Two review authors independently screened search results, selected studies, assessed risk of bias and extracted and cross-checked data. Where appropriate, we pooled results of comparable trials. The random-effects model was used for pooling where there was substantial heterogeneity. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE. Four laboratory-based randomised controlled trials were included. These reported results for 64

  6. Restrictions in systemic and locomotor skeletal muscle perfusion, oxygen supply and VO2 during high-intensity whole-body exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Damsgaard, Rasmus; Dawson, Ellen A; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2008-05-15

    Perfusion to exercising skeletal muscle is regulated to match O(2) delivery to the O(2) demand, but this regulation might be compromised during or approaching maximal whole-body exercise as muscle blood flow for a given work rate is blunted. Whether muscle perfusion is restricted when there is an extreme metabolic stimulus to vasodilate during supramaximal exercise remains unknown. To examine the regulatory limits of systemic and muscle perfusion in exercising humans, we measured systemic and leg haemodynamics, O(2) transport, and , and estimated non-locomotor tissue perfusion during constant load supramaximal cycling (498 +/- 16 W; 110% of peak power; mean +/- S.E.M.) in addition to both incremental cycling and knee-extensor exercise to exhaustion in 13 trained males. During supramaximal cycling, cardiac output (Q), leg blood flow (LBF), and systemic and leg O(2) delivery and reached peak values after 60-90 s and thereafter levelled off at values similar to or approximately 6% (P conductance, leg O(2) delivery and leg for a given power were reduced by 32-47% (P conductance. These observations suggest that limits of cardiac function and muscle vasoconstriction underlie the inability of the circulatory system to meet the increasing metabolic demand of skeletal muscles and other tissues during whole-body exercise.

  7. The effectiveness of leucine on muscle protein synthesis, lean body mass and leg lean mass accretion in older people: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhe-rong; Tan, Zhong-ju; Zhang, Qin; Gui, Qi-feng; Yang, Yun-mei

    2015-01-14

    In the present study, we performed a meta-analysis to assess the ability of leucine supplementation to increase the muscle protein fraction synthetic rate and to augment lean body mass or leg lean mass in elderly patients. A literature search was conducted on Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE and Google Scholar databases up to 31 December 2013 for clinical trials that investigated the administration of leucine as a nutrient that affects muscle protein metabolism and muscle mass in elderly subjects. The included studies were randomised controlled trials. The primary outcome for the meta-analysis was the protein fractional synthetic rate. Secondary outcomes included lean body mass and leg lean mass. A total of nine studies were included in the meta-analysis. The results showed that the muscle protein fractional synthetic rate after intervention significantly increased in the leucine group compared with the control group (pooled standardised difference in mean changes 1·08, 95% CI 0·50, 1·67; Pmass (pooled standardised difference in mean changes 0·18, 95% CI - 0·18, 0·54; P= 0·318) or leg lean mass (pooled standardised difference in mean changes 0·006, 95% CI - 0·32, 0·44; P= 0·756). These findings suggest that leucine supplementation is useful to address the age-related decline in muscle mass in elderly individuals, as it increases the muscle protein fractional synthetic rate.

  8. Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on the body carnitine pool, skeletal muscle energy metabolism and physical performance in male vegetarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Katerina; Kummer, Oliver; Bouitbir, Jamal; Stoffel, Sonja D; Hoerler-Koerner, Ulrike; Bodmer, Michael; Roberts, Paul; Urwyler, Albert; Ehrsam, Rolf; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    More than 95% of the body carnitine is located in skeletal muscle, where it is essential for energy metabolism. Vegetarians ingest less carnitine and carnitine precursors and have lower plasma carnitine concentrations than omnivores. Principle aims of the current study were to assess the plasma and skeletal muscle carnitine content and physical performance of male vegetarians and matched omnivores under basal conditions and after L-carnitine supplementation. Sixteen vegetarians and eight omnivores participated in this interventional study with oral supplementation of 2 g L-carnitine for 12 weeks. Before carnitine supplementation, vegetarians had a 10% lower plasma carnitine concentration, but maintained skeletal muscle carnitine stores compared to omnivores. Skeletal muscle phosphocreatine, ATP, glycogen and lactate contents were also not different from omnivores. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and workload (P max) per bodyweight (bicycle spiroergometry) were not significantly different between vegetarians and omnivores. Sub-maximal exercise (75% VO2max for 1 h) revealed no significant differences between vegetarians and omnivores (respiratory exchange ratio, blood lactate and muscle metabolites). Supplementation with L-carnitine significantly increased the total plasma carnitine concentration (24% in omnivores, 31% in vegetarians) and the muscle carnitine content in vegetarians (13%). Despite this increase, P max and VO2max as well as muscle phosphocreatine, lactate and glycogen were not significantly affected by carnitine administration. Vegetarians have lower plasma carnitine concentrations, but maintained muscle carnitine stores compared to omnivores. Oral L-carnitine supplementation normalizes the plasma carnitine stores and slightly increases the skeletal muscle carnitine content in vegetarians, but without affecting muscle function and energy metabolism.

  9. Salinity and temperature variations reflecting on cellular PCNA, IGF-I and II expressions, body growth and muscle cellularity of a freshwater fish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Y S; Melo, R M C; Campos-Junior, P H A; Santos, J C E; Luz, R K; Rizzo, E; Bazzoli, N

    2014-06-01

    The present study assessed the influence of salinity and temperature on body growth and on muscle cellularity of Lophiosilurus alexaxdri vitelinic larvae. Slightly salted environments negatively influenced body growth of freshwater fish larvae and we observed that those conditions notably act as an environmental influencer on muscle growth and on local expression of hypertrophia and hypeplasia markers (IGFs and PCNA). Furthermore, we could see that salinity tolerance for NaCl 4gl(-)(1) diminishes with increasing temperature, evidenced by variation in body and muscle growth, and by irregular morphology of the lateral skeletal muscle of larvae. We saw that an increase of both PCNA and autocrine IGF-II are correlated to an increase in fibre numbers and fibre diameter as the temperature increases and salinity diminishes. On the other hand, autocrine IGF-I follows the opposite way to the other biological parameters assessed, increasing as salinity increases and temperature diminishes, showing that this protein did not participate in muscle cellularity, but participating in molecular/cellular repair. Therefore, slightly salted environments may provide adverse conditions that cause some obstacles to somatic growth of this species, suggesting some osmotic expenditure with a salinity increment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sex-specific relationships of physical activity, body composition, and muscle quality with lower-extremity physical function in older men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straight, Chad R; Brady, Anne O; Evans, Ellen

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to determine the sex-specific relationships of physical activity, body composition, and muscle quality with lower-extremity physical function in older men and women. Seventy-nine community-dwelling men (n = 39; mean [SD] age, 76.1 [6.2] y; mean [SD] body mass index, 27.3 [3.8] kg/m(2)) and women (n = 40; mean [SD] age, 75.8 [5.5] y; mean [SD] body mass index, 27.0 [3.8] kg/m(2)) were assessed for physical activity via questionnaire, body composition via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning, leg extension power using the Nottingham power rig, and muscle quality (W/kg; the ratio of leg extension power [W] to lower-body mineral-free lean mass [kg]). A composite measure of physical function was obtained by summing Z scores from the 6-minute walk, 8-ft up-and-go test, and 30-second chair-stand test. As expected, men had significantly greater levels of physical activity, lower adiposity, greater lean mass, higher leg extension power, and greater muscle quality compared with women (all P quality and physical activity were the strongest predictors of lower-extremity physical function in men and independently explained 42% and 29% of the variance, respectively. In women, muscle quality (16%) and percent body fat (12%) were independent predictors after adjustment for covariates. Muscle quality is the strongest predictor of lower-extremity physical function in men and women, but sex impacts the importance of physical activity and adiposity. These findings suggest that older men and women may benefit from different intervention strategies for preventing physical disability and also highlight the importance of weight management for older women to preserve physical function.

  11. Efficacy of phosphatidic acid ingestion on lean body mass, muscle thickness and strength gains in resistance-trained men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffman Jay R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphatidic acid (PA has been reported to activate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway and is thought to enhance the anabolic effects of resistance training. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine if oral phosphatidic acid administration can enhance strength, muscle thickness and lean tissue accruement during an 8-week resistance training program. Methods Sixteen resistance-trained men were randomly assigned to a group that either consumed 750 mg of PA (n = 7, 23.1 ± 4.4 y; 176.7 ± 6.7 cm; 86.5 ± 21.2 kg or a placebo (PL, n = 9, 22.5 ± 2.0 y; 179.8 ± 5.4 cm; 89.4 ± 13.6 kg group. During each testing session subjects were assessed for strength (one repetition maximum [1-RM] bench press and squat and body composition. Muscle thickness and pennation angle were also measured in the vastus lateralis of the subject’s dominant leg. Results Subjects ingesting PA demonstrated a 12.7% increase in squat strength and a 2.6% increase in LBM, while subjects consuming PL showed a 9.3% improvement in squat strength and a 0.1% change in LBM. Although parametric analysis was unable to demonstrate significant differences, magnitude based inferences indicated that the Δ change in 1-RM squat showed a likely benefit from PA on increasing lower body strength and a very likely benefit for increasing lean body mass (LBM. Conclusions Results of this study suggest that a combination of a daily 750 mg PA ingestion, combined with a 4-day per week resistance training program for 8-weeks appears to have a likely benefit on strength improvement, and a very likely benefit on lean tissue accruement in young, resistance trained individuals.

  12. Body Morphology, Energy Stores, and Muscle Enzyme Activity Explain Cricket Acoustic Mate Attraction Signaling Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Ian R.; Darveau, Charles-A.; Bertram, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    High mating success in animals is often dependent on males signalling attractively with high effort. Since males should be selected to maximize their reproductive success, female preferences for these traits should result in minimal signal variation persisting in the population. However, extensive signal variation persists. The genic capture hypothesis proposes genetic variation persists because fitness-conferring traits depend on an individual's basic processes, including underlying physiological, morphological, and biochemical traits, which are themselves genetically variable. To explore the traits underlying signal variation, we quantified among-male differences in signalling, morphology, energy stores, and the activities of key enzymes associated with signalling muscle metabolism in two species of crickets, Gryllus assimilis (chirper: 20 pulses/chirp). Chirping G. assimilis primarily fuelled signalling with carbohydrate metabolism: smaller individuals and individuals with increased thoracic glycogen stores signalled for mates with greater effort; individuals with greater glycogen phosphorylase activity produced more attractive mating signals. Conversely, the more energetic trilling G. texensis fuelled signalling with both lipid and carbohydrate metabolism: individuals with increased β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity and increased thoracic free carbohydrate content signalled for mates with greater effort; individuals with higher thoracic and abdominal carbohydrate content and higher abdominal lipid stores produced more attractive signals. Our findings suggest variation in male reproductive success may be driven by hidden physiological trade-offs that affect the ability to uptake, retain, and use essential nutrients, although the results remain correlational in nature. Our findings indicate that a physiological perspective may help us to understand some of the causes of variation in behaviour. PMID:24608102

  13. Body morphology, energy stores, and muscle enzyme activity explain cricket acoustic mate attraction signaling variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R Thomson

    Full Text Available High mating success in animals is often dependent on males signalling attractively with high effort. Since males should be selected to maximize their reproductive success, female preferences for these traits should result in minimal signal variation persisting in the population. However, extensive signal variation persists. The genic capture hypothesis proposes genetic variation persists because fitness-conferring traits depend on an individual's basic processes, including underlying physiological, morphological, and biochemical traits, which are themselves genetically variable. To explore the traits underlying signal variation, we quantified among-male differences in signalling, morphology, energy stores, and the activities of key enzymes associated with signalling muscle metabolism in two species of crickets, Gryllus assimilis (chirper: 20 pulses/chirp. Chirping G. assimilis primarily fuelled signalling with carbohydrate metabolism: smaller individuals and individuals with increased thoracic glycogen stores signalled for mates with greater effort; individuals with greater glycogen phosphorylase activity produced more attractive mating signals. Conversely, the more energetic trilling G. texensis fuelled signalling with both lipid and carbohydrate metabolism: individuals with increased β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity and increased thoracic free carbohydrate content signalled for mates with greater effort; individuals with higher thoracic and abdominal carbohydrate content and higher abdominal lipid stores produced more attractive signals. Our findings suggest variation in male reproductive success may be driven by hidden physiological trade-offs that affect the ability to uptake, retain, and use essential nutrients, although the results remain correlational in nature. Our findings indicate that a physiological perspective may help us to understand some of the causes of variation in behaviour.

  14. Muscle performance, body fat, pain and function in the elderly with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Wagner Teixeira; Rodrigues, Erika de Carvalho; Mainenti, Míriam Raquel Meira

    2014-01-01

    To correlate muscule performance, body composition, pain and joint function in elderly people with gonarthrosis. 21 elderly patients were submitted to bioelectrical impedance analysis, dynamometry associated with electromyographic (EMG) evaluation of isometric knee extension, in addition to pain assessment by the Numeric Pain Intensity Scale and function assessment, by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis (OA) questionnaire. Correlations were checked by the Pearson's correlation coefficient. The sample characteristics were mean age 67.36 ± 4.21 years old, body fat percentage 40.57±6.15%, total WOMAC score 43.27 ± 16.32%, and maximum strength 19.95 ± 6.99 kgF. Pain during movement showed a statistical association with WOMAC physical activity domain (r = 0.47) and its general score (r = 0.51); pain intensity at night presented association with WOMAC stiffness domain (r = 0.55), in addition to the negative correlation with the slope values of the Medium Frequency of the EMG signal (r = - 0.57). pain intensity is correlated to functional incapacity in elderly people with knee OA and to a greater expression of fatigue in EMG signal. Levels of Evidence III, Study of non consecutive patients.

  15. De novo transcriptome assembly from fat body and flight muscles transcripts to identify morph-specific gene expression profiles in Gryllus firmus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetha Nanoth Vellichirammal

    Full Text Available Wing polymorphism is a powerful model for examining many aspects of adaptation. The wing dimorphic cricket species, Gryllus firmus, consists of a long-winged morph with functional flight muscles that is capable of flight, and two flightless morphs. One (obligately flightless morph emerges as an adult with vestigial wings and vestigial flight muscles. The other (plastic flightless morph emerges with fully-developed wings but later in adulthood histolyzes its flight muscles. Importantly both flightless morphs have substantially increased reproductive output relative to the flight-capable morph. Much is known about the physiological and biochemical differences between the morphs with respect to adaptations for flight versus reproduction. In contrast, little is known about the molecular genetic basis of these morph-specific adaptations. To address this issue, we assembled a de novo transcriptome of G. firmus using 141.5 million Illumina reads generated from flight muscles and fat body, two organs that play key roles in flight and reproduction. We used the resulting 34,411 transcripts as a reference transcriptome for differential gene expression analyses. A comparison of gene expression profiles from functional flight muscles in the flight-capable morph versus histolyzed flight muscles in the plastic flight incapable morph identified a suite of genes involved in respiration that were highly expressed in pink (functional flight muscles and genes involved in proteolysis highly expressed in the white (histolyzed flight muscles. A comparison of fat body transcripts from the obligately flightless versus the flight-capable morphs revealed differential expression of genes involved in triglyceride biosynthesis, lipid transport, immune function and reproduction. These data provide a valuable resource for future molecular genetics research in this and related species and provide insight on the role of gene expression in morph-specific adaptations for flight

  16. The effects of 8 weeks of heavy resistance training and branched-chain amino acid supplementation on body composition and muscle performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, Mike; Emerson, Christamarie; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2012-10-01

    This study determined the effects of 8 weeks of heavy resistance training combined with branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation on body composition and muscle performance. Resistance training was performed by 19 non-resistance-trained males (three sets of 8-10 repetitions) four times/week, for 8 weeks, while also ingesting 9 g/day of BCAA or 9 g/day of placebo (PLAC) on the exercise days only (one-half of total dose 30 min before and after exercise). Data were analyzed with separate 2 × 2 analysis of variance (ANOVA) (p training (p = 0.593) and also, there were no significant changes in total body water (p = 0.517). In addition, no training- or supplement-induced (p = 0.783) changes occurred with fat mass or fat-free mass (p = 0.907). Upper-body (p = 0.047) and lower-body strength (p = 0.044) and upper- (p = 0.001) and lower-body muscle endurance (p = 0.013) increased with training; however, these increases were not different between the groups (p > 0.05). When combined with heavy resistance training for 8 weeks, supplementation with 9 g/day of BCAA 30 min before and after exercise had no preferential effects on body composition and muscle performance.

  17. Glenohumeral contact forces and muscle forces evaluated in wheelchair-related activities of daily living in able-bodied subjects versus subjects with paraplegia and tetraplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Drongelen, Stefan; van der Woude, Lucas H; Janssen, Thomas W; Angenot, Edmond L; Chadwick, Edward K; Veeger, Dirkjan H

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the differences in glenohumeral contact forces and shoulder muscle forces between able-bodied subjects and subjects with paraplegia and tetraplegia during wheelchair-related activities of daily living (ADLs). DESIGN: Kinematics and external forces were measured during

  18. Measures of bioavailable serum testosterone and estradiol and their relationships with muscle strength, bone density, and body composition in elderly men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W. van den Beld (Annewieke); F.H. de Jong (Frank); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn the present cross-sectional study of 403 independently living elderly men, we tested the hypothesis that the decreases in bone mass, body composition, and muscle strength with age are related to the fall in circulating endogenous testosterone (T) and

  19. Glenohumeral contact forces and muscle forces evaluated in wheelchair-related activities of daily living in able-bodied subjects versus subjects with paraplegia and tetraplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Drongelen, S; van der Woude, LH; Janssen, Thomas W. J.; Angenot, EL; Chadwick, EK; Veeger, DirkJan (H. E. J.)

    Objective: To estimate the differences in glenohumeral contact forces and shoulder muscle forces between able-bodied subjects and subjects with paraplegia and tetraplegia during wheelchair-related activities of daily living (ADLs). Design: Kinematics and external forces were measured during

  20. Influences of dietary vitamin D restriction on bone strength, body composition and muscle in rats fed a high-fat diet: involvement of mRNA expression of MyoD in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Yuno; Tanabe, Rieko; Nakaoka, Kanae; Yamada, Asako; Noda, Seiko; Hoshino, Ayumi; Haraikawa, Mayu; Goseki-Sone, Masae

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency is associated with a greater risk of osteoporosis and also influences skeletal muscle functions, differentiation and development. The present study investigated the influences of vitamin D restriction on the body composition, bone and skeletal muscle in rats fed a high-fat diet. Sprague-Dawley strain male rats (11weeks old) were divided into four groups and fed experimental diets: a basic control diet (Cont.), a basic control diet with vitamin D restriction (DR), a high-fat diet (F) and a high-fat diet with vitamin D restriction (FDR). At 28days after starting the experimental diets, the visceral fat mass was significantly increased in the F group compared with Cont. group, and the muscle mass tended to decrease in the DR group compared with Cont. group. The total volume of the femur was significantly lower in the DR group compared with Cont. group, and the bone mineral density (BMD) of the femur was significantly lower in the FDR group compared with F group. MyoD is one of the muscle-specific transcription factors. The levels of mRNA expression of MyoD of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles from the DR group were reduced markedly compared with those from the Cont. group. In conclusion, our findings revealed the influences of a vitamin D-restricted high-fat diet on the bone strength, body composition and muscle. Further studies on vitamin D insufficiency in the regulation of muscle as well as fat and bone metabolism would provide valuable data for the prevention of lifestyle-related disorders, including osteoporosis and sarcopenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Muscle perfusion of posterior trunk and lower-limb muscles at rest and during upper-limb exercise in spinal cord-injured and able-bodied individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafeiridis, A; Vasiliadis, A V; Doumas, A; Galanis, N; Christoforidis, T; Kyparos, A; Nikolaidis, M G; Dipla, K; Vrabas, I S

    2012-11-01

    Nonrandomized-controlled trial. To assess muscle perfusion at rest and during arm-cranking exercise (ACE) in upper and lower posterior trunk and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) and controls (C). Exercise Physiology-Biochemistry Laboratory. Eight SCI with thoracic lesion and eight C received injections of radioactive tracer to trapezius (TRAP), latissimus dorsi (LAT) and VL. Radioactive counts were recorded with a γ-camera for 10 min at rest and during ACE (60% VO(2max) for 20 min). Time-count curves were generated and the isotope clearance rate, expressed as half-life time (T(1/2),min), was calculated to assess muscle perfusion. Resting T(1/2) was lower in TRAP and LAT vs VL (Pmuscles in C. Arm-cranking increased (Pmuscles. Resting muscle perfusion was reduced in the paralyzed limbs of SCI compared with C, whereas there was no evidence of impaired microcirculation in upper and lower back muscles in SCI. Although ACE did not induce a hyperemic response in VL, it increased hyperemia in upper and lower posterior trunk muscles in SCI, suggesting beneficial effects of this type of activity on muscle microvasculature in this region.

  2. Effects of training distance on feed intake, growth, body condition and muscle glycogen content in young Standardbred horses fed a forage-only diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringmark, S; Revold, T; Jansson, A

    2017-10-01

    This study examined feed intake, growth, body condition, muscle glycogen content and nutrition-related health in 16 Standardbred horses fed a high-energy, forage-only diet ad libitum and allocated to either a control training programme (C-group) or a training programme with the high-intensity training distance reduced by 30% (R-group), from January as 2-year olds until December as 3-year olds. Feed intake was recorded on 10 occasions during 3 consecutive days. Body weight was recorded once in a week and height, body condition score (BCS), rump fat thickness and thickness of the m. longissimus dorsi were measured at 7±3-week intervals throughout the study. Muscle biopsies of the m. gluteus medius were taken in December as 2-year olds and in November as 3-year olds and analysed for glycogen content. Nutrition-related health disorders were noted when they occurred. Horses consumed 1.7% to 2.6% dry matter of BW, corresponding to 19 to 28 MJ metabolisable energy/100 kg BW. There were no differences between training groups in feed intake or any of the body measurements. The pooled weekly BCS was maintained between 4.8 and 5.1 (root mean square error (RMSE)=0.4). Muscle glycogen content was 587 and 623 mmol/kg dry weight (RMSE=68) as 2- and 3-year olds, respectively, and there was no difference between training groups. When managed under normal conditions, no nutrition-related health disorders or stereotypic behaviours were observed. It was concluded that the training programme did not affect feed intake, growth, BCS or muscle glycogen content. In addition, the forage-only diet did not appear to prohibit muscle glycogen storage, growth or maintenance of body condition, and seemed to promote good nutrition-related health.

  3. Chemical Changes of Short-Bodied Mackerel (Rastrelliger Brachysoma) Muscle at Chilled and Frozen Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emilia Azrina Mohd Bakri; Norizzah Abd Rashid; Seng, C.C.; Anida Yusoff; Fazilah Fazilin Juhari

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the chemical changes in short-bodied mackerel during chilled (4 degree Celcius) and frozen (-18 degree Celicus) storage for 18 days. The chemical changes were monitored at three days interval using Peroxide Value (PV), Thiobarbituric Acid (TBA), Total Volatile Base Nitrogen (TVBN) and Trimethylamine (TMA) tests. The PV of both chilled and frozen mackerel significantly increased (p<0.05) with storage time and the rate was significantly higher in chilled than frozen mackerel. Based on the results, the chilled and frozen mackerel started to become rancid at day 15 and day 18, respectively. Similar trend was observed for TBA value, where the malonaldehyde content significantly increased (p<0.05) for both chilled and frozen mackerel with storage time, and the rate of increase was higher in chilled than frozen mackerel. The TVBN and TMA of chilled mackerel increased significantly during storage time, but the values declined in frozen mackerel which might be due to inhibitory effects of freezing on the bacterial activities and hence avoid accumulation of TMA. Based on the chemical analyses, chilled mackerel spoiled rapidly compared to frozen mackerel. (author)

  4. The effects of exercise on muscle strength, body composition, physical functioning and the inflammatory profile of older adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, Keliane; Forti, Louis N; Beyer, Ingo; Bautmans, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    This systematic review reports the most recent literature regarding the effects of physical exercise on muscle strength, body composition, physical functioning and inflammation in older adults. All articles were assessed for methodological quality and where possible effect size was calculated. Thirty-four articles were included - four involving frail, 24 healthy and five older adults with a specific disease. One reported on both frail and nonfrail patients. Several types of exercise were used: resistance training, aerobic training, combined resistance training and aerobic training and others. In frail older persons, moderate-to-large beneficial exercise effects were noted on inflammation, muscle strength and physical functioning. In healthy older persons, effects of resistance training (most frequently investigated) on inflammation or muscle strength can be influenced by the exercise modalities (intensity and rest interval between sets). Muscle strength seemed the most frequently used outcome measure, with moderate-to-large effects obtained regardless the exercise intervention studied. Similar effects were found in patients with specific diseases. Exercise has moderate-to-large effects on muscle strength, body composition, physical functioning and inflammation in older adults. Future studies should focus on the influence of specific exercise modalities and target the frail population more.

  5. The effect of whole-body vibration and resistance training on muscle strength in a 13-year-old boy with m. biceps femoris lesion and posttraumatic calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantović Milan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common adaptation after major muscle lesion of m. biceps femoris that results in numerous health-sport related complications. Resistance strength training and whole-body vibration (WBV have been recognized as an effective tool, which attenuates atrophy and evokes hypertrophy. Case report. We presented a 13-year-old boy with a lesion of m. biceps femoris and posttraumatic calcification sustained in soccer training session 6 month prior participation in this study. The patient underwent training 3 times a week for 7 weeks, including unilateral progressive WBV + resistance training (RT of the right hamstrings muscle group using WBV and weights. Hamstrings muscle strength was measured using a Cybex isokinetic dynamometer. At the end of week 4, the patient peak torque value of the involved leg increased from 39% body weight (BW to 72% BW and bilateral deficit decreased from -64% to -35%; at the end of week 7 the participant’s peak torque value of the involved leg increased from 72% BW to 98% BW and bilateral deficit decreased from -35% to -3%, respectively. Conclusion. Unilateral WBV + RT protocol evokes strength increase in the hamstrings muscle group. This case study suggests that adding WBV, as well as the RT program have to be considered in the total management of strength disbalance. Further studies are needed to verify the efficiency of WBV + RT protocol over the classic physical therapy exercise program.

  6. The effects of 52 weeks of soccer or resistance training on body composition and muscle function in +65-year-old healthy males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard Andersen, Thomas; Schmidt, Jakob Friis; Pedersen, Mogens Theisen

    2016-01-01

    expression decreased by 38% (pprotein enzyme expression and increases lean body mass in elderly men....... compared to before the intervention period, and unchanged in RG and CG. In RG, upper body lean mass was 3 and 2% higher (p....8±0.3 times weekly on average during the intervention period. Muscle function and body composition were determined before and after 16 and 52 weeks of the intervention period. In SG, BMI was reduced by 1.5% and 3.0% (p

  7. The total body mass of fatty acid ethyl esters in skeletal muscles following ethanol exposure greatly exceeds that found in the liver and the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Raneem O; Laposata, Michael; Rajendram, Rajkumar; Cluette-Brown, Joanne E; Preedy, Victor R

    2006-01-01

    Skeletal muscle appears to be susceptible to chronic and acute excess alcohol intake, giving rise to alcoholic myopathy, a common disease among alcoholics. Fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE), non-oxidative metabolites of ethanol, have been shown to be toxic to cells in vitro and in vivo. We hypothesized that accumulation of FAEE in skeletal muscle could contribute to the development of alcoholic myopathy. Male wistar rats were treated either with 75 mmol ethanol/kg body weight or saline, in the fed state or starved for 1 or 2 days before administration. Rats were thus divided into the following groups: fed-saline (n = 8); fed-ethanol (n = 8); starved 1 day, saline (n = 8); starved 1 day, ethanol (n = 9); starved 2 days, saline (n = 7); and starved 2 days, ethanol (n = 8). At the end of the incubation, skeletal muscles (abdominal and gastrocnemius), liver, and heart were isolated and processed for FAEE isolation and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Total mass of FAEE in the muscles was much greater than that found in the liver and the heart. In general, the animals that were fasted for 1 day and received ethanol had the highest FAEE levels among the three groups of animals. The major ethyl ester species in all cases were ethyl 16:0, ethyl 18:0, ethyl 18:1 n-9, and ethyl 18:2 n-6. Ethyl 20:4 n-6 and ethyl 22:6 n-3 were also present, except in the fasted 1-day group, where ethyl 22:6 disappeared, though it reappeared in the fasted 2-day group. These findings demonstrate that skeletal muscles contain high levels of FAEE that are synthesized in the body after ethanol exposure. The concentration of FAEE in skeletal muscle in this study was very similar to FAEE concentration in the liver. This differs from previous studies suggesting a low concentration of skeletal muscle FAEE with ethanol exposure.

  8. Fatty Acid Transport Protein 1 (FATP1) Localizes in Mitochondria in Mouse Skeletal Muscle and Regulates Lipid and Ketone Body Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitart, Maria; Osorio-Conles, Óscar; Pentinat, Thais; Cebrià, Judith; García-Villoria, Judit; Sala, David; Sebastián, David; Zorzano, Antonio; Ribes, Antonia; Jiménez-Chillarón, Josep C.; García-Martínez, Celia; Gómez-Foix, Anna M.

    2014-01-01

    FATP1 mediates skeletal muscle cell fatty acid import, yet its intracellular localization and metabolic control role are not completely defined. Here, we examine FATP1 localization and metabolic effects of its overexpression in mouse skeletal muscle. The FATP1 protein was detected in mitochondrial and plasma membrane fractions, obtained by differential centrifugation, of mouse gastrocnemius muscle. FATP1 was most abundant in purified mitochondria, and in the outer membrane and soluble intermembrane, but not in the inner membrane plus matrix, enriched subfractions of purified mitochondria. Immunogold electron microscopy localized FATP1-GFP in mitochondria of transfected C2C12 myotubes. FATP1 was overexpressed in gastrocnemius mouse muscle, by adenovirus-mediated delivery of the gene into hindlimb muscles of newborn mice, fed after weaning a chow or high-fat diet. Compared to GFP delivery, FATP1 did not alter body weight, serum fed glucose, insulin and triglyceride levels, and whole-body glucose tolerance, in either diet. However, fatty acid levels were lower and β-hydroxybutyrate levels were higher in FATP1- than GFP-mice, irrespective of diet. Moreover, intramuscular triglyceride content was lower in FATP1- versus GFP-mice regardless of diet, and β-hydroxybutyrate content was unchanged in high-fat-fed mice. Electroporation-mediated FATP1 overexpression enhanced palmitate oxidation to CO2, but not to acid-soluble intermediate metabolites, while CO2 production from β-hydroxybutyrate was inhibited and that from glucose unchanged, in isolated mouse gastrocnemius strips. In summary, FATP1 was localized in mitochondria, in the outer membrane and intermembrane parts, of mouse skeletal muscle, what may be crucial for its metabolic effects. Overexpressed FATP1 enhanced disposal of both systemic fatty acids and intramuscular triglycerides. Consistently, it did not contribute to the high-fat diet-induced metabolic dysregulation. However, FATP1 lead to hyperketonemia

  9. Transcription profiling using RNA-Seq demonstrates expression differences in the body walls of juvenile albino and normal sea cucumbers Apostichopus japonicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Deyou; Yang, Hongsheng; Sun, Lina; Chen, Muyan

    2014-01-01

    Sea cucumbers Apostichopus japonicus are one of the most important aquaculture species in China. Their normal body color is black to fit their surroundings. Wild albinos are rare and hard to breed. To understand the differences between albino and normal (control) sea cucumbers at the transcriptional level, we sequenced the transcriptomes in their body-wall tissues using RNA-Seq high-throughput sequencing. Approximately 4.876 million (M) and 4.884 M 200-nucleotide-long cDNA reads were produced in the cDNA libraries derived from the body walls of albino and control samples, respectively. A total of 9 561 (46.89%) putative genes were identified from among the RNA-Seq reads in both libraries. After filtering, 837 significantly differentially regulated genes were identified in the albino library compared with in the control library, and 3.6% of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to have changed those more than five-fold. The expression levels of 10 DEGs were checked by real-time PCR and the results were in full accord with the RNA-Seq expression trends, although the amplitude of the differences in expression levels was lower in all cases. A series of pathways were significantly enriched for the DEGs. These pathways were closely related to phagocytosis, the complement and coagulation cascades, apoptosis-related diseases, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, and cell adhesion. The differences in gene expression and enriched pathways between the albino and control sea cucumbers offer control targets for cultivating excellent albino A. japonicus strains in the future.

  10. Changes in Skeletal Muscle and Body Weight on Sleeping Beauty Transposon-Mediated Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Pig mIGF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo; Wang, Wei; Wu, Han; Chen, Cai; Shen, Dan; Wang, Saisai; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Li; Chan, Shuheng; Song, Chengyi

    2018-02-22

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) is an important growth factor in mammals, but the functions of the local muscle-specific isoform of insulin-like growth factor 1 (mIGF-1) to skeletal muscle development have rarely been reported. To determine the effect of pig mIGF-1 on body development and muscle deposition in vivo and to investigate the molecular mechanisms, the transgenic mouse model was generated which can also provide experimental data for making transgenic pigs with pig endogenous IGF1 gene. We constructed a skeletal muscle-specific expression vector using 5'- and 3'-regulatory regions of porcine skeletal α-actin gene. The expression cassette was flanked with Sleeping Beauty transposon (SB)-inverted terminal repeats. The recombinant vector could strongly drive enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) reporter gene expression specifically in mouse myoblast cells and porcine fetal fibroblast cells, but not in porcine kidney cells. The EGFP level driven by α-actin regulators was significantly stronger than that driven by cytomegalovirus promoters. These results indicated that the cloned α-actin regulators could effectively drive specific expression of foreign genes in myoblasts, and the skeletal muscle-specific expression vector mediated with SB transposon was successfully constructed. To validate the effect of pig mIGF-1 on skeletal muscle growth, transgenic mice were generated by pronuclear microinjection of SB-mediated mIGF-1 skeletal expression vector and SB transposase-expressing plasmid. The transgene-positive rates of founder mice and the next-generation F1 mice were 30% (54/180) and 90.1% (64/71), respectively. The mIGF-1 gene could be expressed in skeletal muscle specifically. The levels of mRNA and protein in transgenic mice were 15 and 3.5 times higher, respectively, than in wild-type mice. The body weights of F1 transgenic mice were significantly heavier than wild-type mice from the age of 8 weeks onwards. The paraffin-embedded sections of

  11. Activity of the body wall musculature of the African Clawed Toad, Xenopus laevis (Daudin), during diving and respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongh, de H.J.

    1972-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Mechanisms for regulating the specific weight of the body are well known in fishes. In other aquatic vertebrates the lungs might have a function similar to that of the swimbladder or the lungs in fishes. In anuran tadpoles the lungs may serve as hydrostatic balancers, but this has not

  12. the sternalis muscle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-08-17

    Aug 17, 2009 ... scan of the chest wall was performed to gain clarity of the mam- mographic findings (Figs 1a, 1b and 2). The CT scan demonstrated a flattened band of muscle density lying anterior to the medial margin of the pectoralis muscle. This structure was separated from the underlying pectoralis muscle by a thin ...

  13. Pelvic floor muscle strength evaluation in different body positions in nulliparous healthy women and its correlation with sexual activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Orsi Gameiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this study was to assess pelvic floor muscle (PFM strength in different body positions in nulliparous healthy women and its correlation with sexual activity. Materials and Methods Fifty healthy nulliparous women with mean age of 23 years were prospectively studied. Subjective evaluation of PFM was assessed by transvaginal digital palpation (TDP of anterior and posterior areas regarding the vaginal introitus. A perineometer with inflatable vaginal probe was used to assess the PFM strength in four different positions: supine with extended lower limbs (P1; bent-knee supine (P2; sitting (P3; standing (P4. Results Physical activity, 3 times per week, was reported by 58% of volunteers. Sexual activity was observed in 80% of women and 82% of them presented orgasm. The average body mass index (BMI was 21.76 kg/m2, considered as normal according World Health Organization (WHO. We observed that 68% of volunteers were conscious about the PFM contraction. TDP showed concordance of 76% when anterior and posterior areas were compared (p = 0.00014. There was not correlation between PFM strength and orgasm in subjective evaluation. The PFM strength was significantly higher in standing position when compared with the other positions (p < 0.000. No statistical difference was observed between orgasm and PFM strength when objective evaluations were performed. Conclusions There was concordance between anterior and posterior areas in 76% of cases when subjective PFM strength was assessed. In objective evaluation, higher PFM strength was observed when volunteers were standing. No statistical correlation was observed between PFM strength and orgasm in nulliparous healthy women.

  14. Whole-Body and Local Muscle Vibration Immediately Improve Quadriceps Function in Individuals With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamukoff, Derek N; Pietrosimone, Brian; Lewek, Michael D; Ryan, Eric D; Weinhold, Paul S; Lee, Dustin R; Blackburn, J Troy

    2016-07-01

    To determine the immediate effects of a single session of whole-body vibration (WBV) and local muscle vibration (LMV) on quadriceps function in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Singe-blind, randomized crossover trial. Research laboratory. Population-based sample of individuals with ACLR (N=20; mean age ± SD, 21.1±1.2y; mean mass ± SD, 68.3±14.9kg; mean time ± SD since ACLR, 50.7±21.3mo; 14 women; 16 patellar tendon autografts, 3 hamstring autografts, 1 allograft). Participants performed isometric squats while being exposed to WBV, LMV, or no vibration (control). Interventions were delivered in a randomized order during separate visits separated by 1 week. Quadriceps active motor threshold (AMT), motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) amplitude, peak torque (PT), rate of torque development (RTD), electromyographic amplitude, and central activation ratio (CAR) were assessed before and immediately after a WBV, LMV, or control intervention. There was an increase in CAR (+4.9%, P=.001) and electromyographic amplitude (+16.2%, P=.002), and a reduction in AMT (-3.1%, Pquadriceps function and could be useful modalities for restoring quadriceps strength in individuals with knee pathologies. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of floorball training on blood lipids, body composition, muscle strength, and functional capacity of elderly men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorup, J; Pedersen, M T; Melcher, P S; Dreier, R; Bangsbo, J

    2017-11-01

    Floorball training consists of intense repeated exercise and may offer a motivating and social stimulating team activity in elderly individuals. However, the effect of floorball training in elderly adults on physiological adaptations important for health is not known. Thus, this study examined the effect of floorball training on blood lipids, muscle strength, body composition, and functional capacity of men aged 65-76 years. Thirty-nine recreational active men were randomized into a floorball group (FG; n = 22) or petanque group (PG; n = 17), in which training was performed 1 h twice a week for 12 weeks. In FG and PG, average heart rate (HR) during training was 80% and 57%, respectively, of maximal HR. In FG, plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglycerides were 11% and 8% lower (P functional capacity tests were better (P training period. No changes were observed in PG. In conclusion, 12 weeks of floorball training resulted in a number of favorable effects important for health and functional capacity, suggesting that floorball training can be used as a health-promoting activity in elderly men. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The Caenorhabditis elegans paxillin orthologue, PXL-1, is required for pharyngeal muscle contraction and for viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Adam; Qadota, Hiroshi; Benian, Guy M; Vogl, A Wayne; Moerman, Donald G

    2011-07-15

    We have identified the gene C28H8.6 (pxl-1) as the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologue of vertebrate paxillin. PXL-1 contains the four C-terminal LIM domains conserved in paxillin across all species and three of the five LD motifs found in the N-terminal half of most paxillins. In body wall muscle, PXL-1 antibodies and a full-length green fluorescent protein translational fusion localize to adhesion sites in the sarcomere, the functional repeat unit in muscle responsible for contraction. PXL-1 also localizes to ring-shaped structures near the sarcolemma in pharyngeal muscle corresponding to podosome-like sites of actin attachment. Our analysis of a loss-of-function allele of pxl-1, ok1483, shows that loss of paxillin leads to early larval arrested animals with paralyzed pharyngeal muscles and eventual lethality, presumably due to an inability to feed. We rescued the mutant phenotype by expressing paxillin solely in the pharynx and found that these animals survived and are essentially wild type in movement and body wall muscle structure. This indicates a differential requirement for paxillin in these two types of muscle. In pharyngeal muscle it is essential for contraction, whereas in body wall muscle it is dispensable for filament assembly, sarcomere stability, and ultimately movement.

  17. The Caenorhabditis elegans paxillin orthologue, PXL-1, is required for pharyngeal muscle contraction and for viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Adam; Qadota, Hiroshi; Benian, Guy M.; Vogl, A. Wayne; Moerman, Donald G.

    2011-01-01

    We have identified the gene C28H8.6 (pxl-1) as the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologue of vertebrate paxillin. PXL-1 contains the four C-terminal LIM domains conserved in paxillin across all species and three of the five LD motifs found in the N-terminal half of most paxillins. In body wall muscle, PXL-1 antibodies and a full-length green fluorescent protein translational fusion localize to adhesion sites in the sarcomere, the functional repeat unit in muscle responsible for contraction. PXL-1 also localizes to ring-shaped structures near the sarcolemma in pharyngeal muscle corresponding to podosome-like sites of actin attachment. Our analysis of a loss-of-function allele of pxl-1, ok1483, shows that loss of paxillin leads to early larval arrested animals with paralyzed pharyngeal muscles and eventual lethality, presumably due to an inability to feed. We rescued the mutant phenotype by expressing paxillin solely in the pharynx and found that these animals survived and are essentially wild type in movement and body wall muscle structure. This indicates a differential requirement for paxillin in these two types of muscle. In pharyngeal muscle it is essential for contraction, whereas in body wall muscle it is dispensable for filament assembly, sarcomere stability, and ultimately movement. PMID:21633109

  18. Growth hormone signaling in muscle and adipose tissue of obese human subjects: associations with measures of body composition and interaction with resveratrol treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clasen, Berthil F; Poulsen, Morten M; Escande, Carlos; Pedersen, Steen B; Møller, Niels; Chini, Eduardo N; Jessen, Niels; Jørgensen, Jens O L

    2014-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is reduced in obesity, despite normal serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) levels, but the association between obesity and the GH signaling is unknown. Furthermore, SIRT1, an nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent protein deacetylase, reduces hepatic IGF-1 production in mice via blunting of GH-induced STAT5 signaling. To study GH signaling in muscle and fat in obese subjects and the interaction with concomitant administration of the putative SIRT1 activator resveratrol, and to assess the effects of inhibiting or knocking down SIRT1 on GH regulated genes in vitro. Twenty-four obese males were examined in a randomized, double blinded, parallel-group study with resveratrol or placebo treatment for 5 weeks followed by a GH bolus. Muscle and fat biopsies were collected before and after GH. Body composition was assessed by DEXA and MRI. (1) Effect of body composition and age on GH-stimulated STAT5b phosphorylation and IGF-1, SOCS2, and CISH mRNA in muscle and fat. (2) The impact of resveratrol treatment on GH activity. (3) Impact of inhibiting or knocking down SIRT1 on effects of GH in vitro. Significant GH-induced STAT5b phosphorylation in muscle and fat in obese subjects was recorded together with increased CISH and SOCS2 mRNA. GH-induced STAT5b phosphorylation in muscle correlated positively with age [r = 0.53, p body composition. Resveratrol administration had no impact on body composition, serum IGF-1, or GH signaling in vivo, and SIRT1 knock down or inhibition did not affect GH signaling in vitro. (1) GH induced STAT5b phosphorylation is detectable in muscle and fat in adult males with simple obesity, but is not determined by body composition. (2) Resveratrol supplementation does not impact circulating IGF-1 levels or GH signaling in human muscle and fat. (3) Our data speak against a major impact of SIRT1on GH action in human subjects.

  19. Effect of standing posture during whole body vibration training on muscle morphology and function in older adults: A randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greene David

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole body vibration (WBV is a novel modality of exercise shown to improve musculoskeletal function. This study aims to examine the effects of standing posture during low magnitude WBV training on muscle function and muscle morphology in older adults. Methods Nineteen men and women (50-80 years were recruited to a three month randomised controlled trial and allocated to one of three groups: WBV with flexed knees (FK, WBV with locked knees (LK, or sham WBV with flexed knees (CON. Exposure was intermittent (1 min WBV:1 min rest for 20 min, three times per week for 13 weeks. Measurements were taken at baseline and at three months. Primary outcomes included upper and lower body muscle function (strength, power and velocity. Secondary outcomes were muscle morphology, balance, habitual and maximal gait velocity, stair climb power, and chair stand performance. Results Sixteen subjects completed the study. Relative (% upper body contraction velocity improved significantly after WBV with FK compared to LK (FK 16.0%, LK -7.6%, CON 4.7, p = 0.01. Relative upper body strength (LK 15.1%, p = 0.02; FK 12.1%, p = 0.04; CON 4.7% increased significantly following WBV compared to control. Absolute (p = 0.05 and relative (p = 0.03 lower leg strength significantly improved with both standing postures (LK 14.4%; FK 10.7%; CON 1.3%. Only the LK group differed significantly from CON in relative leg strength gains (p = 0.02. Potentially clinically meaningful but statistically non-significant improvements in lower leg muscle cross-sectional area (LK 3.7 cm2, FK 2.4 cm2, CON 2.2 cm2 p = 0.13 were observed after WBV with LK compared to the other groups. No significant effects of WBV on any functional performance tests were observed. Conclusions Our results suggest that WBV may improve muscle strength and contraction velocity in some muscle groups in older adults. However, hypothesised differential adaptation to standing posture (FK > LK was observed

  20. Body composition, muscle strength and quality of active elderly women according to the distance covered in the 6-minute walk test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla H. C. Vilaca

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Changes arising from the aging process, particularly changes in body composition, contribute to the functional decline of the elderly. OBJECTIVE: To compare the body composition and muscle strength, mobility and quality in active elderly women according to the distance walked during the 6-minute walk test (6MWT. METHOD: The study included 77 active elderly women aged 65 to 80 years, who were divided into tertiles (A, B and C according to the distance covered in the 6MWT. We performed anthropometric and clinical evaluations. Body composition was determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA. Handgrip strength (HGS was measured with a portable dynamometer (Saehan, and knee extension strength (KES was measured with the one repetition maximum test (1-RM. Functional mobility was assessed by the Timed Up and Go (TUG test, and body balance was assessed by the Berg Balance Scale (BBS. Muscle quality was defined by the ratio between muscle strength (kgf and muscle mass (kg. RESULTS: The group that walked the shortest distance in the 6MWT had a higher BMI (A=30.8±7.0, B=27.2±4.2 and C=25.9±3.5 kg/m2, greater amount of fat mass (A=31.3±10.7, B=25.9±6.7 and C=23.81±6.46 kg lower HGS (A=21.8±5.1, B=22.1±3.5 and C=25.5±5.1 kgf, lower knee extension strength (A=30.6±10.9, B=40.4±12.5 and C=47.2±10.1 kgf, lower arm muscle quality (A=10.1±3.7, B=11.6±2 and C=12.7±2.2 kg and lower leg muscle quality (A=1.78±1, B=2.84±0.98 and C=3.31±0.77 kg. There was no significant difference between muscle mass (p=0.25 and lean mass (p=0.26. CONCLUSION: Body fat has a negative influence on functional performance, even among active elderly women.

  1. Body mass index from age 15 years onwards and muscle mass, strength, and quality in early old age: findings from the MRC National Survey of Health and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Rachel; Hardy, Rebecca; Bann, David; Aihie Sayer, Avan; Ward, Kate A; Adams, Judith E; Kuh, Diana

    2014-10-01

    As more people live more of their lives obese, it is unclear what impact this will have on muscle mass, strength, and quality. We aimed to examine the associations of body mass index (BMI) from age 15 years onwards with low muscle mass, strength, and quality in early old age. A total of 1,511 men and women from a British birth cohort study with BMI measured at 15, 20, 26, 36, 43, 53, and 60-64 years and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans at 60-64 years were included. Four binary outcomes identified those in the bottom sex-specific 20% of (a) appendicular lean mass (ALM) index (kilogram per square meter), (b) ALM residuals (derived from sex-specific models in which ALM (kilogram) = β0 + β1 height [meter] + β2 fat mass [kilogram]), (c) grip strength (kilogram), (d) muscle quality (grip strength [kilogram]/arm lean mass [kilogram]). Associations of BMI with each outcome were tested. Higher BMI from age 15 years was associated with lower odds of low ALM but higher odds of low muscle quality (per 1 SD increase in BMI at 36 years, odds ratio of low ALM residuals = 0.50 [95% CI: 0.43, 0.59], and muscle quality = 1.50 [1.29, 1.75]). Greater gains in BMI were associated with lower odds of low ALM index but higher odds of low muscle quality. BMI was not associated with grip strength. Given increases in the global prevalence of obesity, cross-cohort comparisons of sarcopenia need to consider our findings that greater gains in BMI are associated with higher muscle mass but not with grip strength and therefore with lower muscle quality. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America.

  2. The Effect of Soursop (Announa Muricata L. Leaves Powder on Diameter of Muscle Fiber, Lipid Cell, Body Weight Gain and Carcass Percentage of Tegal Duck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elly Tugiyanti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the supplementation of soursop leaves powder (Annona muricata L. on body weight gain and carcass percentage of male Tegal duck. Research was conducted from 29 November 2015 to 3 January 2016 in duck cage in Sokaraja Kulon, Purwokerto. One hundred male Tegal duck were fed basal feed consisted of 30% corn, 7% soy bean meal, 6,1% vegetable oil, 17% poultry meat meal, 38,2% ricebran, 0,1% L-lysin HCL, 0,3% DL-methionin, 0,2% topmix, 0,1% NaCl, and 1% CaCO3. Experimental research used completely randomized design with treatments composed of basal feed plus 0, 5, 10, and 15% soursop leaves meal, each with 5 replicates. The observed variables were diameter of muscle fiber, lipid cell, body weight gain, and carcass percentage. The obtained data were subject to analysis of variance followed by orthogonal polynomial test. Result showed that treatments affected non significantly (P>0.05 to the diameter of chest muscle fiber, carcass percentage and carcass but significantly affected (P<0,05 body weight gain with equation Y  =  427,74  - 67,10 X  + 2,27 X2..  Conclusively, supplementation of soursop leaves meal (Annona muricata L. in feed has not been able to increase the muscle fiber diameter of intermuscular lipid cell, carcass percentage and carcass parts. Excessive supplement even lowers the body weight gain of male Tegal duck.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the measurement of whole body muscle mass: A comparison of interval gap methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellmanns, K.; McBean, K.; Thoirs, K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is commonly used in body composition research to measure whole body skeletal muscle mass (SM). MRI calculation methods of SM can vary by analysing the images at different slice intervals (or interval gaps) along the length of the body. This study compared SM measurements made from MRI images of apparently healthy individuals using different interval gap methods to determine the error associated with each technique. It was anticipated that the results would inform researchers of optimum interval gap measurements to detect a predetermined minimum change in SM. Methods: A method comparison study was used to compare eight interval gap methods (interval gaps of 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 100, 120 and 140 mm) against a reference 10 mm interval gap method for measuring SM from twenty MRI image sets acquired from apparently healthy participants. Pearson product-moment correlation analysis was used to determine the association between methods. Total error was calculated as the sum of the bias (systematic error) and the random error (limits of agreement) of the mean differences. Percentage error was used to demonstrate proportional error. Results: Pearson product-moment correlation analysis between the reference method and all interval gap methods demonstrated strong and significant associations (r > 0.99, p < 0.0001). The 40 mm interval gap method was comparable with the 10 mm interval reference method and had a low error (total error 0.95 kg, −3.4%). Analysis methods using wider interval gap techniques demonstrated larger errors than reported for dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), a technique which is more available, less expensive, and less time consuming than MRI analysis of SM. Conclusions: Researchers using MRI to measure SM can be confident in using a 40 mm interval gap technique when analysing the images to detect minimum changes less than 1 kg. The use of wider intervals will introduce error that is no better

  4. Profiling and comparison of color body wall transcriptome of normal juvenile sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus) and those produced by crossing albino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Deyou; Yang, Hongsheng; Sun, Lina

    2014-12-01

    Sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus) is one of the most important aquaculture animals in China. Usually its normal body color is black that fits its living environment. The juvenile individuals obtained by crossing albino sea cucumber segregated in body color. To document the transcriptome difference between albino associating sea cucumber and the control, we sequenced their transcriptomes with RNA-seq. Approximately, 4.790 million (M) and 4.884 M reads, 200 nt in length, were generated from the body wall of albino associating sea cucumber and the control, respectively, from them, 9550 (46.81%) putative genes were identified. In total, 583 genes were found to express differentially between albino associating sea cucumber and the control. Of these differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 4.8% changed more than five-folds. The expression levels of eight DEGs were confirmed with real-time PCR. The changing trend of these DEGs detected with real-time PCR agreed well with that detected with RNA-seq, although the change degree of some DEGs was different. Four significantly enriched pathways were identified for DEGs, which included phagocytosis, Staphylococcus aureus infection, ECM-receptor interaction and focal adhesion. These pathways were helpful for understanding the physiological difference between albino associating sea cucumber and the control.

  5. Lateral abdominal muscle size at rest and during abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre in healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linek, Pawel; Saulicz, Edward; Wolny, Tomasz; Myśliwiec, Andrzej; Kokosz, Mirosław

    2015-02-01

    Lateral abdominal wall muscles in children and adolescents have not been characterised to date. In the present report, we examined the reliability of the ultrasound measurement and thickness of the oblique external muscle (OE), oblique internal muscle (OI) and transverse abdominal muscle (TrA) at rest and during abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre (ADIM) on both sides of the body in healthy adolescents. We also determined possible differences between boys and girls and defined any factors-such as body mass, height and BMI-that may affect the thickness of the abdominal muscles. B-mode ultrasound was used to assess OE, OI and TrA on both sides of the body in the supine position. Ultrasound measurements at rest and during ADIM were reliable in this age group (ICC3,3 > 0.92). OI was always the thickest and TrA the thinnest muscle on both sides of the body. In this group, an identical pattern of the contribution of the individual muscles to the structure of the lateral abdominal wall (OI > OE > TrA) was observed. At rest and during ADIM, no statistically significant side-to-side differences were demonstrated in either gender. The body mass constitutes between 30% and <50% of the thickness differences in all muscles under examination at rest and during ADIM. The structure of lateral abdominal wall in adolescents is similar to that of adults. During ADIM, the abdominal muscles in adolescents react similarly to those in adults. This study provided extensive information regarding the structure of the lateral abdominal wall in healthy adolescents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Altered skeletal muscle fiber composition and size precede whole-body insulin resistance in young men with low birth weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christine B; Storgaard, Heidi; Madsbad, Sten

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Low birth weight (LBW), a surrogate marker of an adverse fetal milieu, is linked to muscle insulin resistance, impaired insulin-stimulated glycolysis, and future risk of type 2 diabetes. Skeletal muscle mass, fiber composition, and capillary density are important determinants of muscle f...... was not significantly different between groups. CONCLUSION: Alterations in fiber composition and size may contribute to development of type 2 diabetes in individuals with LBW....

  7. Effects of Dietary Garlic Extracts on Whole Body Amino Acid and Fatty Acid Composition, Muscle Free Amino Acid Profiles and Blood Plasma Changes in Juvenile Sterlet Sturgeon,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoon Lee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of studies were carried out to investigate the supplemental effects of dietary garlic extracts (GE on whole body amino acids, whole body and muscle free amino acids, fatty acid composition and blood plasma changes in 6 month old juvenile sterlet sturgeon (Acipenser ruthenus. In the first experiment, fish with an average body weight of 59.6 g were randomly allotted to each of 10 tanks (two groups of five replicates, 20 fish/tank and fed diets with (0.5% or without (control GE respectively, at the level of 2% of fish body weight per day for 5 wks. Whole body amino acid composition between the GE and control groups were not different (p>0.05. Among free amino acids in muscle, L-glutamic acid, L-alanine, L-valine, L-leucine and L-phenylalanine were significantly (p0.05 were noticed at 12 h (74.6 vs 73.0. Plasma insulin concentrations (μIU/ml between the two groups were significantly (p<0.05 different at 1 (10.56 vs 5.06 and 24 h (32.56 vs 2.96 after feeding. The present results suggested that dietary garlic extracts could increase dietary glucose utilization through the insulin secretion, which result in improved fish body quality and feed utilization by juvenile sterlet sturgeon.

  8. Glycolytic fast-twitch muscle fiber restoration counters adverse age-related changes in body composition and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaki, Yuichi; Ouchi, Noriyuki; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Bernardo, Barbara L; Lebrasseur, Nathan K; Walsh, Kenneth

    2014-02-01

    Aging is associated with the development of insulin resistance, increased adiposity, and accumulation of ectopic lipid deposits in tissues and organs. Starting in mid-life there is a progressive decline in lean muscle mass associated with the preferential loss of glycolytic, fast-twitch myofibers. However, it is not known to what extent muscle loss and metabolic dysfunction are causally related or whether they are independent epiphenomena of the aging process. Here, we utilized a skeletal-muscle-specific, conditional transgenic mouse expressing a constitutively active form of Akt1 to examine the consequences of glycolytic, fast-twitch muscle growth in young vs. middle-aged animals fed standard low-fat chow diets. Activation of the Akt1 transgene led to selective skeletal muscle hypertrophy, reversing the loss of lean muscle mass observed upon aging. The Akt1-mediated increase in muscle mass led to reductions in fat mass and hepatic steatosis in older animals, and corrected age-associated impairments in glucose metabolism. These results indicate that the loss of lean muscle mass is a significant contributor to the development of age-related metabolic dysfunction and that interventions that preserve or restore fast/glycolytic muscle may delay the onset of metabolic disease. © 2013 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Homogenized rigid body and spring-mass (HRBSM) model for the pushover analysis of out-of-plane loaded unreinforced and FRP reinforced walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolesi, Elisa; Milani, Gabriele

    2017-07-01

    The present paper is devoted to the discussion of a series of unreinforced and FRP retrofitted panels analyzed adopting the Rigid Body and Spring-Mass (HRBSM) model developed by the authors. To this scope, a total of four out of plane loaded masonry walls tested up to failure are considered. At a structural level, the non-linear analyses are conducted replacing the homogenized orthotropic continuum with a rigid element and non-linear spring assemblage by means of which out of plane mechanisms are allowed. FRP retrofitting is modeled adopting two noded truss elements whose mechanical properties are selected in order to describe possible debonding phenomenon or tensile rupture of the strengthening. The outcome provided numerically are compared to the experimental results showing a satisfactory agreement in terms of global pressure-deflection curves and failure mechanisms.

  10. Study of growth in rural school children from Buenos Aires, Argentina using upper arm muscle area by height and other anthropometric dimensions of body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzan, A; Guimarey, L; Frisancho, A R

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective was to compare growth and body composition in an infantile rural population by means of the upper arm muscle area by height and other antropometric measurements. Research was carried out by way of a cross sectional study, including 80% (321 6-13 year olds) of the schoolchildren living in General Lavalle, a rural community of about 3000 inhabitants. The methods and procedures included the evaluation of mother's educational levels and anthropometric measurements. Height (H), weight, mid upper arm circumference, and triceps skinfold (TS) were measured. The body mass index (BMI), the upper arm muscle area (UAMA), the upper arm fat area (UAFA) and the upper arm muscle area by height (UAMAH) were calculated. Variables were grouped by gender and age and transformed into z-scores, using the US anthropometric standards as reference. The results showed that: (1) the mother educational status was, in relation to z-scores, as in an urban population, and (2) the z-scores for BMI, UAFA and TS were above the reference, while the ones for H, UAMA and UAMAH were below the reference. The differences between z-scores in relation to mother's educational levels were statistically significant (p children of General Lavalle tend to be fatty and overweight, while their muscle mass and H are proportionally low, but with values within the reference. Thus, low muscle mass and H are, in general terms, indicative of low protein reserves, the systematically low-anthropometry found for UAMAH suggests that this index should be used in conjunction with other indexes (e.g. BMI, UAFA) to obtain a more complete assessment of body composition and nutritional status.

  11. Comparisons of low-intensity versus moderate-intensity combined aerobic and resistance training on body composition, muscle strength, and functional performance in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiotsu, Yoko; Yanagita, Masahiko

    2018-02-05

    This study aimed to examine the effects of exercise order of combined aerobic and low- or moderate-intensity resistance training into the same session on body composition, functional performance, and muscle strength in healthy older women. Furthermore, this study compared the effects of different (low- vs moderate-) intensity combined training. A total of 60 healthy older women (age 61-81 y) were randomly assigned to five groups that performed aerobic exercise before low-intensity resistance training (AR-L, n = 12) or after resistance training (RA-L, n = 12), performed aerobic exercise before moderate-intensity resistance training (AR-M, n = 12) or after resistance training (RA-M, n = 12), or nonintervention control conditions (CON, n = 12). Body composition, functional performance, and muscle strength were evaluated before and after the 10-week training. No effects of exercise order of combined aerobic and low- or moderate-intensity resistance training (AR-L vs RA-L, AR-M vs RA-M) were observed in body composition, functional performance, or muscle strength, whereas the effects of training intensity of combined training (AR-L vs AR-M, RA-L vs RA-M) were observed on functional performance. All combined trainings significantly increased muscle strength and gait ability (P Functional reach test significantly increased in the AR-M and RA-M groups (P training increases muscle strength and improves gait ability, regardless of the exercise order. Also, greater improvement in dynamic balance capacity, a risk factor associated with falling, is observed in moderate-intensity combined training.

  12. The effects of elastic band resistance training combined with blood flow restriction on strength, total bone-free lean body mass and muscle thickness in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiebaud, Robert S; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Fahs, Christopher A; Rossow, Lindy M; Kim, Daeyeol; Abe, Takashi; Anderson, Mark A; Young, Kaelin C; Bemben, Debra A; Bemben, Michael G

    2013-09-01

    Elastic band (EB) training is a common form of resistance training used by the elderly, individuals with joint problems or those recovering from injury. EB training performed at low intensities by these populations may have little effect on muscle hypertrophy. However, when combined with blood flow restriction (BFR), low-intensity EB resistance training may result in muscle hypertrophy. Postmenopausal women (61 ± 5 years) were assigned to a moderate-to-high-intensity EB group (MH, n = 8) or a low-intensity EB group combined with BFR (LI-BFR, n = 6). Each group performed seated chest press, seated row and seated shoulder press with EB three times a week for eight weeks. EB colours progressed in each group by having participants maintain a rating of 7-9 on the OMNI Resistance for active muscle (OMNI-RES AM) scale (0-10) throughout training. In the LI-BFR group, BFR pressure progressed during the first 4 weeks of training (80-120 mmHg), after which EB colours were progressed. 1-repetition maximum increased for chest press (P = 0.01), shoulder press (P = 0.02) and seated row (P = 0.01), but no differences were found between groups. Only pectoralis major muscle thickness in the upper body increased (P = 0.04). A trend was found for an increase in total bone-free lean body mass (P = 0.055). The main findings of this study were that moderate-to-high-intensity EB training and low-intensity EB training with BFR resulted in similar increases in strength, total bone-free lean body mass and muscle thickness. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  13. Immunocytochemical electron microscopic study and western blot analysis of paramyosin in different invertebrate muscle cell types of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the earthworm Eisenia foetida, and the snail Helix aspersa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royuela, M; García-Anchuelo, R; Arenas, M I; Cervera, M; Fraile, B; Paniagua, R

    1996-04-01

    The presence and distribution pattern of paramyosin have been examined in different invertebrate muscle cell types by means of Western blot analysis and electron microscopy immunogold labelling. The muscles studied were: transversely striated muscle with continuous Z lines (flight muscle from Drosophila melanogaster), transversely striated muscle with discontinuous Z lines (heart muscle from the snail Helix aspersa), obliquely striated body wall muscle from the earthworm Eisenia foetida, and smooth muscles (retractor muscle from the snail and pseudoheart outer muscular layer from the earthworm). Paramyosin-like immunoreactivity was localized in thick filaments of all muscles studied. Immunogold particle density was similar along the whole thick filament length in insect flight muscle but it predominated in filament tips of fusiform thick filaments in both snail heart and earthworm body wall musculature when these filaments were observed in longitudinal sections. In obliquely sectioned thick filaments, immunolabelling was more abundant at the sites where filaments disappeared from the section. These results agree with the notion that paramyosin extended along the whole filament length, but that it can only be immunolabelled when it is not covered by myosin. In all muscles examined, immunolabelling density was lower in cross-sectioned myofilaments than in longitudinally sectioned myofilaments. This suggests that paramyosin does not form a continuous filament. The results of a semiquantitative analysis of paramyosin-like immunoreactivity indicated that it was more abundant in striated than in smooth muscles, and that, within striated muscles, transversely striated muscles contain more paramyosin than obliquely striated muscles.

  14. PPAR-α agonism improves whole body and muscle mitochondrial fat oxidation, but does not alter intracellular fat concentrations in burn trauma children in a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dohm G Lynis

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin resistance is often associated with increased levels of intracellular triglycerides, diacylglycerol and decreased fat β-oxidation. It was unknown if this relationship was present in patients with acute insulin resistance induced by trauma. Methods A double blind placebo controlled trial was conducted in 18 children with severe burn injury. Metabolic studies to assess whole body palmitate oxidation and insulin sensitivity, muscle biopsies for mitochondrial palmitate oxidation, diacylglycerol, fatty acyl Co-A and fatty acyl carnitine concentrations, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy for muscle and liver triglycerides were compared before and after two weeks of placebo or PPAR-α agonist treatment. Results Insulin sensitivity and basal whole body palmitate oxidation as measured with an isotope tracer increased significantly (P = 0.003 and P = 0.004, respectively after PPAR-α agonist treatment compared to placebo. Mitochondrial palmitate oxidation rates in muscle samples increased significantly after PPAR-α treatment (P = 0.002. However, the concentrations of muscle triglyceride, diacylglycerol, fatty acyl CoA, fatty acyl carnitine, and liver triglycerides did not change with either treatment. PKC-θ activation during hyper-insulinemia decreased significantly following PPAR-α treatment. Conclusion PPAR-α agonist treatment increases palmitate oxidation and decreases PKC activity along with reduced insulin sensitivity in acute trauma, However, a direct link between these responses cannot be attributed to alterations in intracellular lipid concentrations.

  15. PPAR-alpha agonism improves whole body and muscle mitochondrial fat oxidation, but does not alter intracellular fat concentrations in burn trauma children in a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cree, Melanie G; Newcomer, Bradley R; Herndon, David N; Qian, Ting; Sun, Dayoung; Morio, Beatrice; Zwetsloot, Jennifer J; Dohm, G Lynis; Fram, Ricki Y; Mlcak, Ronald P; Aarsland, Asle; Wolfe, Robert R

    2007-04-23

    Insulin resistance is often associated with increased levels of intracellular triglycerides, diacylglycerol and decreased fat beta-oxidation. It was unknown if this relationship was present in patients with acute insulin resistance induced by trauma. A double blind placebo controlled trial was conducted in 18 children with severe burn injury. Metabolic studies to assess whole body palmitate oxidation and insulin sensitivity, muscle biopsies for mitochondrial palmitate oxidation, diacylglycerol, fatty acyl Co-A and fatty acyl carnitine concentrations, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy for muscle and liver triglycerides were compared before and after two weeks of placebo or PPAR-alpha agonist treatment. Insulin sensitivity and basal whole body palmitate oxidation as measured with an isotope tracer increased significantly (P = 0.003 and P = 0.004, respectively) after PPAR-alpha agonist treatment compared to placebo. Mitochondrial palmitate oxidation rates in muscle samples increased significantly after PPAR-alpha treatment (P = 0.002). However, the concentrations of muscle triglyceride, diacylglycerol, fatty acyl CoA, fatty acyl carnitine, and liver triglycerides did not change with either treatment. PKC-theta activation during hyper-insulinemia decreased significantly following PPAR-alpha treatment. PPAR-alpha agonist treatment increases palmitate oxidation and decreases PKC activity along with reduced insulin sensitivity in acute trauma, However, a direct link between these responses cannot be attributed to alterations in intracellular lipid concentrations.

  16. Body

    OpenAIRE

    Riggs, Christina

    2010-01-01

    The human body is both the physical form inhabited by an individual “self” and the medium through which an individual engages with society. Hence the body both shapes and is shaped by an individual’s social roles. In contrast to the cognate fields of archaeology, anthropology, and classics, there has been little explicit discussion or theorization of the body in Egyptology. Some recent works, discussed here, constitute an exception to this trend, but there is much more scope for exploring anc...

  17. The Effects of 52 Weeks of Soccer or Resistance Training on Body Composition and Muscle Function in +65-Year-Old Healthy Males – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Thomas Rostgaard; Schmidt, Jakob Friis; Pedersen, Mogens Theisen; Krustrup, Peter; Bangsbo, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The effects of 52 weeks of soccer or resistance training were investigated in untrained elderly men. The subjects aged 68.1±2.1 yrs were randomised into a soccer (SG; n = 9), a resistance (RG; n = 9) and a control group (CG; n = 8). The subjects in SG and RG, respectively, trained 1.7±0.3 and 1.8±0.3 times weekly on average during the intervention period. Muscle function and body composition were determined before and after 16 and 52 weeks of the intervention period. In SG, BMI was reduced by 1.5% and 3.0% (psoccer training reduces BMI and improves anti-oxidative capacity, while long-term resistance training impacts muscle protein enzyme expression and increases lean body mass in elderly men. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01530035 PMID:26886262

  18. Concentration of elements in whole-body fish, fish fillets, fish muscle plugs, and fish eggs from the 2008 Missouri Department of Conservation General Contaminant Monitoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Michael J.; Brumbaugh, William G.; McKee, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the results of a contaminant monitoring survey conducted annually by the Missouri Department of Conservation to examine the levels of selected elemental contaminants in whole-body fish, fish fillets, fish muscle plugs, and fish eggs. Whole-body, fillet, or egg samples of catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, Ictalurus furcatus, Pylodictis olivaris), largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), walleye (Sander vitreus), crappie (Pomoxis annularis, Pomoxis nigromaculatus), shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus), northern hog sucker (Hypentelium nigricans), and Missouri saddled darter (Etheostoma tetrazonum) were collected from 23 sites as part of the Missouri Department of Conservation's Fish Contaminant Monitoring Program. Fish dorsal muscle plugs also were collected from walleye (Sander vitreus) at one of the sites.

  19. Collagen peptide supplementation in combination with resistance training improves body composition and increases muscle strength in elderly sarcopenic men: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdzieblik, Denise; Oesser, Steffen; Baumstark, Manfred W; Gollhofer, Albert; König, Daniel

    2015-10-28

    Protein supplementation in combination with resistance training may increase muscle mass and muscle strength in elderly subjects. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of post-exercise protein supplementation with collagen peptides v. placebo on muscle mass and muscle function following resistance training in elderly subjects with sarcopenia. A total of fifty-three male subjects (72·2 (sd 4·68) years) with sarcopenia (class I or II) completed this randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study. All the participants underwent a 12-week guided resistance training programme (three sessions per week) and were supplemented with either collagen peptides (treatment group (TG)) (15 g/d) or silica as placebo (placebo group (PG)). Fat-free mass (FFM), fat mass (FM) and bone mass (BM) were measured before and after the intervention using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Isokinetic quadriceps strength (IQS) of the right leg was determined and sensory motor control (SMC) was investigated by a standardised one-leg stabilisation test. Following the training programme, all the subjects showed significantly higher (Ptraining further improved body composition by increasing FFM, muscle strength and the loss in FM.

  20. The loss of skeletal muscle strength, mass, and quality in older adults : the health, aging and body composition study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodpaster, Bret H; Park, Seok Won; Harris, Tamara B; Kritchevsky, Steven B; Nevitt, Michael; Schwartz, Ann V; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Tylavsky, Frances A; Visser, Marjolein; Newman, Anne B

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The loss of muscle mass is considered to be a major determinant of strength loss in aging. However, large-scale longitudinal studies examining the association between the loss of mass and strength in older adults are lacking. METHODS: Three-year changes in muscle mass and strength were

  1. Effects of body temperature, passive limb motion and level of anesthesia on the activity of the inspiratory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, E

    1984-04-01

    The relationships between relative tidal activity (moving average EMG) of the diaphragm (AdiT) and of the external intercostal or parasternal muscles (AicT) and between the rate of rise of these activities (Adi and Aic) were assessed during rebreathing in rabbits with various body temperatures (BT: 34-41 degrees C) before and after vagotomy (VGT), at rest and during passive limb motion (PLM), and in vagotomized rabbits with or without thoracic dorsal rhizotomy (TDR) under light (LBA) or deep barbiturate anesthesia (DBA). Both relationships had the form AicT = a AdiTb and Aic = a' Adib'. In intact normothermic animals under LBA mean values for b and b' were 1.47 and 1.37, a and a' being unity by definition. No changes in b or b' occurred even with TDR: this suggests that the relation between the central command to phrenic and to inspiratory intercostal alpha-motoneurones was the same under all conditions. Neither BT nor PLM modified a', but a changed owing to BT and PLM dependence of the relation between central inspiratory drive and off-switch threshold. Both VGT, independently of BT, and DBA decreased a and a' before but not after TDR, when a and a' reached the lowest values (0.12 and 0.22). Hence VGT and DBA, but not BT and PLM, change the relation between the central command to inspiratory intercostal alpha- and gamma-motoneurones, the multiplicative effect of alpha-gamma linkage on AicT and Aic being prevented by TDR.

  2. Plasma adiponectin concentration is associated with skeletal muscle insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation, and low plasma concentration precedes a decrease in whole-body insulin sensitivity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefan, Norbert; Vozarova, Barbora; Funahashi, Tohru

    2002-01-01

    concentration and skeletal muscle IR tyrosine phosphorylation and 2) the prospective effect of plasma adiponectin concentration at baseline on change in insulin sensitivity. Fasting plasma adiponectin concentration, body composition (hydrodensitometry or dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), insulin sensitivity.......02, respectively). Longitudinally, after adjustment for age, sex, and percent body fat, low plasma adiponectin concentration at baseline was associated with a decrease in insulin sensitivity (P = 0.04). In conclusion, our cross-sectional data suggest a role of physiological concentration of fasting plasma...

  3. Resistance training may concomitantly benefit body composition, blood pressure and muscle MMP-2 activity on the left ventricle of high-fat fed diet rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Richard Diego; Durigan, Rita de Cássia Marqueti; de Souza Lino, Anderson Diogo; de Souza Campos, Markus Vinicius; Souza, Maria das Graças; Selistre-de-Araújo, Heloisa Silvestre; Bouskela, Eliete; Kraemer-Aguiar, Luiz Guilherme

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of resistance training (RT) on body composition, systolic and diastolic blood pressures (BP), and activity of muscle MMP-2 in the left ventricle of high-fat fed rats. We have evaluated 32 male Wistar rats divided into four experimental groups (n=8/each) according to diet and exercise status: sedentary (SED; standard diet), sedentary obese (SED-OB; diet: 30% of fat), RT (RT; standard diet) and RT obese (RT-OB; diet: 30% of fat). After weaning (day 21), animals were subjected to the experimental diet according to their groups during 24 weeks. A 12-week strength-training period was used, during which the rats climbed a 1.1-m vertical ladder with weights attached to their tails. Sessions were performed three times/week (Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays), with 4-9 climbs/session and 8-12 dynamic movements/climb. RT induced higher muscle MMP-2 activity in the left ventricle in RT and RT-OB groups. Moreover, this study demonstrated that RT promoted lower body and fat masses, fat percentage, systolic and diastolic BPs and higher fat free mass in both trained groups. RT increased muscle MMP-2 activity in the left ventricle, induced positive changes on body composition and lowered BPs in high-fat diet fed rats, suggesting that it may be a useful tool to prevent alterations induced by high-fat diet consumption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Serotonin as an integrator of leech behavior and muscle mechanical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerry, Shannon P; Daigle, Amanda J; Feilich, Kara L; Liao, Jessica; Oston, Azzara L; Ellerby, David J

    2012-08-01

    The obliquely striated muscle in the leech body wall has a broad functional repertoire; it provides power for both locomotion and suction feeding. It also operates over an unusually high strain range, undergoing up to threefold changes in length. Serotonin (5-HT) may support this functional flexibility, integrating behavior and biomechanics. It can act centrally, promoting motor outputs that drive body wall movements, and peripherally, modulating the mechanical properties of body wall muscle. During isometric contractions 5-HT enhances active force production and reduces resting muscle tone. We therefore hypothesized that 5-HT would increase net work output during the cyclical contractions associated with locomotion and feeding. Longitudinal strains measured during swimming, crawling and feeding were applied to body wall muscle in vitro with the timing and duration of stimulation selected to maximize net work output. The net work output during all simulated behaviors significantly increased in the presence of 100μM 5-HT relative to the 5-HT-free control condition. Without 5-HT the muscle strips could not achieve a net positive work output during simulated swimming. The decrease in passive tension associated with 5-HT may also be important in reducing muscle antagonist work during longitudinal muscle lengthening. The behavioral and mechanical effects of 5-HT during locomotion are clearly complementary, promoting particular behaviors and enhancing muscle performance during those behaviors. Although 5-HT can enhance muscle mechanical performance during simulated feeding, low in vivo activity in serotonergic neurons during feeding may mean that its mechanical role during this behavior is less important than during locomotion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. A Drosophila model of dominant inclusion body myopathy type 3 shows diminished myosin kinetics that reduce muscle power and yield myofibrillar defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggs, Jennifer A; Melkani, Girish C; Glasheen, Bernadette M; Detor, Mia M; Melkani, Anju; Marsan, Nathan P; Swank, Douglas M; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2017-06-01

    Individuals with inclusion body myopathy type 3 (IBM3) display congenital joint contractures with early-onset muscle weakness that becomes more severe in adulthood. The disease arises from an autosomal dominant point mutation causing an E706K substitution in myosin heavy chain type IIa. We have previously expressed the corresponding myosin mutation (E701K) in homozygous Drosophila indirect flight muscles and recapitulated the myofibrillar degeneration and inclusion bodies observed in the human disease. We have also found that purified E701K myosin has dramatically reduced actin-sliding velocity and ATPase levels. Since IBM3 is a dominant condition, we now examine the disease state in heterozygote Drosophila in order to gain a mechanistic understanding of E701K pathogenicity. Myosin ATPase activities in heterozygotes suggest that approximately equimolar levels of myosin accumulate from each allele. In vitro actin sliding velocity rates for myosin isolated from the heterozygotes were lower than the control, but higher than for the pure mutant isoform. Although sarcomeric ultrastructure was nearly wild type in young adults, mechanical analysis of skinned indirect flight muscle fibers revealed a 59% decrease in maximum oscillatory power generation and an approximately 20% reduction in the frequency at which maximum power was produced. Rate constant analyses suggest a decrease in the rate of myosin attachment to actin, with myosin spending decreased time in the strongly bound state. These mechanical alterations result in a one-third decrease in wing beat frequency and marginal flight ability. With aging, muscle ultrastructure and function progressively declined. Aged myofibrils showed Z-line streaming, consistent with the human heterozygote phenotype. Based upon the mechanical studies, we hypothesize that the mutation decreases the probability of the power stroke occurring and/or alters the degree of movement of the myosin lever arm, resulting in decreased in vitro

  6. A Drosophila model of dominant inclusion body myopathy type 3 shows diminished myosin kinetics that reduce muscle power and yield myofibrillar defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Suggs

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with inclusion body myopathy type 3 (IBM3 display congenital joint contractures with early-onset muscle weakness that becomes more severe in adulthood. The disease arises from an autosomal dominant point mutation causing an E706K substitution in myosin heavy chain type IIa. We have previously expressed the corresponding myosin mutation (E701K in homozygous Drosophila indirect flight muscles and recapitulated the myofibrillar degeneration and inclusion bodies observed in the human disease. We have also found that purified E701K myosin has dramatically reduced actin-sliding velocity and ATPase levels. Since IBM3 is a dominant condition, we now examine the disease state in heterozygote Drosophila in order to gain a mechanistic understanding of E701K pathogenicity. Myosin ATPase activities in heterozygotes suggest that approximately equimolar levels of myosin accumulate from each allele. In vitro actin sliding velocity rates for myosin isolated from the heterozygotes were lower than the control, but higher than for the pure mutant isoform. Although sarcomeric ultrastructure was nearly wild type in young adults, mechanical analysis of skinned indirect flight muscle fibers revealed a 59% decrease in maximum oscillatory power generation and an approximately 20% reduction in the frequency at which maximum power was produced. Rate constant analyses suggest a decrease in the rate of myosin attachment to actin, with myosin spending decreased time in the strongly bound state. These mechanical alterations result in a one-third decrease in wing beat frequency and marginal flight ability. With aging, muscle ultrastructure and function progressively declined. Aged myofibrils showed Z-line streaming, consistent with the human heterozygote phenotype. Based upon the mechanical studies, we hypothesize that the mutation decreases the probability of the power stroke occurring and/or alters the degree of movement of the myosin lever arm, resulting in

  7. An investigation of perceived exertion via whole body exertion and direct muscle force indicators during the determination of the maximum acceptable weight of lift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, K G; Jorgensen, M J; Marras, W S

    2000-02-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the perceived exertion mechanisms (direct muscle force and whole body exertion) associated with the decision to change the weight of lift during the determination of the maximum acceptable weight of lift (MAWL). Fifteen males lifted a box of unknown weight at a rate of 4.3 lifts/min, and adjusted the weight until their MAWL was reached. Variables such as the predicted muscle forces and heart rate were measured during the lifting exertion, as well as the predicted spinal loading in three dimensions using an EMG-assisted biomechanical model. Multiple logistic regression techniques were used to identify variables that were associated with the decision to change the weights up and down prior to a subsequent lift. Results indicated that the force in the left erector spinae, right internal oblique, and left latissimus dorsi muscles as well as heart rate were associated with decreases in the weight prior to the next lift. It appears that a combination of local factors (muscle force) and whole body exertion factors (heart rate) provide the feedback for the perceived exertion when decreasing the weight. The up-change model indicated that the forces of the right erector spinae, left internal oblique, and the right latissimus dorsi muscles were associated with the decision to increase the weight prior to the next lift. Thus, local factors provide feedback during the decision to increase the weight when starting from light weights. Collectively, these findings indicate that psychophysically determined weight limits may be more sensitive to muscular strain rather than spinal loading.

  8. Effects of whole-body cryotherapy vs. far-infrared vs. passive modalities on recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage in highly-trained runners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Hausswirth

    Full Text Available Enhanced recovery following physical activity and exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD has become a priority for athletes. Consequently, a number of post-exercise recovery strategies are used, often without scientific evidence of their benefits. Within this framework, the purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of whole body cryotherapy (WBC, far infrared (FIR or passive (PAS modalities in hastening muscular recovery within the 48 hours after a simulated trail running race. In 3 non-adjoining weeks, 9 well-trained runners performed 3 repetitions of a simulated trail run on a motorized treadmill, designed to induce muscle damage. Immediately (post, post 24 h, and post 48 h after exercise, all participants tested three different recovery modalities (WBC, FIR, PAS in a random order over the three separate weeks. Markers of muscle damage (maximal isometric muscle strength, plasma creatine kinase [CK] activity and perceived sensations [i.e. pain, tiredness, well-being] were recorded before, immediately after (post, post 1 h, post 24 h, and post 48 h after exercise. In all testing sessions, the simulated 48 min trail run induced a similar, significant amount of muscle damage. Maximal muscle strength and perceived sensations were recovered after the first WBC session (post 1 h, while recovery took 24 h with FIR, and was not attained through the PAS recovery modality. No differences in plasma CK activity were recorded between conditions. Three WBC sessions performed within the 48 hours after a damaging running exercise accelerate recovery from EIMD to a greater extent than FIR or PAS modalities.

  9. Anatomical and biomechanical traits of broiler chickens across ontogeny. Part II. Body segment inertial properties and muscle architecture of the pelvic limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Paxton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In broiler chickens, genetic success for desired production traits is often shadowed by welfare concerns related to musculoskeletal health. Whilst these concerns are clear, a viable solution is still elusive. Part of the solution lies in knowing how anatomical changes in afflicted body systems that occur across ontogeny influence standing and moving. Here, to demonstrate these changes we quantify the segment inertial properties of the whole body, trunk (legs removed and the right pelvic limb segments of five broilers at three different age groups across development. We also consider how muscle architecture (mass, fascicle length and other properties related to mechanics changes for selected muscles of the pelvic limb. All broilers used had no observed lameness, but we document the limb pathologies identified post mortem, since these two factors do not always correlate, as shown here. The most common leg disorders, including bacterial chondronecrosis with osteomyelitis and rotational and angular deformities of the lower limb, were observed in chickens at all developmental stages. Whole limb morphology is not uniform relative to body size, with broilers obtaining large thighs and feet between four and six weeks of age. This implies that the energetic cost of swinging the limbs is markedly increased across this growth period, perhaps contributing to reduced activity levels. Hindlimb bone length does not change during this period, which may be advantageous for increased stability despite the increased energetic costs. Increased pectoral muscle growth appears to move the centre of mass cranio-dorsally in the last two weeks of growth. This has direct consequences for locomotion (potentially greater limb muscle stresses during standing and moving. Our study is the first to measure these changes in the musculoskeletal system across growth in chickens, and reveals how artificially selected changes of the morphology of the pectoral apparatus may cause

  10. The effects of low and moderate doses of caffeine supplementation on upper and lower body maximal voluntary concentric and eccentric muscle force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallis, Jason; Yavuz, Harley C M

    2018-03-01

    Despite the growing quantity of literature exploring the effect of caffeine on muscular strength, there is a dearth of data that directly explores differences in erogenicity between upper and lower body musculature and the dose-response effect. The present study sought to investigate the effects of low and moderate doses of caffeine on the maximal voluntary strength of the elbow flexors and knee extensors. Ten nonspecifically strength-trained, recreationally active participants (aged 21 ± 0.3 years) completed the study. Using a randomised, counterbalanced, and double-blind approach, isokinetic concentric and eccentric strength was measured at 60 and 180°/s following administration of a placebo, 3 mg·kg -1 body mass caffeine, and 6 mg·kg -1 body mass caffeine. There was no effect of caffeine on the maximal voluntary concentric and eccentric strength of the elbow flexors, or the eccentric strength of the knee extensors. Both 3 and 6 mg·kg -1 body mass caffeine caused a significant increase in peak concentric force of the knee extensors at 180°/s. No difference was apparent between the 2 concentrations. Only 6 mg·kg -1 body mass caused an increase in peak concentric force during repeated contractions. The results infer that the effective caffeine concentration to evoke improved muscle performance may be related to muscle mass and contraction type. The present work indicates that a relatively low dose of caffeine treatment may be effective for improving lower body muscular strength, but may have little benefit for the strength of major muscular groups of the upper body.

  11. Skeletal muscle mass is associated with higher dietary protein intake and lower body fat in postmenopausal women: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thaís R; Spritzer, Poli M

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the association between skeletal muscle mass and dietary protein intake, habitual physical activity, body composition, and metabolic variables. One hundred three healthy postmenopausal women from southern Brazil (age 55.2 ± 4.9 y, body mass index 27.2 ± 4.6 kg/m) were enrolled. Bone mineral density, %body fat, %trunk fat mass, and appendicular lean mass were assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, resting metabolic rate by indirect calorimetry, and habitual physical activity by pedometer. Skeletal muscle mass index (SMI) was expressed as appendicular lean mass standardized to body mass index. The cutoff for low lean mass was Protein intake was measured by a validated food frequency questionnaire and categorized into tertiles: ≤0.93 g/kg body weight (BW), 0.94 to 1.29 g/kg BW, and ≥1.3 g protein/kg BW. The prevalence of low lean mass (SMI mass, and diastolic blood pressure were higher, whereas SMI and mean daily steps were lower in women with protein intake ≤0.93 g/kg BW. SMI was positively correlated with physical activity (r = 0.205, P = 0.038) and protein intake (r = 0.334, P = 0.001), and negatively correlated with waist circumference (r = -0.505, P protein intake (mean difference 0.007, 95% CI, 0.001-0.014, P = 0.044) and an independent, negative contribution of %body fat (mean difference -0.010, 95%CI, -0.011 to -0.008, P protein intake and negatively associated with %body fat.

  12. Immunocytochemical electron microscopic study and Western blot analysis of caldesmon and calponin in striated muscle of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and in several muscle cell types of the earthworm Eisenia foetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royuela, M; Fraile, B; Picazo, M L; Paniagua, R

    1997-01-01

    Caldesmon and calponin are two proteins that are characteristic of vertebrate smooth muscle. In invertebrates, caldesmon has only been studied in some molluscan muscles, and no previous references to calponin have been found. The aim of this paper was to investigate the presence and distribution of caldesmon and calponin in several invertebrate muscle cell types, classified according to their ultrastructural pattern: transversely striated muscle (flight muscle from Drosophila melanogaster), obliquely striated muscle (muscular body wall and inner muscular layer of the pseudoheart from the earthworm Eisenia foetida), and a muscle of doubtful classification which seems to be intermediate between smooth muscle and obliquely striated muscle (outer muscular layer of the pseudoheart, from E. foetida), using electron microscopy immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis. Immunoreactions to both caldesmon and calponin were observed in the outer muscular layer cells from the earthworm pseudoheart but neither in the transversely striated muscle of D. melanogaster nor in the obliquely striated muscle from the earthworm. Present findings suggest that caldesmon- and calponin-like proteins are also present in invertebrate muscle cells, but only in those that are ultrastructurally similar to the vertebrate smooth muscle cells. Since discrepancies in the classification of some invertebrate muscles are common in the literature, the use of distinctive markers, such as troponin, caldesmon and calponin may improve our understanding of the nature and properties of many invertebrate muscles showing an ultrastructural pattern that does not resemble any of the classic muscle types.

  13. Effects of Creatine Supplementation on Muscle Strength and Optimal Individual Post-Activation Potentiation Time of the Upper Body in Canoeists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chi Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Creatine supplementation reduces the impact of muscle fatigue on post-activation potentiation (PAP of the lower body, but its effects on the upper body remain unknown. This study examined the effects of creatine supplementation on muscle strength, explosive power, and optimal individual PAP time of the upper body during a set of complex training bouts in canoeists. Seventeen male high school canoeists performed a bench row for one repetition at maximum strength and conducted complex training bouts to determine the optimal individual timing of PAP and distance of overhead medicine ball throw before and after the supplementation. Subjects were assigned to a creatine or placebo group, and later consumed 20 g of creatine or carboxymethyl cellulose per day for six days. After supplementation, the maximal strength in the creatine group significantly increased (p < 0.05. The optimal individual PAP time in the creatine group was significantly earlier than the pre-supplementation times (p < 0.05. There was no significant change in explosive power for either group. Our findings support the notion that creatine supplementation increases maximal strength and shortens the optimal individual PAP time of the upper body in high school athletes, but has no effect on explosive power. Moreover, it was found that the recovery time between a bench row and an overhead medicine ball throw in a complex training bout is an individual phenomenon.

  14. The effects of whole-body vibration training and vitamin D supplementation on muscle strength, muscle mass, and bone density in institutionalized elderly women: a 6-month randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschueren, Sabine M P; Bogaerts, An; Delecluse, Christophe; Claessens, Albrecht L; Haentjens, Patrick; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Boonen, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Sarcopenia and osteoporosis represent a growing public health problem. We studied the potential benefit of whole-body vibration (WBV) training given a conventional or a high dose of daily vitamin D supplementation in improving strength, muscle mass, and bone density in postmenopausal women. In a 2 × 2 factorial-design trial, 113 institutionalized elderly females aged over 70 years (mean age 79.6 years) were randomly assigned either to a WBV or a no-training group, receiving either a conventional dose (880 IU/day) or a high dose (1600 IU/day) of vitamin D(3). The primary aim was to determine the effects of 6 months of WBV and/or vitamin D supplementation on isometric and dynamic strength, leg muscle mass, and hip bone mineral density (BMD). Additionally, the increase in 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels between conventional and high-dose supplementation was compared. After 6 months of treatment, dynamic muscle strength, hip BMD, and vitamin D serum levels improved significantly in all groups, whereas isometric strength and muscle mass did not change. When compared with no training, the WBV program did not result in additional improvements. When compared with 880 IU, a high dose of 1600 IU of vitamin D did result in higher serum vitamin D levels but did not result in additional improvements. In institutionalized women older than 70 years, the WBV training protocol tested is not more efficient in enhancing muscle mass, strength, and hip BMD compared with vitamin D supplementation. A higher dose of 1600 IU of vitamin D does not provide additional musculoskeletal benefit in this population compared with conventional doses. © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  15. Sleep duration is associated with body fat and muscle mass and waist-to-height ratio beyond conventional obesity parameters in Korean adolescent boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ga Eun; Han, Kyungdo; Kim, Do Hoon; Lee, Jee Hyun; Seo, Won Hee

    2017-08-01

    While evidence has supported a strong association between sleep duration and obesity globally, results from studies of children and adolescents have been conflicting, and information about a sex-specific association has been limited. This study aimed to investigate the association of sleep duration with various parameters of obesity among South Korean adolescents. This population-based, cross-sectional study analysed the data obtained from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES) 2009 and 2010. Data of 990 adolescents were analysed. Sleep duration was based on a self-reported questionnaire. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), body fat percentage (BFP) and skeletal muscle index (SMI, appendicular skeletal muscle mass as a percentage of body weight) were assessed as parameters of obesity. Mean sleep duration in boys was associated inversely with BMI, WC, WHtR and BFP and positively with SMI. Proportions of the highest quartile of BMI, WC, WHtR and BFP and the lowest quartile of SMI increased significantly with increased sleep duration only in boys. Also, in boys, decreased sleep duration was associated significantly with the increased risk of the highest quartile of BMI, WC, WHtR and BFP and the lowest quartile of SMI, even after adjusting for confounding factors. However, in girls, there was no significant association between sleep duration and obesity parameters except WC. Periodic assessment of sleep duration in relation to body fat or muscle mass in male adolescents may be considered, especially in those who are at risk for obesity or related disorders. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  16. Effects of 8 weeks of Xpand® 2X pre workout supplementation on skeletal muscle hypertrophy, lean body mass, and strength in resistance trained males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Ryan P; Joy, Jordan M; Dudeck, Joshua E; Oliveira de Souza, Eduardo; McCleary, Sean A; Wells, Shawn; Wildman, Robert; Wilson, Jacob M

    2013-10-09

    Xpand® 2X is a proprietary blend comprised of branched chain amino acids, creatine monohydrate, beta-alanine (CarnoSyn®), quercetin, coenzymated B-vitamins, alanyl-glutamine (Sustamine®), and natural nitrate sources from pomegranate and beet root extracts purported to enhance the neuromuscular adaptations of resistance training. However to date, no long-term studies have been conducted with this supplement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a multi-ingredient performance supplement (MIPS) on skeletal muscle hypertrophy, lean body mass and lower body strength in resistance-trained males. Twenty resistance-trained males (21.3 ± 1.9 years) were randomly assigned to consume a MIPS or a placebo of equal weight and volume (food-grade orange flavors and sweeteners) in a double-blind manner, 30 minutes prior to exercise. All subjects participated in an 8-week, 3-day per week, periodized, resistance-training program that was split-focused on multi-joint movements such as leg press, bench press, and bent-over rows. Ultrasonography measured muscle thickness of the quadriceps, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) determined lean body mass, and strength of the bench press and leg press were determined at weeks 0, 4, and 8 of the study. Data were analyzed with a 2 × 3 repeated measures ANOVA with LSD post hoc tests utilized to locate differences. There was a significant group-by-time interaction in which the MIPS supplementation resulted in a significant (p supplementation nor the placebo in leg press strength (p = .08). MIPS supplementation also resulted in a significant increase in lean body mass (7.8% vs. 3.6%) and quadriceps muscle thickness (11.8% vs. 4.5%) compared with placebo (group*time, p hypertrophy in resistance-trained men.

  17. Effects of regular exercise and nutritional guidance on body composition, blood pressure, muscle strength and health-related quality of life in community-dwelling Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritani, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Asano, Yasuyo; Yoshizaki, Kyoko; Nishida, Yukiko; Shima, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of 6-month regular exercise and nutritional guidance for body composition, blood pressure, muscle strength and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in community-dwelling Japanese women aged 40-74 years. Participants were divided into an intervention group (n = 48) comprising women registered for health guidance and a control group without intervention (n = 66). The intervention group received 6-month exercise and nutritional guidance to modify lifestyle. Before and after the intervention period, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, body fat percentage, blood pressure, muscle strength and HRQOL using the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey version 2 (SF-36) questionnaire were measured. At baseline, no significant differences were found between intervention and control groups. Waist circumference decreased significantly in the intervention group (from 82.4 to 79.9 cm) compared to the control group (from 80.5 to 79.7 cm). BMI and body fat percentage also decreased significantly more in the intervention group than in the control group. General health perception, vitality and social functioning in the SF-36 showed significantly greater improvements in the intervention group than in the control group. Six-month regular exercise and nutritional guidance had beneficial effects on body composition and health-related quality of life especially for mental components of SF-36. Based on these findings, our intervention was expected to provide benefits to mental components of HRQOL and facilitate sustained participation and motivation in modify lifestyles. As a result, beneficial effects on body composition might also be sustained. © 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity . Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Skeletal muscle metastases: primary tumours, prevalence, and radiological features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surov, Alexey; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Behrmann, Curd [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiology, Halle (Germany); Hainz, Michael; Holzhausen, Hans-Juergen [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Pathology, Halle (Germany); Arnold, Dirk [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Haematology/Oncology, Halle (Germany); Katzer, Michaela [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Urology, Halle (Germany); Schmidt, Joerg [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Medical Statistics and Controlling, Halle (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Although skeletal muscles comprise nearly 50% of the total human body mass and are well vascularised, metastases in the musculature are rare. The reported prevalence of skeletal muscle metastases from post-mortem studies of patients with cancer is inconstant and ranges from 0.03 to 17.5%. Of 5,170 patients with metastasised cancer examined and treated at our institution during the period from January 2000 to December 2007, 61 patients with muscle metastases (80 lesions) were identified on computed tomography (CT). Genital tumours (24.6%) were the most frequent malignancies metastasising into the skeletal musculature, followed by gastrointestinal tumours (21.3%), urological tumours (16.4%), and malignant melanoma (13.1%). Other primary malignancies were rarer, including bronchial carcinoma (8.2%), thyroid gland carcinoma (4.9%), and breast carcinoma (3.3%). In 8.2%, carcinoma of unknown primary was diagnosed. Skeletal muscle metastases (SMM) were located in the iliopsoas muscle (27.5%), paravertebral muscles (25%), gluteal muscles (16.3%), lower extremity muscles (12.5%), abdominal wall muscles (10%), thoracic wall muscles (5%), and upper extremity muscles (3.8%). Most (76.3%) of the 80 SMM were diagnosed incidentally during routine staging CT examinations, while 23.7% were symptomatic. Radiologically, SMM presented with five different types of lesions: focal intramuscular masses (type I, 52.5% of SMM), abscess-like intramuscular lesions (type II, 32.5%), diffuse metastatic muscle infiltration (type III, 8.8%), multifocal intramuscular calcification (type IV, 3.7%) and intramuscular bleeding (type V, 2.5%). (orig.)

  19. Short bowel patients treated for two years with glucagon-like Peptide 2: effects on intestinal morphology and absorption, renal function, bone and body composition, and muscle function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, P B; Lund, P; Gottschalck, I B

    2009-01-01

    demonstrated in energy intake or absorption, and GLP-2 did not significantly affect mucosal morphology, body composition, bone mineral density or muscle function. CONCLUSIONS: GLP-2 treatment reduces fecal weight by approximately 1000 g/d and enables SBS patients to maintain their intestinal fluid......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: In a short-term study, Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) has been shown to improve intestinal absorption in short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients. This study describes longitudinal changes in relation to GLP-2 treatment for two years. METHODS: GLP-2, 400 micrograms, s.c.,TID, were...... and bone mineral density (by DEXA), biochemical markers of bone turnover (by s-CTX and osteocalcin, PTH and vitamin D), and muscle function (NMR, lungfunction, exercise test) were measured. RESULTS: GLP-2 compliance was >93%. Three of eleven patients did not complete the study. In the remaining 8 patients...

  20. Muscle Cells Provide Instructions for Planarian Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica N. Witchley

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration requires both potential and instructions for tissue replacement. In planarians, pluripotent stem cells have the potential to produce all new tissue. The identities of the cells that provide regeneration instructions are unknown. Here, we report that position control genes (PCGs that control regeneration and tissue turnover are expressed in a subepidermal layer of nonneoblast cells. These subepidermal cells coexpress many PCGs. We propose that these subepidermal cells provide a system of body coordinates and positional information for regeneration, and identify them to be muscle cells of the planarian body wall. Almost all planarian muscle cells express PCGs, suggesting a dual function: contraction and control of patterning. PCG expression is dynamic in muscle cells after injury, even in the absence of neoblasts, suggesting that muscle is instructive for regeneration. We conclude that planarian regeneration involves two highly flexible systems: pluripotent neoblasts that can generate any new cell type and muscle cells that provide positional instructions for the regeneration of any body region.

  1. The Combined Effects of Body Weight Support and Gait Speed on Gait Related Muscle Activity: A Comparison between Walking in the Lokomat Exoskeleton and Regular Treadmill Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kammen, Klaske; Boonstra, Annemarijke; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen; den Otter, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Background For the development of specialized training protocols for robot assisted gait training, it is important to understand how the use of exoskeletons alters locomotor task demands, and how the nature and magnitude of these changes depend on training parameters. Therefore, the present study assessed the combined effects of gait speed and body weight support (BWS) on muscle activity, and compared these between treadmill walking and walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton. Methods Ten healthy participants walked on a treadmill and in the Lokomat, with varying levels of BWS (0% and 50% of the participants’ body weight) and gait speed (0.8, 1.8, and 2.8 km/h), while temporal step characteristics and muscle activity from Erector Spinae, Gluteus Medius, Vastus Lateralis, Biceps Femoris, Gastrocnemius Medialis, and Tibialis Anterior muscles were recorded. Results The temporal structure of the stepping pattern was altered when participants walked in the Lokomat or when BWS was provided (i.e. the relative duration of the double support phase was reduced, and the single support phase prolonged), but these differences normalized as gait speed increased. Alternations in muscle activity were characterized by complex interactions between walking conditions and training parameters: Differences between treadmill walking and walking in the exoskeleton were most prominent at low gait speeds, and speed effects were attenuated when BWS was provided. Conclusion Walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton without movement guidance alters the temporal step regulation and the neuromuscular control of walking, although the nature and magnitude of these effects depend on complex interactions with gait speed and BWS. If normative neuromuscular control of gait is targeted during training, it is recommended that very low speeds and high levels of BWS should be avoided when possible. PMID:25226302

  2. The combined effects of body weight support and gait speed on gait related muscle activity: a comparison between walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton and regular treadmill walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaske Van Kammen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For the development of specialized training protocols for robot assisted gait training, it is important to understand how the use of exoskeletons alters locomotor task demands, and how the nature and magnitude of these changes depend on training parameters. Therefore, the present study assessed the combined effects of gait speed and body weight support (BWS on muscle activity, and compared these between treadmill walking and walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton. METHODS: Ten healthy participants walked on a treadmill and in the Lokomat, with varying levels of BWS (0% and 50% of the participants' body weight and gait speed (0.8, 1.8, and 2.8 km/h, while temporal step characteristics and muscle activity from Erector Spinae, Gluteus Medius, Vastus Lateralis, Biceps Femoris, Gastrocnemius Medialis, and Tibialis Anterior muscles were recorded. RESULTS: The temporal structure of the stepping pattern was altered when participants walked in the Lokomat or when BWS was provided (i.e. the relative duration of the double support phase was reduced, and the single support phase prolonged, but these differences normalized as gait speed increased. Alternations in muscle activity were characterized by complex interactions between walking conditions and training parameters: Differences between treadmill walking and walking in the exoskeleton were most prominent at low gait speeds, and speed effects were attenuated when BWS was provided. CONCLUSION: Walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton without movement guidance alters the temporal step regulation and the neuromuscular control of walking, although the nature and magnitude of these effects depend on complex interactions with gait speed and BWS. If normative neuromuscular control of gait is targeted during training, it is recommended that very low speeds and high levels of BWS should be avoided when possible.

  3. ROS production in homogenate from the body wall of sea cucumber Stichopus japonicus under UVA irradiation: ESR spin-trapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hang; Dong, Xiu-fang; Zhao, Ya-ping; Li, Nan; Fu, Hui; Feng, Ding-ding; Liu, Li; Yu, Chen-xu

    2016-02-01

    Sea cucumber Stichopus japonicus (S. japonicus) shows a strong ability of autolysis, which leads to severe deterioration in sea cucumber quality during processing and storage. In this study, to further characterize the mechanism of sea cucumber autolysis, hydroxyl radical production induced by ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation was investigated. Homogenate from the body wall of S. japonicas was prepared and subjected to UVA irradiation at room temperature. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectra of the treated samples were subsequently recorded. The results showed that hydroxyl radicals (OH) became more abundant while the time of UVA treatment and the homogenate concentration were increased. Addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, EDTA, desferal, NaN3 and D2O to the homogenate samples led to different degrees of inhibition on OH production. Metal cations and pH also showed different effects on OH production. These results indicated that OH was produced in the homogenate with a possible pathway as follows: O2(-) → H2O2 → OH, suggesting that OH might be a critical factor in UVA-induced S. japonicus autolysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effect of Body Weight-Supported Treadmill Training on Muscle Morphology in an Individual With Chronic, Motor-Complete Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Melanie M; Ditor, David S; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Phillips, Stuart M; McCartney, Neil; Hicks, Audrey L

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effects of 4 months of thrice-weekly body weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) on skeletal muscle morphology in a woman (age 27 y) with chronic, motor-complete (ASIA B) spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: The participant performed passive thrice-weekly BWSTT for 4 months (48 total sessions) with manual assistance from therapists. Muscle biopsies of the vastus lateralis were taken prior to the beginning of the training program as well as following the completion of 4 months of training. Histochemical analysis was utilized to evaluate changes in muscle fiber size and type following training. Results: At baseline, vastus lateralis muscle biopsies showed evidence of fiber atrophy and fiber type redistribution typical of persons with SCI, with mean fiber areas (and % distributions) of type I, type IIa and type IIx fibers being 3474μm2 (1.3%), 3146μm2 (30.8%) and 1284μm2 (68.0%), respectively. Following training, there were increases in treadmill walking speed (pre: 1.0km/h; post: 2.5km/h) and distance walked/session (pre: 500m; post: 1875m). Vastus lateralis mean fiber area increased by 27.1% and type I fiber % distribution increased to 24.6%, whereas type IIa and type IIx fiber % distributions both decreased following training. Conclusion: These data indicate that 4 months of thrice-weekly BWSTT improved muscle morphology in an individual with chronic, motor-complete SCI. PMID:16739562

  5. Influence of Whole-Body Vibration Training Without Visual Feedback on Balance and Lower-Extremity Muscle Strength of the Elderly: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shiuan-Yu; Lai, Chung-Liang; Chang, Kai-Ling; Hsu, Pi-Shan; Lee, Meng-Chih; Wang, Chun-Hou

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of whole-body vibration (WBV) training without visual feedback on balance and lower-extremity muscle strength in the elderly.Elderly subjects who did not exercise regularly participated in this study. Subjects were randomly divided into a WBV with eyes open group, a visual feedback-deprived plus WBV (VFDWBV) group, and a control group (0 Hz, eyes open). WBV training was provided over a 3-month period, 3 times per week for 5 min each session. Balance performance was measured with the limits of stability test, and muscle strength was measured with an isokinetic dynamometer.A total of 45 elderly subjects with an average age of 69.22  ±  3.97 years, divided into a WBV group (n = 14), a VFDWBV group (n = 17), and a control group (n = 14), completed the trial. Statistically significant differences were found in the balance performance of the 3 groups at different time points (time × group interaction: F = 13.213, P strength of the knee extensor and flexor muscles had time × group interactions: F = 29.604, P muscle strength than the WBV and control groups. The 6-month follow-up showed that the rates of hospital visits for medical services due to falls were 0% in the WBV group (0/14), 0% in the VFDWBV group (0/17), and 28.57% in the control group (4/14).Results showed that WBV training at 20  Hz without visual feedback can significantly improve the balance performance and lower-extremity muscle strength of the elderly.

  6. Influence of spinal disc translational stiffness on the lumbar spinal loads, ligament forces and trunk muscle forces during upper body inclination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Rizwan; Zander, Thomas; Bashkuev, Maxim; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2017-08-01

    Inverse dynamic musculoskeletal human body models are commonly used to predict the spinal loads and trunk muscle forces. These models include rigid body segments, mechanical joints, active and passive structural components such as muscles, tendons and ligaments. Several studies used simple definition of lumbar spinal discs idealized as spherical joints with infinite translational stiffness. The aim of the current sensitivity study was to investigate the influence of disc translational stiffness (shear and compressive stiffness) on the joint kinematics and forces in intervertebral discs (L1-L5), trunk muscles and ligaments for an intermediately flexed position (55°). Based on in vitro data, a range of disc shear stiffness (100-200N/mm) and compressive stiffness (1900-2700N/mm) was considered in the model using the technique of force dependent kinematics (FDK). Range of variation in spinal loads, trunk muscle forces and ligaments forces were calculated (with & without load in hands) and compared with the results of reference model (RM) having infinite translational stiffness. The discs' centers of rotation (CoR) were computed for L3-L4 and L4-L5 motion segments. Between RM and FDK models, maximum differences in compressive forces were 7% (L1-L2 & L2-L3), 8% (L3-L4) and 6% (L4-L5) whereas in shear forces 35% (L1-L2), 47% (L2-L3), 45% (L3-L4) and more than 100% in L4-L5. Maximum differences in the sum of global and local muscle forces were approximately 10%, whereas in ligament forces were 27% (supraspinous), 40% (interspinous), 56% (intertransverse), 58% (lig. flavum) and 100% (lig. posterior). The CoRs were predicted posteriorly, below (L3-L4) and in the disc (L4-L5). FDK model predicted lower spinal loads, ligament forces and varied distribution of global and local muscle forces. Consideration of translational stiffnesses influenced the model results and showed increased differences with lower stiffness values. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  7. Are unilateral and bilateral patellar tendinopathy distinguished by differences in anthropometry, body composition, or muscle strength in elite female basketball players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaida, J E; Cook, J L; Bass, S L; Austen, S; Kiss, Z S

    2004-10-01

    Overuse injury to the patellar tendon (patellar tendinopathy) is a major reason for interrupted training and competition for elite athletes. In both sexes, the prevalence of unilateral and bilateral tendinopathy has been shown to differ. It has been proposed that bilateral pathology may have a different aetiology from unilateral pathology. Investigation of risk factors that may be unique to unilateral and bilateral patellar tendinopathy in female athletes may reveal insights into the aetiology of this condition. To examine whether anthropometry, body composition, or muscle strength distinguished elite female basketball players with unilateral or bilateral patellar tendinopathy. Body composition, anthropometry, and muscle strength were compared in elite female basketball players with unilateral (n = 8), bilateral (n = 7), or no (n = 24) patellar tendinopathy. Body composition was analysed using a dual energy x ray absorptiometer. Anthropometric measures were assessed using standard techniques. Knee extensor strength was measured at 180 degrees /s using an isokinetic dynamometer. z scores were calculated for the unilateral and bilateral groups (using the no tendinopathy group as controls). z scores were tested against zero. The tibia length to stature ratio was approximately 1.3 (1.3) SDs above zero in both the affected and non-affected legs in the unilateral group (ppatellar tendinopathy has identifiable risk factors whereas bilateral patellar tendinopathy may not. This suggests that the aetiology of these conditions may be different. However, interpretation must respect the limitation of small subject numbers.

  8. Methodologies to determine forces on bones and muscles of body segments during exercise, employing compact sensors suitable for use in crowded space vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Fernando

    1995-01-01

    Work under this grant was carried out by the author and by a graduate research assistant. An instrumented bicycle ergometer was implemented focusing on the stated objective: to estimate the forces exerted by each muscle of the feet, calf, and thigh of an individual while bicycling. The sensors used were light and compact. These were probes to measure muscle EMG activity, miniature accelerometers, miniature load sensors, and small encoders to measure angular positions of the pedal. A methodology was developed and implemented to completely describe the kinematics of the limbs using data from the sensors. This work has been published as a Master's Thesis by the Graduate student supported by the grant. The instrumented ergometer along with the sensors and instrumentation were tested during a KC-135 Zero-Gravity flight in July, 1994. A complete description of the system and the tests performed have been published as a report submitted to NASA Johnson Space Center. The data collected during the KC-135 flight is currently being processed so that a kinematic description of the bicycling experiment will be soon determined. A methodology to estimate the muscle forces has been formulated based on previous work. The methodology involves the use of optimization concepts so that the individual muscle forces that represent variables in dynamic equations of motion may be estimated. Optimization of a criteria (goal) function such as minimization of energy will be used along with constraint equations defined by rigid body equations of motion. Use of optimization principles is necessary, because the equations of motion alone constitute an indeterminate system of equations with respect to the large amount of muscle forces which constitute the variables in these equations. The number of variables is reduced somewhat by using forces measured by the load cells installed on the pedal. These load cells measure pressure and shear forces on the foot. The author and his collaborators at NASA

  9. Reduced body weight or increased muscle quality: Which is more important for improving physical function following exercise and weight loss in overweight and obese older women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straight, Chad R; Berg, Alison C; Reed, Rachelle A; Johnson, Mary Ann; Evans, Ellen M

    2018-04-19

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relative contributions of changes in muscle quality and body composition to changes in lower-extremity physical function (LEPF) following a 6-month exercise and weight loss intervention in overweight and obese older women. Thirty-eight overweight and obese (BMI = 30.0 ± 4.4 kg/m 2 ) older (age = 69.3 ± 4.1 y) women completed 6 months of multicomponent exercise (cardiorespiratory, resistance, balance and flexibility training) and weight loss (hypocaloric diet that reduced energy intake by ~500 kcal/d). Body composition was measured via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and muscle quality (N-m/kg) was defined as maximal concentric isokinetic knee torque divided by upper-leg lean mass. The standardized scores of four objective measures of physical function were summed to yield a composite LEPF Z-score. At 6 months, there were significant reductions in body weight (-9.6 ± 3.5%, p quality (+1.6 ± 1.8 N-m/kg, p quality was the strongest independent predictor of an improvement in LEPF Z-score (standardized β = 0.64, p quality. In conclusion, muscle quality can be increased in the presence of clinically meaningful weight loss, and is the primary determinant of improved physical function in overweight/obese older women. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of a Pilates exercise program on muscle strength, postural control and body composition: results from a pilot study in a group of post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamin, M; Gobbo, S; Bullo, V; Zanotto, T; Vendramin, B; Duregon, F; Cugusi, L; Camozzi, V; Zaccaria, M; Neunhaeuserer, D; Ermolao, A

    2015-12-01

    Participation in exercise programs is heartily recommended for older adults since the level of physical fitness directly influences functional independence. The aim of this present study was to investigate the effects of supervised Pilates exercise training on the physical function, hypothesizing that a period of Pilates exercise training (PET) can increase overall muscle strength, body composition, and balance, during single and dual-task conditions, in a group of post-menopausal women. Twenty-five subjects, aged 59 to 66 years old, were recruited. Eligible participants were assessed prior and after 3 months of PET performed twice per week. Muscular strength was evaluated with handgrip strength (HGS) test, 30-s chair sit-to-stand test (30CST), and abdominal strength (AST) test. Postural control and dual-task performance were measured through a stabilometric platform while dynamic balance with 8 ft up and go test. Finally, body composition was assessed by means of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Statistically significant improvements were detected on HGS (+8.22%), 30CST (+23.41%), 8 ft up and go test (-5.95%), AST (+30.81%), medio-lateral oscillations in open eyes and dual-task condition (-22.03% and -10.37%). Pilates was effective in increasing upper body, lower body, and abdominal muscle strength. No changes on body composition were detected. Results on this investigation indicated also that 12-week of mat Pilates is not sufficient to determine a clinical meaningful improvement on static balance in single and dual-task conditions.

  11. Alpha-actinin in different invertebrate muscle cell types of Drosophila melanogaster, the earthworm Eisenia foetida, and the snail Helix aspersa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royuela, M; Astier, C; Fraile, B; Paniagua, R

    1999-01-01

    The presence and distribution of alpha-actinin has been studied in several invertebrate muscle cell types. These comprised transversely striated muscle (flight muscle) from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, transversely striated muscle (heart muscle) from the snail Helix aspersa, obliquely striated muscle (body wall muscle) from the earthworm Eisenia foetida, smooth muscle (retractor muscle) from H. aspersa, and smooth muscle (outer muscular layer of the pseudoheart) from E. foetida. The study was carried by means of Western blot analysis, ELISA, and immunohistochemical electron microscopy, using anti alpha-actinin antibody. Immunoreaction for a protein with the same molecular weight as that of mammalian alpha-actinin was detected in all muscle types studied, although the amount and intensity of immunoreaction varied among them. In the insect muscle, immunolabelling was found along the whole Z-line. In both the transversely striated muscle from the snail and the obliquely striated muscle from the earthworm, immunolabelling did not occupy the whole Z-line but showed discontinuous, orderly arranged patches along the Z-line course. In the two smooth muscles studied (snail and earthworm), immunolabelling was limited to small patches which did not show an apparently ordered distribution. Since it is assumed that alpha-actinin is located at the anchorage sites for actin filaments, present observations suggest that, only in the Drosophila muscle, actin filaments are parallelly arranged in all their course, whereas in the other invertebrate muscles studied these filaments converge on discontinuously distributed anchorage sites.

  12. A computational framework for simultaneous estimation of muscle and joint contact forces and body motion using optimization and surrogate modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskinazi, Ilan; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2018-04-01

    Concurrent estimation of muscle activations, joint contact forces, and joint kinematics by means of gradient-based optimization of musculoskeletal models is hindered by computationally expensive and non-smooth joint contact and muscle wrapping algorithms. We present a framework that simultaneously speeds up computation and removes sources of non-smoothness from muscle force optimizations using a combination of parallelization and surrogate modeling, with special emphasis on a novel method for modeling joint contact as a surrogate model of a static analysis. The approach allows one to efficiently introduce elastic joint contact models within static and dynamic optimizations of human motion. We demonstrate the approach by performing two optimizations, one static and one dynamic, using a pelvis-leg musculoskeletal model undergoing a gait cycle. We observed convergence on the order of seconds for a static optimization time frame and on the order of minutes for an entire dynamic optimization. The presented framework may facilitate model-based efforts to predict how planned surgical or rehabilitation interventions will affect post-treatment joint and muscle function. Copyright © 2018 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reproducibility, and age, body-weight and gender dependency of candidate skeletal muscle MRI outcome measures in healthy volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrow, Jasper M.; Reilly, Mary M.; Hanna, Michael G.; Sinclair, Christopher D.J.; Yousry, Tarek A.; Thornton, John S.; Fischmann, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can potentially meet the pressing need for objective, sensitive, reproducible outcome measures in neuromuscular disease trials. We tested, in healthy volunteers, the consistency, reliability and sensitivity to normal inter-subject variation of MRI methods targeted to lower limb muscle pathology to inform the design of practical but comprehensive MRI outcome measure protocols for use in imminent patient studies. Forty-seven healthy volunteers, age 21-81 years, were subject at 3T to three-point Dixon fat-fraction measurement, T 1 -relaxometry, T 2 -relaxometry and magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) imaging at mid-thigh and mid-calf level bilaterally. Fifteen subjects underwent repeat imaging at 2 weeks. Mean between-muscle fat fraction and T 2 differences were small, but significant (p 2 correlated positively, and MTR negatively with subject age in both the thigh and calf, with similar significant correlations with weight at thigh level only (p < 0.001 to p < 0.05). Scan-rescan and inter-observer intra-class correlation coefficients ranged between 0.62-0.84 and 0.79-0.99 respectively. Quantitative lower-limb muscle MRI using readily implementable methods was sensitive enough to demonstrate inter-muscle differences (small in health), and correlations with subject age and weight. In combination with high reliability, this strongly supports the suitability of these methods to provide longitudinal outcome measures in neuromuscular disease treatment trials. (orig.)

  14. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Emerson Randolph

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies, such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some muscular dystrophies. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on their embryologic origins and the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease.

  15. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  16. Recumbent vs. upright bicycles: 3D trajectory of body centre of mass, limb mechanical work, and operative range of propulsive muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telli, Riccardo; Seminati, Elena; Pavei, Gaspare; Minetti, Alberto Enrico

    2017-03-01

    Recumbent bicycles (RB) are high performance, human-powered vehicles. In comparison to normal/upright bicycles (NB) the RB may allow individuals to reach higher speeds due to aerodynamic advantages. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the non-aerodynamic factors that may potentially influence the performance of the two bicycles. 3D body centre of mass (BCoM) trajectory, its symmetries, and the components of the total mechanical work necessary to sustain cycling were assessed through 3D kinematics and computer simulations. Data collected at 50, 70, 90 110 rpm during stationary cycling were used to drive musculoskeletal modelling simulation and estimate muscle-tendon length. Results demonstrated that BCoM trajectory, confined in a 15-mm side cube, changed its orientation, maintaining a similar pattern across all cadences in both bicycles. RB displayed a reduced additional mechanical external power (16.1 ± 9.7 W on RB vs. 20.3 ± 8.8 W on NB), a greater symmetry on the progression axis, and no differences in the internal mechanical power compared to NB. Simulated muscle activity revealed small significant differences for only selected muscles. On the RB, quadriceps and gluteus demonstrated greater shortening, while biceps femoris, iliacus, and psoas exhibited greater stretch; however, aerodynamics still remains the principal benefit.

  17. Pain Catastrophizing and Fear of Pain Predict the Experience of Pain in Body Parts Not Targeted by a Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederstrasser, Nils Georg; Meulders, Ann; Meulders, Michel; Slepian, P Maxwell; Vlaeyen, Johan W S; Sullivan, Michael J L

    2015-11-01

    The present study examined whether pain catastrophizing and pain-related fear predict the experience of pain in body regions that are not targeted by an experimental muscle injury protocol. A delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) protocol was used to induce pain unilaterally in the pectoralis, serratus, trapezius, latissimus dorsi, and deltoid muscles. The day after the DOMS protocol, participants were asked to rate their pain as they lifted weighted canisters with their targeted (ie, injured) arm and their nontargeted arm. The lifting task is a nonnoxious stimulus unless participants are already experiencing musculoskeletal pain. Therefore, reports of pain on the nontargeted arm were operationalized as pain in response to a nonnoxious stimulus. Eighty-two healthy university students (54 men, 28 women) completed questionnaires on pain catastrophizing and fear of pain and went through the DOMS protocol. The analyses revealed that catastrophizing and pain-related fear prospectively predicted pain experience in response to a nonnoxious stimulus. The possible mechanisms underlying this effect and clinical implications are discussed. Pain catastrophizing and fear of pain prospectively predict the pain experience in response to a nonnoxious stimulus. The pattern of findings is consistent with the predictions of current models of generalization of pain-related fear. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Smooth muscle cells in atherosclerosis originate from the local vessel wall and not circulating progenitor cells in ApoE knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon, Jacob Fog; Weile, Charlotte; Sondergaard, Claus S

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies of bone marrow (BM)-transplanted apoE knockout (apoE-/-) mice have concluded that a substantial fraction of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in atherosclerosis arise from circulating progenitor cells of hematopoietic origin. This pathway, however, remains controversial. In the present...... study, we reexamined the origin of plaque SMCs in apoE-/- mice by a series of BM transplantations and in a novel model of atherosclerosis induced in surgically transferred arterial segments....

  19. Circuit resistance training in women with normal weight obesity syndrome: body composition, cardiometabolic and echocardiographic parameters, and cardiovascular and skeletal muscle fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Fabiano C; Bertucci, Danilo R; Barbosa, Marina R; Nunes, João E; Botero, João P; Rodrigues, Maria F; Shiguemoto, Gilberto E; Santoro, Valdir; Verzola, Ana C; Nonaka, Rodrigo O; Verzola, Roberto M; Baldissera, Vilmar; Perez, Sérgio E

    2017-01-01

    Normal weight obesity (NWO) syndrome has been characterized in subjects with normal Body Mass Index (BMI) and high body fat mass percentage (BF%>30 for women) being a risk factor for cardiometabolic dysregulation and cardiovascular mortality. This study evaluated whether circuit resistance training (CRT) improves body composition, heart size and function, cardiometabolic parameters, and cardiorespiratory, cardiovascular and skeletal muscle fitness in women with NWO. Data are means (95% Confidence Interval). Twenty-three women participated: 10 NWO-CRT (baseline: BMI=22.4 [21.4-23.3] kg/m2; BF%=44.5 [41.0-48.0]%) performed CRT; and 13 untrained NWO-control (baseline: BMI=21.7 [20.8-22.7] kg/m2; BF%=37.8 [34.6-41.1]%). At baseline and after 10 weeks were performed/measured dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, echocardiography, blood tests, arterial pressure, exercise testing, and total-overload-by-training-session (TOL). At baseline, the NWO-CRT exhibited larger BF (27.28 [23.9-30.6] kg) than NWO-control (22.41 [19.5-25.3] kg) (P=0.0227). After training, NWO-CRT: reduced 8 kg of BF (P=0.000002); became BF% lower than NWO-control (33.1 [30.1-36.0] body surface area ratio (84.29 [78.98-89.6] to 90.29 [81.45-99.12] g/m2, P=0.0215). CRT reduced BF% and generated cardiometabolic, cardiac, skeletal muscle and cardiovascular benefits, being a useful strategy to combat the normal weight obesity syndrome in women.

  20. Muscle wasting in male TNF-α blocker naïve ankylosing spondylitis patients: a comparison of gender differences in body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez Vodnizza, Sebastián; Visman, Ingrid M; van Denderen, Christiaan; Lems, Willem F; Jaime, Francisca; Nurmohamed, Michael T; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E

    2017-09-01

    To assess gender differences in body composition (BC) in a cohort of AS patients naïve to TNF-α blockers. Patients included fulfilled the Modified New York criteria for AS. Demographic information and disease activity measures (ASDAS and BASDAI) were reported. BC was measured by whole body DXA. Body fat percentage (BF%), fat mass index (FMI), fat free mass index (FFMI) and android/gynoid fat ratio were reported and compared between men and women and with the reference population (percentiles). Seventy consecutive patients were included; 60% were men. Demographic variables were similar, except for dyslipidaemia (57.1% of men; 14.3% of women). Women had significantly more fat (BF%, FMI), and less muscle (FFMI) than men, but below the median of the reference population. Male AS patients had a markedly low FFMI (31.7th percentile) compared with the reference population. In the whole group, after multivariate analysis, an ASDAS CRP >3.5 was related to lower fat free mass content. In men, a significant relationship between having a high disease activity (ASDAS, BASDAI) and lower BF% or FMI percentile was found, but in women it was the opposite. Muscle wasting, measured as low FFMI compared with the reference population, was found in male TNF-α blocker naïve AS patients, especially in those with active disease. Women had higher volumes of body fat than men, but near the median of the reference population. The relationships between fat content and disease activity support the complex association between adipose tissue and inflammation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Resistance Training with Single vs. Multi-joint Exercises at Equal Total Load Volume: Effects on Body Composition, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, and Muscle Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Antonio; Gentil, Paulo; Moro, Tatiana; Marcolin, Giuseppe; Bianco, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the effects of equal-volume resistance training performed with single-joint (SJ) or multi-joint exercises (MJ) on VO2max, muscle strength and body composition in physically active males. Thirty-six participants were divided in two groups: SJ group (n = 18, 182.1 ± 5.2, 80.03 ± 2.78 kg, 23.5 ± 2.7 years) exercised with only SJ exercises (e.g., dumbbell fly, knee extension, etc.) and MJ group (n = 18, 185.3 ± 3.6 cm, 80.69 ± 2.98 kg, 25.5 ± 3.8 years) with only MJ exercises (e.g., bench press, squat, etc.). The total work volume (repetitions × sets × load) was equated between groups. Training was performed three times a week for 8 weeks. Before and after the training period, participants were tested for VO2max, body composition, 1 RM on the bench press, knee extension and squat. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare post training values between groups, using baseline values as covariates. According to the results, both groups decreased body fat and increased fat free mass with no difference between them. Whilst both groups significantly increased cardiorespiratory fitness and maximal strength, the improvements in MJ group were higher than for SJ in VO2max (5.1 and 12.5% for SJ and MJ), bench press 1 RM (8.1 and 10.9% for SJ and MJ), knee extension 1 RM (12.4 and 18.9% for SJ and MJ) and squat 1 RM (8.3 and 13.8% for SJ and MJ). In conclusion, when total work volume was equated, RT programs involving MJ exercises appear to be more efficient for improving muscle strength and maximal oxygen consumption than programs involving SJ exercises, but no differences were found for body composition. PMID:29312007

  2. The importance of body mass normalisation for ultrasound measurements of the morphology of oblique abdominis muscles: the effect of age, gender, and sport practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linek, Pawel

    2017-06-27

    Some studies have not considered body mass as a confounder in analysis of oblique abdominis muscles (OAM) (including the oblique externus [OE] and oblique internus [OI]), which may have led to improper interpretation of results. To assess the differences in the effect of age, gender, and physical activity between normalised for body mass and actual values of the OAM as well as to establish the effect of age, gender, and physical activity on normalised for body mass OAM thicknesses in adolescents. A real-time ultrasound was used to obtain images of the OAM. Body mass normalisation for OAM thicknesses was performed with allometric scaling and the following equations: Allometric-scaled OE=OE thickness/body mass0.88; Allometric-scaled OI=OI thickness/body mass0.72. Analysis showed that boys have significantly thicker OAM than girls, and those who practise sports have thicker OAM than non-active individuals. For allometric-scaled OAM, there was only a significant gender effect, where boys have thicker allometric-scaled OAM than girls. There was a significant correlation between participants' age and the actual value of the OAM. The correlations between age and allometric-scaled OAM were insignificant. An analysis of OAM without body mass normalisation can lead to improper interpretation of study results. Thus, future studies should analyse OE and OI thickness measurements after normalisation rather than actual values. In the adolescent population, there is no effect of age and physical activity on allometric-scaled OAM; males have thicker allometric-scaled OAM than females.

  3. A low arm and leg muscle mass to total body weight ratio is associated with an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Hwan; So, Wi-Young

    2016-09-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and arm and leg muscle mass to total weight ratios in Korean adults. This was a randomized, controlled, cross-sectional study. Data from 2,383 adults (1,030 men and 1,353 women) were collected from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010-2011. Blood lipid profiles, blood pressure, and anthropometric characteristics, including weight, height, waist circumference, and muscle mass on dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), were evaluated in the participants. MetS was defined according to the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. The average mass of both arms and legs was determined using regional muscle analysis by DXA. Afterwards, the arm and leg muscle mass to total body weight ratio was determined and classified into 4 quartiles (i.e., quartile 1 [highest muscle ratio] to quartile 4 [lowest muscle ratio]). According to the arm muscle and leg muscle ratios, there was a higher prevalence of MetS in quartile 4 than in quartile 1 in both men and women. A low arm and leg muscle mass to body weight ratio was associated with a higher prevalence of MetS after adjusting for age, physical activity, frequency of smoking, and frequency of alcohol consumption. In conclusion, MetS patients demonstrated a lower arm and leg muscle mass to body weight ratio. Strength training for the lower and upper extremities is recommended because it can have a positive effect on MetS prevention.

  4. L-carnitine as an ergogenic aid for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease submitted to whole-body and respiratory muscle training programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borghi-Silva A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of adding L-carnitine to a whole-body and respiratory training program were determined in moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients. Sixteen COPD patients (66 ± 7 years were randomly assigned to L-carnitine (CG or placebo group (PG that received either L-carnitine or saline solution (2 g/day, orally for 6 weeks (forced expiratory volume on first second was 38 ± 16 and 36 ± 12%, respectively. Both groups participated in three weekly 30-min treadmill and threshold inspiratory muscle training sessions, with 3 sets of 10 loaded inspirations (40% at maximal inspiratory pressure. Nutritional status, exercise tolerance on a treadmill and six-minute walking test, blood lactate, heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory muscle strength were determined as baseline and on day 42. Maximal capacity in the incremental exercise test was significantly improved in both groups (P < 0.05. Blood lactate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and heart rate at identical exercise levels were lower in CG after training (P < 0.05. Inspiratory muscle strength and walking test tolerance were significantly improved in both groups, but the gains of CG were significantly higher than those of PG (40 ± 14 vs 14 ± 5 cmH2O, and 87 ± 30 vs 34 ± 29 m, respectively; P < 0.05. Blood lactate concentration was significantly lower in CG than in PG (1.6 ± 0.7 vs 2.3 ± 0.7 mM, P < 0.05. The present data suggest that carnitine can improve exercise tolerance and inspiratory muscle strength in COPD patients, as well as reduce lactate production.

  5. The effects of whole-body vibration therapy on bone turnover, muscle strength, motor function, and spasticity in chronic stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, M Y C; Lau, R W K; Yip, S P

    2013-08-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been used in older adults to improve bone health and neuromuscular function, and may have potential applications for stroke patients. To investigate the effects of WBV on bone turnover, leg muscle strength, motor function, and spasticity among chronic stroke patients. Randomized controlled trial (RCT). Community. Eighty-two chronic stroke patients. The experimental group underwent exercise training with WBV stimulation for a maximum of 15 minutes, 3 days per week for 8 weeks. The controls received the same exercises without WBV. Participants were evaluated for isokinetic knee muscle strength, serum levels of bone formation and resorption markers, spasticity and motor function of the paretic leg at baseline, immediately after the 8-week training period, and 1-month follow-up. Intention-to-treat analysis revealed no significant changes in levels of bone turnover markers and motor function of the paretic leg over time in both groups. Muscle strength outcomes showed no significant group×time interaction, with similar significant improvements found in both groups. Spasticity of the paretic knee was significantly reduced in the experimental group (P=0.005), but not in controls (P=0.465). No serious adverse events were reported. The WBV protocol used in this study did not induce additional effects on bone turnover, knee muscle strength and paretic leg motor function among chronic stroke patients. WBV may have potential to modulate spasticity, but this requires further investigation. More study on WBV is required before it can be recommended as an adjunct treatment in rehabilitation of chronic stroke patients.

  6. Alleviation of Motor Impairments in Patients with Cerebral Palsy: Acute Effects of Whole-body Vibration on Stretch Reflex Response, Voluntary Muscle Activation and Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Krause

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionIndividuals suffering from cerebral palsy (CP often have involuntary, reflex-evoked muscle activity resulting in spastic hyperreflexia. Whole-body vibration (WBV has been demonstrated to reduce reflex activity in healthy subjects, but evidence in CP patients is still limited. Therefore, this study aimed to establish the acute neuromuscular and kinematic effects of WBV in subjects with spastic CP.Methods44 children with spastic CP were tested on neuromuscular activation and kinematics before and immediately after a 1-min bout of WBV (16–25 Hz, 1.5–3 mm. Assessment included (1 recordings of stretch reflex (SR activity of the triceps surae, (2 electromyography (EMG measurements of maximal voluntary muscle activation of lower limb muscles, and (3 neuromuscular activation during active range of motion (aROM. We recorded EMG of m. soleus (SOL, m. gastrocnemius medialis (GM, m. tibialis anterior, m. vastus medialis, m. rectus femoris, and m. biceps femoris. Angular excursion was recorded by goniometry of the ankle and knee joint.ResultsAfter WBV, (1 SOL SRs were decreased (p < 0.01 while (2 maximal voluntary activation (p < 0.05 and (3 angular excursion in the knee joint (p < 0.01 were significantly increased. No changes could be observed for GM SR amplitudes or ankle joint excursion. Neuromuscular coordination expressed by greater agonist–antagonist ratios during aROM was significantly enhanced (p < 0.05.DiscussionThe findings point toward acute neuromuscular and kinematic effects following one bout of WBV. Protocols demonstrate that pathological reflex responses are reduced (spinal level, while the execution of voluntary movement (supraspinal level is improved in regards to kinematic and neuromuscular control. This facilitation of muscle and joint control is probably due to a reduction of spasticity-associated spinal excitability in favor of giving access for greater supraspinal input during voluntary motor

  7. The Effect of High-Intensity Interval Cycling Sprints Subsequent to Arm-Curl Exercise on Upper-Body Muscle Strength and Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Naoki; Yoshida, Shou; Okuyama, Mizuki; Nakazato, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    Kikuchi, N, Yoshida, S, Okuyama, M, and Nakazato, K. The effect of high-intensity interval cycling sprints subsequent to arm-curl exercise on upper-body muscle strength and hypertrophy. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2318-2323, 2016-The purpose of this study was to examine whether lower limb sprint interval training (SIT) after arm resistance training (RT) influences training response of arm muscle strength and hypertrophy. Twenty men participated in this study. We divided subjects into RT group (n = 6) and concurrent training group (CT, n = 6). The RT program was designed to induce muscular hypertrophy (3 sets × 10 repetitions [reps] at 80% 1 repetition maximum [1RM] of arm-curl exercise) and was performed in an 8-week training schedule performed 3 times per week on nonconsecutive days. Subjects assigned to the CT group performed identical protocols as strength training and modified SIT (4 sets of 30-s maximal effort, separated in 4 m 30-s rest intervals) on the same day. Pretest and posttest maximal oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max), muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), and 1RM were measured. Significant increase in V[Combining Dot Above]O2max from pretest to posttest was observed in the CT group (p = 0.010, effect size [ES] = 1.84) but not in the RT group (p = 0.559, ES = 0.35). Significant increase in CSA from pretest to posttest was observed in the RT group (p = 0.030, ES = 1.49) but not in the CT group (p = 0.110, ES = 1.01). Significant increase in 1RM from pretest to posttest was observed in the RT group (p = 0.021, ES = 1.57) but not in the CT group (p = 0.065, ES = 1.19). In conclusion, our data indicate that concurrent lower limb SIT interferes with arm muscle hypertrophy and strength.

  8. Imaging of muscle injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, G.Y. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Brandser, E.A. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Kathol, M.H. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Tearse, D.S. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery; Callaghan, J.J. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery

    1996-01-01

    Although skeletal muscle is the single largest tissue in the body, there is little written about it in the radiologic literature. Indirect muscle injuries, also called strains or tears, are common in athletics, and knowing the morphology and physiology of the muscle-tendon unit is the key to the understanding of these injuries. Eccentric muscle activation produces more tension within the muscle tan when it is activated concentrically, making it more susceptible to tearing. Injuries involving the muscle belly tend to occur near the myotendinous junction. In adolescents, the weakest link in the muscle-tendon-bone complex is the apophysis. Traditionally, plain radiography has been the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of these injuries; however, with the advent of MRI it has become much easier to diagnose injuries primarily affecting the soft tissues. This article reviews the anatomy and physiology of the muscle-tendon unit as they relate to indirect muscle injuries. Examples of common muscle injuries are illustrated. (orig.)

  9. Impact of vitamin D supplementation during a resistance training intervention on body composition, muscle function, and glucose tolerance in overweight and obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Andres E; Flynn, Michael G; Pinkston, Catherine; Markofski, Melissa M; Jiang, Yan; Donkin, Shawn S; Teegarden, Dorothy

    2013-06-01

    The impact of vitamin D supplementation in overweight and obese adults during resistance training on body composition, muscle function, and glucose tolerance was investigated. Twenty-three overweight and obese (age: 26.1±4.7 y; BMI: 31.3±3.2 kg/m(2); 25-hydroxyvitamin D: 19.3±7.2 ng/mL) adults were recruited for participation in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Participants were randomly divided into vitamin D (VitD, 4000 IU/d; 5 females, 5 males) and placebo (PL; 7 females, 6 males) groups. Both groups completed 12 weeks of resistance training. 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone, body composition, and glucose tolerance were assessed at baseline and 12 weeks. Muscle function (strength and power) was assessed at baseline, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. During the intervention, 25-hydroxyvitamin D increased and parathyroid hormone decreased in the VitD group (Pchange in 25-hydroxyvitamin D with the change in waist-to-hip ratio (R(2)=0.205, P=0.02). No other improvements were observed with supplementation. Vitamin D supplementation in overweight and obese adults during resistance training induced an early improvement in peak power, and elevated vitamin D status was associated with reduced waist-to-hip ratio. NCT01199926. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  10. Resistance training improves body composition and increases matrix metalloproteinase 2 activity in biceps and gastrocnemius muscles of diet-induced obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Markus Vinicius Campos; Leite, Richard Diego; Souza Lino, Anderson Diogo de; Marqueti, Rita de Cássia; Bernardes, Celene Fernandes; Araújo, Heloisa Sobreiro Selistre de; Bouskela, Eliete; Bouskella, Eliete; Shiguemoto, Gilberto Eiji; Andrade Perez, Sérgio Eduardo de; Kraemer-Aguiar, Luiz Guilherme

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the influence of resistance training on body composition and matrix metalloproteinase 2 activity in skeletal muscles of rats fed a high-fat diet. Thirty-two Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups (n = 8/each) according to diet and exercise status: Control (standard diet), Obese Control (high-fat diet), Resistance Training (standard diet) and Obese Resistance Training (high-fat diet) groups. Animals were fed a high-fat diet for 12 weeks to promote excessive weight gain. Resistance Training groups performed 12 weeks of training periods after this period in a vertical ladder three times/week. Fat percentage, fat-free mass and fat mass were assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 activity in biceps and gastrocnemius muscles was analyzed using zymography. Resistance training significantly reduced body and fat masses and fat percentages in both trained groups (pmuscles of both trained groups (pmuscle matrix metalloproteinase 2 activity promoted by excessive weight gain were positively modified by resistance training.

  11. Reproducibility, and age, body-weight and gender dependency of candidate skeletal muscle MRI outcome measures in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, Jasper M.; Reilly, Mary M.; Hanna, Michael G. [UCL Institute of Neurology, Medical Research Council Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, Department of Molecular Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); Sinclair, Christopher D.J.; Yousry, Tarek A.; Thornton, John S. [UCL Institute of Neurology, Medical Research Council Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, Department of Molecular Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Neurology, Neuroradiological Academic Unit, Department of Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, London (United Kingdom); Fischmann, Arne [University of Basel Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Basel (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can potentially meet the pressing need for objective, sensitive, reproducible outcome measures in neuromuscular disease trials. We tested, in healthy volunteers, the consistency, reliability and sensitivity to normal inter-subject variation of MRI methods targeted to lower limb muscle pathology to inform the design of practical but comprehensive MRI outcome measure protocols for use in imminent patient studies. Forty-seven healthy volunteers, age 21-81 years, were subject at 3T to three-point Dixon fat-fraction measurement, T{sub 1}-relaxometry, T{sub 2}-relaxometry and magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) imaging at mid-thigh and mid-calf level bilaterally. Fifteen subjects underwent repeat imaging at 2 weeks. Mean between-muscle fat fraction and T{sub 2} differences were small, but significant (p < 0.001). Fat fraction and T{sub 2} correlated positively, and MTR negatively with subject age in both the thigh and calf, with similar significant correlations with weight at thigh level only (p < 0.001 to p < 0.05). Scan-rescan and inter-observer intra-class correlation coefficients ranged between 0.62-0.84 and 0.79-0.99 respectively. Quantitative lower-limb muscle MRI using readily implementable methods was sensitive enough to demonstrate inter-muscle differences (small in health), and correlations with subject age and weight. In combination with high reliability, this strongly supports the suitability of these methods to provide longitudinal outcome measures in neuromuscular disease treatment trials. (orig.)

  12. Cochrane review: Whole-body cryotherapy (extreme cold air exposure) for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Joseph T; Baker, Philip Ra; Minett, Geoffrey M; Bieuzen, Francois; Stewart, Ian B; Bleakley, Chris

    2016-01-14

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness, or 'DOMS', affects many people after exercise and can impair future performance. It usually peaks one to four days after exercise and several strategies are used to overcome it. The effectiveness and safety of many of these strategies applied and promoted is unknown. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Simple equations to predict concentric lower-body muscle power in older adults using the 30-second chair-rise test: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley N Smith

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Wesley N Smith1, Gianluca Del Rossi1, Jessica B Adams1, KZ Abderlarahman2, Shihab A Asfour2, Bernard A Roos1,3,4,5, Joseph F Signorile1,31Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences,2Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, USA; 3Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Bruce W Carter Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Miami, FL, USA; 4Departments of Medicine and Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 5Stein Gerontological Institute, Miami Jewish Health Systems, Miami, FL, USAAbstract: Although muscle power is an important factor affecting independence in older adults, there is no inexpensive or convenient test to quantify power in this population. Therefore, this pilot study examined whether regression equations for evaluating muscle power in older adults could be derived from a simple chair-rise test. We collected data from a 30-second chair-rise test performed by fourteen older adults (76 ± 7.19 years. Average (AP and peak (PP power values were computed using data from force-platform and high-speed motion analyses. Using each participant’s body mass and the number of chair rises performed during the first 20 seconds of the 30-second trial, we developed multivariate linear regression equations to predict AP and PP. The values computed using these equations showed a significant linear correlation with the values derived from our force-platform and high-speed motion analyses (AP: R = 0.89; PP: R = 0.90; P < 0.01. Our results indicate that lower-body muscle power in fit older adults can be accurately evaluated using the data from the initial 20 seconds of a simple 30-second chair-rise test, which requires no special equipment, preparation, or setting.Keywords: instrumental activity of daily living, clinical test, elderly, chair-stand test, leg power

  14. Unexpected granular cell tumor in abdominal wall: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panunzi, Andrea; D'Orazi, Valerio; Toni, Francesca; Coppola, Giovanni Andrea; D'Alessandro, Valentina; Pontone, Stefano; Pironi, Daniele; Ortensi, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Granular cell tumors (GCTs) are uncommon benign neoplasms deriving from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve fibers. Although these tumors can be found anywhere in the body, the most frequent site is the tongue, followed by the chest wall and the arm. The abdominal wall is an extremely rare site for GCTs. These tumors are generally asymptomatic and have a slow growth rate. Today, thanks to their immunoreactivity to S-100 and CD68, the differential diagnosis is more straightforward than in the past. We report on a young patient affected by a GCT located in the upper third of the right rectus abdominis muscle. En bloc excision through a diamond-shaped skin incision allowed us to make a correct histological diagnosis, which was confirmed by the immunohistochemical findings. GCT, which is very rare in abdominal wall muscles, should be considered in the differential diagnosis, and surgical excision is the treatment of choice.

  15. Effect of whole-body vibration on muscle strength, spasticity, and motor performance in spastic diplegic cerebral palsy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa M. Ibrahim

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: The obtained results suggest that 12-weeks’ intervention of whole-body vibration training can increase knee extensors strength and decrease spasticity with beneficial effects on walking speed and motor development in spastic diplegic CP children.

  16. Association of body size and muscle strength with incidence of coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases: a population-based cohort study of one million Swedish men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Tynelius, Per; Batty, G David; Rasmussen, Finn

    2009-02-01

    Muscle strength and body size may be associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke risk. However, perhaps because of a low number of cases, existing evidence is inconsistent. Height, weight, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), elbow flexion, hand grip and knee extension strength were measured in young adulthood in 1 145 467 Swedish men born between 1951 and 1976. Information on own and parental social position was derived from censuses. During the register-based follow-up until the end of 2006, 12 323 CHD and 8865 stroke cases emerged, including 1431 intracerebral haemorrhage, 1316 subarachoid haemorrhage and 2944 intracerebral infarction cases. Hazard ratios (HR) per 1 SD in the exposures of interest were computed using Cox proportional hazard model. Body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) showed increased risk with CHD and intracerebral infarction, whereas for intracerebral and subarachoid haemorrhage both under- and overweight was associated with increased risk. Height was inversely associated with CHD and all types of stroke. After adjustment for height, BMI, SBP, DBP and social position, all strength indicators were inversely associated with disease risk. For CHD and intracerebral infarction, grip strength showed the strongest association (HR = 0.89 and 0.91, respectively) whereas for intracerebral and subarachoid haemorrhage, knee extension strength was the best predictor (HR = 0.88 and 0.92, respectively). Body size and muscle strength in young adulthood are important predictors of risk of CHD and stroke in later life. In addition to adiposity, underweight needs attention since it may predispose to cerebrovascular complications.

  17. The feasibility of whole body vibration in institutionalised elderly persons and its influence on muscle performance, balance and mobility: a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN62535013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Hees Ellen

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatigue or lack of interest can reduce the feasibility of intensive physical exercise in nursing home residents. Low-volume exercise interventions with similar training effects might be an alternative. The aim of this randomised controlled trial was to investigate the feasibility of Whole Body Vibration (WBV in institutionalised elderly, and its impact on functional capacity and muscle performance. Methods Twenty-four nursing home residents (15 female, 9 male; mean age 77.5 ± 11.0 years were randomised (stratification for age, gender and ADL-category to 6 weeks static WBV exercise (WBV+, N = 13 or control (only static exercise; N = 11. Outcome measures were exercise compliance, timed up-and-go, Tinetti-test, back scratch, chair sit-and-reach, handgrip strength and linear isokinetic leg extension. Results At baseline, WBV+ and control groups were similar for all outcome variables. Twenty-one participants completed the program and attended respectively 96% and 86% of the exercise sessions for the WBV+ and control groups. Training-induced changes in timed up-and-go and Tinetti-test were better for WBV+ compared to control (p = 0.029 for timed up-and-go, p = 0.001 and p = 0.002 for Tinetti body balance and total score respectively. In an alternative analysis (Worst Rank Score & Last Observation Carried Forward the differences in change remained significant on the Tinetti body balance and total score. No other significant differences in change between both groups were observed. Conclusion In nursing home residents with limited functional dependency, six weeks static WBV exercise is feasible, and is beneficial for balance and mobility. The supplementary benefit of WBV on muscle performance compared to classic exercise remains to be explored further.

  18. Proteomics of Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and plays an important role in locomotion and whole body metabolism. It accounts for ~80% of insulin stimulated glucose disposal. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance, a primary feature of Type 2 diabetes, is caused by a decreased ability of m...

  19. Body Build and the Level of Development of Muscle Strength Among Male Jiu-Jitsu Competitors and Strength-Trained Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietraszewska Jadwiga

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the present study was to assess the morpho-functional characteristics of male jiu-jitsu practitioners against a sample of strength-trained university students. Methods. The all-male research sample included 49 jiu-jitsu competitors and 30 university students actively involved in strength training. Measures of body mass and height, lower extremity length, sitting height, arm span, trunk width, skeletal breadths, circumferences and skinfold thicknesses of the trunk and extremities were collected. Body tissue composition was assessed using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Somatotype was classified according to the anthropometric method of Heath and Carter. Participants also performed three motor tests composed of the standing long jump, flexed arm hang, and sit-ups and two dynamometer tests measuring handgrip and back muscle strength. Differences between the measured characteristics in both samples were analyzed using Student’s t test. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to the determine the relationships between the morphological characteristics and the results of the motor tests. Results. The jiu-jitsu sample was slightly smaller than the strength-training students. In contrast, body mass was almost identical in both groups. The remaining length, height, and skinfold characteristics also did not differ significantly between the groups. Only hip breadth was significantly larger in the jiu-jitsu sample. No between-group differences were noted in the levels of endomorphy, mesomorphy, and ectomorphy. The composite somatotype of the jiu-jitsu athletes (2.1-5.8-2.0 was very similar to that of the strength-trained students (2.1-5.9-2.4. Statistically significant differences were observed in the tests assessing muscle strength. Handgrip and back muscle strength was greater in the strength-training students, whereas the jiu-jitsu athletes performed better in all three motor tests. Conclusions. The minor morphological

  20. dSir2 in the adult fat body, but not in muscles, regulates life span in a diet-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Kushal Kr; Ayyub, Champakali; Ali, Syed Zeeshan; Mandot, Vinesh; Prasad, Nagaraj G; Kolthur-Seetharam, Ullas

    2012-12-27

    Sir2, an evolutionarily conserved NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, has been implicated as a key factor in mediating organismal life span. However, recent contradictory findings have brought into question the role of Sir2 and its orthologs in regulating organismal longevity. In this study, we report that Drosophila Sir2 (dSir2) in the adult fat body regulates longevity in a diet-dependent manner. We used inducible Gal4 drivers to knock down and overexpress dSir2 in a tissue-specific manner. A diet-dependent life span phenotype of dSir2 perturbations (both knockdown and overexpression) in the fat body, but not muscles, negates the effects of background genetic mutations. In addition to providing clarity to the field, our study contrasts the ability of dSir2 in two metabolic tissues to affect longevity. We also show that dSir2 knockdown abrogates fat-body dFOXO-dependent life span extension. This report highlights the importance of the interplay between genetic factors and dietary inputs in determining organismal life spans. Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. dSir2 in the Adult Fat Body, but Not in Muscles, Regulates Life Span in a Diet-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushal Kr. Banerjee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sir2, an evolutionarily conserved NAD+-dependent deacetylase, has been implicated as a key factor in mediating organismal life span. However, recent contradictory findings have brought into question the role of Sir2 and its orthologs in regulating organismal longevity. In this study, we report that Drosophila Sir2 (dSir2 in the adult fat body regulates longevity in a diet-dependent manner. We used inducible Gal4 drivers to knock down and overexpress dSir2 in a tissue-specific manner. A diet-dependent life span phenotype of dSir2 perturbations (both knockdown and overexpression in the fat body, but not muscles, negates the effects of background genetic mutations. In addition to providing clarity to the field, our study contrasts the ability of dSir2 in two metabolic tissues to affect longevity. We also show that dSir2 knockdown abrogates fat-body dFOXO-dependent life span extension. This report highlights the importance of the interplay between genetic factors and dietary inputs in determining organismal life spans.

  2. Ultrasound Evaluation of the Abdominal Wall and Lumbar Multifidus Muscles in Participants Who Practice Pilates: A 1-year Follow-up Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gala-Alarcón, Paula; Calvo-Lobo, César; Serrano-Imedio, Ana; Garrido-Marín, Alejandro; Martín-Casas, Patricia; Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo

    2018-04-18

    The purpose of this study was to describe ultrasound (US) changes in muscle thickness produced during automatic activation of the transversus abdominis (TrAb), internal oblique (IO), external oblique (EO), and rectus abdominis (RA), as well as the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the lumbar multifidus (LM), after 1 year of Pilates practice. A 1-year follow-up case series study with a convenience sample of 17 participants was performed. Indeed, TrAb, IO, EO, and RA thickness, as well as LM CSA changes during automatic tests were measured by US scanning before and after 1 year of Pilates practice twice per week. Furthermore, quality of life changes using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and US measurement comparisons of participants who practiced exercises other than Pilates were described. Statistically significant changes were observed for the RA muscle thickness reduction during the active straight leg raise test (P = .007). Participants who practiced other exercises presented a larger LM CSA and IO thickness, which was statistically significant (P .05). A direct moderate correlation was observed (r = 0.562, P = .019) between the TrAb thickness before and after a 1-year follow-up. Long-term Pilates practice may reduce the RA thickness automatic activation during active straight leg raise. Furthermore, LM CSA and IO thickness increases were observed in participants who practice other exercise types in conjunction with Pilates. Despite a moderate positive correlation observed for TrAb thickness, the quality of life did not seem to be modified after long-term Pilates practice. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. The effects of adding single-joint exercises to a multi-joint exercise resistance training program on upper body muscle strength and size in trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de França, Henrique Silvestre; Branco, Paulo Alexandre Nordeste; Guedes Junior, Dilmar Pinto; Gentil, Paulo; Steele, James; Teixeira, Cauê Vazquez La Scala

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was compare changes in upper body muscle strength and size in trained men performing resistance training (RT) programs involving multi-joint plus single-joint (MJ+SJ) or only multi-joint (MJ) exercises. Twenty young men with at least 2 years of experience in RT were randomized in 2 groups: MJ+SJ (n = 10; age, 27.7 ± 6.6 years) and MJ (n = 10; age, 29.4 ± 4.6 years). Both groups trained for 8 weeks following a linear periodization model. Measures of elbow flexors and extensors 1-repetition maximum (1RM), flexed arm circumference (FAC), and arm muscle circumference (AMC) were taken pre- and post-training period. Both groups significantly increased 1RM for elbow flexion (4.99% and 6.42% for MJ and MJ+SJ, respectively), extension (10.60% vs 9.79%, for MJ and MJ+SJ, respectively), FAC (1.72% vs 1.45%, for MJ and MJ+SJ, respectively), and AMC (1.33% vs 3.17% for MJ and MJ+SJ, respectively). Comparison between groups revealed no significant difference in any variable. In conclusion, 8 weeks of RT involving MJ or MJ+SJ resulted in similar alterations in muscle strength and size in trained participants. Therefore, the addition of SJ exercises to a RT program involving MJ exercises does not seem to promote additional benefits to trained men, suggesting MJ-only RT to be a time-efficient approach.

  4. Partial body weight support treadmill training speed influences paretic and non-paretic leg muscle activation, stride characteristics, and ratings of perceived exertion during acute stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnfield, Judith M; Buster, Thad W; Goldman, Amy J; Corbridge, Laura M; Harper-Hanigan, Kellee

    2016-06-01

    Intensive task-specific training is promoted as one approach for facilitating neural plastic brain changes and associated motor behavior gains following neurologic injury. Partial body weight support treadmill training (PBWSTT), is one task-specific approach frequently used to improve walking during the acute period of stroke recovery (training parameters and physiologic demands during this early recovery phase. To examine the impact of four walking speeds on stride characteristics, lower extremity muscle demands (both paretic and non-paretic), Borg ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and blood pressure. A prospective, repeated measures design was used. Ten inpatients post unilateral stroke participated. Following three familiarization sessions, participants engaged in PBWSTT at four predetermined speeds (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0mph) while bilateral electromyographic and stride characteristic data were recorded. RPE was evaluated immediately following each trial. Stride length, cadence, and paretic single limb support increased with faster walking speeds (p⩽0.001), while non-paretic single limb support remained nearly constant. Faster walking resulted in greater peak and mean muscle activation in the paretic medial hamstrings, vastus lateralis and medial gastrocnemius, and non-paretic medial gastrocnemius (p⩽0.001). RPE also was greatest at the fastest compared to two slowest speeds (ptraining at the slowest speeds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of combining passive muscle stretching and whole body vibration on spasticity and physical performance of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupimai, Teeraporn; Peungsuwan, Punnee; Prasertnoo, Jitlada; Yamauchi, Juinichiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the immediate and short-term effects of a combination of prolonged passive muscle stretching (PMS) and whole body vibration (WBV) on the spasticity, strength and balance of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] A randomized two-period crossover trial was designed. Twelve subjects with cerebral palsy aged 10.6 ± 2.4 years received both PMS alone as a control group (CG) and a combination of PMS and WBV as an experimental group (EG). After random allocation to the trial schedules of either EG-CG or CG-EG, CG received prolonged PMS while standing on a tilt-table for 40 minutes/day, and EG received prolonged PMS for 30 minutes, followed by 10 minutes WBV. Both CG and EG received the treatment 5 days/week for 6 weeks. [Results] Immediately after one treatment, EG resulted in better improvement in scores on the Modified Ashworth Scale than CG. After the 6-week intervention, EG also showed significantly decreased scores on the Modified Ashworth Scale compared to CG. Both CG and EG showed significantly reduced the performance times in the five times sit to stand test, and EG also showed significantly increased scores on the pediatric balance scale. [Conclusion] This study showed that 6 weeks of combined prolonged PMS and WBV had beneficial effects on the spasticity, muscle strength and balance of children and adolescents with CP.

  6. Sporadic-inclusion body myositis (s-IBM) is not so prevalent in Istanbul/Turkey: a muscle biopsy based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oflazer, P Serdaroglu; Deymeer, F; Parman, Y

    2011-06-01

    In a muscle biopsy based study, only 9 out of 5450 biopsy samples, received from all parts of greater Istanbul area, had typical clinical and most suggestive light microscopic sporadic-inclusion body myositis (s-IBM) findings. Two other patients with and ten further patients without characteristic light microscopic findings had referring diagnosis of s-IBM. As the general and the age-adjusted populations of Istanbul in 2010 were 13.255.685 and 2.347.300 respectively, the calculated corresponding 'estimated prevalences' of most suggestive s-IBM in the Istanbul area were 0.679 X 10(-6) and 3.834 X 10(-6). Since Istanbul receives heavy migration from all regions of Turkey and ours is the only muscle pathology laboratory in Istanbul, projection of these figures to the Turkish population was considered to be reasonable and an estimate of the prevalence of s-IBM in Turkey was obtained. The calculated 'estimated prevalence' of s-IBM in Turkey is lower than the previously reported rates from other countries. The wide variation in the prevalence rates of s-IBM may reflect different genetic, immunogenetic or environmental factors in different populations.

  7. Thermal shielding walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Takenori.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress the amount of heat released from a pressure vessel and reliably shield neutron fluxes and gamma rays from a reactor core by the addition of cooling ducts in a thermal shielding wall provided with a blower and an air cooling cooler. Constitution: A thermal shielding wall is located on a pedestal so as to surround a pressure vessel and the pressure vessel is located by way of a skirt in the same manner. Heat insulators are disposed between the pressure vessel and the shielding wall while closer to the skirt in the skirt portion and closer to the shielding wall in the vessel body portion. A plurality of cooling ducts are arranged side by side at the inner side in the shielding wall. A through-duct radially passing through the wall is provided in the lower portion thereof and a blower fan for cooling air and a cooler for cooling returned air are connected by way of a communication duct to the other end of the through-duct. This enables to provide a shielding wall capable of suppressing the amount of heat released from the pressure vessel as much as possible and giving more effective cooling. (Kawakami, Y.)

  8. Resistance Training with Single vs. Multi-joint Exercises at Equal Total Load Volume: Effects on Body Composition, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, and Muscle Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Paoli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to compare the effects of equal-volume resistance training performed with single-joint (SJ or multi-joint exercises (MJ on VO2max, muscle strength and body composition in physically active males. Thirty-six participants were divided in two groups: SJ group (n = 18, 182.1 ± 5.2, 80.03 ± 2.78 kg, 23.5 ± 2.7 years exercised with only SJ exercises (e.g., dumbbell fly, knee extension, etc. and MJ group (n = 18, 185.3 ± 3.6 cm, 80.69 ± 2.98 kg, 25.5 ± 3.8 years with only MJ exercises (e.g., bench press, squat, etc.. The total work volume (repetitions × sets × load was equated between groups. Training was performed three times a week for 8 weeks. Before and after the training period, participants were tested for VO2max, body composition, 1 RM on the bench press, knee extension and squat. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA was used to compare post training values between groups, using baseline values as covariates. According to the results, both groups decreased body fat and increased fat free mass with no difference between them. Whilst both groups significantly increased cardiorespiratory fitness and maximal strength, the improvements in MJ group were higher than for SJ in VO2max (5.1 and 12.5% for SJ and MJ, bench press 1 RM (8.1 and 10.9% for SJ and MJ, knee extension 1 RM (12.4 and 18.9% for SJ and MJ and squat 1 RM (8.3 and 13.8% for SJ and MJ. In conclusion, when total work volume was equated, RT programs involving MJ exercises appear to be more efficient for improving muscle strength and maximal oxygen consumption than programs involving SJ exercises, but no differences were found for body composition.

  9. Endoscopic gold fiducial marker placement into the bladder wall to optimize radiotherapy targeting for bladder-preserving management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer: feasibility and initial outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice M Garcia

    Full Text Available Bladder radiotherapy is a management option for carefully selected patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. However, the inability to visualize the tumor site during treatment and normal bladder movement limits targeting accuracy and increases collateral radiation. A means to accurately and reliably target the bladder during radiotherapy is needed.Eighteen consecutive patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T1-T4 elected bladder-preserving treatment with maximal transurethral resection (TUR, radiation and concurrent chemotherapy. All underwent endoscopic placement of 24-K gold fiducial markers modified with micro-tines (70 [2.9×0.9 mm.]; 19 [2.1×0.7 mm. into healthy submucosa 5-10 mm. from the resection margin, using custom-made coaxial needles. Marker migration was assessed for with intra-op bladder-filling cystogram and measurement of distance between markers. Set-up error and marker retention through completion of radiotherapy was confirmed by on-table portal imaging.Between 1/2007 and 7/2012, a total of 89 markers (3-5 per tumor site were placed into 18 patients of mean age 73.6 years. Two patients elected cystectomy before starting treatment; 16/18 completed chemo-radiotherapy. All (100% markers were visible with all on-table (portal, cone-beam CT, fluoroscopy, plain-film, and CT-scan imaging. In two patients, 1 of 4 markers placed at the tumor site fell-out (voided during the second half of radiotherapy. All other markers (80/82, 98% were present through the end of radio-therapy. No intraoperative (e.g. uncontrolled bleeding, collateral injury or post-operative complications (e.g. stone formation, urinary tract infection, post-TUR hematuria >48 hours occurred. Use of micro-tined fiducial tumor-site markers afforded a 2 to 6-fold reduction in bladder-area targeted with high-dose radiation.Placement of the micro-tined fiducial markers into the bladder was feasible and associated with excellent retention-rate and no complications

  10. , 1584), increase in lean body mass (ID 1579, 1582, 1583), increase in muscle strength (ID 1578, 1583, 1587), increase in endurance performance (ID 1580, 1581), skeletal muscle tissue repair (ID 1586) and faster recovery from muscle fatigue after exercise (ID 1576, 1585) pursuant to Article 13, EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to β-hydroxy β-methylbutyrate monohydrate (HMB) alone or in combination with α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) and reduction of muscle tissue damage during exercise (ID 1577

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    claims in relation to β-hydroxy β-methylbutyrate monohydrate (HMB) alone or in combination with α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) and reduction of muscle tissue damage during exercise, increase in lean body mass, increase in muscle strength, increase in endurance performance, skeletal muscle tissue repair...... and faster recovery from muscle fatigue after exercise. The scientific substantiation is based on the information provided by the Member States in the consolidated list of Article 13 health claims and references that EFSA has received from Member States or directly from stakeholders. The food constituent...

  11. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how walls...

  12. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how walls...... have encouraged architectural thinking of enclosure, materiality, construction and inhabitation in architectural history, the paper’s aim is to define new directions for the integration of LEDs in walls, challenging the thinking of inhabitation and program. This paper introduces the notion...... of “ambiguous walls” as a more “critical” approach to design [1]. The concept of ambiguous walls refers to the diffuse status a lumious and possibly responsive wall will have. Instead of confining it can open up. Instead of having a static appearance, it becomes a context over time. Instead of being hard...

  13. A buffered form of creatine does not promote greater changes in muscle creatine content, body composition, or training adaptations than creatine monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagim Andrew R

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Creatine monohydrate (CrM has been consistently reported to increase muscle creatine content and improve high-intensity exercise capacity. However, a number of different forms of creatine have been purported to be more efficacious than CrM. The purpose of this study was to determine if a buffered creatine monohydrate (KA that has been purported to promote greater creatine retention and training adaptations with fewer side effects at lower doses is more efficacious than CrM supplementation in resistance-trained individuals. Methods In a double-blind manner, 36 resistance-trained participants (20.2 ± 2 years, 181 ± 7 cm, 82.1 ± 12 kg, and 14.7 ± 5% body fat were randomly assigned to supplement their diet with CrM (Creapure® AlzChem AG, Trostberg, Germany at normal loading (4 x 5 g/d for 7-days and maintenance (5 g/d for 21-days doses; KA (Kre-Alkalyn®, All American Pharmaceutical, Billings, MT, USA at manufacturer’s recommended doses (KA-L, 1.5 g/d for 28-days; or, KA with equivalent loading (4 x 5 g/d for 7-days and maintenance (5 g/d doses of CrM (KA-H. Participants were asked to maintain their current training programs and record all workouts. Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis, fasting blood samples, body weight, DEXA determined body composition, and Wingate Anaerobic Capacity (WAC tests were performed at 0, 7, and 28-days while 1RM strength tests were performed at 0 and 28-days. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA and are presented as mean ± SD changes from baseline after 7 and 28-days, respectively. Results Muscle free creatine content obtained in a subgroup of 25 participants increased in all groups over time (1.4 ± 20.7 and 11.9 ± 24.0 mmol/kg DW, p = 0.03 after 7 and 28-days, respectively, with no significant differences among groups (KA-L −7.9 ± 22.3, 4.7 ± 27.0; KA-H 1.0 ± 12.8, 9.1

  14. A buffered form of creatine does not promote greater changes in muscle creatine content, body composition, or training adaptations than creatine monohydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagim, Andrew R; Oliver, Jonathan M; Sanchez, Adam; Galvan, Elfego; Fluckey, James; Riechman, Steven; Greenwood, Michael; Kelly, Katherine; Meininger, Cynthia; Rasmussen, Christopher; Kreider, Richard B

    2012-09-13

    Creatine monohydrate (CrM) has been consistently reported to increase muscle creatine content and improve high-intensity exercise capacity. However, a number of different forms of creatine have been purported to be more efficacious than CrM. The purpose of this study was to determine if a buffered creatine monohydrate (KA) that has been purported to promote greater creatine retention and training adaptations with fewer side effects at lower doses is more efficacious than CrM supplementation in resistance-trained individuals. In a double-blind manner, 36 resistance-trained participants (20.2 ± 2 years, 181 ± 7 cm, 82.1 ± 12 kg, and 14.7 ± 5% body fat) were randomly assigned to supplement their diet with CrM (Creapure® AlzChem AG, Trostberg, Germany) at normal loading (4 x 5 g/d for 7-days) and maintenance (5 g/d for 21-days) doses; KA (Kre-Alkalyn®, All American Pharmaceutical, Billings, MT, USA) at manufacturer's recommended doses (KA-L, 1.5 g/d for 28-days); or, KA with equivalent loading (4 x 5 g/d for 7-days) and maintenance (5 g/d) doses of CrM (KA-H). Participants were asked to maintain their current training programs and record all workouts. Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis, fasting blood samples, body weight, DEXA determined body composition, and Wingate Anaerobic Capacity (WAC) tests were performed at 0, 7, and 28-days while 1RM strength tests were performed at 0 and 28-days. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and are presented as mean ± SD changes from baseline after 7 and 28-days, respectively. Muscle free creatine content obtained in a subgroup of 25 participants increased in all groups over time (1.4 ± 20.7 and 11.9 ± 24.0 mmol/kg DW, p = 0.03) after 7 and 28-days, respectively, with no significant differences among groups (KA-L -7.9 ± 22.3, 4.7 ± 27.0; KA-H 1.0 ± 12.8, 9.1 ± 23.2; CrM 11.3 ± 23.9, 22.3 ± 21

  15. Mechanisms of carbacholine and GABA action on resting membrane potential and Na+/K+-ATPase of Lumbricus terrestris body wall muscles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Volkov, E. M.; Nurullin, L. F.; Volkov, M. E.; Nikolsky, E. E.; Vyskočil, František

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 158, č. 4 (2011), s. 520-524 ISSN 1095-6433 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110905; GA ČR GA202/09/0806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : GABA * acetylcholine * atropine Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.235, year: 2011

  16. A buffered form of creatine does not promote greater changes in muscle creatine content, body composition, or training adaptations than creatine monohydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Creatine monohydrate (CrM) has been consistently reported to increase muscle creatine content and improve high-intensity exercise capacity. However, a number of different forms of creatine have been purported to be more efficacious than CrM. The purpose of this study was to determine if a buffered creatine monohydrate (KA) that has been purported to promote greater creatine retention and training adaptations with fewer side effects at lower doses is more efficacious than CrM supplementation in resistance-trained individuals. Methods In a double-blind manner, 36 resistance-trained participants (20.2 ± 2 years, 181 ± 7 cm, 82.1 ± 12 kg, and 14.7 ± 5% body fat) were randomly assigned to supplement their diet with CrM (Creapure® AlzChem AG, Trostberg, Germany) at normal loading (4 x 5 g/d for 7-days) and maintenance (5 g/d for 21-days) doses; KA (Kre-Alkalyn®, All American Pharmaceutical, Billings, MT, USA) at manufacturer’s recommended doses (KA-L, 1.5 g/d for 28-days); or, KA with equivalent loading (4 x 5 g/d for 7-days) and maintenance (5 g/d) doses of CrM (KA-H). Participants were asked to maintain their current training programs and record all workouts. Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis, fasting blood samples, body weight, DEXA determined body composition, and Wingate Anaerobic Capacity (WAC) tests were performed at 0, 7, and 28-days while 1RM strength tests were performed at 0 and 28-days. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and are presented as mean ± SD changes from baseline after 7 and 28-days, respectively. Results Muscle free creatine content obtained in a subgroup of 25 participants increased in all groups over time (1.4 ± 20.7 and 11.9 ± 24.0 mmol/kg DW, p = 0.03) after 7 and 28-days, respectively, with no significant differences among groups (KA-L −7.9 ± 22.3, 4.7 ± 27.0; KA-H 1.0 ± 12.8, 9.1 ± 23.2; Cr

  17. How much protein can the body use in a single meal for muscle-building? Implications for daily protein distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Brad Jon; Aragon, Alan Albert

    2018-01-01

    Controversy exists about the maximum amount of protein that can be utilized for lean tissue-building purposes in a single meal for those involved in regimented resistance training. It has been proposed that muscle protein synthesis is maximized in young adults with an intake of ~ 20-25 g of a high-quality protein; anything above this amount is believed to be oxidized for energy or transaminated to form urea and other organic acids. However, these findings are specific to the provision of fast-digesting proteins without the addition of other macronutrients. Consumption of slower-acting protein sources, particularly when consumed in combination with other macronutrients, would delay absorption and thus conceivably enhance the utilization of the constituent amino acids. The purpose of this paper was twofold: 1) to objectively review the literature in an effort to determine an upper anabolic threshold for per-meal protein intake; 2) draw relevant conclusions based on the current data so as to elucidate guidelines for per-meal daily protein distribution to optimize lean tissue accretion. Both acute and long-term studies on the topic were evaluated and their findings placed into context with respect to per-meal utilization of protein and the associated implications to distribution of protein feedings across the course of a day. The preponderance of data indicate that while consumption of higher protein doses (> 20 g) results in greater AA oxidation, this is not the fate for all the additional ingested AAs as some are utilized for tissue-building purposes. Based on the current evidence, we conclude that to maximize anabolism one should consume protein at a target intake of 0.4 g/kg/meal across a minimum of four meals in order to reach a minimum of 1.6 g/kg/day. Using the upper daily intake of 2.2 g/kg/day reported in the literature spread out over the same four meals would necessitate a maximum of 0.55 g/kg/meal.

  18. Whole body oxygen uptake and evoked knee torque in response to low frequency electrical stimulation of the quadriceps muscles: V•O2 frequency response to NMES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minogue, Conor M; Caulfield, Brian M; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2013-06-28

    There is emerging evidence that isometric Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) may offer a way to elicit therapeutically significant increases in whole-body oxygen uptake in order to deliver aerobic exercise to patients unable to exercise volitionally, with consequent gains in cardiovascular health. The optimal stimulation frequency to elicit a significant and sustained pulmonary oxygen uptake has not been determined. The aim of this study was to examine the frequency response of the oxygen uptake and evoked torque due to NMES of the quadriceps muscles across a range of low frequencies spanning the twitch to tetanus transition. Ten healthy male subjects underwent bilateral NMES of the quadriceps muscles comprising eight 4 minute bouts of intermittent stimulation at selected frequencies in the range 1 to 12 Hz, interspersed with 4 minutes rest periods. Respiratory gases and knee extensor torque were simultaneously monitored throughout. Multiple linear regression was used to fit the resulting data to an energetic model which expressed the energy rate in terms of the pulse frequency, the torque time integral and a factor representing the accumulated force developed per unit time. Additional oxygen uptake increased over the frequency range to a maximum of 564 (SD 114) ml min-1 at 12 Hz, and the respiratory exchange ratio was close to unity from 4 to 12 Hz. While the highest induced torque occurred at 12 Hz, the peak of the force development factor occurred at 6 Hz. The regression model accounted for 88% of the variability in the observed energetic response. Taking into account the requirement to avoid prolonged tetanic contractions and to minimize evoked torque, the results suggest that the ideal frequency for sustainable aerobic exercise is 4 to 5 Hz, which coincided in this study with the frequency above which significant twitch force summation occurred.

  19. The effect of five weeks of Tribulus terrestris supplementation on muscle strength and body composition during preseason training in elite rugby league players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogerson, Shane; Riches, Christopher J; Jennings, Carl; Weatherby, Robert P; Meir, Rudi A; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya M

    2007-05-01

    Tribulus terrestris is an herbal nutritional supplement that is promoted to produce large gains in strength and lean muscle mass in 5-28 days (15, 18). Although some manufacturers claim T. terrestris will not lead to a positive drug test, others have suggested that T. terrestris may increase the urinary testosterone/epitestosterone (T/E) ratio, which may place athletes at risk of a positive drug test. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of T. terrestris on strength, fat free mass, and the urinary T/E ratio during 5 weeks of preseason training in elite rugby league players. Twenty-two Australian elite male rugby league players (mean +/- SD; age = 19.8 +/- 2.9 years; weight = 88.0 +/- 9.5 kg) were match-paired and randomly assigned in a double-blind manner to either a T. terrestris (n = 11) or placebo (n = 11) group. All subjects performed structured heavy resistance training as part of the club's preseason preparations. A T. terrestris extract (450 mg.d(-1)) or placebo capsules were consumed once daily for 5 weeks. Muscular strength, body composition, and the urinary T/E ratio were monitored prior to and after supplementation. After 5 weeks of training, strength and fat free mass increased significantly without any between-group differences. No between-group differences were noted in the urinary T/E ratio. It was concluded that T. terrestris did not produce the large gains in strength or lean muscle mass that many manufacturers claim can be experienced within 5-28 days. Furthermore, T. terrestris did not alter the urinary T/E ratio and would not place an athlete at risk of testing positive based on the World Anti-Doping Agency's urinary T/E ratio limit of 4:1.

  20. Leg muscle mass and composition in relation to lower extremity performance in men and women aged 70 to 79 : the health, aging and body composition study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Marjolein; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Goodpaster, Bret H; Newman, Anne B; Nevitt, Michael; Stamm, Elizabeth; Harris, Tamara B

    OBJECTIVES: The loss of muscle mass with aging, or sarcopenia, is hypothesized to be associated with the deterioration of physical function. Our aim was to determine whether low leg muscle mass and greater fat infiltration in the muscle were associated with poor lower extremity performance (LEP).

  1. Effect of vitamin D supplementation and isokinetic training on muscle strength, explosive strength, lean body mass and gait in severely burned children: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebid, Anwar Abdelgayed; El-Shamy, Shamekh Mohamed; Amer, Maysa Abbas

    2017-03-01

    To determine the effects of vitamin D (VD) supplementation and isokinetic training on muscle strength, explosive strength (counter movement jump) (ES), lean body mass (LBM) and gait parameters in severe pediatric burn. Forty-eight burned children with circumferential lower extremity burns covering 40-55% of the total body surface area (TBSA), aged 10-16 years (Mean±SD 13.01±1.75), were randomized into the standard of care (n=16), isokinetic (n=17) and VD (n=15) groups. Unburned children (n=20) served as matched controls. All burned children received 12 weeks of routine physical therapy program (RPTP). In addition, the isokinetic group received isokinetic training for the quadriceps dominant limb 3 times per week at angular velocity 150°/s, and the VD group received the isokinetic training plus an oral daily dose of vitamin D 3 1000 IU (Cholecalciferol). The primary measures, assessed at baseline and 12 weeks, included quadriceps strength by isokinetic dynamometer, ES, LBM by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and gait parameters by GAITRite system. The VD and isokinetic groups showed significant improvement in quadriceps strength, ES, LBM and gait parameters compared with the standard of care, and VD group show significant improvement in the VD level as compared with the other groups. The outcome measures (and percent of improvement where applicable) for the VD, isokinetic and standard of care are as follows: quadriceps strength, 85.25±0.93Nm (85%), 64.25±0.93 (36%) and 51.88±1.31Nm (12%); stride length, 94.00±2.69 (7%), 110.60±2.87 (25%) and 139.56±2.57 (60%); step length, 67.26±2.45 (72%), 55.25±2.49 (43%) and 43.76±1.34 (18%); velocity, 133.94±1.65 (82%), 99.94±1.65 (35%) and 80.11±1.91 (9%); and cadence, 140.63±1.36 (68%), 132.63±1.36 (58%) and 90.35±1.32 (9%), VD level 43.33±7.48 (75%), 24.77±7.38 (5%) and 25.63±8.39 (4%) respectively. VD supplementation combined with exercise training significantly increased muscle strength, ES, LBM

  2. Heavy Resistance Training and Supplementation With the Alleged Testosterone Booster Nmda has No Effect on Body Composition, Muscle Performance, and Serum Hormones Associated With the Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in Resistance-Trained Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darryn S. Willoughby

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of 28 days of heavy resistance training while ingesting the alleged testosterone-boosting supplement, NMDA, were determined on body composition, muscle strength, serum cortisol, prolactin, and hormones associated with the hypothalamo-pituitary- gonadal (HPG axis. Twenty resistance-trained males engaged in 28 days of resistance training 4 times/wk while orally ingesting daily either 1.78 g of placebo (PLAC or NMDA. Data were analyzed with separate 2 x 2 ANOVA (p 0.05 or supplementation (p > 0.05. In regard to total body mass and fat-free mass, however, each was significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training (p 0.05. In both groups, lower-body muscle strength was significantly increased in response to resistance training (p 0.05. All serum hormones (total and free testosterone, LH, GnRH, estradiol, cortisol, prolactin were unaffected by resistance training (p > 0.05 or supplementation (p > 0.05. The gonadal hormones and cortisol and prolactin were unaffected by 28 days of NMDA supplementation and not associated with the observed increases in muscle strength and mass. At the dose provided, NMDA had no effect on HPG axis activity or ergogenic effects in skeletal muscle.

  3. Agreement of bioelectrical impedance with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and MRI to estimate changes in body fat, skeletal muscle and visceral fat during a 12-month weight loss intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Kaye, Sanna; Karmi, Anna; Suojanen, Laura; Rissanen, Aila; Virtanen, Kirsi A

    2013-05-28

    The aim of the present study was to analyse the agreement of bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) compared with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and MRI in estimating body fat, skeletal muscle and visceral fat during a 12-month weight loss intervention. A total of nineteen obese adults (twelve females, seven males) aged 20·2-48·6 years, mean BMI 34·6 (SE 0·6) kg/m², participated in the study. Body fat, skeletal muscle and visceral fat index were measured by BIA (Omron BF-500; Omron Medizintechnik) and compared with DXA (body fat and skeletal muscle) at baseline, 5 and 12 months, and with MRI (visceral fat) at baseline and 5 months. The subjects lost 8·9 (SE 1·8) kg (9·0 (SE 1·7) %) of body weight during the 12-month intervention. BIA, as compared to DXA, accurately assessed loss of fat (7·0 (SE 1·5) v. 7·0 (SE 1·4) kg, P= 0·94) and muscle (1·0 (SE 0·2) v. 1·4 (SE 0·3) kg, P= 0·18). While body fat was similar by the two methods, skeletal muscle was underestimated by 1-2 kg using BIA at each time point. Compared to MRI, BIA overestimated visceral fat, especially in males. BIA and DXA showed high correlations for kg fat, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally (r 0·91-0·99). BIA, compared with DXA and MRI, detected kg muscle and visceral fat more accurately cross-sectionally (r 0·77-0·87 and r 0·40-0·78, respectively) than their changes longitudinally (r 0·24-0·61 and r 0·46, respectively). BIA is at its best when assessing the amount or changes in fat mass. It is a useful method for measuring skeletal muscle, but limited in its ability to measure visceral fat.

  4. Foreign body granuloma in the anterior abdominal wall mimicking an acute appendicular lump and induced by a translocated copper-T intrauterine contraceptive device: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansari Maulana Mohammed

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Intrauterine contraceptive devices may at times perforate and migrate to adjacent organs. Such uterine perforation usually passes unnoticed with development of potentially serious complications. Case presentation A 25-year-old woman of North Indian origin presented with an acute tender lump in the right iliac fossa. The lump was initially thought to be an appendicular lump and treated conservatively. Resolution of the lump was incomplete. On exploratory laparotomy, a hard suspicious mass was found in the anterior abdominal wall of the right iliac fossa. Wide excision and bisection of the mass revealed a copper-T embedded inside. Examination of the uterus did not show any evidence of perforation. The next day, the patient gave a history of past copper-T Intrauterine contraceptive device insertion. Conclusions Copper-T insertion is one of the simplest contraceptive methods but its neglect with inadequate follow-up may lead to uterine perforation and extra-uterine migration. Regular self-examination for the "threads" supplemented with abdominal X-ray and/or ultrasound in the follow-up may detect copper-T migration early. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of intrauterine contraceptive device migration to the anterior abdominal wall of the right iliac fossa.

  5. Muscle Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after ... It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves that malfunction. Sometimes ...

  6. GH responsiveness before and after a 3-week multidisciplinary body weight reduction program associated with an incremental respiratory muscle endurance training in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigamonti, A E; Agosti, F; Patrizi, A; Tringali, G; Fessehatsion, R; Cella, S G; Sartorio, A

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the obesity-related hyposomatropism is usually reversible after a consistent weight loss induced by diet and/or bariatric surgery. Recently, a single bout of respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET) by means of a specific commercially available device (Spiro Tiger®) has been reported to induce a marked GH response in obese adults, its GH-releasing effect being significantly lower in obese adolescents. The GH response disappeared in both obese adults and adolescents when RMET was repeated at 2-h intervals in-between. The aim of the present study was to evaluate GH responses to repeated bouts of RMET administered before and after a 3-week in-hospital multidisciplinary body weight reduction program (entailing energy-restricted diet, 90 min/daily aerobic physical activity, psychological counseling, and nutritional education) combined with a progressively increasing RMET (15 daily sessions, 5 sessions per week) in 7 obese male adolescents [age: 12-17 years; body mass index (BMI): 38.5±3.1 kg/m2; percent fat mass (FM): 37.0±2.0%]. Blood samplings for GH determinations were collected during the 1st and 15th sessions, which were composed of 2 consecutive bouts of RMET (of identical intensity and duration) at 2-h interval in-between. At the beginning of the study, baseline GH levels significantly increased after the first bout of RMET in all subjects (pweight (from 115.3±9.2 kg to 111.5±8.7 kg, pweight reduction intervention does not seem useful to positively influence the reduced GH responsiveness to 2 repeated RMET bouts in obese adolescents. More intensive and/or long-term RMET protocols, associated with energy-restricted diets, determining more consistent changes in body composition, are likely needed to restore the impaired GH-IGF-1 function of obese adolescents. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Heavy Resistance Training and Supplementation With the Alleged Testosterone Booster Nmda has No Effect on Body Composition, Muscle Performance, and Serum Hormones Associated With the Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in Resistance-Trained Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Darryn S; Spillane, Mike; Schwarz, Neil

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 28 days of heavy resistance training while ingesting the alleged testosterone-boosting supplement, NMDA, were determined on body composition, muscle strength, serum cortisol, prolactin, and hormones associated with the hypothalamo-pituitary- gonadal (HPG) axis. Twenty resistance-trained males engaged in 28 days of resistance training 4 times/wk while orally ingesting daily either 1.78 g of placebo (PLAC) or NMDA. Data were analyzed with separate 2 x 2 ANOVA (p training and supplementation. No changes were noted for total body water and fat mass in response to resistance training (p > 0.05) or supplementation (p > 0.05). In regard to total body mass and fat-free mass, however, each was significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training (p 0.05). In both groups, lower-body muscle strength was significantly increased in response to resistance training (p 0.05). All serum hormones (total and free testosterone, LH, GnRH, estradiol, cortisol, prolactin) were unaffected by resistance training (p > 0.05) or supplementation (p > 0.05). The gonadal hormones and cortisol and prolactin were unaffected by 28 days of NMDA supplementation and not associated with the observed increases in muscle strength and mass. At the dose provided, NMDA had no effect on HPG axis activity or ergogenic effects in skeletal muscle. Key PointsIn response to 28 days of heavy resistance training and NMDA supplementation, similar increases in muscle mass and strength in both groups occurred; however, the increases were not different between supplement groups.The supplementation of NMDA had no preferential effect on augmenting testosterone or decreasing estrogen, cortisol, and prolactin.While resistance training was effective in increasing muscle mass and strength, it was not preferentially due to NMDA supplementation.At the dose provided, NMDA supplementation for 28 days combined with resistance training does not increases muscle mass and strength due to its

  8. Nebulin-like protein in the earthworm Eisenia foetida. Immunocytochemical electron microscopic study and western blot analysis of several muscle cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royuela, M; Fraile, B; Paniagua, R

    1997-07-01

    Nebulin is a giant protein (500-900 kDa), which has been reported only in the skeletal muscle (not in cardiac muscle) of vertebrates. The possible presence and distribution of nebulin-like proteins in obliquely striated muscles (body wall and inner muscular layer of the pseudoheart) and smooth muscle (outer muscular layer of the pseudoheart) from the earthworm Eisenia foetida have been examined by means of Western blotting analysis and immunoelectron microscopy, using antibodies against mouse nebulin. The results were compared with those obtained in skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscles of the mouse. In the mouse, immunoreaction to nebulin was observed only in the skeletal muscle and extended along the length of the thin filament. In the earthworm, immunoreaction to a nebulin-like protein was found in the muscle of the body wall and the inner muscular layer of the pseudoheart, but not in the outer muscular layer of the pseudoheart. By electron microscopy, immunolabeling to this protein was observed along the whole length of the thin filament. Western blotting analysis of this nebulin-like protein showed a single band at an estimated molecular mass between 350 and 450 kDa that is slightly lower than that of mouse skeletal muscle nebulin.

  9. Cellular schwannoma arising from the gastric wall misdiagnosed as a gastric stromal tumor: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangyao; Chen, Ping; Zong, Liang; Shi, Lei; Zhao, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Cellular schwannomas have been previously described at almost every anatomic location of the human body, but reports in the gastric wall are rare. The current study presents a rare case of cellular schwannoma originating from the gastric wall. Computed tomography revealed a 5.6×5.3×4.0-cm 3 solid mass located in the posterior wall of the stomach. Open laparotomy confirmed its mesenchymal origin. Microscopically, the tissue was composed of spindle-shaped and fascicularly-arranged cells, but mitotic figures were rare. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the tumor was negative for cluster of differentiation (CD)117, CD34, smooth muscle actin and desmin, but positive for S-100 and Ki67. The patient presented no evidence of recurrence and metastasis during follow-up. Gastric cellular schwannomas may be diagnosed by clinical characteristics, histological observations and immunohistochemical markers.

  10. Effect of whole-body vibration and insulin-like growth factor-I on muscle paralysis-induced bone degeneration after botulinum toxin injection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehoff, Anja; Lechner, Philipp; Ratiu, Oana; Reuter, Sven; Hamann, Nina; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Schönau, Eckhard; Bloch, Wilhelm; Beccard, Ralf

    2014-04-01

    Botulinum toxin A (BTX)-induced muscle paralysis results in pronounced bone degradation with substantial bone loss. We hypothesized that whole-body vibration (WBV) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) treatment can counteract paralysis-induced bone degradation following BTX injections by activation of the protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway. Female C57BL/6 mice (n = 60, 16 weeks) were assigned into six groups (n = 10 each): SHAM, BTX, BTX+WBV, BTX+IGF-I, BTX+WBV+IGF-I, and a baseline group, which was killed at the beginning of the study. Mice received a BTX (1.0 U/0.1 mL) or saline (SHAM) injection in the right hind limb. The BTX+IGF-I and BTX+WBV+IGF-I groups obtained daily subcutaneous injections of human IGF-I (1 μg/day). The BTX+WBV and BTX+WBV+IGF-I groups underwent WBV (25 Hz, 2.1 g, 0.83 mm) for 30 min/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Femora were scanned by pQCT, and mechanical properties were determined. On tibial sections TRAP staining, static histomorphometry, and immunohistochemical staining against Akt, phospho-Akt, IGF-IR (IGF-I receptor), and phospho-IGF-IR were conducted. BTX injection decreased trabecular and cortical bone mineral density. The WBV and WBV+IGF-I groups showed no difference in trabecular bone mineral density compared to the SHAM group. The phospho-IGF-IR and phospho-Akt stainings were not differentially altered in the injected hind limbs between groups. We found that high-frequency, low-magnitude WBV can counteract paralysis-induced bone loss following BTX injections, while we could not detect any effect of treatment with IGF-I.

  11. CLIMBING WALL

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE AND RESCUE Group of TIS Commission informs that the climbing wall in the yard of the Fire-fighters Station, is intended for the sole use of the members of that service, and recalls that access to this installation is forbidden for safety reasons to all persons not belonging to the Service.CERN accepts no liability for damage or injury suffered as a result of failure to comply with this interdiction.TIS/DI

  12. Genetic parameters of white striping in relation to body weight, carcass composition, and meat quality traits in two broiler lines divergently selected for the ultimate pH of the pectoralis major muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnahhas, Nabeel; Berri, Cécile; Chabault, Marie; Chartrin, Pascal; Boulay, Maryse; Bourin, Marie Christine; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth

    2016-04-19

    White striping (WS) is an emerging quality defect with adverse consequences for the sensorial, technological, and nutritional qualities of breast meat in broiler chickens. The genetic determinism of this defect is little understood and thus the aim of the study presented here was to estimate the genetic parameters of WS in relation to other traits of economic importance such as body weight, carcass composition, and technological meat quality in an experimental population consisting of two divergent lines selected for high (pHu + line) or low (pHu- line) ultimate pH (pHu) of the pectoralis major (p. major) muscle. The incidence of WS in the whole population was 50.7%, with 36.7% of broilers being moderately and 14% being severely affected. A higher incidence of moderate (p meat yield (0.68 ± 0.06), but not with the percentage of leg or abdominal fat. Increased body weight and breast muscle yield were significantly associated with increased incidence and severity of WS regardless of the line. Significant rg were observed between WS and several meat quality traits, including breast (0.21 ± 0.08) and thigh (0.31 ± 0.10) pHu, and breast cooking loss (0.30 ± 0.15). WS was also strongly genetically correlated with the intramuscular fat content of the pectoralis major muscle (0.64 ± 0.09), but not with the lipid oxidation index of this muscle. This study highlighted the role of genetics as a major determinant of WS. The estimated genetic correlations showed that WS was more highly related to muscle development than to the overall growth of the body. The positive genetic association reported in this study between WS and muscle pHu indicated a possible relationship between the ability of muscle to store energy as a carbohydrate and its likelihood of developing WS. Finally, the strong genetic determinism of WS suggested that selection can be an efficient means of reducing the incidence of WS and of limiting its undesirable consequences on meat quality in broiler chickens.

  13. Muscle as a secretory organ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente K

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the body. Skeletal muscles are primarily characterized by their mechanical activity required for posture, movement, and breathing, which depends on muscle fiber contractions. However, skeletal muscle is not just a component in our locomotor system. Recent...... evidence has identified skeletal muscle as a secretory organ. We have suggested that cytokines and other peptides that are produced, expressed, and released by muscle fibers and exert either autocrine, paracrine, or endocrine effects should be classified as "myokines." The muscle secretome consists...... of several hundred secreted peptides. This finding provides a conceptual basis and a whole new paradigm for understanding how muscles communicate with other organs such as adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, bones, and brain. In addition, several myokines exert their effects within the muscle itself. Many...