WorldWideScience

Sample records for body tumors radioguided

  1. Quantitative assessment of Cerenkov luminescence for radioguided brain tumor resection surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Justin S.; Mitchell, Gregory S.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2017-05-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is a developing imaging modality that detects radiolabeled molecules via visible light emitted during the radioactive decay process. We used a Monte Carlo based computer simulation to quantitatively investigate CLI compared to direct detection of the ionizing radiation itself as an intraoperative imaging tool for assessment of brain tumor margins. Our brain tumor model consisted of a 1 mm spherical tumor remnant embedded up to 5 mm in depth below the surface of normal brain tissue. Tumor to background contrast ranging from 2:1 to 10:1 were considered. We quantified all decay signals (e±, gamma photon, Cerenkov photons) reaching the brain volume surface. CLI proved to be the most sensitive method for detecting the tumor volume in both imaging and non-imaging strategies as assessed by contrast-to-noise ratio and by receiver operating characteristic output of a channelized Hotelling observer.

  2. Radioguided parathyroidectomy for tertiary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somnay, Yash R; Weinlander, Eric; Alfhefdi, Amal; Schneider, David; Sippel, Rebecca S; Chen, Herbert

    2015-05-15

    Tertiary hyperparathyroidism (3HPT) is defined as the persistent hyperproduction of parathyroid hormone and resulting hypercalcemia after renal transplantation. Here, we examine the utility of radioguided parathyroidectomy (RGP) in patients with 3HPT. We reviewed a prospective surgery database containing 80 3HPT patients who underwent RGP from January 2001-July 2014 at our institution. We evaluated patient demographics, operative management, radioguided neoprobe utilization, and operative outcomes. Data are reported as mean ± standard error of the mean. The mean age of the patients was 52 ± 1 y, and 46% were male. A total of 69 patients had hyperplasia and received subtotal parathyroidectomy, whereas 5 patients had double adenomas and 6 patients had single adenomas. The average calcium level among 3HPT patients was 10.8 ± 0.1 mg/dL preoperatively and 8.7 ± 0.1 mg/dL postoperatively. In vivo radioguided counts normalized to background counts averaged 145 ± 4%, whereas ex vivo counts normalized to background counts averaged 69 ± 5%. All but one ex vivo count was >20%. Ectopically located glands were successfully localized in 38 patients using the gamma probe. Ex vivo percentage did not correlate with parathyroid gland weight, preoperative parathyroid hormone, or preoperative calcium. Our radioguided approach achieved normocalcemia in 96% of 3HPT patients undergoing RGP; two patients developed recurrent disease. In this series, all enlarged parathyroid glands were localized and resected using the gamma probe. Thus, RGP reliably localizes adenomatous, hyperplastic, and ectopically located glands in patients with 3HPT, resulting in high cure rate after resection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A γ detecting probe developed for radioguided surgery and its primary using for animal experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Haipeng, Lin Yingwu; Gong Peirong; Yang Zhirong; Qiu Shi

    2003-01-01

    A new γ detecting probe device was described, which was used in radioguided surgery (RGS) for detecting tumor and its micrometastasis. The concrete scheme for this system was given in this paper and its performance was also evaluate. The animal experimental results showed that the γ detecting probe has excellent location resolution, and its collimator is practical

  4. New applications of radioguided surgery in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almir Galvão Vieira Bitencourt

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report oncological cases (excluding those related to breast cancer for which radioguided surgery has been used in combination with the Radioguided Occult Lesion Localization technique. INTRODUCTION: Radioguided surgery enables a surgeon to identify lesions or tissues that have been preoperatively marked with radioactive substances. The Radioguided Occult Lesion Localization technique has been widely used to identify the sentinel lymph node and occult lesions in patients with breast cancer. However, few studies have reported the use of this technique for non-breast cancer pathologies. METHODOLOGY: In all cases, injection of Technecium-99m sulfur colloid was performed, directly inside or near by the suspicious lesion, guided by ultrasound or computed tomography, up to 36 hours prior to the surgical procedure. Intraoperative lesion detection was carried out using a gamma-probe. RESULTS: We report five oncology cases in which preoperative markings of the lesions were carried out using the Radioguided Occult Lesion Localization technique. The patients presented with the following: recurrence of renal cell carcinoma, cervical recurrence of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid, recurrence of retroperitoneal sarcoma, lesions of the popliteal fossa, and recurrence of rhabdomyosarcoma of a thigh. In each case, the lesions that were marked preoperatively were ultimately successfully excised. CONCLUSIONS: Radioguided surgery has proven to be a safe and effective alternative for the management of oncology patients. The Radioguided Occult Lesion Localization technique can be useful in selected cases where suspect lesions may be difficult to identify intraoperatively, due to their dimensions or anatomical location. The procedure allows for more conservative excisions and reduces the surgery-related morbidity.

  5. [Diagnostic and treatment of carotid bodies tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonev, A; Zakhariev, T

    2007-01-01

    Carotid body tumor is rare neoplasm (about 0,5 per cent of all tumors).[28]. The tumor arise from paraganglionic cells of carotid body, which develops from both mesodermal elements of the third branchial arch and neural elements originating from the neural crest ectoderm.[25]. Mathews warned: "this rare tumor presents unusual difficulties to the surgeon, and should one encounter it without having suspected the diagnosis, the experience will not soon be forgotten".[19]. The aim of this retrospective study is to investigate the frequency, number of spreading and results from the treatment in patients with carotid bodies tumors. Eleven patients (2,58%) with carotid bodies tumors were diagnosed and operated under upon from January 1990 to June 2007 at the "Department of Vascular surgery and Angiology" of "St. Ekaterina" University hospital - Sofia, from commonly 427 surgical intervention in the area of carotid triangle for the same period. The clinical picture, operating time and blood loss during the surgery were examined. Careful subadventitial dissection was used like a method, which have to reduce the number of postoperative complications and blood loss. All 11 patients were operated upon with endotrachial anesthesia and in two of them there was intracranial nerves injure, reconstruction of carotid artery has established in two of the patients. In the early postoperative period there was disphagia in three of the patients, four were with partial damage of n. hypoglossus, two- with damage of the face branch of n. facialis and six with parasthesia at the operated side. CT angiography of carotid bifurcation has established as basic method in the diagnostic. Total extirpation of the tumor remains the basic method of treatment from high quality specialists in carotid surgery. Careful subadvetitial dissection and accuracy excision allow the whole separation of the tumor from the carotid bifurcation without traumatic lesion. [28].

  6. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norihisa, Yoshiki; Nagata, Yasushi; Takayama, Kenji; Matsuo, Yukinori; Sakamoto, Takashi; Sakamoto, Masato; Mizowaki, Takashi; Yano, Shinsuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Since 1998, we have treated primary and oligometastatic lung tumors with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The term 'oligometastasis' is used to indicate a small number of metastases limited to an organ. We evaluated our clinical experience of SBRT for oligometastatic lung tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 patients with oligometastatic lung tumors were included in this study. The primary involved organs were the lung (n = 15), colorectum (n = 9), head and neck (n = 5), kidney (n = 3), breast (n = 1), and bone (n = 1). Five to seven, noncoplanar, static 6-MV photon beams were used to deliver 48 Gy (n = 18) or 60 Gy (n = 16) at the isocenter, with 12 Gy/fraction within 4-18 days (median, 12 days). Results: The overall survival rate, local relapse-free rate, and progression-free rate at 2 years was 84.3%, 90.0%, and 34.8%, respectively. No local progression was observed in tumors irradiated with 60 Gy. SBRT-related pulmonary toxicities were observed in 4 (12%) Grade 2 cases and 1 (3%) Grade 3 case. Patients with a longer disease-free interval had a greater overall survival rate. Conclusion: The clinical result of SBRT for oligometastatic lung tumors in our institute was comparable to that after surgical metastasectomy; thus, SBRT could be an effective treatment of pulmonary oligometastases

  7. Bilateral carotid body tumor resection in a female patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Burgess

    Full Text Available Introduction: Carotid body tumors also called carotid paragangliomas are rare neuroendocrine neoplasms derived from neural crest cells, approximately 3% of all paragangliomas occur in the head and neck area (Xiao and She, 2015; although they represent 65% of the head and neck paragangliomas (Georgiadis et al., 2008. Presentation of case: We present the therapeutic management of a 65-year-old woman with bilateral carotid body tumors. The patient presented to medical clinic for unrelated signs and symptoms of weight loss, dyspepsia, and epigastric pain. Physical examination showed bilateral non-tender neck masses for which imaging studies were ordered resulting in the diagnosis of bilateral carotid tumor. Surgical resection was staged with one week of distance between each tumor resection. Discussion: Carotid Body Tumors can arise from the paraganglia located within the adventitia of the medial aspect of the carotid bifurcation.Resection is the only curative treatment. Carotid body tumors resection represents a special challenge due to potential neurovascular complications. Conclusions: Surgical resection of carotid body tumors represents a special challenge to the surgeon because of the complex anatomical location of the tumor, including close relationship with the cranial nerves, involvement of the carotid vessels and large vascularization of the tumor. With the advance of diagnosis and improvement in surgical techniques as well as the understanding of biological behavior of tumors, surgical treatment has become a safer alternative for treating these tumors. Keywords: Carotid body tumor, Bilateral, Paraganglioma, Resection

  8. Carotid Body Tumor Presenting as Parotid Swelling Misdiagnosed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carotid body tumor (CBT) also known as chemodectoma is a rare tumor of neuroendocrine tissue of carotid body and is the most commonly seen jugular paraganglioma. In most cases, it is benign but it can be malignant. Extra adrenal paraganglioma is rare. We present such a rare case where unusual presentation of ...

  9. A case report of bilateral carotid body tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Zalak Panchal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A carotid body tumor is a rare presentation of an extra-adrenal paraganglioma which typically present as a slow growing, painless neck mass found along the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. These tumors are generally benign but possess aggressive local growth potential. Therefore, definitive treatment requires surgical resection. Carotid body paragangliomas are diagnosed by Doppler ultrasound, carotid artery angiography, cranial computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Here we describe a case of bilateral carotid body tumors in a 46-year-old female presented with a bilateral neck swelling.

  10. Sterotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Méndez Romero (Alejandra)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAs a common deposit for tumor cells, the liver is second only to the lymph nodes as a site of metastatic disease. Unfortunately, by the time patients present with liver metastases there is usually evidence of the systemic spread of the disease, and patients can not longer be considered

  11. Clinical applications of gamma-detection probes - radioguided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneebaum, S.; Stadler, J.; Skornick, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Radioguided surgery (RGS) is a surgical technique that enables the surgeon to identify tissue ''marked'' by a radionuclide before surgery, based on the tissue characteristics, the radioactive tracer and its carrying molecule, or the affinity of both. Thus, yet another tool has been added to the inspection and palpation traditionally used by the surgeon. Current clinical applications of radioguided surgery are: radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) for colon cancer, sentinel-node mapping for malignant melanoma (which has become state-of-the-art), sentinel-node mapping for breast, vulvar and penile cancer, and detection of parathyroid adenoma and bone tumour (such as osteid osteoma). Although the same gamma-detecting probe (GDP) may be used for all these applications, the carrier substance and the radionuclide differ. MoAb and peptides are used for RIGS, sulphur colloid for sentinel-node mapping, iodine-125 for RIGS, technetium-99m for sentinel node, parathyroid and bone. The mode of injection also differs, but there are some common principles of gamma-guided surgery. RIGS enables the surgeon to corroborate tumour existence, find occult metastases, and assess the margins of resection; this may result in a change on the surgical plan. Sentinel lymph-node (SLN) scintigraphy for melanoma guides the surgeon to find the involved lymph nodes for lymph-node dissection. SLN for breast cancer is being investigated with promising results. This procedure has also changed the outlook of lymph-node pathology by giving the pathologist designated tissue samples for more comprehensive examination. Gamma-guided surgery will result in more accurate and less unnecessary surgery, better pathology and, hopefully, in better patient survival. (orig.)

  12. The GOSTT concept and hybrid mixed/virtual/augmented reality environment radioguided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdés Olmos, R. A.; Van Leeuwen, F. W. B.; Vidal-Sicart, S.; Giammarile, F.; Zaknun, J. J.; Mariani, G.

    2014-01-01

    The popularity gained by the sentinel lymph node (SLN) procedure in the last two decades did increase the interest of the surgical disciplines for other applications of radioguided surgery. An example is the gamma-probe guided localization of occult or difficult to locate neoplastic lesions. Such guidance can be achieved by intralesional delivery (ultrasound, stereotaxis or CT) of a radiolabelled agent that remains accumulated at the site of the injection. Another possibility rested on the use of systemic administration of a tumour-seeking radiopharmaceutical with favourable tumour accumulation and retention. On the other hand, new intraoperative imaging devices for radioguided surgery in complex anatomical areas became available. All this a few years ago led to the delineation of the concept Guided intraOperative Scintigraphic Tumour Targeting (GOSTT) to include the whole spectrum of basic and advanced nuclear medicine procedures required for providing a roadmap that would optimise surgery. The introduction of allied signatures using, e.g. hybrid tracers for simultaneous detection of the radioactive and fluorescent signals did amply the GOSTT concept. It was now possible to combine perioperative nuclear medicine imaging with the superior resolution of additional optical guidance in the operating room. This hybrid approach is currently in progress and probably will become an important model to follow in the coming years. A cornerstone in the GOSTT concept is constituted by diagnostic imaging technologies like SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT was introduced halfway the past decade and was immediately incorporated into the SLN procedure. Important reasons attributing to the success of SPECT/CT were its combination with lymphoscintigraphy, and the ability to display SLNs in an anatomical environment. This latter aspect has significantly been improved in the new generation of SPECT/CT cameras and provides the base for the novel mixed reality protocols of image-guided surgery. In

  13. Radioguided surgery in primary hyperparathyroidism: Results and correlation with intraoperative histopathologic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Juan P; Domínguez, María L; de Santos, Francisco J; González, José M; Fernández, Nuria; Enciso, Fidel J

    2017-08-11

    Radioguided surgery is a minimally invasive surgical technique for the treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism. The goals of our study were to evaluate the rate of success and compare the results with intraoperative histological analysis. We retrospectively studied 84 patients with primary parathyroidism who had undergone radioguided surgery. All the patients had a positive parathyroid scintigraphy prior to surgery. An intravenous injection of Tc-99m sestamibi was administered before surgery, and radioguided location of the pathologic parathyroid tissue was performed using an intraoperative gamma probe, applying the "20% rule". All resected specimens underwent intraoperative histologic analysis. All patients were followed up for at least 6 months. Positive predictive values of both parathyroid scintigraphy and cervical ultrasonography were also compared. Radioguided surgery success rate was 99%. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for gamma probe were 99, 73, 97 and 89%, respectively. After surgery, 83 of 84 patients were eucalcaemic (99%) and parathyroid hormone normalised in 77 of 84 patients (92%). Ultrasonography showed low positive predictive value (41%) when compared with scintigraphy. Radioguided surgery is a minimally invasive surgical technique with excellent results for the treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism and could replace both intraoperative histological analysis and intraoperative parathyroid hormone assay. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  14. Diagnosis and surgical treatment of the carotid body tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matticari, S; Credi, G; Pratesi, C; Bertini, D

    1995-06-01

    Resection of carotid body tumors can be difficult to perform because of its site, vascularity, arterial adherence and local cranial nerve involvement. Advances in vascular surgical technique have reduced the risks of perioperative complications such as carotid injury, stroke and death. From January 1980 to May 1994 20 patients (22 carotid body tumors) were examined. All patients except one were evaluated with a preoperative angiography. No preoperative embolization was performed. Thirteen patients underwent ultrasonography, nine a CT scan of the neck, 5 magnetic resonance scanning and two magnetic resonance angiography. One old patient refused operation. The authors report their experience on 21 carotid body tumor resections (14 Shamblin group I and 7 group II paragangliomas). Surgical technique is based on subadventitial resection (18 excisions) and 3 resections were performed from the medial surface of the carotid bifurcation which had been partially absorbed into the mass. In the last 15 operations intraoperative Somatosensorial Evoked Potential (SEP) monitoring has been used. Only two patient required arterial repair because intimal dissection and another patient needed vagus nerve section. The ligation of external carotid artery and internal carotid resection with graft replacement were never necessary in these patients. No early or late deaths occurred and no recurrences were detected at follow-up.

  15. Use of radioguided surgery with [111In]-pentetreotide in the management of an ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoid causing ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossrubatscher, E; Vignati, F; Dalino, P; Possa, M; Belloni, P A; Vanzulli, A; Bramerio, M; Marocchi, A; Rossetti, O; Zurleni, F; Loli, P

    2005-01-01

    Intraoperative [111In]-pentetreotide scintigraphy with a hand-held gamma detector probe has recently been proposed to increase the intraoperative detection rate of small neuroendocrine tumors and their metastases. We report a case of a 28-yr-old woman with ectopic Cushing's syndrome due to an ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoid, in whom the use of radioguided surgery improved disease management. At presentation, radiolabeled pentetreotide scintigraphy was the only procedure able to detect the ectopic source of ACTH. After radiologic confirmation, the patient underwent removal of a bronchial carcinoid, with disease persistence. After surgery, pentetreotide scintigraphy showed pathologic uptake in the mediastinum not previously detected at surgery and only subsequently confirmed by radiologic studies. Despite a second thoracic exploration, hormonal, scintigraphic, and radiological evidence of residual disease persisted. Radioguided surgery was then performed using a hand-held gamma probe 48 h after iv administration of a tracer dose of radiolabeled [111In-DTPA-D-Phe1]-pentetreotide, which permitted detection and removal of multiple residual mediastinal lymph node metastases. Clinical and radiologic cure, with no evidence of tracer uptake at pentetreotide scintigraphy, was subsequently observed. The use of an intraoperative gamma counter appears a promising procedure in the management of metastatic ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids.

  16. Baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity after carotid body tumor resection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, Henri J. L. M.; Karemaker, John M.; Wieling, Wouter; Marres, Henri A. M.; Lenders, Jacques W. M.

    2003-01-01

    Bilateral carotid body tumor resection causes a permanent attenuation of vagal baroreflex sensitivity. We retrospectively examined the effects of bilateral carotid body tumor resection on the baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve traffic. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was recorded in 5

  17. A comprehensive overview of radioguided surgery using gamma detection probe technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Nathan C

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The concept of radioguided surgery, which was first developed some 60 years ago, involves the use of a radiation detection probe system for the intraoperative detection of radionuclides. The use of gamma detection probe technology in radioguided surgery has tremendously expanded and has evolved into what is now considered an established discipline within the practice of surgery, revolutionizing the surgical management of many malignancies, including breast cancer, melanoma, and colorectal cancer, as well as the surgical management of parathyroid disease. The impact of radioguided surgery on the surgical management of cancer patients includes providing vital and real-time information to the surgeon regarding the location and extent of disease, as well as regarding the assessment of surgical resection margins. Additionally, it has allowed the surgeon to minimize the surgical invasiveness of many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, while still maintaining maximum benefit to the cancer patient. In the current review, we have attempted to comprehensively evaluate the history, technical aspects, and clinical applications of radioguided surgery using gamma detection probe technology.

  18. Tumor segmentation of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1 patients: tumor burden correlates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffler, Michael A.; Xi, Yin; Chhabra, Avneesh [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Le, Lu Q. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Dermatology, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Segmentation of whole-body MRI (WBMRI) to assess the feasibility, quantitate the total tumor volume (tumor burden) in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and examine associations with demographic, disease-related and anthropomorphic features. A consecutive series of patients with NF1 underwent WBMRI and were reviewed for tumors. Tumors were segmented using a semiautomated software-based tool. Tumors were classified as superficial or deep and discrete or plexiform. Segmentation times were recorded. Segmentation yielded the quantity and tumor burden of superficial, internal and plexiform tumors. Correlations between segmentation data and demographic, disease-related and anthropomorphic features were examined. Fifteen patients were evaluated (42.3 ± 13.6 years, 10 female, 5 male). Segmentation times were a median of 30 min and yielded 2,328 tumors (1,582 superficial, 746 internal and 23 plexiform). One tumor was malignant. Tumor counts ranged from 14 to 397. Tumor burden ranged from 6.95 cm3 to 571 cm3. Individual tumor volume ranged from 0.0120 cm3 to 298 cm3. Significant correlation was found between the total volume of superficial tumors and height (ρ = 0.5966, p < 0.02). Male patients had higher overall tumor burdens (p < 0.05) and higher superficial tumor burden (p < 0.03). Patients with negative family history had more tumors (p < 0.05). Segmentation of WBMRI in patients with NF1 is feasible and elucidates meaningful relationships among disease phenotype, anthropomorphic and demographic features. (orig.)

  19. Tumor segmentation of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1 patients: tumor burden correlates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffler, Michael A.; Xi, Yin; Chhabra, Avneesh; Le, Lu Q.

    2017-01-01

    Segmentation of whole-body MRI (WBMRI) to assess the feasibility, quantitate the total tumor volume (tumor burden) in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and examine associations with demographic, disease-related and anthropomorphic features. A consecutive series of patients with NF1 underwent WBMRI and were reviewed for tumors. Tumors were segmented using a semiautomated software-based tool. Tumors were classified as superficial or deep and discrete or plexiform. Segmentation times were recorded. Segmentation yielded the quantity and tumor burden of superficial, internal and plexiform tumors. Correlations between segmentation data and demographic, disease-related and anthropomorphic features were examined. Fifteen patients were evaluated (42.3 ± 13.6 years, 10 female, 5 male). Segmentation times were a median of 30 min and yielded 2,328 tumors (1,582 superficial, 746 internal and 23 plexiform). One tumor was malignant. Tumor counts ranged from 14 to 397. Tumor burden ranged from 6.95 cm3 to 571 cm3. Individual tumor volume ranged from 0.0120 cm3 to 298 cm3. Significant correlation was found between the total volume of superficial tumors and height (ρ = 0.5966, p < 0.02). Male patients had higher overall tumor burdens (p < 0.05) and higher superficial tumor burden (p < 0.03). Patients with negative family history had more tumors (p < 0.05). Segmentation of WBMRI in patients with NF1 is feasible and elucidates meaningful relationships among disease phenotype, anthropomorphic and demographic features. (orig.)

  20. Factors affecting the local control of stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumors including primary lung cancer and metastatic lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Masaaki; Yamashita, Motohiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors affecting local control of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors including primary lung cancer and metastatic lung tumors. Between June 2006 and June 2009, 159 lung tumors in 144 patients (primary lung cancer, 128; metastatic lung tumor, 31) were treated with SBRT with 48-60 Gy (mean 50.1 Gy) in 4-5 fractions. Higher doses were given to larger tumors and metastatic tumors in principle. Assessed factors were age, gender, tumor origin (primary vs. metastatic), histological subtype, tumor size, tumor appearance (solid vs. ground glass opacity), maximum standardized uptake value of positron emission tomography using 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose, and SBRT doses. Follow-up time was 1-60 months (median 18 months). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year local failure-free rates of all lesions were 90, 80, and 77%, respectively. On univariate analysis, metastatic tumors (p<0.0001), solid tumors (p=0.0246), and higher SBRT doses (p=0.0334) were the statistically significant unfavorable factors for local control. On multivariate analysis, only tumor origin was statistically significant (p=0.0027). The 2-year local failure-free rates of primary lung cancer and metastatic lung tumors were 87 and 50%, respectively. A metastatic tumor was the only independently significant unfavorable factor for local control after SBRT. (author)

  1. Hybrid radioguided occult lesion localization (hybrid ROLL) of (18)F-FDG-avid lesions using the hybrid tracer indocyanine green-(99m)Tc-nanocolloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KleinJan, G H; Brouwer, O R; Mathéron, H M; Rietbergen, D D D; Valdés Olmos, R A; Wouters, M W; van den Berg, N S; van Leeuwen, F W B

    2016-01-01

    To assess if combined fluorescence- and radio-guided occult lesion localization (hybrid ROLL) is feasible in patients scheduled for surgical resection of non-palpable (18)F-FDG-avid lesions on PET/CT. Four patients with (18)F-FDG-avid lesions on follow-up PET/CT that were not palpable during physical examination but were suspected to harbor metastasis were enrolled. Guided by ultrasound, the hybrid tracer indocyanine green (ICG)-(99m)Tc-nanocolloid was injected centrally in the target lesion. SPECT/CT imaging was used to confirm tracer deposition. Intraoperatively, lesions were localized using a hand-held gamma ray detection probe, a portable gamma camera, and a fluorescence camera. After excision, the gamma camera was used to check the wound bed for residual activity. A total of six (18)F-FDG-avid lymph nodes were identified and scheduled for hybrid ROLL. Comparison of the PET/CT images with the acquired SPECT/CT after hybrid tracer injection confirmed accurate tracer deposition. No side effects were observed. Combined radio- and fluorescence-guidance enabled localization and excision of the target lesion in all patients. Five of the six excised lesions proved tumor-positive at histopathology. The hybrid ROLL approach appears to be feasible and can facilitate the intraoperative localization and excision of non-palpable lesions suspected to harbor tumor metastases. In addition to the initial radioguided detection, the fluorescence component of the hybrid tracer enables high-resolution intraoperative visualization of the target lesion. The procedure needs further evaluation in a larger cohort and wider range of malignancies to substantiate these preliminary findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  2. Radioguided Surgery for Localization of Nonpalpable Breast Lesions A Mini-Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhans, Linnea; Klausen, Thomas Levin; Tvedskov, Tove Filtenborg

    2016-01-01

    been tested in one randomized trial. The results are either equal to or superior to those obtained with WGL, with regards to achieving free margins and low reoperation rates. Additionally, the RSL technique is less unpleasant for the patient and more flexible regarding preoperative logistics. The seed...... of patients with insufficient resection margin. These patients require a reoperation. New methods in the field of radioguided surgery (RGS) have been developed including radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) and radioactive seed localization (RSL). Especially RSL is a very promising technique. Guided...... can be placed a few days before surgery, in contrast to the wire used in WGL, which has to be placed within few hours of surgery. RSL has quickly become popular in surgical and radiological teams that have used the technique and will probably become an important tool for preoperative localization...

  3. 99mTc radio-guided completion thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karyagar, Savas; Mulazimoglu, Mehmet; Oezpacaci, Tevfik; Uyanik, Ercan; Karyagar, Sevda S.; Oezdenkaya, Yasar; Karatape, Oguzhan; Bender, Oemer; Yalcin, Orhan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether or not radio-guided surgery has any beneficial effects on completion thyroidectomy (CT) and the associated complication rates. Twenty seven patients were scheduled for CT, for thyroid carcinoma, from December 2004 to June 2005, and were included in the study. All the patients had initial thyroid surgery in other centers and been referred to our clinic for CT. Operation findings and the effectiveness of 99m Tc radio-guided CT were analyzed. The intraoperative mean ratio of thyroid activity to background activity counted with a gamma probe was 1.3 ± 0.3. Average operation timing was 74 ± 9 minutes. Postoperatively, no residual tissue was detected in any of the patients with ultrasonography and thyroid scintigraphy. In the first postoperative month, serum TSH level was 61 ± 16.4 mlU/L, when preoperatively it was 7.3 ± 3.1 mlU/L (P < 0.001). In the postoperative period, one patient experienced temporary hypoparathyroidism (3.9%). Permanent hypoparathyroidism or recurrent laryngeal nerve damage was not detected in any patient. Tc-99 radio-guided CT is a reliable surgical method, which provides the detection and removal of residual thyroid tissues with minimal complications. (author)

  4. Multi-slice spiral CT diagnosis of carotid body tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Peiling; Leng Renli; Li Shu; Xie Xiuli; Xu Ke

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to explore the Multi-slice spiral CT (MSCT) findings of carotid body tumor (CBT). Methods: Twelve cases of CBT proved by surgery were collected in this study and all patients accepted contrast-enhanced MSCT examination. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional post-processing were performed at diagnostic workstation using Aquilion 1.42. The CT features of CBT were analyzed. Results Each of 12 patients had one lesion. All lesions demonstrated well-marginated masses of homogeneous soft- tissue density with CT value within 29-48 HU on pre-enhanced images. All lesions were markedly enhanced with CT value over 200 HU on arterial-phase images, and the density of lesions decreased rapidly on delay- phase images. Twelve lesions were all located at the level of carotid artery bifurcation, 3 of them enveloping common carotid artery and internal/external carotid artery, and other 9 of them riding right on the carotid bifurcation. Internal carotid artery usually were shifted toward posterior-lateral, and external carotid artery toward anterior or anterior-medial. Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced MSCT examination not only can make a qualitative diagnosis of CBT, but determine its accurate location. It plays an importantly instructional role in clinical diagnosis and treatment. (authors)

  5. Use of mammary lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative radioguided gamma probe in sentinel lymph node biopsy of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soon; Zeon, Seok Kil; Kim, Yu Sa [School of Medicine, Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    The sentinel lymph node is defined as the first draining node from a primary tumor and reflects the histologic feature of the remainder of the lymphatic basin status. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative radioguided gamma probe for identification and removal of sentinel lymph node in breast cancer. Lymphoscintigraphy was performed preoperatively in 15 patients with biopsy proven primary breast cancer. Tc-99m antimony sulfide colloid was injected intradermally at four points around the tumor. Imaging acquisition included dynamic imaging, followed by early and late static images at 2 hours. The sentinel lymph node criteria on lymphoscintigraphy is the first node of the highest uptake in early and late static images. We tagged the node emitting the highest activity both n vivo an ex vivo. Histologic study for sentinel and axillary lymph node investigation was done by Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. On lymphoscintigraphy, three of 15 patients had clear lymphatic vessels in dynamic images, and 11 of 15 patients showed sentinel lymph node in early static image and three in late static 2 hours image. Mean detection time of sentinel lymph node on lynphoscintigraphy was 33.5{+-}48.4 minutes. The sentinel lymph node localization and removal by lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative gamma probe were successful in 14 of 15 patients (detection rate: 93.3%). On lymphoscintigraphy, 14 of 15 patients showed 2.47{+-}2.00 sentinel lymph nodes. On intraoperative gamma probe, 2.36{+-}1.96 sentinel lymph nodes were detected. In 7 patients with positive results of sentinel lymph node metastasis, 5 patients showed positive results of axillary lymph node (sensitivity: 72%) but two did not . In 7 patients with negative results of sentinel lymph node metastasis, all axillary nodes were free of disease (specificity: 100%). Sentinel lymph node biopsy with lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative gamma probe is a reliable method to predict

  6. Quantitative assessment of whole-body tumor burden in adult patients with neurofibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Scott R; Bredella, Miriam A; Cai, Wenli; Kassarjian, Ara; Harris, Gordon J; Esparza, Sonia; Merker, Vanessa L; Munn, Lance L; Muzikansky, Alona; Askenazi, Manor; Nguyen, Rosa; Wenzel, Ralph; Mautner, Victor F

    2012-01-01

    Patients with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), NF2, and schwannomatosis are at risk for multiple nerve sheath tumors and premature mortality. Traditional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has limited ability to assess disease burden accurately. The aim of this study was to establish an international cohort of patients with quantified whole-body internal tumor burden and to correlate tumor burden with clinical features of disease. We determined the number, volume, and distribution of internal nerve sheath tumors in patients using whole-body MRI (WBMRI) and three-dimensional computerized volumetry. We quantified the distribution of tumor volume across body regions and used unsupervised cluster analysis to group patients based on tumor distribution. We correlated the presence and volume of internal tumors with disease-related and demographic factors. WBMRI identified 1286 tumors in 145/247 patients (59%). Schwannomatosis patients had the highest prevalence of tumors (P = 0.03), but NF1 patients had the highest median tumor volume (P = 0.02). Tumor volume was unevenly distributed across body regions with overrepresentation of the head/neck and pelvis. Risk factors for internal nerve sheath tumors included decreasing numbers of café-au-lait macules in NF1 patients (P = 0.003) and history of skeletal abnormalities in NF2 patients (P = 0.09). Risk factors for higher tumor volume included female gender (P = 0.05) and increasing subcutaneous neurofibromas (P = 0.03) in NF1 patients, absence of cutaneous schwannomas in NF2 patients (P = 0.06), and increasing age in schwannomatosis patients (p = 0.10). WBMRI provides a comprehensive phenotype of neurofibromatosis patients, identifies distinct anatomic subgroups, and provides the basis for investigating molecular biomarkers that correlate with unique disease manifestations.

  7. Rethinking liquid biopsy: Microfluidic assays for mobile tumor cells in human body fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neoh, Kuang Hong; Hassan, Ayon Ahmed; Chen, Anqi; Sun, Yukun; Liu, Peng; Xu, Kai-Feng; Wong, Alice S T; Han, Ray P S

    2018-01-01

    Traditionally, liquid biopsy is a blood test involving the harvesting of tumor materials from peripheral blood. Tumor cells from non-blood body fluids have always been clinically available in cytological examinations but limited for use in differential diagnosis due to the low sensitivity of conventional cytopathology. With the recent significant progress in microfluidic and downstream molecular technologies, liquid biopsies have now evolved to include harvesting tumor cells and DNA fragments in all kinds of non-blood body fluids. This expansion into general body fluids presages the notion that liquid biopsy could soon be used in competition, as well as, in complementarity with tissue biopsy. Preliminary research of fluid-harvested tumor materials to spot early-stage tumors, monitor disease progression for metastasis and recurrence, and detect chemoresistance have been reported. To reflect the propagation of tumor cells in non-blood body fluids, we introduced the term Mobile Tumor Cells (MTCs), in lieu of the widely accepted term of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) resident in the bloodstream. Our review starts with a discussion on the clinical significance of MTCs, followed by a presentation of microfluidic techniques for MTC capture and various strategies for their identification. Hopefully, the phenotypic and genomic data acquired from harvested MTCs can be used to guide and improve cancer treatment decisions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Feasibility of a wireless gammar probe in radioguided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye Min; Kim, Jeong Ho; Park, Chan Jong; Joo, Koan Sik [Dept. of Physics, University of Myongji, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Nuclear medicine is divided into two major domains: diagnosis and therapy. Nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures are used for determining and evaluating the physiological, chemical, endocrinal, and metabolic conditions of organs or tissues. Tumors can be diagnosed based on the images provided by the associated machinery; after diagnosis, sometimes these tumors can be surgically removed. Currently, to help guide the surgeon to the exact location of the tumor site, the use of intraoperative probes has steadily gained popularity. These probes allow the physician to locate the tumor on the basis of the higher uptake of the preoperatively injected radio pharmaceutical within the site, as compared to the surrounding tissue. Direct detection offers very good energy resolution, but the detection efficiency is low; on the other hand, indirect detection presents high efficiency and low energy resolution. For this reason, the use of both detectors is recommended for obtaining an accurate localization of the diagnostic and therapeutic fields. In the literature, there are several works that aim to develop a suitable probe that presents such characteristics (i.e., good resolution, high detection efficiency, as well as the capacity for miniaturization). In this study, a wireless gamma probe is designed for the detection of tumors of the tissue surface using a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) and a cerium-doped gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (Ce:GAGG) scintillator. Our experiments demonstrate the feasibility of wireless diagnostics, as well as the suitable energy resolution and spatial resolution. The system developed based on the results of this study is expected to perform intraoperative or diagnostic evaluations of residual lesions (or the absence thereof) and its quantitative distribution in the affected area, thus contributing to wireless diagnostics and screening systems.

  9. Carotid Body Tumor Presenting as Parotid Swelling Misdiagnosed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    basal cell adenoma, and ductal papilloma in the benign category. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma, polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma, acinic cell carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, malignant mixed tumor, and squamous cell carcinoma are amongst the malignant category.[8] Neuroendocrine carcinomas have also ...

  10. Foreign body granuloma mimicking recurrent intracranial tumor: a very rare clinical entity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askin Esen Hasturk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gelatin sponge, oxidized cellulose and microfibrillar collagen are used to achieve hemostasis during neurosurgical procedures. Hemostatic agents may produce clinically symptomatic, radiologically apparent mass lesions. The differential diagnosis should include the foreign body along with recurrent tumor. We present a case of intracranial hemostatic agents found in a 56-year-old male patient seven years after undergoing a craniotomy for a left posterior parietal convexity meningioma. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI suggested the presence of a recurrent tumor. We emphasize that although it is rare, a granuloma due to a foreign body reaction can result in a false image of tumor recurrence.

  11. Use of bremsstrahlung radiation to identify hidden weak β‑ sources: feasibility and possible use in radio-guided surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlotti, D.; Collamati, F.; Faccini, R.; Fresch, P.; Iacoangeli, F.; Mancini-Terracciano, C.; Marafini, M.; Mirabelli, R.; Recchia, L.; Russomando, A.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Toppi, M.; Traini, G.; Bocci, V.

    2017-11-01

    The recent interest in β^‑ radionuclides for radio-guided surgery derives from the feature of the β radiation to release energy in few millimeters of tissue. Such feature can be used to locate residual tumors with a probe located in its immediate vicinity, determining the resection margins with an accuracy of millimeters. The drawback of this technique is that it does not allow to identify tumors hidden in more than few mm of tissue. Conversely, the bremsstrahlung X-rays emitted by the interaction of the β‑ radiation with the nuclei of the tissue are relatively penetrating. To complement the β‑ probes, we have therefore developed a detector based on cadmium telluride, an X-ray detector with a high quantum efficiency working at room temperature. We measured the secondary emission of bremsstrahlung photons in a target of Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) with a density similar to living tissue. The results show that this device allows to detect a 1 ml residual or lymph-node with an activity of 1 kBq hidden under a layer of 10 mm of PMMA with a 3:1 signal to noise, i.e. with a five sigma discrimination in less than 5 s.

  12. Anti-tumor effect of total body irradiation of low doses on WHT/Ht mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Miyako; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko

    1987-01-01

    The effect of low dose (0.05 - 1.0 Gy) of total body irradiation (TBI) on non-tumor bearing and tumor bearing mice were investigated. Mice received TBI of 0.1 Gy during 6 - 12 hours before tumor cell inoculation demonstrated to need larger number of tumor cells (approximately 2.5 times) for 50 per cent tumor incidence, compared to recipient mice not to receive TBI. On the other hand, in tumor bearing mice given 0.1 Gy of TBI only tumor cell killing effect was not detected, however enhancement of tumor cell killing effect and prolonged growth delay were observed when tumor bearing mice were treated with 0.1 Gy of TBI in combined with local irradiation on tumors, especially cell killing effect was remarkable in dose range over 6 Gy of local exposure. The mechanism of the effect of 0.1 Gy TBI is considered to be host mediated reactions from the other our experimental results. (author)

  13. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  14. Carotid Body Tumors: A Review of 25 Years Experience in Diagnosis and Management of 56 Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Ahmed; Elwan, Hussein; Fouad, Fouad M.S.; Kamal Eldin, Hussein; Khairy, Hussein; Elhindawy, Khaled; Taha, Ahmed; Hefnawy, Engie

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To report our experience in the management of CBTs and review the literature. Materials and Methods: 56 CBTs were operated upon over a period of 25 years. Surgical intervention was planned according to the Shamblin classification. Thirty-nine of the tumors were in males (69.64%), and 17 of the tumors were in females (30.36%). The average age was 42 (ages ranging between 32 and 47). Twenty-two tumors were diagnosed and treated with Shamblin type I, twenty-eight with type II and eight tumors with type III. All patients were unilateral except two had bilateral carotid tumors. Thirty-five lumps were de novo (group A), while 21 lumps were treated after a prior trial of removal (group B). Results: The incidence of carotid reconstruction was lower among group A (1/35) compared to group B (9/21). Complications were less in group A than group B (23% vs. 30%). There were 4 cases with suspected malignancy and no recurrences during the follow-up period. Conclusion: There is an increased incidence of major vascular reconstruction in cases not properly investigated or diagnosed and in cases with prior attempts of removal in Primary Hospitals. Proper diagnosis of suspicious lumps is mandatory. Resection of CBTs by surgeons with experience in vascular reconstruction is recommended. Vascular reconstructions have to be performed safely without serious complications. Also today, prior attempts of removal are not so common, with preoperative evaluation using the latest diagnostic tools. Cranial nerves injury (especially the Hypoglossal Nv) continues to be the most common complication. PMID:25298832

  15. Exosome levels in human body fluids: A tumor marker by themselves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Francesco; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Campanella, Claudia; Bavisotto, Celeste Caruso; Marcilla, Antonio; Properzi, Francesca; Fais, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Despite considerable research efforts, the finding of reliable tumor biomarkers remains challenging and unresolved. In recent years a novel diagnostic biomedical tool with high potential has been identified in extracellular nanovesicles or exosomes. They are released by the majority of the cells and contain detailed molecular information on the cell of origin including tumor hallmarks. Exosomes can be isolated from easy accessible body fluids, and most importantly, they can provide several biomarkers, with different levels of specificity. Recent clinical evidence shows that the levels of exosomes released into body fluids may themselves represent a predictive/diagnostic of tumors, discriminating cancer patients from healthy subjects. The aim of this review is to highlight these latest challenging findings to provide novel and groundbreaking ideas for successful tumor early diagnosis and follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Stroke from Delayed Embolization of Polymerized Glue Following Percutaneous Direct Injection of a Carotid Body Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamoorthy, Thamburaj; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Rajan, Jayadevan E; Thomas, Bejoy [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala, (India)

    2007-06-15

    Direct percutaneous embolization of hypervascular tumors results in more effective preoperative devascularization. Migration of glue is a well known complication of direct glue injection and it may lead to stroke or cranial nerve deficits. We report here on a case of carotid body tumor in a 52-year-old man; the tumor was mainly embolized by percutaneous injection of 50% glue and this was supported with balloon protection of the internal carotid artery. Thirteen hours later, he developed hemiparesis from delayed migration of glue. The possible mechanisms of this migration are discussed and preventive measures are suggested. Preoperative embolization of hypervascular tumors of the head and neck, including carotid body tumor, is often performed to decrease the amount of blood loss during surgery. Devascularization is mainly performed with particulate agents and by employing the transarterial route. More effective embolization may be achieved by performing percutaneous direct embolization of hypervascular tumors with liquid embolic agents. Even though there are few reports available on direct embolization, complications from glue migration have been reported, and this mainly happens during the procedure when the glue is in a liquid state. We report here on a case of delayed migration of polymerized glue (n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate [NBCA]), many hours after the procedure, into the intracranial circulation and the final result was stroke. A 52-year-old male with right carotid body tumor underwent direct percutaneous glue (n-butylcyanoacrylate [NBCA]) embolization. Several hours later, he developed left hemiparesis from embolization of the polymerized glue cast. Migration of glue during percutaneous tumor embolization is presumed to occur only in the liquid state, which may lead to stroke or cranial nerve deficits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of delayed glue embolization from a treated hypervascular tumor of the head and neck.

  17. Radio-guided surgery for removal of a giant parathyroid cyst related to hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes Valdes, Edelberto; Escarpanter Gonzalez, Julio C; Lopez Diaz, Adlin; Alfonso Trujillo, Yiovanni; Infante Amoros, Adalberto; Dominguez lvarez, Carlos A; Palau San Pedro, Aley

    2009-01-01

    Among present advances of surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism is the preoperative localization of hyper-functioning glands by preoperative and intraoperative scan, this later one by a special gamma probe. By the other hand, parathyroid cysts are rare; may be of functioning type or not, as well as the findings of 99mTc-MIBI, and the intraoperative use of gamma probe to assess all the possible sites where could be hyperproductive glands of parathyroid hormone. We describe features of management, safety, and administration of radiological agent during the immediate preoperative period, as well as use of gamma probe during intervention. Evolution over follow-up is reported. This case represents the third patient operated on from hyperthyroidism by radio-guided surgery in our center, which introduced this technique in our country. (Author)

  18. Intraoperative β{sup -} detecting probe for radio-guided surgery in tumour resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Bellini, Fabio; Bocciy, Valerio; Collamatiyz, Francesco; Faccini, Riccardo; Paramattiy, Riccardo; Paterayz, Vincenzo; Pinciy, Davide; Recchiay, Luigi; Sciubbayz, Adalberto; Senzacqua, Martina; Voenay, Cecilia; Morgantiy, Silvio [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome, (Italy); De Luciax, Erika; Matteixk, Ilaria; Sartizx, Alessio [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell INFN, Frascati, (Italy); Russomando, Aandrea [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome, (Italy); Center for Life Nano Science-at-Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Rome, (Italy); Marafiniy, Michela [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome, (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche ' E. Fermi' , Rome, (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    The development of the β{sup -} based radio-guided surgery aims to extend the technique to those tumours where surgery is the only possible treatment and the assessment of the resection would most profit from the low background around the lesion, as for brain tumours. Feasibility studies on meningioma and gliomas already estimated the potentiality of this new treatment. To validate the technique, a prototype of the intraoperative probe detecting β{sup -} decays and specific phantoms simulating tumour remnant patterns embedded in healthy tissue have been realized. The response of the probe in this simulated environment is tested with dedicated procedures. This document discusses the innovative aspects of the method, the status of the developed intraoperative β{sup -} detecting probe and the results of the preclinical tests. (authors)

  19. Lymphoscintigraphy and radioguided surgery in cervical and vulvar malignant tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales Guzman-Barron, Rosanna E.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To validate a combined technique in the detection of sentinel nodes in early cervix and vulvar cancer patients. Material and Methods: Seventy patients, 24 to 63 years old (average 40 years), with cervical cancer stages IA2, IB1 and IIA, and fourteen patients, 28 to 80 years old (median 68 years) with vulval neoplasm, stage I and II, had sentinel node (SN) detection using lymphoscintigraphy and a gamma probe in the surgical room, after injection of Tc 99m dextran and patent blue dye. Sentinel nodes were seen between 20 and 135 minutes after injection, in cervical cancer, and between one and sixty minutes in vulvar neoplasms. In patients with cervical tumors, 99 sentinel nodes were localized in the obturator region, 28 were interiliac, nine were located in the external iliac region, three in the common iliac region and one was found in perineum. In patients with a vulvar neoplasm, all sentinel nodes were located in the superficial inguinal region. The detection rate was 98,8% for cervical cancer and 100% for vulvar neoplasms, with bilateral drainage in 46% and 29% respectively. Metastases were found in 10,4% (7/65) of IB1 stage cervical cancer patients (6 squamous cell carcinomas - non keratinizing: 5, keratinizing: 1 and one adenocarcionoma) and none in four patients with IA2 stage (with non keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma). The patients with IIA stage cervical cancer (keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma) had metastases in the SN. Three out of 14 patients with vulvar cancer showed metastases in the sentinel node. Two of them had epidermoid carcinoma and one, malignant melanoma. There were no metastases in non-sentinel nodes when sentinel nodes were negative for metastases, both in cervical or vulvar cancer. Conclusion: It is feasible to localize sentinel nodes in cervical and vulvar cancer, using a combined technique with Tc 99m Dextran and 'patent blue'. (author)

  20. Radioguided breast surgery for occult lesion localization – correlation between two methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutfilen Bianca

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of sub-clinical breast lesions has increased with screening mammography. Biopsy techniques can offer precision and agility in its execution, as well as patient comfort. This trial compares radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL and wire-guided localization (WL of breast lesions. We investigate if a procedure at the ambulatorial level (ROLL could lead to a better aesthetic result and less postoperative pain. In addition, we intend to demonstrate the efficacy of radioguided localization and removal of occult breast lesions using radiopharmaceuticals injected directly into the lesions and correlate radiological and histopathological findings. Methods One hundred and twenty patients were randomized into two groups (59 WL and 61 ROLL. The patients were requested to score the cosmetic appearance of their breast after surgery, and a numerical rating scale was used to measure pain on the first postoperative day. Clearance margins were considered at ≥ 10 mm for invasive cancer, ≥ 5 mm for ductal carcinoma in situ, and ≥ 1 mm for benign disease. Patients were subsequently treated according to the definitive histological result. When appropriate, different statistical tests were used in order to test the significance between the two groups, considering a P value Results WL and ROLL located all the occult breast lesions successfully. In the ROLL group, the specimen volume was smaller and there were more cases with clear margins (P Conclusion ROLL is an effective method for the excision of non-palpable breast lesions. It enables more careful planning of the cutaneous incision, leading to better aesthetic results, less postoperative symptoms, and smaller volumes of excised tissue.

  1. Radioguided surgery of primary hyperparathyroidism in a population with a high prevalence of thyroid pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Talavera, Paloma [University Hospital of Valladolid, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Valladolid (Spain); Gonzalez, Carmen; Gomez, Alberto [University Hospital of Salamanca, Department of Surgery, Salamanca (Spain); Garcia-Talavera, Jose Ramon; Martin, Esther; Martin, Mariano [University Hospital of Salamanca, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Salamanca (Spain)

    2010-11-15

    Patients with concomitant thyroid pathology are usually excluded from minimally invasive radioguided parathyroidectomy (MIRP). We assessed the value in these patients of the gamma probe, alone or in combination with other techniques, in MIRP and unilateral or bilateral approaches. We evaluated its performance in association with intraoperative determination of intact parathyroid hormone (ioPTHi) and preoperative {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI dual phase scintigraphy. Included in the study were 87 patients with a diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism who underwent radioguided surgery. They were divided into two groups depending on the presence of concomitant thyroid pathology (TP group, 33 patients) or absence of concomitant thyroid pathology (NTP group, 54 patients). In the TP group, ioPTHi achieved the highest accuracy (90.9%), followed by the gamma probe (81.8%) and scintigraphy (69.7%). In the NTP group, the probe (94.4%) performed better than ioPTH and scintigraphy (both 85.2%). In the TP group, scintigraphy in combination with the gamma probe had a success rate of 90.9%, and 94% in combination with ioPTHi. The three techniques are applied together had a success rate of 97%. For all patients undergoing MIRP, the probe alone worked well, irrespective of the presence or absence of concomitant thyroid pathology. Patients with concomitant thyroid pathology should not be a priori excluded from a MIRP, as long as other adjuvant techniques (scintigraphy or ioPTHi) are used in conjunction with the gamma probe. In these patients, the probe can also be helpful in unilateral or bilateral surgery. (orig.)

  2. Perihepatic foreign body abscess mimicking a ruptured hepatic tumor: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Mi Ran; Lee, In Sun; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu

    2001-01-01

    The most common surgically retained foreign body is t506e laparotomy sponge, and since cotton sponges are inert, they do not undergo any specific decomposition or biochemical reaction. Pathologically, however, two types of foreign body reaction occur: either type there is an aseptic fibrinous response that creates adhesions and encapsulation, resulting in a foreign-body granuloma, or the response is exudative in nature and leads to abscess formation with or without secondary bacterial invasion. We describe the case of a 52-year-old woman with a past history of cholecystectomy in whom a foreign-body abscess mimicked a hepatic tumor

  3. Perihepatic foreign body abscess mimicking a ruptured hepatic tumor: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Mi Ran; Lee, In Sun; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu [Ulsan Univ. Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-04-01

    The most common surgically retained foreign body is t506e laparotomy sponge, and since cotton sponges are inert, they do not undergo any specific decomposition or biochemical reaction. Pathologically, however, two types of foreign body reaction occur: either type there is an aseptic fibrinous response that creates adhesions and encapsulation, resulting in a foreign-body granuloma, or the response is exudative in nature and leads to abscess formation with or without secondary bacterial invasion. We describe the case of a 52-year-old woman with a past history of cholecystectomy in whom a foreign-body abscess mimicked a hepatic tumor.

  4. Dose estimation for internal organs during boron neutron capture therapy for body-trunk tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Suzuki, M.; Masunaga, S.; Kinashi, Y.; Kondo, N.; Ono, K.; Maruhashi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation doses during boron neutron capture therapy for body-trunk tumors were estimated for various internal organs, using data from patients treated at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. Dose–volume histograms were constructed for tissues of the lung, liver, kidney, pancreas, and bowel. For pleural mesothelioma, the target total dose to the normal lung tissues on the diseased side is 5 Gy-Eq in average for the whole lung. It was confirmed that the dose to the liver should be carefully considered in cases of right lung disease. - Highlights: • This article is written about the dose estimation for internal organs in body-trunk BNCT. • The dose estimations were performed for several internal organs in body-trunk BNCTs for several body tumors, carried out at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute

  5. Clinical application of intraoperative radioguidance technique for detection of metastatic lymph nodes in patients with esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Min; Hu Yongxiao

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical usefulness of intraoperative radioguidance technique for detection of metastatic lymph nodes in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods: Intravenous 99m Tc-MIBI solution (740MBq) was administered 30 min befor operation to 30 patients with esophageal squamous carcinoma and 10 patients with benign esophageal disorders (leiomyoma, cardiac achalasia), Intraoperatively, the operative field was screened with γ-probe to detect the radioactivity of various structures, activity over twofold of the basal value (over normal esophagus) was taken to be positive (presence of malignancy). All the lymph nodes removed were screened with γ-camera post operatively. Serially-sectioned with immune-histochemistry staining pathologic examination were performed in radiologically positive but conventionally pathologically negative nodes (n=13) to detect any false positive case. Serial section with IHC stain was also performed in the 546 radiologically negative nodes to detect any false negative case. Results: Among all the 694 nodes removed during operation, 135 nodes proved to be both radiologically and conventionally pathologically positive. In the 13 radiologically positive but conventionally pathologically negative nodes, serial section with IHC staining revealed presence of microscopic metastasis in 6 nodes (γ probe false positive 7 cases). No false negativity was detected in the 546 radiologically negative nodes with IHC technic. Thus sensitivity of the radioguidance technique was 100% , specificity was (95.3%) with an accuracy of 98.9%. Conclusion: Intraoperative radioguidance technique is feasible, highly sensitive, and highly specific with high accuracy and zero false negativeness. (authors)

  6. Decreased tumor uptake of gallium-67 in animals after whole-body irradiation. [Gamma radiation, rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, W.P.; Alderson, P.O.; Eckelman, W.C.; Hamilton, R.G.; Weiss, J.F.

    1978-02-01

    The mechanism of decreased Ga-67 citrate retention and serum binding after whole-body irradiation is unknown. To investigate this mechanism and to determine the effects of prior irradiation on tumor uptake of Ga-67, Sprague-Dawley rats bearing a subcutaneous Walker-256 carcinosarcoma were exposed to whole-body Co-60 irradiations of 250-1000 rads. Each animal received 10 ..mu..Ci of Ga-67 citrate intravenously 24 hr after exposure. Control animals received Ga-67 but were not irradiated. Animals were killed at 48 hr and the uptakes (percentage ID/g) in the tumor and other tissues were determined. A blood sample was also obtained to determine the serum iron, unsaturated iron-binding capacity (UIBC) and transferrin level. Tumor uptake and serum UIBC were decreased in irradiated animals, whereas serum iron levels and Ga-67 urinary excretion were increased. There was a significant correlation between the UIBC and the Ga-67 tumor uptake (r = 0.78, p < 0.001, n = 49). Transferrin levels in the irradiated group were not different from control values. The results indicate that the decreased Ga-67 retention and tumor uptake seen after whole-body irradiation are related--at least in part--to the saturation of transferrin by increased levels of circulating iron.

  7. Radiotherapy of uterine body cancer with preliminary cryodestruction of the tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myikhanovs'kij, O.A.

    2001-01-01

    The study involved 57 patients, of them 28 with cryodestruction of the tumor before radiotherapy and 29 patients with uterine body cancer treated with radiotherapy without cryotherapy (control). In 28 patients of the study group, 3-year survival was 25. In the control unsatisfactory results were observed in 12 of the patients

  8. Quality of life after stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary and metastatic liver tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romero, Alejandra Mendez; Wunderink, Wouter; van Os, Rob M.; Nowak, Peter J. C. M.; Helimen, Ben J. M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Brandwijk, Rene P.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a high local control rate for primary and metastatic liver tumors. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of this treatment on the patient's quality of life. This is the first report of quality of life associated with liver SBRT.

  9. Percutaneous fiducial marker placement prior to stereotactic body radiotherapy for malignant liver tumors: an initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Kengo; Shimohira, Masashi; Murai, Taro; Nishimura, Junichi; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Hashizume, Takuya; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe our initial experience with a gold flexible linear fiducial marker and to evaluate the safety and technical and clinical efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy using this marker for malignant liver tumors. Between July 2012 and February 2015, 18 patients underwent percutaneous fiducial marker placement before stereotactic body radiotherapy for malignant liver tumors. We evaluated the technical and clinical success rates of the procedure and the associated complications. Technical success was defined as successful placement of the fiducial marker at the target site, and clinical success was defined as the completion of stereotactic body radiotherapy without the marker dropping out of position. All 18 fiducial markers were placed successfully, so the technical success rate was 100% (18/18). All 18 patients were able to undergo stereotactic body radiotherapy without marker migration. Thus, the clinical success rate was 100% (18/18). Slight pneumothorax occurred as a minor complication in one case. No major complications such as coil migration or bleeding were observed. The examined percutaneous fiducial marker was safely placed in the liver and appeared to be useful for stereotactic body radiotherapy for malignant liver tumors

  10. New Experiences of Treatment in Multiple Tumors with HIFU Ablation and Whole Body Hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Akira; Gondo, Hideki; Iijima, Norio; Xia, Yuantian; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2007-05-01

    We have performed some 5000 whole body hyperthermia (WBH) treatments using far-infrared equipment (RHD 7500: Enthermics medical systems, USA) in 1000 cancer patients since 1991 at Luke Hospital & Clinic (Nakano, Japan). Hyperthermia is a natural treatment whereby patients are heated within the fever temperature range of 41-42 C. However, this therapy alone is poorly suited to advanced cancer patients, where regional tumor control is needed. The potential of HIFU therapy for theses cases deserves further investigation. We have treated 20 times in 12 advanced cancer patients, since importing a new HIFU device (Sonic CZ901: Mianyang some electronic Ltd: China) last December and are able to report some interesting results of combination treatment with HIFU and WBH. Our first experience was a 20-year old female pharyngeal cancer patient with lung and multiple liver metastases. Her lung tumor reduced following WBH (given weekly, 4 times in total) and her liver tumor clearly reduced following HIFU treatment. Our second experience of combinative treatment was in a 65-year old male suffering from a neck tumor with bone metastasis. He received WBH after HIFU treatment into 7th lib bone metastasis. After 10 days, his neck tumor grew with evidence of internal necrosis, and finally ruptured. CT images showed necrotic changes in the focus of the neck tumor and also lib bone metastasis. We believe that this new thermal combinative therapy shows great promise.

  11. Inter-Fraction Tumor Volume Response during Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Correlated to Patient Variables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Salamekh

    Full Text Available Analyze inter-fraction volumetric changes of lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT and determine if the volume changes during treatment can be predicted and thus considered in treatment planning.Kilo-voltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT images obtained immediately prior to each fraction were used to monitor inter-fraction volumetric changes of 15 consecutive patients (18 lung nodules treated with lung SBRT at our institution (45-54 Gy in 3-5 fractions in the year of 2011-2012. Spearman's (ρ correlation and Spearman's partial correlation analysis was performed with respect to patient/tumor and treatment characteristics. Multiple hypothesis correction was performed using False Discovery Rate (FDR and q-values were reported.All tumors studied experienced volume change during treatment. Tumor increased in volume by an average of 15% and regressed by an average of 11%. The overall volume increase during treatment is contained within the planning target volume (PTV for all tumors. Larger tumors increased in volume more than smaller tumors during treatment (q = 0.0029. The volume increase on CBCT was correlated to the treatment planning gross target volume (GTV as well as internal target volumes (ITV (q = 0.0085 and q = 0.0039 respectively and could be predicted for tumors with a GTV less than 22 mL. The volume increase was correlated to the integral dose (ID in the ITV at every fraction (q = 0.0049. The peak inter-fraction volume occurred at an earlier fraction in younger patients (q = 0.0122.We introduced a new analysis method to follow inter-fraction tumor volume changes and determined that the observed changes during lung SBRT treatment are correlated to the initial tumor volume, integral dose (ID, and patient age. Furthermore, the volume increase during treatment of tumors less than 22mL can be predicted during treatment planning. The volume increase remained significantly less than the overall PTV expansion, and radiation

  12. Evaluation of neuroendocrine tumors with 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC TOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artiko, Vera; Afgan, Aida; Petrović, Jelena; Radović, Branislava; Petrović, Nebojša; Vlajković, Marina; Šobić-Šaranović, Dragana; Obradović, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the short review of our preliminary results obtained with 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC. The total of 495 patients with different neuroendocrine tumors were investigated during last few years. There have been 334 true positive (TP), 73 true negative (TN), 6 false positive (FP) and 82 false negative findings (FN). Diagnosis was made according to SPECT findings in 122 patients (25%). The mean T/NT ratio for TP cases was significantly higher (p < 0.01) on SPECT (3.12 ± 1.13) than on whole body scan (2.2 ± 0.75). According to our results, overall sensitivity of the method is 80%, specificity 92%, positive predictive value 98%, negative predictive value 47% and accuracy 82%. Fifteen TP patients underwent therapy with 90Y-DOTATATE. Scintigraphy of neuroendocrine tumors with 99mTc-Tektrotyd is a useful method for diagnosis, staging and follow up of the patients suspected to have neuroendocrine tumors. SPECT had important role in diagnosis. It is also helpful in the appropriate choice of the therapy, including the peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. In the absence of 68Ga-labeled peptides and PET/CT, the special emphasize should be given to application of SPECT/CT as well as to the radioguided surgery.

  13. Compact whole-body fluorescent imaging of nude mice bearing EGFP expressing tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanping; Xiong, Tao; Chu, Jun; Yu, Li; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2005-01-01

    Issue of tumor has been a hotspot of current medicine. It is important for tumor research to detect tumors bearing in animal models easily, fast, repetitively and noninvasivly. Many researchers have paid their increasing interests on the detecting. Some contrast agents, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Discosoma red fluorescent protein (Dsred) were applied to enhance image quality. Three main kinds of imaging scheme were adopted to visualize fluorescent protein expressing tumors in vivo. These schemes based on fluorescence stereo microscope, cooled charge-coupled-device (CCD) or camera as imaging set, and laser or mercury lamp as excitation light source. Fluorescence stereo microscope, laser and cooled CCD are expensive to many institutes. The authors set up an inexpensive compact whole-body fluorescent imaging tool, which consisted of a Kodak digital camera (model DC290), fluorescence filters(B and G2;HB Optical, Shenyang, Liaoning, P.R. China) and a mercury 50-W lamp power supply (U-LH50HG;Olympus Optical, Japan) as excitation light source. The EGFP was excited directly by mercury lamp with D455/70 nm band-pass filter and fluorescence was recorded by digital camera with 520nm long-pass filter. By this easy operation tool, the authors imaged, in real time, fluorescent tumors growing in live mice. The imaging system is external and noninvasive. For half a year our experiments suggested the imaging scheme was feasible. Whole-body fluorescence optical imaging for fluorescent expressing tumors in nude mouse is an ideal tool for antitumor, antimetastatic, and antiangiogenesis drug screening.

  14. Surgery with radioguided location of a liver metastasis of melanoma choroid: case report; Cirurgia com localizacao radioguiada de uma metastase hepatica de melanoma de coroide: relato de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Marcelo; Miranda, Mario Henrique Furlanetto, E-mail: mmoreno@unochapeco.edu.br, E-mail: mirandamario@unochapeco.edu.br [Universidade Comunitaria da Regiao de Chapeco (UNOCHAPECO), SC (Brazil)

    2015-04-15

    Introduction: The use of radioguided occult lesion localization prior to surgical excision is increasing, mainly due to the development of new probes and the use of PET-CT. Case report: A 70-year-old male who presented with a metastatic lesion in his liver from a choroidal melanoma. This was located using PET-CT and subsequently located with a low-energy intraoperative gamma probe during the laparotomy. Conclusion: The present case shows that it is possible to excise a hepatic metastasis utilizing the principles of radioguided surgery, even in centers without access to high energy probes. (author)

  15. Iatrogenic central retinal artery occlusion after carotid body tumor embolization and excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangel, Carlos M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report a case of iatrogenic central retinal artery occlusion after embolization and surgical resection of carotid body paraganglioma.Methods: Case report Results: One adult female patient presented with persistent unilateral visual loss after embolization with Embosphere and Contour microparticles of carotid body tumor. Fluorescein angiography revealed intraluminal microspheres in the central retinal artery ramifications. OCT revealed intraretinal spherical, hyporeflective particles with posterior shadowing. Conclusions: Central retinal artery occlusion should be assessed as a possible complication after surgical repair of head and neck paragangliomas.

  16. Effects of whole-body irradiation on neonatally thymectomized mice. Incidence of benign and malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.E.; Howarth, J.L.; Troup, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    The individual and combined effects of neonatal thymectomy and whole-body irradiation on the prevalence of benign and malignant tumors in germ-free female mice of the Charles Rivers line were studied to determine if a portion of the tumorigenic effects of irradiation can be attributed to injury of the thymic-dependent component of the immune response. Neonatal thymectomy increased (a) the incidence of benign and malignant tumors and (b) the prevalence of multiple primary neoplasms in an individual mouse. Whole-body exposure to 700 rad at 6 weeks of age further increased the incidence of tumors, but the relative magnitude of this increase was less pronounced than in sham-operated controls. Thus, the cumulative effects of thymectomy plus irradiation are less pronounced than the sum of the individual effects. One of several possible explanations for this observation is that a portion of the carcinogenic effects of whole-body irradiation is mediated by suppression of the thymic-dependent component of the immune response

  17. Intraoperative probe detecting β{sup −} decays in brain tumour radio-guided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solfaroli Camillocci, E., E-mail: elena.solfaroli@roma1.infn.it [Dip. Fisica, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Bocci, V.; Chiodi, G. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Collamati, F. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Dip. Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); Donnarumma, R.; Faccini, R.; Mancini Terracciano, C. [Dip. Fisica, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Marafini, M. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche ‘E. Fermi’, Roma (Italy); Mattei, I.; Muraro, S. [Center for Life Nano Science@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Roma (Italy); Recchia, L. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Rucinski, A. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Dip. Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); Russomando, A. [Dip. Fisica, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Center for Life Nano Science@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Roma (Italy); Toppi, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Traini, G. [Dip. Fisica, Sapienza Univ. di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Morganti, S. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy)

    2017-02-11

    Radio-guided surgery (RGS) is a technique to intraoperatively detect tumour remnants, favouring a radical resection. Exploiting β{sup −} emitting tracers provides a higher signal to background ratio compared to the established technique with γ radiation, allowing the extension of the RGS applicability range. We developed and tested a detector based on para-terphenyl scintillator with high sensitivity to low energy electrons and almost transparent to γs to be used as intraoperative probe for RGS with β{sup −} emitting tracer. Portable read out electronics was customised to match the surgeon needs. This probe was used for preclinical test on specific phantoms and a test on “ex vivo” specimens from patients affected by meningioma showing very promising results for the application of this new technique on brain tumours. In this paper, the prototype of the intraoperative probe and the tests are discussed; then, the results on meningioma are used to make predictions on the performance of the probe detecting residuals of a more challenging and more interesting brain tumour: the glioma.

  18. Dosimetric effect of intrafraction tumor motion in phase gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Bo; Yang Yong; Li Tianfang; Li Xiang; Heron, Dwight E.; Huq, M. Saiful

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A major concern for lung intensity modulated radiation therapy delivery is the deviation of actually delivered dose distribution from the planned one due to simultaneous movements of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves and tumor. For gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment (SBRT), the situation becomes even more complicated because of SBRT's characteristics such as fewer fractions, smaller target volume, higher dose rate, and extended fractional treatment time. The purpose of this work is to investigate the dosimetric effect of intrafraction tumor motion during gated lung SBRT delivery by reconstructing the delivered dose distribution with real-time tumor motion considered. Methods: The tumor motion data were retrieved from six lung patients. Each of them received three fractions of stereotactic radiotherapy treatments with Cyberknife Synchrony (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA). Phase gating through an external surrogate was simulated with a gating window of 5 mm. The resulting residual tumor motion curves during gating (beam-on) were retrieved. Planning target volume (PTV) was defined as physician-contoured clinical target volume (CTV) surrounded by an isotropic 5 mm margin. Each patient was prescribed with 60 Gy/3 fractions. The authors developed an algorithm to reconstruct the delivered dose with tumor motion. The DMLC segments, mainly leaf position and segment weighting factor, were recalculated according to the probability density function of tumor motion curve. The new DMLC sequence file was imported back to treatment planning system to reconstruct the dose distribution. Results: Half of the patients in the study group experienced PTV D95% deviation up to 26% for fractional dose and 14% for total dose. CTV mean dose dropped by 1% with tumor motion. Although CTV is almost covered by prescribed dose with 5 mm margin, qualitative comparison on the dose distributions reveals that CTV is on the verge of underdose. The discrepancy happens due to tumor

  19. Comprehensive evaluation of occupational radiation exposure to intraoperative and perioperative personnel from 18F-FDG radioguided surgical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.; Sarikaya, Ismet; Hall, Nathan C.; Knopp, Michael V.; White, William C.; Marsh, Steven G.; Hinkle, George H.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to comprehensively evaluate occupational radiation exposure to all intraoperative and perioperative personnel involved in radioguided surgical procedures utilizing 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG). Radiation exposure to surgeon, anesthetist, scrub technologist, circulating nurse, preoperative nurse, and postoperative nurse, using aluminum oxide dosimeters read by optically stimulated luminescence technology, was evaluated during ten actual radioguided surgical procedures involving administration of 18 F-FDG. Mean patient dosage of 18 F-FDG was 699 ± 181 MBq (range 451-984). Mean time from 18 F-FDG injection to initial exposure of personnel to the patient was shortest for the preoperative nurse (75 ± 63 min, range 0-182) followed by the circulating nurse, anesthetist, scrub technologist, surgeon, and postoperative nurse. Mean total time of exposure of the personnel to the patient was longest for the anesthetist (250 ± 128 min, range 69-492) followed by the circulating nurse, scrub technologist, surgeon, postoperative nurse, and preoperative nurse. Largest deep dose equivalent per case was received by the surgeon (164 ± 135 μSv, range 10-580) followed by the anesthetist, scrub technologist, postoperative nurse, circulating nurse, and preoperative nurse. Largest deep dose equivalent per hour of exposure was received by the preoperative nurse (83 ± 134 μSv/h, range 0-400) followed by the surgeon, anesthetist, postoperative nurse, scrub technologist, and circulating nurse. On a per case basis, occupational radiation exposure to intraoperative and perioperative personnel involved in 18 F-FDG radioguided surgical procedures is relatively small. Development of guidelines for monitoring occupational radiation exposure in 18 F-FDG cases will provide reassurance and afford a safe work environment for such personnel. (orig.)

  20. Interfraction variation in lung tumor position with abdominal compression during stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Ueki, Nami; Iizuka, Yusuke; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yano, Shinsuke [Division of Clinical Radiology Service, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of abdominal compression on the interfraction variation in tumor position in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in a larger series of patients with large tumor motion amplitude.Methods: Thirty patients with lung tumor motion exceeding 8 mm who underwent SBRT were included in this study. After translational and rotational initial setup error was corrected based on bone anatomy, CBCT images were acquired for each fraction. The residual interfraction variation was defined as the difference between the centroid position of the visualized target in three dimensions derived from CBCT scans and those derived from averaged intensity projection images. The authors compared the magnitude of the interfraction variation in tumor position between patients treated with [n= 16 (76 fractions)] and without [n= 14 (76 fractions)] abdominal compression.Results: The mean ± standard deviation (SD) of the motion amplitude in the longitudinal direction before abdominal compression was 19.9 ± 7.3 (range, 10–40) mm and was significantly (p < 0.01) reduced to 12.4 ± 5.8 (range, 5–30) mm with compression. The greatest variance of the interfraction variation with abdominal compression was observed in the longitudinal direction, with a mean ± SD of 0.79 ± 3.05 mm, compared to −0.60 ± 2.10 mm without abdominal compression. The absolute values of the 95th percentile of the interfraction variation for one side in each direction were 3.97/6.21 mm (posterior/anterior), 4.16/3.76 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.90/2.32 mm (right/left) without abdominal compression, and 2.14/5.03 mm (posterior/anterior), 3.93/9.23 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.37/5.45 mm (right/left) with abdominal compression. An absolute interfraction variation greater than 5 mm was observed in six (9.2%) fractions without and 13 (17.1%) fractions with abdominal compression.Conclusions: Abdominal compression was effective for reducing the amplitude

  1. Acceptable Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Tumors Adjacent to the Central Biliary System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriguchi, Takahisa; Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Oku, Yohei; Aoki, Yousuke [Radiation Oncology Center, Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Shigematsu, Naoyuki [Department of Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kunieda, Etsuo, E-mail: kunieda-mi@umin.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokai University, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate biliary toxicity after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver tumors. Methods and Materials: Among 297 consecutive patients with liver tumors treated with SBRT of 35 to 50 Gy in 5 fractions, patients who were irradiated with >20 Gy to the central biliary system (CBS), including the gallbladder, and had follow-up times >6 months were retrospectively analyzed. Toxicity profiles, such as clinical symptoms and laboratory and radiologic data especially for obstructive jaundice and biliary infection, were investigated in relation to the dose volume and length relationship for each biliary organ. Results: Fifty patients with 55 tumors were irradiated with >20 Gy to the CBS. The median follow-up period was 18.2 months (range, 6.0-80.5 months). In the dose length analysis, 39, 34, 14, and 2 patients were irradiated with >20 Gy, >30 Gy, >40 Gy, and >50 Gy, respectively, to >1 cm of the biliary tract. Seven patients were irradiated with >20 Gy to >20% of the gallbladder. Only 2 patients experienced asymptomatic bile duct stenosis. One patient, metachronously treated twice with SBRT for tumors adjacent to each other, had a transient increase in hepatic and biliary enzymes 12 months after the second treatment. The high-dose area >80 Gy corresponded to the biliary stenosis region. The other patient experienced biliary stenosis 5 months after SBRT and had no laboratory changes. The biliary tract irradiated with >20 Gy was 7 mm and did not correspond to the bile duct stenosis region. No obstructive jaundice or biliary infection was found in any patient. Conclusions: SBRT for liver tumors adjacent to the CBS was feasible with minimal biliary toxicity. Only 1 patient had exceptional radiation-induced bile duct stenosis. For liver tumors adjacent to the CBS without other effective treatment options, SBRT at a dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions is a safe treatment with regard to biliary toxicity.

  2. Evaluating image reconstruction methods for tumor detection performance in whole-body PET oncology imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartizien, Carole; Kinahan, Paul E.; Comtat, Claude; Lin, Michael; Swensson, Richard G.; Trebossen, Regine; Bendriem, Bernard

    2000-04-01

    This work presents initial results from observer detection performance studies using the same volume visualization software tools that are used in clinical PET oncology imaging. Research into the FORE+OSEM and FORE+AWOSEM statistical image reconstruction methods tailored to whole- body 3D PET oncology imaging have indicated potential improvements in image SNR compared to currently used analytic reconstruction methods (FBP). To assess the resulting impact of these reconstruction methods on the performance of human observers in detecting and localizing tumors, we use a non- Monte Carlo technique to generate multiple statistically accurate realizations of 3D whole-body PET data, based on an extended MCAT phantom and with clinically realistic levels of statistical noise. For each realization, we add a fixed number of randomly located 1 cm diam. lesions whose contrast is varied among pre-calibrated values so that the range of true positive fractions is well sampled. The observer is told the number of tumors and, similar to the AFROC method, asked to localize all of them. The true positive fraction for the three algorithms (FBP, FORE+OSEM, FORE+AWOSEM) as a function of lesion contrast is calculated, although other protocols could be compared. A confidence level for each tumor is also recorded for incorporation into later AFROC analysis.

  3. Overt and Subclinical Baroreflex Dysfunction After Bilateral Carotid Body Tumor Resection: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Implications for Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Michael G Z; Srinivasan, Visish M; Hanna, Ehab; DeMonte, Franco

    2017-05-01

    Carotid body paragangliomas are rare, usually benign, tumors arising from glomus cells of the carotid body. Bilateral involvement is present in ∼5% of sporadic cases and up to one third of familial cases. In most patients undergoing bilateral resection of carotid body tumors, a condition known as baroreflex failure syndrome (BFS) develops after resection of the second tumor characterized by headache, anxiety, emotional lability, orthostatic lightheadedness, hypertension, and tachycardia. This condition is believed to result from damage to the carotid baroreceptor apparatus. Patients without overt cardiovascular abnormalities may have subclinical baroreceptor dysfunction evident only on specific testing, measuring heart rate and sympathetic nerve responses to baroloading (e.g., phenylephrine) and barounloading (e.g., Valsalva maneuver). Given the high incidence of BFS in patients undergoing bilateral resection of carotid body tumors, it is suggested that operation is limited to unilateral resection of the dominant/symptomatic lesion and nonsurgical intervention (i.e., embolization, radiotherapy) on the contralateral side. Alternatively, refinement of surgical technique to prevent injury to elements of the baroreceptor apparatus may prevent this complication of bilateral tumor resection. We present a case of a 16-year-old girl with bilateral jugular vagale and carotid body tumors who developed hypertension after surgical resection of her left jugular vagale tumor and worsening of hypertension concurrent with progression, requiring intensity-modulated radiation therapy and a resection for significant progression of her left jugular vagale tumor. Additional case studies and series of bilateral carotid body tumors and BFS were identified through a comprehensive literature search in the PubMed database. Our case shows the generalizability of BFS to patients with tumors involving the vagal baroafferent fibers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Targeted microbubbles for imaging tumor angiogenesis: assessment of whole-body biodistribution with dynamic micro-PET in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willmann, Jürgen K; Cheng, Zhen; Davis, Corrine

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate in vivo whole-body biodistribution of microbubbles (MBs) targeted to tumor angiogenesis-related vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by using dynamic micro-positron emission tomography (PET) in living mice....

  5. Carotid Body Tumors: A Case Series and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darouassi, Youssef; Alaoui, Mustapha; Mliha Touati, Mohamed; Al Maghraoui, Oussama; En-Nouali, Amine; Bouaity, Brahim; Ammar, Haddou

    2017-08-01

    Paragangliomas of the head and neck are rare vascular tumors derived from the paraganglia tissues originating from the neural crest. They are usually benign and hypervascularized. Diagnosis is relatively easy in condition to consider it in evaluating every lateral neck mass. We made a retrospective study of the records of 10 patients who presented with carotid body tumors at the Department of Vascular surgery of the Military Hospital Avicenne in Marrakech during the period between 2008 and 2013. Epidemiologic, etiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic features were analyzed. The average age of our patients was 35.4 years (26-55 years), with a male predominance (sex ratio = 2.33). We noted 7 cases of isolated carotid locations and 3 cases of multiple locations. A slow-growing neck mass was the main clinical presentation. Other signs were pain, dysphonia, dizziness, headache, and tinnitus. Physical examination showed, in most cases, a neck nontender mass with side to side mobility. Imaging techniques included Doppler ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) scan, magnetic resonance imaging, and catheter arteriography. Urinary analysis for metanephrine was carried out in 1 case. The clinical presentation and imaging results strongly suggested the diagnosis of carotid paraganglioma in all cases. Treatment was surgical excision in all cases associated with a preoperative embolization in 1 case and a postoperative radiotherapy in 2 cases. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis, and a lymph node metastasis was suspected of malignity in 1 case. The evolution was favorable in all our patients. Carotid body tumor requires early diagnosis and an adequate multidisciplinary team. The diagnosis must be considered in the case of any pulsatile cervical mass. Surgery is the treatment of choice despite its risks especially in large tumors. The therapeutic indication should, ideally, be set in a multidisciplinary consultation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stability potential of spinal instrumentations in tumor vertebral body replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahldiek, M J; Panjabi, M M

    1998-03-01

    The multidirectional stability potential of anterior, posterior, and combined instrumentations applied at L1-L3 was studied after L2 corpectomy and replacement with a carbon-fiber implant. To evaluate the biomechanical characteristics of short-segment anterior, posterior, and combined instrumentations in lumbar spine tumor vertebral body replacement surgery. The biomechanical properties of many different spinal instrumentations have been studied in various spinal injury models. Only a few studies, however, investigate the stabilization methods in spinal tumor vertebral body replacement surgery. Eight fresh frozen human cadaveric thoracolumbar spine specimens (T12-L4) were prepared for biomechanical testing. Pure moments (2.5 Nm, 5 Nm, and 7.5 Nm) of flexion-extension, left-right axial torsion, and left-right lateral bending were applied to the top vertebra in a flexibility machine, and the motions of the L1 vertebra with respect to L3 were recorded with an optoelectronic motion measurement system after reconditioning. The L2 vertebral body was resected and replaced by a carbon-fiber cage. Different fixation methods were applied to the L1 and L3 vertebrae. One anterior, two posterior, and two combined instrumentations were tested. Load-displacement curves were recorded and neutral zone and range of motion parameters were determined. The anterior instrumentation provided less potential stability than the posterior and combined instrumentations in all motion directions. The anterior instrumentation, after vertebral body replacement, showed greater motion than the intact spine, especially in axial torsion (range of motion, 10.3 degrees vs 5.5 degrees; neutral zone, 2.9 degrees vs. 0.7 degrees; P combined instrumentation provided superior rigidity in all directions compared with all other instrumentations. Posterior and combined instrumentations provided greater rigidity than anterior instrumentation. Anterior instrumentation should not be used alone in vertebral body

  7. Asymmetric Cancer Hallmarks in Breast Tumors on Different Sides of the Body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel M Campoy

    Full Text Available During the last decades it has been established that breast cancer arises through the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in different cancer related genes. These alterations confer the tumor oncogenic abilities, which can be resumed as cancer hallmarks (CH. The purpose of this study was to establish the methylation profile of CpG sites located in cancer genes in breast tumors so as to infer their potential impact on 6 CH: i.e. sustained proliferative signaling, evasion of growth suppressors, resistance to cell death, induction of angiogenesis, genome instability and invasion and metastasis. For 51 breast carcinomas, MS-MLPA derived-methylation profiles of 81 CpG sites were converted into 6 CH profiles. CH profiles distribution was tested by different statistical methods and correlated with clinical-pathological data. Unsupervised Hierarchical Cluster Analysis revealed that CH profiles segregate in two main groups (bootstrapping 90-100%, which correlate with breast laterality (p = 0.05. For validating these observations, gene expression data was obtained by RealTime-PCR in a different cohort of 25 tumors and converted into CH profiles. This analyses confirmed the same clustering and a tendency of association with breast laterality (p = 0.15. In silico analyses on gene expression data from TCGA Breast dataset from left and right breast tumors showed that they differed significantly when data was previously converted into CH profiles (p = 0.033. We show here for the first time, that breast carcinomas arising on different sides of the body present differential cancer traits inferred from methylation and expression profiles. Our results indicate that by converting methylation or expression profiles in terms of Cancer Hallmarks, it would allow to uncover veiled associations with clinical features. These results contribute with a new finding to the better understanding of breast tumor behavior, and can moreover serve as proof of

  8. Dose estimation for internal organs during boron neutron capture therapy for body-trunk tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Y; Tanaka, H; Suzuki, M; Masunaga, S; Kinashi, Y; Kondo, N; Ono, K; Maruhashi, A

    2014-06-01

    Radiation doses during boron neutron capture therapy for body-trunk tumors were estimated for various internal organs, using data from patients treated at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. Dose-volume histograms were constructed for tissues of the lung, liver, kidney, pancreas, and bowel. For pleural mesothelioma, the target total dose to the normal lung tissues on the diseased side is 5Gy-Eq in average for the whole lung. It was confirmed that the dose to the liver should be carefully considered in cases of right lung disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Radio-guided excision of metastatic lymph nodes in thyroid carcinoma: a safe technique for previously operated neck compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbil, Yeşim; Sari, Serkan; Ağcaoğlu, Orhan; Ersöz, Feyzullah; Bayraktar, Adem; Salmaslioğlu, Artür; Gozkun, Osman; Adalet, Işik; Ozarmağan, Selçuk

    2010-11-01

    Better follow-up of patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and more sensitive detection leads to detection of recurrences in the neck. Despite excellent outcomes, the major challenge is controlling locoregional recurrence. We aimed to investigate whether the radio-guided excision of metastatic lymph nodes makes it possible to find the affected lymph nodes in patients with previously operated neck compartments. This prospective study included 46 patients with recurrent/persistent PTC who had previously undergone operation of the neck compartment. Prior to operation, the pathologic node was localized by ultrasound (US) and radiotracer ((99m)Tc-labeled rhenium colloid) was injected directly into the pathologic node. Careful dissection was carried out following the area of maximum radioactivity until the metastatic lymph node(s) were identified and excised. One affected lymph node was removed in 17 patients, and more than one lymph node (affected or additional nodes) was removed in 29 patients. The median count from the lesion was significantly higher than values from the lesion bed (background activity) (16,886 counts/20 s versus 52 counts/20 s; p basal thyroglobulin (Tg). Five patients had suspicious lymph nodes on the operated side. Although the basal Tg level remained above the normal limit, moderately high in 8 patients, no metastases were detected in the neck. Radio-guided excision of metastatic lymph nodes can be performed safely for the detection and excision of recurrent thyroid cancer in the central and lateral neck.

  10. Dose impact of a carbon fiber couch for stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, Hirofumi; Kanetake, Nagisa; Kawasaki, Keiichi; Iwashita, Yuki; Sakata, Junichi; Okuda, Tomoko; Araki, Fujio; Shimohigashi, Yoshinobu; Tomiyama, Yuki

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the dose attenuation caused by a carbon fiber radiation therapy table (Imaging Couch Top; ICT, BrainLab) and to evaluate the dosimetric impact of ICT during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in lung tumors. The dose attenuation of ICT was measured using an ionization chamber and modeled by means of a treatment planning system (TPS). SBRT was planned with and without ICT in a lung tumor phantom and ten cases of clinical lung tumors. The results were analyzed from isocenter doses and a dose-volume histogram (DVH): D 95 , D mean , V 20 , V 5 , homogeneity index (HI), and conformity index (CI). The dose attenuation of the ICT modeled with TPS agreed to within ±1% of the actually measured values. The isocenter doses, D 95 and D mean with and without ICT showed differences of 4.1-5% for posterior single field and three fields in the phantom study, and differences of 0.6-2.4% for five fields and rotation in the phantom study and six fields in ten clinical cases. The dose impact of ICT was not significant for five or more fields in SBRT. It is thus possible to reduce the dose effect of ICT by modifying the beam angle and beam weight in the treatment plan. (author)

  11. 4π Noncoplanar Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Centrally Located or Larger Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Peng; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan; Long, Troy; Romeijn, Edwin; Low, Daniel A.; Kupelian, Patrick; Abraham, John; Yang, Yingli; Sheng, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric improvements in stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with larger or central lung tumors using a highly noncoplanar 4π planning system. Methods and Materials: This study involved 12 patients with centrally located or larger lung tumors previously treated with 7- to 9-field static beam intensity modulated radiation therapy to 50 Gy. They were replanned using volumetric modulated arc therapy and 4π plans, in which a column generation method was used to optimize the beam orientation and the fluence map. Maximum doses to the heart, esophagus, trachea/bronchus, and spinal cord, as well as the 50% isodose volume, the lung volumes receiving 20, 10, and 5 Gy were minimized and compared against the clinical plans. A dose escalation study was performed to determine whether a higher prescription dose to the tumor would be achievable using 4π without violating dose limits set by the clinical plans. The deliverability of 4π plans was preliminarily tested. Results: Using 4π plans, the maximum heart, esophagus, trachea, bronchus and spinal cord doses were reduced by 32%, 72%, 37%, 44%, and 53% (P≤.001), respectively, and R 50 was reduced by more than 50%. Lung V 20 , V 10 , and V 5 were reduced by 64%, 53%, and 32% (P≤.001), respectively. The improved sparing of organs at risk was achieved while also improving planning target volume (PTV) coverage. The minimal PTV doses were increased by the 4π plans by 12% (P=.002). Consequently, escalated PTV doses of 68 to 70 Gy were achieved in all patients. Conclusions: We have shown that there is a large potential for plan quality improvement and dose escalation for patients with larger or centrally located lung tumors using noncoplanar beams with sufficient quality and quantity. Compared against the clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy and static intensity modulated radiation therapy plans, the 4π plans yielded significantly and consistently improved tumor coverage and

  12. Salvage Reirradiaton With Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Recurrent Head-and-Neck Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cengiz, Mustafa; Ozyigit, Goekhan; Yazici, Goezde; Dogan, Ali; Yildiz, Ferah; Zorlu, Faruk; Guerkaynak, Murat; Gullu, Ibrahim H.; Hosal, Sefik; Akyol, Fadil

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we present our results of reirradiation of locally recurrent head-and-neck cancer with image-guided, fractionated, frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy technique. Methods and Materials: From July 2007 to February 2009, 46 patients were treated using the CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA) at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. All patients had recurrent, unresectable, and previously irradiated head-and-neck cancer. The most prominent site was the nasopharynx (32.6%), and the most common histopathology was epidermoid carcinoma. The planning target volume was defined as the gross tumor volume identified on magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. There were 22 female and 24 male patients. Median age was 53 years (range, 19-87 years). The median tumor dose with stereotactic body radiotherapy was 30 Gy (range, 18-35 Gy) in a median of five (range, one to five) fractions. Results: Of 37 patients whose response to therapy was evaluated, 10 patients (27%) had complete tumor regression, 11 (29.8%) had partial response, and 10 (27%) had stable disease. Ultimate local disease control was achieved in 31 patients (83.8%). The overall survival was 11.93 months in median (ranged, 11.4 - 17.4 months), and the median progression free survival was 10.5 months. One-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 41% and 46%, respectively. Grade II or greater long-term complications were observed in 6 (13.3%) patients. On follow-up, 8 (17.3%) patients had carotid blow-out syndrome, and 7 (15.2%) patients died of bleeding from carotid arteries. We discovered that this fatal syndrome occurred only in patients with tumor surrounding carotid arteries and carotid arteries receiving all prescribed dose. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiotherapy is an appealing treatment option for patients with recurrent head-and-neck cancer previously treated with radiation to high doses. Good local control with

  13. Multicenter results of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for non-resectable primary liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, Rafael A.; Rojas, Daniel; Sanabria, Juan R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. An excess of 100 000 individuals are diagnosed with primary liver tumors every year in USA but less than 20% of those patients are amenable to definitive surgical management due to advanced local disease or comorbidities. Local therapies to arrest tumor growth have limited response and have shown no improvement on patient survival. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as an alternative local ablative therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tumor response to SBRT in a combined multicenter database. Study design. Patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, n = 21) or intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC, n = 11) treated with SBRT from four Academic Medical Centers were entered into a common database. Statistical analyses were performed for freedom from local progression (FFLP) and patient survival. Results. The overall FFLP for advanced HCC was 63% at a median follow-up of 12.9 months. Median tumor volume decreased from 334.2 to 135 cm 3 (p < 0.004). The median time to local progression was 6.3 months. The 1- and 2-years overall survival rates were 87% and 55%, respectively. Patients with ICC had an overall FFLP of 55.5% at a median follow-up of 7.8 months. The median time to local progression was 4.2 months and the six-month and one-year overall survival rates were 75% and 45%, respectively. The incidence of grade 1-2 toxicities, mostly nausea and fatigue, was 39.5%. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were present in two and one patients, respectively. Conclusion. Higher rates of FFLP were achieved by SBRT in the treatment of primary liver malignancies with low toxicity

  14. Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia after stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Satoru; Yamashita, Yasufumi; Nomoto, Yoshihito

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate characteristics of organizing pneumonia (OP) after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumor. Between September 2010 and June 2014, patients who were diagnosed as Stage I lung cancer and treated with SBRT at our institution were included in this study. A total of 78 patients (47 males with a median age of 80 years) were analyzed. The median follow-up period was 23 months. Five patients (6.4%) developed OP at 6–18 months after SBRT. The cumulative incidence of OP was 4.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–11.0) and 8.2% (95% CI, 2.9–17.0) at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Tumor location (superior and middle lobe vs inferior lobe) was shown to be a borderline significant factor for the occurrence of OP (P = 0.069). In the subgroup analysis of patients with a radiographic follow-up period at least 6 months, or who died within 6 months after SBRT, 7 of 72 patients (9.7%) developed Grade 2 or 3 radiation pneumonitis (G2/3 RP) at 2–4 months after SBRT. A statistically significant association between G2/3 RP in the subacute phase and OP was shown (P = 0.040). In two of the five patients who developed OP, the symptoms and radiographic change were improved rapidly by corticosteroid administration. One patient had relapsed OP after suspending the treatment and re-administration was required. Three patients with minor symptoms were managed without corticosteroid administration and OP resolved without any relapse. The radiation-induced OP should be considered as one of the late lung injuries after SBRT for lung tumors. (author)

  15. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver oligo-recurrence and oligo-progression from various tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Yu Jin; Kim, Mi Sook; Jang, Won Il; Seo, Young Seok; Cho, Chul Koo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Paik, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for patients with liver oligo-recurrence and oligo-progression from various primary tumors. Between 2002 and 2013, 72 patients with liver oligo-recurrence (oligo-metastasis with a controlled primary tumor) and oligo-progression (contradictory progression of a few sites of disease despite an overall tumor burden response to therapy) underwent SBRT. Of these, 9 and 8 patients with uncontrollable distant metastases and patients immediate loss to follow-up, respectively, were excluded. The total planning target volume was used to select the SBRT dose (median, 48 Gy; range, 30 to 60 Gy, 3–4 fractions). Toxicity was evaluated using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. We evaluated 55 patients (77 lesions) treated with SBRT for liver metastases. All patients had controlled primary lesions, and 28 patients had stable lesions at another site (oligo-progression). The most common primary site was the colon (36 patients), followed by the stomach (6 patients) and other sites (13 patients). The 2-year local control and progression-free survival rates were 68% and 22%, respectively. The 2- and 5-year overall survival rates were 56% and 20%, respectively. The most common adverse events were grade 1–2 fatigue, nausea, and vomiting; no grade ≥3 toxicities were observed. Univariate analysis revealed that oligo-progression associated with poor survival. SBRT for liver oligo-recurrence and oligo-progression appears safe, with similar local control rates. For liver oligo-progression, criteria are needed to select patients in whom improved overall survival can be expected through SBRT.

  16. Quality of Life After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Primary and Metastatic Liver Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Romero, Alejandra; Wunderink, Wouter; Os, Rob M. van; Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Brandwijk, Rene P.; Verhoef, Cornelis; IJzermans, Jan N.M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a high local control rate for primary and metastatic liver tumors. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of this treatment on the patient's quality of life. This is the first report of quality of life associated with liver SBRT. Methods and Materials: From October 2002 to March 2007, a total of 28 patients not suitable for other local treatments and with Karnofsky performance status of at least 80% were entered in a Phase I-II study of SBRT for liver tumors. Quality of life was a secondary end point. Two generic quality of life instruments were investigated, EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) and EuroQoL-Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-5D VAS), in addition to a disease-specific questionnaire, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ C-30). Points of measurement were directly before and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. Mean scores and SDs were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using paired-samples t-test and Student t-test. Results: The calculated EQ-5D index, EQ-5D VAS and QLQ C-30 global health status showed that mean quality of life of the patient group was not significantly influenced by treatment with SBRT; if anything, a tendency toward improvement was found. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy combines a high local control rate, by delivering a high dose per fraction, with no significant change in quality of life. Multicenter studies including larger numbers of patients are recommended and under development

  17. Relationship between whole-body tumor burden, clinical phenotype, and quality of life in patients with neurofibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merker, Vanessa L; Bredella, Miriam A; Cai, Wenli; Kassarjian, Ara; Harris, Gordon J; Muzikansky, Alona; Nguyen, Rosa; Mautner, Victor F; Plotkin, Scott R

    2014-06-01

    Patients with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), NF2, and schwannomatosis share a predisposition to develop multiple nerve sheath tumors. Previous studies have demonstrated that patients with NF1 and NF2 have reduced quality of life (QOL), but no studies have examined the relationship between whole-body tumor burden and QOL in these patients. We administered a QOL questionnaire (the SF-36) and a visual analog pain scale (VAS) to a previously described cohort of adult neurofibromatosis patients undergoing whole-body MRI. One-sample t-tests were used to compare norm-based SF-36 scores to weighted population means. Spearman correlation coefficients and multiple linear regression analyses controlling for demographic and disease-specific clinical variable were used to relate whole-body tumor volume to QOL scales. Two hundred forty-five patients (142 NF1, 53 NF2, 50 schwannomatosis) completed the study. Subjects showed deficits in selected subscales of the SF-36 compared to adjusted general population means. In bivariate analysis, increased tumor volume was significantly associated with pain in schwannomatosis patients, as measured by the SF-36 bodily pain subscale (rho = -0.287, P = 0.04) and VAS (rho = 0.34, P = 0.02). Regression models for NF2 patients showed a positive relationship between tumor burden and increased pain, as measured by the SF-36 (P = 0.008). Patients with NF1, NF2, and schwannomatosis suffer from reduced QOL, although only pain shows a clear relationship to patient's overall tumor burden. These findings suggest that internal tumor volume is not a primary contributor to QOL and emphasize the need for comprehensive treatment approaches that go beyond tumor-focused therapies such as surgery by including psychosocial interventions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Adenosarcoma of the uterine body initially presenting as an interstitial small tumor of the uterus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, H; Tsuji, N; Jimi, T; Butsuhara, Y; Terakawa, K; Nagano, T

    2014-01-01

    Adenosarcoma of the uterine body is a rare mixed tumor in which a benign epithelial component is mixed with a malignant stromal element. It has been considered that this tumor originates from the endometrium and its most common finding of imaging is a polypoid tumor occupying the uterine cavity. The authors herein present a case of 37-year-old female with a complaint of abnormal vaginal bleeding. At the first visit, transvaginal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a round mass with a diameter of one cm in the uterine wall. No malignant pathological finding was detected. The patient visited the authors again one year later, because of continuous bleeding. At that time, they found a polypoid tumor in the uterine cavity, which turned out to be adenosarcoma with sarcomatous overgrowth. The round mass in the uterus detected at first time seems to have been incipience of adenosarcoma. Prodromal sign of adenosarcoma has not been reported previously.

  19. Immuno-enhancement in tumor-bearing mice induced by whole body X-irradiation with 75 mGy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ying; Li Xiuyi; Gong Shouliang; Liu Shuzheng

    2000-01-01

    Objective: In present study the authors observed the effect of whole body irradiation (WBI) with 75 mGy X-rays on the immune function of tumor-bearing mice. Methods: Lewis lung carcinoma cells were implanted into the right thigh muscle of C57BL/6J mice. Ten days after tumor implantation, the tumor-bearing mice were administrated with 75 mGy X-rays WBI, then the mice were sacrificed 18 h after irradiation to detect the immune parameters including the spontaneous proliferation of thymocytes, the proliferative response of splenocytes to ConA and LPS, the cytotoxic activities of specific cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer cells (NK), as well as lymphokine activated killer cells (LAK) in spleen. The methods the authors used were 3 H-TdR incorporation or release assay. Results: the immune parameters of exposed tumor-bearing mice were much higher than those of sham-irradiated tumor-bearing mice (P<0.01). Conclusion: These results suggested that low dose radiation (LDR) could enhance the immune function of tumor-bearing mice, which might be of practical significance in the prevention and therapy of cancer

  20. Influence of nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaniwa, T.; Kanematsu, N.; Tsuji, H.; Kamada, T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning, the planar integrated dose (PID) measured in water is applied to the patient dose calculation with density scaling using the stopping power ratio. Since body tissues are chemically different from water, this dose calculation can be subject to errors, particularly due to differences in inelastic nuclear interactions. In recent studies, the authors proposed and validated a PID correction method for these errors. In the present study, the authors used this correction method to assess the influence of these nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in various clinical cases. Methods: Using 10–20 cases each of prostate, head and neck (HN), bone and soft tissue (BS), lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine neoplasms, the authors first used treatment plans for carbon-ion radiotherapy without nuclear interaction correction to derive uncorrected dose distributions. The authors then compared these distributions with recalculated distributions using the nuclear interaction correction (corrected dose distributions). Results: Median (25%/75% quartiles) differences between the target mean uncorrected doses and corrected doses were 0.2% (0.1%/0.2%), 0.0% (0.0%/0.0%), −0.3% (−0.4%/−0.2%), −0.1% (−0.2%/−0.1%), −0.1% (−0.2%/0.0%), −0.4% (−0.5%/−0.1%), and −0.3% (−0.4%/0.0%) for the prostate, HN, BS, lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine cases, respectively. The largest difference of −1.6% in target mean and −2.5% at maximum were observed in a uterine case. Conclusions: For most clinical cases, dose calculation errors due to the water nonequivalence of the tissues in nuclear interactions would be marginal compared to intrinsic uncertainties in treatment planning, patient setup, beam delivery, and clinical response. In some extreme cases, however, these errors can be substantial. Accordingly, this correction method should be routinely applied to treatment planning in clinical practice

  1. Effects of Carotid Body Tumor Resection on the Blood Pressure of Essential Hypertensive Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudim, Marat; Groom, Kelly L.; Laffer, Cheryl L.; Netterville, James L.; Robertson, David; Elijovich, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Removal of the carotid body (CB) improves animal models of hypertension (HTN) and heart failure, presumably via withdrawal of chemoreflex-induced sympathetic activation. The effect of CB tumor (CBT) resection on blood pressure (BP) in subjects with HTN is unknown. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 20 subjects with HTN (BP≥140/90 mmHg or use of antihypertensives) out of 134 who underwent CBT resection. Short-term (from 3 months before to the first reading after 30 days from surgery) and long-term (slope of the regressions on time over the entire follow up) changes in BP and heart rate (HR) were ascertained and adjusted for covariates (interval between readings, total follow up, number of readings and changes in therapy). Age and duration of HTN were 56±4 and 9±5 years. Adjusted short-term decreases in systolic (SBP: −9.9±3.1, p<0.001) and pulse pressures (PP: −7.9±2.7, p<0.002) were significant and correlated with their respective long-term changes (SBP: r=0.47, p=0.047; PP: r=0.54, p=0.019). Also, there was a strong relationship between adjusted short-term changes in SBP and PP (r=0.64, p<0.004). Out of 12 subjects with concordant decreases in short- and long-term BP changes, 6 (50% of responders or 33% of the total) had short-term falls of SBP ≥10 mmHg and of PP ≥ 5mmHg. To our knowledge this study is the first to show that unilateral CBT resection is associated with sustained reduction of BP in subjects with HTN. Hence, we suggest that targeted removal of the CB chemoreflex conceivably has a role in the therapy of human HTN. PMID:26051925

  2. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT of orofacial tumors, a value of whole-body imaging approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferda, Jiri [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Plzen and Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 306 40 Plzen (Czech Republic); Department of Radiology, University Hospital Plzen and Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 306 40 Plzen (Czech Republic)], E-mail: ferda@fnplzen.cz; Ferdova, Eva [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Plzen and Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 306 40 Plzen (Czech Republic); Department of Radiology, University Hospital Plzen and Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 306 40 Plzen (Czech Republic); Zahlava, Jan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Plzen and Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 306 40 Plzen (Czech Republic); Walter, Jiri [Department of Stomatosurgery, University Hospital Plzen and Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 306 40 Plzen (Czech Republic); Mukensnabl, Petr; Daum, Ondrej [sikls Institute of Pathological Anatomy, University Hospital Plzen and Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 306 40 Plzen (Czech Republic); Kreuzberg, Boris [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Plzen and Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 306 40 Plzen (Czech Republic)

    2010-02-15

    Aim: Staging of head and neck tumors is one of the most difficult tasks in imaging techniques, due to the very complicated head and neck anatomy and serious problems with the differentiation of reactive enlarged lymph nodes and lymph nodes involved with metastases. The aim of the study was to evaluate the validity of the whole-body approach in the assessment of head and neck malignancies using {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT. Materials and methods: The analysis of a group of 1750 consecutive whole-body procedures in all indications of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT was made according to: the presence of orofacial tumors; their histology; findings concerning the spread outside head and neck region; and findings concerning the primary staging or restaging. The examinations of head and neck tumors were performed after intravenous application of the {sup 18}F-FDG and its accumulation for one hour. Drinking and speaking is restricted during this accumulation to prevent artificial muscle {sup 18}F-FDG uptake and to minimize false positive findings. In our hospital, high resolution PET is followed by the sub-millimeter isotropic acquisition of CT data after intravenous application of an iodinated contrast material. The acquisitions of head and neck region and trunk are performed separately to obtain optimal resolution in both regions. Results: 105 examinations of the orofacial tumors were performed on 87 patients in a group of 1750 consecutive PET/CT examinations. The ratio between primary staging and restaging was 3:7. The most frequent indications were carcinomas of the tongue (19 examinations) and carcinomas of the salivary glands (19 examinations). The metastatic spread of the tumor outside the region of the head and neck was noted in 12 cases. Conclusion: Our findings of distant metastases confirmed the importance of the use of whole-body PET/CT in this indication.

  3. The variability of tumor motion and respiration pattern in Stereotactic Body RadioTherapy(SBRT) for Lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Joon; Bae, Sun Myeong; Baek, Geum Mun; Kang, Tae Young; Seo, Dong Rin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, ASAN Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of tumor motion and respiration pattern in lung cancer patients undergoing Stereotactic Body RadioTherapy(SBRT) by using On-Board imager (OBI) system and Real-time Position Management (RPM) System. This study population consisted of 60 lung cancer patient treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (48 Gy / 4 fractions). Of these, 30 were treated with gating (group 1) and 30 without gating(group2): typically the patients whose tumors showed three-dimensional respiratory motion > 10 mm were selected for gating. 4-dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT). Cone Beam CT (CBCT) and Fluoroscopy images were used to measure the tumor motion. RPM system was used to evaluate the variability of respiration pattern on SBRT for group1. The mean difference of tumor motion among 4DCT, CBCT and Fluoroscopy images in the cranio-caudal direction was 2.3 mm in group 1, 2. The maximum difference was 12.5 mm in the group 1 and 8.5 mm in group 2. The number of treatment fractions that patient's respiration pattern was within Upper-Lower threshold on SBRT in group 2 was 31 fractions. A patient who exhibited the most unstable pattern exceeded 108 times in a fraction. Although many patients in group 1 and 2 kept the reproducibility of tumor motion within 5 mm during their treatment, some patients exhibited variability of tumor motion in the CBCT and Fluoroscopy images. It was possible to improve the accuracy of dose delivery in SBRT without gating for lung cancer patient by using RPM system.

  4. Quality of life in patients with skin tumors: the mediator role of body image and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M Graça; Ponte, Mafalda; Ferreira, Gabriela; Machado, José C

    2017-06-01

    This study analyzed the relationships between illness representations, psychological morbidity, family stress, and quality of life and whether these variables were mediated by body image and social support. The sample consisted of 106 patients with skin tumors, who answered the following measures: Dermatology Life Quality Index, Illness Perception Questionnaire-Brief, Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey, Index of Family Relations, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales, and the Body Image Scale. Patients with poor quality of life showed more threatening cognitive and emotional illness representations, less perceived social support, higher psychological morbidity, and higher concern with body image. Body image mediated the relationship between cognitive and comprehension illness representations, family stress, psychological morbidity, and quality of life. Social support mediated the relationship between family stress/psychological morbidity and quality of life. Psychological intervention should focus on body image and social support, particularly in patients with melanoma, less disease duration, tumors in the face, head or neck, in an active professional status, and with lower education. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Kilovoltage Imaging of Implanted Fiducials to Monitor Intrafraction Motion With Abdominal Compression During Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Gastrointestinal Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorke, Ellen, E-mail: yorke@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Xiong, Ying [Department of Radiation Oncology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Han, Qian [Department of Radiotherapy, Henan Provincial People' s Hospital, Zhengzhou (China); Zhang, Pengpeng; Mageras, Gikas; Lovelock, Michael; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jian-Ping [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To assess intrafraction respiratory motion using a commercial kilovoltage imaging system for abdominal tumor patients with implanted fiducials and breathing constrained by pneumatic compression during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A pneumatic compression belt limited respiratory motion in 19 patients with radiopaque fiducials in or near their tumor during SBRT for abdominal tumors. Kilovoltage images were acquired at 5- to 6-second intervals during treatment using a commercial system. Intrafractional fiducial displacements were measured using in-house software. The dosimetric effect of the observed displacements was calculated for 3 sessions for each patient. Results: Intrafraction displacement patterns varied between patients and between individual treatment sessions. Averaged over 19 patients, 73 sessions, 7.6% of craniocaudal displacements exceeded 0.5 cm, and 1.2% exceeded 0.75 cm. The calculated single-session dose to 95% of gross tumor volume differed from planned by an average of −1.2% (range, −11.1% to 4.8%) but only for 4 patients was the total 3-session calculated dose to 95% of gross tumor volume more than 3% different from planned. Conclusions: Our pneumatic compression limited intrafractional abdominal target motion, maintained target position established at setup, and was moderately effective in preserving coverage. Commercially available intrafractional imaging is useful for surveillance but can be made more effective and reliable.

  6. Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Assessment of Whole-Body Metabolic Tumor Burden Using F-18-FDG PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Salamon

    Full Text Available To determine the metabolically active whole-body tumor volume (WB-MTV on F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18-FDG PET/CT in individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 using a three-dimensional (3D segmentation and computerized volumetry technique, and to compare PET WB-MTV between patients with benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs.Thirty-six NF1 patients (18 patients with malignant PNSTs and 18 age- and sex-matched controls with benign PNSTs were examined by F-18-FDG PET/CT. WB-MTV, whole-body total lesion glycolysis (WB-TLG and a set of semi-quantitative imaging-based parameters were analyzed both on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis.On a per-lesion basis, malignant PNSTs demonstrated both a significantly higher MTV and TLG than benign PNSTs (p < 0.0001. On a per-patient basis, WB-MTV and WB-TLG were significantly higher in patients with malignant PNSTs compared to patients with benign PNSTs (p < 0.001. ROC analysis showed that MTV and TLG could be used to differentiate between benign and malignant tumors.WB-MTV and WB-TLG may identify malignant change and may have the potential to provide a basis for investigating molecular biomarkers that correlate with metabolically active disease manifestations. Further evaluation will determine the potential clinical impact of these PET-based parameters in NF1.

  7. Estudo do efeito do uso de colimador na sonda gama utilizada em cirurgia radioguiada Study of the effect of using a collimator on a gamma probe in radioguided surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iran José Oliveira da Silva

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste trabalho consiste em estudar a influência da resolução espacial da sonda gama Europrobe que é utilizada em cirurgia radioguiada. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Na técnica de cirurgia radioguiada, após a injeção de um radiotraçador no tumor primário, é utilizada uma sonda detectora de radiação gama a fim de determinar a localização do linfonodo sentinela. Para simular a região dos pontos de injeção do radiotraçador e o linfonodo sentinela, duas fontes de Tc-99m, com 20,42 MBq e 0,70 MBq, foram posicionadas no interior de um recipiente preenchido com água. Em seguida, com a janela de entrada da sonda coberta com um colimador, realizou-se varredura sobre a superfície da água. Assim, foi possível registrar a taxa de contagens variando-se a distância lateral da sonda em relação às duas fontes, as quais foram separadas por uma distância variando entre 30 mm e 60 mm. RESULTADOS: Os resultados mostraram que o uso do colimador contribui para melhorar a resolução espacial da sonda, permitindo a identificação do linfonodo sentinela distante até 30 mm do ponto de injeção. CONCLUSÃO: Esse estudo permite concluir que a sonda Europrobe, quando utilizada com capa colimadora com orifício central de 3,5 mm de diâmetro, é capaz de identificar o linfonodo sentinela posicionado a até 30 mm de distância em relação à região do ponto de injeção do radiotraçador.OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study is to evaluate the performance of the Europrobe gamma probe spatial resolution in radioguided surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the radioguided surgery technique, after a radiotracer injection into the primary tumor, a gamma detector probe is utilized to determine the localization of the sentinel lymph node. In order to simulate the region of the radiotracer injection the sentinel lymph node, two Tc-99m sources, with 20.42 MBq and 0.70 MBq, were positioned in a water-filled tank. With a collimator cap

  8. Inhibitory mechanism of low-dose, whole-body irradiation with gamma-rays against tumor metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuhiro Ohsima; Mitsutoshi Tukimoto; Shuji Kojima

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. A lot of beneficial effects of low-dose irradiation are well known. Of them, an inhibitory effect of the radiation on lung metastasis is reported so far. It has been reported that low-dose whole-body irradiation with gamma rays enhanced cytotoxic immune response as one of the mechanisms. In our laboratory, it has been confirmed an enhancement of natural killer activity in mice irradiated with whole-body 0.5Gy gamma-rays. Metastasis is accomplished by multistep process, involving basement membrane destruction, local invasion, intravasation, survival in the bloodstream, extravasation into distant organs, and proliferation at the target site. Besides, a lot of growth factors and proteases are involved in these steps. As to mechanism of inhibition of tumor metastasis induced by low-dose whole-body irradiation, studies from the standpoint of tumor invasion have not been reported. Here, inhibitory effect of 0.5Gy whole-body gamma-ray irradiation on tumor metastasis and its mechanism were examined in pulmonary metastasis model mice injected with B16 melanoma cells. Consequently, 0.5Gy whole-body gamma ray irradiation significantly suppressed colony formation in the lungs. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase- 2 (MMP- 2), a proteinase related to metastasis, in lung tissues was suppressed by the radiation. Alteration of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP) after the gamma-ray irradiation was examined. Expression of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 mRNA in the lungs were significantly increased. In order to clarify the inhibitory effect obtained in the in vivo metastatic lung cancer model mice, we studied effects of gamma-rays on cell proliferation, alterations of mRNA and proteins related to tumor metastasis in cultured B16 melanoma cells. Proliferation of B16 melanoma cells was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. MMP-2 mRNA expression was not altered in any doses of gamma-rays. Thought expression of the protein was slightly

  9. Changes in sex and non-sex hormones and distribution of erythrocyte antigens in reproductive age women with tumors of body of uterus in Adjara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashidze, I; Kotrikadze, N; Diasamidze, A; Nagervadze, M; Ramishvili, L

    2013-04-01

    The aim the research was to study the hormonal state of reproductive age women with tumors of body of uterus. The quantitative changes of sex steroid hormones: progesterone (P), estradiol (E), testosterone (T), gonadotropine -Luteinizing hormone (LH) and Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were investigated. Distribution of ABO blood group antigens and Rh-Hr systems genetic variants in the blood of women living in Adjara Region was also studied. For study was used reproductive age women's blood with benign (fibromioma) and malignant (endometrial cancer) tumors of body of uterus (the middle age was 20-45 years). The determination of hormones was made by the enzymatic analysis method (ELAIZA). For the research of blood groups, were used the immunoserologic methods. The study have revealed that in blood of reproductive age women with benign and malignant tumors of body of uterus, level of estradiol was increased while levels of progesterone and testosterone were sharply reduced. Amount of Follicle-stimulating hormone and Luteinizing hormone were also increased. It's significant that, both hormones were sharply increased in case of cancer of body of uterus, in comparison with control group and benign tumor. According to distribution of ABO blood group phenotypes - O (I) phenotypic group of ABO system has its highest frequency in blood of women with cancer of body of uterus. Cancer of body of uterus is associated with O (I) phenotypic groups; benign tumor of body of uterus - with A(II) and AB(IV) phenotypic groups. Women with cc and EE genetic variants of Rh-Hr system have sensitivity to the development of benign and malignant tumors of body of uterus; women with ee genetic variant have lower sensitivity towards body of uterus cancer and sharply expressed sensitivity to uterus benign tumors. In women with malignant tumors of body of uterus the frequency of distribution of Rh-Hr system CC genetic variant was sharply reduced.

  10. Pioglitazone treatment increases survival and prevents body weight loss in tumor-bearing animals: possible anti-cachectic effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mércia Beluzi

    Full Text Available Cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by profound involuntary weight loss, fat depletion, skeletal muscle wasting, and asthenia; all symptoms are not entirely attributable to inadequate nutritional intake. Adipose tissue and skeletal muscle loss during cancer cachexia development has been described systematically. The former was proposed to precede and be more rapid than the latter, which presents a means for the early detection of cachexia in cancer patients. Recently, pioglitazone (PGZ was proposed to exhibit anti-cancer properties, including a reduction in insulin resistance and adipose tissue loss; nevertheless, few studies have evaluated its effect on survival. For greater insight into a potential anti-cachectic effect due to PGZ, 8-week-old male Wistar rats were subcutaneously inoculated with 1 mL (2×107 of Walker 256 tumor cells. The animals were randomly assigned to two experimental groups: TC (tumor + saline-control and TP5 (tumor + PGZ/5 mg. Body weight, food ingestion and tumor growth were measured at baseline and after removal of tumor on days 7, 14 and 26. Samples from different visceral adipose tissue (AT depots were collected on days 7 and 14 and stored at -80o C (5 to 7 animals per day/group. The PGZ treatment showed an increase in the survival average of 27.3% (P< 0.01 when compared to TC. It was also associated with enhanced body mass preservation (40.7 and 56.3%, p< 0.01 on day 14 and 26 compared with the TC group. The treatment also reduced the final tumor mass (53.4%, p<0.05 and anorexia compared with the TC group during late-stage cachexia. The retroperitoneal AT (RPAT mass was preserved on day 7 compared with the TC group during the same experimental period. Such effect also demonstrates inverse relationship with tumor growth, on day 14. Gene expression of PPAR-γ, adiponectin, LPL and C/EBP-α from cachectic rats was upregulated after PGZ. Glucose uptake from adipocyte cells (RPAT was entirely re

  11. Incidence of liver tumors in beagles with body burdens of 239Pu or 241Am

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.N.; Mays, C.W.; Wrenn, M.E.; Shabestari, L.; Lloyd, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Tetravalent 239 Pu or trivalent 241 Am in a citrate buffer, given via a single intravenous injection to beagles, induced very pronounced liver changes, usually at relatively long postinjection times. The lesions consisted of cell injury or cell necrosis which was followed by nodular hyperplasia and a significant incidence of primary liver tumors. The most frequent neoplasm was the bile duct adenoma, followed by the bile duct carcinoma. A lesser number of sarcomas were also induced, especially fibrosarcomas. The number of hepatic cell tumors was low. An abnormally high incidence of both hyperplastic nodules and primary liver tumors occurred at long postinjection times and at average doses extending down to ∼10 rads. The various nodular lesions and liver tumors frequently occurred as incidental findings in dogs dying from other causes, especially bone cancer. In comparison to bone neoplasia, the liver was a much less important target organ in the high-dose level groups, but in some of the low-dose groups, especially in the 241 Am groups, the risk of radiation-induced liver cancer was approximately equal to or exceeded the risk of skeletal tumors. However, in any projection of the risks observed in this animal model to man, one should be mindful that the beagle skeleton is approximately 25 times more sensitive to radiation-induced bone neoplasia than is the human skeleton (Mays et al., 1976) and that the radiosensitivity difference for the beagle and human liver is unknown. 41 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  12. A clinical trial comparing the responses of animal tumors receiving heat sensitizing drugs prior to whole body hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.K.; Forsyth, K.; Dewhirst, M.W.; Fuller, D.J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Whole body hyperthermia (WBH) has rarely been found effective in inducing complete tumor responses. Recent in vitro studies showing that heat sensitizion is possible have renewed interest in this field. In this protocol, WBH is induced via a commercially available inductive device and maintained at 42 0 C for thirty minutes. The heat sensitizing drugs, difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) methylglyoxal bis (guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) are administered 48 hours before, in accordance with in vitro studies. Goals of the study include evaluation of normal tissue toxicity and tumor response. Two normal dogs were treated to study acute toxicities before inception of the clinical trial. The gastrointestinal and hematopoietic systems were used to monitor toxicities using systems review and serial bloodwork. These studies and preliminary clinical results of observed tumor regression in dogs with lymphomas are discussed. Consistent changes in all patients included elevations in liver enzymes, creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and white blood cell counts, as well as, decreases in platelet counts. All changes were transient and clinical signs were not associated with them. Tumor volume reductions from 25% to 74% have been documented

  13. iROLL: does 3-D radioguided occult lesion localization improve surgical management in early-stage breast cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemel, Christina; Kajdi, Georg W.; Schmid, Jan; Buck, Andreas K.; Herrmann, Ken [University Hospital of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Cramer, Andreas; Grossmann, Christoph; Grimminger, Hanns-Joerg [Missionsaerztliches Klinikum Wuerzburg, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Malzahn, Uwe [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Clinical Epidemiology and Biometry, Wuerzburg (Germany); Lamp, Nora [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Pathology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Langen, Heinz-Jakob [Missionsaerztliches Klinikum Wuerzburg, Department of Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of 3-D radioguided occult lesion localization (iROLL) and to compare iROLL with wire-guided localization (WGL) in patients with early-stage breast cancer undergoing breast-conserving surgery and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). WGL (standard procedure) and iROLL in combination with SLNB were performed in 31 women (mean age 65.1 ± 11.2 years) with early-stage breast cancer and clinically negative axillae. Patient comfort in respect of both methods was assessed using a ten point scale. SLNB and iROLL were guided by freehand SPECT (fhSPECT). The results of the novel 3-D image-based method were compared with those of WGL, ultrasound-based lesion localization, and histopathology. iROLL successfully detected the malignant primary and at least one sentinel lymph node in 97 % of patients. In a single patient (3 %), only iROLL, and not WGL, enabled lesion localization. The variability between fhSPECT and ultrasound-based depth localization of breast lesions was low (1.2 ± 1.4 mm). Clear margins were achieved in 81 % of the patients; however, precise prediction of clear histopathological surgical margins was not feasible using iROLL. Patients rated iROLL as less painful than WGL with a pain score 0.8 ± 1.2 points (p < 0.01) lower than the score for iROLL. iROLL is a well-tolerated and feasible technique for localizing early-stage breast cancer in the course of breast-conserving surgery, and is a suitable replacement for WGL. As a single image-based procedure for localization of breast lesions and sentinel nodes, iROLL may improve the entire surgical procedure. However, no advantages of the image-guided procedure were found with regard to prediction of complete tumour resection. (orig.)

  14. Intraoperative radioguidance with a portable gamma camera: a novel technique for laparoscopic sentinel node localisation in urological malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeeren, L.; Valdes Olmos, R.A.; Vogel, W.V.; Sivro, F.; Hoefnagel, C.A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meinhardt, W.; Bex, A.; Poel, H.G. van der; Horenblas, S. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Urology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-07-15

    Our aim was to assess the feasibility of intraoperative radioguidance with a portable gamma camera during laparoscopic sentinel node (SN) procedures in urological malignancies. We evaluated the use of the intraoperative portable gamma camera in 20 patients: 16 patients with prostate carcinoma (PCC), 2 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RC) and 2 patients with testicular cancer (TC). Intra/peritumoural injection of {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid ({sup 99m}Tc) was followed by planar lymphoscintigraphy, SPECT/CT and marking of SN levels. Before laparoscopy a {sup 125}I seed was fixed on the laparoscopic gamma probe as a pointer of SN seeking. The portable gamma camera was set to display the {sup 99m}Tc signal for SN localisation and the {sup 125}I signal for SN seeking. Matching of these signals on screen indicated exact SN localisation, and consequently this SN was removed. The mean injected dose was 218 MBq in PCC, 228 MBq in RC and 88 MBq in TC. Pelvic SN were visualised in all PCC patients, with uncommonly located SN in seven patients. SN metastases were found in seven patients (one in a uncommonly located SN). Both RC patients and TC patients had para-aortic SN, which were all tumour free. A total of 59 SN were removed. The portable gamma camera enabled real-time SN display/identification in 18 patients (90%). The use of a portable gamma camera in combination with a laparoscopic gamma probe incorporates intraoperative real-time imaging with improved SN identification in urological malignancies. This procedure might also be useful for SN identification of other deep draining malignancies. (orig.)

  15. Selective activity against proliferating tumor endothelial cells by CVX-22, a thrombospondin-1 mimetic CovX-Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronella, Julia; Li, Lingna; Johnson, Kimberly; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven; Roxas, Giovanni; Levin, Nancy

    2009-06-01

    CVX-22 is a CovX-Body, produced by covalently attaching a thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) type 1 repeat peptide mimetic to a humanized IgG1 molecule. To dissect the antiangiogenic mechanism of CVX-22, the numbers and proliferative status of defined tumor endothelial cell (TEC) subsets from the B16 and C32 melanoma models were examined. CVX-22 treatment reduced the numbers of activated, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-positive TECs. Because the vast majority of mitotically active TECs reside in the VEGFR2 subset, a reduction in numbers of this compartment resulted in an 82% overall decrease in BrdU labeling of TEC. However, the rate of proliferation and VEGFR2 receptor density of this VEGFR2-positive subpopulation were unaffected. Instead, CVX-22 induced endothelial cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that CVX-22 acts by selective deletion of activated, VEGFR2-positive TEC. The overrepresentation of activated cells in sites of tumor angiogenesis may confer a unique specificity of CVX-22 for tumor vasculature.

  16. A ketogenic diet increases transport and oxidation of ketone bodies in RG2 and 9L gliomas without affecting tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Feyter, Henk M; Behar, Kevin L; Rao, Jyotsna U; Madden-Hennessey, Kirby; Ip, Kevan L; Hyder, Fahmeed; Drewes, Lester R; Geschwind, Jean-François; de Graaf, Robin A; Rothman, Douglas L

    2016-08-01

    The dependence of tumor cells, particularly those originating in the brain, on glucose is the target of the ketogenic diet, which creates a plasma nutrient profile similar to fasting: increased levels of ketone bodies and reduced plasma glucose concentrations. The use of ketogenic diets has been of particular interest for therapy in brain tumors, which reportedly lack the ability to oxidize ketone bodies and therefore would be starved during ketosis. Because studies assessing the tumors' ability to oxidize ketone bodies are lacking, we investigated in vivo the extent of ketone body oxidation in 2 rodent glioma models. Ketone body oxidation was studied using (13)C MR spectroscopy in combination with infusion of a (13)C-labeled ketone body (beta-hydroxybutyrate) in RG2 and 9L glioma models. The level of ketone body oxidation was compared with nontumorous cortical brain tissue. The level of (13)C-beta-hydroxybutyrate oxidation in 2 rat glioma models was similar to that of contralateral brain. In addition, when glioma-bearing animals were fed a ketogenic diet, the ketone body monocarboxylate transporter was upregulated, facilitating uptake and oxidation of ketone bodies in the gliomas. These results demonstrate that rat gliomas can oxidize ketone bodies and indicate upregulation of ketone body transport when fed a ketogenic diet. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that brain tumors are metabolically inflexible and show the need for additional research on the use of ketogenic diets as therapy targeting brain tumor metabolism. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Comparative analysis of imaging sensitivity of positron emission mammography and whole-body PET in relation to tumor size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yayoi; Ozawa, Yukihiko; Kubouchi, Kouichi; Nakamura, Seigo; Nakajima, Yasuo; Inoue, Tomio

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) consists of a dedicated PET scanner for breast imaging with a higher spatial resolution than whole-body PET (WBPET) scanners. This study compared the imaging sensitivity of PEM with WBPET in relation to tumor size. Fifty-four Japanese women younger than 50 years with histologically confirmed breast lesions were retrospectively enrolled. Positron emission mammography and WBPET were conducted on the same day. Positron emission mammography and WBPET images were blindly evaluated and compared with histopathology. Tumors were classified into 3 groups based on size as follows: group 1, 1 cm or smaller; group 2, 1 to 2 cm; and group 3, larger than 2 cm. The sensitivities of PEM and WBPET were compared in overall subjects and in each size group. In visual analysis, the overall imaging sensitivity was 78.6% (33/42) for PEM and 47.6% (20/42) for WBPET. The overall sensitivity of PEM was significantly higher than that of WBPET (P PEM and WBPET were larger in smaller tumors: group 1 (66.7% vs 13.3%), group 2 (63.4% vs 36.4%), and group 3 (100.0% vs 87.5%). The sensitivity of PEM was significantly higher than that of WBPET in group 1 (P = 0.008); however, no significant differences were seen in group 2 (P = 0.500) or group 3 (P = 0.250). Overall, the imaging specificity of PEM and WEBPET was 90.6% (60/66) and 93.9% (62/66), respectively. The imaging sensitivity of PEM was higher than that of WBPET in Japanese women younger than 50 years. Positron emission mammography showed significant sensitivity in tumors smaller than 1 cm, which has been a weak point for WBPET.

  18. Very low-dose adult whole-body tumor imaging with F-18 FDG PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Andrzej; Naveed, Muhammad; McGrath, Mary; Lisi, Michele; Lavalley, Cathy; Feiglin, David

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if effective radiation dose due to PET component in adult whole-body tumor imaging with time-of-flight F-18 FDG PET/CT could be significantly reduced. We retrospectively analyzed data for 10 patients with the body mass index ranging from 25 to 50. We simulated F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose via reconstruction of simulated shorter acquisition time per bed position scans from the acquired list data. F-18 FDG whole-body scans were reconstructed using time-of-flight OSEM algorithm and advanced system modeling. Two groups of images were obtained: group A with a standard dose of F-18 FDG and standard reconstruction parameters and group B with simulated 25% dose and modified reconstruction parameters, respectively. Three nuclear medicine physicians blinded to the simulated activity independently reviewed the images and compared diagnostic quality of images. Based on the input from the physicians, we selected optimal modified reconstruction parameters for group B. In so obtained images, all the lesions observed in the group A were visible in the group B. The tumor SUV values were different in the group A, as compared to group B, respectively. However, no significant differences were reported in the final interpretation of the images from A and B groups. In conclusion, for a small number of patients, we have demonstrated that F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose, accompanied by appropriate modification of the reconstruction parameters provided adequate diagnostic quality of PET images acquired on time-of-flight PET/CT.

  19. The detection rates and tumor clinical/pathological stages of whole-body FDG-PET cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Ken; Omagari, Junichi; Ochiai, Reiji; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Kitagawa, Mami; Kobayashi, Hisashi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) has been used for cancer screening, mainly in East-Asia, and cancers are found not infrequently. However, their stages have not been clarified. We examined the detection rates of various cancers using whole-body PET for the screening of cancers in asymptomatic individuals, focusing on their clinical and pathological stages. Whole-body PET was obtained as a part of our cancer screening program among 3,426 healthy subjects. All subjects participated in a course of PET examination in conjunction with conventional examinations including a medical questionnaire, tumor markers, immunological fecal occult blood test, neck and abdominal ultrasonography and whole body computed tomography. A diagnosis and staging was obtained by an analysis of the pathological findings or by an analysis of the clinical follow-up data. Malignant tumors were discovered in 65 lesions found in 3,426 participants (1.90%). The PET findings were true-positive in 46 of the 65 cancer cases. The cancers were found in the following organs: the colon 14; thyroid gland 10; stomach 7; lung 5; liver 3; breast 2; and one each in the kidney, gallbladder, esophagus, pancreas and retroperitoneum. The stages were as follows: stage 0 5, stage I 17, stage II 10, stage III 7, and stage IV 6. One was an unknown primary. There were 19 false-negative findings (0.6%) on PET. Six cancers (0.18%) were missed in our screening program. PET imaging has the potential to detect a wide variety of cancers at potentially curative stages. Most PET-negative cancers are early stage cancers, and thus can be detected using other conventional examinations such as endoscopy. (author)

  20. A method of surface marker location optimization for tumor motion estimation in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Bo; Park, Justin C.; Fan, Qiyong; Kahler, Darren; Liu, Chihray; Chen, Yunmei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Accurately localizing lung tumor localization is essential for high-precision radiation therapy techniques such as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Since direct monitoring of tumor motion is not always achievable due to the limitation of imaging modalities for treatment guidance, placement of fiducial markers on the patient’s body surface to act as a surrogate for tumor position prediction is a practical alternative for tracking lung tumor motion during SBRT treatments. In this work, the authors propose an innovative and robust model to solve the multimarker position optimization problem. The model is able to overcome the major drawbacks of the sparse optimization approach (SOA) model. Methods: The principle-component-analysis (PCA) method was employed as the framework to build the authors’ statistical prediction model. The method can be divided into two stages. The first stage is to build the surrogate tumor matrix and calculate its eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors. The second stage is to determine the “best represented” columns of the eigenvector matrix obtained from stage one and subsequently acquire the optimal marker positions as well as numbers. Using 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) and breath hold CT imaging data, the PCA method was compared to the SOA method with respect to calculation time, average prediction accuracy, prediction stability, noise resistance, marker position consistency, and marker distribution. Results: The PCA and SOA methods which were both tested were on all 11 patients for a total of 130 cases including 4DCT and breath-hold CT scenarios. The maximum calculation time for the PCA method was less than 1 s with 64 752 surface points, whereas the average calculation time for the SOA method was over 12 min with 400 surface points. Overall, the tumor center position prediction errors were comparable between the two methods, and all were less than 1.5 mm. However, for the extreme scenarios (breath hold), the

  1. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I lung cancer and small lung metastasis: evaluation of an immobilization system for suppression of respiratory tumor movement and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayakawa Shiho

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for lung tumors, reducing tumor movement is necessary. In this study, we evaluated changes in tumor movement and percutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2 levels, and preliminary clinical results of SBRT using the BodyFIX immobilization system. Methods Between 2004 and 2006, 53 consecutive patients were treated for 55 lesions; 42 were stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, 10 were metastatic lung cancers, and 3 were local recurrences of NSCLC. Tumor movement was measured with fluoroscopy under breath holding, free breathing on a couch, and free breathing in the BodyFIX system. SpO2 levels were measured with a finger pulseoximeter under each condition. The delivered dose was 44, 48 or 52 Gy, depending on tumor diameter, in 4 fractions over 10 or 11 days. Results By using the BodyFIX system, respiratory tumor movements were significantly reduced compared with the free-breathing condition in both craniocaudal and lateral directions, although the amplitude of reduction in the craniocaudal direction was 3 mm or more in only 27% of the patients. The average SpO2 did not decrease by using the system. At 3 years, the local control rate was 80% for all lesions. Overall survival was 76%, cause-specific survival was 92%, and local progression-free survival was 76% at 3 years in primary NSCLC patients. Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis developed in 7 patients. Conclusion Respiratory tumor movement was modestly suppressed by the BodyFIX system, while the SpO2 level did not decrease. It was considered a simple and effective method for SBRT of lung tumors. Preliminary results were encouraging.

  2. Study of the effect of using a collimator on a gamma probe in radioguided surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Iran José Oliveira da; Khoury, Helen Jamil; Lemos, Márcia Rosana Leite de; Almeida Filho, Paulo José de; Guimarães, Maria Inês Calil Cury

    2006-01-01

    OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste trabalho consiste em estudar a influência da resolução espacial da sonda gama Europrobe que é utilizada em cirurgia radioguiada. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Na técnica de cirurgia radioguiada, após a injeção de um radiotraçador no tumor primário, é utilizada uma sonda detectora de radiação gama a fim de determinar a localização do linfonodo sentinela. Para simular a região dos pontos de injeção do radiotraçador e o linfonodo sentinela, duas fontes de Tc-99m, com 20,42 MBq ...

  3. Carcinoid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spread to other parts of the body. Doctors don't know what causes the mutations that can lead to carcinoid tumors. But they know that carcinoid tumors develop in neuroendocrine cells. Neuroendocrine cells are found in various organs throughout the body. They perform some nerve cell ...

  4. A Retrospective Review of CyberKnife Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Adrenal Tumors (Primary and Metastatic): Winthrop University Hospital Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Amishi; Rai, Hema; Haas, Jonathan; Witten, Matthew; Blacksburg, Seth; Schneider, Jeffrey G

    2015-01-01

    The adrenal gland is a common site of cancer metastasis. Surgery remains a mainstay of treatment for solitary adrenal metastasis. For patients who cannot undergo surgery, radiation is an alternative option. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an ablative treatment option allowing larger doses to be delivered over a shorter period of time. In this study, we report on our experience with the use of SBRT to treat adrenal metastases using CyberKnife technology. We retrospectively reviewed the Winthrop University radiation oncology data base to identify 14 patients for whom SBRT was administered to treat malignant adrenal disease. Of the factors examined, the biological equivalent dose (BED) of radiation delivered was found to be the most important predictor of local adrenal tumor control. We conclude that CyberKnife-based SBRT is a safe, non-invasive modality that has broadened the therapeutic options for the treatment of isolated adrenal metastases.

  5. Computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor on EPID cine images without implanted markers in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimura, H; Toyofuku, F; Higashida, Y; Onizuka, Y; Terashima, H; Egashira, Y; Shioyama, Y; Nomoto, S; Honda, H; Nakamura, K; Yoshidome, S; Anai, S

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor in cine images on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) without implanted markers during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Each tumor region was segmented in the first EPID cine image, i.e., reference portal image, based on a multiple-gray level thresholding technique and a region growing technique, and then the image including the tumor region was cropped as a 'tumor template' image. The tumor location was determined as the position in which the tumor template image took the maximum cross-correlation value within each consecutive portal image, which was acquired in cine mode on the EPID in treatment. EPID images with 512 x 384 pixels (pixel size: 0.56 mm) were acquired at a sampling rate of 0.5 frame s -1 by using energies of 4, 6 or 10 MV on linear accelerators. We applied our proposed method to EPID cine images (226 frames) of 12 clinical cases (ages: 51-83, mean: 72) with a non-small cell lung cancer. As a result, the average location error between tumor points obtained by our method and the manual method was 1.47 ± 0.60 mm. This preliminary study suggests that our method based on the tumor template matching technique might be feasible for tracking the location of a lung tumor without implanted markers in SBRT.

  6. Evaluating the role of embolization and carotid artery sacrifice and reconstruction in the management of carotid body tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Moustafa; Saman, Masoud; Stroman, David; Brown, Ryan; Ducic, Yadranko

    2016-10-01

    To review the surgical management of carotid body tumors (CBT), outcomes of carotid artery reconstruction, as well as utility of preoperative embolization. Retrospective chart review. A single-surgeon case series with chart review was performed of all cases between 1997 and 2014 at a single institution. Tumor classification, major neurovascular resection, requirement for in-line carotid artery reconstruction, intraoperative blood loss, and operative time, and postoperative neurovascular complications were determined. In all, 96 patients with 101 CBTs underwent definitive resection disease. Vascular sacrifice was 2.9% (three) for the internal jugular vein, 8.9% (nine) for the external carotid artery, and 13.8% (14) for the internal carotid artery (ICA). ICA sacrifices were performed with immediate in-line arterial bypass grafting with vascular surgery. Permanent cranial neuropathies occurred in 4.9% (five) of patients, without cerebrovascular events. We recommend surgical resection as the primary approach to the management of these CBTs. In lesions involving the ICA, we recommend vein bypass grafting. We found no differences or advantages to preoperative embolization. 4 Laryngoscope, 126:2282-2287, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Effective detection of the tumors causing osteomalacia using [Tc-99m]-HYNIC-octreotide (99mTc-HYNIC-TOC) whole body scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Hongli; Li, Fang; Zhuang, Hongming; Wang, Zhenghua; Tian, Jian; Xing, Xiaoping; Jin, Jin; Zhong, Dingrong; Zhang, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is an endocrine disorder caused by tumors producing excessive fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23). The causative tumors are generally small, slow-growing benign mesenchymal tumors. The only cure of the disease depends on resection of the tumors, which are extremely difficult to localize due to their small sizes and rare locations. Since these tumors are known to express somatostatin receptors, this research was undertaken to evaluate efficacy of [Tc-99m]-HYNIC-octreotide (99mTc-HYNIC-TOC) whole body imaging in this clinical setting Methods: Images of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scans and clinical chart from 183 patients with hypophosphatemia and clinically suspected TIO were retrospectively reviewed. The scan findings were compared to the results of histopathological examinations and clinical follow-ups. Results: Among 183 patients, 72 were confirmed to have TIO while 103 patients were found to have other causes of hypophosphatemia. The possibility of TIO could not be either diagnosed or excluded in the remaining 8 patients. For analytical purposes, these 8 patients who could neither be diagnosed nor excluded as having TIO were regarded as having the disease, bringing the total of TIO patients to 80. The 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scan identified 69 tumors in 80 patients with TIO, which rendered a sensitivity of 86.3% (69/80). 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy excluded 102 patients without TIO with a specificity of 99.1% (102/103). The overall accuracy of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC whole body scan in the localization of tumors responsible for osteomalacia is 93.4% (171/183). Conclusions: Whole body 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC imaging is effective in the localization of occult tumors causing TIO

  8. Effective detection of the tumors causing osteomalacia using [Tc-99m]-HYNIC-octreotide (99mTc-HYNIC-TOC) whole body scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Hongli, E-mail: annsmile1976@sina.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China); Li, Fang, E-mail: lifang@pumch.cn [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhuang, Hongming, E-mail: zhuang@email.chop.edu [Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, 34th and Civic Ctr Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Wang, Zhenghua, E-mail: ccq1214@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China); Tian, Jian, E-mail: tianjian4809@hotmail.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China); Xing, Xiaoping, E-mail: xingxp@126.com [Department of Endocrinology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China); Jin, Jin, E-mail: jinjin9010@126.com [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhong, Dingrong, E-mail: ZhongDR@pumch.cn [Department of Pathology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhang, Jingjing, E-mail: zhangjingjingtag@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is an endocrine disorder caused by tumors producing excessive fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23). The causative tumors are generally small, slow-growing benign mesenchymal tumors. The only cure of the disease depends on resection of the tumors, which are extremely difficult to localize due to their small sizes and rare locations. Since these tumors are known to express somatostatin receptors, this research was undertaken to evaluate efficacy of [Tc-99m]-HYNIC-octreotide (99mTc-HYNIC-TOC) whole body imaging in this clinical setting Methods: Images of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scans and clinical chart from 183 patients with hypophosphatemia and clinically suspected TIO were retrospectively reviewed. The scan findings were compared to the results of histopathological examinations and clinical follow-ups. Results: Among 183 patients, 72 were confirmed to have TIO while 103 patients were found to have other causes of hypophosphatemia. The possibility of TIO could not be either diagnosed or excluded in the remaining 8 patients. For analytical purposes, these 8 patients who could neither be diagnosed nor excluded as having TIO were regarded as having the disease, bringing the total of TIO patients to 80. The 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scan identified 69 tumors in 80 patients with TIO, which rendered a sensitivity of 86.3% (69/80). 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy excluded 102 patients without TIO with a specificity of 99.1% (102/103). The overall accuracy of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC whole body scan in the localization of tumors responsible for osteomalacia is 93.4% (171/183). Conclusions: Whole body 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC imaging is effective in the localization of occult tumors causing TIO.

  9. Effective detection of the tumors causing osteomalacia using [Tc-99m]-HYNIC-octreotide (99mTc-HYNIC-TOC) whole body scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Hongli; Li, Fang; Zhuang, Hongming; Wang, Zhenghua; Tian, Jian; Xing, Xiaoping; Jin, Jin; Zhong, Dingrong; Zhang, Jingjing

    2013-11-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is an endocrine disorder caused by tumors producing excessive fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23). The causative tumors are generally small, slow-growing benign mesenchymal tumors. The only cure of the disease depends on resection of the tumors, which are extremely difficult to localize due to their small sizes and rare locations. Since these tumors are known to express somatostatin receptors, this research was undertaken to evaluate efficacy of [Tc-99m]-HYNIC-octreotide (99mTc-HYNIC-TOC) whole body imaging in this clinical setting Images of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scans and clinical chart from 183 patients with hypophosphatemia and clinically suspected TIO were retrospectively reviewed. The scan findings were compared to the results of histopathological examinations and clinical follow-ups. Among 183 patients, 72 were confirmed to have TIO while 103 patients were found to have other causes of hypophosphatemia. The possibility of TIO could not be either diagnosed or excluded in the remaining 8 patients. For analytical purposes, these 8 patients who could neither be diagnosed nor excluded as having TIO were regarded as having the disease, bringing the total of TIO patients to 80. The 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scan identified 69 tumors in 80 patients with TIO, which rendered a sensitivity of 86.3% (69/80). 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy excluded 102 patients without TIO with a specificity of 99.1% (102/103). The overall accuracy of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC whole body scan in the localization of tumors responsible for osteomalacia is 93.4% (171/183). Whole body 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC imaging is effective in the localization of occult tumors causing TIO. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Impact of Tumor Size on Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allibhai, Zishan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); Taremi, Mojgan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stronach Regional Cancer Centre, Newmarket (Canada); Bezjak, Andrea; Brade, Anthony; Hope, Andrew J.; Sun, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); Cho, B.C. John, E-mail: john.cho@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) offers excellent control rates. Most published series deal mainly with small (usually <4 cm), peripheral, solitary tumors. Larger tumors are associated with poorer outcomes (ie, lower control rates, higher toxicity) when treated with conventional RT. It is unclear whether SBRT is sufficiently potent to control these larger tumors. We therefore evaluated and examined the influence of tumor size on treatment outcomes after SBRT. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and October 2010, 185 medically inoperable patients with early (T1-T2N0M0) NSCLC were treated on a prospective research ethics board-approved single-institution protocol. Prescription doses were risk-adapted based on tumor size and location. Follow-up included prospective assessment of toxicity (as per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and serial computed tomography scans. Patterns of failure, toxicity, and survival outcomes were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method, and the significance of tumor size (diameter, volume) with respect to patient, treatment, and tumor factors was tested. Results: Median follow-up was 15.2 months. Tumor size was not associated with local failure but was associated with regional failure (P=.011) and distant failure (P=.021). Poorer overall survival (P=.001), disease-free survival (P=.001), and cause-specific survival (P=.005) were also significantly associated with tumor size (with tumor volume more significant than diameter). Gross tumor volume and planning target volume were significantly associated with grade 2 or worse radiation pneumonitis. However, overall rates of grade ≥3 pneumonitis were low and not significantly affected by tumor or target size. Conclusions: Currently employed stereotactic body radiation therapy dose regimens can provide safe effective local therapy even for larger solitary NSCLC tumors (up to 5.7 cm

  11. Tumor glucose metabolism imaged in vivo in small animals with whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatni, Muhammad Rameez; Xia, Jun; Sohn, Rebecca; Maslov, Konstantin; Guo, Zijian; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Kun; Xia, Younan; Anastasio, Mark; Arbeit, Jeffrey; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-07-01

    With the increasing use of small animals for human disease studies, small-animal whole-body molecular imaging plays an important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose molecular information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image co-registration, the spatial resolution of the molecular imaging modality is not improved. Utilizing a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography system, we demonstrate, for the first time, that both anatomy and glucose uptake can be imaged in a single modality. Anatomy was imaged with the endogenous hemoglobin contrast, and glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose.

  12. Fractionated half body irradiation for palliation of multiple symptomatic bone metastases from solid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiguchi, Kenji; Hayashi, Shinya; Sunagawa, Yoshimitsu; Sougawa, Mitsuharu; Nakazawa, Masanori; Yamashita, Takashi (Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital)

    1992-06-01

    This was a phase I-II nonrandomized study that explored the toxicity and response of fractionated half-body irradiation (F-HBI) in patients with multiple symptomatic osseous metastases. The patients had no premedication and received 10 Gy in 5 fractions with a dose rate of 15 cGy/min. At the Cancer Institute Hospital, 9 patients were treated by this technique (1 upper and lower F-HBI, 6 upper F-HBI, 2 lower F-HBI). All patients were female and had adenocarcinomas (8 breast and 1 lung). Adverse effects were myelosuppression, vomiting and partial alopecia. But hematologic toxicity was treated with blood transfusion or G-CSF. All toxicity was transient, and no pneumonitis nor radiation-related deaths occurred. When given as palliation, F-HBI was found to relieve pain in 80% of the patients. In 10% of the patients the pain relief was complete. The mean time to achieve pain relief in responders after F-HBI was 9 days. The pain relief was long-lasting and continued without need of reirradiation for 40% of the remaining patient's life. This treatment modality appears to be well tolerated and effective in patients with multiple symptomatic osseous metastases. The optimal indications, dose and fractionation for F-HBI should be further explored in randomized trials. (author).

  13. Clinical outcome of stereotactic body radiotherapy of 54 Gy in nine fractions for patients with localized lung tumor using a custom-made immobilization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Abe, Yoshinao; Kondo, Hidehiro

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical outcome of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of 54 Gy in nine fractions for patients with localized lung tumor using a custom-made immobilization system. The subjects were 19 patients who had localized lung tumor (11 primaries, 8 metastases) between May 2003 and October 2005. Treatment was conducted on 19 lung tumors by fixed multiple noncoplanar conformal beams with a standard linear accelerator. The isocentric dose was 54 Gy in nine fractions. The median overall treatment time was 15 days (range 11-22 days). All patients were immobilized by a thermo-shell and a custom-made headrest during the treatment. The crude local tumor control rate was 95% during the follow-up of 9.4-39.5 (median 17.7) months. In-field recurrence was noted in only one patient at the last follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate at 2 years was 89.5%. Grade 1 radiation pneumonia and grade 1 radiation fibrosis were observed in 12 of the 19 patients. Treatment-related severe early and late complications were not observed in this series. The stereotactic body radiotherapy of 54 Gy in nine fractions achieved acceptable tumor control without any severe complications. The results suggest that SBRT can be one of the alternatives for patients with localized lung tumors. (author)

  14. Association between body mass index and mortality for colorectal cancer survivors: overall and by tumor molecular phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Peter T.; Newton, Christina C.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Phipps, Amanda I.; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Baron, John A.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Casey, Graham; Cleary, Sean P.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Farris, Alton B.; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Gallinger, Steven; Green, Roger C.; Haile, Robert W.; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Makar, Karen W.; McLaughlin, John R.; Potter, John D.; Renehan, Andrew G.; Sinicrope, Frank A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Win, Aung Ko; Lindor, Noralane M.; Limburg, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Microsatellite instability (MSI) and BRAF-mutation status are associated with colorectal cancer survival whereas the role of body mass index (BMI) is less clear. We evaluated the association between BMI and colorectal cancer survival, overall and by strata of MSI, BRAF-mutation, sex, and other factors. Methods This study included 5,615 men and women diagnosed with invasive colorectal cancer who were followed for mortality (maximum: 14.7 years; mean: 5.9 years). Pre-diagnosis BMI was derived from self-reported weight approximately 1-year before diagnosis and height. Tumor MSI and BRAF-mutation status were available for 4,131 and 4,414 persons, respectively. Multivariable hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated from delayed-entry Cox proportional hazards models. Results In multivariable models, high pre-diagnosis BMI was associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality in both sexes (per 5-kg/m2, HR = 1.10; 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.15), with similar associations stratified by sex (p-interaction: 0.41), colon vs rectum (p-interaction: 0.86), MSI status (p-interaction: 0.84), and BRAF-mutation status (p-interaction: 0.28). In joint models, with MS-stable/MSI-low and normal BMI as the reference group, risk of death was higher for MS-stable/MSI-low and obese BMI (HR: 1.32; p-value: 0.0002), not statistically significantly lower for MSI-high and normal BMI (HR: 0.86; p-value: 0.29), and approximately the same for MSI-high and obese BMI (HR: 1.00; p-value: 0.98). Conclusions High pre-diagnosis BMI was associated with increased mortality; this association was consistent across participant subgroups, including strata of tumor molecular phenotype. Impact High BMI may attenuate the survival benefit otherwise observed with MSI-high tumors. PMID:26038390

  15. Disability, body image and sports/physical activity in adult survivors of childhood CNS tumors: population-based outcomes from a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boman, Krister K.; Hörnquist, Lina; de Graaff, Lisanne; Rickardsson, Jenny; Lannering, Birgitta; Gustafsson, Göran

    2013-01-01

    Childhood CNS tumor survivors risk health and functional impairments that threaten normal psychological development and self-perception. This study investigated the extent to which health and functional ability predict adult survivors' body image (BI) and self-confidence regarding sports and

  16. Intrafraction Variation of Mean Tumor Position During Image-Guided Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Chirag; Grills, Inga S.; Kestin, Larry L.; McGrath, Samuel; Ye Hong; Martin, Shannon K.; Yan Di

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Prolonged delivery times during daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) introduce concerns regarding intrafraction variation (IFV) of the mean target position (MTP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of the IFV-MTP and to assess target margins required to compensate for IFV and postonline CBCT correction residuals. Patient, treatment, and tumor characteristics were analyzed with respect to their impact on IFV-MTP. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with 140 tumors underwent 659 fractions of lung SBRT. Dose prescribed was 48 or 60 Gy in 12 Gy fractions. Translational target position correction of the MTP was performed via onboard CBCT. IFV-MTP was measured as the difference in MTP between the postcorrection CBCT and the posttreatment CBCT excluding residual error. Results: IFV-MTP was 0.2 ± 1.8 mm, 0.1 ± 1.9 mm, and 0.01 ± 1.5 mm in the craniocaudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral dimensions and the IFV-MTP vector was 2.3 ± 2.1 mm. Treatment time and excursion were found to be significant predictors of IFV-MTP. An IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 and 5 mm was seen in 40.8% and 7.2% of fractions, respectively. IFV-MTP greater than 2 mm was seen in heavier patients with larger excursions and longer treatment times. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were seen between immobilization devices. The stereotactic frame immobilization device was found to be significantly less likely to have an IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 mm compared with the alpha cradle, BodyFIX, and hybrid immobilization devices. Conclusions: Treatment time and respiratory excursion are significantly associated with IFV-MTP. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were found between immobilization devices. Target margins for IFV-MTP plus post-correction residuals are dependent on immobilization device with 5-mm uniform margins being acceptable for the frame immobilization device.

  17. Potential dosimetric benefits of adaptive tumor tracking over the internal target volume concept for stereotactic body radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karava, Konstantina; Ehrbar, Stefanie; Riesterer, Oliver; Roesch, Johannes; Glatz, Stefan; Klöck, Stephan; Guckenberger, Matthias; Tanadini-Lang, Stephanie

    2017-11-09

    Radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer has two major challenges: (I) the tumor is adjacent to several critical organs and, (II) the mobility of both, the tumor and its surrounding organs at risk (OARs). A treatment planning study simulating stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for pancreatic tumors with both the internal target volume (ITV) concept and the tumor tracking approach was performed. The two respiratory motion-management techniques were compared in terms of doses to the target volume and organs at risk. Two volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans (5 × 5 Gy) were created for each of the 12 previously treated pancreatic cancer patients, one using the ITV concept and one the tumor tracking approach. To better evaluate the overall dose delivered to the moving tumor volume, 4D dose calculations were performed on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scans. The resulting planning target volume (PTV) size for each technique was analyzed. Target and OAR dose parameters were reported and analyzed for both 3D and 4D dose calculation. Tumor motion ranged from 1.3 to 11.2 mm. Tracking led to a reduction of PTV size (max. 39.2%) accompanied with significant better tumor coverage (p<0.05, paired Wilcoxon signed rank test) both in 3D and 4D dose calculations and improved organ at risk sparing. Especially for duodenum, stomach and liver, the mean dose was significantly reduced (p<0.05) with tracking for 3D and 4D dose calculations. By using an adaptive tumor tracking approach for respiratory-induced pancreatic motion management, a significant reduction in PTV size can be achieved, which subsequently facilitates treatment planning, and improves organ dose sparing. The dosimetric benefit of tumor tracking is organ and patient-specific.

  18. Three-dimensional volumetric interpolated breath-hold MR imaging for whole-body tumor staging in less than 15 minutes: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Thomas C; Goehde, Susanne C; Herborn, Christoph U; Treder, Wiebke; Ruehm, Stefan G; Debatin, Jörg F; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric interpolated breath-hold whole-body MR imaging using CT and nuclear medicine techniques as the standard of reference in patients with metastases. The 3D volumetric interpolated breath-hold whole-body MR imaging examination for metastases screening correlates well with CT and scintigraphy. The use of the rolling table platform permits rapid whole-body imaging in an average of 11 min. The preliminary results indicate that the described technique has the potential to emerge as an all-encompassing alternative to conventional multimodality tumor staging strategies.

  19. Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumor > Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/ ... the body. It is important to remember that statistics on the survival rates for people with a ...

  20. DCB - Tumor Metastasis Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor metastasis research examines the mechanisms that allow cancer cells to leave the primary tumor and spread to another part of the body. Learn about recent tumor metastasis research studies supported by the Division of Cancer Biology.

  1. Resection of tumors of the third ventricle involving the hypothalamus: effects on body mass index using a dedicated surgical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortini, Pietro; Gagliardi, Filippo; Bailo, Michele; Boari, Nicola; Castellano, Antonella; Falini, Andrea; Losa, Marco

    2017-07-01

    Resection of large lesions growing into the third ventricle is considered nowadays still a demanding surgery, due to the high risk of severe endocrine and neurological complications. Some neurosurgical approaches were considered in the past the procedures of choice to access the third ventricle, however they were burden by endocrine and neurological consequences, like memory loss and epilepsy. We report here the endocrine and functional results in a series of patients operated with a recently developed approach specifically tailored for the resection of large lesions growing into the third ventricle. Authors conducted a retrospective analysis on 10 patients, operated between 2011 and 2012, for the resection of large tumors growing into the third ventricle. Total resection was achieved in all patients. No perioperative deaths were recorded and all patients were alive after the follow-up. One year after surgery 8/10 patients had an excellent outcome with a Karnofsky Performance Status of 100 and a Glasgow Outcome score of 5, with 8 patients experiencing an improvement of the Body Mass Index. Modern neurosurgery allows a safe and effective treatment of large lesions growing into the third ventricle with a postoperative good functional status.

  2. EPID-based in vivo dosimetry for stereotactic body radiotherapy of non-small cell lung tumors: Initial clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consorti, R; Fidanzio, A; Brainovich, V; Mangiacotti, F; De Spirito, M; Mirri, M A; Petrucci, A

    2017-10-01

    EPID-based in vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been implemented for stereotactic body radiotherapy treatments of non-small cell lung cancer to check both isocenter dose and the treatment reproducibility comparing EPID portal images. 15 patients with lung tumors of small dimensions and treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy were enrolled for this initial experience. IVD tests supplied ratios R between in vivo reconstructed and planned isocenter doses. Moreover a γ-like analysis between daily EPID portal images and a reference one, in terms of percentage of points with γ-value smaller than 1, P γlevels of 5% for R ratio, P γlevel, and an average P γ90%. Paradigmatic discrepancies were observed in three patients: a set-up error and a patient morphological change were identified thanks to CBCT image analysis whereas the third discrepancy was not fully justified. This procedure can provide improved patient safety as well as a first step to integrate IVD and CBCT dose recalculation. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Body

    OpenAIRE

    Riggs, Christina

    2010-01-01

    The human body is both the physical form inhabited by an individual “self” and the medium through which an individual engages with society. Hence the body both shapes and is shaped by an individual’s social roles. In contrast to the cognate fields of archaeology, anthropology, and classics, there has been little explicit discussion or theorization of the body in Egyptology. Some recent works, discussed here, constitute an exception to this trend, but there is much more scope for exploring anc...

  4. Initial experience with the use of an expandable titanium cage as a vertebral body replacement in patients with tumors of the spinal column: a report of 95 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Ashwin; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M; Doppenberg, Egon; Suki, Dima; Gokaslan, Ziya; Mendel, Ehud; Rao, Ganesh; Rhines, Laurence D

    2012-01-01

    Vertebral body resection to treat spine tumors necessitates reconstruction to maintain spinal stability. The durability of reconstruction may be a challenge in cancer patients as treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiation coupled with poor nutritional status may compromise bone quality. We present a series of patients who underwent implantation of an expandable titanium cage (ETC) for reconstruction after vertebral body resection for primary or metastatic spine tumors. We report the functional outcome, assess the durability of reconstruction, and describe complications associated with this procedure. A retrospective review of patients undergoing placement of ETC after vertebrectomy for spinal tumor at our institution was performed. From September 2001 to August 2006, 95 patients underwent implantation of an ETC for reconstruction of the anterior spinal column following vertebrectomy for tumor (75 one-level, 19 two-level, 1 three-level). All patients underwent spinal stabilization as well. The median survival after surgery was 13.7 months; 23 patients had primary spinal tumors and 72 had metastatic tumors. Numerical pain scores were significantly improved postoperatively indicating a palliative benefit. No new neurological deficits were noted postoperatively, except when intentional neurological sacrifice was performed for oncologic reasons. Median height correction of 14% (range 0-118%) and median improvement in sagittal alignment of 6° (range 0-28°) were demonstrated on immediate postoperative imaging. Three patients experienced hardware related complications, one of which had posterior migration of the ETC. On postoperative imaging, 12 patients demonstrated subsidence of greater than 1 mm, but none required operative revision. Use of an ETC for spinal reconstruction in patients with spinal tumors is safe, decreases pain associated with pathologic fracture, protects neurologic function, and is durable. We found a very low incidence of cage-related construct

  5. Impact of Pretreatment Tumor Growth Rate on Outcome of Early-Stage Lung Cancer Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atallah, Soha; Cho, B.C. John; Allibhai, Zishan; Taremi, Mojgan; Giuliani, Meredith [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Le, Lisa W. [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brade, Anthony; Sun, Alexander; Bezjak, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hope, Andrew J., E-mail: andrew.hope@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of pretreatment tumor growth rate on outcomes in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A review was conducted on 160 patients with T1-T2N0M0 NSCLC treated with SBRT at single institution. The patient's demographic and clinical data, time interval (t) between diagnostic and planning computed tomography (CT), vital status, disease status, and cause of death were extracted from a prospectively kept database. Differences in gross tumor volume between diagnostic CT (GTV1) and planning CT (GTV2) were recorded, and growth rate was calculated by use of specific growth rate (SGR). Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed for overall survival (OS). Differences between groups were compared with a log-rank test. Multivariate analyses were performed by use of the Cox proportional hazard model with SGR and other relevant clinical factors. Cumulative incidence was calculated for local, regional, and distant failures by use of the competing risk approach and was compared with Gray's test. Results: The median time interval between diagnostic and planning CT was 82 days. The patients were divided into 2 groups, and the median SGR was used as a cut-off. The median survival times were 38.6 and 27.7 months for the low and high SGR groups, respectively (P=.03). Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (P=.01), sex (P=.04), SGR (P=.03), and GTV2 (P=.002) were predictive for OS in multivariable Cox regression analysis and, except sex, were similarly predictive for failure-free survival (FFS). The 3-year cumulative incidences of regional failure were 19.2% and 6.0% for the high and low SGR groups, respectively (P=.047). Conclusion: High SGR was correlated with both poorer OS and FFS in patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with SBRT. If validated, this measurement may be useful in identifying patients most likely to benefit from

  6. Tumoral tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    Direct tumor tracers are subdivided in the following categories:metabolite tracers, antitumoral tracers, radioactive proteins and cations. Use of 67 Ga-citrate as a clinically important tumoral tracer is emphasized and gallium-67 whole-body scintigraphy is discussed in detail. (M.A.) [pt

  7. Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Postoperative Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Solid Tumor Malignancies to the Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmond, Kristin J., E-mail: kjanson3@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Robertson, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lo, Simon S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Soltys, Scott G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Ryu, Samuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stony Brook Cancer Center, Stony Brook, New York (United States); McNutt, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chao, Samuel T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ghia, Amol [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Norris Cancer Center and Keck School of Medicine at University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sheehan, Jason [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To develop consensus contouring guidelines for postoperative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases. Methods and Materials: Ten spine SBRT specialists representing 10 international centers independently contoured the clinical target volume (CTV), planning target volume (PTV), spinal cord, and spinal cord planning organ at risk volume (PRV) for 10 representative clinical scenarios in postoperative spine SBRT for metastatic solid tumor malignancies. Contours were imported into the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research. Agreement between physicians was calculated with an expectation minimization algorithm using simultaneous truth and performance level estimation with κ statistics. Target volume definition guidelines were established by finding optimized confidence level consensus contours using histogram agreement analyses. Results: Nine expert radiation oncologists and 1 neurosurgeon completed contours for all 10 cases. The mean sensitivity and specificity were 0.79 (range, 0.71-0.89) and 0.94 (range, 0.90-0.99) for the CTV and 0.79 (range, 0.70-0.95) and 0.92 (range, 0.87-0.99) for the PTV), respectively. Mean κ agreement, which demonstrates the probability that contours agree by chance alone, was 0.58 (range, 0.43-0.70) for CTV and 0.58 (range, 0.37-0.76) for PTV (P<.001 for all cases). Optimized consensus contours were established for all patients with 80% confidence interval. Recommendations for CTV include treatment of the entire preoperative extent of bony and epidural disease, plus immediately adjacent bony anatomic compartments at risk of microscopic disease extension. In particular, a “donut-shaped” CTV was consistently applied in cases of preoperative circumferential epidural extension, regardless of extent of residual epidural extension. Otherwise more conformal anatomic-based CTVs were determined and described. Spinal instrumentation was consistently excluded from the CTV. Conclusions: We provide

  8. Clinical value of combined detection of serum tumor markers and whole body bone scan for diagnosis of bone metastases from breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Chao; Zhao Jing; Liu Desheng; Zhang Jingchuan; Ji Xuejing; Hou Xiancun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical value of serum tumor marker determination and whole body bone scan for diagnosis of bone metastases from breast cancer. Methods: Serum tumor markers (CA15-3, CEA, TSGF)were detected with GLIA and whole body bone scan were investigated by SPECT in 124 breast cancer patients. Results: In 124 patients, 38 patients were diagnosed as positive for bone metastases with whole body bone scan. The positive predicting values of CA15-3, CEA, TSGF were 76.78%, 80% and 82.14%, and the negative predicting values of CA15-3, GEA, TSGF were 82.41%, 86.74% and 84.29% respectively. The levels of CA15-3, CEA, TSGF in patients with bone metastases were significantly higher than those in patients without metastasis and the controls (P<0.01). Conclusion: Determination of levels of serum tumor markers CA15-3, CEA, TSGF is helpful for diagnosis of bone metastases from breast cancer. Combined detection of GA15-3, CEA, TSGF could increase the sensitivity and accuracy of diagnosing bone metastases. (authors)

  9. Comparison of pencil beam–based homogeneous vs inhomogeneous target dose planning for stereotactic body radiotherapy of peripheral lung tumors through Monte Carlo–based recalculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtakara, Kazuhiro, E-mail: ohtakara@murakami.asahi-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Murakami Memorial Hospital, Asahi University, Gifu (Japan); Hoshi, Hiroaki [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    This study was conducted to ascertain whether homogeneous target dose planning is suitable for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of peripheral lung cancer under appropriate breath-holding. For 20 peripheral lung tumors, paired dynamic conformal arc plans were generated by only adjusting the leaf margin to the planning target volume (PTV) edge for fulfilling the conditions such that the prescription isodose surface (IDS) encompassing exactly 95% of the PTV (PTV D{sub 95}) corresponds to 95% and 80% IDS, normalized to 100% at the PTV isocenter under a pencil beam (PB) algorithm with radiologic path length correction. These plans were recalculated using the x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm under otherwise identical conditions, and then compared. Lesions abutting the parietal pleura or not were defined as edge or island tumors, respectively, and the influences of the target volume and its location relative to the chest wall on the target dose were examined. The median (range) leaf margin required for the 95% and 80% plans was 3.9 mm (1.3 to 5.0) and −1.2 mm (−1.8 to 0.1), respectively. Notably, the latter was significantly correlated negatively with PTV. In the 80% plans, the PTV D{sub 95} was slightly higher under XVMC, whereas the PTV D{sub 98} was significantly lower, irrespective of the dose calculation algorithm used. Other PTV and all gross tumor volume doses were significantly higher, while the lung doses outside the PTV were slightly lower. The target doses increased as a function of PTV and were significantly lower for island tumors than for edge tumors. In conclusion, inhomogeneous target dose planning using smaller leaf margin for a larger tumor volume was deemed suitable in ensuring more sufficient target dose while slightly reducing lung dose. In addition, more inhomogeneous target dose planning using <80% IDS (e.g., 70%) for PTV covering would be preferable for island tumors.

  10. Tumor Control Probability Modeling for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Early-Stage Lung Cancer Using Multiple Bio-physical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Tai, An; Lee, Percy; Biswas, Tithi; Ding, George X.; El Naqa, Isaam; Grimm, Jimm; Jackson, Andrew; Kong, Feng-Ming (Spring); LaCouture, Tamara; Loo, Billy; Miften, Moyed; Solberg, Timothy; Li, X Allen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To analyze pooled clinical data using different radiobiological models and to understand the relationship between biologically effective dose (BED) and tumor control probability (TCP) for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Method and Materials The clinical data of 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year actuarial or Kaplan-Meier TCP from 46 selected studies were collected for SBRT of NSCLC in the literature. The TCP data were separated for Stage T1 and T2 tumors if possible, otherwise collected for combined stages. BED was calculated at isocenters using six radiobiological models. For each model, the independent model parameters were determined from a fit to the TCP data using the least chi-square (χ2) method with either one set of parameters regardless of tumor stages or two sets for T1 and T2 tumors separately. Results The fits to the clinic data yield consistent results of large α/β ratios of about 20 Gy for all models investigated. The regrowth model that accounts for the tumor repopulation and heterogeneity leads to a better fit to the data, compared to other 5 models where the fits were indistinguishable between the models. The models based on the fitting parameters predict that the T2 tumors require about additional 1 Gy physical dose at isocenters per fraction (≤5 fractions) to achieve the optimal TCP when compared to the T1 tumors. Conclusion This systematic analysis of a large set of published clinical data using different radiobiological models shows that local TCP for SBRT of early-stage NSCLC has strong dependence on BED with large α/β ratios of about 20 Gy. The six models predict that a BED (calculated with α/β of 20) of 90 Gy is sufficient to achieve TCP ≥ 95%. Among the models considered, the regrowth model leads to a better fit to the clinical data. PMID:27871671

  11. SU-E-J-31: Monitor Interfractional Variation of Tumor Respiratory Motion Using 4D KV Conebeam Computed Tomography for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, A; Prior, P; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 4DCT has been widely used to generate internal tumor volume (ITV) for a lung tumor for treatment planning. However, lung tumors may show different respiratory motion on the treatment day. The purpose of this study is to evaluate 4D KV conebeam computed tomography (CBCT) for monitoring tumor interfractional motion variation between simulation and each fraction of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods: 4D KV CBCT was acquired with the Elekta XVI system. The accuracy of 4D KV CBCT for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) was tested with a dynamic thorax motion phantom (CIRS, Virginia) with a linear amplitude of 2 cm. In addition, an adult anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson, Rando) with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters embedded at the center and periphery of a slab of solid water was used to measure the dose of 4D KV CBCT and to compare it with the dose with 3D KV CBCT. The image registration was performed by aligning\\ each phase images of 4D KV CBCT to the planning images and the final couch shifts were calculated as a mean of all these individual shifts along each direction.A workflow was established based on these quality assurance tests for lung cancer patients. Results: 4D KV CBCT does not increase imaging dose in comparison to 3D KV CBCT. Acquisition of 4D KV CBCT is 4 minutes as compared to 2 minutes for 3D KV CBCT. Most of patients showed a small daily variation of tumor respiratory motion about 2 mm. However, some patients may have more than 5 mm variations of tumor respiratory motion. Conclusion: The radiation dose does not increase with 4D KV CBCT. 4D KV CBCT is a useful tool for monitoring interfractional variations of tumor respiratory motion before SBRT of lung cancer patients.

  12. Radioguided localisation of impalpable breast lesions using 99m-Technetium macroaggregated albumin: Lessons learnt during introduction of a new technique to guide preoperative localisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landman, Joanne [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Kulawansa, Sagarika [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); McCarthy, Michael; Troedson, Russell [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Phillips, Michael [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Tinning, Jill [The Multidisciplinary Breast Service, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Taylor, Donna, E-mail: Donna.Taylor@health.wa.gov.au [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    Preoperative wire-guided localisation (WGL) of impalpable breast lesions is widely used but can be technically difficult. Risks include wire migration, inaccurate placement, and inadequate surgical margins. Research shows that radioguided occult lesion localisation (ROLL) is quicker, easier, and can improve surgical and cosmetic outcomes. An audited introduction of ROLL was conducted to validate the technique as a feasible alternative to WGL. Fifty patients with single impalpable lesions and biopsy proven malignancy or indeterminate histology underwent WGL followed by intralesional radiopharmaceutical injection of 99m-Technetium macroaggregated albumin. Postprocedural mammography was performed to demonstrate wire position, and scintigraphy to evaluate radiopharmaceutical migration. Lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative sentinel node biopsy were performed if indicated, followed by lesion localisation and excision using a gamma probe. Specimen imaging was performed, with immediate reexcision for visibly inadequate margins. Accurate localisation was achieved in 86% of patients with ROLL compared to 72% with WGL. All lesions were successfully removed, with clear margins in 71.8% of malignant lesions. Reexcision and intraoperative sentinel node localisation rates were equivalent to preaudit figures for WGL. ROLL was easy to perform and problems were infrequent. Inaccurate radiopharmaceutical placement necessitating WGL occurred in four patients. Minor radiopharmaceutical migration was common, but precluded using ROLL in only two cases. ROLL is effective, simple, inexpensive, and easily learnt; however, preoperative confirmation of correct radiopharmaceutical placement using mammography and the gamma probe is important to help ensure successful lesion removal. Insertion of a backup hookwire is recommended during the initial introduction of ROLL.

  13. Use of {sup 99m}Tc 2-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile in minimally invasive radioguided surgery in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism: A narrative review of the current literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denmeade, Kristie A [Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasound Department, Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital, Bankstown, New South Wales (Australia); Constable, Chris [Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Reed, Warren M [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasound Department, Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital, Bankstown, New South Wales (Australia)

    2013-06-15

    The use of technetium-99m 2-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile ({sup 99m}Tc MIBI) for assistance in minimally invasive radioguided surgery (MIRS) is growing in popularity as a safe, effective, and proficient technique used for parathyroidectomy in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) treatment. Previously, the preferred treatment for PHPT was bilateral neck exploration (BNE), a very invasive, costly, and lengthy procedure. However, as a large majority (80–85% of cases of PHPT) are attributed to a single parathyroid adenoma (PA), a simpler more direct technique such as MIRS is a far better option. The following article is an exploration of the current literature concerning varied protocols utilizing {sup 99m}Tc MIBI for assistance in MIRS for patients undergoing treatment of PHPT. This technique boasts many advantageous outcomes for patients suffering from PHPT. These include a reduction in cost, operating time, and patient recovery; less evidence of post-surgical hypocalcaemia, less pain, and complications; superior cosmetic results; same-day discharge; and the possibility of local anaesthesia which is particularly beneficial in elderly patients. Better outcomes for patients with deep or ectopic PAs, reduced intra-operative complications, and improved cosmetic outcomes for patients who have previously undergone thyroid and/or parathyroid surgery are also advantageous. Of the literature reviewed it was also found that no patients suffered any major surgical complications such as laryngeal nerve palsy or permanent hypoparathyroidism using {sup 99m}Tc MIBI for assistance in MIRS.

  14. Use of 99mTc 2-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile in minimally invasive radioguided surgery in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism: A narrative review of the current literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denmeade, Kristie A; Constable, Chris; Reed, Warren M

    2013-01-01

    The use of technetium-99m 2-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile ( 99m Tc MIBI) for assistance in minimally invasive radioguided surgery (MIRS) is growing in popularity as a safe, effective, and proficient technique used for parathyroidectomy in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) treatment. Previously, the preferred treatment for PHPT was bilateral neck exploration (BNE), a very invasive, costly, and lengthy procedure. However, as a large majority (80–85% of cases of PHPT) are attributed to a single parathyroid adenoma (PA), a simpler more direct technique such as MIRS is a far better option. The following article is an exploration of the current literature concerning varied protocols utilizing 99m Tc MIBI for assistance in MIRS for patients undergoing treatment of PHPT. This technique boasts many advantageous outcomes for patients suffering from PHPT. These include a reduction in cost, operating time, and patient recovery; less evidence of post-surgical hypocalcaemia, less pain, and complications; superior cosmetic results; same-day discharge; and the possibility of local anaesthesia which is particularly beneficial in elderly patients. Better outcomes for patients with deep or ectopic PAs, reduced intra-operative complications, and improved cosmetic outcomes for patients who have previously undergone thyroid and/or parathyroid surgery are also advantageous. Of the literature reviewed it was also found that no patients suffered any major surgical complications such as laryngeal nerve palsy or permanent hypoparathyroidism using 99m Tc MIBI for assistance in MIRS

  15. Comparison of two threshold detection criteria methodologies for determination of probe positivity for intraoperative in situ identification of presumed abnormal 18F-FDG-avid tissue sites during radioguided oncologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Gregg J; Povoski, Stephen P; Hall, Nathan C; Murrey, Douglas A; Lee, Robert; Martin, Edward W

    2014-09-13

    Intraoperative in situ identification of (18)F-FDG-avid tissue sites during radioguided oncologic surgery remains a significant challenge for surgeons. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the 1.5-to-1 ratiometric threshold criteria method versus the three-sigma statistical threshold criteria method for determination of gamma detection probe positivity for intraoperative in situ identification of presumed abnormal (18)F-FDG-avid tissue sites in a manner that was independent of the specific type of gamma detection probe used. From among 52 patients undergoing appropriate in situ evaluation of presumed abnormal (18)F-FDG-avid tissue sites during (18)F-FDG-directed surgery using 6 available gamma detection probe systems, a total of 401 intraoperative gamma detection probe measurement sets of in situ counts per second measurements were cumulatively taken. For the 401 intraoperative gamma detection probe measurement sets, probe positivity was successfully met by the 1.5-to-1 ratiometric threshold criteria method in 150/401 instances (37.4%) and by the three-sigma statistical threshold criteria method in 259/401 instances (64.6%) (P < 0.001). Likewise, the three-sigma statistical threshold criteria method detected true positive results at target-to-background ratios much lower than the 1.5-to-1 target-to-background ratio of the 1.5-to-1 ratiometric threshold criteria method. The three-sigma statistical threshold criteria method was significantly better than the 1.5-to-1 ratiometric threshold criteria method for determination of gamma detection probe positivity for intraoperative in situ detection of presumed abnormal (18)F-FDG-avid tissue sites during radioguided oncologic surgery. This finding may be extremely important for reshaping the ongoing and future research and development of gamma detection probe systems that are necessary for optimizing the in situ detection of radioisotopes of higher-energy gamma photon emissions used during radioguided oncologic surgery.

  16. Impact of tumor attachment to the pleura measured by a pretreatment CT image on outcome of stage I NSCLC treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takaya; Kadoya, Noriyuki; Shirata, Yuko; Koto, Masashi; Sato, Kiyokazu; Matsushita, Haruo; Sugawara, Toshiyuki; Umezawa, Rei; Kubozono, Masaki; Ishikawa, Yojiro; Kozumi, Maiko; Takahashi, Noriyoshi; Ito, Kengo; Katagiri, Yu; Takeda, Ken; Jingu, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Pleural invasion status is known to be a predictor of survival after pulmonary resection for non-small cell lung cancer. Our goal was to determine whether the length of tumor attachment to the pleura on a pretreatment CT image has prognostic value as an alternative to pleural invasion status for stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). A total of 90 tumors in 87 patients (males: 68, females: 19) who received SBRT between March 2005 and September 2011 in our institution were reviewed. The median age of the patients was 78 years (range, 48-90 years). The median tumor diameter was 2.2 cm (range, 0.9-4.2 cm). The prescribed dose was typically 48 Gy in 4 fractions, 60 Gy in 8 fractions or 60 Gy in 15 fractions to the isocenter with 6 MV X-ray using 4 non-coplanar and 3 coplanar static beams. The lengths of attachment were measured using pretreatment CT images at the lung window. Cumulative incidence rates were calculated using Kaplan-Meier curves, and univariate and multivariate analyses for in-field tumor control, locoregional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis and freedom from progression (FFP) were performed using a Cox proportional hazards model. Of the 90 tumors, 42 tumors were attached to the pleura (median, 14.7 mm; range, 4.3-36.0 mm), 21 tumors had pleural indentation and 27 tumors had no attachment. The median follow-up period for survivors was 46.1 months. The 3-year in-field control, LRC, FFP and overall survival rates were 91.2%, 75.3%, 63.8% and 68.6%, respectively. SBRT dose and tumor diameter were independently significant predictors of in-field control (p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively). Broad attachment to the pleura, the length being more than 14.7 mm, was a negative independent predictor of LRC and FFP (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01, respectively). Pleural attachment status on a pretreatment CT image might be an important predictor of LRC and FFP

  17. Imaging of bone tumors for the musculoskeletal oncologic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errani, C; Kreshak, J; Ruggieri, P; Alberghini, M; Picci, P; Vanel, D

    2013-12-01

    The appropriate diagnosis and treatment of bone tumors requires close collaboration between different medical specialists. Imaging plays a key role throughout the process. Radiographic detection of a bone tumor is usually not challenging. Accurate diagnosis is often possible from physical examination, history, and standard radiographs. The location of the lesion in the bone and the skeleton, its size and margins, the presence and type of periosteal reaction, and any mineralization all help determine diagnosis. Other imaging modalities contribute to the formation of a diagnosis but are more critical for staging, evaluation of response to treatment, surgical planning, and follow-up.When necessary, biopsy is often radioguided, and should be performed in consultation with the surgeon performing the definitive operative procedure. CT is optimal for characterization of the bone involvement and for evaluation of pulmonary metastases. MRI is highly accurate in determining the intraosseous extent of tumor and for assessing soft tissue, joint, and vascular involvement. FDG-PET imaging is becoming increasingly useful for the staging of tumors, assessing response to neoadjuvant treatment, and detecting relapses.Refinement of these and other imaging modalities and the development of new technologies such as image fusion for computer-navigated bone tumor surgery will help surgeons produce a detailed and reliable preoperative plan, especially in challenging sites such as the pelvis and spine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of combined DWIBS/3D-CE-T1w whole-body MRI in tumor staging: Comparison with PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manenti, Guglielmo; Cicciò, Carmelo; Squillaci, Ettore; Strigari, Lidia; Calabria, Ferdinando; Danieli, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic performance of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) by diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) in malignant tumor detection and the potential diagnostic advantages in generating fused DWIBS/3D-contrast enhanced T1w (3D-CE-T1w) images. Methods: 45 cancer patients underwent 18F-FDG PET-CT and WB-MRI for staging purpose. Fused DWIBS/3D-CE T1w images were generated off-line. 3D-CE-T1w, DWIBS images alone and fused with 3D-CE T1w were compared by two readers groups for detection of primary diseases and local/distant metastases. Diagnostic performance between the three WB-MRI data sets was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Imaging exams and histopathological results were used as standard of references. Results: Areas under the ROC curves of DWIBS vs. 3D-CE-T1w vs. both sequences in fused fashion were 0.97, 0.978, and 1.00, respectively. The diagnostic performance in tumor detection of fused DWIBS/3D-CE-T1w images were statistically superior to DWIBS (p < 0.001) and 3D-CE-T1w (p ≤ 0.002); while the difference between DWIBS and 3D-CE-T1w did not show statistical significance difference. Detection rates of malignancy did not differ between WB-MRI with DWIBS and 18F-FDG PET-CT. Conclusion: WB-MRI with DWIBS is to be considered as alternative tool to conventional whole-body methods for tumor staging and during follow-up in cancer patients.

  19. Whole-body MRI including diffusion-weighted MRI compared with 5-HTP PET/CT in the detection of neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlbom, Lina; Caballero-Corbalán, José; Granberg, Dan; Sörensen, Jens; Eriksson, Barbro; Ahlström, Håkan

    2017-03-01

    We wanted to explore if whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including diffusion-weighted (DW) and liver-specific contrast agent-enhanced imaging could be valuable in lesion detection of neuroendocrine tumors (NET). [11C]-5-Hydroxytryptophan positron emission tomography/computed tomography (5-HTP PET/CT) was used for comparison. Twenty-one patients with NET were investigated with whole-body MRI, including DW imaging (DWI) and contrast-enhanced imaging of the liver, and whole-body 5-HTP PET/CT. Seven additional patients underwent upper abdomen MRI including DWI, liver-specific contrast agent-enhanced imaging, and 5-HTP PET/CT. There was a patient-based concordance of 61% and a lesion-based concordance of 53% between the modalities. MRI showed good concordance with PET in detecting bone metastases but was less sensitive in detecting metastases in mediastinal lymph nodes. MRI detected more liver metastases than 5-HTP PET/CT. Whole-body MRI with DWI did not detect all NET lesions found with whole-body 5-HTP PET/CT. Our findings indicate that MRI of the liver including liver-specific contrast agent-enhanced imaging and DWI could be a useful complement to whole-body 5-HTP PET/CT.

  20. Liver Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Liver Tumors KidsHealth / For Parents / Liver Tumors What's in this article? Types of Tumors ... Cancerous) Tumors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping Print The liver is the body's largest solid organ. Lying next ...

  1. SU-E-T-630: Predictive Modeling of Mortality, Tumor Control, and Normal Tissue Complications After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, WD; Berlind, CG; Gee, JC; Simone, CB

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: While rates of local control have been well characterized after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), less data are available characterizing survival and normal tissue toxicities, and no validated models exist assessing these parameters after SBRT. We evaluate the reliability of various machine learning techniques when applied to radiation oncology datasets to create predictive models of mortality, tumor control, and normal tissue complications. Methods: A dataset of 204 consecutive patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) at the University of Pennsylvania between 2009 and 2013 was used to create predictive models of tumor control, normal tissue complications, and mortality in this IRB-approved study. Nearly 200 data fields of detailed patient- and tumor-specific information, radiotherapy dosimetric measurements, and clinical outcomes data were collected. Predictive models were created for local tumor control, 1- and 3-year overall survival, and nodal failure using 60% of the data (leaving the remainder as a test set). After applying feature selection and dimensionality reduction, nonlinear support vector classification was applied to the resulting features. Models were evaluated for accuracy and area under ROC curve on the 81-patient test set. Results: Models for common events in the dataset (such as mortality at one year) had the highest predictive power (AUC = .67, p < 0.05). For rare occurrences such as radiation pneumonitis and local failure (each occurring in less than 10% of patients), too few events were present to create reliable models. Conclusion: Although this study demonstrates the validity of predictive analytics using information extracted from patient medical records and can most reliably predict for survival after SBRT, larger sample sizes are needed to develop predictive models for normal tissue toxicities and more advanced

  2. Frequency of excisions and yields of malignant skin tumors in a population-based screening intervention of 360,288 whole-body examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Annika; Nolte, Sandra; Geller, Alan C; Katalinic, Alexander; Weinstock, Martin A; Volkmer, Beate; Greinert, Ruediger; Breitbart, Eckhard W

    2012-08-01

    To explore the frequency of excisions and yields of histopathologically confirmed skin cancer. A population-based skin cancer screening intervention (the SCREEN project) in the German state of Schleswig-Holstein (July 1, 2003, to June 30, 2004). Physician offices. Participants could choose between nondermatologist physicians and dermatologists for their initial whole-body skin examination. All screening physicians received a mandatory 8-hour training course. PARTICIPANTS Inhabitants of Schleswig-Holstein 20 years or older with statutory health insurance (N = 360,288). Frequency of excisions and yields of malignant skin tumors (malignant melanomas [MMs], basal cell carcinomas [BCCs], and squamous cell carcinomas [SCCs]), stratified by sex and age. Overall, 15,983 excisions were performed (1 of 23 screenees). A total of 3103 malignant skin tumors were diagnosed in 2911 persons: 585 MMs, 1961 BCCs, 392 SCCs, and 165 other malignant skin tumors. Overall, 116 persons (3103 of 360,288) had to be screened to find 1 malignant tumor, with 1 of 620 for MM, 1 of 184 for BCC, and 1 of 920 for SCC. Twenty excisions were performed to find 1 melanoma in men 65 years and older, but more than 50 excisions were required to find 1 melanoma in men aged between 20 and 49 years. The results of SCREEN suggest a high yield of malignant skin tumors in a large-scale population-based screening project. We found that a high number of excisions was performed in the youngest screenees with an associated low yield, suggesting a need in screener training to emphasize a more conservative attitude toward excisions in young screenees.

  3. Minimally invasive radio-guided parathyroidectomy on a group of 452 primary hyperparathyroid patients. Refinement of preoperative imaging and intraoperative procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubello, D. [' S. Maria della Misericordia' Rovigo Hospital, Ist. Oncologico Veneto (IOV), Rovigo (Italy). Nuclear Medicine Service, PET Unit; Mariani, G. [Univ. of Pisa Medical School (Italy). Regional Center of Nuclear Medicine; Pelizzo, M.R. [Univ. of Padova Medical School (Italy). Dept. of Special Surgery

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of minimally invasive radio-guided parathyroidectomy (MIRP) in primary hyperparathyroid (PHPT) patients. Patients, methods: 452 consecutive PHPT patients were evaluated. Inclusion criteria for MIRP were (a) evidence at scintigraphy of a solitary parathyroid adenoma (PA); (b) a clear sestamibi uptake in the PA; (c) the absence of concomitant thyroid nodules; (d) no history of familial HPT or MEN; (e) no history of previous neck irradiation. Intra-operative protocol consisted of the injection of a low 37 MBq sestamibi dose in the operating suite 10 min before surgery. A hand held 11-mm collimated gamma probe was used. Quick PTH (QPTH) was routinely measured. Results: 344 out of the 452 patients met the inclusion criteria, and MIRP was successfully performed in 321 of them (93.3%). No major intra-operative complication was recorded. MIRP required a mean operative time of 32 min, and a mean hospital stay of 1.2 d. The parathyroid to background ratio (P/B) calculated by the probe was well correlated with the P/B calculated by sestamibi SPECT (r = 0.91; p <0.01), while no significant correlation was found between the probe-calculated P/B and the P/B calculated at planar sestamibi scan. Conclusions: In our experience: (a) an accurate preoperative localising imaging protocol based on planar and SPECT sestamibi scan, and neck US is effective in selecting PHPT patients for MIRP, (b) the P/B calculated by sestamibi SPECT seems able to predict the probe-calculated P/B more accurately than the P/B calculated at planar scan, (c) the low 37 MBq sestamibi dose protocol proved to be a safe and effective approach to perform MIRP. (orig.)

  4. A phase I/II study on stereotactic body radiotherapy with real-time tumor tracking using CyberKnife based on the Monte Carlo algorithm for lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Hiromitsu; Ishikura, Satoshi; Murai, Taro; Iwabuchi, Michio; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Tatewaki, Koshi; Ohta, Seiji; Yokota, Naoki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2017-08-01

    In this phase I/II study, we assessed the safety and initial efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors with real-time tumor tracking using CyberKnife based on the Monte Carlo algorithm. Study subjects had histologically confirmed primary non-small-cell lung cancer staged as T1a-T2aN0M0 and pulmonary oligometastasis. The primary endpoint was the incidence of Grade ≥3 radiation pneumonitis (RP) within 180 days of the start of SBRT. The secondary endpoint was local control and overall survival rates. Five patients were initially enrolled at level 1 [50 Gy/4 fractions (Fr)]; during the observation period, level 0 (45 Gy/4 Fr) was opened. The dose was escalated to the next level when grade ≥3 RP was observed in 0 out of 5 or 1 out of 10 patients. Virtual quality assurance planning was performed for 60 Gy/4 Fr; however, dose constraints for the organs at risk did not appear to be within acceptable ranges. Therefore, level 2 (55 Gy/4 Fr) was regarded as the upper limit. After the recommended dose (RD) was established, 15 additional patients were enrolled at the RD. The prescribed dose was normalized at the 95% volume border of the planning target volume based on the Monte Carlo algorithm. Between September 2011 and September 2015, 40 patients (primary 30; metastasis 10) were enrolled. Five patients were enrolled at level 0, 15 at level 1, and 20 at level 2. Only one grade 3 RP was observed at level 1. Two-year local control and overall survival rates were 98 and 81%, respectively. The RD was 55 Gy/4 Fr. SBRT with real-time tumor tracking using CyberKnife based on the Monte Carlo algorithm was tolerated well and appeared to be effective for solitary lung tumors.

  5. SU-E-J-260: Dose Recomputation Versus Dose Deformation for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Lung Tumors: A Dosimetric Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, M; Flynn, R; Xia, J; Bayouth, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric accuracy between recomputed dose and deformed dose for stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung tumors. Methods: Two non-small-cell lung cancer patients were analyzed in this study, both of whom underwent 4D-CT and breath-hold CT imaging. Treatment planning was performed using the breath-hold CT images for the dose calculation and the 4D-CT images for determining internal target volumes. 4D-CT images were reconstructed with ten breathing amplitude for each patient. Maximum tumor motion was 13 mm for patient 1, and 7 mm for patient 2. The delivered dose was calculated using the 4D-CT images and using the same planning parameters as for the breath-hold CT. The deformed dose was computed by deforming the planning dose using the deformable image registration between each binned CT and the breath-hold CT. Results: For patient 1, the difference between recomputed dose and deformed mean lung dose (MLD) ranged from 11.3%(0.5 Gy) to 1.1%(0.06 Gy), mean tumor dose (MTD) ranged from 0.4%(0.19 Gy) to −1.3%(−0.6 Gy), lung V20 ranged from +0.74% to −0.33%. The differences in all three dosimetric criteria remain relatively invariant to target motion. For patient 2, V20 ranged from +0.42% to −2.41%, MLD ranged from −0.2%(−0.05 Gy) to −10.4%(−2.12 Gy), and MTD ranged from −0.5%(−0.31 Gy) to −5.3%(−3.24 Gy). The difference between recomputed dose and deformed dose shows strong correlation with tumor motion in all three dosimetric measurements. Conclusion: The correlation between dosimetric criteria and tumor motion is patient-specific, depending on the tumor locations, motion pattern, and deformable image registration accuracy. Deformed dose can be a good approximation for recalculated dose when tumor motion is small. This research is supported by Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc and Iowa Center for Research By Undergraduates

  6. Association of body mass index with ER, PR and 14-3-3σ expression in tumor and stroma of type I and type II endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peevey, Joseph F; Seagle, Brandon-Luke L; Maniar, Kruti P; Kim, J Julie

    2017-06-27

    Obesity is a prominent risk factor for endometrial cancer (EC) and can impede on surgical and hormonal treatments. Markers of EC, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), phospho(Ser473)-AKT (pAKT) and 14-3-3 sigma (14-3-3σ) were measured in EC tissues in both the tumor and stroma and grouped by body mass index (BMI). Immunohistochemical scoring of 82 cases of Type 1 and Type II EC tissues revealed a significantly increased tumor expression of ER, PR and 14-3-3σ in women with Type I (BMI PR and 14-3-3σ in the tumor epithelium was significantly higher in Type I than Type II. In particular, Type I EC exhibited significantly increased levels of only PR from patients with BMI > 40 compared to BMI PR, PIK3CA, PTEN and SFN (gene for 14-3-3σ) confirmed increased PR expression in EC of obese women. In conclusion, ER, PR and 14-3-3σ are differentially regulated in Type I compared to Type II EC while PR is dysregulated in obese women with Type I EC. These findings have potential implications for efficacy of progestin treatment in obese women.

  7. Association of Serum Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand with Body Fat Distribution as Assessed by Dual X-Rays Absorptiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cervellati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A low chronic inflammation mediated by cytokine release is considered a major pathogenic mechanism accounting for the higher risk of cardiovascular disease in the overweight/obese population. In this context, although the existence of a possible interaction between soluble tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL and quantity and localization, of adiposity in the body has been hypothesized, no studies have yet investigated this link by radiologic techniques able to assess directly fat mass (FM in different body regions. To address this issue, we assessed body fat distribution by dual X-rays absorptiometry (DXA in a sample of 103 women and investigated the possible association between the derived adiposity measures and serum TRAIL concentration. The level of TRAIL showed a positive and independent correlation with arms FM (P<0.05, trunk FM (P<0.001 and trunk FM% (P<0.05, total FM and total FM% (P<0.001 for both, and an inverse association with legs FM% (P<0.05. Only trunk FM retained a significant correlation (P<0.05 with TRAIL after adjusting for all the other indices of regional adiposity. In conclusion, from our study it emerged a significant and independent association of serum TRAIL levels with overall, and, mainly, central adiposity. Further studies are needed to longitudinally investigate the cause-effect relationship between change in body fat distribution and TRAIL.

  8. Coping and quality of life in patients with skin tumors in the follow-up stage: The mediating role of body image and psychological morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M Graça; Baia, Vânia; Machado, José C

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between coping style, body image, psychological morbidity, and quality of life. A total of 58 patients who were diagnosed with skin tumors, had been submitted to surgery, and were in the follow-up phase answered the following instruments: dermatology life quality index (DLQI), hospital anxiety and depression scales (HADS), body image scale (BIS), and the mini mental adjustment to cancer scale (Mini-MAC). The results showed that patients with a higher use of the coping styles of helplessness/hopelessness, anxious preoccupation, and cognitive avoidance reported a worse quality of life. Body image mediated the relationship between the coping styles of anxious preoccupation, helplessness/hopelessness, and quality of life. Psychological morbidity mediated the relationship between helplessness/hopelessness and quality of life. Therefore, even in the follow-up phase, it is important that health professionals are aware of the patient's emotional distress and body image to identify those at a higher risk of having a poorer quality of life.

  9. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Stereotactic Body Frame in Reducing Respiratory Intrafractional Organ Motion Using the Real-Time Tumor-Tracking Radiotherapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengua, Gerard; Ishikawa, Masayori; Sutherland, Kenneth; Horita, Kenji; Yamazaki, Rie; Fujita, Katsuhisa; Onimaru, Rikiya; Katoh, Noriwo; Inoue, Tetsuya; Onodera, Shunsuke; Shirato, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of the stereotactic body frame (SBF), with or without a diaphragm press or a breathing cycle monitoring device (Abches), in controlling the range of lung tumor motion, by tracking the real-time position of fiducial markers. Methods and Materials: The trajectories of gold markers in the lung were tracked with the real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. The SBF was used for patient immobilization and the diaphragm press and Abches were used to actively control breathing and for self-controlled respiration, respectively. Tracking was performed in five setups, with and without immobilization and respiration control. The results were evaluated using the effective range, which was defined as the range that includes 95% of all the recorded marker positions in each setup. Results: The SBF, with or without a diaphragm press or Abches, did not yield effective ranges of marker motion which were significantly different from setups that did not use these materials. The differences in the effective marker ranges in the upper lobes for all the patient setups were less than 1mm. Larger effective ranges were obtained for the markers in the middle or lower lobes. Conclusion: The effectiveness of controlling respiratory-induced organ motion by using the SBF+diaphragm press or SBF + Abches patient setups were highly dependent on the individual patient reaction to the use of these materials and the location of the markers. They may be considered for lung tumors in the lower lobes, but are not necessary for tumors in the upper lobes.

  10. Tumor control probability and the utility of 4D vs 3D dose calculations for stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes, Gilmer, E-mail: gilmer.valdes@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Robinson, Clifford [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Lee, Percy [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Morel, Delphine [Department of Biomedical Engineering, AIX Marseille 2 University, Marseille (France); Department of Medical Physics, Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble (France); Low, Daniel; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Lamb, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) dose calculations for lung cancer radiotherapy have been technically feasible for a number of years but have not become standard clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to determine if clinically significant differences in tumor control probability (TCP) exist between 3D and 4D dose calculations so as to inform the decision whether 4D dose calculations should be used routinely for treatment planning. Radiotherapy plans for Stage I-II lung cancer were created for 8 patients. Clinically acceptable treatment plans were created with dose calculated on the end-exhale 4D computed tomography (CT) phase using a Monte Carlo algorithm. Dose was then projected onto the remaining 9 phases of 4D-CT using the Monte Carlo algorithm and accumulated onto the end-exhale phase using commercially available deformable registration software. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the gross tumor volume (GTV), planning tumor volume (PTV), and PTV{sub setup} were compared according to target coverage and dose. The PTV{sub setup} was defined as a volume including the GTV and a margin for setup uncertainties but not for respiratory motion. TCPs resulting from these DVHs were estimated using a wide range of alphas, betas, and tumor cell densities. Differences of up to 5 Gy were observed between 3D and 4D calculations for a PTV with highly irregular shape. When the TCP was calculated using the resulting DVHs for fractionation schedules typically used in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), the TCP differed at most by 5% between 4D and 3D cases, and in most cases, it was by less than 1%. We conclude that 4D dose calculations are not necessary for most cases treated with SBRT, but they might be valuable for irregularly shaped target volumes. If 4D calculations are used, 4D DVHs should be evaluated on volumes that include margin for setup uncertainty but not respiratory motion.

  11. Clinical outcome of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary and oligometastatic lung tumors: a single institutional study with almost uniform dose with different five treatment schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Fujioka, Ichitaro; Ono, Shuichi; Tsushima, Eiki; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized primary and oligometastatic lung tumors by assessing efficacy and safety of 5 regimens of varying fraction size and number. One-hundred patients with primary lung cancer (n = 69) or oligometastatic lung tumors (n = 31), who underwent SBRT between May 2003 and August 2010, were included. The median age was 75 years (range, 45–88). Of them, 98 were judged to have medically inoperable disease, predominantly due to chronic illness or advanced age. SBRT was performed using 3 coplanar and 3 non-coplanar fixed beams with a standard linear accelerator. Fraction sizes were escalated by 1 Gy, and number of fractions given was decreased by 1 for every 20 included patients. Total target doses were between 50 and 56 Gy, administered as 5–9 fractions. The prescribed dose was defined at the isocenter, and median overall treatment duration was 10 days (range, 5–22). The median follow-up was 51.1 months for survivors. The 3-year local recurrence rates for primary lung cancer and oligometastasis was 6 % and 3 %, respectively. The 3-year local recurrence rates for tumor sizes ≤3 cm and >3 cm were 3 % and 14 %, respectively (p = 0.124). Additionally, other factors (fraction size, total target dose, and BED 10 ) were not significant predictors of local control. Radiation pneumonia (≥ grade 2) was observed in 2 patients. Radiation-induced rib fractures were observed in 22 patients. Other late adverse events of greater than grade 2 were not observed. Within this dataset, we did not observe a dose response in BED 10 values between 86.4 and 102.6 Gy. SBRT with doses between 50 and 56 Gy, administered over 5–9 fractions achieved acceptable tumor control without severe complications

  12. Whole-body bioluminescent imaging of human uveal melanoma in a new mouse model of local tumor growth and metastasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notting, I.C.; Buijs, J.; Que, I.; Mintardjo, R.E.; Horst, G. ter; Karperien, M.; Missotten, G.S.; Jager, M.J.; Schalij-Delfos, N.E.; Keunen, J.E.E.; Pluijm, G. van der

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Human uveal melanoma develops in one of the most capillary-rich tissues of the body and has a pure hematogenous dissemination. Radiodiagnostic examinations, such as ultrasonic diagnostic resonance imaging and chest radiographs plus liver enzyme studies in blood, are methods used to detect

  13. Comprehensive imaging of tumor recurrence in breast cancer patients using whole-body MRI at 1.5 and 3 T compared to FDG-PET-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Gerwin P. [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)], E-mail: gerwin.schmidt@med.uni-muenchen.de; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Haug, Alexander [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, 81377 Munich (Germany); Heinemann, Volker [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, 81377 Munich (Germany); Bauerfeind, Ingo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, 81377 Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O. [Institute of Clinical Radiology University Hospital Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic accuracy for the detection of tumor recurrence in breast cancer patients using whole-body-MRI (WB-MRI) at 1.5 or 3 T compared to FDG-PET-CT. Materials and methods: Thirty-three female patients with breast cancer and suspicion of recurrence underwent FDG-PET-CT and WB-MRI. Coronal T1w-TSE- and STIR-sequences, HASTE-imaging of the lungs, contrast-enhanced T1w- and T2w-TSE-sequences of the liver, brain and abdomen were performed, using a WB-MRI-scanner at 1.5 (n = 23) or 3 T (n = 10). Presence of local recurrence, lymph node involvement and distant metastatic disease was assessed using clinical and radiological follow-up as a standard of reference. Results: Tumor recurrence was found in 20 of 33 patients. Overall 186 malignant foci were detected with WB-MRI and PET-CT. Both modalities revealed two recurrent tumors of the breast. PET-CT detected more lymph node metastases (n = 21) than WB-MRI (n = 16). WB-MRI was more precise in the detection of distant metastases (n = 154 versus n = 147). Sensitivity was 93% (172/186) and 91% (170/186) for WB-MRI and PET-CT, specificity was 86% (66/77) and 90% (69/77), respectively. Examination times for WB-MRI at 1.5 and 3 T were 51 and 43 min, respectively, examination time for PET-CT was 103 min. Conclusion: WB-MRI and PET-CT are useful for the detection of tumor recurrence in the follow-up of breast cancer. WB-MRI is highly sensitive to distant metastatic disease. PET-CT is more sensitive in detecting lymph node involvement. Tumor screening with WB-MRI is feasible at 1.5 and 3 T, scan time is further reduced at 3 T with identical resolution.

  14. Role of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT in accurate selection of primary hyperparathyroid patients for minimally invasive radio-guided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubello, Domenico; Massaro, Arianna; Cittadin, Silvia; Rampin, Lucia [Istituto Oncologico Veneto (IOV), Nuclear Medicine Service - PET Unit, ' S. Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, Rovigo (Italy); Al-Nahhas, Adil [Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Boni, Giuseppe; Mariani, Giuliano [University of Pisa Medical School, Regional Center of Nuclear Medicine, Pisa (Italy); Pelizzo, Maria R. [University of Padova Medical School, Department of Special Surgery, Padova (Italy)

    2006-09-15

    A prerequisite for optimum minimally invasive radio-guided surgery (MIRS) for primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is the demonstration of significant uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi in a parathyroid adenoma (PA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical role or {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT in selecting patients for this procedure. Fifty-four consecutive PHPT patients were evaluated by single-session {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate/{sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi planar subtraction scintigraphy, followed by {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT acquisition to localise hyperfunctioning PAs and assist in planning the surgical approach. Scintigraphy showed the presence of a solitary PA in 47/54 patients (87%) and two or more PAs in four patients (7.4%); it was negative in the remaining three patients (5.6%). The overall sensitivity of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi scintigraphy was 94.6%. In 7/54 patients, the PA was located deep in the para-oesophageal/paratracheal space. So far, 22 patients with scintigraphic evidence of a solitary PA (in four of whom the PA was located deep in the neck) have undergone successful MIRS using the low 37 MBq (1 mCi) {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi dose protocol. Intraoperative quick parathyroid hormone (QPTH) assay demonstrated a fall in all 22 patients, thus confirming successful removal of the hyperfunctioning PA. No major surgical complications were observed. After a period of follow-up ranging between 6 and 27 months (median 13 months), no case of persistent/recurrent PHPT was recorded. When comparing the parathyroid to background (P/B) ratio measured at planar and SPECT preoperative scintigraphy with that measured intraoperatively with the gamma probe, a good linear correlation was found between the SPECT and the intraoperative gamma probe measurements (r=0.89; p<0.01) but no correlation was found with planar scintigraphic data. Our preliminary data suggest that measurement of the P/B ratio by means of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT is more accurate in predicting the

  15. Incremental value of combined 99MTc tetrofosmin parathyroid scintigraphy, rapid intra operative PTH assays and minimally invasive radio-guided surgery (MIRS) in optimizing parathyroidectomies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padma, S.; Kumar, S.; Babu, T.; Kumar, H.; Nair, V.; Nair, G.K.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Aim of our study was to evaluate incremental diagnostic value of 99mTc Tetrofosmin parathyroid SPECT (TPSPECT), rapid intra operative quick parathyroid hormone measurement (QPTH) combined with radio guidance provided by scintillation probe (Minimally Invasive Radio guided Surgery MIRS) in parathyroid surgeries. While TPSPECT is an established investigation in preoperative workup of hyperparathyroidism patients , MIRS is a relatively new concept in Indian subcontinent. Methods: 29 pts (M: F = 18: 11), age range 16- 65 yrs (mean 41+ 9 yrs) having clinical and biochemical hyperparathyroidism underwent TPSPECT between Jan 02 -04, using 20 mci IV 99mTc Tetrofosmin. Pts with familial hyperparathyroidism , previous nodular goiters and previous neck irradiation were excluded from study. Scintigraphy comprised of immediate, delayed planar and SPECT imaging of neck and chest. Imagewise abnormal, persistent tracer uptake was considered positive for adenoma and diffuse uptake for hyperplasia. 26 pts underwent exploration (22 adenomas and 4 hyperplasias).18 pts had benefit of intraoperative QPTH. A select group (after Dec 2003) i.e. 9 pts got the assistance of radioguided probing. Peroperatively NM physician used cordless handheld gamma probe (Gamma Finder, World of Medicine, Germany) in neck and mediastinum to detect parathyroid adenoma / hyperplasias. A five fold increase in radioactive counts perceived by probe when compared to background was considered positive for parathyroid adenoma / hyperplasia. If PTH levels fell from baseline by at least 50%, the surgery was concluded as complete. Results: In all 22 pts suspected to have primary hyperparathyroidism TPSPECT identified adenomas (100 % sensitivity). While planar imaging had a sensitivity of 90.1% (20/22 pts), SPECT identified the adenoma in all pts. Interestingly only 3/22 pts had ectopic glands while 5 had more than one adenomas. The most commonly involved gland was left inferior. In secondary

  16. Spleen cells of whole body x-irradiated W/Fu rats enhance tumor growth in vivo and non-specific cytotoxicity in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroson, H.; Schechter, M.; Herskovic, T.; Kurzman, I.; Rotman, M.; Friedenberg, R.

    1980-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of spleen cells of normal Wistar/Furth (W/Fu) rats obtained after whole body x-irradiation (WBI) upon mammary carcinoma growth in vivo, and cell mediated cytotoxicity against several target cells in vitro. The ME/H mammary carcinoma employed here originally arose spontaneously in a W/Fu rat, metastasizing to the retroperitoneal lymph node and lungs. It was found that surviving non-adherent spleen cells taken two days after 500R WBI cause enhanced tumor growth and metastases development in a Winn assay compared with nonadherent spleen cells from unirradiated controls. These cells were also enriched in granulocytes compared with controls. While the level of nonspecific cell mediated cytotoxicity was variable, it increased significantly following WBI of the spleen cell donor. Our results indicate that there are apparently two opposing effects shown by non-adherent spleen cells surviving WBI of normal W/Fu rats: enhancement of in vivo tumor growth; and enhancement of in vitro cell mediated cytotoxicity. A possible mechanism to explain these contrasting results is suggested

  17. Treatment of large stage I-II lung tumors using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT): Planning considerations and early toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Chin Loon; Palma, David; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric predictors of early clinical toxicity following SBRT in patients with lung tumors and planning target volumes (PTV) exceeding 80 cm 3 . Methods: Eighteen consecutive patients who were treated using volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc TM ) were assessed. All were either unfit or refused to undergo surgery or chemoradiotherapy. PTV planning objectives were as used in the ROSEL study protocol. Clinical toxicity was scored using Common Toxicity Criteria AE4.0. Lung volumes receiving 5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy (V 5 , V 10 , V 15 and V 20 ) and mean lung dose were assessed and correlated to symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP). Results: Median age, age-adjusted Charlson-comorbidity score and PTV size were 74, 7.5 and 137 cm 3 , respectively. At a median follow-up of 12.8 months, 8 deaths were recorded: 5 arising from comorbidity, 2 were potentially treatment-related and 1 had local recurrence. RP was reported in 5 patients (grade 2 in 3 and grade 3 in 2). All RP occurred in plans without a high priority optimization objective on contralateral lung. Acute RP was best predicted by contralateral lung V 5 (p 80 cm 3 , the contralateral lung V 5 best predicts RP. Limiting contralateral lung V 5 to <26% may reduce acute toxicity.

  18. Radio-guided sentinel lymph node identification by lymphoscintigraphy fused with an anatomical vector profile: clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccoli Asabella, A; Antonica, F; Renna, M A; Rubini, D; Notaristefano, A; Nicoletti, A; Rubini, G

    2013-12-01

    To develop a method to fuse lymphoscintigraphic images with an adaptable anatomical vector profile and to evaluate its role in the clinical practice. We used Adobe Illustrator CS6 to create different vector profiles, we fused those profiles, using Adobe Photoshop CS6, with lymphoscintigraphic images of the patient. We processed 197 lymphoscintigraphies performed in patients with cutaneous melanomas, breast cancer or delayed lymph drainage. Our models can be adapted to every patient attitude or position and contain different levels of anatomical details ranging from external body profiles to the internal anatomical structures like bones, muscles, vessels, and lymph nodes. If needed, more new anatomical details can be added and embedded in the profile without redrawing them, saving a lot of time. Details can also be easily hidden, allowing the physician to view only relevant information and structures. Fusion times are about 85 s. The diagnostic confidence of the observers increased significantly. The validation process showed a slight shift (mean 4.9 mm). We have created a new, practical, inexpensive digital technique based on commercial software for fusing lymphoscintigraphic images with built-in anatomical reference profiles. It is easily reproducible and does not alter the original scintigraphic image. Our method allows a more meaningful interpretation of lymphoscintigraphies, an easier recognition of the anatomical site and better lymph node dissection planning.

  19. Survival Outcomes of Patients Treated with Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Parotid Gland Tumors: a Retrospective Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, Sana D.; Snider, James W.; Wang, Hongkun; Wooster, Margaux; Lominska, Christopher; Deeken, John; Newkirk, Kenneth; Davidson, Bruce; Harter, K. William

    2012-01-01

    Background: to review a single-institution experience with the management of parotid malignancies treated by fractionated stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT). Findings: Between 2003 and 2011, 13 patients diagnosed with parotid malignancies were treated with adjuvant or definitive SBRT to a median dose of 33 Gy (range 25–40 Gy). There were 11 male and two female patients with a median age of 80. Ten patients declined conventional radiation treatment and three patients had received prior unrelated radiation therapy to neighboring structures with unavailable radiation records. Six patients were treated with definitive intent while seven patients were treated adjuvantly for adverse surgical or pathologic features. Five patients had clinical or pathologic evidence of lymph node disease. Conclusion: at a median follow-up of 14 months only one patient failed locally, and four failed distantly. The actuarial 2-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and local-regional control rates were 46, 84, and 47%, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed surgery as a positive predictor of overall survival while presence of gross disease was a negatively correlated factor (p < 0.05).

  20. An expandable prosthesis with dual cage-and-plate function in a single device for vertebral body replacement: the clinical experience on 14 consecutive cases with vertebral tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, J J; Ramírez, J J; Chiquete, E; Gómez-Limón, E

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to test the hypothesis that an expandable prosthesis with dual cage-and-plate function can provide immediate and durable spine stabilization after corpectomy. We designed an expandable vertebral body prosthesis with dual cage-and-plate function in a single device (JR-prosthesis). Anatomical studies were performed to design a titanium-made prosthesis. Cadaver assays were done with a stainless steal device to test fixation and adequacy to the human spine anatomy. Then, 14 patients with vertebral tumors (8 metastatic) underwent corpectomy and vertebral body replacement with the JR-prosthesis. All patients had neurological deficit, severe pain and spine instability (mean follow-up: 25.4 months). Mean pain score before surgery in a visual analog scale improved from 7.6 to 3.0 points after operation (P=0.002). All patients achieved at least one grade of improvement in the Frankel score (P=0.003), excepting the 3 patients with Frankel grade A presurgery. Two patients with renal cell carcinoma died during the following 4 days after surgery (renal failure and massive bleeding), the rest attained a painless and stable spine immediately and maintained for long periods. No significant infections or implant failures were registered. A non-fatal case of inferior vena cava surgical injury was observed (repaired during surgery without further complications). The JR-prosthesis stabilizes the spine immediately after surgery and for the rest of the patients' life. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the clinical experience of any expandable vertebral body prosthesis with dual cage-and-plate function in a single device. These observations await confirmation in different scenarios.

  1. SU-G-BRA-10: Marker Free Lung Tumor Motion Tracking by An Active Contour Model On Cone Beam CT Projections for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, M; Yuan, Y; Lo, Y [The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Wei, J [City College of New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel strategy to extract the lung tumor motion from cone beam CT (CBCT) projections by an active contour model with interpolated respiration learned from diaphragm motion. Methods: Tumor tracking on CBCT projections was accomplished with the templates derived from planning CT (pCT). There are three major steps in the proposed algorithm: 1) The pCT was modified to form two CT sets: a tumor removed pCT and a tumor only pCT, the respective digitally reconstructed radiographs DRRtr and DRRto following the same geometry of the CBCT projections were generated correspondingly. 2) The DRRtr was rigidly registered with the CBCT projections on the frame-by-frame basis. Difference images between CBCT projections and the registered DRRtr were generated where the tumor visibility was appreciably enhanced. 3) An active contour method was applied to track the tumor motion on the tumor enhanced projections with DRRto as templates to initialize the tumor tracking while the respiratory motion was compensated for by interpolating the diaphragm motion estimated by our novel constrained linear regression approach. CBCT and pCT from five patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy were included in addition to scans from a Quasar phantom programmed with known motion. Manual tumor tracking was performed on CBCT projections and was compared to the automatic tracking to evaluate the algorithm accuracy. Results: The phantom study showed that the error between the automatic tracking and the ground truth was within 0.2mm. For the patients the discrepancy between the calculation and the manual tracking was between 1.4 and 2.2 mm depending on the location and shape of the lung tumor. Similar patterns were observed in the frequency domain. Conclusion: The new algorithm demonstrated the feasibility to track the lung tumor from noisy CBCT projections, providing a potential solution to better motion management for lung radiation therapy.

  2. SU-G-BRA-10: Marker Free Lung Tumor Motion Tracking by An Active Contour Model On Cone Beam CT Projections for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, M; Yuan, Y; Lo, Y; Wei, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel strategy to extract the lung tumor motion from cone beam CT (CBCT) projections by an active contour model with interpolated respiration learned from diaphragm motion. Methods: Tumor tracking on CBCT projections was accomplished with the templates derived from planning CT (pCT). There are three major steps in the proposed algorithm: 1) The pCT was modified to form two CT sets: a tumor removed pCT and a tumor only pCT, the respective digitally reconstructed radiographs DRRtr and DRRto following the same geometry of the CBCT projections were generated correspondingly. 2) The DRRtr was rigidly registered with the CBCT projections on the frame-by-frame basis. Difference images between CBCT projections and the registered DRRtr were generated where the tumor visibility was appreciably enhanced. 3) An active contour method was applied to track the tumor motion on the tumor enhanced projections with DRRto as templates to initialize the tumor tracking while the respiratory motion was compensated for by interpolating the diaphragm motion estimated by our novel constrained linear regression approach. CBCT and pCT from five patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy were included in addition to scans from a Quasar phantom programmed with known motion. Manual tumor tracking was performed on CBCT projections and was compared to the automatic tracking to evaluate the algorithm accuracy. Results: The phantom study showed that the error between the automatic tracking and the ground truth was within 0.2mm. For the patients the discrepancy between the calculation and the manual tracking was between 1.4 and 2.2 mm depending on the location and shape of the lung tumor. Similar patterns were observed in the frequency domain. Conclusion: The new algorithm demonstrated the feasibility to track the lung tumor from noisy CBCT projections, providing a potential solution to better motion management for lung radiation therapy.

  3. Reconstruction of Thoracic Spine Using a Personalized 3D-Printed Vertebral Body in Adolescent with T9 Primary Bone Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Wen Jie; Mobbs, Ralph J; Wilcox, Ben; Phan, Steven; Phan, Kevin; Sutterlin, Chester E

    2017-09-01

    Neurosurgery and spine surgery have the potential to benefit from the use of 3-dimensional printing (3DP) technology due to complex anatomic considerations and the delicate nature of surrounding structures. We report a procedure that uses a 3D-printed titanium T9 vertebral body implant post T9 vertebrectomy for a primary bone tumor. A 14-year-old female presented with progressive kyphoscoliosis and a pathologic fracture of the T9 vertebra with sagittal and coronal deformity due to a destructive primary bone tumor. Surgical resection and reconstruction was performed in combination with a 3D-printed, patient-specific implant. Custom design features included porous titanium end plates, corrective angulation of the implant to restore sagittal balance, and pedicle screw holes in the 3D implant to assist with insertion of the device. In addition, attachment of the anterior column construct to the posterior pedicle screw construct was possible due to the customized features of the patient-specific implant. An advantage of 3DP is the ability to manufacture patient-specific implants, as in the current case example. Additionally, the use of 3DP has been able to reduce operative time significantly. Surgical procedures can be preplanned using 3DP patient-specific models. Surgeons can train before performing complex procedures, which enhances their presurgical planning in order to maximize patient outcomes. When considering implants and prostheses, the use of 3DP allows a superior anatomic fit for the patient, with the potential to improve restoration of anatomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dosimetric comparison of deep inspiration breath hold and free breathing technique in stereotactic body radiotherapy for localized lung tumor using Flattening Filter Free beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Karthick Raj; Bhuiyan, Md. Anisuzzaman; Alam, Md. Mahbub; Ahmed, Sharif; Sumon, Mostafa Aziz; Sengupta, Ashim Kumar; Rahman, Md. Shakilur; Azharul Islam, Md. S. M.

    2018-03-01

    Aim: To compare the dosimetric advantage of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized lung tumor between deep inspiration breath hold technique and free breathing technique. Materials and methods: We retrospectively included ten previously treated lung tumor patients in this dosimetric study. All the ten patients underwent CT simulation using 4D-CT free breathing (FB) and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) techniques. Plans were created using three coplanar full modulated arc using 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) bream with a dose rate of 1400 MU/min. Same dose constraints for the target and the critical structures for a particular patient were used during the plan optimization process in DIBH and FB datasets. We intend to deliver 50 Gy in 5 fractions for all the patients. For standardization, all the plans were normalized at target mean of the planning target volume (PTV). Doses to the critical structures and targets were recorded from the dose volume histogram for evaluation. Results: The mean right and left lung volumes were inflated by 1.55 and 1.60 times in DIBH scans compared to the FB scans. The mean internal target volume (ITV) increased in the FB datasets by 1.45 times compared to the DIBH data sets. The mean dose followed by standard deviation (x¯ ± σx¯) of ipsilateral lung for DIBH-SBRT and FB-SBRT plans were 7.48 ± 3.57 (Gy) and 10.23 ± 4.58 (Gy) respectively, with a mean reduction of 36.84% in DIBH-SBRT plans. Ipsilateral lung were reduced to 36.84% in DIBH plans compared to FB plans. Conclusion: Significant dose reduction in ipsilateral lung due to the lung inflation and target motion restriction in DIBH-SBRT plans were observed compare to FB-SBRT. DIBH-SBRT plans demonstrate superior dose reduction to the normal tissues and other critical structures.

  5. Early Graphical Appearance of Radiation Pneumonitis Correlates With the Severity of Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) in Patients With Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Atsuya; Ohashi, Toshio; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate factors associated with Grade ≥3 radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 128 patients with 133 lung tumors treated with SBRT. RP was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Univariate analyses were used to identify predictive factors for RP. Results: The median follow-up period after SBRT was 12 months (range, 5-45 months). Incidences of Grades 0, 1, 2, and 3 RP were 27%, 52%, 16%, and 5%, respectively. No patients suffered Grade 4 or 5 RP. For all patients with Grade 2 or 3, symptoms occurred either simultaneously with or subsequent to graphical appearances. The latent period was the only significant factor associated with Grade ≥3 RP (p < 0.01). A latent period of 1 or 2 months indicated a 40% (6/15) risk for Grade 3. However, the risk for Grade 3 was 1.2% (1/82) 3 months after SBRT. No pretreatment clinical or dosimetric factors were significantly associated with Grade ≥3 RP. However, 4 of 7 patients with Grade 3 RP had severe pulmonary comorbidities. Conclusion: Only the latency period was a significant factor in the development of RP. No pretreatment clinical or dosimetric factors were significantly associated with Grade ≥3 RP. Patients, especially those with severe pulmonary comorbidities, should be carefully observed for the graphical appearance of RP within a few months during the follow-up period after SBRT.

  6. 4π Noncoplanar Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Potential to Improve Tumor Control and Late Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rwigema, Jean-Claude M.; Nguyen, Dan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Heron, Dwight E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen, Allen M.; Lee, Percy; Wang, Pin-Chieh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Vargo, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Tenn, Stephen; Steinberg, Michael L.; Kupelian, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential benefit of 4π radiation therapy in recurrent, locally advanced, or metastatic head-and-neck cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven patients with 29 tumors who were treated using SBRT were included. In recurrent disease (n=26), SBRT was delivered with a median 44 Gy (range, 35-44 Gy) in 5 fractions. Three patients with sinonasal mucosal melanoma, metastatic breast cancer, and primary undifferentiated carcinoma received 35 Gy, 22.5 Gy, and 40 Gy in 5 fractions, respectively. Novel 4π treatment plans were created for each patient to meet the objective that 95% of the planning target volume was covered by 100% of the prescription dose. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) and 50% dose spillage volumes were compared against the delivered clinical SBRT plans. Local control (LC), late toxicity, tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability were determined. Results: Using 4π plans, mean/maximum doses to all OARs were reduced by 22% to 89%/10% to 86%. With 4π plans, the 50% dose spillage volume was decreased by 33%. Planning target volume prescription dose escalation by 10 Gy and 20 Gy were achieved while keeping doses to OARs significantly improved or unchanged from clinical plans, except for the carotid artery maximum dose at 20-Gy escalation. At a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 1-41 months), crude LC was 52%. The 2-year LC of 39.2% approximated the predicted mean TCP of 42.2%, which increased to 45.9% with 4π plans. For 10-Gy and 20-Gy dose escalation, 4π plans increased TCP from 80.1% and 88.1% to 85.5% and 91.4%, respectively. The 7.4% rate of grade ≥3 late toxicity was comparable to the predicted 5.6% mean normal tissue complication probability for OARs, which was significantly reduced by 4π planning at the prescribed and escalated doses. Conclusions: 4π plans may allow dose escalation with significant and consistent

  7. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  8. The Possible Effect Of Tamoxifen Vs Whole Body Irradiation Treatment On Thyroid Hormones in Female Rats Bearing Mammary Tumors Chemically Induced

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelgawad, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in most developed and developing regions of the world. In women, this drug has tissuespecific effects, acting as an estrogen antagonist on the breast, and as an estrogen agonist on bone, lipid metabolism (increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol), and the endometrium. Thyroid hormones act on almost all organs throughout the body and regulate the basal metabolism of the organism. Thyroid hormone can also stimulate the proliferation in vitro of certain tumor cell lines. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the significant value of tamoxifen and/or irradiation treatment on thyroid hormones in breast cancer bearing female rats. Forty two female Sprague-Dawely rats randomly divided into seven groups and the effect of tamoxifen and post-irradiation was studied on breast cancer chemically induced. The results shows a T 4 and estradiol levels not T 3 were altered in different experimental groups. It could be concluded that irradiation-induced changes in the composition of the mammary microenvironment promote the expression of neoplastic potential by affecting both estradiol and thyroid hormones, and tamoxifen may alter the thyroid hormones. Irradiation and tamoxifen administration may have worth effects on T 4 and estradiol levels and it is recommended to further studies towards the bystander effect of radiation and tamoxifen on the tissue culture and molecular biology scale.

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a picture of areas inside the body. Serum tumor marker test : A procedure in which a sample of ... increased levels in the blood. These are called tumor markers . The following three tumor markers are used to ...

  10. General Information about Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a picture of areas inside the body. Serum tumor marker test : A procedure in which a sample of ... increased levels in the blood. These are called tumor markers . The following three tumor markers are used to ...

  11. More Accurate Definition of Clinical Target Volume Based on the Measurement of Microscopic Extensions of the Primary Tumor Toward the Uterus Body in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Ib-IIa Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Wen-Jia; Wu, Xiao; Xue, Ren-Liang; Lin, Xiang-Ying; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; Yan, Shu-Mei; Zhang, Yao-Hong; Zhai, Tian-Tian; Lu, Jia-Yang; Wu, Li-Li; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Hai-Hua; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Li, De-Rui; Xie, Liang-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To more accurately define clinical target volume for cervical cancer radiation treatment planning by evaluating tumor microscopic extension toward the uterus body (METU) in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter study, surgical resection specimens from 318 cases of stage Ib-IIa SCCC that underwent radical hysterectomy were included. Patients who had undergone preoperative chemotherapy, radiation, or both were excluded from this study. Microscopic extension of primary tumor toward the uterus body was measured. The association between other pathologic factors and METU was analyzed. Results: Microscopic extension toward the uterus body was not common, with only 12.3% of patients (39 of 318) demonstrating METU. The mean (±SD) distance of METU was 0.32 ± 1.079 mm (range, 0-10 mm). Lymphovascular space invasion was associated with METU distance and occurrence rate. A margin of 5 mm added to gross tumor would adequately cover 99.4% and 99% of the METU in the whole group and in patients with lymphovascular space invasion, respectively. Conclusion: According to our analysis of 318 SCCC specimens for METU, using a 5-mm gross tumor volume to clinical target volume margin in the direction of the uterus should be adequate for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa SCCC. Considering the discrepancy between imaging and pathologic methods in determining gross tumor volume extent, we recommend a safer 10-mm margin in the uterine direction as the standard for clinical practice when using MRI for contouring tumor volume

  12. More accurate definition of clinical target volume based on the measurement of microscopic extensions of the primary tumor toward the uterus body in international federation of gynecology and obstetrics Ib-IIa squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen-Jia; Wu, Xiao; Xue, Ren-Liang; Lin, Xiang-Ying; Kidd, Elizabeth A; Yan, Shu-Mei; Zhang, Yao-Hong; Zhai, Tian-Tian; Lu, Jia-Yang; Wu, Li-Li; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Hai-Hua; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Li, De-Rui; Xie, Liang-Xi

    2015-01-01

    To more accurately define clinical target volume for cervical cancer radiation treatment planning by evaluating tumor microscopic extension toward the uterus body (METU) in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC). In this multicenter study, surgical resection specimens from 318 cases of stage Ib-IIa SCCC that underwent radical hysterectomy were included. Patients who had undergone preoperative chemotherapy, radiation, or both were excluded from this study. Microscopic extension of primary tumor toward the uterus body was measured. The association between other pathologic factors and METU was analyzed. Microscopic extension toward the uterus body was not common, with only 12.3% of patients (39 of 318) demonstrating METU. The mean (±SD) distance of METU was 0.32 ± 1.079 mm (range, 0-10 mm). Lymphovascular space invasion was associated with METU distance and occurrence rate. A margin of 5 mm added to gross tumor would adequately cover 99.4% and 99% of the METU in the whole group and in patients with lymphovascular space invasion, respectively. According to our analysis of 318 SCCC specimens for METU, using a 5-mm gross tumor volume to clinical target volume margin in the direction of the uterus should be adequate for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa SCCC. Considering the discrepancy between imaging and pathologic methods in determining gross tumor volume extent, we recommend a safer 10-mm margin in the uterine direction as the standard for clinical practice when using MRI for contouring tumor volume. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. More Accurate Definition of Clinical Target Volume Based on the Measurement of Microscopic Extensions of the Primary Tumor Toward the Uterus Body in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Ib-IIa Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wen-Jia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Wu, Xiao [Department of Pathology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Xue, Ren-Liang; Lin, Xiang-Ying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Kidd, Elizabeth A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Yan, Shu-Mei [Department of Pathology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Zhang, Yao-Hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chaozhou Hospital of Chaozhou City, Guangdong Province (China); Zhai, Tian-Tian; Lu, Jia-Yang; Wu, Li-Li; Zhang, Hao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Huang, Hai-Hua [Department of Pathology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Chen, Zhi-Jian; Li, De-Rui [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Xie, Liang-Xi, E-mail: xieliangxi1@qq.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To more accurately define clinical target volume for cervical cancer radiation treatment planning by evaluating tumor microscopic extension toward the uterus body (METU) in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter study, surgical resection specimens from 318 cases of stage Ib-IIa SCCC that underwent radical hysterectomy were included. Patients who had undergone preoperative chemotherapy, radiation, or both were excluded from this study. Microscopic extension of primary tumor toward the uterus body was measured. The association between other pathologic factors and METU was analyzed. Results: Microscopic extension toward the uterus body was not common, with only 12.3% of patients (39 of 318) demonstrating METU. The mean (±SD) distance of METU was 0.32 ± 1.079 mm (range, 0-10 mm). Lymphovascular space invasion was associated with METU distance and occurrence rate. A margin of 5 mm added to gross tumor would adequately cover 99.4% and 99% of the METU in the whole group and in patients with lymphovascular space invasion, respectively. Conclusion: According to our analysis of 318 SCCC specimens for METU, using a 5-mm gross tumor volume to clinical target volume margin in the direction of the uterus should be adequate for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa SCCC. Considering the discrepancy between imaging and pathologic methods in determining gross tumor volume extent, we recommend a safer 10-mm margin in the uterine direction as the standard for clinical practice when using MRI for contouring tumor volume.

  14. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dholakia, Avani S.; Chaudhry, Muhammad; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Chang, Daniel T.; Raman, Siva P.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Su, Zheng; Pai, Jonathan; Oteiza, Katharine E.; Griffith, Mary E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Tryggestad, Erik; Pawlik, Timothy; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Koong, Albert C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV peak ) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Liver mean + [2 × Liver sd ]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results: Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n=19, 59%), 65 years or older (n=21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n=27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7-22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm 3 or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64-5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR 3.08, 95% CI 1.18-8.02, P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19-22.21, P=.029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07-10.48, P=.038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may assist in tailoring therapy

  15. Tumors and tumor-like lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koesling, S.; Stoevesandt, D.; Knipping, S.

    2007-01-01

    Tumors and tumor-like lesions are rare diseases in the paranasal sinuses. There is a great variety of histological types, but only a small number of morphological patterns on imaging. Histology is an important point in therapeutic planning. In most cases it is obtained by sampling, which is not as difficult in the sinonasal area as in other regions of the body. The main task of imaging is an exact estimation of the extent and spread of a lesion. This article discusses the possibilities and limitations of CT and MRI in the assessment of the dignity and spread of paranasal tumors and tumor-like lesions in consideration of necessary therapeutic information. Additionally, an overview of features on imaging of different paranasal tumors and tumor-like lesions is given. (orig.)

  16. Mediastinal tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thymoma - mediastinal; Lymphoma - mediastinal ... mediastinal tumors in adults occur in the anterior mediastinum. They are usually cancerous (malignant) lymphomas, germ cell tumors, or thymomas. These tumors are ...

  17. High-dose therapy for patients with primary multifocal and early relapsed Ewing's tumors: results of two consecutive regimens assessing the role of total-body irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdach, S; Meyer-Bahlburg, A; Laws, H J; Haase, R; van Kaik, B; Metzner, B; Wawer, A; Finke, R; Göbel, U; Haerting, J; Pape, H; Gadner, H; Dunst, J; Juergens, H

    2003-08-15

    Risk stratification of metastatic and relapsed Ewing's tumors (ETs) has been a matter of debate during the last decade. Patients with bone or bone marrow metastases or early or multiple relapses constitute the worst risk group in ET and have a poorer prognosis than patients with primary lung metastases or late relapses. In this article, the results of the present Meta European Intergroup Cooperative Ewing Sarcoma Study (MetaEICESS) (tandem melphalan/etoposide [TandemME]) were compared with the result of the previous study (hyper melphalan/etoposide [HyperME]), both at 5 years, in a patient population within the same high-risk stratum to determine toxicity. Among 54 eligible patients, 26 were treated according to the HyperME protocol, and 28 were treated according to TandemME protocol. Patients received six cycles of the Cooperative Ewing Sarcoma Study treatment in HyperME and six cycles of the EICESS treatment in TandemME as induction chemotherapy. Patients also received involved-compartment irradiation for local intensification and myeloablative systemic intensification consolidation with hyperfractionated total-body irradiation (TBI) combined with melphalan/etoposide in HyperME or two times the melphalan/etoposide in TandemME followed by autologous stem-cell transplantation. The event-free survival (EFS) rate +/- SD in HyperME and TandemME was 22% +/- 8% and 29% +/- 9%, respectively. The dead of complication rate was 23% in HyperME and 4% in TandemME. TandemME offers a decent, albeit still not satisfactory, rate of long-term remissions in most advanced ETs (AETs), with short-term treatment and acceptable toxicity. TBI was not required to maintain EFS level in this setting but was associated with a high rate of toxic death. Future prospective studies in unselected patients are warranted to evaluate high-dose therapy in an unselected group of patients with AET.

  18. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... different types of brain tumors. Some are cancerous (meaning they can spread to parts of the body ... of the face, trunk, arms, or legs slurred speech difficulty standing or walking poor coordination headache in ...

  19. Atypically localized glomus tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meric Ugurlar

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: When a painful mass is found in the body, glomus tumors should be kept in mind. The consideration of symptoms, including pain, temperature sensitivity, point tenderness, and discoloration, common characteristics of glomus tumors, may aid diagnosis. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(3.000: 112-117

  20. Support Vector Machine-Based Prediction of Local Tumor Control After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klement, Rainer J.; Allgäuer, Michael; Appold, Steffen; Dieckmann, Karin; Ernst, Iris; Ganswindt, Ute; Holy, Richard; Nestle, Ursula; Nevinny-Stickel, Meinhard; Semrau, Sabine; Sterzing, Florian; Wittig, Andrea; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several prognostic factors for local tumor control probability (TCP) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been described, but no attempts have been undertaken to explore whether a nonlinear combination of potential factors might synergistically improve the prediction of local control. Methods and Materials: We investigated a support vector machine (SVM) for predicting TCP in a cohort of 399 patients treated at 13 German and Austrian institutions. Among 7 potential input features for the SVM we selected those most important on the basis of forward feature selection, thereby evaluating classifier performance by using 10-fold cross-validation and computing the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The final SVM classifier was built by repeating the feature selection 10 times with different splitting of the data for cross-validation and finally choosing only those features that were selected at least 5 out of 10 times. It was compared with a multivariate logistic model that was built by forward feature selection. Results: Local failure occurred in 12% of patients. Biologically effective dose (BED) at the isocenter (BED ISO ) was the strongest predictor of TCP in the logistic model and also the most frequently selected input feature for the SVM. A bivariate logistic function of BED ISO and the pulmonary function indicator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) yielded the best description of the data but resulted in a significantly smaller AUC than the final SVM classifier with the input features BED ISO , age, baseline Karnofsky index, and FEV1 (0.696 ± 0.040 vs 0.789 ± 0.001, P<.03). The final SVM resulted in sensitivity and specificity of 67.0% ± 0.5% and 78.7% ± 0.3%, respectively. Conclusions: These results confirm that machine learning techniques like SVMs can be successfully applied to predict treatment outcome after SBRT. Improvements over traditional TCP modeling are

  1. Ghrelin and pre-proghrelin immunoreactive cells in gastric neuroendocrine tumors associated with atrophic body gastritis Grelina e pré-progrelina em tumores neuroendócrinos do estômago associados à gastrite atrófica do corpo

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    Letícia Figueiredo Moreira

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Ghrelin is a 28 amino acid peptide secreted mainly by endocrine cells present in the gastric mucosa and acknowledged as an endogenous releaser of growth hormone. The immunohistochemical expression of ghrelin has been described in neuroendocrine tumors, and it is believed that may exert modulating action related to the growth of these tumors. OBJECTIVE: To study the presence of ghrelin and preproghrelin immunoreactive cells in gastric neuroendocrine tumors associated with atrophic body gastritis. METHODS: Endoscopic biopsies from 15 patients with neuroendocrine tumor of the gastric mucosa associated with atrophic body gastritis were performed for immunohistochemistry, and specific chromogranin, ghrelin and preproghrelin antibodies were applied. The immunohistochemical expression was assessed in tumor cells and endocrine micronodular hyperplasia present in mucosa adjacent to the tumor, and it was classified in relation to the number of stained cells. RESULTS: Chromogranin was positive in 14 out of 15 tumors. Ghrelin and preproghrelin immunoreactive cells were detected in 11 (73% and 13 (87% tumors, respectively. There was a significant correlation between the immunohistochemical results of both antigen expressions (kappa = 81%. Ghrelin and preproghrelin expression was detected in hyperplastic nodules present in the mucosa adjacent to the tumor in seven and eight cases, respectively. There was no correlation between these results and those observed in neoplastic cells. CONCLUSION: Ghrelin and preproghrelin immunoreactive cells may be found in variable number in Type I neuroendocrine gastric tumors and in hyperplastic nodules associated with these tumors. However, it remains unclear what role these peptides play on the development of these tumors.INTRODUÇÃO: Grelina é um peptídeo de 28 aminoácidos, reconhecido como liberador endógeno do hormônio do crescimento, sendo secretado principalmente por células endócrinas da mucosa g

  2. Computed Tomography-Based Anatomic Assessment Overestimates Local Tumor Recurrence in Patients With Mass-like Consolidation After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlap, Neal E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Yang Wensha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McIntosh, Alyson [Department of Radiation Oncology, John and Dorothy Morgan Cancer Center, Lehigh Valley Hospital, Allentown, PA (United States); Sheng, Ke [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Larner, James M., E-mail: jml2p@virginia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate pulmonary radiologic changes after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), to distinguish between mass-like fibrosis and tumor recurrence. Methods and Materials: Eighty consecutive patients treated with 3- to 5-fraction SBRT for early-stage peripheral non-small cell lung cancer with a minimum follow-up of 12 months were reviewed. The mean biologic equivalent dose received was 150 Gy (range, 78-180 Gy). Patients were followed with serial CT imaging every 3 months. The CT appearance of consolidation was defined as diffuse or mass-like. Progressive disease on CT was defined according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1. Positron emission tomography (PET) CT was used as an adjunct test. Tumor recurrence was defined as a standardized uptake value equal to or greater than the pretreatment value. Biopsy was used to further assess consolidation in select patients. Results: Median follow-up was 24 months (range, 12.0-36.0 months). Abnormal mass-like consolidation was identified in 44 patients (55%), whereas diffuse consolidation was identified in 12 patients (15%), at a median time from end of treatment of 10.3 months and 11.5 months, respectively. Tumor recurrence was found in 35 of 44 patients with mass-like consolidation using CT alone. Combined with PET, 10 of the 44 patients had tumor recurrence. Tumor size (hazard ratio 1.12, P=.05) and time to consolidation (hazard ratio 0.622, P=.03) were predictors for tumor recurrence. Three consecutive increases in volume and increasing volume at 12 months after treatment in mass-like consolidation were highly specific for tumor recurrence (100% and 80%, respectively). Patients with diffuse consolidation were more likely to develop grade {>=}2 pneumonitis (odds ratio 26.5, P=.02) than those with mass-like consolidation (odds ratio 0.42, P=.07). Conclusion: Incorporating the kinetics of mass-like consolidation and PET to the current criteria for evaluating posttreatment response will

  3. Influence of Fractionation Scheme and Tumor Location on Toxicities After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Large (≥5 cm) Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Multi-institutional Analysis

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    Verma, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Shostrom, Valerie K. [Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Zhen, Weining; Zhang, Mutian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Braunstein, Steve E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Holland, John [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Hallemeier, Christopher L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Harkenrider, Matthew M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, Illinois (United States); Iskhanian, Adrian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Attia, Albert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Lee, Percy [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Wang, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Decker, Roy H. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); McGarry, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Simone, Charles B., E-mail: charlessimone@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: To describe the impact of fractionation scheme and tumor location on toxicities in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for ≥5-cm non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as part of a multi-institutional analysis. Methods: Patients with primary ≥5-cm N0 M0 NSCLC who underwent ≤5-fraction SBRT were examined across multiple high-volume SBRT centers. Collected data included clinical/treatment parameters; toxicities were prospectively assessed at each institution according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Patients treated daily were compared with those treated every other day (QOD)/other nondaily regimens. Stratification between central and peripheral tumors was also performed. Results: Ninety-two patients from 12 institutions were evaluated (2004-2016), with median follow-up of 12 months. In total there were 23 (25%) and 6 (7%) grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 toxicities, respectively. Grades 2 and 3 pulmonary toxicities occurred in 9% and 4%, respectively; 1 patient treated daily experienced grade 5 radiation pneumonitis. Of the entire cohort, 46 patients underwent daily SBRT, and 46 received QOD (n=40)/other nondaily (n=6) regimens. Clinical/treatment parameters were similar between groups; the QOD/other group was more likely to receive 3-/4-fraction schemas. Patients treated QOD/other experienced significantly fewer grade ≥2 toxicities as compared with daily treatment (7% vs 43%, P<.001). Patients treated daily also had higher rates of grade ≥2 pulmonary toxicities (P=.014). Patients with peripheral tumors (n=66) were more likely to receive 3-/4-fraction regimens than those with central tumors (n=26). No significant differences in grade ≥2 toxicities were identified according to tumor location (P>.05). Conclusions: From this multi-institutional study, toxicity of SBRT for ≥5-cm lesions is acceptable, and daily treatment was associated with a higher rate of toxicities.

  4. Tumor vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, M.; Ihan, A.

    2006-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regiments. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tumor vaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which immune tolerance exists. That is why the population of tumor-specific lymphocytes is represented by a small number of low-affinity T-lymphocytes that induce weak antitumor immune response. Simultaneously, tumors evolve many mechanisms to actively evade immune system, what makes them poorly immunogenic or even tolerogenic. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies are directed toward breaking immune tolerance to tumor antigens, enhancing immunogenicity of tumor vaccines and overcoming mechanisms of tumor escape. There are several approaches, unfortunately, all of them still far away from an ideal tumor vaccine that would reject a tumor. Difficulties in the activation of antitumor immune response by tumor vaccines have led to the development of alternative immunotherapeutic strategies that directly focus on effector mechanisms of immune system (adoptive tumor- specific T-lymphocyte transfer and tumor specific monoclonal antibodies). (author)

  5. Surgical Treatment in Uveal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaan Gündüz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment in uveal tumors can be done via iridectomy, partial lamellar sclerouvectomy (PLSU and endoresection. Iridectomy is done in iris tumors without angle and ciliary body involvement. PLSU is performed in tumors with ciliary body and choroidal involvement. For this operation, a partial thickness scleral flap is dissected, the intraocular tumor is excised, and the flap is sutured back in position. PLSU surgery is done in iridociliary and ciliary body tumors with less than 3 clock hours of iris and ciliary body involvement and in choroidal tumors with a base diameter less than 15 mm. However, it can be employed in any size tumor for biopsy purposes. Potential complications of PLSU surgery include vitreous hemorrhage, cataract, retinal detachment, and endophthalmitis. Endoresection is a technique whereby the intraocular tumor is excised using vitrectomy techniques. The rationale for performing endoresection is based on the fact that irradiated uveal melanomas may be associated with exudation and neovascular glaucoma and removing the dead tumor tissue may contribute to better visual outcome. There are some centers where endoresection is done without prior radiotherapy. Allegedly, avoidance of radiation retinopathy and papillopathy are the main advantages of using endoresection without prior radiotherapy. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: Supplement 29-34

  6. Tumors markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi-Mizumoto, N.H.

    1989-01-01

    In order to study blood and cell components alterations (named tumor markers) that may indicate the presence of a tumor, several methods are presented. Aspects as diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic value and clinical evaluation are discussed. (M.A.C.)

  7. Mammary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Mammary neoplasia is one of the more common malignancies affecting domestic species. Despite their importance, they are often over- diagnosed, undertreated and subject to several misconceptions propagated by veterinarians and pet owners alike. Mammary neoplasia is the most frequent tumor type encountered in the female accounting for almost half of all malignancies reported. The canine has the highest incidence of mammary tumors of all domestic species. In the dog, about 65 percent of mammary tumors are benign mixed tumors, and 25 percent are carcinomas. The rest are adenomas, myoepitheliomas, and malignant mixed tumors. The age distribution of mammary tumors closely follows the age distribution of most tumors in the dog. Mammary tumors are rare in dogs 2 years old, but incidence begins to increase sharply at approximately 6 years of age. Median age at diagnosis is about 10 years. No breed predilection has been consistently reported

  8. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  9. Urogenital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  11. Cirugía radioguiada para la extirpación de un quiste paratiroideo gigante con hiperparatiroidismo Radio-guided surgery for removal of a giant parathyroid cyst related to hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edelberto Fuentes Valdés

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Entre los avances actuales del tratamiento quirúrgico del hiperparatiroidismo se encuentra la localización preoperatoria de la(s glándula(s hiperfuncionante(s mediante gammagrafía preoperatoria e intraoperatoria, esta última a través de una sonda gamma especial. Por otro lado, los quistes paratiroideos son raros; pueden ser funcionantes o no. Se describe un nuevo caso de quiste paratiroideo hiperfuncionante, así como los hallazgos de la gammagrafía con 99mTc-MIBI y el uso intraoperatorio de la sonda gamma para evaluar todos los sitios probables donde pudieran existir glándulas hiperproductoras de hormona paratiroidea. Se describen aspectos de la manipulación, seguridad y administración del radiofármaco en el período preoperatorio inmediato, así como la utilización de la sonda gamma durante la intervención. Se informa la evolución durante el seguimiento. Este caso representa el tercer paciente intervenido por hiperparatiroidismo mediante cirugía radioguiada en nuestro centro, institución en la que se introdujo esta técnica en el paísAmong present advances of surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism is the preoperative localization of hyper-functioning glands by preoperative and intraoperative scan, this later one by a special gamma probe. By the other hand, parathyroid cysts are rare; may be of functioning type or not, as well as the findings of 99mTc-MIBI, and the intraoperative use of gamma probe to assess all the possible sites where could be hyperproductive glands of parathyroid hormone. We describe features of management, safety, and administration of radiological agent during the immediate preoperative period, as well as use of gamma probe during intervention. Evolution over follow-up is reported. This case represents the third patient operated on from hyperthyroidism by radio-guided surgery in our center, which introduced this technique in our country.

  12. [Markers of brain tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, R; Pezzotta, S; Bernini, F; Racagni, G

    1984-05-19

    Biological markers of tumors are compounds or enzymatic activities measurable in body fluids. Their presence or concentration must be linked to tumoral growth. The markers of the central nervous system tumors are detected in CSF. Alpha-feto-protein, carcinoembryonic antigen, human chorionic gonadotropin, adenohypophyseal peptide hormones, enzymes, etc., have found some application in the early diagnosis of leptomeningeal metastasis. Other applications involve the early detection and recurrency of primary brain tumors, as well as the evaluation of efficacy of their therapy. The tests based on the CSF content of desmosterol and polyamines have been studied extensively. Their rationale is discussed and specificity, sensitivity, efficiency and predictive value are considered. Experimental results concerning a new possible biochemical marker, based on CSF concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, are reported.

  13. Tumor immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, W. den

    1987-01-01

    Tumor immunology, the use of immunological techniques for tumor diagnosis and approaches to immunotherapy of cancer are topics covered in this multi-author volume. Part A, 'Tumor Immunology', deals with present views on tumor-associated antigens, the initiation of immune reactions of tumor cells, effector cell killing, tumor cells and suppression of antitumor immunity, and one chapter dealing with the application of mathematical models in tumor immunology. Part B, 'Tumor Diagnosis and Imaging', concerns the use of markers to locate the tumor in vivo, for the histological diagnosis, and for the monitoring of tumor growth. In Part C, 'Immunotherapy', various experimental approaches to immunotherapy are described, such as the use of monoclonal antibodies to target drugs, the use of interleukin-2 and the use of drugs inhibiting suppression. In the final section, the evaluation, a pathologist and a clinician evaluate the possibilities and limitations of tumor immunology and the extent to which it is useful for diagnosis and therapy. refs.; figs.; tabs

  14. Glomus tumor of penis- A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri S. Kate

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glomus tumors are rare, painful, and benign soft tissue tumors of the skin arising from the glomus body, an arteriovenous thermoregulatory structure. This lesion is usually found on the extremities. Glomus tumor involving the external genital organs including penis is extremely rare. Until now, only few cases have been reported in the available literature. A 22 year old male patient presented with a painful nodule over the penis. The pathologic diagnosis was glomus tumor of the glans penis. We report herewith a case of glomus tumor of penis diagnosed on histopathologic examination. Glomus tumor, being a benign neoplasm, complete extirpation of the glomus tumor is the treatment of choice.

  15. Scalloped a member of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway controls mushroom body size in Drosophila brain by non-canonical regulation of neuroblast proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohith, Basavanahalli Nanjundaiah; Shyamala, Baragur Venkatanarayanasetty

    2017-12-15

    Cell proliferation, growth and survival are three different basic processes which converge at determining a fundamental property -the size of an organism. Scalloped (Sd) is the first characterised transcriptional partner to Yorkie (Yki), the downstream effector of the Hippo pathway which is a highly potential and evolutionarily conserved regulator of organ size. Here we have studied the hypomorphic effect of sd on the development of Mushroom Bodies (MBs) in Drosophila brain. We show that, sd non-function results in an increase in the size of MBs. We demonstrate that, sd regulation on MB size operates through multiple routes. Sd expressed in the differentiated MB neurons, imposes non-cell autonomous repression on the proliferation of MB precursor cells, and Sd expression in the MB neuroblasts (NB) cell autonomously represses mushroom body neuroblast (MBNB) proliferation. Further Sd in Kenyon cells (KCs) imparts a cell autonomous restriction on their growth. Our findings are distinctive because, while the classical sd loss of function phenotypes in eye, wing and lymph gland are reported as loss of tissue or reduced organ size, the present study shows that, Sd inactivation in the developing MB, promotes precursor cell proliferation and results in an increase in the organ size. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The expanding role of stereotactic body radiation therapy in oligometastatic solid tumors: What do we know and where are we going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Julian C; Salama, Joseph K

    2017-01-01

    The spectrum hypothesis posits that there are distinct clinical states of metastatic progression. Early data suggest that aggressive treatment of more biologically indolent metastatic disease, characterized by metastases limited in number and destination organ, may offer an opportunity to alter the disease course, potentially allowing for longer survival, delay of systemic therapy, or even cure. The development of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has opened new avenues for the treatment of oligometastatic disease. Early data support the use of SBRT for treating oligometastases in a number of organs, with promising rates of treated metastasis control and overall survival. Ongoing investigation is required to definitively establish benefit, determine the appropriate treatment regimen, refine patient selection, and incorporate SBRT with systemic therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tumor vaccines:

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Mojca; Ihan, Alojz

    2006-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regirrcents. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tccmor aaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which imrrtune tol...

  18. Glomus Tumor of the Toe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, Robert L B; Sangueza, Omar P; Schwartz, Gregory A

    2017-05-01

    A glomus tumor is an uncommon, predominantly benign, neoplastic lesion that primarily involves a thermoregulatory microvascular apparatus, the glomus body. Although these lesions can occur anywhere in the body, the subungual tissue of the hand represents the most common presentation site. Glomus tumors are not often encountered in the foot. Symptoms traditionally include the classic triad of pain, pressure, and cold sensitivity. This case report describes a variant location for a glomus tumor in the subcuticular tissue adjacent to the medial middle phalanx of the second toe. The nonsubungual location for this presentation should prompt the inclusion of glomus tumor in a digital soft-tissue lesion differential diagnosis. The lesion was excised surgically and was subsequently diagnosed histopathologically as a glomus tumor.

  19. Breast Tumor Angiogenesis and Tumor-Associated Macrophages: Histopathologist's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewe Seng Ch'ng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Much progress has been made since the conceptualization of tumor angiogenesis—the induction of growth of new blood vessels by tumor—as a salient feature of clinically significant primary or metastatic cancers. From a practicing histopathologist's point of view, we appraise the application of this concept in breast cancer with particular reference to the evaluation of proangiogenic factors and the assessment of new microvessels in histopathological examination. Recently, much focus has also been centered on the active roles played by tumor-associated macrophages in relation to tumor angiogenesis. We review the literature; many data supporting this facet of tumor angiogenesis were derived from the breast cancer models. We scrutinize the large body of clinical evidence exploring the link between the tumor-associated macrophages and breast tumor angiogenesis and discuss particularly the methodology and limitations of incorporating such an assessment in histopathological examination.

  20. Tumors and tumor-like lesions; Tumoren und tumoraehnliche Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koesling, S.; Stoevesandt, D. [Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany); Knipping, S. [Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen-, Ohrenheilkunde, Kopf- und Halschirurgie, Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Tumors and tumor-like lesions are rare diseases in the paranasal sinuses. There is a great variety of histological types, but only a small number of morphological patterns on imaging. Histology is an important point in therapeutic planning. In most cases it is obtained by sampling, which is not as difficult in the sinonasal area as in other regions of the body. The main task of imaging is an exact estimation of the extent and spread of a lesion. This article discusses the possibilities and limitations of CT and MRI in the assessment of the dignity and spread of paranasal tumors and tumor-like lesions in consideration of necessary therapeutic information. Additionally, an overview of features on imaging of different paranasal tumors and tumor-like lesions is given. (orig.)

  1. Neuroendocrine tumors and smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Miličević

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine cells are dispersed around the body and can be found within the gastrointestinal system, lungs, larynx, thymus, thyroid, adrenal, gonads, skin and other tissues. These cells form the so-called ''diffuse neuroendocrine system'' and tumors arising from them are defined as neuroendocrine tumors (NETs. The traditional classification of NETs based on their embryonic origin includes foregut tumors (lung, thymus, stomach, pancreas and duodenum, midgut tumors (beyond the ligament of Treitz of the duodenum to the proximal transverse colon and hindgut tumors (distal colon and rectum. NETs at each site are biologically and clinically distinct from their counterparts at other sites. Symptoms in patients with early disease are often insidious in onset, leading to a delay in diagnosis. The majority of these tumors are thus diagnosed at a stage at which the only curative treatment, radical surgical intervention, is no longer an option. Due to the increasing incidence and mortality, many studies have been conducted in order to identify risk factors for the development of NETs. Still, little is known especially when it comes to preventable risk factors such as smoking. This review will focus on smoking and its contribution to the development of different subtypes of NETs.

  2. Animal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    There are few trained veterinary radiation oncologists and the expense of facilities has limited the extent to which this modality is used. In recent years, a few cobalt teletherapy units and megavoltage x-ray units have been employed in larger veterinary institutions. In addition, some radiation oncologists of human medical institutions are interested and willing to cooperate with veterinarians in the treatment of animal tumors. Carefully designed studies of the response of animal tumors to new modalities serve two valuable purposes. First, these studies may lead to improved tumor control in companion animals. Second, these studies may have important implications to the improvement of therapy of human tumors. Much remains to be learned of animal tumor biology so that appropriate model systems can be described for such studies. Many of the latter studies can be sponsored by agencies interested in the improvement of cancer management

  3. Stereotactic body radiotherapy with a focal boost to the MRI-visible tumor as monotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer: early results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluwini, Shafak; Rooij, Peter van; Hoogeman, Mischa; Kirkels, Wim; Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine; Bangma, Chris

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that prostate cancer (PC) cells are more sensitive to high fraction dose in hypofractionation schemes. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as monotherapy is established to be a good treatment option for PC using extremely hypofractionated schemes. This hypofractionation can also be achieved with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We report results on toxicity, PSA response, and quality of life (QOL) in patients treated with SBRT for favorable-risk PC. Over the last 4 years, 50 hormone-naïve patients with low- and intermediate-risk PC were treated with SBRT to a total dose of 38 Gy delivered in four daily fractions of 9.5 Gy. An integrated boost to 11 Gy per fraction was applied to the dominant lesion if visible on MRI. Toxicity and QoL was assessed prospectively using validated questionnaires. Median follow-up was 23 months. The 2-year actuarial biochemical control rate was 100%. Median PSA nadir was 0.6 ng/ml. Median International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) was 9/35 before treatment, with a median increase of 4 at 3 months and remaining stable at 13/35 thereafter. The EORTC/RTOG toxicity scales showed grade 2 and 3 gastrointestinal (GI) acute toxicity in 12% and 2%, respectively. The late grade 2 GI toxicity was 3% during 24 months FU. Genitourinary (GU) grade 2, 3 toxicity was seen in 15%, 8%, in the acute phase and 10%, 6% at 24 months, respectively. The urinary, bowel and sexual domains of the EORTC-PR25 scales recovered over time, showing no significant changes at 24 months post-treatment. SBRT to 38 Gy in 4 daily fractions for low- and intermediate-risk PC patients is feasible with low acute and late genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Longer follow-up preferably within randomized studies, is required to compare these results with standard fractionation schemes

  4. Circumferential or sectored beam arrangements for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of primary lung tumors: Effect on target and normal-structure dose-volume metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Mara W.; Kato, Catherine M.; Carson, Kelly M.P.; Matsunaga, Nathan M.; Arao, Robert F.; Doss, Emily J.; McCracken, Charles L.; Meng, Lu Z.; Chen, Yiyi; Laub, Wolfram U.; Fuss, Martin; Tanyi, James A.

    2013-01-01

    To compare 2 beam arrangements, sectored (beam entry over ipsilateral hemithorax) vs circumferential (beam entry over both ipsilateral and contralateral lungs), for static-gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery techniques with respect to target and organs-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume metrics, as well as treatment delivery efficiency. Data from 60 consecutive patients treated using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) formed the basis of this study. Four treatment plans were generated per data set: IMRT/VMAT plans using sectored (-s) and circumferential (-c) configurations. The prescribed dose (PD) was 60 Gy in 5 fractions to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (maximum PTV dose ∼ 150% PD) for a 6-MV photon beam. Plan conformality, R 50 (ratio of volume circumscribed by the 50% isodose line and the PTV), and D 2 cm (D max at a distance ≥2 cm beyond the PTV) were evaluated. For lungs, mean doses (mean lung dose [MLD]) and percent V 30 /V 20 /V 10 /V 5 Gy were assessed. Spinal cord and esophagus D max and D 5 /D 50 were computed. Chest wall (CW) D max and absolute V 30 /V 20 /V 10 /V 5 Gy were reported. Sectored SBRT planning resulted in significant decrease in contralateral MLD and V 10 /V 5 Gy , as well as contralateral CW D max and V 10 /V 5 Gy (all p max and D 5 /D 50 for the spinal cord with sectored planning did not reach statistical significance for static-gantry IMRT, although VMAT metrics did show a statistically significant decrease (all p 50 significantly improved with IMRT-s/VMAT-c (p 2 cm significantly improved with VMAT-c (p < 0.001). Plan delivery efficiency improved with sectored technique (p < 0.001); mean monitor unit (MU)/cGy of PD decreased from 5.8 ± 1.9 vs 5.3 ± 1.7 (IMRT) and 2.7 ± 0.4 vs 2.4 ± 0.3 (VMAT). The sectored configuration achieves unambiguous dosimetric advantages over circumferential arrangement in terms

  5. Circumferential or sectored beam arrangements for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of primary lung tumors: Effect on target and normal-structure dose-volume metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Mara W. [Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA (United States); Department of Physics, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA (United States); Kato, Catherine M. [Macalester College, St. Paul, MN (United States); Carson, Kelly M.P. [The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Matsunaga, Nathan M. [Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Arao, Robert F. [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Doss, Emily J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Portland, OR (United States); McCracken, Charles L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Meng, Lu Z. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Chen, Yiyi [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Laub, Wolfram U.; Fuss, Martin [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Tanyi, James A., E-mail: tanyij@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To compare 2 beam arrangements, sectored (beam entry over ipsilateral hemithorax) vs circumferential (beam entry over both ipsilateral and contralateral lungs), for static-gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery techniques with respect to target and organs-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume metrics, as well as treatment delivery efficiency. Data from 60 consecutive patients treated using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) formed the basis of this study. Four treatment plans were generated per data set: IMRT/VMAT plans using sectored (-s) and circumferential (-c) configurations. The prescribed dose (PD) was 60 Gy in 5 fractions to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (maximum PTV dose ∼ 150% PD) for a 6-MV photon beam. Plan conformality, R{sub 50} (ratio of volume circumscribed by the 50% isodose line and the PTV), and D{sub 2} {sub cm} (D{sub max} at a distance ≥2 cm beyond the PTV) were evaluated. For lungs, mean doses (mean lung dose [MLD]) and percent V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} Gy were assessed. Spinal cord and esophagus D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} were computed. Chest wall (CW) D{sub max} and absolute V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} were reported. Sectored SBRT planning resulted in significant decrease in contralateral MLD and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy}, as well as contralateral CW D{sub max} and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} (all p < 0.001). Nominal reductions of D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} for the spinal cord with sectored planning did not reach statistical significance for static-gantry IMRT, although VMAT metrics did show a statistically significant decrease (all p < 0.001). The respective measures for esophageal doses were significantly lower with sectored planning (p < 0.001). Despite comparable dose conformality, irrespective of planning configuration, R{sub 50} significantly improved with IMRT

  6. Tumor Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... only a small number of people will test positive for the disease who do not have it—in other words, it will result in very few false-positive results. Although tumor markers are extremely useful in ...

  7. Tumor Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peer Review and Funding Outcomes Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance Manage Your Award Grants Management Contacts Monitoring ... may require immediate or more aggressive treatment. The importance of tumor grade in planning treatment and determining ...

  8. Solid-pseudo papillary tumor of the pancreas: Frantz's tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Bruno Righi Rodrigues de; Moreira, Reni Cecilia Lopes; Campos, Marcelo Esteves Chaves

    2010-01-01

    The pseudo papillary solid tumor of the pancreas, also known as Frantz's tumor, is a rare disease, taking place in approximately 0.17% to 2.7% of non-endocrine tumors of the pancreas. Recently, the increase of its incidence has been noted with more than two-thirds of the total cases described in the last 10 years. A possible explanation is a greater knowledge of the disease and a greater uniformity of conceptualization in the last years. Generally, it affects young adult females. In most of the series, the tumor principally attacks the body and tail of the pancreas. The objective of the present report is to present the diagnostic and therapeutic option used in this rare pancreatic tumor of low-grade malignancy. (author)

  9. Urinary hydroxyproline excretion as a marker of bone metastasis in prostatic cancer. 2. Correlation between extent of metastatic lesions in whole body bone scintigraphy of patients with prostatic cancer and tumor markers in blood and urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Shin-ichi; Rinsho, Kenji (Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1984-01-01

    In 25 patients with prostatic cancer confirmed histologically, 24 patients had bone metastasis on the whole body bone scintigraphy. The extent of bone metastasis was estimated quantitatively by the computerized digitizer. At the same time, the number of the metastatic lesions was counted. The correlations between the area of metastatic lesions on the sup(99m)Tc-MDP bone scintigrams and ESR, LDH, total acid phosphatase, prostatic acid phosphatase, ALP and urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were further investigated. The number of the metastatic lesions was also investigated with the same tumor markers. The results are as follows: 1) The extent of the metastatic lesions was showed more accurately by the area measured with the computerized digitalizer than by the number of metastatic lesions. 2) The correlation between the area of metastatic lesions and serum ALP levels was relatively high (..gamma.. = 0.75). But almost all were within normal limits. 3) As for the relation between the area of the metastatic lesions and the urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels, the correlation was high (..gamma.. = 0.78). And the hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were almost over the upper limit. Therefore, the urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine was considered as a good marker of the extent of bone metastasis.

  10. Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search Menu Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr Instagram LinkedIn Brain Tumor Information | News & Blog Our Mission Our History Mission Leadership & Staff Financials Careers News & Blog Contact Us Donate Now Our Impact Our Impact Recent News News & ...

  11. [Radiation therapy for malignant tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shumei; Konishi, Koji

    2008-04-01

    Radiation therapy uses ionizing radiation to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors, with consideration to minimize harmful damages to health tissues. About 30% of all people with cancer are treated with radiation therapy, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy. Radiation therapy may be internal or external. In brachytheraphy as the internal radiation therapy the radioisotope is implanted into or near the tumor by tubes as the container. And it is often used for patients with the tongue cancer. External radiation, the type most often used, comes from a machine outside the body. It is usually used for shrinking tumors with bony invasions such as gingival cancer and improving the pain in patients with bony metastasis. For the primary bone tumor the radiation therapy is not always used because the radiosensitivity of the almost primary bone tumor is low.

  12. Mediastinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canizares, Claudio; Araujo, Ivan; Rodriguez, Amparo; Robles, Wilson; Simba, Catalina

    2005-01-01

    In our practice the mediastinal tumors are infrequent. The mediastinum is the portion of the thoracic cavity that contains numerous organs and structures which makes a crossroad for the diagnostic process. Within which congenital cysts, inflammatory and benign tumors, malignant neoplasms may develop. In the superior compartment are found: thymoma and thymic cysts, germ cell tumors, thyroid lesions, parathyroid adenomas, malignant lymphomas, paragangliomas, hemangiomas, lipomas, and inflammatory lesions such as fibrosing mediastinitis. In the middle portion: pericardial cysts, bronchial cysts, malignant lymphomas. In the posterior region: neurogenic tumors such as Shawnomas, neurofibromas, ganglioneuroblastomas, neuroblastomas, paragangliomas, and gastro enteric cysts. We describe two cases. One of a female patient with a prominent tumor in the anterior compartment of the mediastinum, detected by the x-ray films. Initially a cardiac lesion was excluded by echographic, angiographic studies. The biopsy exhibited a prominent fibrosis that suggested fibrosing mediastinitis (sclerosing). Whoever the immunohistochemical phenotype was positive for lambda chains, determining the diagnosis of lymphoma. The other case is of a young male with a thymoma associated to a pure red cell aplasia, which was the initial clinical symptom. Computerized tomography and thyroid scintigraphy was used. (The author)

  13. Imaging of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaensler, E.H.L.

    1995-01-01

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.)

  14. Biological stoichiometry in tumor micro-environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Kareva

    Full Text Available Tumors can be viewed as evolving ecological systems, in which heterogeneous populations of cancer cells compete with each other and somatic cells for space and nutrients within the ecosystem of the human body. According to the growth rate hypothesis (GRH, increased phosphorus availability in an ecosystem, such as the tumor micro-environment, may promote selection within the tumor for a more proliferative and thus potentially more malignant phenotype. The applicability of the GRH to tumor growth is evaluated using a mathematical model, which suggests that limiting phosphorus availability might promote intercellular competition within a tumor, and thereby delay disease progression. It is also shown that a tumor can respond differently to changes in its micro-environment depending on the initial distribution of clones within the tumor, regardless of its initial size. This suggests that composition of the tumor as a whole needs to be evaluated in order to maximize the efficacy of therapy.

  15. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nursing, or cause a man to lose his sex drive or lower his sperm count. Pituitary tumors often go undiagnosed because their symptoms resemble those of so many other more common diseases. × Definition The pituitary is a small, bean-sized gland ...

  16. Nephrogenic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesbauer, P.

    2008-01-01

    Nephroblastomas are the most common malignant renal tumors in childhood. According to the guidelines of the SIOP (Societe Internationale d'Oncologie Pediatrique) and GPOH (Gesellschaft fuer Paediatrische Onkologie und Haematologie) pre-operative chemotherapy can be started without histological confirmation and thus initial imaging studies, in particular ultrasound, play an outstanding role for diagnostic purposes

  17. Imaging probe for tumor malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Hiraoka, Hasahiro

    2009-02-01

    Solid tumors possess unique microenvironments that are exposed to chronic hypoxic conditions ("tumor hypoxia"). Although more than half a century has passed since it was suggested that tumor hypoxia correlated with poor treatment outcomes and contributed to cancer recurrence, a fundamental solution to this problem has yet to be found. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is the main transcription factor that regulates the cellular response to hypoxia. It induces various genes whose functions are strongly associated with malignant alteration of the entire tumor. The cellular changes induced by HIF-1 are extremely important targets of cancer therapy, particularly in therapy against refractory cancers. Imaging of the HIF-1-active microenvironment is therefore important for cancer therapy. To image HIF-1activity in vivo, we developed a PTD-ODD fusion protein, POHA, which was uniquely labeled with near-infrared fluorescent dye at the C-terminal. POHA has two functional domains: protein transduction domain (PTD) and VHL-mediated protein destruction motif in oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of the alpha subunit of HIF-1 (HIF-1α). It can therefore be delivered to the entire body and remain stabilized in the HIF-1-active cells. When it was intravenously injected into tumor-bearing mice, a tumor-specific fluorescence signal was detected in the tumor 6 h after the injection. These results suggest that POHA can be used an imaging probe for tumor malignancy.

  18. Tumor-induced osteomalacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Florenzano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome clinically characterized by bone pain, fractures and muscle weakness. It is caused by tumoral overproduction of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23 that acts primarily at the proximal renal tubule, decreasing phosphate reabsorption and 1α-hydroxylation of 25 hydroxyvitamin D, thus producing hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia. Lesions are typically small, benign mesenchymal tumors that may be found in bone or soft tissue, anywhere in the body. In up to 60% of these tumors, a fibronectin-1(FN1 and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1 fusion gene has been identified that may serve as a tumoral driver. The diagnosis is established by the finding of acquired chronic hypophosphatemia due to isolated renal phosphate wasting with concomitant elevated or inappropriately normal blood levels of FGF23 and decreased or inappropriately normal 1,25-OH2-Vitamin D (1,25(OH2D. Locating the tumor is critical, as complete removal is curative. For this purpose, a step-wise approach is recommended, starting with a thorough medical history and physical examination, followed by functional imaging. Suspicious lesions should be confirmed by anatomical imaging, and if needed, selective venous sampling with measurement of FGF23. If the tumor is not localized, or surgical resection is not possible, medical therapy with phosphate and active vitamin D is usually successful in healing the osteomalacia and reducing symptoms. However, compliance is often poor due to the frequent dosing regimen and side effects. Furthermore, careful monitoring is needed to avoid complications such us secondary/tertiary hyperparathyroidism, hypercalciuria, and nephrocalcinosis. Novel therapeutical approaches are being developed for TIO patients, such as image-guided tumor ablation and medical treatment with the anti-FGF23 monoclonal antibody KRN23 or anti FGFR medications. The case of a patient with TIO is presented to

  19. Human brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindel, W.; Luyten, P.R.; Herholz, K.; Marien, J.H.; Kugel, H.; Bunke, J.; Heiss, W.D.; Hollander, J.A. den.

    1990-01-01

    It has been postulated that malignant tumors show increased anaerobic glycolysis. Areas of increased glycolysis could be identified by detection of increased glucose uptake and lactate production. The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the most active parts in human brain tumors can be localized by correlating findings of proton (H-1) spectroscopic imaging and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Localized H-1 MR spectroscopy was performed with a clinical 1.5-T whole-body MR system. In 15 patients with CH-1 gliomas, the spatial distribution of choline-containing compounds, creatine, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), and lactate was displayed as spectroscopic images. Those metabolite maps were correlated with conventional MR images and, in five cases, with corresponding PET sections

  20. Oral Administration of Aloe vera (L.) Burm. f. (Xanthorrhoeaceae) and Honey Improves the Host Body Composition and Modulates Proteolysis Through Reduction of Tumor Progression and Oxidative Stress in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasin, Rebeka; de Andrade, Rafael Siqueira; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative stress has a dual role in cancer; it is linked with tumorigenic events and host wasting, as well as senescence and apoptosis. Researchers have demonstrated the importance of coadjuvant therapies in cancer treatment, and Aloe vera and honey have immunomodulatory, anticancer, and antioxidant properties. The preventive and therapeutic effects of Aloe vera (L.) Burm. f. (Xanthorrhoeaceae) and honey in tumor progression and host wasting were analyzed in Walker 256 carcinoma-bearing rats. The animals were distributed into the following groups: C=control-untreated, W=tumor-untreated, WA=treated after tumor induction, A=control-treated, AW=treated before tumor induction, and AWA=treated before and after tumor induction. Proteolysis and oxidative stress were analyzed in the tumor, liver, muscle, and myocardial tissues. The results suggest that the Aloe vera and honey treatment affect the tumor and host by different mechanisms; the treatment-modulated host wasting and cachexia, whereas it promoted oxidative stress and damage in tumor tissues, particularly in a therapeutic context (WA).

  1. Cowden Syndrome and Concomitant Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, Seppo W; Ringholm, Lene; Dali, Christine I

    2015-01-01

    Cowden Syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder. Patients with Cowden Syndrome are at increased risk of various benign and malignant neoplasms in breast, endometrium, thyroid, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary system. Neuroendocrine tumors are ubiquitous neoplasms that may...... occur anywhere in the human body. Bronchopulmonary neuroendocrine tumors include four different histological subtypes, among these, typical and atypical pulmonary carcinoids. No association between Cowden Syndrome and neuroendocrine tumors has previously been described. We present two cases of Cowden...

  2. Wilms Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the disease. Tests that might be used include: Ultrasonography (ultrasound or US) , usually the first tool used ... parts of the body; most commonly, the lungs, liver, bone, and/or brain. About 10% are stage ...

  3. Pituitary tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that directly affect body tissues, such as bones and the breast milk glands. The pituitary hormones include: Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) Growth hormone (GH) Prolactin Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) Luteinizing ...

  4. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  5. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Headaches Seizures Memory Depression Mood Swings & Cognitive Changes Fatigue Other Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning About Us ...

  6. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  7. Adult Central Nervous System Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)-Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ... body. Often, tumors found in the brain have started somewhere else in the body and spread to ...

  8. Body Hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... girlshealth.gov/ Home Body Puberty Body hair Body hair Even before you get your first period , you ... removing pubic hair Ways to get rid of hair top Removing body hair can cause skin irritation, ...

  9. Glomus Tumor of Thumb Occurring at Unusual Location

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glomus Tumor of Thumb Occurring at Unusual Location. Samir Dwidmuthe, Amit Nemade, Santhosh Rai1. INTRODUCTION. Wood[1] first described glomus tumors in 1812 as painful subcutaneous tubercles. These are benign tumors that arise from one of the subcutaneous glomus bodies. These account for approximately ...

  10. Malignant Glomus Tumor of the Peritoneum: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baleato-González, Sandra; García-Figueiras, Roberto; Trujillo-Ariza, Maria Virginia [Department of Radiology, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Choupana s/n, 15701 Santiago de Compostela (A Coruña) (Spain); Carrera-Álvarez, Juan Jose [Department of Pathology, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Choupana s/n, 15701 Santiago de Compostela (A Coruña) (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    Glomus tumors are usually benign tumors that occur in the skin and soft tissues of the extremities. Visceral locations, such as stomach, intestines or lung, are extremely rare because glomus bodies are rare or absent in these organs. This report describes our experience in a 47-year-old woman diagnosed with a peritoneal malignant glomus tumor. This finding has not been previously reported.

  11. Radiation-induced tumors in transplanted ovaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covelli, V.; Di Majo, V.; Bassani, B.; Metalli, P.; Silini, G.

    1982-01-01

    A comparison was made of tumor induction in the ovaries of whole-body-irradiation mice (250-kV X rays, doses of 0.25-4.00 Gy) or in ovaries irradiated in vivo and then transplanted intramuscularly into castrated syngeneic hosts. The form of the dose-induction relationships was similar in the two cases, showing a steeply rising branch at doses up to 0.75 Gy followed by a maximum and an elevated plateau up to 4.00 Gy. A higher incidence of tumors in transplanted organs was apparent for doses up to the maximum, which was attributed to castration-induced hormonal imbalance. Specific death rate analysis of mice dying with ovarian tumors showed that in this system radiation acts essentially by decreasing tumor latency. Ovarian tumors were classified in various histological types and their development in time was followed by serial sacrifice. Separate analysis of death rate of animals carrying different tumor classes allowed further resolution of the various components of the tumor induction phenomenon. It was thus possible to show that the overall death rate analysis masks a true effect of induction of granulosa cell tumors in whole-body-irradiation animals. The transplantation technique offers little advantage for the study of radiation induction of ovarian tumor

  12. Foreign Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SearchingPediatrics.com Pediatrics Common Questions, Quick Answers Foreign Body Donna D'Alessandro, M.D. Lindsay Huth, B. ... I call the doctor? What is a foreign body? A foreign body is when an object is ...

  13. Multimodal imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1-associated nerve sheath tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamon, J.; Adam, G.; Mautner, V.F.; Derlin, T.

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a neurogenetic disorder. Individuals with NF1 may develop a variety of benign and malignant tumors of which peripheral nerve sheath tumors represent the most frequent entity. Plexiform neurofibromas may demonstrate a locally destructive growth pattern, may cause severe symptoms and may undergo malignant transformation into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents the reference standard for detection of soft tissue tumors in NF1. It allows for identification of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas, for assessment of local tumor extent, and for evaluation of whole-body tumor burden on T2-weighted imaging. Multiparametric MRI may provide a comprehensive characterization of different tissue properties of peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and may identify parameters associated with malignant transformation. Due to the absence of any radiation exposure, whole-body MRI may be used for serial follow-up of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission-tomography (FDG PET/CT) allows a highly sensitive and specific detection of MPNST, and should be used in case of potential malignant transformation of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor. PET/CT provides a sensitive whole-body tumor staging. The use of contrast-enhanced CT for diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumors is limited to special indications. To obtain the most precise readings, optimized examination protocols and dedicated radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians familiar with the complex and variable morphologies of peripheral nerve sheath tumors are required.

  14. Half body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartelink, H.; Battermann, J.; Hart, G.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-one patients with complaints of severe pain from disseminated breast cancer were treated with half body irradiation with a single dose of 600 to 800 rad. All of them had a relief of pain for periods ranging from 14 to 280 days, with a median duration of 101 days. The objective effects of a single radiation dose was studied in 15 patients with lung metastases. The growth delay observed in these patients was of the same order as the period of pain relief observed in breast cancer patients after half body irradiation. In general a longer lasting palliation was obtained in patients with slowly growing tumors

  15. Tumors and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. ...

  16. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  17. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... navigate their brain tumor diagnosis. WATCH AND SHARE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Central Nervous System Cancers Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  18. Patterns of tumor initiation in choroidal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Judge, H; Gragoudas, E S; Seddon, J M; Egan, K M

    2000-07-15

    This study attempts to document the occurrence of tumors with respect to clock hour location and distance from the macula and to evaluate tumor location in relation to retinal topography and light dose distribution on the retinal sphere. Analysis of patterns of tumor initiation may provide new evidence to clarify the controversy regarding the possible light-related etiology of choroidal melanoma. Incident cases of choroidal and ciliary body melanoma in Massachusetts residents diagnosed between 1984 and 1993 were the basis for analysis. Conventional fundus drawings and photos were used to assess the initiation site of each tumor. The initiation site was defined as the intersect between the largest tumor diameter and the largest perpendicular diameter of the tumor. Initiation sites were recorded using spherical coordinates. The retinal sphere was divided into 61 mutually exclusive sectors defined according to clock hour and anteroposterior distance from the macula. Rates of initiation were computed for each sector, overall, and according to gender and other clinical factors. Results were similar in left and right eyes; therefore, these were combined in analysis. Tumor initiation had a predilection for the macula (P iris color (P = 0.01). Tumor diameters were largest in the peripheral region of the fundus and smallest in the macular and ciliary body zone (P iris color (P = 0.84), or tumor diameter (P = 0.73). Results suggest that tumor initiation is not uniformly distributed, with rates of occurrence concentrated in the macular area and decreasing monotonically with distance from the macula to the ciliary body. This pattern is consistent with the retinal topography and correlates positively with the dose distribution of solar light on the retinal sphere.

  19. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  20. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  1. Awake craniotomy for tumor resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadali Attari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment of brain tumors, especially those located in the eloquent areas such as anterior temporal, frontal lobes, language, memory areas, and near the motor cortex causes high risk of eloquent impairment. Awake craniotomy displays major rule for maximum resection of the tumor with minimum functional impairment of the Central Nervous System. These case reports discuss the use of awake craniotomy during the brain surgery in Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. A 56-year-old woman with left-sided body hypoesthesia since last 3 months and a 25-year-old with severe headache of 1 month duration were operated under craniotomy for brain tumors resection. An awake craniotomy was planned to allow maximum tumor intraoperative testing for resection and neurologic morbidity avoidance. The method of anesthesia should offer sufficient analgesia, hemodynamic stability, sedation, respiratory function, and also awake and cooperative patient for different neurological test. Airway management is the most important part of anesthesia during awake craniotomy. Tumor surgery with awake craniotomy is a safe technique that allows maximal resection of lesions in close relationship to eloquent cortex and has a low risk of neurological deficit.

  2. Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisseler-Eckhoff, Annette, E-mail: Annette.Fisseler-Eckhoff@hsk-wiesbaden.de; Demes, Melanie [Department of Pathology und Cytology, Dr. Horst-Schmidt-Kliniken (HSK), Wiesbaden 65199 (Germany)

    2012-07-31

    Neuroendocrine tumors may develop throughout the human body with the majority being found in the gastrointestinal tract and bronchopulmonary system. Neuroendocrine tumors are classified according to the grade of biological aggressiveness (G1–G3) and the extent of differentiation (well-differentiated/poorly-differentiated). The well-differentiated neoplasms comprise typical (G1) and atypical (G2) carcinoids. Large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas as well as small cell carcinomas (G3) are poorly-differentiated. The identification and differentiation of atypical from typical carcinoids or large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas and small cell carcinomas is essential for treatment options and prognosis. Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors are characterized according to the proportion of necrosis, the mitotic activity, palisading, rosette-like structure, trabecular pattern and organoid nesting. The given information about the histopathological assessment, classification, prognosis, genetic aberration as well as treatment options of pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors are based on own experiences and reviewing the current literature available. Most disagreements among the classification of neuroendocrine tumor entities exist in the identification of typical versus atypical carcinoids, atypical versus large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas and large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas versus small cell carcinomas. Additionally, the classification is restricted in terms of limited specificity of immunohistochemical markers and possible artifacts in small biopsies which can be compressed in cytological specimens. Until now, pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors have been increasing in incidence. As compared to NSCLCs, only little research has been done with respect to new molecular targets as well as improving the classification and differential diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors of the lung.

  3. Malignant phyllodes breast tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa R. Shah-Patel, MD

    2017-01-01

    Malignant phyllodes tumor is a rare tumor of the breast occurring in females usually between the ages of 35 and 55 years. It is often difficult to distinguish benign from malignant phyllodes tumors from other benign entities such as fibroadenomas. This case presentation demonstrates a woman with malignant phyllodes tumor treated with mastectomy with abdominal skin flap reconstruction.

  4. Malignant phyllodes breast tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa R. Shah-Patel, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Malignant phyllodes tumor is a rare tumor of the breast occurring in females usually between the ages of 35 and 55 years. It is often difficult to distinguish benign from malignant phyllodes tumors from other benign entities such as fibroadenomas. This case presentation demonstrates a woman with malignant phyllodes tumor treated with mastectomy with abdominal skin flap reconstruction.

  5. Endocrine tumors other than thyroid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeichi, Norio; Dohi, Kiyohiko

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the tendency for the occurrence of tumors in the endocrine glands, other than the thyroid gland, in A-bomb survivors using both autopsy and clinical data. ABCC-RERF sample data using 4136 autopsy cases (1961-1977) revealed parathyroid tumors in 13 A-bomb survivors, including 3 with the associated hyperparathyroidism, with the suggestion of dose-dependent increase in the occurrence of tumors. Based on clinical data from Hiroshima University, 7 (46.7%) of 15 parathyroid tumors cases were A-bomb survivors. Data (1974-1987) from the Tumor Registry Committee (TRC) in Hiroshima Prefecture revealed that a relative risk of parathyroid tumors was 5.6 times higher in the entire group of A-bomb survivors and 16.2 times higher in the group of heavily exposed A-bomb survivors, suggesting the dose-dependent increase in their occurrence. Adrenal tumors were detected in 47 of 123 cases from the TRC data, and 15 (31.5%) of these 47 were A-bomb survivors. Particularly, 11 cases of adrenal tumors associated with Cushing syndrome included 6 A-bomb survivors (54.5%). The incidence of multiple endocrine gonadial tumors (MEGT) tended to be higher with increasing exposure doses; and the 1-9 rad group, the 10-99 rad group, and the 100 or more rad group had a risk of developing MEGT of 4.1, 5.7, and 7.1, respectively, relative to both the not-in the city group and the 0 rad group. These findings suggested that there is a correlation between A-bomb radiation and the occurrence of parathyroid tumors (including hyperparathyroidism), adrenal tumors associated with Cushing syndrome and MEGT (especially, the combined thyroid and ovarian tumors and the combined thyroid and parathyroid tumors). (N.K.)

  6. Supratentorial tumors; Supratentorielle Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, I.; Dillmann, K.; Roth, C.; Backens, M.; Reith, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Saarland, Homburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie

    2007-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a routine diagnostic measure for a suspected intracerebral mass. Computed tomography is usually also indicated. Further diagnostic procedures as well as the interpretation of the findings vary depending on the tumor location. This contribution discusses the symptoms and diagnostics for supratentorial tumors separated in relation to their intra- or extracranial location. Supratentorial tumors include astrocytoma, differentiated by their circumscribed and diffuse growth, ganglioglioma, ependyoma, neurocytoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET), oligodendroglioma, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNET), meningoangiomatosis, pineal tumors, hamartoma, lymphoma, craniopharyngeoma and metastases. The supratentorial extracranial tumors include the choroid plexus, colloid cysts, meningeoma, infantile myofibromatosis and lipoma. The most common subforms, especially of astrocytoma, will also be presented. (orig.)

  7. Pulmonary neuroendocrine (carcinoid) tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caplin, M E; Baudin, E; Ferolla, P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary carcinoids (PCs) are rare tumors. As there is a paucity of randomized studies, this expert consensus document represents an initiative by the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society to provide guidance on their management. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Bibliographical searches were...... carried out in PubMed for the terms 'pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors', 'bronchial neuroendocrine tumors', 'bronchial carcinoid tumors', 'pulmonary carcinoid', 'pulmonary typical/atypical carcinoid', and 'pulmonary carcinoid and diagnosis/treatment/epidemiology/prognosis'. A systematic review...

  8. [Wilms tumor in hemihypertrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, O; Wemmer, U

    1977-04-07

    The case of a 4-year-old boy with Wilms' tumor and hemihypertrophy is described. Wilms' tumors are frequently associated with congenital malformations of the urinary tract, with aniridia and hemihypertrophy. Hemihypertrophy is a relatively rare malformation (1:14000) in the common population, but in patients with Wilms' tumors its frequency is about 1:49. Besides Wilms' tumors tumors of the adrenal cortex and hepatoblastomas are frequently observed together with hemihypertrophy.

  9. Tumor-Derived Exosomes and Their Role in Tumor-Induced Immune Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa L. Whiteside

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-derived exosomes (TEX are emerging as critical components of an intercellular information network between the tumor and the host. The tumor escapes from the host immune system by using a variety of mechanisms designed to impair or eliminate anti-tumor immunity. TEX carrying a cargo of immunoinhibitory molecules and factors represent one such mechanism. TEX, which are present in all body fluids of cancer patients, deliver negative molecular or genetic signals to immune cells re-programming their functions. Although TEX can also stimulate immune activity, in the microenvironments dominated by the tumor, TEX tend to mediate immune suppression thus promoting tumor progression. The TEX content, in part resembling that of the parent cell, may serve as a source of cancer biomarkers. TEX also interfere with immune therapies. A better understanding of TEX and their contribution to cancer progression and cancer patients’ response to immune therapies represents a challenging new field of investigation.

  10. Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the tumor or abnormality within the body and define its exact size and shape. These images also ... imaging, computerized dose planning and radiation delivery. LINAC technology is much more common than Gamma Knife technology ...

  11. Body Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect body image Pre-baby body Pregnancy and eating disorders Looking for information on mental health conditions? Visit ... Mental health section. Fact sheets Anorexia nervosa Binge eating disorder Bulimia nervosa Cosmetics and your health Depression during ...

  12. Glomus Tumor of the Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Lee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundGlomus tumors were first described by Wood in 1812 as painful subcutaneous tubercles. It is an uncommon benign neoplasm involving the glomus body, an apparatus that involves in thermoregulation of cutaneous microvasculature. Glomus tumor constitutes 1%-5% of all hand tumors. It usually occurs at the subungual region and more commonly in aged women. Its classical clinical triad consists of pain, tenderness and temperature intolerance, especially cold sensitivity. This study reviews 15 cases of glomus tumor which were analyzed according to its anatomic location, surgical approach and histologic findings.MethodsFifteen patients with subungual glomus tumors of the hand operated on between January 2006 and March 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were evaluated preoperatively with standard physical examination including ice cube test and Love's test. Diagnostic imaging consisted of ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. All procedures were performed with tourniquet control under local anesthesia. Eleven patients underwent excision using the transungual approach, 3 patients using the volar approach and 1 patient using the lateral subperiosteal approach.ResultsTotal of 15 cases were reviewed. 11 tumors were located in the nail bed, 3 in the volar pulp and 1 in the radial aspect of the finger tip. After complete excision, patients remained asymptomatic in the immediate postoperative period. In the long term follow up, patients exhibited excellent cosmetic results with no recurrence.ConclusionsAccurate diagnosis should be made by physical, radiologic and pathologic examinations. Preoperative localization and complete extirpation is essential in preventing recurrence and subsequent nail deformity.

  13. The Calcifying Epithelial Odonogenic Tumor : Report of a Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hosaka Mitsuo [Dental Research Institute, School of Dentisty, Nippon Dental university, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-08-15

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm which was first described by Pindborg in 1955 and accounts for less than 1% of all odontogenic tumors. The tumor occurs primarily in the molar-premolar region of the mandible, and 52% of cases are associated with an unerupted tooth. The clinical feature is most commonly a slow-growing painless swelling. The tumor may show considerable radiographic variation and usually characteristic histopathologic features. In this study, we report a case of the calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor on the left mandibular body and ramus area in a 28-year-old male with a brief review of the concerned literatures.

  14. A importância da embolização pré-operatória no tratamento do tumor do corpo carotídeo: relato de caso e revisão da literatura The importance of preoperative embolization for the treatment of the carotid body tumor: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Marins Cavalcanti

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Os tumores do corpo carotídeo são neoplasias raras, que se originam dos pequenos órgãos quimio e barorreceptores localizados na adventícia da bifurcação da artéria carótida comum. Constituem-se uma doença de grande interesse para o cirurgião vascular, na medida em que crescem aderidos à adventícia dos vasos que compõem essa bifurcação. Por isso, sua cirurgia requer não só o conhecimento anatômico da região, mas também perfeito reconhecimento das técnicas de reconstrução vascular. Representam um problema especial quanto a seu manejo, devido à sua rica vascularização e intimidade com estruturas nobres da região cervical, como nervos e grandes vasos. Neste caso, apresentamos um homem com um tumor de corpo carotídeo aderido à carótida direita, diagnosticado por punção biópsia e tratado em dois tempos, sendo o primeiro por tratamento endovascular, realizando embolização percutânea do tumor, e, no segundo, a ressecção cirúrgica do mesmo, o que evidencia o tratamento combinado, segundo atual literatura.

  15. Hepatic tumors in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, J T

    2001-02-01

    Although they account for only 1% to 4% of solid tumors in children, hepatic tumors and pseudotumors offer a diagnostic challenge to the clinician seeing only an occasional case. Metastatic lesions such as neuroblastoma, Wilms' tumor, and lymphoma are the most common neoplasm seen in the liver, but 10 distinct primary tumors and pseudotumors of the liver occur with some regularity, and a few others may be seen rarely, including leiomyosarcoma, rhabdoid tumor, and endodermal sinus tumor. Five of these neoplasms--hepatoblastoma, infantile hemangio-endothelioma, mesenchymal hamartoma, undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma, and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the biliary tree--occur only in children and are the major focus of the article.

  16. Brain and Spinal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vessels. Also under investigation are ways to improve drug delivery to the tumor and to prevent the side- ... vessels. Also under investigation are ways to improve drug delivery to the tumor and to prevent the side- ...

  17. Glomus tumors in neurofibromatosis type 1: genetic, functional and clinical evidence of a novel association

    OpenAIRE

    Brems, Hilde; Park, Caroline; Maertens, Ophélia; Pemov, Alexander; Messiaen, Ludwine; Upadhyaya, Meena; Claes, Kathleen; Beert, Eline; Peeters, Kristel; Mautner, Victor; Sloan, Jennifer L.; Yao, Lawrence; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Sciot, Raf; Smet, Luc De

    2009-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common disorder that arises secondary to mutations in the tumor suppressor gene NF1. Glomus tumors are small, benign but painful tumors that originate from the glomus body, a thermoregulatory shunt concentrated in the fingers and toes. We report eleven individuals with NF1 who harbored 20 glomus tumors of the fingers and one in the toe; five individuals had multiple glomus tumors. We hypothesized that bi-allelic inactivation of NF1 underlies the pathogenesi...

  18. Aggressive malignant phyllodes tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Nathan Roberts; Dianne M. Runk

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Originally described in 1838 by Muller, phyllodes tumor is a rare fibroepithelial neoplasm which represents roughly 0.3–0.9% of all breast cancers. Phyllodes tumor are divided into benign, borderline and malignant histologic categories. Malignant phyllodes tumor represent anywhere from 10–30% of all phyllodes tumors. This group has both the potential to recur locally and metastasize, however not all malignant phyllodes behave this way. The challenge lays in predicting which tumo...

  19. Multiple Primary Tumors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... Multiple primary tumors occur in clinical practice causing diagnostic dilemma. It ... KEYWORDS: Carcinoid, colorectal cancer, metachronous, synchronous .... layer of the colon. The tumor cells are strongly positive to chromagranin and AE1/AE3. Features are those of carcinoid tumor of the colon. She was ...

  20. Granular Cell Tumor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Necrosis within the tumor was absent, no mitosis was. Granular cell tumors are seldom diagnosed identified in the section and the edges of the accurately clinically. The lesion in this case was sample were tumor free (Figure 2). mistaken for a sebaceous cyst and following ulceration resembled carcinoma of the vulvar.

  1. Malignant tumors of childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 34 papers about malignant tumors. some of the titles are: Invasive Cogenital Mesoblastic Nephroma, Leukemia Update, Unusual Perinatal Neoplasms, Lymphoma Update, Gonadal Germ Cell Tumors in Children, Nutritional Status and Cancer of Childhood, and Chemotherapy of Brain tumors in Children

  2. Soft tissue mixed tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiichi Hiraishi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Mixed tumors are relatively common in the skin and salivary glands, but extremely rare in soft tissues, often resulting in diagnostic problems. The occurrence of these tumors in the hand is especially limited. In this article we report the clinical, radiological, and histological features of a mixed tumor of the hypothenar region of the right hand.

  3. Tumor interstitial fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Olsen, Charlotta J.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) is a proximal fluid that, in addition to the set of blood soluble phase-borne proteins, holds a subset of aberrantly externalized components, mainly proteins, released by tumor cells and tumor microenvironment through various mechanisms, which include classical secr...

  4. Multiple Primary Tumors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... Multiple primary tumors occur in clinical practice causing diagnostic dilemma. It ... KEYWORDS: Carcinoid, colorectal cancer, metachronous, synchronous .... layer of the colon. The tumor cells are strongly positive to chromagranin and AE1/AE3. Features are those of carcinoid tumor of the colon. She was ...

  5. Renaissance in tumor immunotherapy: possible combination with phototherapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Michael R.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses the combination of non-toxic dyes and harmless visible light to produce highly toxic reactive oxygen species that destroy tumors. The ideal cancer treatment should target both the primary tumor and the metastases with minimal toxicity. This is best accomplished by educating the body's immune system to recognize the tumor as foreign so that after the primary tumor is destroyed, distant metastases will also be eradicated. PDT may accomplish this feat and stimulate long-term, specific anti-tumor immunity. PDT causes an acute inflammatory response, the rapid induction of large amounts of necrotic and apoptotic tumor cells, induction of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPS) including heat-shock proteins, stimulates tumor antigen presentation to naïve T-cells, and generation of cytotoxic T-cells that can destroy distant tumor metastases. By using various syngeneic mouse tumors in immunocompetent mice, we have studied specific PDT regimens related to tumor type as well as mouse genotype and phenotype. We have investigated the role of tumor-associated antigens in PDT-induced immune response by choosing mouse tumors that express: model defined antigen, naturally-occurring cancer testis antigen, and oncogenic virus-derived antigen. We studied the synergistic combination of low-dose cyclophosphamide and PDT that unmasks the PDT-induced immune response by depleting the immunosuppressive T-regulatory cells. PDT combined with immunostimulants (toll-like receptor ligands) can synergistically maximize the generation of anti-tumor immunity by activating dendritic cells and switching immunosuppressive macrophages to a tumor rejection phenotype. Tumors expressing defined tumor-associated antigens with known MHC class I peptides allows anti-tumor immunity to be quantitatively compared.

  6. CLINICAL ASPECTS OF TRANSMISSIBLE VENEREAL TUMOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Sá

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The transmissible venereal tumor is among the main diseases that affect domestic animals of the Canidae family. Abandoned animals are the main transmitters of the disease, which is highly contagious; most of the injuries are commonly found on animals genital organs and faces. This is a tumor without any involvement with an infectious agent, tumor cells are transferred from a sick animal to a healthy animal through natural breeding or direct contact of the lesions with other body parts. The disease has no predisposition for breeding, sex and species, therefore possibly affecting all canids although there are more reports on stray animals.The TVT lesions have cauliflower appearance and may be pedunculated, papillary or multilobulated, with hemorrhagic and crumbly aspect. The tumor can have benign or malignant potential, being the second most frequently commonly reported, wherein according to its potential raise the difficulty of the treatment or not.

  7. Cholecystokinin expression in tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F

    2016-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a classic gut hormone. CCK is also a complex system of peptides expressed in several molecular forms in enteroendocrine I cells, in cerebral and peripheral neurons, in cardiac myocytes and spermatozoa. CCK gene expression has now been found at protein or peptide level...... in different neuroendocrine tumors; cerebral gliomas and astrocytomas and specific pediatric tumors. Tumor hypersecretion of CCK was recently reported in a patient with a metastatic islet cell tumor and hypercholecystokininemia resulting in a novel tumor syndrome, the cholecystokininoma syndrome. This review...

  8. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambet eTeesalu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular zip code of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  9. Tumor-Penetrating Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC), contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor-homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR) motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies, and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is present in the

  10. PET and endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigo, P.; Belhocine, T.; Hustinx, R.; Foidart-Willems, J.

    2000-01-01

    The authors review the main indications of PET examination, and specifically of 18 FDG, in the assessment of endocrine tumors: of the thyroid, of the parathyroid, of the adrenal and of the pituitary glands. Neuroendocrine tumors, gastro-entero-pancreatic or carcinoid tumors are also under the scope. Usually, the most differentiated tumors show only poor uptake of the FDG as they have a weak metabolic and proliferative activity. In the assessment of endocrine tumors, FDG-PET should be used only after most specific nuclear examinations been performed. (author)

  11. Body punk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kevin

    BODYPUNK - A Treatise on male body builders and the meaning of the body in the shadow of an Anti Doping Campaign Based on a qualitative study, the thesis investigates the visual representation of the male bodybuilder found in the national anti doping campaign: ‗ "The hunt has begun" along...... with an analysis of the embodied meaning of men‘s bodybuilding....

  12. Effects of exercise on tumor physiology and metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line; Christensen, Jesper Frank; Hojman, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is a potent regulator of a range of physiological processes in most tissues. Solid epidemiological data show that exercise training can reduce disease risk and mortality for several cancer diagnoses, suggesting that exercise training may directly regulate tumor physiology and metabolism....... Here, we review the body of literature describing exercise intervention studies performed in rodent tumor models and elaborate on potential mechanistic effects of exercise on tumor physiology. Exercise has been shown to reduce tumor incidence, tumor multiplicity, and tumor growth across numerous......, exercise training has the potential to be a beneficial and integrated component of cancer management, but has yet to fully elucidate its potential. Understanding the mechanistic effects of exercise on tumor physiology is warranted. Insight into these mechanistic effects is emerging, but experimental...

  13. Stages of Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... markers . Most malignant germ cell tumors release tumor markers. The following tumor markers are used to detect extracranial germ cell tumors: ... testicular germ cell tumors, blood levels of the tumor markers help show if the tumor is a seminoma ...

  14. Signifying Bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of biosemiosis connect signifying bodies with their natural surroundings, cultural activities and subjective experiences. Health stretches all the way from the ecosocial surroundings, through the skin and into the self-organizing processes of every living cell. Signifying Bodies lays out a new approach to health...... and health care. Eschewing all forms of dualism, the authors emphasise the interdependency of how we act, think, feel and function. They advocate a relational turn in health care, in which bodies live and learn from suffering and care. In this view, health is inseparable from both living beings...

  15. Body Piercing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Body Piercing Posted under Health Guides . Updated 1 August 2017. + ... medical reasons why I should not get a piercing? Yes. There are medical conditions (see the list ...

  16. Characterizing intraocular tumors with photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Xue, Yafang; Gursel, Zeynep; Slimani, Naziha; Wang, Xueding; Demirci, Hakan

    2016-03-01

    Intraocular tumors are life-threatening conditions. Long-term mortality from uveal melanoma, which accounts for 80% of primary intraocular tumors, could be as high as 25% depending on the size, ciliary body involvement and extraocular extension. The treatments of intraocular tumors include eye-sparing approaches such as radiotherapy and thermotherapy, and the more aggressive enucleation. The accurate diagnosis of intraocular tumors is thereby critical in the management and follow-up of the patients. The diagnosis of intraocular tumors is usually based on clinical examination with acoustic backscattering based ultrasonography. By analyzing the high frequency fluctuations within the ultrasound (US) signals, microarchitecture information inside the tumor can be characterized. However, US cannot interrogate the histochemical components formulating the microarchitecture. One representative example is the inability of US imaging (and other contemporary imaging modalities as well) in differentiating nevoid and melanoma cells as the two types of cells possesses similar acoustic backscattering properties. Combining optical and US imaging, photoacoustic (PA) measurements encode both the microarchitecture and histochemical component information in biological tissue. This study attempts to characterize ocular tumors by analyzing the high frequency signal components in the multispectral PA images. Ex vivo human eye globes with melanoma and retinoblastoma tumors were scanned using less than 6 mJ per square centimeters laser energy with tunable range of 600-1700 nm. A PA-US parallel imaging system with US probes CL15-7 and L22-14 were used to acquire the high frequency PA signals in real time. Preliminary results show that the proposed method can identify uveal melanoma against retinoblastoma tumors.

  17. Tumor detection with radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, S.

    1984-01-01

    The most common primary ocular tumor in adults is malignant melanoma of the choroid. Metastatic tumors to the choroid occur with the same frequency. The radioactive phosphorous uptake test is used most often as a nuclear diagnostic test. The test does not differentiate melanomas from metastases, and it is necessary to perform surgery for proper placement of a detection device within a distance of 1-2 mm of the tumor. These deficiencies leave ophthalmologists with a pressing need for a gamma-emitting radiopharmaceutical that would facilitate noninvasive identification of choroidal melanoma. This need is made more urgent by the fact that recently, radiation therapy has been used to treat these tumors rather than enucleation. Eyes then harbor irradiated melanoma whose status is unknown. The tumor rarely decreases in size more than 25% to 50%. There is thus a need for a specific diagnostic test to assess the nature of the tumor and the effectiveness of therapy

  18. [Immune system and tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terme, Magali; Tanchot, Corinne

    2017-02-01

    Despite having been much debated, it is now well established that the immune system plays an essential role in the fight against cancer. In this article, we will highlight the implication of the immune system in the control of tumor growth and describe the major components of the immune system involved in the antitumoral immune response. The immune system, while exerting pressure on tumor cells, also will play a pro-tumoral role by sculpting the immunogenicity of tumors cells as they develop. Finally, we will illustrate the numerous mechanisms of immune suppression that take place within the tumoral microenvironment which allow tumor cells to escape control from the immune system. The increasingly precise knowledge of the brakes to an effective antitumor immune response allows the development of immunotherapy strategies more and more innovating and promising of hope. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Imaging of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most frequent solid tumor of the pancreas. This tumor has distinct features including early obstruction of the pancreatic duct, diminished enhancement after administration of contrast material due to desmoplastic growth, high propensity to infiltrate adjacent structures and to metastasize into the liver and the peritoneum. Hormone active endocrine tumors cause specific clinical symptoms. Imaging is aimed at localization of these hypervascular tumors. Non hormone active tumors are most frequently malignant and demonstrate very varying features. Cystic pancreatic tumors are increasingly detected by means of cross sectional imaging. Exact classification can be achieved with knowledge of the macropathology and considering clinical presentation as well as age and gender of the patients. (orig.)

  20. Central nervous system tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curran, W.J. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Intrinsic tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) pose a particularly challenging problem to practicing oncologists. These tumors rarely metastasize outside the CNS, yet even histologically benign tumors can be life-threatening due to their local invasiveness and strategic location. The surrounding normal tissues of the nervous system is often incapable of full functional regeneration, therefore prohibiting aggressive attempts to use either complete surgical resection or high doses of irradiation. Despite these limitations, notable achievements have recently been recorded in the management of these tumors

  1. Aggressive malignant phyllodes tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Nathan; Runk, Dianne M

    2015-01-01

    Originally described in 1838 by Muller, phyllodes tumor is a rare fibroepithelial neoplasm which represents roughly 0.3-0.9% of all breast cancers. Phyllodes tumor are divided into benign, borderline and malignant histologic categories. Malignant phyllodes tumor represent anywhere from 10-30% of all phyllodes tumors. This group has both the potential to recur locally and metastasize, however not all malignant phyllodes behave this way. The challenge lays in predicting which tumor will recur locally or metastasize. Distinguishing this subset of malignant phyllodes tumor is paramount. We present a case of malignant phyllodes which presented with metastatic disease. What is fascinating about this case is not only the initial presentation but also the aggressiveness of this variation of phyllodes tumor. The patient initially presented with a large mass which encompassed her whole right breast. On surgical pathology the mass measured roughly 31cm in diameter and weighed over 10kg. Within 5 weeks from surgery the patient had suffered brain metastases and also 6 local recurrent tumors. The patient passed roughly 11 weeks after her first visit to our office. Despite biopsy proven malignant phyllodes tumor, it was near impossible to predict such a rapid course of disease progression in our patient. Our case illustrates the unpredictable nature of this disease in general and it possibly sheds light on a variant of the disease which had undergone an aggressive transformation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. TUMORES ANEXIALES Y EMBARAZO

    OpenAIRE

    Tapia M.,Mauricio; Orellana H.,Ricardo; Cisterna C.,Patricio; Gazitúa P.,Raimundo; Sepúlveda A.,Rodrigo

    2005-01-01

    Objetivo: Evaluar la frecuencia de tumores anexiales en el embarazo, la histología tumoral y los resultados perinatales. Pacientes y método: Análisis retrospectivo de 33 pacientes con diagnóstico de tumor anexial y embarazo atendidas en el Servicio de Obstetricia del Hospital San Juan de Dios entre febrero de 2001 a julio de 2004. Resultados: La asociación tumor anexial y embarazo fue 1 en 424 embarazos. El tipo histológico más frecuente fue el cistoadenoma seroso (19,2%). La cirugía no alter...

  3. Management of CNS tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of tumors of the CNS has undergone a number of changes based on the impact of CT. The use of intraoperative US for the establishment of tumor location and tumor histology is demonstrated. MR imaging also is beginning to make an impact on the diagnosis and treatment of tumors of the CNS. Examples of MR images are shown. The authors then discuss the important aspects of tumor histology as it affects management and newer concepts in surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy on tumor treatment. The role of intraoperative placement of radioactive sources, the utilization of heavy particle radiation therapy, and the potential role of other experimental radiation therapy techniques are discussed. The role of hyperfractionated radiation and of neutrons and x-ray in a mixed-beam treatment are discussed in perspective with standard radiation therapy. Current chemotherapy techniques, including intraarterial chemotherapy, are discussed. The complications of radiation therapy alone and in combination with chemotherapy in the management of primary brain tumors, brain metastases, and leukemia are reviewed. A summary of the current management of pituitary tumors, including secreting pituitary adenomas and chromophobe adenomas, are discussed. The treatment with heavy particle radiation, transsphenoidal microsurgical removal, and combined radiotherapeutic and surgical management are considered. Tumor metastasis management of lesions of the brain and spinal cord are considered

  4. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, an uncommon tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Vasudevan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report a case of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT in the maxilla in a young girl aged 14 years and its surgical management. We also review the literature and variations in the nomenclature and classifications of this interesting tumor. The review of literature gives an interesting picture regarding terminologies in the past and dilemma in classifying this tumor. The introduction of the name adenomatoid odontogenic tumour has resulted in the simpler and fruitful surgical management like enucleation and curettage with no reports of recurrences. In the past, similar lesion with the terminology like adeno ameloblastoma has resulted in unnecessary mutilating surgery. The conflicting views whether the lesion is being neoplasm or an anomalous hamartomatous growth is also being discussed.

  5. [Leptin correlates with distribution of fatty tissue and plasma levels of insulin, testosterone and tumor necrosis factor alpha in perimenopausal women with increased testosterone level and central location of body fat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewicz, Tomasz; Krzysiek, Józef; Janczak-Saif, Agnieszka; Sztefko, Krystyna

    2006-01-01

    The evaluation of the influence of testosterone and fat tissue distribution on the serum leptin levels in perimenopausal women. 93 perimenopausal women without HRT (age: 51.0 +/- 8.8 yrs, FSH: 68.0 +/- 49.4 IU/l, estradiol: 38.3 +/- 37.0 ng/1) were divided into group A - 63 women with serum testosterone level or = 0.6 ng/ml. Each group was later divided according to WHR into subgroup I (AI and BI) (WHR or = 0.8). Basic fasting serum levels of LH, FSH, PRL, estradiol, insulin, hGH, IGF-I, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-3, leptin, testosterone, DHEAS TNF-alpha and SHBG were measured by RIA kits. Total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol, as well as triglycerides plasma levels were measured. Statistical evaluation was carried out by ANOVA and linear regression. BMI, WHR and plasma DHEAS level were higher in group B vs. group A. The lowest hGH, HDL-cholesterol and the highest TNF-alpha levels were found in group BII. The relations leptin/BMI and leptin/body mass were found in each group. The inverse relation between leptin and IGFBP-1 was found in groups A and B. In group A the inverse relations leptin/HDL-cholesterol and leptin/ DHEAS were observed. In group B the direct leptin/testosterone and inverse leptin/IGF-I relations were found. In group AI the inverse leptin/DHEAS relation remained, while in group AII inverse leptin/HDL-cholesterol relation remained and reverse leptin/IGFBP-1 relation was significant. The direct leptin/testosterone, leptin/WHR and inverse leptin/TNF-alpha links were observed in group BII. The serum leptin level was linked to WHR, serum testosterone, insulin, TNF-alpha levels only in groups of perimenopausal women with such cardiovascular risk factors as high WHR, overweight, high serum TNF-alpha and testosterone levels.

  6. Tumor carcinoide apendicular Appendiceal carcinoid tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Vázquez Palanco

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue dar a conocer un interesante caso de tumor carcinoide que se presentó con cuadro clínico de apendicitis aguda. El paciente fue un varón de 8 años de edad, al cual se realizó apendicectomía a causa de una apendicitis aguda. El resultado anatomopatológico confirmó un tumor de células endocrinas (argentafinoma, tumor carcinoide en el tercio distal del órgano, que infiltraba hasta la serosa, y apendicitis aguda supurada. El paciente fue enviado a un servicio de oncohematología para tratamiento oncoespecífico. Por lo inusual de estos tumores en edades tempranas y por lo que puede representar para el niño una conducta no consecuente, decidimos presentar este caso a la comunidad científica nacional e internacional. Es extremadamente importante el seguimiento de los pacientes con apendicitis aguda y de las conclusiones del examen histológico, por lo que puede representar para el niño una conducta inadecuada en una situación como esta.The objective of this paper was to make known an interesting case of carcinoid tumor that presented a clinical picture of acute appendicitis.The patient was an eight-year-old boy that underwent appendectomy due to an acute appendicitis. The anatomopathological report confirmed an endocrine cell tumor (argentaffinoma, carcinoid tumor in the distal third of the organ that infiltrated up to the serosa, and acute suppurative appendicitis. The patient was referred to an oncohematology service for oncospecific treatment. As it is a rare tumor at early ages, and taking into account what a inconsequent behavior may represent for the child, it was decided to present this case to the national and international scientific community. The follow-up of the patients with acute appendicitis and of the conclusions of the histological examination is extremely important considering what an inadequate conduct may represent for the child in a situation like this.

  7. Body Disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sea, Jonghan; Beauregard, Eric

    2017-02-01

    This study explores the body disposal patterns in a sample of 54 Korean homicides that occurred between 2006 and 2012. Based on information collected by the police during their investigation, factors that could influence body disposal patterns were examined, such as homicide classification, intention, whether an accomplice was present, and offender mental disorder. Bivariate analyses showed that the majority of the victims who were disposed of were acquaintances of the offenders. Moreover, several offenders were more likely to dispose of the dead body "within hours" of killing the victim. Dead bodies were usually recovered in agricultural areas, forest/wooded areas, as well as residential areas. It was also noteworthy that, in 47 cases, the offender had knowledge of the geographic area where the body was dumped. In cases of "expressive" homicide, victims were more likely to be disposed of somewhere far away (e.g., over 40 km) from the crime scene, whereas "instrumental" homicide victims appeared to be disposed of somewhere closer (e.g., within 30 km) to the crime scene. Results are discussed in light of their practical implications for homicide investigations.

  8. An exceptional collision tumor: gastric calcified stromal tumor and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The authors report an exceptional case of collision tumor comprised of a gastric calcified stromal tumor and a pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The pancreatic tumor was detected fortuitously on the histological exam of resection specimen. Key words: Collision tumor, stromal tumor, adenocarcinoma ...

  9. Body Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The high-tech art of digital signal processing (DSP) was pioneered at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the mid-1960s for use in the Apollo Lunar Landing Program. Designed to computer enhance pictures of the Moon, this technology became the basis for the Landsat Earth resources satellites and subsequently has been incorporated into a broad range of Earthbound medical and diagnostic tools. DSP is employed in advanced body imaging techniques including Computer-Aided Tomography, also known as CT and CATScan, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). CT images are collected by irradiating a thin slice of the body with a fan-shaped x-ray beam from a number of directions around the body's perimeter. A tomographic (slice-like) picture is reconstructed from these multiple views by a computer. MRI employs a magnetic field and radio waves, rather than x-rays, to create images.

  10. Body parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayiter, Elif

    2010-01-01

    In this project, the artist wishes to examine corporeality in the virtual realm, through the usage of the (non)-physical body of the avatar. An art installation created in the virtual world of Second Life, which is meant to be accessed with site specific avatars, will provide the creative platform whereby this investigation is undertaken. Thus, "body parts" seeks to challenge the residents of virtual environments into connecting with the virtual manifestations, i.e., avatars of others in an emotionally expressive/intimate manner.

  11. GASTROENTEROPANCREATIC NEUROENDOCRINE TUMORS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pavel M.E., Baum U., Hahn E.G., Hensen J. Doxorubucin and streptozocin after failed biotherapy of Neuroendocrine tumors. Int J. Gastrointest Cancer 2005; 35 179-185. 33. Yao J.C., Phan A., Hoff P.M., et al. Targeting vas- cular endothelial growth factor in advanced carci- noid tumors: a random assignment phase II study.

  12. Keratinization in odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; Courtney, R M; Kerr, D A

    1975-03-01

    The potential of odontogenic epithelium to keratinize in the form of ghost cells is demonstrated in the histologic variants of a number of odontongic tumors. Although the cells lack keratohyaline granules, they do contain abundant tonofilaments and probably represent an altered form of keratin. The presence of this material in odontogenic tumors does not appear to alter clinical occurence or clinical behavior.

  13. Ewing tumors in infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Henk; Dirksen, Uta; Ranft, Andreas; Jürgens, Heribert

    2008-01-01

    Malignancies in infancy are extremely rare. Ewing tumors are hardly ever noted in these children. Since it is generally assumed that malignancies in infancy have an extremely poor outcome, we wanted to investigate whether this was also the case in Ewing tumors. We identified in the Munster data

  14. Vanishing tumor in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Vimal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient with microprolactinoma, who had two successful pregnancies, is described for management issues. First pregnancy was uneventful. During the second pregnancy, the tumor enlarged to macroprolactinoma with headache and blurring of vision which was managed successfully with bromocriptine. Post delivery, complete disappearance of the tumor was documented.

  15. Children's Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news and announcements in our newsletter: Children’s Tumor Foundation 120 Wall Street, 16th Floor New York, NY 10005-3904 1-800-323-7938 info@ctf.org © Children's Tumor Foundation - All rights reserved Privacy Policy

  16. Brain Tumors - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Brain Tumors URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Brain Tumors - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  17. Renal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heerwagen, S T; Jensen, C; Bagi, P

    2007-01-01

    Renal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare soft-tissue tumor of controversial etiology with a potential for local recurrence after incomplete surgical resection. The radiological findings in renal IMT are not well described. We report two cases in adults with a renal mass treated...

  18. Pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Won-Jong; Mirra, Joseph M.

    2004-01-01

    To discuss the concept of pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone, which pathologically show hyperchromatism and marked pleomorphism with quite enlarged, pleomorphic nuclei, but with no to extremely rare, typical mitoses, and to propose guidelines for their diagnosis. From a database of 4,262 bone tumors covering from 1971 to 2001, 15 cases of pseudoanaplastic bone tumors (0.35% of total) were retrieved for clinical, radiographic and pathologic review. Postoperative follow-up after surgical treatment was at least 3 years and a maximum of 7 years. There were eight male and seven female patients. Their ages ranged from 10 to 64 years with average of 29.7 years. Pathologic diagnoses of pseudoanaplastic variants of benign bone tumors included: osteoblastoma (4 cases), giant cell tumor (4 cases), chondromyxoid fibroma (3 cases), fibrous dysplasia (2 cases), fibrous cortical defect (1 case) and aneurysmal bone cyst (1 case). Radiography of all cases showed features of a benign bone lesion. Six cases, one case each of osteoblastoma, fibrous dysplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst, chondromyxoid fibroma, giant cell tumor and osteoblastoma, were initially misdiagnosed as osteosarcoma. The remaining cases were referred for a second opinion to rule out sarcoma. Despite the presence of significant cytologic aberrations, none of our cases showed malignant behavior following simple curettage or removal of bony lesions. Our observation justifies the concept of pseudoanaplasia in some benign bone tumors as in benign soft tissue tumors, especially in their late evolutionary stage when bizarre cytologic alterations strongly mimic a sarcoma. (orig.)

  19. Pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Won-Jong [Uijongbu St. Mary Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gyunggido, 480-821 (Korea); Mirra, Joseph M. [Orthopaedic Hospital, Orthopedic Oncology, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2004-11-01

    To discuss the concept of pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone, which pathologically show hyperchromatism and marked pleomorphism with quite enlarged, pleomorphic nuclei, but with no to extremely rare, typical mitoses, and to propose guidelines for their diagnosis. From a database of 4,262 bone tumors covering from 1971 to 2001, 15 cases of pseudoanaplastic bone tumors (0.35% of total) were retrieved for clinical, radiographic and pathologic review. Postoperative follow-up after surgical treatment was at least 3 years and a maximum of 7 years. There were eight male and seven female patients. Their ages ranged from 10 to 64 years with average of 29.7 years. Pathologic diagnoses of pseudoanaplastic variants of benign bone tumors included: osteoblastoma (4 cases), giant cell tumor (4 cases), chondromyxoid fibroma (3 cases), fibrous dysplasia (2 cases), fibrous cortical defect (1 case) and aneurysmal bone cyst (1 case). Radiography of all cases showed features of a benign bone lesion. Six cases, one case each of osteoblastoma, fibrous dysplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst, chondromyxoid fibroma, giant cell tumor and osteoblastoma, were initially misdiagnosed as osteosarcoma. The remaining cases were referred for a second opinion to rule out sarcoma. Despite the presence of significant cytologic aberrations, none of our cases showed malignant behavior following simple curettage or removal of bony lesions. Our observation justifies the concept of pseudoanaplasia in some benign bone tumors as in benign soft tissue tumors, especially in their late evolutionary stage when bizarre cytologic alterations strongly mimic a sarcoma. (orig.)

  20. Bronchial carcinoid tumors: A rare malignant tumor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-03

    Feb 3, 2015 ... Mancini MC, Jeffrey MC. Carcinoid Lung Tumors. Available from: http//www. emedicine.medscape.com/article/426400‑overview. 3. Leotlela PD, Jauch A, Holtgreve‑Grez H, Thakker RV. Genetics of neuroendocrine and carcinoid tumours. Endocr Relat Cancer 2003;10:437‑50. 4. Rea F, Rizzardi G, Zuin A, ...

  1. Pancreatoblastoma, a Rare Childhood Tumor: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuman ARGON

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatoblastoma, rarely encountered in the literature, is a malignant exocrine tumor seen in the pancreas. A 5-year-old boy suffering from abdominal pain was sent to our institute for further examination and treatment. Clinical examination was normal but for a palpable abdominal tumor mass. Abdominal Doppler ultrasonography showed a mass with well-defined margins within the body of the pancreas. Laboratory tests, including lactic dehydrogenase, alpha-fetoprotein and cancer antigen 125 were abnormal. The tumor invading the splenic vein and transverse colon was removed totally. We observed a hypercellular tumor in histopathological examination. The tumor had epithelial acinar cells and squamoid morules (corpuscles separated by stromal bands. Adjuvant chemotherapy was used after surgery. However, the patient died 14 months later. All data about pancreatoblastoma have to be collected in order to choose the treatment to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of the tumor, to diagnose it early and to develop target-specific treatments.

  2. Wilm's tumor in adulthood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveev, B.P.; Bukharkin, B.V.; Gotsadze, D.T.

    1984-01-01

    Wilms' tumor occurs extremely rarely in adults. There is no consensus in the literature on the problems of clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of the diseasa. Ten adult patients (aged 16-29) with Wilms' tumor formed the study group. They made up 0.9 per cent of the total number of kidney tumor patients. The peculiarities of the clinical course that distinguish adult nephroblastoma from renal cancer and Wilms' tumor of the infancy were analysed. The latent period appeared to be long. Problems of diagnosis are discussed. Angiography proved to be of the highest diagnostic value. Complex treatment including transperitoneal nephrectory, radiation and chemotherapy was carried out in 7 cases, palliative radiation treatmenchemotherapy andn 3. Unlike pediatric nephroblastomt - i Wilms' tumor in adults was resistant to radiation. Treatment results still remained unsatisfactory: 6 patients died 7-19 months after the beginning of treatment

  3. Radiotherapy of pineal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danoff, B.; Sheline, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radiotherapy has universally been used in the treatment of pineal tumors and suprasellar germinomas. Recently however, major technical advances related to the use of the operating microscope and development of microsurgical techniques have prompted a renewed interest in the direct surgical approach for biopsy and/or excision. This interest has resulted in a controversy regarding the role of surgery prior to radiotherapy. Because of the heterogeneity of tumors occurring in the pineal region (i.e., germ cell tumors, pineal parenchymal tumors, glial tumors, and cysts) and their differing biological behavior, controversy also surrounds aspects of radiotherapy such as: the optimal radiation dose, the volume to be irradiated, and indications for prophylactic spinal irradiation. A review of the available data is presented in an attempt to answer these questions

  4. Bog bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels

    2015-01-01

    In northern Europe during the Iron Age, many corpses were deposited in bogs. The cold, wet and anaerobic environment leads in many cases to the preservation of soft tissues, so that the bodies, when found and excavated several thousand years later, are remarkably intact. Since the 19th century th...

  5. BODY CONDITION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Andrew Taylor

    Table 1 Seasonal variation in body and kidney weight of adult mountain reedbuck culled at Sterkfontein. Values are ..... This leads to a decrease in nutritional quality of grazing for mountain reedbuck and a loss of condition. .... This would decrease the chances of starvation of those animals left, and allow them to build up ...

  6. Sacralising Bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, Ravinder

    2010-01-01

    -sacrifice became central to the mass mobilisation against the monarchy. Once the revolutionary government came into existence, this sacred tradition was regulated to create ‘martyrs’ as a fixed category, in order to consolidate the legacy of the revolution. In this political theatre, the dead body is a site...

  7. Response of the tumor and organs of the tumor-bearing animal to the action of an ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlakova, E.B.; Gaintseva, V.D.; Pal'mina, N.P.; Sezina, N.P.

    1977-01-01

    Changes in the antioxigenic activity (AOA) of the liver of the tumor-bearing animals and the tumor have been studied after a single whole-body exposure of animals to a dose of 600 R. AOA of the liver of animals having hepatoma 22-a and Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) was found to decrease immediately after irradiation while that of the tumor itself can both increase (hepatoma 22-a) and decrease (EAT). Proceeding from the assumption that AOA is connected with tissue radiosensitivity it is suggested that the observed variations in the response of tumor cells and normal tissue to the action of ionizing radiation should be taken into account when developing the schemes of radiation effect on the tumor

  8. Tumor markers of breast cancer: New prospectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Kabel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumor markers are substances produced by the tumors or by other cells of the body in response to cancer or certain benign conditions. Although most of these markers are made by the normal cells as well as by cancer cells, they are produced at much higher levels in cancerous conditions. These markers are used to evaluate the patient's response to treatment and to detect the presence of metastasis or recurrence. Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in females worldwide. The CA 27-29, CA 15-3, CA27.29, carcinoembryonic antigen, tissue polypeptide specific antigen, p53, cathepsin D, cyclin E, nestin and HER-2 are tumor markers that are often expressed in people with breast cancer. They play a crucial role in diagnosis, monitoring response to therapy, early detection of metastasis and determination of recurrence in patients with breast cancer.

  9. Pancreatic desmoid tumor in a 4-year-old male with hemihypertrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Ken Saida; Osamu Miyazaki; Kentaro Matsuoka; Toshihiko Watanabe; Akihiro Fujino; Shunsuke Nosaka

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of a pancreatic desmoid tumor detected during follow-up for hemihypertrophy in a 4-year-old boy. Hemihypertrophy is a rare disorder in which one side of the body grows more than the other, causing asymmetry, and well-known complications include embryonal tumors. However, there has been no report of desmoid tumors in patients with hemihypertrophy, and these tumors are rare and poorly characterized in the literature, especially the cystic variant. For this patient, the ...

  10. Multiple primary tumors in patients with uterine cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velikova, N.; Parvanova, V.; Dimitrova, N.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The aging population and improved medical care lead to increased likelihood for patients experienced a tumor to develop at least one more in the course of his life. The aim of the study was to analyze the clinical and biological characteristics and survival of patients with primary tumor multiplicity in which a tumor is cancer of the uterine body. Materials and Methods: For the period 1997-2007, in the department of radiotherapy were treated 191 women with carcinoma of the uterine body (in a group of moderate and high risk) with invasion of the myometrium more than one third. Patients ranged in age from 36 to 77 (average age 59.9) and were followed until 31.03.2013 with an average follow-up period 126 months. Postoperatively, all were carried intravaginal brachytherapy with high dose rate 3x5 Gy once a week, followed by percutaneous radiotherapy 22x2 Gy daily to the area of the pelvic lymph nodes. Data to diagnose combined tumors were obtained from the National Cancer Registry. Survival analysis was made by the method of Kaplan - Meier with Lograng test. Results: In 26 (13.6 %) of the analyzed patients a tumor multiplicity is find in 22 (84,6%) tumors are two in 3 (11.5 %)- three , and in 1 (3.8%) - four . A detailed analysis of 14 (53.8%) patients whose cancer of the uterine body is the first tumor and is followed by another. The distribution of the tumor according to the second location is: breast cancer 5 (35.7%) skin malignant melanoma without 4 (28.5%) of the column 3 (21.4 %) of stomach 1 (7.1%) , MALT lymphoma, 1 (7.1% ) . Evaluate and compare the 5 - and 10-year overall survival of patients whose cancer of the uterine body only, and those who are diagnosed with a malignant tumor following - in those without a second tumor is 85.3% and 81.4 %, and in the presence of such a - 78, 6% and 69.3% respectively. Conclusion: The matched tumors are the most common among the so-called hormone dependent cancers such as breast cancer, uterine

  11. Radiological and histopathological study of benign tumors of the mandible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seon Young; Baek, Seung Yon; Choi, Kyung Hee; Suh, Jeung Soo; Rhee, Chung Sik; Kim, Hee Seup [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-06-15

    Benign tumors of the mandible are uncommon lesions. That were classified into odontogenic tumors and nonodontogenic tumors. Author reviewed the radiological evaluation and pathological microscopic finding from 33 benign tumors of the mandible that were confirmed by the biopsy during last 10 years in Dental Clinics, Ewha Womans University Hospital and Seoul National University Dental Hospital. Following results were obtained; 1. Benign tumors of the mandible were classified into odontogenic (66.7%) and non-odontogenic tumors (33.3%). 2. The range of the age distribution was between 6 years and 67 years old. The commonest age group was the second decade (39.4%). 3. There was no difference to sex distribution. 4. The most frequent location was the body of the mandible (42.4%). 5. Radiographic findings were relatively characteristic in odontogenic tumors rather than non-odontogenic tumors. 1) Radiolucent cystic lesions-ameloblastoma, odontogenic myxoma, odontogenic fibtoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and neurofibroma. 2) Radiopaque mass lesions-odontoma, cementoma and osteoma. 3) Mixed patterns-ossifying fibroma, cementifying fibroma, calcifying odontogenic epithelial tumor and hemangioma. It was concluded that the radiographic examination was of value to diagnose the benign tumors of the mandible in symptomless patients.

  12. Radiological and histopathological study of benign tumors of the mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seon Young; Baek, Seung Yon; Choi, Kyung Hee; Suh, Jeung Soo; Rhee, Chung Sik; Kim, Hee Seup

    1984-01-01

    Benign tumors of the mandible are uncommon lesions. That were classified into odontogenic tumors and nonodontogenic tumors. Author reviewed the radiological evaluation and pathological microscopic finding from 33 benign tumors of the mandible that were confirmed by the biopsy during last 10 years in Dental Clinics, Ewha Womans University Hospital and Seoul National University Dental Hospital. Following results were obtained; 1. Benign tumors of the mandible were classified into odontogenic (66.7%) and non-odontogenic tumors (33.3%). 2. The range of the age distribution was between 6 years and 67 years old. The commonest age group was the second decade (39.4%). 3. There was no difference to sex distribution. 4. The most frequent location was the body of the mandible (42.4%). 5. Radiographic findings were relatively characteristic in odontogenic tumors rather than non-odontogenic tumors. 1) Radiolucent cystic lesions-ameloblastoma, odontogenic myxoma, odontogenic fibtoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and neurofibroma. 2) Radiopaque mass lesions-odontoma, cementoma and osteoma. 3) Mixed patterns-ossifying fibroma, cementifying fibroma, calcifying odontogenic epithelial tumor and hemangioma. It was concluded that the radiographic examination was of value to diagnose the benign tumors of the mandible in symptomless patients

  13. Effects of exercise on tumor physiology and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Line; Christensen, Jesper Frank; Hojman, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is a potent regulator of a range of physiological processes in most tissues. Solid epidemiological data show that exercise training can reduce disease risk and mortality for several cancer diagnoses, suggesting that exercise training may directly regulate tumor physiology and metabolism. Here, we review the body of literature describing exercise intervention studies performed in rodent tumor models and elaborate on potential mechanistic effects of exercise on tumor physiology. Exercise has been shown to reduce tumor incidence, tumor multiplicity, and tumor growth across numerous different transplantable, chemically induced or genetic tumor models. We propose 4 emerging mechanistic effects of exercise, including (1) vascularization and blood perfusion, (2) immune function, (3) tumor metabolism, and (4) muscle-to-cancer cross-talk, and discuss these in details. In conclusion, exercise training has the potential to be a beneficial and integrated component of cancer management, but has yet to fully elucidate its potential. Understanding the mechanistic effects of exercise on tumor physiology is warranted. Insight into these mechanistic effects is emerging, but experimental intervention studies are still needed to verify the cause-effect relationship between these mechanisms and the control of tumor growth.

  14. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertoli-stromal cell tumor; Arrhenoblastoma; Androblastoma; Ovarian cancer - Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 13. Prat J. Ovarian sex cord - stromal and steroid cell tumors. In: Mutter GL, Prat J, eds. Pathology of ...

  15. The PCa Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottnik, Joseph L; Zhang, Jian; Macoska, Jill A; Keller, Evan T

    2011-12-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) is a very complex niche that consists of multiple cell types, supportive matrix and soluble factors. Cells in the TME consist of both host cells that are present at tumor site at the onset of tumor growth and cells that are recruited in either response to tumor- or host-derived factors. PCa (PCa) thrives on crosstalk between tumor cells and the TME. Crosstalk results in an orchestrated evolution of both the tumor and microenvironment as the tumor progresses. The TME reacts to PCa-produced soluble factors as well as direct interaction with PCa cells. In return, the TME produces soluble factors, structural support and direct contact interactions that influence the establishment and progression of PCa. In this review, we focus on the host side of the equation to provide a foundation for understanding how different aspects of the TME contribute to PCa progression. We discuss immune effector cells, specialized niches, such as the vascular and bone marrow, and several key protein factors that mediate host effects on PCa. This discussion highlights the concept that the TME offers a potentially very fertile target for PCa therapy.

  16. Epilepsy and brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENGLOT, DARIO J.; CHANG, EDWARD F.; VECHT, CHARLES J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common in patients with brain tumors, and epilepsy can significantly impact patient quality of life. Therefore, a thorough understanding of rates and predictors of seizures, and the likelihood of seizure freedom after resection, is critical in the treatment of brain tumors. Among all tumor types, seizures are most common with glioneuronal tumors (70–80%), particularly in patients with frontotemporal or insular lesions. Seizures are also common in individuals with glioma, with the highest rates of epilepsy (60–75%) observed in patients with low-grade gliomas located in superficial cortical or insular regions. Approximately 20–50% of patients with meningioma and 20–35% of those with brain metastases also suffer from seizures. After tumor resection, approximately 60–90% are rendered seizure-free, with most favorable seizure outcomes seen in individuals with glioneuronal tumors. Gross total resection, earlier surgical therapy, and a lack of generalized seizures are common predictors of a favorable seizure outcome. With regard to anticonvulsant medication selection, evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of focal epilepsy should be followed, and individual patient factors should also be considered, including patient age, sex, organ dysfunction, comorbidity, or cotherapy. As concomitant chemotherapy commonly forms an essential part of glioma treatment, enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants should be avoided when possible. Seizure freedom is the ultimate goal in the treatment of brain tumor patients with epilepsy, given the adverse effects of seizures on quality of life. PMID:26948360

  17. Central nervous system tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, P.R.; Fike, J.R.; Hoopes, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tumors are relatively common in veterinary medicine, with most diagnoses occurring in the canine and feline species. Numerous tumor types from various cells or origins have been identified with the most common tumors being meningiomas and glial cell tumors. Radiation therapy is often used as an aid to control the clinical signs associated with these neoplasms. In general, these tumors have a very low metastatic potential, such that local control offers substantial benefit. Experience in veterinary radiation oncology would indicate that many patients benefit from radiation treatment. Current practice indicates the need for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging studies. These highly beneficial studies are used for diagnosis, treatment planning, and to monitor treatment response. Improvements in treatment planning and radiation delivered to the tumor, while sparing the normal tissues, should improve local control and decrease potential radiation related problems to the CNS. When possible, multiple fractions of 3 Gy or less should be used. The tolerance dose to the normal tissue with this fractionation schedule is 50 to 55 Gy. The most common and serious complications of radiation for CNS tumors is delayed radiation myelopathy and necrosis. Medical management of the patient during radiation therapy requires careful attention to anesthetic protocols, and medications to reduce intracranial pressure that is often elevated in these patients. Canine brain tumors have served as an experimental model to test numerous new treatments. Increased availability of advanced imaging modalities has spawned increased detection of these neoplasms. Early detection of these tumors with appropriate aggressive therapy should prove beneficial to many patients

  18. Uterine mesenchymal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil A Sangle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Uterine mesenchymal tumors are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that can frequently be diagnostically challenging. Differentiation between the benign and malignant counterparts of mesenchymal tumors is significant due to differences in clinical outcome, and the role of the surgical pathologist in making this distinction (especially in the difficult cases cannot be underestimated. Although immunohistochemical stains are supportive toward establishing a final diagnosis, the morphologic features trump all the other ancillary techniques for this group of neoplasms. This review therefore emphasizes the key morphologic features required to diagnose and distinguish uterine mesenchymal tumors from their mimics, with a brief description of the relevant immunohistochemical features.

  19. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  20. Body Weight and Body Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McFarlane Traci

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Health Issue Body weight is of physical and psychological importance to Canadian women; it is associated with health status, physical activity, body image, and self-esteem. Although the problems associated with overweight and obesity are indeed serious, there are also problems connected to being underweight. Weight prejudice and the dieting industry intensify body image concerns for Canadian women and can have a major negative impact on self-esteem. Key Findings Women have lower BMIs than men, a lower incidence of being overweight and a higher incidence of being underweight. However, women across all weight categories are more dissatisfied with their bodies. Sixty percent of women are inactive, and women with a BMI of 27 or higher are more likely to be inactive than women with lower BMIs. The data show that women are aware of the health benefits of exercise, but there is a gap between knowledge and practice. When asked about barriers to health improvement, 39.7% of women cited lack of time and 39.2% lack of willpower. Data Gaps and Recommendations Weight prejudice must be made unacceptable and positive body image should be encouraged and diversity valued. Health policies should encourage healthy eating and healthy activity. Health curricula for young students should include information about healthy eating, active lifestyle, and self-esteem. Physical activities that mothers can participate in with their families should be encouraged. Research should be funded to elucidate the most effective methods of getting women to become and remain physically active without focusing on appearance.

  1. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors.

  2. Serum thyroglobulin: tumor marker in thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajay Kumar; Shah, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Measurement of s-Tg is of limited value in the diagnosis of primary thyroid tumor but is very useful in post-operative management of differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The sensitivity and the specificity of Tg determination is comparable to that obtained with whole body scan WBS, however, both are complimentary. In our experience, the accuracy of s-Tg determination whether on or off thyroxin medication does not differ significantly

  3. GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMOR (GIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eTornillo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild-type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other entities, have been discovered (e.g. succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway. The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data.

  4. Radioimmunoassays for tumor diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressler, J.

    1983-01-01

    Aside from imaging techniques several (radio-)immunological analyses are used for tumor diagnosis. Oncofetal antigens, for instance the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), have become the most important substances for many malignancies. However, nearly all of the so-called tumor markers are not suitable for early diagnosis or screening either because of low sensitivity or low tumor specifity. On the other hand follow-up measurements give a very sensitive index of the success of treatment and may indicate tumor progression when other signs are still not present. In some carcinomas and under some clinical circumstances tumorspecific markers are available and mandatory for detection and/or staging: AFP in hepatoma, acid phosphatase in metastasizing carcinoma of the prostate and serum thyreoglobulin in differentiated thyroid cancer. (orig.) [de

  5. Brain Tumors and Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can help calm the mind. Meditation, guided imagery, music therapy, and yoga are just a few worth investigating. Home Donor and Privacy Policies Find Resources Disclaimer Donate Subscribe Login American Brain Tumor Association 8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave. Ste ...

  6. Benign Liver Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Benign Liver Tumors Back ...

  7. Adrenocortical tumors in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Ribeiro

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Childhood adrenocortical tumors (ACT are rare. In the USA, only about 25 new cases occur each year. In Southern Brazil, however, approximately 10 times that many cases are diagnosed each year. Most cases occur in the contiguous states of São Paulo and Paraná. The cause of this higher rate has not been identified. Familial genetic predisposition to cancer (p53 mutations and selected genetic syndromes (Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome have been associated with childhood ACT in general but not with the Brazilian counterpart. Most of the affected children are young girls with classic endocrine syndromes (virilizing and/or Cushing. Levels of urinary 17-ketosteroids and plasma dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S, which are abnormal in approximately 90% of the cases, provide the pivotal clue to a diagnosis of ACT. Typical imaging findings of pediatric ACT consist of a large, well-defined suprarenal tumor containing calcifications with a thin capsule and central necrosis or hemorrhage. The pathologic classification of pediatric ACT is troublesome. Even an experienced pathologist can find it difficult to differentiate carcinoma from adenoma. Surgery is the single most important procedure in the successful treatment of ACT. The role of chemotherapy in the management of childhood ACT has not been established although occasional tumors are responsive to mitotane or cisplatin-containing regimens. Because of the heterogeneity and rarity of the disease, prognostic factors have been difficult to establish in pediatric ACT. Patients with incomplete tumor resection or with metastatic disease at diagnosis have a dismal prognosis. In patients with localized and completely resected tumors, the size of the tumor has predictive value. Patients with large tumors have a much higher relapse rate than those with small tumors.

  8. Perlecan and tumor angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinnong; Couchman, John R

    2003-01-01

    Perlecan is a major heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) of basement membranes (BMs) and connective tissues. The core protein of perlecan is divided into five domains based on sequence homology to other known proteins. Commonly, the N-terminal domain I of mammalian perlecan is substituted with thr...... have unwanted promoting effects on tumor cell proliferation and tumor angiogenesis. Understanding of these attributes at the molecular level may offer opportunities for therapeutic intervention....

  9. Incidental malignant periocular tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thabit Odat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the incidence, epidemiology, and clinical characteristics of incidental malignant periocular tumors at the royal medical services hospitals of Jordan.METHODS: Retrospective medical charts of 327 patients with malignant periocular tumor diagnosis at Jordan military hospitals between 2004 and 2015 were reviewed. Study variables included age, gender, city where patient lived, the presenting complaint(not caused by or related to tumor, clinical and histological diagnosis, size of the tumor, location, and surgical procedure.RESULTS:A total of 327 charts reviewed, 46(14.1%patients were found to have incidental malignant periocular tumor. Males where affected more than females with a ratio of 2:1. The average age was 66.39±10.59(22-83y. The most common presenting symptom or disease was blurring of vision secondary to cataract(44%, followed by combined cataract and other associated complaints such as epiphora in 21.7%.Preliminary clinical diagnosis corresponded with histological diagnosis in 95.7% of skin cancer. The average size of the lesions was 1.04×0.85 mm2(0.2×0.2-3.0×3.0 mm2. There was no significant relationship between the maximum diameter of the tumor and age of the patient,(P=0.105. The most frequent location of tumors was the lower eyelid(30.4%followed by the medial canthus(26.1%. The follow up period ranged between 6mo and 3y(average 9.3mo.CONCLUSION: Incidental malignant periocular malignant tumors were relatively common in this study, which urges excision of any suspicious lesion particularly young patients. A prospective study is needed to investigate the reasons why some patients neglect these lesions.

  10. Radioembolization of hepatic tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Unresectable primary and metastatic liver tumors are a leading cause of cancer mortality and morbidity. This remains a challenging and key task for every oncologist despite significant advances that have been made with selective targeted systemic agents and in technology advances with radiotherapy delivery. Radioembolization (RE) is a technique of permanently implanting microspheres containing Yttrium-90 (90Y), a beta-emitting isotope with a treatment range of 2 mm, into hepatic tumors. This ...

  11. Impossible body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusero, L

    1999-01-01

    SUMMARY This play tells the story of one woman coming to terms with her "poly" identity through a journey into the multiple layers of love, race, sex, appearance and Otherness. The one-woman show Impossible Body was first performed for a reading series sponsored by "Onstage" at the University of Colorado, Boulder, in February 1997. A revised version was developed and staged at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington in April 1997. The current script, from which these excerpts are taken, was first presented at the Queer Studies Conference in Boulder, Colorado.

  12. Body counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppe, P.

    1975-01-01

    The paper gives a survey on some applications of the whole body counter in clinical practice and a critical study of its application as a routine testing method. Remarks on the necessary precautions are followed by a more detailed discussion of the determination of the natural potassium content, the iron metabolism, the vitamin B12 test, investigations of the metabolism of the bone using 47 Ca and 85 Sr, investigations with iodine and iodine-labelled substances, clearance investigations (in particular the 51 Cr EDTA clearance test), as well as the possibilities of neutron activation in vivo. (ORU/AK) [de

  13. Radio-guided minimally invasive parathyroidectomy under local

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    temps d'operation, les succes de la normocalcémie post opératoire et la morbidité périopératoire. ... rarely, parathyroid carcinoma.1 The classic operation for primary hyperparathyroidism consists ..... Radar-guzzler mini/milky invasive pmut/zvruidr'r'tu/ny under 10ml anesthesia - ANSI/ll Alfudda 8! al hyperparathyroidism: an ...

  14. Tumor burden talks in cancer treatment with PEGylated liposomal drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Yu Lin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: PEGylated liposomes are important drug carriers that can passively target tumor by enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect in neoplasm lesions. This study demonstrated that tumor burden determines the tumor uptake, and also the tumor response, in cancer treatment with PEGylated liposomal drugs in a C26/tk-luc colon carcinoma-bearing mouse model. METHODS: Empty PEGylated liposomes (NanoX and those encapsulated with VNB (NanoVNB were labeled with In-111 to obtain InNanoX and InVNBL in high labeling yield and radiochemical purity (all >90%. BALB/c mice bearing either small (58.4±8.0 mm(3 or large (102.4±22.0 mm(3 C26/tk-luc tumors in the right dorsal flank were intravenously administered with NanoVNB, InNanoX, InVNBL, or NanoX as a control, every 7 days for 3 times. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by body weight loss, tumor growth inhibition (using calipers and bioluminescence imaging and survival fraction. The scintigraphic imaging of tumor mouse was performed during and after treatment. RESULTS: The biodistribution study of InVNBL revealed a clear inverse correlation (r (2 = 0.9336 between the tumor uptake and the tumor mass ranged from 27.6 to 623.9 mg. All three liposomal drugs showed better therapeutic efficacy in small-tumor mice than in large-tumor mice. Tumor-bearing mice treated with InVNBL (a combination drug showed the highest tumor growth inhibition rate and survival fraction compared to those treated with NanoVNB (chemodrug only and InNanoX (radionuclide only. Specific tumor targeting and significantly increased tumor uptake after periodical treatment with InVNBL were evidenced by scintigraphic imaging, especially in mice bearing small tumors. CONCLUSION: The significant differences in the outcomes of cancer treatment and molecular imaging between animals bearing small and large tumors revealed that tumor burden is a critical and discriminative factor in cancer therapy using PEGylated liposomal drugs.

  15. Targeted Imaging of Tumor-Associated Macrophages by Cyanine 7-Labeled Mannose in Xenograft Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jiang MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannose receptor is considered as a hallmark of M2-oriented tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs, but its utility in TAMs was rarely reported. Therefore, deoxymannose (DM, a high-affinity ligand of mannose receptor, was labeled with near-infrared dye cyanine 7 (Cy7, and its feasibility of targeted imaging on TAMs was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The Cy7-DM was synthesized, and its binding affinity with induced TAMs in vitro, whole-body imaging in xenograft tumor mouse model in vivo, and the cellular localization in dissected tissues were evaluated. We demonstrated a high uptake of Cy7-DM by induced M2 macrophages and TAMs in tumor tissues. In vivo near-infrared live imaging visualized abundant TAMs in tumor lesions instead of inflammatory sites by Cy7-DM imaging, and the quantity of Cy7-DM signals in tumors was significantly higher than that shown in inflammatory sites from 1 to 8 hours of imaging. Our results suggest that mannose could rapidly and specifically target TAMs and is a promising candidate for targeted diagnosis of tumor with rich TAMs.

  16. Tumor regression grading of gastrointestinal cancers after neoadjuvant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Rupert; Becker, Karen

    2018-02-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy has been successfully introduced in the treatment of locally advanced gastrointestinal malignancies, particularly esophageal, gastric, and rectal cancers. The effects of preoperative chemo- or radiochemotherapy can be determined by histopathological investigation of the resection specimen following this treatment. Frequent histological findings after neoadjuvant therapy include various amounts of residual tumor, inflammation, resorptive changes with infiltrates of foamy histiocytes, foreign body reactions, and scarry fibrosis. Several tumor regression grading (TRG) systems, which aim to categorize the amount of regressive changes after cytotoxic treatment in primary tumor sites, have been proposed for gastroesophageal and rectal carcinomas. These systems primarily refer to the amount of therapy-induced fibrosis in relation to the residual tumor (e.g., the Mandard, Dworak, or AJCC systems) or the estimated percentage of residual tumor in relation to the previous tumor site (e.g., the Becker, Rödel, or Rectal Cancer Regression Grading systems). TRGs provide valuable prognostic information, as in most cases, complete or subtotal tumor regression after neoadjuvant treatment is associated with better patient outcomes. This review describes the typical histopathological findings after neoadjuvant treatment, discusses the most commonly used TRG systems for gastroesophageal and rectal carcinomas, addresses the limitations and critical issues of tumor regression grading in these tumors, and describes the clinical impact of TRG.

  17. Tumor thrombus formation in two dogs with insulinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambrook, Lydia E; Kudnig, Simon T

    2012-10-15

    A 9-year-old sexually intact male Staffordshire Bull Terrier and a 9-year-old neutered male Boxer were evaluated for intermittent neurologic signs including muscle tremors, ataxia, episodic collapse, disorientation, and seizures. Both dogs had low blood glucose and high serum insulin concentrations. Results of abdominal ultrasonography were unremarkable for both dogs. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a mass that extended from the body of the pancreas into the pancreaticoduodenal vein in each dog. Marginal resection of pancreatic masses was performed, and tumor thrombi were removed via venotomy in both dogs. Histologic evaluation indicated the masses were pancreatic islet cell tumors with tumor thrombi. Clinical signs resolved following surgical resection of tumors and tumor thrombi, and the dogs were euglycemic during the follow-up period (17 and 45 months after surgery). Although gross tumor thrombus formation has been identified in humans with insulinomas, tumor thrombi have not been previously reported for dogs with insulinomas. Surgical removal of tumor thrombi via venotomy seemed to be well tolerated by the dogs. Tumor thrombus formation did not seem to adversely affect prognosis for the 2 dogs of this report.

  18. Tumores neonatales bucomaxilofaciales Neonatal buccomaxillofacial tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoila del S. López Díaz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realiza un estudio descriptivo, lineal y retrospectivo por un período de 10 años, de 11 recién nacidos (edad 0-30 días, quienes al nacer presentan en la región bucomaxilofacial un tumor que les ocasiona de manera determinante compromiso para la ventilación y/o alimentación, por lo que se hace necesario realizarles a todos de manera inmediata, tratamiento quirúrgico para preservarles la vida. Se analizaron las variables edad, sexo, color de la piel, diagnóstico, tumoraciones que se presentaron con mayor frecuencia, compromiso para la ventilación y/o alimentación, procederes y mortalidad. Los datos se recogieron en una planilla confeccionada al efecto, lo que permitió establecer resultados y confeccionar tablas. Se concluye que en nuestro estudio este tipo de tumoración afectó con mayor frecuencia al sexo femenino y a niños de piel blanca; y el tipo de tumoración observada con mayor frecuencia fueron las malformaciones vasculares de tipo linfático (linfangiomas gigantes o higromas quísticos, así como y los teratomas bucofaríngeos, con una mortalidad de alrededor del 27,3 % en estas edades neonatales.A descriptive, lineal and retrospective study of 11 newborn infants aged 0-30 days was conducted. They presented a tumor in the buccomaxillofacial region that compromised their ventilation and/or nutrition, which made necessary to immediately perform surgery to preserve their lives. The following variables were analyzed: age, sex, colour of the skin, diagnosis, the most common tumours, compromise for ventilation and/or nutrition, procedures and mortality. Data were collected in a form that allowed to establish results and to make tables. It was concluded that this type of tumor affected mostly females and white children. The most commonly observed tumors were vascular lymphatic malformations (giant lymphangiomas or cystic hygromas, as well as buccopharyngeal teratomas, with a mortality around 27.3 % at these neonatal ages.

  19. [Enophthalmos in an orbital tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Bianca; Szabo, I; Nicula, Cristina; Popescu, Livia Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Enophtalmus is an unusual sign of the orbital tumors often represented by proptosis. One patient with enophtalmus and intraorbital tumor and aplasy is presented. The treatment of choice of orbital tumor is complete surgical excision and careful follow-up. Considering the more aggressive course followed by recurrent tumor, correct diagnosis and management is essential.

  20. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Foreign Body Retrieval Foreign body retrieval is the removal of ... foreign body detection and removal? What is Foreign Body Retrieval? Foreign body retrieval involves the removal of ...

  1. Positron emission tomography using 18fluorodeoxyglucose and tumors markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamy, P.J.; Grenier, J.

    2004-01-01

    Tumor cells present different characteristics that are used to diagnosis metastasis. Tumor markers are substances that can often be detected in higher-than-normal amounts in the blood, urine, or body tissues of some patients with certain types of cancer. The main use of tumor markers is to assess a cancer's response to treatment and to check for recurrence. Less than 20 % of the initial rises of tumor marker is accompanied with clinical events or radiological signs. TEP using 18 FDG allows metastasis detection at early stage. Tumor markers as tools to monitor recurrence can help to select the patients who need a TER. These two diagnostic ways, used together, should improve patients follow-up. (author)

  2. Pituitary gland tumors; Hypophysentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesser, J.; Schlamp, K.; Bendszus, M. [Radiologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    This article gives an overview of the most common tumors of the pituitary gland and the differential diagnostics with special emphasis on radiological diagnostic criteria. A selective search of the literature in PubMed was carried out. Pituitary adenomas constitute 10-15 % of all intracranial tumors and are the most common tumors of the sellar region. Tumors smaller than 1 cm in diameter are called microadenomas while those larger than 1 cm in diameter are called macroadenomas. Approximately 65 % of pituitary gland adenomas secrete hormones whereby approximately 50 % secrete prolactin, 10 % secrete growth hormone (somatotropin) and 6 % secrete corticotropin. Other tumors located in the sella turcica can also cause endocrinological symptoms, such as an oversecretion of pituitary hormone or pituitary insufficiency by impinging on the pituitary gland or its stalk. When tumors spread into the space cranial to the sella turcica, they can impinge on the optic chiasm and cause visual disorders. A common differential diagnosis of a sellar tumor is a craniopharyngeoma. In children up to 10 % of all intracranial tumors are craniopharyngeomas. Other differential diagnoses for sellar tumors are metastases, meningiomas, epidermoids and in rare cases astrocytomas, germinomas or Rathke cleft cysts As these tumors are located in an anatomically complex region of the skull base and are often very small, a highly focused imaging protocol is required. The currently favored modality is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the administration of a contrast agent. The sellar region should be mapped in thin slices. In cases of suspected microadenoma the imaging protocol should also contain a sequence with dynamic contrast administration in order to assess the specific enhancement characteristics of the tumor and the pituitary gland. (orig.) [German] Diese Arbeit ist eine Uebersicht ueber die haeufigsten Hypophysentumoren und deren Differenzialdiagnosen mit Augenmerk auf die

  3. Thermoradiotherapy of malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Kazuo; Itami, Jun; Arimizu, Noboru; Uno, Takashi; Toita, Takafumi; Shiina, Takeki; Mikuriya, Shuuichi; Yamada, Tsunehisa.

    1991-01-01

    From October 1986 to June 1989, 79 patients with malignant tumors were treated by radiation therapy combined with hyperthermia at National Medical Center Hospital. Seventy two patients (male: 48, female: 23) were evaluable. Average age was 62.4 years old (ranged 20-81 years old). Irradiation was delivered twice to fifth weekly in tumor doses of 50 to 60 Gy (TDF 82-122). We used 3 types of hyperthermic equipment, Thermotron RF8, BSD 1000 System and Endoradiotherm 100A. Hyperthermia was initiated within 30 minutes following irradiation, most of the patients being treated with adequate equipment, 41-44degC, for 60-70 minutes every 72 hours. Fifteen of 71 patients (20.8%) showed a complete response and 36 patients (50%) showed a partial response, so effective rate was 70.8% of all. In superficial tumors, 4 of 21 patients (21.5%) showed a complete response and 8 of 21 patients showed a partial response, effective rate was 63.2% of all. In deep seated tumor, 10 of 46 patients (21.7%) showed a complete response and 25 of all patients showed a partial response, so effective rate was 76.1% of all. Five patients were heated following only intra-tumor injection of OK-432 and its effective rate was 75%. We think that this modality of therapy will be effective in cases which heating area had been irradiated over tolerable doses. CR rate of superficial tumors according to intra-tumor center temperature tends to higher in the cases of higher tumor temperature. In deep seated tumor, 11 patients (23.9%) had reached over 43degC, 29 patients (63.0%) heated 41-43degC, 6 patients (13.0%) heated under 41degC and CR rate of each group were 36.4%, 17.2%, 16.7%, respectively. We think that thermotherapy with irradiation is an effective therapy in the treatment of malignancies but the improvement of heating equipment will be expected. (author)

  4. Effects of low dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Li; Hou Dianjun; Huang Shanying; Deng Daping; Wang Linchao; Cheng Yufeng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of low-dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice and radiotherapy induced by low-dose radiation. Methods: Male Wistar mice were implanted with Walker-256 sarcoma cells in the right armpit. On day 4, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body X-ray radiation. From the fifth day, tumor volume was measured, allowing for the creation of a graph depicting tumor growth. Lymphocytes activity in mice after whole-body X-ray radiation with LDR was determinned by FCM. Cytokines level were also determined by ELISA. Results: Compared with the radiotherapy group, tumor growth was significantly slower in the mice pre-exposed to low-dose radiation (P<0.05), after 15 days, the average tumor weight in the mice pre- exposed to low-dose radiation was also significantly lower (P<0.05). Lymphocytes activity and the expression of the CK in mice after whole-body y-ray radiation with LDR increased significantly. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation can markedly improve the immune function of the lymphocyte, inhibit the tumor growth, increase the resistant of the high-dose radiotherapy and enhance the effect of radiotherapy. (authors)

  5. Tumor scintigram, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Shunichi; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa; Shimura, Kazuo; Ifuka, Keijiro

    1975-01-01

    In various cases of malignant tumors, especially those of lung cancer and liver cancer, scans were made with 57 Co-bleomycin(BLM), and its diagnostic significance was evaluated. Tumors were visualized with 57 Co-BLM in 22 of the 26 cases of lung cancer (84.6%). Concentrations of the RI were noted in all of the cases of squamous epithelium cancer, adenoid cancer and cellule-type undifferentiated cancer. The smallest tumor that could be detected was a 2 x 2 cm adenoid cancer. Tumors were imaged in 19 of the 27 cases of liver cancer (70.4%). This detection rate was increased by a combination of 57 Co-BLM and 198 Au-colloid scanning. The authors believe that 57 Co-BLM will help to establish the diagnosis of lung cancer or liver cancer. Tumors were also imaged in 6 of the 15 cases of breast cancer, but no distinct concentration was noted in the 7 cases of thyroid cancer. (Ueda, J.)

  6. Cryoablation for pulmonary tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Masafumi; Izumi, Yotaro; Tsukada, Norimasa; Asakura, Keisuke; Nakatsuka, Seishi; Yashiro, Hideki; Inoue, Masanori; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Kobayashi, Koichi

    2008-01-01

    We have experienced more than 200 sessions for mainly metastatic lung tumor and small number of primary lung cancer since 2002. Cryo-probe is inserted percutaneously with local anesthesia under CT scan guide. Co-axial technique is adopted to prevent from hemorrhage and massive air leakage. The average of hospital stay after treatment is 2.6 days. Although pneumothorax was associated with more than half patients, 5% of them experienced chest tube insertion. Local recurrence 1 year after treatment was found 10% of tumors of 10 mm or less diameter, 30% of 11-20 mm diameter, and 40% of 20-30 mm diameter and 100% of 31 mm or more diameter. In case of large vessels (3 mm or more diameter) running within 4 mm from tumor, recurrence rate was higher compared with the same sized tumors without large vessels running nearby. We are eager for the development of 3D-simulation system considering the distribution of caloric value is strongly requested to improve the local control power of cryoablation for lung tumor. (author)

  7. CNS Tumors in Neurofibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campian, Jian; Gutmann, David H

    2017-07-20

    Neurofibromatosis (NF) encompasses a group of distinct genetic disorders in which affected children and adults are prone to the development of benign and malignant tumors of the nervous system. The purpose of this review is to discuss the spectrum of CNS tumors arising in individuals with NF type 1 (NF1) and NF type 2 (NF2), their pathogenic etiologies, and the rational treatment options for people with these neoplasms. This article is a review of preclinical and clinical data focused on the treatment of the most common CNS tumors encountered in children and adults with NF1 and NF2. Although children with NF1 are at risk for developing low-grade gliomas of the optic pathway and brainstem, individuals with NF2 typically manifest low-grade tumors affecting the cranial nerves (vestibular schwannomas), meninges (meningiomas), and spinal cord (ependymomas). With the identification of the NF1 and NF2 genes, molecularly targeted therapies are beginning to emerge, as a result of a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying NF1 and NF2 protein function. As we enter into an era of precision oncology, a more comprehensive awareness of the factors that increase the risk of developing CNS cancers in affected individuals, coupled with a greater appreciation of the cellular and molecular determinants that maintain tumor growth, will undoubtedly yield more effective therapies for these cancer predisposition syndromes.

  8. Tumor Markers: At a Glance

    OpenAIRE

    NS Manikantan; Dhanya Balakrishnan; AD Manoj Kumar; Brijesh Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Tumor markers are biochemical substances elaborated by tumor cells due to either the cause or effect of malignant process. produced by host in response to a tumor that can be used to differentiate a tumor from normal tissue or to determine the presence of a tumor based on measurements in blood or secretions.1 These markers can be normal endogenous products that are produced at a greater rate in cancer cells or the products of newly switched on genes th...

  9. Granular cell tumor masquerading as a chalazion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Ryan T; Black, Evan H

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell tumors were first described in the 1920s and since then have been commonly found throughout the body. They are rarely found in periorbital, orbital, and ocular structures. The authors present a patient with a 2-year history of a lesion that had been previously excised as a presumed chalazion without pathologic analysis. The lesion recurred, and histopathological analysis following complete resection revealed a granular cell tumor. This case is an example of a rare periocular tumor. Although only an isolated case, it provides support for the recommendation that excised lesions be sent to pathologic study, particularly those with an atypical clinical course.

  10. MR pancreatography (MRP) for mucin-producing pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usuki, Noriaki; Nishimoto, Masaoki; Shima, Tomoko; Hirokawa, Keiko; Tashiro, Takahiko; Saiwai, Shigeo; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Okabe, Sumihiro

    1997-01-01

    MR pancreatography was performed in 11 patients with mucin-producing pancreatic tumor (main duct type: four and branch duct type: seven) using HASTE with a body phased array coil on a 1.5-T unit. The results of MR pancreatography were compared with imaging of endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP). In all cases, MR pancreatography demonstrated all dilated pancreatic ducts and cysts. ERP did not completely demonstrate dilated ducts and cysts because of mucinous materials. Conspicuity of an intraductal tumor was more excellent by ER pancreatography than MR pancreatography. Therefore MR pancreatography and ER pancreatography are complementary methods in diagnosis for mucin-producing pancreatic tumors. (author)

  11. Photodynamic Treatment of Tumor with Bacteria Expressing KillerRed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Libo; Kanada, Masamitsu; Zhang, Jinyan; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer treatment modality in which a photosensitizing dye is administered and exposed to light to kill tumor cells via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A fundamental obstacle for PDT is the low specificity for staining solid tumors with dyes. Recently, a tumor targeting system guided by anaerobic bacteria was proposed for tumor imaging and treatment. Here, we explore the feasibility of the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed, which is expressed in Escherichia coli, to treat tumors. Using nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT), we detected a lengthy ROS diffusion from the bodies of KillerRed-expressing bacteria in vitro, which demonstrated the feasibility of using bacteria to eradicate cells in their surroundings. In nude mice, Escherichia coli (E. coli) expressing KillerRed (KR-E. coli) were subcutaneously injected into xenografts comprising CNE2 cells, a human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line, and HeLa cells, a human cervical carcinoma cell line. KR-E. coli seemed to proliferate rapidly in the tumors as observed under an imaging system. When the intensity of fluorescence increased and the fluorescent area became as large as the tumor one day after KR-E. coli injection, the KR-E. coli-bearing tumor was irradiated with an orange light (λ = 540-580 nm). In all cases, the tumors became necrotic the next day and were completely eliminated in a few days. No necrosis was observed after the irradiation of tumors injected with a vehicle solution or a vehicle carrying the E. coli without KillerRed. In successfully treated mice, no tumor recurrence was observed for more than two months. E. coli genetically engineered for KillerRed expression are highly promising for the diagnosis and treatment of tumors when the use of bacteria in patients is cleared for infection safety.

  12. Photodynamic Treatment of Tumor with Bacteria Expressing KillerRed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libo Yan

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a cancer treatment modality in which a photosensitizing dye is administered and exposed to light to kill tumor cells via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. A fundamental obstacle for PDT is the low specificity for staining solid tumors with dyes. Recently, a tumor targeting system guided by anaerobic bacteria was proposed for tumor imaging and treatment. Here, we explore the feasibility of the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed, which is expressed in Escherichia coli, to treat tumors. Using nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT, we detected a lengthy ROS diffusion from the bodies of KillerRed-expressing bacteria in vitro, which demonstrated the feasibility of using bacteria to eradicate cells in their surroundings. In nude mice, Escherichia coli (E. coli expressing KillerRed (KR-E. coli were subcutaneously injected into xenografts comprising CNE2 cells, a human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line, and HeLa cells, a human cervical carcinoma cell line. KR-E. coli seemed to proliferate rapidly in the tumors as observed under an imaging system. When the intensity of fluorescence increased and the fluorescent area became as large as the tumor one day after KR-E. coli injection, the KR-E. coli-bearing tumor was irradiated with an orange light (λ = 540-580 nm. In all cases, the tumors became necrotic the next day and were completely eliminated in a few days. No necrosis was observed after the irradiation of tumors injected with a vehicle solution or a vehicle carrying the E. coli without KillerRed. In successfully treated mice, no tumor recurrence was observed for more than two months. E. coli genetically engineered for KillerRed expression are highly promising for the diagnosis and treatment of tumors when the use of bacteria in patients is cleared for infection safety.

  13. Glomus jugulare tumor with intra- and extracranial extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morisako, Toshitaka; Goya, Tomokazu; Wakisaka, Shinichiro; Kinoshita, Kazuo

    1987-01-01

    A case of glomus jugulare tumor with intra- and extracranial extension is described. The patient was a 63-year-old woman who complained of gait and memory disturbances. On admission neurological examination revealed recent memory disturbance, left deafness, left XI, XIIth cranial nerve palsies, and slight ataxic gait. Roentgenogram of the skull showed an enlarged left jugular foramen with bone erosion. Plain X-ray computerized tomography scan (X-CT) indicated obstructive hydrocephalus and X-CT with contrast enhancement revealed a mass lesion in the left posterior cranial fossa extending through enlarged left jugular foramen to the extracranial space toward the level of C 2 . Cerebral angiography demonstrated a large mass with blood supply from branches of left external carotid and vertebral arteries. The tumor stain was not remarkable. Left internal jugular vein was completely obstructed at the level of the second cervical vertebral body. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly showed the tumor extending from the anterolateral portion to the second cervical vertebral body through the enlarged jugular foramen to the posterior cranial fossa. Brain stem and cerebellar hemisphere which were markedly compressed by the mass were clearly visualized. At first a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was made and four weeks later subtotal removal of the tumor was undertaken. Histopathology of tumor specimen showed typical glomus jugulare tumor. MRI was considered to be very useful for the diagnosis and treatment of the glomus jugulare tumor with intra- and extracranial extension. (author)

  14. Radioimmunodetection of human melanoma tumor xenografts with human monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomibuchi, Makoto; Saxton, R.E.; Lake, R.R.; Katano, Mitsuo; Irie, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    A human IgM monoclonal antibody has been established that defines a tumor-associated membrane antigen expressed on human melanoma cells. The antigen has been identified as the ganglioside GD2. In this paper, the authors describe the potential usefulness of the human monoclonal antibody for radioimaging. Nude mice bearing tumors derived from a human melanoma cell line were used as a model. Antibody activity was degradated significantly after labeling with 131 I by the use of a modified chloramine-T method. After testing various concentrations, labeled antibody of a specific activity of 2.8μCi/μg produced the best results. Balb/c nude mice bearing a GD2-positive M14 melanoma cell line were injected with 10-30μg of labeled antibody, and its radiolocalization in different organs and in the whole body were evaluated. The best tumor image was obtained on Day 6. The labeled antibody uptake ratio between tumor and muscle was 9.2:1; the ratio between tumor and liver was 1.4:1. These studies represent the first report of experimental tumor imaging with human monoclonal antibody. Human monoclonals will probably prove to be superior reagents for tumor imaging in melanoma patients if the problem of anti-body radiolysis is resolved. (author)

  15. Tumor radiation responses and tumor oxygenation in aging mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, S.

    1989-01-01

    EMT6 mouse mammary tumors transplanted into aging mice are less sensitive to radiation than tumors growing in young adult animals. The experiments reported here compare the radiation dose-response curves defining the survivals of tumor cells in aging mice and in young adult mice. Cell survival curves were assessed in normal air-breathing mice and in mice asphyxiated with N 2 to produce uniform hypoxia throughout the tumors. Analyses of survival curves revealed that 41% of viable malignant cells were severely hypoxic in tumors in aging mice, while only 19% of the tumor cells in young adult animals were radiobiologically hypoxic. This did not appear to reflect anaemia in the old animals. Treatment of aging animals with a perfluorochemical emulsion plus carbogen (95% O 2 /5% CO 2 ) increased radiation response of the tumors, apparently by improving tumor oxygenation and decreasing the number of severely hypoxic, radiation resistant cells in the tumors. (author)

  16. Mediastinal tumors. Update 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.E.; Thomas, C.R. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This volume represents the premier work devoted solely to the complex myriad of mediastinal tumors. The contributors to the state-of-the-art text are clinical investigators of international renown. The diagnosis, natural history, and therapeutic strategies in respect of all mediastinal tumors are thoroughly addressed in a concise and logical manner. An emphasis on the multidisciplinary nature of mediastinal tumors is thematic throughout the text. Moreover, the combined-modality treatment schemes that have been increasingly developed worldwide are analyzed. This textbook will prove of value to all general surgeons, thoracic surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, pulmonologists, and endocrinologists, as well as to nursing and medical students, residents and fellows-in training. (orig.). 55 figs., 21 tabs

  17. Orbital lymphoid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hiroko; Ueno, Hisayuki

    1994-01-01

    We examined 13 cases of orbital lymphoid tumors (OLT) and 1 of orbital hemangioma (OH), using dynamic MRI, to determine the biological behavior of the tumors before surgery. We measured time-dependent changes in the contrast enhancement of tumors and described time intensity curves (TIC), dividing the cases into 3 architectural types: completes septum (CS), incomplete septum (IS), and diffuse types. The TICs of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH, 2 cases) of CS type and idiopathic orbital inflamation (1), RLH (5) of IS type, atypical lymphoid hyperplasia (4), and malignant lymphoma (1) and OH (1) showed rapid increase with low peak and gradual decrease, rapid increase with high peak and gradual decrease, rapid increase and plateau, and gradual increase type, respectively. In order words, OLT showed various TIC, roughly correlating with pathological findings. These results indicate that dynamic MRI may be useful in the preoperative clinical diagnosis of OLT. (author)

  18. Percutaneous bone tumor management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangi, Afshin; Buy, Xavier

    2010-06-01

    Interventional radiology plays a major role in the management of bone tumors. Many different percutaneous techniques are available. Some aim to treat pain and consolidate a pathological bone (cementoplasty); others aim to ablate tumor or reduce its volume (sclerotherapy, thermal ablation). In this article, image-guided techniques of primary and secondary bone tumors with vertebroplasty, ethanol injection, radiofrequency ablation, laser photocoagulation, cryoablation, and radiofrequency ionization (coblation) will be reviewed. For each modality, the principles, the indications, and the results will be presented. The technical choice depends on the therapeutic intent-curative or palliative-and the need for consolidation, but also on the general status of the patient and the other therapeutic options. For the most complex cases, combined treatments can be required. However, the less disabling technique should always be considered first.

  19. Bilateral Wilms' tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolm, A.W.; Jaffe, N.; Folkman, M.J.; Cassady, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty children with bilateral Wilms' tumor were presented to the Children's Hospital Medical Center and Children's Cancer Research Foundation, Sidney Farber Cancer Institute, and Joint Center for Radiation Therapy (CHMC-CCRF, SFCI, JCRT) from January 1, 1956 to December 31, 1976. Of these 20, 16 had simultaneous and 4 had metachronous disease on presentation. All patients were treated with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Of the 16 patients with simultaneous disease, 10 (63%) are alive and free of disease 12+ to 175+ months post diagnosis and treatment, with median follow-up of 121 months. There were no long-term survivors in the metachronous group; all were dead of disease within 21 months from initial presentation of original tumor. With these data we relate prognosis to extent of disease and discuss a general approach to the management of bilateral Wilms' tumor

  20. Radiology of neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hako, R.; Hakova, H.; Gulova, I.

    2011-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors arise in the bronchopulmonary or gastrointestinal tract, but they can arise in almost any organ. The tumors have varied malignant potential depending on the site of their origin. Metastases may be present at the time of diagnosis, which often occurs at a late stage of the disease. Most NETs have nonspecific imaging characteristics. Imaging plays a pivotal role in the localization and staging of neuroendocrine tumors and in monitoring the treatment response. Imaging should involve multi-phase computed tomography, contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and other one. Hepatic metastatic disease in particular lends itself to a wide range of interventional treatment options. Transcatheter arterial embolization may be used alone or in combination with chemo embolization. Ablative techniques, hepatic cryotherapy and percutaneous ethanol injection may then be undertaken. A multidisciplinary approach to treatment and follow-up is important. (author)

  1. Dysembryoplastic Neuroepithelial Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon-Lim Suh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNT is a benign glioneuronal neoplasm that most commonly occurs in children and young adults and may present with medically intractable, chronic seizures. Radiologically, this tumor is characterized by a cortical topography and lack of mass effect or perilesional edema. Partial complex seizures are the most common presentation. Three histologic subtypes of DNTs have been described. Histologically, the recognition of a unique, specific glioneuronal element in brain tumor samples from patients with medically intractable, chronic epilepsy serves as a diagnostic feature for complex or simple DNT types. However, nonspecific DNT has diagnostic difficulty because its histology is indistinguishable from conventional gliomas and because a specific glioneuronal element and/or multinodularity are absent. This review will focus on the clinical, radiographic, histopathological, and immunohistochemical features as well as the molecular genetics of all three variants of DNTs. The histological and cytological differential diagnoses for this lesion, especially the nonspecific variant, will be discussed.

  2. Benign notochordal cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Gamarra, C; Bernabéu Taboada, D; Pozo Kreilinger, J J; Tapia Viñé, M

    Benign notochordal cell tumors (TBCN) are lesions with notochordal differentiation which affect the axial skeleton. They are characterized by asymptomatic or non-specific symptomatology and are radiologically unnoticed because of their small size, or because they are mistaken with other benign bone lesions, such as vertebral hemangiomas. When they are large, or symptomatic, can be differential diagnosis with metastases, primary bone tumors and chordomas. We present a case of a TBCN in a 50-year-old woman, with a sacral lesion seen in MRI. A CT-guided biopsy was scheduled to analyze the lesion, finding that the tumor was not clearly recognizable on CT, so the anatomical references of MRI were used to select the appropriate plane. The planning of the approach and the radio-pathological correlation were determinant to reach the definitive diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Glomus tumors in neurofibromatosis type 1: genetic, functional, and clinical evidence of a novel association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brems, Hilde; Park, Caroline; Maertens, Ophélia; Pemov, Alexander; Messiaen, Ludwine; Messia, Ludwine; Upadhyaya, Meena; Claes, Kathleen; Beert, Eline; Peeters, Kristel; Mautner, Victor; Sloan, Jennifer L; Yao, Lawrence; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Sciot, Raf; De Smet, Luc; Legius, Eric; Stewart, Douglas R

    2009-09-15

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common disorder that arises secondary to mutations in the tumor suppressor gene NF1. Glomus tumors are small, benign but painful tumors that originate from the glomus body, a thermoregulatory shunt concentrated in the fingers and toes. We report 11 individuals with NF1 who harbored 20 glomus tumors of the fingers and 1 in the toe; 5 individuals had multiple glomus tumors. We hypothesized that biallelic inactivation of NF1 underlies the pathogenesis of these tumors. In 12 NF1-associated glomus tumors, we used cell culture and laser capture microdissection to isolate DNA. We also analyzed two sporadic (not NF1-associated) glomus tumors. Genetic analysis showed germ line and somatic NF1 mutations in seven tumors. RAS mitogen-activated protein kinase hyperactivation was observed in cultured NF1(-/-) glomus cells, reflecting a lack of inhibition of the pathway by functional neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1. No abnormalities in NF1 or RAS mitogen-activated protein kinase activation were found in sporadic glomus tumors. By comparative genomic hybridization, we observed amplification of the 3'-end of CRTAC1 and a deletion of the 5'-end of WASF1 in two NF1-associated glomus tumors. For the first time, we show that loss of neurofibromin function is crucial in the pathogenesis of glomus tumors in NF1. Glomus tumors of the fingers or toes should be considered as part of the tumor spectrum of NF1.

  4. [Surgery of adrenal tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, V O; Ermolov, A S; Kovalenko, T I; Kondratiev, A V

    2004-01-01

    From 1983 to 2003 examination and surgical treatment were performed in 463 patients with different adrenal tumors. Hormone-active tumors were revealed in 249 of them, non-active - in 214. Combination of CT or MRT with study of adrenal hormones is the basis of the diagnosis. In different cases multispiral computed tomography, angiography, selected taking of blood from inferior caval vein, US- or CT-guided biopsy were used. Open surgery through thoracofrenolumbotomy was performed in 392 patients, videolaparoscopic surgery - in 71. Expediency of laparoscopic surgery in line with open surgery is demonstrated.

  5. Tumor-induced osteomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan de Beur, Suzanne M

    2005-09-14

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic form of renal phosphate wasting that results in severe hypophosphatemia, a defect in vitamin D metabolism, and osteomalacia. This debilitating disorder is illustrated by the clinical presentation of a 55-year-old woman with progressive fatigue, weakness, and muscle and bone pain with fractures. After a protracted clinical course and extensive laboratory evaluation, tumor-induced osteomalacia was identified as the basis of her clinical presentation. In this article, the distinctive clinical characteristics of this syndrome, the advances in diagnosis of TIO, and new insights into the pathophysiology of this disorder are discussed.

  6. Total body irradiation: current indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, P.; Danhier, S.; Dubray, B.; Cosset, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The choice of dose and fractionation for total body irradiation is made difficult by the large number of considerations to be taken into account. The outcome of bone marrow transplantation after total body irradiation can be understood in terms of tumor cell killing, engraftment, and normal tissue damage, each of these endpoints being influenced by irradiation-, disease-, transplant-, and patient- related factors. Interpretation of clinical data is further hampered by the overwhelming influence of logistic constraints, the small numbers of randomized studies, and the concomitant variations in total dose and fraction size or dose rate. So far, three cautious conclusions can be drawn in order to tentatively adapt the total body irradiation schedule to clinically-relevant situations. Firstly, the organs at risk for normal tissue damage (lung, liver, lens, kidney) are protected by delivering small doses per fraction at low dose rate. This suggests that, when toxicity is at stake (e.g. in children), fractionated irradiation should be preferred, provided that inter-fraction intervals are long enough. Secondly, fractionated irradiation should be avoided in case of T-cell depleted transplant, given the high risk of graft rejection in this setting. An alternative would be to increase total (or fractional) dose of fractionated total body irradiation, but this approach is likely to induce more normal tissue toxicity. Thirdly, clinical data have shown higher relapse rates in chronic myeloid leukemia after fractionated or low dose rate total body irradiation, suggesting that fractionated irradiation should not be recommended, unless total (or fractional) dose is increased. Total body irradiation-containing regimens, primarily cyclophosphamide / total body irradiation, are either equivalent to or better than the chemotherapy-only regimens, primarily busulfan / cyclophosphamide. Busulfan / cyclophosphamide certainly represents a reasonable alternative, especially in patients who

  7. [Multifaceted body. I. The bodies of medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraga, M; Bourquin, C; Wykretowicz, H; Stiefel, F

    2015-02-11

    The human body is the object upon which medicine is acting, but also lived reality, image, symbol, representation and the object of elaboration and theory. All these elements which constitute the body influence the way medicine is treating it. In this series of three articles, we address the human body from various perspectives: medical (1), phenomenological (2), psychosomatic and socio-anthropological (3). This first article discusses four distinct types of representation of the body within medicine, each related to a specific epistemology and shaping a distinct kind of clinical legitimacy: the body-object of anatomy, the body-machine of physiology, the cybernetic body of biology, the statistical body of epidemiology.

  8. "Osseous tumors of the hand "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Farzan M

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available The majority of osseous tumors of the hand are benign. The surgeon who evaluates and treats osseous tumors of the hand has to be familiar with limb anatomy, tumor biology, various presentations of the tumors and the range of treatment possibilities and their limitations. Lesions in the hand more often present earlier in their course than those at other sites, just because they are more likely to superficial and easily noticed. A review of all cases of osseous tumors of the hand, seen by a hand surgeon over the last 10 years, at Imam Khomeini hospital was performed. Among 55 cases with osseous tumors of hand, 48 primary benign bone tumors, 3 primary malignant bone tumors, and 4 metastatic bone tumors were found. Enchondroma was the most common benign bone tumor followed by osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, aneurismal bone cyst, giant cell tumor, epidermoid cyst, and osteochondroma. There were two chondrosarcoma and one Ewing’s sarcoma as primary malignant bone tumors. Metastasis to the hand from colon, esophagus, and breast were also found. There were also two cases with Brown tumor secondary to hyperparathyroidism, we conclude that a variety of osseous tumors could occur in the hand, and usually they are benign. Although malignant neoplasms in the hand that arise from tissues other than the skin are very rare, the hand may be the site of distant breast, lung, kidney, esophagus, or colon adenocarcinoma metastases, most of which have a predilection for the distal phalanges.

  9. Aggressive malignant phyllodes tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Roberts

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Despite biopsy proven malignant phyllodes tumor, it was near impossible to predict such a rapid course of disease progression in our patient. Our case illustrates the unpredictable nature of this disease in general and it possibly sheds light on a variant of the disease which had undergone an aggressive transformation.

  10. Surgery for adrenal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamah, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the presentation, localization, pathology, surgical management and outcome of surgery for adrenal gland tumors. Design: Prospective clinico epidemiological study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at the Department of General Surgery, University Unit, Riyadh medical Complex Kingdom of Saudi Rabia from June, 1991 to may, 2001. Subjects and Methods: A total of 21 cases with adrenal tumors were studied for demographic data, clinical presentation, diagnostic workup, localization, surgical management, pathology and outcome. The outcome of these patients was followed prospectively. Results: The study included 12 female and 9 male patients. The mean age at surgery was 36.7 years. Hypertension (69.%) was the commonest presentation in hypersecretory functional tumors. The localization accuracy for ultrasonography, computerized tomography, MRI and MIBG scan was 95.2%, 98.3% 87.8% and 83.6% respectively. Pheochromocytoma was the most common adrenal pathology observed in 14 (66.6%) cases. The overall morbidity was 19% with no hospital mortality. Complete follow-up of available 19 patients (90.5 %) revealed no tumor recurrence and persistent hypertension in 14.3% cases. Conclusion: surgery on adrenal glands is safe in experienced hands and is recommended in institutes with all backup facilities. (author)

  11. Unmasking circulating tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swennenhuis, Joost Franciscus

    2017-01-01

    The number of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) that can be isolated from blood of cancer patients is prognostic for the course of the disease. A higher number of CTCs correlates with a worse prognosis. A change from a higher number to a lower number of CTCs indicates a benefit of the current treatment

  12. Targeting thapsigargin towards tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Brøgger; Doan, Thi Quynh Nhu; Paulsen, Eleonora Sandholdt

    2015-01-01

    substrates for either prostate specific antigen (PSA) or prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) prodrugs were created, which selectively affect prostate cancer cells or neovascular tissue in tumors. One of the prodrug is currently tested in clinical phase II. The prodrug under clinical trial has been...

  13. Study of wilms' tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.H.; Yaqub, N.

    2001-01-01

    This study is an effort to bring into light data related to children with Wilms' tumor managed at Islamabad as local literature on this topic is lacking. It was retrospective study. The study was conducted at Children Hospital, Pakistan Institute of Medical Science, Islamabad between January, 1987 and December 1995. All patients managed during the study period were included in the study. In all the patients complete blood count (CBC), urine analysis (D/R),X-ray abdomen and chest, ultrasound abdomen and in selected cases CT scan were performed. National Wilms' Tumor Study Group (NWTS 3) protocol was followed for further management. Fifty patients including 28 males and 22 females with the age range from 9 months to 8 years were managed in 9 years period. Left kidney was involved in 31 patients. Most of the tumors were solid on ultrasound, 76% patients were in stage III and IV. In one case bilateral involvement of kidney was found. Forty patients underwent primary surgery. Only 14 patients received complete course of chemotherapy while 31 radiotherapy. Nineteen patients died and 15 lost to follow-up. The survival and mortality rates are comparable to NWTS-3 results, although, most of the patients were presented in advance stage of Wilms tumor. The survival of these patients can be improved by increasing awareness of society through electronic and print media. (author)

  14. Stages of Wilms Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and interleukin-2 (IL-2) are types of biologic therapy used to treat childhood renal cell cancer . Interferon affects the division of cancer cells and ... Tumors Renal Cell Cancer (RCC) Treatment of renal cell cancer usually ... nodes. Biologic therapy ( interferon and interleukin-2 ) for cancer that ...

  15. Tumor-stem cells interactions by fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleshina, Aleksandra V.; Cherkasova, Elena I.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kiseleva, Ekaterina V.; Dashinimaev, Erdem B.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, great deal of interest is investigation the function of the stem cells (SC) in tumors. In this study, we studied «recipient-tumor- fluorescent stem cells » system using the methods of in vivo imaging and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). We used adipose-derived adult stem (ADAS) cells of human lentiviral transfected with the gene of fluorescent protein Turbo FP635. ADAS cells were administrated into nude mice with transplanted tumor HeLa Kyoto (human cervical carcinoma) at different stages of tumor growth (0-8 days) intravenously or into tumor. In vivo imaging was performed on the experimental setup for epi - luminescence bioimaging (IAP RAS, Nizhny Novgorod). The results of the imaging showed localization of fluorophore tagged stem cells in the spleen on day 5-9 after injection. The sensitivity of the technique may be improved by spectral separation autofluorescence and fluorescence of stem cells. We compared the results of in vivo imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM 510 META, Carl Zeiss, Germany). Internal organs of the animals and tumor tissue were investigated. It was shown that with i.v. injection of ADAS, bright fluorescent structures with spectral characteristics corresponding to TurboFP635 protein are locally accumulated in the marrow, lungs and tumors of animals. These findings indicate that ADAS cells integrate in the animal body with transplanted tumor and can be identified by fluorescence bioimaging techniques in vivo and ex vivo.

  16. A tumor profile in Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satgé, Daniel; Nishi, Motoi; Sirvent, Nicolas; Vekemans, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Constitutional trisomy 18 causes Edwards syndrome, which is characterized by intellectual disability and a particular set of malformations. Although this condition carries high mortality during prenatal and early postnatal life, some of the rare infants who survive the first months develop benign and malignant tumors. To determine the tumor profile associated with Edwards syndrome, we performed a systematic review of the literature. This review reveals a tumor profile differing from those of Down (trisomy 21) and Patau (trisomy 13) syndromes. The literature covers 45 malignancies: 29 were liver cancers, mainly hepatoblastomas found in Japanese females; 13 were kidney tumors, predominantly nephroblastomas; 1 was neuroblastoma; 1 was a Hodgkin disease; and 1 was acute myeloid leukemia in an infant with both trisomy 18 and type 1 neurofibromatosis. No instances of the most frequent malignancies of early life-cerebral tumors, germ cell tumors, or leukemia--are reported in children with pure trisomy 18. Tumor occurrence does not appear to correlate with body weight, tissue growth, or cancer genes mapping to chromosome 18. Importantly, the most recent clinical histories report successful treatment; this raises ethical concerns about cancer treatment in infants with Edwards syndrome. In conclusion, knowledge of the Edwards' syndrome tumor profile will enable better clinical surveillance in at-risk organs (i.e., liver, kidney). This knowledge also provides clues to understanding oncogenesis, including the probably reduced frequency of some neoplasms in infants and children with this genetic condition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. CT and MRI of sphenoid tumors and pseudo tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaujeux, R.; Dietemann, J.L.; Brun, F.; Bourjat, P.

    1994-01-01

    The radiological features of the main tumors and pseudotumors of the sphenoid bone with CT and MRI are described in detail. The lesions are classified as tumors and pseudotumors of the sphenoid bone and sphenoid sinus and as neighboring tumors and pseudotumors with secondary sphenoid invasion. Metastases, chondromas, fibrous dysplasia, myelomas, plasmocytomas and chordomas are the most frequent sphenoid lesions. Tumors and pseudotumors of the sphenoid sinus mainly include mucoceles and cholesterin granulomas. Neighboring tumors are of intracranial origin (pituitary adenoma, meningioma, aneurysm) or originate in the nasopharynx (nasopharyngeal fibroma, malignant tumors) or the nasosinusal cavities (inverted papillomas, invasive aspergillosis, malignant tumors). The radiological features do no always allow diagnosing the tumoral type. However, the merits of CT and, even more, of MRI for an accurate assessment of extension is indisputable. (authors). 41 refs., 12 figs

  18. Large Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Mimicking A Gynecologic Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sew-Khee Yeat

    2005-06-01

    Conclusion: GISTs express c-kit proteins (CD-117 on immunohistochemistry. They may mimic gynecologic tumors since they share the same pelvic cavity. One should always consider GISTs as part of the differential diagnosis in pelvic tumors.

  19. Rare and Challenging Tumor Entity: Phyllodes Tumor of the Prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bannowsky

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic epithelial-stromal tumors of the prostate are rare, with 82 cases reported in literature. These cases have been published under a variety of diagnoses, including phyllodes tumor and prostatic stromal proliferation of uncertain malignant potential as well as a malignant tumor called “prostatic stromal sarcoma”. We report a case of a 60-year-old man with the histological diagnosis of phyllodes tumor of the prostate in transurethral resection specimen.

  20. Mixed odontogenic tumor: Ameloblastoma and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etit Demet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors constitute a group of heterogeneous disease derived from epithelial, mesenchymal and/or ectomesenchymal elements. Ameloblastoma is the best known and the most frequent form of odontogenic tumors. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT, known as Pindborg tumor, is locally invasive lesion which has a characteristic amiloid deposition. Here a case of a peripheral ameloblastoma associated with CEOT is presented with clinical and morphological features.

  1. Epidemiological features of brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors account for 1.4% of all cancers and 2.4% of all cancer-related deaths. The incidence of brain tumors varies and it is higher in developed countries of Western Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand. In Serbia, according to data from 2009, malignant brain tumors account for 2. 2 of all tumors, and from all cancer­related deaths, 3.2% is caused by malignant brain tumors. According to recent statistical reports, an overall incidence of brain tumors for benign and malignant tumors combined is 18.71 per 100,000 persons/year. The most common benign brain tumor in adults is meningioma, which is most present in women, and the most common malignant tumor is glioblastoma, which is most present in adult men. Due to high mortality, especially in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma and significant brain tumor morbidity, there is a constant interest in understanding its etiology in order to possibly prevent tumor occurrence in future and enable more efficient treatment strategies for this fatal brain disease. Despite the continuously growing number of epidemiological studies on possible factors of tumor incidence, the etiology remains unclear. The only established environmental risk factor of gliomas is ionizing radiation exposure. Exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields via cell phone use has gained a lot of attention as a potential risk factor of brain tumor development. However, studies have been inconsistent and inconclusive, so more definite results are still expected.

  2. Carcinoid tumor of the kidney: An unusual renal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P P Singh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoid tumors are low-grade malignant tumors that arise from neuroendocrine cells. Primary renal carcinoid is extremely rare. We present a case of 57-year-old male with primary renal carcinoid tumor. Presently, the patient is on regular follow up and is doing well.

  3. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... percent of foreign body ingestions occur among children. Most foreign bodies pass through the gastrointestinal tract without ... fainting and shock. Foreign bodies in the airway: Most foreign bodies in the airway are usually expelled ...

  4. Palliative radiation therapy for solid tumors in dogs: 103 cases (2007-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollett, Melissa A; Duda, Lili; Brown, Dorothy C; Krick, Erika L

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical response, adverse effects, and outcomes associated with palliative radiation therapy (PRT) in dogs with various solid tumor types at various body locations. Retrospective case series. 103 dogs with solid tumors. Medical records for dogs with solid tumors treated with PRT between July 2007 and January 2011 at a veterinary teaching hospital were reviewed. Data collected included signalment, tumor type and location, initial staging results, PRT protocol, other tumor-specific treatments, patient and tumor response, outcome, and acute and chronic adverse effects. Median progression-free survival time, median survival time (MST), and other descriptive statistics were calculated. Types of tumors treated included carcinoma, sarcoma, melanoma, primary bone tumor, mast cell tumor, and ameloblastoma. For all dogs, the overall tumor and clinical response rates to PRT were 75% and 77%, respectively, and the MST was 134 days, but those responses varied substantially among tumor types. Dogs that developed a positive clinical response or maintained stable disease after PRT had a significantly longer MST than did dogs with progressive disease. Tumor location was not significantly associated with median progression-free survival time or MST. Most dogs tolerated the PRT well. Acute and chronic adverse effects were observed in 57 and 8 dogs, respectively, but were generally self-limiting. Results indicated that dogs with various types of solid tumors that received PRT had objective beneficial responses and an improvement in quality of life that was positively associated with survival time.

  5. Biopsy in Musculoskeletal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Gharehdaghi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of bone tumors is based on careful evaluation of clinical, imaging and a pathologic findings. So the biopsy of bone and soft tissue sarcomas is the final step in evaluation and a fundamental step in the diagnosis of the lesion. It should not be performed as a shortcut to diagnosis (1. The biopsy should be performed in order to confirm the diagnosis and differentiate among few diagnoses after careful staged studies. Real and artificial changes in imaging studies will be superimposed after performing biopsy, which may alter the interpretation if done after biopsy is taken (1. The correct management of a sarcoma depends on the accurate diagnosis. Inadequate, inapprppriate, or inaccurate non-representative biopsy leads to poorer outcome in terms of survivorship and limb salvage. An incorrect, unplanned incision and biopsy may unnecessarily contaminate uninvolved compartments which may convert a salvageable limb to amputation. Anatomic approach along with the proper biopsy techniques may lead to success or catastrophe. It is clear that in patients with inappropriate biopsy, the chance of the need to change the treatment to more radical than would originally be expected is significantly higher. Also it is more probable to need to  convert curative to palliative treatment and to require adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with inappropriate biopsies. Patients with sarcoma are best served by early referral to a specialized center where staged investigations and biopsy can be performed with minimal morbidity (3. Open biopsy is still considered the gold standard; however, recent studies suggest comparable results with percutaneous core needle biopsy. Our study on 103 consecutive CNB and open biopsy showed comparable results as well. Surgeons need to answer to two questions prior to performing a biopsy: 1-          Where is the best part of the lesion to be biopsied? 2-          What is the safest route without contaminating

  6. Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davies, Karen

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare neoplasms accounting for less than 5% of pancreatic malignancies. They are broadly classified into either functioning tumors (insulinomas, gastrinomas, glucagonomas, VIPomas, and somatostatinomas) or nonfunctioning tumors. The diagnosis of these tumors is difficult and requires a careful history and examination combined with laboratory tests and radiologic imaging. Signs and symptoms are usually related to hormone hypersecretion in the case of functioning tumors and to tumor size or metastases with nonfunctioning tumors. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice even in the face of metastatic disease. Further development of novel diagnostic and treatment modalities offers potential to greatly improve quality of life and prolong disease-free survival for patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors.

  7. Targeting Therapy Resistant Tumor Vessels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2007-01-01

    .... To achieve this, we have developed tumor models for vascular normalization and are using in vivo phage display and isolation of peptides that specifically home to normalized tumor vessels resistant...

  8. Targeting Therapy Resistant Tumor Vessels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2008-01-01

    .... To achieve this, we have developed tumor models for vascular normalization and are using in vivo phage display and isolation of peptides that specifically home to normalized tumor vessels resistant...

  9. Living with a Brain Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Act Living with a Brain Tumor Understanding Emotions Talking About Your Brain Tumor Involving Family and Friends Returning To Work Physical Intimacy Health Insurance Options Financial & Medical Assistance ...

  10. Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davies, Karen

    2009-04-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare neoplasms accounting for less than 5% of pancreatic malignancies. They are broadly classified into either functioning tumors (insulinomas, gastrinomas, glucagonomas, VIPomas, and somatostatinomas) or nonfunctioning tumors. The diagnosis of these tumors is difficult and requires a careful history and examination combined with laboratory tests and radiologic imaging. Signs and symptoms are usually related to hormone hypersecretion in the case of functioning tumors and to tumor size or metastases with nonfunctioning tumors. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice even in the face of metastatic disease. Further development of novel diagnostic and treatment modalities offers potential to greatly improve quality of life and prolong disease-free survival for patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors.

  11. Neurogenic tumors of the stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneton, J.N.; Drouillard, J.; Roux, P.; Ettore, F.; Lecomte, P.

    1983-08-01

    The general and radiologic features of neurogenic tumors of the stomach are reviewed in connection with 18 cases (16 benign and 2 maglignant tumors). Such neurogenic tumors are rare in the stomach, representing less than 0.5% of all tumors. Solitary neurogenic tumors must be differentiated from those encountered during von Recklinghausen's disease. Radiological or endoscopic examination can generally determine the benign or malignant nature of solitary neurogenic tumors, which are essentially represented by schwannomas. Since these tumors are submucosal, a deep biopsy is imperative; furthermore, since such tumors are subject to hemorrhage, prior investigation by CT appears advisable to detect possible hypervascularization after injection of contrast material. For patients with von Recklinghausen's disease, a neurofibroma is usually diagnosed when faced with a digestive hemorrhage. Radiological exploration of the entire digestive tract appears essential to confirm the solitary nature of the gastric lesion and to be sure it is responsible for the clinical symptoms.

  12. Tumor Biology and Microenvironment Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Biology's research portfolio, research in this area seeks to understand the role of tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME) in driving cancer initiation, progression, maintenance and recurrence.

  13. Multimodal imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1-associated nerve sheath tumors; Multimodale Bildgebung bei Neurofibromatose-Typ-1-assoziierten Nervenscheidentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamon, J.; Adam, G. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Mautner, V.F. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Derlin, T. [Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2015-12-15

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a neurogenetic disorder. Individuals with NF1 may develop a variety of benign and malignant tumors of which peripheral nerve sheath tumors represent the most frequent entity. Plexiform neurofibromas may demonstrate a locally destructive growth pattern, may cause severe symptoms and may undergo malignant transformation into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents the reference standard for detection of soft tissue tumors in NF1. It allows for identification of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas, for assessment of local tumor extent, and for evaluation of whole-body tumor burden on T2-weighted imaging. Multiparametric MRI may provide a comprehensive characterization of different tissue properties of peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and may identify parameters associated with malignant transformation. Due to the absence of any radiation exposure, whole-body MRI may be used for serial follow-up of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission-tomography (FDG PET/CT) allows a highly sensitive and specific detection of MPNST, and should be used in case of potential malignant transformation of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor. PET/CT provides a sensitive whole-body tumor staging. The use of contrast-enhanced CT for diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumors is limited to special indications. To obtain the most precise readings, optimized examination protocols and dedicated radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians familiar with the complex and variable morphologies of peripheral nerve sheath tumors are required.

  14. Bednar Tumor: An Uncommon Entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonkar, Gayathri P; Rupani, Asha; Shah, Ajay; Deshpande, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Bednar tumor is an uncommon variant of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. Also known as pigmented dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, this tumor is of intermediate grade. It is seen in adults and has a predisposition to affect the shoulder region. We report a rare case of Bednar tumor in a 40-year-old female patient. The diagnosis of Bednar tumor must be considered while reporting pigmented subcutaneous spindle cell lesions.

  15. Determinates of tumor response to radiation: Tumor cells, tumor stroma and permanent local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wende; Huang, Peigen; Chen, David J.; Gerweck, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: The causes of tumor response variation to radiation remain obscure, thus hampering the development of predictive assays and strategies to decrease resistance. The present study evaluates the impact of host tumor stromal elements and the in vivo environment on tumor cell kill, and relationship between tumor cell radiosensitivity and the tumor control dose. Material and methods: Five endpoints were evaluated and compared in a radiosensitive DNA double-strand break repair-defective (DNA-PKcs −/− ) tumor line, and its DNA-PKcs repair competent transfected counterpart. In vitro colony formation assays were performed on in vitro cultured cells, on cells obtained directly from tumors, and on cells irradiated in situ. Permanent local control was assessed by the TCD 50 assay. Vascular effects were evaluated by functional vascular density assays. Results: The fraction of repair competent and repair deficient tumor cells surviving radiation did not substantially differ whether irradiated in vitro, i.e., in the absence of host stromal elements and factors, from the fraction of cells killed following in vivo irradiation. Additionally, the altered tumor cell sensitivity resulted in a proportional change in the dose required to achieve permanent local control. The estimated number of tumor cells per tumor, their cloning efficiency and radiosensitivity, all assessed by in vitro assays, were used to predict successfully, the measured tumor control doses. Conclusion: The number of clonogens per tumor and their radiosensitivity govern the permanent local control dose

  16. Parallel evolution of tumor subclones mimics diversity between tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco

    2013-01-01

    are not present ubiquitously in late stage ccRCC and are likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumor progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumors may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations...... and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumors reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumor sampling bias and impact upon tumor progression and clinical outcome....

  17. Parasellar dermoid tumor with intra-tumoral hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamata, H.; Yanagimachi, N.; Matsuyama, S. [Department of Radiology I, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Matsumae, M.; Takamiya, Y.; Tsugane, R. [Department of Neurosurgery, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    We report a case of parasellar dermoid tumor with intra-tumoral hemorrhage. It is rare for a dermoid tumor that hemorrhage was detected as high attenuation on the initial CT. In the present case, the tumor content included a little fat component and mostly cholesterin-rich fluid which resulted in extremely low signal intensity on T2-weighted and high signal on T1-weighted MR images. In addition to this, hemosiderin accumulation in the tumor could be the reason for low signal intensity on T2-weighted images. (orig.) With 3 figs., 19 refs.

  18. Nonodontogenic Tumors of the Jaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyalram, Donita; Aslam-Pervez, Nawaf; Lubek, Joshua E

    2016-02-01

    Nonodontogenic tumors of the jaws are common in the pediatric population, accounting for approximately 70% of pediatric jaw tumors. This article focuses on the clinical characteristics and management of the benign nonodontogenic tumors (nonaggressive and aggressive) of the jaws most commonly encountered in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Intravascular bronchio-alveolar tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata, J.M.; Caceres, J.; Prat, J.; Lopez, J.I.; Velilla, O.

    1991-01-01

    In 1975 Dail and Liebow described the clinical and pathological characteristics of a pulmonary tumor which they dominated intravascular bronchio-alveolar tumor (IVBAT). Our aim is to acquaint radiologists with the existence of this tumor by describing the radiologic findings in 2 patients with IVBAT, 1 with hepatic involvement ant the other with pulmonary osteoarthropathy. (author). 7 refs.; 2 figs

  20. Tumor uptake of radioruthenium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Richards, P.; Meinken, G.E.; Larson, S.M.; Grunbaum, Z.

    1980-01-01

    The use of ruthenium-97 as a scintigraphic agent, particularly for tumor localization, is investigated. The tumor uptake of ruthenium chloride and ruthenium-labelled transferrin is evaluated and their application as tumor-imagine agents is compared to gallium-67 citrate

  1. Notch Signaling and Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    Human brain tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplasms occurring inside the cranium and the central spinal cord. In adults and children, astrocytic glioma and medulloblastoma are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors. These tumor types are thought to arise from cells in which Notch s...

  2. Pituitary tumors containing cholecystokinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, J F; Lindholm, J; Andersen, B N

    1987-01-01

    We found small amounts of cholecystokinin in the normal human adenohypophysis and therefore examined pituitary tumors from 87 patients with acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome, prolactinoma, or inactive pituitary adenomas. Five adenomas associated with Nelson's syndrome contained...... increased amounts of cholecystokinin, the concentrations being extremely high in two: 8281 and 13,453 pmol per gram as compared with less than 30 pmol per gram in normal pituitary glands. The cholecystokinin concentrations were moderately increased in adenomas from another 12 patients, of whom 5 had Cushing......'s disease and 7 acromegaly with adenomas containing ACTH. The cholecystokinin peptides from the tumors were smaller and less sulfated than cholecystokinin from normal pituitary glands. We conclude that ACTH-producing pituitary cells may also produce an altered form of cholecystokinin....

  3. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  4. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Palaskar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is an uncommon lesion of unknown cause. It encompasses a spectrum of myofibroblastic proliferation along with varying amount of inflammatory infiltrate. A number of terms have been applied to the lesion, namely, inflammatory pseudotumor, fibrous xanthoma, plasma cell granuloma, pseudosarcoma, lymphoid hamartoma, myxoid hamartoma, inflammatory myofibrohistiocytic proliferation, benign myofibroblatoma, and most recently, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. The diverse nomenclature is mostly descriptive and reflects the uncertainty regarding true biologic nature of these lesions. Recently, the concept of this lesion being reactive has been challenged based on the clinical demonstration of recurrences and metastasis and cytogenetic evidence of acquired clonal chromosomal abnormalities. We hereby report a case of inflammatory pseudotumor and review its inflammatory versus neoplastic behavior.

  5. Tumors of the mediastinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duwe, Beau V; Sterman, Daniel H; Musani, Ali I

    2005-10-01

    Tumors of the mediastinum represent a wide diversity of disease states. The location and composition of a mass is critical to narrowing the differential diagnosis. The most common causes of an anterior mediastinal mass include the following: thymoma; teratoma; thyroid disease; and lymphoma. Masses of the middle mediastinum are typically congenital cysts, including foregut and pericardial cysts, while those that arise in the posterior mediastinum are often neurogenic tumors. The clinical sequelae of mediastinal masses can range from being asymptomatic to producing symptoms of cough, chest pain, and dyspnea. This article will review the anatomy of the mediastinum as well as the different clinical, radiographic, and prognostic features, and therapeutic options of the most commonly encountered masses.

  6. CT findings of parotid gland tumors: benign versus malignant tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Moon Ok; Han, Chun Hwan; Kim, Mie Young; Yi, Jeong Geun; Park, Kyung Joo; Lee, Joo Hyuk [Kang Nam General Hospital, Public Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeung Sook [Korea Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of parotid gland tumors to help in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. The CT findings of 22 patients with surgically proven parotid gland tumors were reviewed. Analysis was focused on the density and margin characteristics of the tumors, and the relationship between the tumor and surrounding structures. Those tumors were pleomorphic adenoma (n = 8), Warthin's tumor (n = 5), basal cell adenoma (n = 1), lipoma (n = 1), dermoid cyst (n = 1), adenoid cystic carcinoma (n = 2), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (n 1), epidermoid carcinoma (n = 1), and carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma (n 1). Most of benign and malignant tumors were heterogeneous in density on contrast enhanced CT scans. In 5 of 6 malignant cases, the tumors had irregular or ill-defined margin and a tendancy to involve or cross the superficial layer of deep cervical fascia with obliteration of subcutaneous fat. Two malignant tumors invaded surrounding structures. Although the heterogeneous density of tumor is not a specific finding for malignancy at CT, following findings, such as, irregular or blurred margin of the lesion, the involvement of fascial plane, and the infiltration of surrounding structures may suggest the possibility of malignant parotid tumor.

  7. Intranodal Schwannoma Mimicking a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Stomach: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Kyung Bum; Namkyoung, Sook; Kim, Heung Cheol [Dept. of Radiology, Chuncheon Scared Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Sung; Ryu, Byoung Yoon [Dept. of General Surgery, Chuncheon Scared Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Young Hee [Dept. of Pathology, Chuncheon Scared Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    A 66-year-old-woman is presented with intranodal schwannoma of the retroperitoneum. Ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) results demonstrated a large encapsulated mass with internal cystic or necrotic portions in the gastrosplenic space. The tumor abutted the greater curvature of the gastric body and slightly indented the proximal small bowel loops on a small bowel series. The observations suggested a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The mass was surgically proven to be a retroperitoneal tumor and histopathologically intranodal ancient schwannoma.

  8. Combined tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrba, H.

    1990-01-01

    This comprehensive survey of current methods and achievements first takes a look at the two basic therapies, devoting a chapter each to the surgery and radiotherapy of tumors. The principal subjects of the book, however, are the systemic, adjuvant therapy, biological therapies, hyperthermia and various other therapies (as e.g. treatment with ozone, oxygen, or homeopathic means), and psychotherapy. (MG) With 54 figs., 86 tabs [de

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals and tumor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, A.N.; Atkins, H.L.

    1976-01-01

    A number of radiopharmaceuticals are evaluated as to their usefulness for the reliable localization of malignant tumors by radioisotope scanning. Compounds discussed include 75 Se-selenomethionine, 32 P-phosphate, /sup 99m/Tc-phosphate, 67 Ga-citrate, and 111 In-bleomycin. It is pointed out that no ideal agent has yet been found and that considerable difficulties exist in comparing one clinical series with another

  10. TRUS Findings of Prostate Tumor or Tumor Like Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hak Jong; Jang, Jung Min; Kim, Seung Hyup [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    Tumors or tumor-like lesions in the prostate raise questions concerning their histogenesis and they may have prognoses dissimilar to those of prostatic adenocarcinoma. Several neoplasms involving the prostate have been described and characterized in recent years. In addition to adenocarcinoma, they include mucinous cyst adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine cancer, lymphoma, spindle cell neoplasm, squamous cell carcinoma, transitional cell carcinoma, and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) mimicking malignancy. In addition, infectious conditions such as tuberculosis and some stages of prostatic abscess can also mimic prostate tumors. Radiologic findings overlap and have limited roles in the diagnoses of these entities. However, knowledge of these variable tumors and tumor-like conditions is helpful when making accurate radiologic diagnoses, which have important clinical implications for treatment and prognosis. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and available pathologic images of unusual tumors and tumor- like lesions are demonstrated in this article

  11. A Ketogenic Formula Prevents Tumor Progression and Cancer Cachexia by Attenuating Systemic Inflammation in Colon 26 Tumor-Bearing Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kentaro; Tonouchi, Hidekazu; Sasayama, Akina; Ashida, Kinya

    2018-02-14

    Low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets (ketogenic diets) might prevent tumor progression and could be used as supportive therapy; however, few studies have addressed the effect of such diets on colorectal cancer. An infant formula with a ketogenic composition (ketogenic formula; KF) is used to treat patients with refractory epilepsy. We investigated the effect of KF on cancer and cancer cachexia in colon tumor-bearing mice. Mice were randomized into normal (NR), tumor-bearing (TB), and ketogenic formula (KF) groups. Colon 26 cells were inoculated subcutaneously into TB and KF mice. The NR and TB groups received a standard diet, and the KF mice received KF ad libitum . KF mice preserved their body, muscle, and carcass weights. Tumor weight and plasma IL-6 levels were significantly lower in KF mice than in TB mice. In the KF group, energy intake was significantly higher than that in the other two groups. Blood ketone body concentrations in KF mice were significantly elevated, and there was a significant negative correlation between blood ketone body concentration and tumor weight. Therefore, KF may suppress the progression of cancer and the accompanying systemic inflammation without adverse effects on weight gain, or muscle mass, which might help to prevent cancer cachexia.

  12. A Ketogenic Formula Prevents Tumor Progression and Cancer Cachexia by Attenuating Systemic Inflammation in Colon 26 Tumor-Bearing Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Nakamura

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets (ketogenic diets might prevent tumor progression and could be used as supportive therapy; however, few studies have addressed the effect of such diets on colorectal cancer. An infant formula with a ketogenic composition (ketogenic formula; KF is used to treat patients with refractory epilepsy. We investigated the effect of KF on cancer and cancer cachexia in colon tumor-bearing mice. Mice were randomized into normal (NR, tumor-bearing (TB, and ketogenic formula (KF groups. Colon 26 cells were inoculated subcutaneously into TB and KF mice. The NR and TB groups received a standard diet, and the KF mice received KF ad libitum. KF mice preserved their body, muscle, and carcass weights. Tumor weight and plasma IL-6 levels were significantly lower in KF mice than in TB mice. In the KF group, energy intake was significantly higher than that in the other two groups. Blood ketone body concentrations in KF mice were significantly elevated, and there was a significant negative correlation between blood ketone body concentration and tumor weight. Therefore, KF may suppress the progression of cancer and the accompanying systemic inflammation without adverse effects on weight gain, or muscle mass, which might help to prevent cancer cachexia.

  13. Spinal Cord Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body Feeling less sensitive to pain, heat and cold Loss of bowel or bladder function Difficulty walking, sometimes leading to falls Back pain that's worse at night Loss of sensation or muscle weakness, especially in your arms or ...

  14. Cardiac tumors: echo assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Mankad MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tumors are exceedingly rare (0.001–0.03% in most autopsy series. They can be present anywhere within the heart and can be attached to any surface or be embedded in the myocardium or pericardial space. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and highly variable related to the localization, size and composition of the cardiac mass. Echocardiography, typically performed for another indication, may be the first imaging modality alerting the clinician to the presence of a cardiac mass. Although echocardiography cannot give the histopathology, certain imaging features and adjunctive tools such as contrast imaging may aid in the differential diagnosis as do the adjunctive clinical data and the following principles: (1 thrombus or vegetations are the most likely etiology, (2 cardiac tumors are mostly secondary and (3 primary cardiac tumors are mostly benign. Although the finding of a cardiac mass on echocardiography may generate confusion, a stepwise approach may serve well practically. Herein, we will review such an approach and the role of echocardiography in the assessment of cardiac masses.

  15. Neuroendocrine Tumor, diagnostic difficulties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Oliveira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH secretion is a rare disease. A 51 years old woman, with a Cushing syndrome secondary to ectopic ACTH secretion, diagnosed in 2009, with mediastinal lymphadenopathy, whose biopsy was compatible with lung small cell carcinoma, staged as IIIB using TNM classification. No other lesions were found in patient study. The patient was submitted to chemotherapy, associated to ketoconazole 200 mg twice daily, with partial remission of both conditions. Three years later was admitted with an aggravation of Cushing syndrome. There was no evidence of progression of pulmonary disease. A cystic lesion in the pancreatic uncinated process was found by abdominal CT scan and with avid uptake by DOTANOC PET discreet in anterior mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of pancreatic mass revealed a neuroendocrine tumor. Pulmonary masses were biopsied again and was in favor of neuroendocrine tumor. It was assumed the diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with mediastinal metastasis. The patient initiated lanreotid (120 mg, monthly, subcutaneous in association with ketoconazole. After 5 months of therapy, patient died with sepsis secondary to pneumonia. Neuroendocrine tumours are rare, difficult to diagnose and with poor prognosis when associated with ectopic ACTH secreting Cushing syndrome.

  16. Mouse Leydig Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Syong Pan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordycepin is a natural pure compound extracted from Cordyceps sinensis (CS. We have demonstrated that CS stimulates steroidogenesis in primary mouse Leydig cell and activates apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. It is highly possible that cordycepin is the main component in CS modulating Leydig cell functions. Thus, our aim was to investigate the steroidogenic and apoptotic effects with potential mechanism of cordycepin on MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. Results showed that cordycepin significantly stimulated progesterone production in dose- and time-dependent manners. Adenosine receptor (AR subtype agonists were further used to treat MA-10 cells, showing that A1, A 2A , A 2B , and A3, AR agonists could stimulate progesterone production. However, StAR promoter activity and protein expression remained of no difference among all cordycepin treatments, suggesting that cordycepin might activate AR, but not stimulated StAR protein to regulate MA-10 cell steroidogenesis. Meanwhile, cordycepin could also induce apoptotic cell death in MA-10 cells. Moreover, four AR subtype agonists induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and four AR subtype antagonists could all rescue cell death under cordycepin treatment in MA-10 cells. In conclusion, cordycepin could activate adenosine subtype receptors and simultaneously induce steroidogenesis and apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells.

  17. Wilms′ tumor: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant B Tongaonkar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Wilms′ tumor (WT is the commonest pediatric renal tumor, predominantly seen in children less than five years of age. The majority of patients present with an abdominal lump and CT scan is the usual imaging modality for determining the extent of disease. With multimodality management, the results of treatment of WT have improved dramatically over the last 50 years. The treatment protocols have been devised and modified repeatedly depending on evidence from randomized trials by several cooperative groups - mainly National Wilms′ Tumor Study Group (NWTSG and the International Society of Pediatric Oncology (SIOP. The NWTSG recommends primary surgery followed by chemotherapy while SIOP advocates four weeks of chemotherapy prior to surgery. The regimen, dose and duration of chemotherapy have been repeatedly modified to reduce toxicity while maintaining efficacy. The role of radiation therapy has also been customized. Most centers have reported excellent survival rates with the modern day treatment protocols, except in patients with an unfavorable histology. The results of treatment of relapsed WT have also improved with newer drugs and combinations being used for the same.

  18. Patofysiologiske mekanismer bag øjensymptomer ved primaere tumorer i corpus pineale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illum, N O; Møller, M; Garde, E

    1993-01-01

    Primary tumors of the pineal body can produce dyscoordinative movements of the eye, pupillary dilatation, paralysis of adduction during convergence and nystagmus. Obstruction of the aqueduct can cause hydrocephalus, increased intracranial pressure and papilledema. Diabetes insipidus may be a pres...

  19. Localized giant cell tumors in the spinal column radiologic presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Echeverria, M.A.; Parra Blanco, J.A.; Pagola Serrano, M.A.; Mellado Santos, J.M.; Bueno Lopez, J.; Gonzalez Tutor, A.

    1994-01-01

    Given the uncommonness of the location of giant cell tumors (GCT) in the spinal column and the limited number of studies published, we present a case of GCT located in the spinal column, which involved both vertebral bodies and partially destroyed the adjacent rib. (Author)

  20. Methylated DNA for monitoring tumor growth and regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Søren; Nielsen, Dorte; Söletormos, Georg

    2014-01-01

    of gene promoters. Because tumor cells naturally secrete DNA and upon cell death leak DNA, modified methylated DNA can be detected in blood, urine, sputum and other body fluids. At present international guidelines do not include recommendations for monitoring modified methylated DNA. The low level...

  1. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the anal wall in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Documented reports of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are relatively few in the sub-Saharan continent. The body of evidence points towards anal wall involvement being a rarity indeed. In this article we document a 61 year old Nigerian man who presented with bleeding per rectum and in whom the histological ...

  2. MR findings of ovarian tumors with hormonal activity, with emphasis on tumors other than sex cord-stromal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yumiko Oishi; Saida, Tsukasa Sasaki; Minami, Rie; Yagi, Takako; Tsunoda, Hajime; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Minami, Manabu

    2007-01-01

    Sex cord-stromal tumors including granulosa cell tumor, thecoma, Sertoli stromal cell tumor and steroid cell tumor are noted for their hormonal activity. However, there are many kinds of ovarian tumors other than sex cord-stromal tumors and tumor-like conditions with endocrine manifestations. Cross-sectional imaging, especially MR, can provide precise features of ovarian tumors and uterine morphological change even in a clinically latent excess of estrogen. In this article, we demonstrate typical imaging findings of ovarian tumors with hormonal activity. We also shortly explain the mechanism of the virilization and hyperestrogenism caused by ovarian tumors and tumor-like conditions

  3. Tumor regression patterns in retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, S.N.; Siddique, S.N.; Zaheer, N.

    2016-01-01

    To observe the types of tumor regression after treatment, and identify the common pattern of regression in our patients. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Al-Shifa Trust Eye Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from October 2011 to October 2014. Methodology: Children with unilateral and bilateral retinoblastoma were included in the study. Patients were referred to Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, for chemotherapy. After every cycle of chemotherapy, dilated funds examination under anesthesia was performed to record response of the treatment. Regression patterns were recorded on RetCam II. Results: Seventy-four tumors were included in the study. Out of 74 tumors, 3 were ICRB group A tumors, 43 were ICRB group B tumors, 14 tumors belonged to ICRB group C, and remaining 14 were ICRB group D tumors. Type IV regression was seen in 39.1% (n=29) tumors, type II in 29.7% (n=22), type III in 25.6% (n=19), and type I in 5.4% (n=4). All group A tumors (100%) showed type IV regression. Seventeen (39.5%) group B tumors showed type IV regression. In group C, 5 tumors (35.7%) showed type II regression and 5 tumors (35.7%) showed type IV regression. In group D, 6 tumors (42.9%) regressed to type II non-calcified remnants. Conclusion: The response and success of the focal and systemic treatment, as judged by the appearance of different patterns of tumor regression, varies with the ICRB grouping of the tumor. (author)

  4. Brain tumor stem cell dancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzuto, Giuseppina; Toccacieli, Laura; Mazzoleni, Stefania; Frustagli, Gianluca; Chistolini, Pietro; Galli, Rossella; Molinari, Agnese

    2014-01-01

    Issues regarding cancer stem cell (CSC) movement are important in neurosphere biology as cell-cell or cell-environment interactions may have significant impacts on CSC differentiation and contribute to the heterogeneity of the neurosphere. Despite the growing body of literature data on the biology of brain tumor stem cells, floating CSC-derived neurospheres have been scarcely characterized from a morphological and ultrastructural point of view. Here we report a morphological and ultrastructural characterization performed by live imaging and scanning electron microscopy. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) CSC-derived neurospheres are heterogeneous and are constituted by cells, morphologically different, capable of forming highly dynamic structures. These dynamic structures are regulated by not serendipitous cell-cell interactions, and they synchronously pulsate following a cyclic course made of "fast" and "slow" alternate phases. Autocrine/paracrine non canonical Wnt signalling appears to be correlated with the association status of neurospheres. The results obtained suggest that GBM CSCs can behave both as independents cells and as "social" cells, highly interactive with other members of its species, giving rise to a sort of "multicellular organism".

  5. Peripheral tumors alter neuroinflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyter, Leah M; El Mouatassim Bih, Sarah; Sattar, Husain; Prendergast, Brian J

    2014-03-13

    Cancer is associated with an increased prevalence of depression. Peripheral tumors induce inflammatory cytokine production in the brain and depressive-like behaviors. Mounting evidence indicates that cytokines are part of a pathway by which peripheral inflammation causes depression. Neuroinflammatory responses to immune challenges can be exacerbated (primed) by prior immunological activation associated with aging, early-life infection, and drug exposure. This experiment tested the hypothesis that peripheral tumors likewise induce neuroinflammatory sensitization or priming. Female rats with chemically-induced mammary carcinomas were injected with either saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 250μg/kg; i.p.), and expression of mRNAs involved in the pathway linking inflammation and depression (interleukin-1beta [Il-1β], CD11b, IκBα, indolamine 2,3-deoxygenase [Ido]) was quantified by qPCR in the hippocampus, hypothalamus, and frontal cortex, 4 or 24h post-treatment. In the absence of LPS, hippocampal Il-1β and CD11b mRNA expression were elevated in tumor-bearing rats, whereas Ido expression was reduced. Moreover, in saline-treated rats basal hypothalamic Il-1β and CD11b expression were positively correlated with tumor weight; heavier tumors, in turn, were characterized by more inflammatory, necrotic, and granulation tissue. Tumors exacerbated CNS proinflammatory gene expression in response to LPS: CD11b was greater in hippocampus and frontal cortex of tumor-bearing relative to tumor-free rats, IκBα was greater in hippocampus, and Ido was greater in hypothalamus. Greater neuroinflammatory responses in tumor-bearing rats were accompanied by attenuated body weight gain post-LPS. The data indicate that neuroinflammatory pathways are potentiated, or primed, in tumor-bearing rats, which may exacerbate future negative behavioral consequences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Caring for patients with brain tumor: The patient and care giver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patients with brain tumors form a heterogeneous group in terms of clinical presentation and pathology. However, the impact of the disease on patients' families is often more homogenous and frequently quite profound. A considerable body of literature is available on the management of brain tumors and ...

  7. Ultrasound Presentation of a Disseminated Fetal and Neonatal Rhabdoid Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolaine Joueidi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of a disseminated fetal rhabdoid tumor discovered at 32 weeks of gestation in a 29-year-old woman on immunosuppressive therapy. The mother consulted for a decrease in fetal movement. Fetal ultrasound showed signs of a disseminated tumor affecting the left armpit, liver, spleen, and limbs. A caesarian section was performed because of signs of fetal distress. Immunohistochemical analysis of a fetal biopsy showed deletion of the SMARCB1 gene. Pathological analysis of the placenta showed a rhabdoid tumor invading both fetal and maternal compartments. The mother underwent a whole-body MRI, and no metastasis was found. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a disseminated rhabdoid tumor invading both fetal and maternal compartments.

  8. RhoB: Team Oncogene or Team Tumor Suppressor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Julia A; Gilkes, Daniele M

    2018-01-30

    Although Rho GTPases RhoA, RhoB, and RhoC share more than 85% amino acid sequence identity, they play very distinct roles in tumor progression. RhoA and RhoC have been suggested in many studies to contribute positively to tumor development, but the role of RhoB in cancer remains elusive. RhoB contains a unique C-terminal region that undergoes specific post-translational modifications affecting its localization and function. In contrast to RhoA and RhoC, RhoB not only localizes at the plasma membrane, but also on endosomes, multivesicular bodies and has even been identified in the nucleus. These unique features are what contribute to the diversity and potentially opposing functions of RhoB in the tumor microenvironment. Here, we discuss the dualistic role that RhoB plays as both an oncogene and tumor suppressor in the context of cancer development and progression.

  9. [Intraductal papillary mucinous pancreas tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maev, I V; Kaziulin, A N; Kucheriavyĭ, Iu A

    2008-01-01

    Data of the literature on the epidemiology, patogenesis, diagnosis, peculiarities of the symptoms and the treatment of the intraduct papillar pancreatic tumor, are analyzed in this review. These tumors are rare, there are up to 1% of the exocrine pancreatic tumors. Intraduct proliferation of the mucin producing cells, that are disposed as papillars is typical of these tumors. There are the symptoms of the acute or chronic pancreatitis, sometimes the diagnosis of this tumor is accidental. The main diagnostic methods are ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT). Endoluminal ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) are the main methods to reveal the intraduct growth. The surgical treatment is necessary for these patients.

  10. Patofysiologiske mekanismer bag øjensymptomer ved primaere tumorer i corpus pineale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illum, N O; Møller, M; Garde, E

    1993-01-01

    Primary tumors of the pineal body can produce dyscoordinative movements of the eye, pupillary dilatation, paralysis of adduction during convergence and nystagmus. Obstruction of the aqueduct can cause hydrocephalus, increased intracranial pressure and papilledema. Diabetes insipidus may be a pres......Primary tumors of the pineal body can produce dyscoordinative movements of the eye, pupillary dilatation, paralysis of adduction during convergence and nystagmus. Obstruction of the aqueduct can cause hydrocephalus, increased intracranial pressure and papilledema. Diabetes insipidus may...

  11. Human embryo immune escape mechanisms rediscovered by the tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Laura; Petrini, Massimiliano; Fiammenghi, Laura; Riccobon, Angela; Ridolfi, Ruggero

    2009-01-01

    Towards the end of the 1990s, the two opposing theories on immunosurveillance and immunostimulation were extensively studied by researchers in an attempt to understand the complex mechanisms that regulate the relation between tumors and the host's immune system. Both theories probably have elements that would help us to comprehend how the host can induce anti-tumor clinical responses through stimulation of the immune system and which could also give us a deeper insight into the mechanisms of tumor immunosuppression. The model that most resembles the behavior of tumor cells in terms of growth, infiltration and suppression of the immune system of the environment in which they live is undoubtedly that of the embryonic cell. The fetus behaves like an allogenic transplant within the mother's body, using every means it has to escape from and defend itself against the mother's immune system. The majority of these mechanisms are the same as those found in tumor cells: antigenic loss, lack of expression of classic HLA-I molecules, production of immunosuppressive cytokines, induction of lack of expression of co-stimulatory molecules in antigen presenting cells, and induction of apoptosis in infiltrating lymphocytes, with activation of a type Th2 regulatory lymphocyte response. A careful and comparative study of key mechanisms capable of triggering tolerance or cytotoxicity in both embryonic and tumor cells could prove immensely valuable in designing new strategies for anti-tumor immunotherapy.

  12. An Extradigital Glomus Tumor of the Median Antebrachial Vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoni, Anthony R; Waughtel, Jessica; Cook, Jonathan; Bejarano, Pablo A; Friedman, David

    2018-01-01

    Glomus tumors are benign vascular neoplasms that arise from specialized dermal arteriovenous anastomoses called glomus bodies. These tumors are most often found in the digital pulp and subungual region of the fingertips; however, a review of the literature suggests that extradigital glomus tumors may occur more often than is generally recognized. Although most extradigital glomus tumors arise within subcutaneous tissues, glomus tumors have occasionally been found within bones, nerves, and blood vessels. An intravascular glomus tumor of the forearm is a very rare occurrence and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Here we describe a 55-year-old right-handed man with a 10-year history of exquisite tenderness and dysesthesia of his right proximal forearm. Surgical exploration revealed the presence of a mass arising from the median antebrachial vein, which was confirmed histologically to be a glomus tumor. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. CT diagnosis of mediastinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Dadong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of CT for diagnosing the mediastinal tumors, in order to improve the accuracy of the diagnosis on mediastinal tumor. Methods: 16 cases of mediastinal tumors proved by surgery or pathology were analyzed retrospectively. Results: There were 6 cases of thymoma, 3 of intrathoracic thyroid, 2 of bronchial cyst, 2 of malignant lymphoma, 2 of neurogenic tumor, and 1 of teratoma. The accuracy rate of CT localization and CT diagnosis were 100% and 93.75% respectively. Conclusion: CT examination is one of the most effective ways in diagnosing mediastinal tumor. According to the mediastinal tumor location, imaging features with proper examining method, closely combing the clinical data and lab examination, generally, mediastinal tumors can be diagnosed accurately. (authors)

  14. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... atrophy, but less than one-tenth of these tumors are confined to the optic nerve or its sheaths. No signs or symptoms are pathognomonic for tumors of the optic nerve. The tumors of the optic nerve may originate from the optic nerve itself (primary tumors) as a proliferation of cells normally present...... in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  15. Experimental rat lung tumor model with intrabronchial tumor cell implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, Antero; Simão, Antônio Felipe Leite; Miranda, Samuel de Paula; Mourão, Lívia Talita Cajaseiras; Bezerra, Nilfácio Prado; Almeida, Paulo Roberto Carvalho de; Ribeiro, Ronaldo de Albuquerque

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rat lung tumor model for anticancer drug testing. Sixty-two female Wistar rats weighing 208 +/- 20 g were anesthetized intraperitoneally with 2.5% tribromoethanol (1 ml/100 g live weight), tracheotomized and intubated with an ultrafine catheter for inoculation with Walker's tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, a technique was established for intrabronchial implantation of 10(5) to 5 x 10(5) tumor cells, and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. The tumor take rate was 94.7% for implants with 4 x 10(5) tumor cells, HRCT and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.953; p<0.0001), the median time of survival was 11 days, and surgical mortality was 4.8%. The present rat lung tumor model was shown to be feasible: the take rate was high, surgical mortality was negligible and the procedure was simple to perform and easily reproduced. HRCT was found to be a highly accurate tool for tumor diagnosis, localization and measurement and may be recommended for monitoring tumor growth in this model.

  16. Modulating the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Tumor Nanomedicine Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanomedicines including liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect have become the mainstream for tumor treatment owing to their superiority over conventional anticancer agents. Advanced design of nanomedicine including active targeting nanomedicine, tumor-responsive nanomedicine, and optimization of physicochemical properties to enable highly effective delivery of nanomedicine to tumors has further improved their therapeutic benefits. However, these strategies still could not conquer the delivery barriers of a tumor microenvironment such as heterogeneous blood flow, dense extracellular matrix, abundant stroma cells, and high interstitial fluid pressure, which severely impaired vascular transport of nanomedicines, hindered their effective extravasation, and impeded their interstitial transport to realize uniform distribution inside tumors. Therefore, modulation of tumor microenvironment has now emerged as an important strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. Here, we review the existing strategies and approaches for tumor microenvironment modulation to improve tumor perfusion for helping more nanomedicines to reach the tumor site, to facilitate nanomedicine extravasation for enhancing transvascular transport, and to improve interstitial transport for optimizing the distribution of nanomedicines. These strategies may provide an avenue for the development of new combination chemotherapeutic regimens and reassessment of previously suboptimal agents.

  17. Modulating the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Tumor Nanomedicine Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2017-01-01

    Nanomedicines including liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect have become the mainstream for tumor treatment owing to their superiority over conventional anticancer agents. Advanced design of nanomedicine including active targeting nanomedicine, tumor-responsive nanomedicine, and optimization of physicochemical properties to enable highly effective delivery of nanomedicine to tumors has further improved their therapeutic benefits. However, these strategies still could not conquer the delivery barriers of a tumor microenvironment such as heterogeneous blood flow, dense extracellular matrix, abundant stroma cells, and high interstitial fluid pressure, which severely impaired vascular transport of nanomedicines, hindered their effective extravasation, and impeded their interstitial transport to realize uniform distribution inside tumors. Therefore, modulation of tumor microenvironment has now emerged as an important strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. Here, we review the existing strategies and approaches for tumor microenvironment modulation to improve tumor perfusion for helping more nanomedicines to reach the tumor site, to facilitate nanomedicine extravasation for enhancing transvascular transport, and to improve interstitial transport for optimizing the distribution of nanomedicines. These strategies may provide an avenue for the development of new combination chemotherapeutic regimens and reassessment of previously suboptimal agents. PMID:29311946

  18. Treatment Options for Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... markers . Most malignant germ cell tumors release tumor markers. The following tumor markers are used to detect extracranial germ cell tumors: ... testicular germ cell tumors, blood levels of the tumor markers help show if the tumor is a seminoma ...

  19. General Information about Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... markers . Most malignant germ cell tumors release tumor markers. The following tumor markers are used to detect extracranial germ cell tumors: ... testicular germ cell tumors, blood levels of the tumor markers help show if the tumor is a seminoma ...

  20. Body Image and Body Contouring Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwer, David B; Polonsky, Heather M

    2016-10-01

    Dissatisfaction with physical appearance and body image is a common psychological phenomena in Western society. Body image dissatisfaction is frequently reported by those who have excess body weight, but also is seen in those of normal body weight. For both groups of individuals, this dissatisfaction impacts self-esteem and quality of life. Furthermore, it is believed to be the motivational catalyst to a range of appearance-enhancing behaviors, including weight loss efforts and physical activity. Body image dissatisfaction is also believed to play a role in the decision to seek the wide range of body contouring procedures offered by aesthetic physicians. Individuals who seek these procedures typically report increased body image dissatisfaction, focus on the feature they wish to alter with treatment, and often experience improvement in body image following treatment. At the same time, extreme body image dissatisfaction is a symptom of a number of recognized psychiatric disorders. These include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), all of which can contraindicate aesthetic treatment. This special topic review paper provides an overview of the relationship between body image dissatisfaction and aesthetic procedures designed to improve body contouring. The review specifically focuses on the relationship of body image and body weight, as well as the presentation of body image psychopathology that would contraindicate aesthetic surgery. The overall goal of the paper is to highlight the clinical implications of the existing research and provide suggestions for future research on the psychological aspects of body contouring procedures. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Pilomatricoma: A tumor with hidden depths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simi C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pilomatricoma is a benign tumor of hair matrix differentiation and has been classically described as comprising of basaloid and shadow cells admixed with multinucleated giant cells and areas of calcification. However, there are a diverse range of histologic features this tumor displays that are often unrecognized. Aims: This study was undertaken to record the histopathologic features of pilomatricoma with an emphasis on the occurrence of other forms of differentiation. Methods: The study included all skin biopsy specimens over a 13-year period from 1995 to 2007 that had a histologic diagnosis of pilomatricoma. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides were reviewed. Results: This study included 21 cases of pilomatricoma. Supramatrical differentiation was seen in all cases and three-quarters of the cases showed matrical differentiation. Also observed in some of the cases were clear cell differentiation toward the outer root sheath, infundibular differentiation, calcification, ossification and secondary inflammation with a foreign body giant cell reaction. Epidermal induction in the form of a downward plate-like growth of the epidermis was seen in a few cases. Conclusion: Pilomatricoma, although considered a tumor of hair matrix differentiation, can show cellular evolution toward the other parts of the hair follicle, such as the outer and inner root sheaths, sebaceous and infundibular components and, therefore, can be considered a panfollicular neoplasm.

  2. Prostate tumor grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This prostate cancer construct was grown during NASA-sponsored bioreactor studies on Earth. Cells are attached to a biodegradable plastic lattice that gives them a head start in growth. Prostate tumor cells are to be grown in a NASA-sponsored Bioreactor experiment aboard the STS-107 Research-1 mission in 2002. Dr. Leland Chung of the University of Virginia is the principal investigator. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: NASA and the University of Virginia.

  3. Imaging tumors of the patella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casadei, R., E-mail: roberto.casadei@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Kreshak, J., E-mail: j.kreshak@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Rinaldi, R. [Department of Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Rimondi, E., E-mail: eugenio.rimondi@ior.it [Department of Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Bianchi, G., E-mail: giuseppe.bianchi@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Alberghini, M., E-mail: marco.alberghini@ior.it [Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Ruggieri, P. [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Vanel, D., E-mail: daniel.vanel@ior.it [Department of Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Background: Patellar tumors are rare; only a few series have been described in the literature and radiographic diagnosis can be challenging. We reviewed all patellar tumors at one institution and reviewed the literature. Materials and methods: In an evaluation of the database at one institution from 1916 to 2009, 23,000 bone tumors were found. Of these, 41 involved the patella. All had imaging studies and microscopic diagnostic confirmation. All medical records, imaging studies, and pathology were reviewed. Results: There were 15 females and 26 males, ranging from 8 to 68 years old (average 30). There were 30 benign tumors; eight giant cell tumors, eight chondroblastomas, seven osteoid osteomas, two aneurysmal bone cysts, two ganglions, one each of chondroma, exostosis, and hemangioma. There were 11 malignant tumors: five hemangioendotheliomas, three metastases, one lymphoma, one plasmacytoma, and one angiosarcoma. Conclusion: Patellar tumors are rare and usually benign. As the patella is an apophysis, the most frequent lesions are giant cell tumor in the adult and chondroblastoma in children. Osteoid osteomas were frequent in our series and easily diagnosed. Metastases are the most frequent malignant diagnoses in the literature; in our series malignant vascular tumors were more common. These lesions are often easily analyzed on radiographs. CT and MR define better the cortex, soft tissue extension, and fluid levels. This study presents the imaging patterns of the more common patellar tumors in order to help the radiologist when confronted with a lesion in this location.

  4. What is a pediatric tumor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Jaume Mora1,21Department of Oncology, 2Developmental Tumor Biology Laboratory, Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Fundacio Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Working together with medical oncologists, the question of whether a Ewing sarcoma in a 25-year-old is a pediatric tumor comes up repeatedly. Like Ewing's, some tumors present characteristically at ages that cross over what has been set as the definition of pediatrics (15 years, 18 years, or 21 years?. Pediatric oncology textbooks, surprisingly, do not address the subject of defining a pediatric tumor. They all begin with an epidemiology chapter defining the types of tumors appearing at distinct stages of childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. Describing the epidemiology of tumors in relation to age, it becomes clear that the disease is related to the phenomenon of aging. The question, however, remains: is there a biological definition of what pediatric age is? And if so, will tumors occurring during this period of life have anything to do with such biological definition? With the aim of finding an objective definition, the fundamental concepts of what defines "pediatrics" was reviewed and then the major features of tumors arising during development were analyzed. The tumors were explored from the perspective of a host immersed in the normal process of growth and development. This physiological process, from pluripotential and undifferentiated cells, makes possible the differentiation, maturation, organization, and function of tissues, organs, and apparatus. A biological definition of pediatric tumors and the infancy–childhood–puberty classification of developmental tumors according to the infancy–childhood–puberty model of normal human development are proposed.Keywords: growth and development, pediatric tumor, infant, childhood and adolescence, pubertal tumors

  5. Multiparametric classification links tumor microenvironments with tumor cell phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Gligorijevic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While it has been established that a number of microenvironment components can affect the likelihood of metastasis, the link between microenvironment and tumor cell phenotypes is poorly understood. Here we have examined microenvironment control over two different tumor cell motility phenotypes required for metastasis. By high-resolution multiphoton microscopy of mammary carcinoma in mice, we detected two phenotypes of motile tumor cells, different in locomotion speed. Only slower tumor cells exhibited protrusions with molecular, morphological, and functional characteristics associated with invadopodia. Each region in the primary tumor exhibited either fast- or slow-locomotion. To understand how the tumor microenvironment controls invadopodium formation and tumor cell locomotion, we systematically analyzed components of the microenvironment previously associated with cell invasion and migration. No single microenvironmental property was able to predict the locations of tumor cell phenotypes in the tumor if used in isolation or combined linearly. To solve this, we utilized the support vector machine (SVM algorithm to classify phenotypes in a nonlinear fashion. This approach identified conditions that promoted either motility phenotype. We then demonstrated that varying one of the conditions may change tumor cell behavior only in a context-dependent manner. In addition, to establish the link between phenotypes and cell fates, we photoconverted and monitored the fate of tumor cells in different microenvironments, finding that only tumor cells in the invadopodium-rich microenvironments degraded extracellular matrix (ECM and disseminated. The number of invadopodia positively correlated with degradation, while the inhibiting metalloproteases eliminated degradation and lung metastasis, consistent with a direct link among invadopodia, ECM degradation, and metastasis. We have detected and characterized two phenotypes of motile tumor cells in vivo, which

  6. [Perspectives on body: embodiment and body image].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shiow-Ru; Chao, Yu-Mei Yu

    2007-06-01

    "Body" is a basic concept of both the natural and human sciences. This extensive review of the literature explores the various philosophical approaches to the body, including empiricism, idealism, existentialism and phenomenology, as well as the relationship between body and mind. Embodiment and body image are the two main concepts of body addressed in this article. Merleau-Ponty's perspective on embodiment, an important new area of theory development, emphasizes that embodiment research must focus on life experiences, such as the study of body image. Using Schilder's framework of psychosocialology, this article provides a comprehensive understanding of the concept of body image and women's perspectives on the "body" in both Western culture and Eastern cultures. Body size and shape significantly influence the self-image of women. Body image is something that develops and changes throughout one's life span and is continually being constructed, destructed, and reconstructed. Personal body image has important psychological effects on the individual, especially women. This integrative review can make a significant contribution to knowledge in this area and, consequently, to related practice and research.

  7. Aquaporins and Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Maugeri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain primary tumors are among the most diverse and complex human cancers, and they are normally classified on the basis of the cell-type and/or the grade of malignancy (the most malignant being glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, grade IV. Glioma cells are able to migrate throughout the brain and to stimulate angiogenesis, by inducing brain capillary endothelial cell proliferation. This in turn causes loss of tight junctions and fragility of the blood–brain barrier, which becomes leaky. As a consequence, the most serious clinical complication of glioblastoma is the vasogenic brain edema. Both glioma cell migration and edema have been correlated with modification of the expression/localization of different isoforms of aquaporins (AQPs, a family of water channels, some of which are also involved in the transport of other small molecules, such as glycerol and urea. In this review, we discuss relationships among expression/localization of AQPs and brain tumors/edema, also focusing on the possible role of these molecules as both diagnostic biomarkers of cancer progression, and therapeutic targets. Finally, we will discuss the possibility that AQPs, together with other cancer promoting factors, can be exchanged among brain cells via extracellular vesicles (EVs.

  8. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Articles and Media Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Body General Ultrasound Contrast Materials Anesthesia Safety X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Videos related to Foreign Body Retrieval ...

  9. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 80 percent of foreign body ingestions occur among children. Most foreign bodies pass through the gastrointestinal tract ... blockages that may require surgical removal of magnets. Children account for about 80 percent of foreign body ...

  10. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of foreign body detection and removal? What is Foreign Body Retrieval? Foreign body retrieval involves ... and damage to surrounding tissues. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Foreign ...

  11. Lewy Body Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewy body disease is one of the most common causes of dementia in the elderly. Dementia is the loss of mental ... to affect normal activities and relationships. Lewy body disease happens when abnormal structures, called Lewy bodies, build ...

  12. Whole Body Counters (rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodburn, John H. [Walter Johnson High School, Rockville, MD; Lengemann, Frederick W. [Cornell University

    1967-01-01

    Whole body counters are radiation detecting and measuring instruments that provide information about the human body. This booklet describes different whole body counters, scientific principles that are applied to their design, and ways they are used.

  13. Robotic radiosurgery. Treating tumors that move with respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urschel, Harold C. Jr.; Kresl, John J.; Luketich, James D.; Papiez, Lech; Timmerman, Robert D.; Schulz, Raymond A.

    2007-01-01

    Addresses in detail all aspects of the use of robotic radiosurgery to treat tumors of the lung, liver, and pancreas Includes full consideration of tumor tracking techniques, dosimetry, radiobiology, and fiducial placement strategies Written by leading experts Includes many high quality illustrations Stereotactic radiosurgery continues to evolve in ways that allow this powerful technology to reach and treat more tumors in more patients. This volume in the Robotic Radiosurgery series is devoted to theory and practice in the emerging field of stereotactic radiosurgery (also called stereotactic body radiation therapy) for extracranial tumors, particularly those that move as patients breathe. The book is divided into six sections. The first three sections address tumor motion due to respiration and tumor tracking techniques; dosimetry, radiobiology, and imaging; and fiducial placement systems. The fourth and fifth sections then discuss in depth the use of robotic radiosurgery to treat lung and abdominal tumors, respectively, and a final section explains emerging concepts and techniques. Within this framework, detailed information is provided on the technology and methodology for delivery of high doses of radiation to moving targets, radiobiological and radiological principles, and the challenges faced by clinicians performing extracranial stereotactic radiosurgery. Furthermore, there are thorough reviews of the general clinical literature on stereotactic radiation treatment of tumors of the lungs, liver, and pancreas, and the latest clinical data from clinicians conducting clinical studies using the CyberKnife registered Robotic Radiosurgery System. Special attention is given to the frameless robotic radiosurgery device known as the CyberKnife, the only image-guided radiosurgery system that utilizes intelligent robotics to track, detect, and correct for changes in tumor position during treatments. Tumors that move with respiration are treated with the CyberKnife using a

  14. Robotic radiosurgery. Treating tumors that move with respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urschel, Harold C. Jr. [Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Chair of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgical Research, Education and Clinical Excellence; Kresl, John J. [Arizona Oncology Services at St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Luketich, James D. [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center PUH, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). The Heart, Lung and Esophageal Surgery Inst.; Papiez, Lech; Timmerman, Robert D. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schulz, Raymond A. (eds.)

    2007-07-01

    Addresses in detail all aspects of the use of robotic radiosurgery to treat tumors of the lung, liver, and pancreas Includes full consideration of tumor tracking techniques, dosimetry, radiobiology, and fiducial placement strategies Written by leading experts Includes many high quality illustrations Stereotactic radiosurgery continues to evolve in ways that allow this powerful technology to reach and treat more tumors in more patients. This volume in the Robotic Radiosurgery series is devoted to theory and practice in the emerging field of stereotactic radiosurgery (also called stereotactic body radiation therapy) for extracranial tumors, particularly those that move as patients breathe. The book is divided into six sections. The first three sections address tumor motion due to respiration and tumor tracking techniques; dosimetry, radiobiology, and imaging; and fiducial placement systems. The fourth and fifth sections then discuss in depth the use of robotic radiosurgery to treat lung and abdominal tumors, respectively, and a final section explains emerging concepts and techniques. Within this framework, detailed information is provided on the technology and methodology for delivery of high doses of radiation to moving targets, radiobiological and radiological principles, and the challenges faced by clinicians performing extracranial stereotactic radiosurgery. Furthermore, there are thorough reviews of the general clinical literature on stereotactic radiation treatment of tumors of the lungs, liver, and pancreas, and the latest clinical data from clinicians conducting clinical studies using the CyberKnife {sup registered} Robotic Radiosurgery System. Special attention is given to the frameless robotic radiosurgery device known as the CyberKnife, the only image-guided radiosurgery system that utilizes intelligent robotics to track, detect, and correct for changes in tumor position during treatments. Tumors that move with respiration are treated with the Cyber

  15. Effects of low dose radiation on tumor apoptosis, cell cycle progression and changes of apoptosis-related protein bcl-2 in tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hongsheng; Fei Conghe; Shen Fangzhen; Liang Jun

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of low dose radiation (LDR) on tumor apoptosis, cell cycle progression and changes of apoptosis-related protein bcl-2 in tumor-bearing mice. Methods: Kunming stain male mice were implanted with S180 sarcoma cells in the left inguen subcutaneously as an in situ experimental animal model. Seven days after implantation, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body γ-irradiation. At 24 and 48 h after irradiation, all mice were sacrificed to measure the tumor volume, and tumor cell apoptosis, cell cycle progression were analyzed by flow cytometry. The expression of apoptosis-related protein bcl-2 and the apoptotic rate of tumor cells were observed by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Results: Tumor growth was significantly slowed down after LDR (P 1 phase and the expression of bcl-2 protein decreased at 24 h. Apoptotic rate of tumor cells increased significantly at 48 h after LDR. Conclusion: LDR could cause a G 1 -phase arrest and increase the apoptosis of tumor cells through the low level of apoptosis-related protein bcl-2 in the tumor-bearing mice. The organized immune function and anti-tumor ability are markedly increased after LDR. The study provides practical evidence of clinical application to cancer treatment

  16. Application of Image Processing Algorithms for Brain Tumor Analysis in 2D and 3D Leading to Tumor’s Positioning in Skull: Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AYESHA AMIR SIDDIQI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation of brain tumors has been found challenging throughout in the field of image processing. Different algorithms have been applied to the segmentation of solid or cystic tumors individually but little work has been done for solid cum cystic tumor. The papers reviewed in this article only deal with the case study of patients suffering from solid cum cystic brain tumor as this type of tumor is rarely found for the purpose of research. The research work conducted so far on this topic has been reviewed. The study begins with 2D (Two Dimensional segmentation of tumor using MATLAB. It is then extended to study of slices of tumor and its volume calculation using open source software named 3D Slicer which represents the tumor in 3D. This software can intake the 2D slices and process them to give a combined 3D view. Various techniques are available in the software. According to the particular requirement an appropriate algorithm can be chosen. This paper gives a promising hierarchy for volume calculation of tumor and the three dimensional view. Further we can also find the position of tumor in the skull using the same software. This piece of work is a valuable guideline for the researchers interested in segmentation and three dimensional representations of different areas of human body. The models extracted out using the given algorithms can also be treated for matching and comparison of any future research. This will also aid surgeons and physicians in efficient analysis and reporting techniques.

  17. Tumors of the foot skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, K.

    2007-01-01

    About 3-4% of all tumors and tumor-like lesions of the skeleton are located in the foot. Many of these lesions have a predilection for certain locations, so that the spectrum of entities occurring in the foot differs from the rest of the skeleton. Despite the fact that practically any entity can occur in the foot in rare cases, taken together the ten most frequent lesions make up for the vast majority of tumors and tumor-like lesions of the foot. The differential diagnosis of these lesions follows the general principles that apply in the rest of the skeleton. It is based on the analysis of the lesion's X-ray morphology and location, the patient's age, and in certain entities, the MR morphology. This article describes the most important tumors and tumor-like lesions of the foot, their differential diagnosis, and the principles of local staging. (orig.) [de

  18. Vasculogenic mimicry and tumor metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingxin; Qiao, Lili; Liang, Ning; Xie, Jian; Luo, Hui; Deng, Guodong; Zhang, Jiandong

    2016-01-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM), a microvascular channel made up of nonendothelial cells, has been accepted as a new model of neovascularization in aggressive tumors, owning to the specific capacity of malignant cells to form vessel-like networks which provide sufficient blood supply for tumor growth. Multiple molecular mechanisms, especially vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular receptor A2 (EphA2), phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR1), and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1a, have been reported to participate in VM formation which is associated with tumor migration and invasion. In addition, hypoxia, cancer stem cells (CSCs) and epithelial-mesenehymal transition (EMT) are regarded as significant factors in VM formation and tumor metastasis. Due to the important effects of VM on tumor progression, a review was carried out in the present study, to synthetically analyze the relationship between VM and tumor metastasis.

  19. Tumor markers in clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, S.

    2004-01-01

    The subtle differences between normal and tumor cells are exploited in the detection and treatment of cancer. These differences are designated as tumor markers and can be either qualitative or quantitative in their nature. That means that both the structures that are produced by tumor cells as well as the structures that are produced in excessive amounts by host tissues under the influence of tumor cells can function as tumor markers. Speaking in general, the tumor markers are the specific molecules appearing in the blood or tissues and the occurrence of which is associated with cancer. According to their application, tumor markers can be roughly divided as markers in clinical oncology and markers in pathology. In this review, only tumor markers in clinical oncology are going to be discussed. Current tumor markers in clinical oncology include (i) oncofetal antigens, (ii) placental proteins, (iii) hormones, (iv) enzymes, (v) tumor-associated antigens, (vi) special serum proteins, (vii) catecholamine metabolites, and (viii) miscellaneous markers. As to the literature, an ideal tumor marker should fulfil certain criteria - when using it as a test for detection of cancer disease: (1) positive results should occur in the early stages of the disease, (2) positive results should occur only in the patients with a specific type of malignancy, (3) positive results should occur in all patients with the same malignancy, (4) the measured values should correlate with the stage of the disease, (5) the measured values should correlate to the response to treatment, (6) the marker should be easy to measure. Most tumor markers available today meet several, but not all criteria. As a consequence of that, some criteria were chosen for the validation and proper selection of the most appropriate marker in a particular malignancy, and these are: (1) markers' sensitivity, (2) specificity, and (3) predictive values. Sensitivity expresses the mean probability of determining an elevated tumor

  20. Pericytes limit tumor cell metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xian, Xiaojie; Håkansson, Joakim; Ståhlberg, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Previously we observed that neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) deficiency in beta tumor cells facilitates metastasis into distant organs and local lymph nodes. Here, we show that NCAM-deficient beta cell tumors grew leaky blood vessels with perturbed pericyte-endothelial cell-cell interactions...... and deficient perivascular deposition of ECM components. Conversely, tumor cell expression of NCAM in a fibrosarcoma model (T241) improved pericyte recruitment and increased perivascular deposition of ECM molecules. Together, these findings suggest that NCAM may limit tumor cell metastasis by stabilizing...... the microvessel wall. To directly address whether pericyte dysfunction increases the metastatic potential of solid tumors, we studied beta cell tumorigenesis in primary pericyte-deficient Pdgfb(ret/ret) mice. This resulted in beta tumor cell metastases in distant organs and local lymph nodes, demonstrating a role...

  1. MR findings of metastatic brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Joong Mo; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Cha, Sang Hoon; Ryoo, Jae Wook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MR) findings of metastatic brain tumors with emphasis on the signal intensities of the lesion on MR. Thirty four patients with intracranial metastases were studies with MR imaging. The diagnosis was established on the basis of either brain biopsy or combination of brain MR findings and the presence of primary tumors. The primary tumors include lung cancer (n=18), breast cancer (n=3), stomach cancer (n=3), rectal cancer (n=1), renal cell carcinoma (n=1), hepatocellular carcinoma (n=1), ovarian cancer (n=1), thyroid cancer (n=1), melanoma (n=1) and unknown primary sites (n=4). The parenchymal lesion were solitary in 35% (12/34) and multiple in 65% (22/34). The size of lesions was variable, ranging from several millimetes to 5 cm in diameter. The corticomedullar junction of the cerebral hemispheres was the most common location of the lesions (68%). The signal intensity of solid portion of the lesions was usually either isointense (44%) or hypointense (29%) on T1-weighted images, whereas it appeared in isointense (47%), hypointense (8%) or hypointense (11%) on protion density-weighted or T2-weighted images. The remaining cases showed mixed signal intensities. The enhancement patterns were variable including nodular (<1 cm) (6%), homogeneous (19%), heterogeneous (10%), ring-like enhancement (22%) or mixed pattern (43%). The size of surrounding edema was larger than the tumor diameter in 76%. In conclusion, although there are no specific MR findings of intracranial metastasis except multiplicity, intracranial metastasis should be included in differential diagnosis with high priority, when a solitary mass showing isointensity on body T1- and T2-weighted images with massive surrounding edema, especially in the corticomedullary junction of the cerebral hemispheres is encountered.

  2. MR findings of metastatic brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Joong Mo; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Cha, Sang Hoon; Ryoo, Jae Wook

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MR) findings of metastatic brain tumors with emphasis on the signal intensities of the lesion on MR. Thirty four patients with intracranial metastases were studies with MR imaging. The diagnosis was established on the basis of either brain biopsy or combination of brain MR findings and the presence of primary tumors. The primary tumors include lung cancer (n=18), breast cancer (n=3), stomach cancer (n=3), rectal cancer (n=1), renal cell carcinoma (n=1), hepatocellular carcinoma (n=1), ovarian cancer (n=1), thyroid cancer (n=1), melanoma (n=1) and unknown primary sites (n=4). The parenchymal lesion were solitary in 35% (12/34) and multiple in 65% (22/34). The size of lesions was variable, ranging from several millimetes to 5 cm in diameter. The corticomedullar junction of the cerebral hemispheres was the most common location of the lesions (68%). The signal intensity of solid portion of the lesions was usually either isointense (44%) or hypointense (29%) on T1-weighted images, whereas it appeared in isointense (47%), hypointense (8%) or hypointense (11%) on protion density-weighted or T2-weighted images. The remaining cases showed mixed signal intensities. The enhancement patterns were variable including nodular (<1 cm) (6%), homogeneous (19%), heterogeneous (10%), ring-like enhancement (22%) or mixed pattern (43%). The size of surrounding edema was larger than the tumor diameter in 76%. In conclusion, although there are no specific MR findings of intracranial metastasis except multiplicity, intracranial metastasis should be included in differential diagnosis with high priority, when a solitary mass showing isointensity on body T1- and T2-weighted images with massive surrounding edema, especially in the corticomedullary junction of the cerebral hemispheres is encountered

  3. Effects of high fat diet on incidence of spontaneous tumors in Wistar rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    KRISTIANSEN, E.; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard; Meyer, Otto A.

    1993-01-01

    . There was no difference in food consumption, body weight, weight gain, and longevity between the two groups. A statistically significant increase in the incidence of tumors in the high-fat group was seen in fibroadenoma of the mammae (female, p = 0.05). No statistically significant difference was seen when the incidence...... of benign mammary tumors (adenomas and fibroadenomas) was combined, just as the overall incidence of mammary tumors (adenomas, fibroadenomas, and adenocarcinomas) was not significantly different between the groups. A statistically significant decrease in the incidence of tumors in the high-fat group...

  4. Comparative Study of Histopathologic Characterization of Azoxymethane-induced Colon Tumors in Three Inbred Rat Strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobæk Larsen, Morten; Fenger, Claus; Hansen, Ket

    2002-01-01

    To obtain controlled genetic variation, colon cancer was chemically induced by use of four subcutaneous injections of azoxymethane (15 mg/kg of body weight/wk) to rats of 3 inbred strains (BDIX/OrlIco, F344/NHsd, WAG/Rij). The selection was based on the availability of established colon cancer cell...... characteristics should resemble the corresponding human tumors. The size of the tumors should be at about 1 cm in diameter, as these tumor cells were intended to be used in future transplantation studies. The two experiments yielded highly reproducible results: histologic evaluation of all colon tumors in all...

  5. Foreign body orbital cyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanfard, Younes; Heegard, Steffen; Fledelius, Hans C.

    2001-01-01

    Ophthalmology, penetrating orbital injury, orbital foreign body, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), histology......Ophthalmology, penetrating orbital injury, orbital foreign body, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), histology...

  6. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Body General Ultrasound Contrast ...

  7. Notch Signaling and Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    Human brain tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplasms occurring inside the cranium and the central spinal cord. In adults and children, astrocytic glioma and medulloblastoma are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors. These tumor types are thought to arise from cells in which Notch...... signaling plays a fundamental role during development. Recent findings have shown that Notch signaling is dysregulated, and contributes to the malignant potential of these tumors. Growing evidence point towards an important role for cancer stem cells in the initiation and maintenance of glioma...

  8. Desmoid tumor within lesser sac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Radoje

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Desmoid tumors or fibromatoses comprise a number of benign fibrous proliferative lesions that have local infiltrative growth and tendency to recur after incomplete excision. They never metastasize. The authors present a 31-year old woman who, due to epigastric pain and palpable mass detected on presentation, underwent the excision of firm tumorous mass, 210x140x115mm in diameter, from the lesser sac. Compressing the splenic vein, the tumor caused left-sided portal hypertension which subsided after the mass was removed. The recovery was uneventful. The histological examination verified typical desmoid tumor. Twelve years after surgery, the patient remained symptom-free with no signs of recurrence.

  9. Health-related quality of life in long-term survivors of childhood brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, Tonny Solveig; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Nysom, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To identify predictors for health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in survivors of childhood brain tumors and its relationship to cognitive function. PROCEDURE: One hundred twenty-six consecutive Danish childhood brain tumor patients treated 1970-1997 and being 7.9-40.4 years at follow...... functioning, cognitive functioning, body image, outlook of life, and intimate relations were significantly related to RT. Tumor location in the posterior fossa was associated with lower scores for physical functioning and energy, and tumor site in the third ventricle region was associated with lower scores...... while tumor location in the third ventricle region remained significant for body image, younger age at diagnosis for social functioning and intimate relations, and younger age at follow-up for physical symptoms. In contrasts, neither gender nor presence of hydrocephalus requiring shunt inserted...

  10. Antitumor Activity of Prosopis glandulosa Torr. on Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma (EAC) Tumor Bearing Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil Kumar, Raju; Rajkapoor, Balasubramanian; Perumal, Perumal; Dhanasekaran, Thangavel; Alvin Jose, Manonmani; Jothimanivannan, Chennakesavalu

    2011-01-01

    The antitumor activity of ethanol extract of Prosopis glandulosa Torr. (EPG) was evaluated against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) tumor model in Swiss albino mice on dose dependent manner. The activity was assessed using survival time, average increase in body weight, hematological parameters and solid tumor volume. Oral administration of EPG at the dose of 100, 200 and 400 mg/Kg, significantly (p < 0.001) increased the survival time and decreased the average body weight of the tumor bearing mice. After 14 days of inoculation, EPG was able to reverse the changes in the hematological parameters, protein and PCV consequent to tumor inoculation. Oral administration of EPG was effective in reducing solid tumor mass development induced by EAC cells. The results indicate that EPG possess significant antitumor activity on dose dependent manner.

  11. Skull base tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Nader, Remi; van Doormaal, Tristan; Kamel, Mahmoud; Voormolen, Eduard H J; Lasio, Giovanni; Aboud, Emad; Regli, Luca; Tulleken, Cornelius A F; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2010-11-01

    Resident duty-hours restrictions have now been instituted in many countries worldwide. Shortened training times and increased public scrutiny of surgical competency have led to a move away from the traditional apprenticeship model of training. The development of educational models for brain anatomy is a fascinating innovation allowing neurosurgeons to train without the need to practice on real patients and it may be a solution to achieve competency within a shortened training period. The authors describe the use of Stratathane resin ST-504 polymer (SRSP), which is inserted at different intracranial locations to closely mimic meningiomas and other pathological entities of the skull base, in a cadaveric model, for use in neurosurgical training. Silicone-injected and pressurized cadaveric heads were used for studying the SRSP model. The SRSP presents unique intrinsic metamorphic characteristics: liquid at first, it expands and foams when injected into the desired area of the brain, forming a solid tumorlike structure. The authors injected SRSP via different passages that did not influence routes used for the surgical approach for resection of the simulated lesion. For example, SRSP injection routes included endonasal transsphenoidal or transoral approaches if lesions were to be removed through standard skull base approach, or, alternatively, SRSP was injected via a cranial approach if the removal was planned to be via the transsphenoidal or transoral route. The model was set in place in 3 countries (US, Italy, and The Netherlands), and a pool of 13 physicians from 4 different institutions (all surgeons and surgeons in training) participated in evaluating it and provided feedback. All 13 evaluating physicians had overall positive impressions of the model. The overall score on 9 components evaluated--including comparison between the tumor model and real tumor cases, perioperative requirements, general impression, and applicability--was 88% (100% being the best possible

  12. Metabolic reprogramming induced by ketone bodies diminishes pancreatic cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Surendra K; Gebregiworgis, Teklab; Purohit, Vinee; Chaika, Nina V; Gunda, Venugopal; Radhakrishnan, Prakash; Mehla, Kamiya; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Powers, Robert; Yu, Fang; Singh, Pankaj K

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant energy metabolism is a hallmark of cancer. To fulfill the increased energy requirements, tumor cells secrete cytokines/factors inducing muscle and fat degradation in cancer patients, a condition known as cancer cachexia. It accounts for nearly 20% of all cancer-related deaths. However, the mechanistic basis of cancer cachexia and therapies targeting cancer cachexia thus far remain elusive. A ketogenic diet, a high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet that elevates circulating levels of ketone bodies (i.e., acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone), serves as an alternative energy source. It has also been proposed that a ketogenic diet leads to systemic metabolic changes. Keeping in view the significant role of metabolic alterations in cancer, we hypothesized that a ketogenic diet may diminish glycolytic flux in tumor cells to alleviate cachexia syndrome and, hence, may provide an efficient therapeutic strategy. We observed reduced glycolytic flux in tumor cells upon treatment with ketone bodies. Ketone bodies also diminished glutamine uptake, overall ATP content, and survival in multiple pancreatic cancer cell lines, while inducing apoptosis. A decrease in levels of c-Myc, a metabolic master regulator, and its recruitment on glycolytic gene promoters, was in part responsible for the metabolic phenotype in tumor cells. Ketone body-induced intracellular metabolomic reprogramming in pancreatic cancer cells also leads to a significantly diminished cachexia in cell line models. Our mouse orthotopic xenograft models further confirmed the effect of a ketogenic diet in diminishing tumor growth and cachexia. Thus, our studies demonstrate that the cachectic phenotype is in part due to metabolic alterations in tumor cells, which can be reverted by a ketogenic diet, causing reduced tumor growth and inhibition of muscle and body weight loss.

  13. General Information about Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... found in both kidneys when the cancer is first diagnosed . The treatment of other childhood kidney tumors depends on the tumor type. Recurrent ... lungs . In this case, a biopsy is done first. Then chemotherapy is given ... Cancers for more information. Biologic therapy Biologic ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... found in both kidneys when the cancer is first diagnosed . The treatment of other childhood kidney tumors depends on the tumor type. Recurrent ... lungs . In this case, a biopsy is done first. Then chemotherapy is given ... Cancers for more information. Biologic therapy Biologic ...

  15. Reduction of the radiogenic tumor incidence by stimulation with lyophilized fetal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bause, R.; Gros, C.J.; Landsberger, A.; Renner, H.; Klinikum Nuernberg

    1983-01-01

    The effect of an immunization treatment with lyophilized xenogenic fetal cells was studied in 7 months old, female albino rats (strain Wistar). The tumor incidence was measured after a sublethal whole-body irradiation with 600 cGy. Furthermore, the spleen of the individual animals was histologically examined. 3,5 to 6 months after a whole-body irradiation with 600 cGy, the tumor incidence was 55%. The tumors found were tubular adenocarcinomas of the thyroid gland. A significant reduction of the tumor incidence can be achieved by an immunostimulation with xenogenic, lyophilized, fetal cells (connective tissue and bone marrow, respectively) administered twice, namely eight days before and four days after the whole-body irradiation. The tumor incidence measured after 3,5 months was 10% and 15%, respectively, and after 6 months 15% and 25%, respectively. No significant tumor protection is achieved, however, by a single stimulation before whole-body irradiation and by a stimulation performed one or two times after whole-body irradiation. Histologic examinations of the spleen show in the immunostimulized animals a strong regeneration of the immune system with a significantly increased number of follicles and a significant increase of lumphocytes in the red pulp. The authors stress the possible clinical importance for radio-oncology of an immunostimulation with lyophilized, xenogenic, fetal cells. (orig.) [de

  16. Diagnosis of adrenal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, E.I.; Loesch, H.

    1987-09-01

    Of 155 patients with adrenal disorders, 120 (77%) were correctly diagnosed as negative. There were no correlations between the results of computer tomography and phlebography or between computer tomography and laboratory tests. In 31 patients (20%) a correct diagnosis was obtained and these patients were sent to surgery. Four cases (3%) were shown to be false positive. In these cases (with one exception), both the computer tomography and phlebography results had been overinterpreted. Computer tomography was shown to be a method of high sensitivity and almost as great specificity. Tumors cannot be distinguished by phlebography; only pheochromocytoma shows a characteristic alteration of vessels in arteriograms. In general, an accurate diagnosis requires positive angiography (arterio- or phlebography) results and clear evidence of elevated hormone levels. Only then is surgery indicated.

  17. Diagnosis of adrenal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, E.I.; Loesch, H.

    1987-01-01

    Of 155 patients with adrenal disorders, 120 (77%) were correctly diagnosed as negative. There were no correlations between the results of computer tomography and phlebography or between computer tomography and laboratory tests. In 31 patients (20%) a correct diagnosis was obtained and these patients were sent to surgery. Four cases (3%) were shown to be false positive. In these cases (with one exception), both the computer tomography and phlebography results had been overinterpreted. Computer tomography was shown to be a method of high sensitivity and almost as great specificity. Tumors cannot be distinguished by phlebography; only pheochromocytoma shows a characteristic alteration of vessels in arteriograms. In general, an accurate diagnosis requires positive angiography (arterio- or phlebography) results and clear evidence of elevated hormone levels. Only then is surgery indicated. (orig.) [de

  18. Plasma S100β is not a useful biomarker for tumor burden in neurofibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Miriam J; Esparza, Sonia; Merker, Vanessa L; Muzikansky, Alona; Bredella, Miriam A; Harris, Gordon J; Kassarjian, Ara; Cai, Wenli; Walker, James A; Mautner, Victor F; Plotkin, Scott R

    2013-05-01

    Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), NF2, and schwannomatosis are characterized by a predisposition to develop multiple neurofibromas and schwannomas. Currently, there is no blood test to estimate tumor burden in patients with these disorders. We explored whether S100β would act as a biomarker of tumor burden in NF since S100β is a classic immunohistochemical marker of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells and a small study showed S100β concentrations correlate with the volume of vestibular schwannomas. We calculated whole-body tumor burden in subjects with NF1, NF2, and schwannomatosis using whole-body MRI (WBMRI) and measured the concentration of S100β in plasma using ELISA. We used chi-square tests and Spearman rank correlations to test the relationship between S100β levels and whole-body tumor burden. 127 consecutive patients were enrolled in the study (69 NF1 patients, 28 NF2 patients, and 30 schwannomatosis patients). The median age was 40years, 43% were male, and median whole-body tumor volume was 26.9mL. There was no relationship between the presence of internal tumors and the presence of detectable S100β in blood for the overall group or for individual diagnoses (p>0.05 by chi-square for all comparisons). Similarly, there was no correlation between whole-body tumor volume and S100β concentration for the overall group or for individual diagnoses (p>0.05 by Spearman for all comparisons). Plasma S100β is not a useful biomarker for tumor burden in the neurofibromatoses. Further work is needed to identify a reliable biomarker of tumor burden in NF patients. Copyright © 2012 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Phyllodes Tumors of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusalem, Osama Turki; Al-Masri, Anwar

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study all patients with phyllodes tumors of the breast which were diagnosed at King Hussien Medical Center and Prince Rashid Military Hospital between the 1st of may 2002 till January 2009. Methods: A total of 26 patients diagnosed to have phylloedes tumors were retrieved from the hospital records. All cases were analyzed and assessed in two main categories: demographical characteristics and histopathological parameters. The demographical characteristics included: sex and age of the patients, and tumor size while the histopathological aspects were divided into three subgroups: Benign, Borderline and Malignant tumors with its stromal components characteristics. All the histopathological reports for specimens sent by surgeons were reviewed by 2 senior pathologists. Statistical analysis was done by using Chi square and P-Value. Results: All our patients were females; their age range between 17-67 years, the mean patient age at presentation was 39 years. Out of the 26 patients diagnosed to have phyllodes tumor, 6 had breast-conserving therapy and 20 women had mastectomy. The types of Phyllodes tumors include: A-Benign phyllodes tumors (15 cases), B-Borderline phyllodes (7cases) and C-malignant phyllodes (4 cases). With significant values of benign tumors occurrence (pphyllodes tumors of the breast. The greatest dimension of the tumors ranged from 1 to 15 cm, with a mean of 5 cm. Approximately 73.1% of tumors were less or equal to 5 cm in the greatest dimension and 26.9% >5 cm. The duration of symptoms varied from one month to ten year.s Six patients had painful swellings, whereas in twenty patients the pain was absent. Four patients had recurrent tumors; the distinctive features of those with recurrent tumors were the histological findings of stromal over growth and the presence of positive resection margin. In our series, we found that three patients of those with recurrence discovered to have stromal over growth. While one only had a previous positive

  20. Books as Bodies, Bodies as Books

    OpenAIRE

    Couch, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Books as Bodies, Bodies as Books was a performance-lecture at the Wellcome Library, and part of the Wellcome Library Insights, a series of events which offer the opportunity to explore a theme or topic, whilst showcasing the Wellcome Library’s collection. The performance-lecture explored birthing girdles, reading as rumination, livers as tablets, flap anatomy, folds as metaphors of digestion, and palimpsests and skin. Karin Littau writes in her book, Theories of Reading: Books, Bodie...

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Tumor-Tumor Distant Interactions Supports a Systemic Control of Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzekry, Sebastien; Lamont, Clare; Barbolosi, Dominique; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2017-09-15

    Interactions between different tumors within the same organism have major clinical implications, especially in the context of surgery and metastatic disease. Three main explanatory theories (competition, angiogenesis inhibition, and proliferation inhibition) have been proposed, but precise determinants of the phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here, we formalized these theories into mathematical models and performed biological experiments to test them with empirical data. In syngeneic mice bearing two simultaneously implanted tumors, growth of only one of the tumors was significantly suppressed (61% size reduction at day 15, P < 0.05). The competition model had to be rejected, whereas the angiogenesis inhibition and proliferation inhibition models were able to describe the data. Additional models including a theory based on distant cytotoxic log-kill effects were unable to fit the data. The proliferation inhibition model was identifiable and minimal (four parameters), and its descriptive power was validated against the data, including consistency in predictions of single tumor growth when no secondary tumor was present. This theory may also shed new light on single cancer growth insofar as it offers a biologically translatable picture of how local and global action may combine to control local tumor growth and, in particular, the role of tumor-tumor inhibition. This model offers a depiction of concomitant resistance that provides an improved theoretical basis for tumor growth control and may also find utility in therapeutic planning to avoid postsurgery metastatic acceleration. Cancer Res; 77(18); 5183-93. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Correlation between tumor size and blood volume in lung tumors. A prospective study on dual-energy gemstone spectral CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Takai, Yoshihiro; Narita, Yuichiro

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between tumor size and blood volume for patients with lung tumors, using dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) and a gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) viewer. During the period from March 2011 to March 2013, 50 patients with 57 medically inoperable lung tumors underwent DECT before stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of 50-60 Gy in 5-6 fractions. DECT was taken for pretreatment evaluation. The region-of-interest for a given spatial placement of the tumors was set, and averages for CT value, water density and iodine density were compared with tumor size. The average values for iodine density in tumors of ≤ 2 cm, 2-3 cm, and > 3 cm maximum diameter were 24.7, 19.6 and 16.0 (100 μg/cm 3 ), respectively. The average value of the iodine density was significantly lower in larger tumors. No significant correlation was detected between tumor size and average CT value or between tumor size and average water density. Both the average water density and the average CT value were affected by the amount of air in the tumor, but the average iodine density was not affected by air in the tumor. The average water density and the average CT value were significantly correlated, but the average iodine density and the average CT value showed no significant correlation. The blood volume of tumors can be indicated by the average iodine density more accurately than it can by the average CT value. The average iodine density as assessed by DECT might be a non-invasive and quantitative assessment of the radio-resistance ascribable to the hypoxic cell population in a tumor. (author)

  3. Antiangiogenic Agent Might Upgrade tumor Cell Sensitivity to Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badr, N.M.S.A.

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of the fundamental role of angiogenesis and metastasis in cancer growth has led to tremendous interest in research regarding its regulatory mechanisms and clinical implications in the management of cancer. The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of the angiogenic regulators modification on the tumor growth and the cell sensitivity to ionizing radiation targeting the improvement of cancer therapeutic protocols. Accordingly, the antiangiogenic activity of apigenin and selenium was tested in vitro via MTT assay. The action of Apigenin and or Selenium was examined in vivo by using a model of solid tumor carcinoma (EAC). The growth rate of solid tumor in all experimental groups was measured by Caliper. The irradiated mice were exposed to 6.5 Gy of gamma rays. Apigenin 50 mg/kg body weight and selenium 5 μg per mice were daily administrated for 14 consecutive days after tumor volume reached 1mm 3 . The angiogenic activators TNF-α (key cytokine) in spleen, serum MMP 2 and MMP 9, liver and tumor NO, the lipid peroxidation (LPx) and angiogenic inhibitor TIMP-1 in spleen as well as, antioxidant markers (CAT, SOD, GPX) in tumor and liver tissue and DNA fragmentation in splenocytes were estimated to monitor efficacy of Apigenin and selenium in cancer treatment strategy. All parameters were determined as a time course on days 16 and 22 after tumor volume reached 1mm 3 . The using of MTT assay on EAC cells shows inhibition in EAC cell proliferation after the incubation with apigenin and /or selenium. The administration of apigenin and /or selenium to mice bearing tumor and to irradiated mice bearing tumor reduce significantly the TNF-α expression, MMP 2,9 , NO , LPx level and increased the antioxidant enzymes (GPx , SOD and CAT) activities. The DNA fragmentation and the antiangiogenic factors TIMP-1 were significantly increased when compared with their values in mice bearing tumor or in irradiated mice bearing tumor. From the results

  4. Adolescence and Body Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinshenker, Naomi

    2002-01-01

    Discusses body image among adolescents, explaining that today's adolescents are more prone to body image distortions and dissatisfaction than ever and examining the historical context; how self-image develops; normative discontent; body image distortions; body dysmorphic disorder (BDD); vulnerability of boys (muscle dysmorphia); who is at risk;…

  5. Chemokines in tumor proximal fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotyza, Jaromir

    2017-03-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines produced by leukocytes and other types of cells including tumor cells. Their action is determined by the expression of cognate receptors and subsequent signaling in target cells, followed by the modulation of cytoskeletal proteins and the induction of other responses. In tumors, chemokines produced by neoplastic/stroma cells control the leukocyte infiltrate influencing tumor growth and progression. Tumor cells also express functional chemokine receptors responding to chemokine signals, promoting cell survival, proliferation and metastasis formation. Chemokines may be detected in serum of cancer patients, but due to the paracrine nature of these molecules, more significant concentrations are found in the tumor adjacent, non-vascular fluids, collectively called tumor proximal fluids. This review summarizes the expression of CC and CXC chemokines in these fluids, namely in interstitial fluid, pleural, ascitic, and cyst fluids, but also in urine, saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, cervical secretions and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Most comparative clinical studies reveal increased chemokine levels in high-grade tumor proximal fluids rather than in low-grade tumors and benign conditions, indicating shorter survival periods. The data confirm peritumoral fluid chemokines as sensitive diagnostic and prognostic markers, as well as offer support for chemokines and their receptors as potential targets for antitumor therapy.

  6. Focal midbrain tumors in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandertop, W P; Hoffman, H J; Drake, J M; Humphreys, R P; Rutka, J T; Amstrong, D C; Becker, L E

    1992-08-01

    The clinical and neuroradiological features of focal midbrain tumors in 12 children are described, and the results of their surgical management are presented. Patients with a focal midbrain tumor usually exhibit either symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure caused by an obstructive hydrocephalus (50%) or symptoms and signs caused by pressure on the tegmentum and cerebral peduncles. The lesions are confined to the tectal plate or tegmentum with possible extension upward to the thalamus and downward to the pons, displacing but not invading these structures. The edges of the tumor are well defined, and the large majority have a solid consistency with intense regular enhancement after intravenous contrast. Radical resection is hardly ever feasible in brain stem tumors, but in this series, significant reduction of the tumor mass was obtained in 75% of the patients, with no surgical mortality and minimal surgical morbidity and with the majority of patients showing clinical improvement postoperatively. All tumors were nonpilocytic, low-grade astrocytomas. Six patients received adjunctive radiotherapy. The mean follow-up period is 2.5 years, and all patients are alive and doing well. We conclude that focal midbrain tumors in children appear to be a distinct subgroup of brain stem tumors and are very amenable to surgical resection with an excellent long-term prognosis.

  7. [Local treatment of liver tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, T.K.; Skjoldbye, Bjørn Ole

    2008-01-01

    Local treatment of non-resectable liver tumors is common. This brief review describes the local treatment techniques used in Denmark. The techniques are evaluated according to the evidence in literature. The primary local treatment is Radiofrequency Ablation of both primary liver tumors and liver...

  8. Mechanism of brain tumor headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lynne P

    2014-04-01

    Headaches occur commonly in all patients, including those who have brain tumors. Using the search terms "headache and brain tumors," "intracranial neoplasms and headache," "facial pain and brain tumors," "brain neoplasms/pathology," and "headache/etiology," we reviewed the literature from the past 78 years on the proposed mechanisms of brain tumor headache, beginning with the work of Penfield. Most of what we know about the mechanisms of brain tumor associated headache come from neurosurgical observations from intra-operative dural and blood vessel stimulation as well as intra-operative observations and anecdotal information about resolution of headache symptoms with various tumor-directed therapies. There is an increasing overlap between the primary and secondary headaches and they may actually share a similar biological mechanism. While there can be some criticism that the experimental work with dural and arterial stimulation produced head pain and not actual headache, when considered with the clinical observations about headache type, coupled with improvement after treatment of the primary tumor, we believe that traction on these structures, coupled with increased intracranial pressure, is clearly part of the genesis of brain tumor headache and may also involve peripheral sensitization with neurogenic inflammation as well as a component of central sensitization through trigeminovascular afferents on the meninges and cranial vessels. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  9. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  10. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  11. Focal midbrain tumors in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandertop, W. P.; Hoffman, H. J.; Drake, J. M.; Humphreys, R. P.; Rutka, J. T.; Amstrong, D. C.; Becker, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    The clinical and neuroradiological features of focal midbrain tumors in 12 children are described, and the results of their surgical management are presented. Patients with a focal midbrain tumor usually exhibit either symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure caused by an obstructive

  12. Pancreatic desmoid tumor in a 4-year-old male with hemihypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Saida

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We report the first case of a pancreatic desmoid tumor detected during follow-up for hemihypertrophy in a 4-year-old boy. Hemihypertrophy is a rare disorder in which one side of the body grows more than the other, causing asymmetry, and well-known complications include embryonal tumors. However, there has been no report of desmoid tumors in patients with hemihypertrophy, and these tumors are rare and poorly characterized in the literature, especially the cystic variant. For this patient, the lesion was diagnosed as a desmoid tumor based on immunostaining positive for beta-catenin and mutation of the beta-catenin gene (CTNNB1. This case suggests that desmoid tumors should be considered a possible etiology of pancreatic cystic lesions in patients with hemihypertrophy.

  13. Body Image and Transsexualism

    OpenAIRE

    Kraemer, B; Delsignore, A; Schnyder, U; Hepp, U

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To achieve a detailed view of the body image of transsexual patients, an assessment of perception, attitudes and experiences about one's own body is necessary. To date, research on the body image of transsexual patients has mostly covered body dissatisfaction with respect to body perception. SAMPLING AND METHODS: We investigated 23 preoperative (16 male-to-female and 7 female-to-male transsexual patients) and 22 postoperative (14 male-to-female and 8 female-to-male) transsexual pa...

  14. Computed tomography of Krukenberg tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, K.C.; Gold, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of three patients with Kurkenberg tumor was reviewed retrospectively. CT showed large, lobulated, multicystic masses with soft-tissue components, indistinguishable from primary ovarian carcinoma. Much has been written about metastatic ovarian tumor, but this is the first report in the radiologic literature about their CT features. The authors emphasize the importance of recognizing the ovary as a frequent site of metastases and the proper approach to this problem. In patients with a history of colon or gastric carcinoma, the mixed cystic and solid ovarian mass on CT should be regarded as metastatic tumor until proven otherwise. A careful search for gastrointestinal tract signs or symptoms should be done in any patient with a pelvic tumor. When CT is done for evaluation of ovarian tumor, the stomach and colon should be carefully evaluated, and the ovaries routinely examined in the preoperative CT staging of gastric or colon carcinoma

  15. Notch Signaling and Brain Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie; Kristoffersen, Karina; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    Human brain tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplasms occurring inside the cranium and the central spinal cord. In adults and children, astrocytic glioma and medulloblastoma are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors. These tumor types are thought to arise from cells in which Notch...... signaling plays a fundamental role during development. Recent findings have shown that Notch signaling is dysregulated, and contributes to the malignant potential of these tumors. Growing evidence point towards an important role for cancer stem cells in the initiation and maintenance of glioma...... and medulloblastoma. In this chapter we will cover the present findings of Notch signaling in human glioma and medulloblastoma and try to create an overall picture of its relevance in the pathogenesis of these tumors....

  16. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, G.O. Jr.; Davis, P.C.; Patrick, L.E.; Winn, K.J.; Ball, T.I.; Wyly, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy is an uncommon neoplasm occurring primarily in the child one year or less in age. Difficulty in deciding the cellular origin of this tumor has led to numerous names, including congenital melanocarcinoma, melanotic epithelial odontoma, melanotic ameloblastoma, and retinal anlage tumor, to list a few. Electron microscopy and histochemical studies, however, have now established the neural crest the most likely origin. The most frequent site of occurrence is the maxilla followed by the skull, the brain and the mandible. The genital organs are the most frequent extracranial site. Within the skull, there is a predilection for the anterior fontanel. The following is a case report of a young child with melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy arising at the anterior fontanel. Included is a discussion of magnetic resonance (MR) findings, which to our knowledge, have not been previously reported in this tumor. (orig.)

  17. Benign mixed tumor of the lacrimal sac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Suk Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoplasms of the lacrimal drainage system are uncommon, but potentially life-threatening and are often difficult to diagnose. Among primary lacrimal sac tumors, benign mixed tumors are extremely rare. Histologically, benign mixed tumors have been classified as a type of benign epithelial tumor. Here we report a case of benign mixed tumor of the lacrimal sac.

  18. Pathogenesis and progression of fibroepithelial breast tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, Arno

    2006-01-01

    Fibroadenoma and phyllodes tumor are fibroepithelial breast tumors. These tumors are biphasic, i.e. they are composed of stroma and epithelium. The behavior of fibroadenomas is benign, whereas phyllodes tumors can recur and even metastasize. Classification criteria for both tumors show considerable

  19. Tumors and tumor-like lesions of the heart valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Lavee

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Valvular tumors and tumor-like lesions may have similar morphological and clinical characteristics, and may place the patients at a high risk of stroke in different ways. From January 2004 to June 2008, 11 patients underwent surgery for a suspected valvular tumor. Valvular tumor and tumor-like lesions accounted for 0.32% of adult cardiac operations. Five (45.5% valvular lesions were papillary fibroelastomas, one (9.1% was myxoma, 2 (18.2% were organized thrombi, and 3 (27.3% were calcification lesions. There was a total of 5 (45.5% atrioventricular valve lesions, 4 arising from the atrial side of the leaflets, and one from the ventricular side. All 5 (45.5% semilunar valvular lesions were from the aortic valve. One (9.1% lesion originated from the chorda tendinea of the mitral valve. All leaflet lesions were resected by a simple shave technique, and all the patients recovered favorably. Valvular tumor and tumor-like lesions are rare. Pre-operative differential diagnoses among these valvular lesions pose important clinical implications for appropriate treatment for the underlying diseases. Prompt therapeutic measures in view of the underlying diseases of the valvular lesions are essential to prevent potential embolic events.

  20. Tumor-penetrating nanosystem strongly suppresses breast tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shweta; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Mölder, Tarmo; Tobi, Allan; Teesalu, Tambet; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2018-01-01

    Antiangiogenic and vascular disrupting compounds have shown promise in cancer therapy, but tend to be only partially effective. We previously reported a potent theranostic nanosystem that was highly effective in glioblastoma and breast cancer mouse models, retarding tumor growth and producing some cures [Agemy et al. 2011,2013]. The nanosystem consists of iron oxide NPs (“nanoworms”) coated with a composite peptide with tumor-homing and pro-apoptotic domains. The homing component targets tumor vessels by binding to p32/gC1qR at the surface or tumor endothelial cells. We sought to further improve the efficacy nanosystem by searching for an optimally effective homing peptide that would also incorporate a tumor-penetrating function. To this effect, we tested a panel of candidate p32 binding peptides with a sequence motif that conveys tumor-penetrating activity (CendR motif). We identified a peptide designated as Linear TT1 (Lin TT1) (sequence: AKRGARSTA) as most effective in causing tumor homing and penetration of the nanosystem. This peptide had the lowest affinity for p32 among the peptides tested. The low affinity may have moderated the avidity effect from the multivalent presentation on nanoparticles (NPs), such that the NPs avoid getting trapped by the so called “binding-site barrier”, which can hinder tissue penetration of compounds with a high affinity for their receptors. Treatment of breast cancer mice with the LinTT1 nanosystem showed greatly improved efficacy compared to the original system. These results identify a promising treatment modality and underscore the value of tumor penetration effect in improving the efficacy tumor treatment. PMID:28178415