WorldWideScience

Sample records for body radiation therapy

  1. [Stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, D; Martinage, G; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T; Makhloufi, S; Faivre, J-C; Thureau, S; Lartigau, É

    2016-10-01

    After the liver and lungs, bones are the third most common sites of cancer metastasis. Palliative radiotherapy for secondary bone tumours helps relieve pain, improve the quality of life and reduce the risk of fractures. Stereotactic body radiotherapy can deliver high radiation doses with very tight margins, which has significant advantages when treating tumours close to the spinal cord. Strict quality control is essential as dose gradient at the edge of the spinal cord is important. Optimal schedule is not defined. A range of dose-fractionation schedules have been used. Pain relief and local control are seen in over 80%. Toxicity rates are low, although vertebral fracture may occur. Ongoing prospective studies will help clarify its role in the management of oligometastatic patients. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J.; Rose, Peter S.; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Brown, Paul D.; Brinkmann, Debra H.; Laack, Nadia N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 ± 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10–40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1–5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18–30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1–5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Kamran A. [Mayo Medical School, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Rose, Peter S. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Brinkmann, Debra H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Laack, Nadia N., E-mail: laack.nadia@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 {+-} 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10-40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

  4. Guidelines for safe practice of stereotactic body (ablative) radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, Matthew; Barry, Tamara; Bailey, Michael; Smith, Leigh; Seeley, Anna; Siva, Shankar; Hegi-Johnson, Fiona; Booth, Jeremy; Ball, David; Thwaites, David

    2015-01-01

    The uptake of stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR) / stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) worldwide has been rapid. The Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology (FRO) assembled an expert panel of radiation oncologists, radiation oncology medical physicists and radiation therapists to establish guidelines for safe practice of SABR. Draft guidelines were reviewed by a number of international experts in the field and then distributed through the membership of the FRO. Members of the Australian Institute of Radiography and the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine were also asked to comment on the draft. Evidence-based recommendations (where applicable) address aspects of departmental staffing, procedures and equipment, quality assurance measures, as well as organisational considerations for delivery of SABR treatments. Central to the guidelines is a set of key recommendations for departments undertaking SABR. These guidelines were developed collaboratively to provide an educational guide and reference for radiation therapy service providers to ensure appropriate care of patients receiving SABR.

  5. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... material placed in the body near cancer cells ( internal radiation therapy , also called brachytherapy ). Systemic radiation therapy uses radioactive ... material placed in the body near cancer cells (internal radiation therapy, more commonly called brachytherapy). Systemic radiation therapy uses ...

  6. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muldermans, Jonathan L. [F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Romak, Lindsay B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Kwon, Eugene D. [Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Park, Sean S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R., E-mail: olivier.kenneth@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To review outcomes of patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer (PCa) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to identify variables associated with local failure. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed records of patients treated with SBRT for oligometastatic PCa. Metastasis control (ie, control of the treated lesion, MC), biochemical progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, and overall survival were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Sixty-six men with 81 metastatic PCa lesions, 50 of which were castrate-resistant, were included in the analysis. Lesions were in bone (n=74), lymph nodes (n=6), or liver (n=1). Stereotactic body radiation therapy was delivered in 1 fraction to 71 lesions (88%), at a median dose of 16 Gy (range, 16-24 Gy). The remaining lesions received 30 Gy in 3 fractions (n=6) or 50 Gy in 5 fractions (n=4). Median follow-up was 16 months (range, 3-49 months). Estimated MC at 2 years was 82%. Biochemical progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, and overall survival were 54%, 45%, and 83%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, only the dose of SBRT was significantly associated with MC; lesions treated with 16 Gy had 58% MC, and those treated with ≥18 Gy had 95% MC at 2 years (P≤.001). At 2 years, MC for lesions treated with 18 Gy (n=21) was 88%. No patient treated with ≥18 Gy in a single fraction or with any multifraction regimen had local failure. Six patients (9%) had grade 1 pain flare, and 2 (3%) had grade 2 pain flare. No grade 2 or greater late toxicities were reported. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer provided optimal metastasis control and acceptable toxicity with doses ≥18 Gy. Biochemical progression-free survival was 54% at 16 months with the inclusion of SBRT in the treatment regimen. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should be considered in

  7. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, from radioactive substances that a doctor places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including The ...

  8. Accompanying therapy with melatonin at radiation therapy for uterine body cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokhach, N.E.; Sorochan, P.P.; Gromakova, Yi.A.; Krugova, M.; Sukhyin, V.S.

    2011-01-01

    The results of treatment for uterine body cancer using post-operative radiation therapy (RT) accompanied by melatonin administration are analyzed. Accompanying therapy with melatonin limited negative RT influence on hematological and immune indices and prevented aggravation of quality of life.

  9. Potency preservation following stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obayomi-Davies, Olusola; Pahira, John; McGeagh, Kevin G; Collins, Brian T; Kowalczyk, Keith; Bandi, Gaurav; Kumar, Deepak; Suy, Simeng; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P; Chen, Leonard N; Bhagat, Aditi; Wright, Henry C; Uhm, Sunghae; Kim, Joy S; Yung, Thomas M; Lei, Siyuan; Batipps, Gerald P

    2013-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction after prostate radiation therapy remains an ongoing challenge and critical quality of life issue. Given the higher dose of radiation per fraction using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) there is concern that post-SBRT impotency would be higher than conventional radiation therapy approaches. This study sought to evaluate potency preservation and sexual function following SBRT for prostate cancer. Between February 2008 and March 2011, 216 men with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated definitively with SBRT monotherapy at Georgetown University Hospital. Potency was defined as the ability to have an erection firm enough for intercourse with or without sexual aids while sexual activity was defined as the ability to have an erection firm enough for masturbation and foreplay. Patients who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) were excluded from this study. Ninety-seven hormone-naïve men were identified as being potent at the initiation of therapy and were included in this review. All patients were treated to 35–36.25 Gy in 5 fractions delivered with the CyberKnife Radiosurgical System (Accuray). Prostate specific antigen (PSA) and total testosterone levels were obtained pre-treatment, every 3 months for the first year and every 6 months for the subsequent year. Sexual function was assessed with the Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM), the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC)-26 and Utilization of Sexual Medication/Device questionnaires at baseline and all follow-up visits. Ninety-seven men (43 low-, 50 intermediate- and 4 high-risk) at a median age of 68 years (range, 48–82 years) received SBRT. The median pre-treatment PSA was 5.9 ng/ml and the minimum follow-up was 24 months. The median pre-treatment total serum testosterone level was 11.4 nmol/L (range, 4.4-27.9 nmol/L). The median baseline SHIM was 22 and 36% of patients utilized sexual aids prior to treatment. Although potency rates declined following

  10. A Study of Pseudoprogression After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahig, Houda; Simard, Dany [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Létourneau, Laurent [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wong, Philip; Roberge, David; Filion, Edith; Donath, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Masucci, Laura, E-mail: g.laura.masucci.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of pseudoprogression (PP) after spine stereotactic body radiation therapy based on a detailed and quantitative assessment of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) morphologic tumor alterations, and to identify predictive factors distinguishing PP from local recurrence (LR). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 35 patients with 49 spinal segments treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy, from 2009 to 2014, was conducted. The median number of follow-up MRI studies was 4 (range, 2-7). The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) within each of the 49 spinal segments were contoured on the pretreatment and each subsequent follow-up T1- and T2-weighted MRI sagittal sequence. T2 signal intensity was reported as the mean intensity of voxels constituting each volume. LR was defined as persistent GTV enlargement on ≥2 serial MRI studies for ≥6 months or on pathologic confirmation. PP was defined as a GTV enlargement followed by stability or regression on subsequent imaging within 6 months. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for estimation of actuarial local control, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Results: The median follow-up was 23 months (range, 1-39 months). PP was identified in 18% of treated segments (9 of 49) and LR in 29% (14 of 49). Earlier volume enlargement (5 months for PP vs 15 months for LR, P=.005), greater GTV to reference nonirradiated vertebral body T2 intensity ratio (+30% for PP vs −10% for LR, P=.005), and growth confined to 80% of the prescription isodose line (80% IDL) (8 of 9 PP cases vs 1 of 14 LR cases, P=.002) were associated with PP on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed an earlier time to volume enlargement and growth within the 80% IDL as significant predictors of PP. LR involved the epidural space in all but 1 lesion, whereas PP was confined to the vertebral body in 7 of 9 cases. Conclusions: PP was observed in 18% of treated spinal segments. Tumor growth

  11. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Young Seok; Kim, Mi-Sook; Yoo, Sung Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Yang, Kwang Mo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Choi, Chul Won; Lee, Dong Han; Kim, Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kang, Hye Jin; Kim, YoungHan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical application of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients with a focus on local efficacy and toxicity. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients with locally advanced and nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer who had been treated between 2004 and 2006. Follow-up duration ranged from 4 to 41 months (median, 14.5 months). A total dose of 40 Gy was delivered in 20 fractions using a conventional three-field technique, and then a single fraction of 14, 15, 16, or 17 Gy SBRT was administered as a boost without a break. Twenty-one patients received chemotherapy. Overall and local progression-free survival were calculated and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: One-year overall survival and local progression-free survival rates were 60.0% and 70.2%, respectively. One patient (3%) developed Grade 4 toxicity. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 response was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that a SBRT boost provides a safe means of increasing radiation dose. Based on the results of this study, we recommend that a well controlled Phase II study be conducted on locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  12. Stereotactic body radiation therapy versus conventional radiation therapy in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Stefan Starup; Schytte, Tine; Jensen, Henrik R

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is now an accepted and patient friendly treatment, but still controversy exists about its comparability to conventional radiation therapy (RT). The purpose of this single...... and SBRT predicted improved prognosis. However, staging procedure, confirmation procedure of recurrence and technical improvements of radiation treatment is likely to influence outcomes. However, SBRT seems to be as efficient as conventional RT and is a more convenient treatment for the patients....

  13. Dysuria Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einsley-Marie eJanowski

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dysuria following prostate radiation therapy is a common toxicity that adversely affects patients’ quality of life and may be difficult to manage. Methods: 204 patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT from 2007 to 2010 for localized prostate carcinoma with a minimum follow up of three years were included in this retrospective review of prospectively collected data. All patients were treated to 35-36.25Gy in 5 fractions delivered with robotic SBRT with real time fiducial tracking. Dysuria and other lower urinary tract symptoms were assessed via Question 4b (Pain or burning on urination of the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC-26 and the American Urological Association (AUA Symptom Score at baseline and at routine follow up. Results: 204 patients (82 low-, 105 intermediate-, and 17 high risk according to the D’Amico classification at a median age of 69 years (range 48-91 received SBRT for their localized prostate cancer with a median follow up of 47 months. Bother associated with dysuria significantly increased from a baseline of 12% to a maximum of 43% at one month (p<0.0001. There were two distinct peaks of moderate to severe dysuria bother at 1 month and at 6-12 months, with 9% of patients experiencing a late transient dysuria flare. While a low level of dysuria was seen through the first two years of follow-up, it returned to below baseline by two years (p=0.91. The median baseline AUA score of 7.5 significantly increased to 11 at 1 month (p<0.0001 and returned to 7 at 3 months (p= 0.54. Patients with dysuria had a statistically higher AUA score at baseline and at all follow-ups up to 30 months. Dysuria significantly correlated with dose and AUA score on multivariate analysis. Frequency and strain significantly correlated with dysuria on stepwise multivariate analysis.Conclusions: The rate and severity of dysuria following SBRT is comparable to patients treated with other radiation modalities.

  14. Adaptive Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Planning for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Yujiao [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Zhang, Fan [Occupational and Environmental Safety Office, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yin, Fang-Fang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai, Jing, E-mail: jing.cai@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of adaptive planning on lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Forty of 66 consecutive lung SBRT patients were selected for a retrospective adaptive planning study. CBCT images acquired at each fraction were used for treatment planning. Adaptive plans were created using the same planning parameters as the original CT-based plan, with the goal to achieve comparable comformality index (CI). For each patient, 2 cumulative plans, nonadaptive plan (P{sub NON}) and adaptive plan (P{sub ADP}), were generated and compared for the following organs-at-risks (OARs): cord, esophagus, chest wall, and the lungs. Dosimetric comparison was performed between P{sub NON} and P{sub ADP} for all 40 patients. Correlations were evaluated between changes in dosimetric metrics induced by adaptive planning and potential impacting factors, including tumor-to-OAR distances (d{sub T-OAR}), initial internal target volume (ITV{sub 1}), ITV change (ΔITV), and effective ITV diameter change (Δd{sub ITV}). Results: 34 (85%) patients showed ITV decrease and 6 (15%) patients showed ITV increase throughout the course of lung SBRT. Percentage ITV change ranged from −59.6% to 13.0%, with a mean (±SD) of −21.0% (±21.4%). On average of all patients, P{sub ADP} resulted in significantly (P=0 to .045) lower values for all dosimetric metrics. Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} was found to correlate with changes in dose to 5 cc (ΔD5cc) of esophagus (r=0.61) and dose to 30 cc (ΔD30cc) of chest wall (r=0.81). Stronger correlations between Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} and ΔD30cc of chest wall were discovered for peripheral (r=0.81) and central (r=0.84) tumors, respectively. Conclusions: Dosimetric effects of adaptive lung SBRT planning depend upon target volume changes and tumor-to-OAR distances. Adaptive lung SBRT can potentially reduce dose to adjacent OARs if patients present large tumor volume shrinkage during the treatment.

  15. Institutional experience in the treatment of colorectal liver metastases with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Méndez Romero, Alejandra; Keskin-Cambay, Fatma; van Os, Rob M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Heijmen, Ben J. M.; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Verhoef, Cornelis

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether the impact of dose escalation in our patient population represented an improvement in local control without increasing treatment related toxicity. A cohort of consecutive patients with colorectal liver metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) between

  16. Risk Factors Associated With Symptomatic Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Shiming; Zeng, Zhaochong; Ye, Luxi; Huang, Yan; He, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis is the most frequent acute pulmonary toxicity following stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer. Here, we investigate clinical and dosimetric factors associated with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage I non–small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy. A total of 67 patients with stage I non–small cell lung cancer who received stereotactic body radiation therapy at our institution were enrolled, and their clini...

  17. Usefulness of radiation treatment planning allpied respiration factor for streotatic body radiation therapy in the lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sung Pil; Kim, Tae Hyung; So, Woon Young; Back, Geum Mun [Dept. of Medical Health Science, Graduate School, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    We are evaluated the usefulness of radiation treatment planning applied respiration factor for stereotactic body radiation therapy in the lung cancer. Four dimensional computed tomography images were obtained in 10 patients with lung cancer. The radiation treatment plans were established total lung volume according to respiration images (new method) and conventional method. We was analyzed in the lung volume, radiation absorbed dose of lung and main organs (ribs, tracheobronchus, esophagus, spinal cord) around the tumor, respectively. We were confirmed that lung volume and radiation absorbed dose of lung and main organs around the tumor deference according to applied respiration. In conclusion, radiation treatment planning applied respiration factor seems to be useful for stereotactic body radiation therapy in the lung cancer.

  18. Proctitis following stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joh, Daniel Y; Chen, Leonard N; Porter, Gerald; Bhagat, Aditi; Sood, Sumit; Kim, Joy S; Moures, Rudy; Yung, Thomas; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T; Ju, Andrew W; Suy, Simeng; Carroll, John; Lynch, John H; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Collins, Sean P

    2014-12-12

    Proctitis after radiation therapy for prostate cancer remains an ongoing clinical challenge and critical quality of life issue. SBRT could minimize rectal toxicity by reducing the volume of rectum receiving high radiation doses and offers the potential radiobiologic benefits of hypofractionation. This study sought to evaluate the incidence and severity of proctitis following SBRT for prostate cancer. Between February 2008 and July 2011, 269 men with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated definitively with SBRT monotherapy at Georgetown University Hospital. All patients were treated to 35-36.25Gy in 5 fractions delivered with the CyberKnife Radiosurgical System (Accuray). Rectal bleeding was recorded and scored using the CTCAE v.4. Telangiectasias were graded using the Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS). Proctitis was assessed via the Bowel domain of the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC)-26 at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months post-SBRT. The median age was 69 years with a median prostate volume of 39 cc. The median follow-up was 3.9 years with a minimum follow-up of two years. The 2-year actuarial incidence of late rectal bleeding ≥ grade 2 was 1.5%. Endoscopy revealed VRS Grade 2 rectal telangiectasias in 11% of patients. All proctitis symptoms increased at one month post-SBRT but returned to near-baseline with longer follow-up. The most bothersome symptoms were bowel urgency and frequency. At one month post-SBRT, 11.2% and 8.5% of patients reported a moderate to big problem with bowel urgency and frequency, respectively. The EPIC bowel summary scores declined transiently at 1 month and experienced a second, more protracted decline between 6 months and 18 months before returning to near-baseline at two years post-SBRT. Prior to treatment, 4.1% of men felt their bowel function was a moderate to big problem which increased to 11.5% one month post-SBRT but returned to near-baseline at two years post-SBRT. In this single institution cohort

  19. Cost-Effectiveness of Surgery, Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy, and Systemic Therapy for Pulmonary Oligometastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lester-Coll, Nataniel H., E-mail: nataniel.lester-coll@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Rutter, Charles E.; Bledsoe, Trevor J. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Goldberg, Sarah B. [Department of Medicine (Medical Oncology), Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Decker, Roy H.; Yu, James B. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Introduction: Pulmonary oligometastases have conventionally been managed with surgery and/or systemic therapy. However, given concerns about the high cost of systemic therapy and improvements in local treatment of metastatic cancer, the optimal cost-effective management of these patients is unclear. Therefore, we sought to assess the cost-effectiveness of initial management strategies for pulmonary oligometastases. Methods and Materials: A cost-effectiveness analysis using a Markov modeling approach was used to compare average cumulative costs, quality adjusted life years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) among 3 initial disease management strategies: video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) wedge resection, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), and systemic therapy among 5 different cohorts of patient disease: (1) melanoma; (2) non-small cell lung cancer adenocarcinoma without an EGFR mutation (NSCLC AC); (3) NSCLC with an EGFR mutation (NSCLC EGFRm AC); (4) NSCLC squamous cell carcinoma (NSCLC SCC); and (5) colon cancer. One-way sensitivity analyses and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to analyze uncertainty with regard to model parameters. Results: In the base case, SBRT was cost effective for melanoma, with costs/net QALYs of $467,787/0.85. In patients with NSCLC, the most cost-effective strategies were SBRT for AC ($156,725/0.80), paclitaxel/carboplatin for SCC ($123,799/0.48), and erlotinib for EGFRm AC ($147,091/1.90). Stereotactic body radiation therapy was marginally cost-effective for EGFRm AC compared to erlotinib with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $126,303/QALY. For colon cancer, VATS wedge resection ($147,730/2.14) was the most cost-effective strategy. Variables with the greatest influence in the model were erlotinib-associated progression-free survival (EGFRm AC), toxicity (EGFRm AC), cost of SBRT (NSCLC SCC), and patient utilities (all histologies). Conclusions: Video-assisted thoracic

  20. Cost-Effectiveness of Surgery, Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy, and Systemic Therapy for Pulmonary Oligometastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester-Coll, Nataniel H; Rutter, Charles E; Bledsoe, Trevor J; Goldberg, Sarah B; Decker, Roy H; Yu, James B

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary oligometastases have conventionally been managed with surgery and/or systemic therapy. However, given concerns about the high cost of systemic therapy and improvements in local treatment of metastatic cancer, the optimal cost-effective management of these patients is unclear. Therefore, we sought to assess the cost-effectiveness of initial management strategies for pulmonary oligometastases. A cost-effectiveness analysis using a Markov modeling approach was used to compare average cumulative costs, quality adjusted life years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) among 3 initial disease management strategies: video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) wedge resection, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), and systemic therapy among 5 different cohorts of patient disease: (1) melanoma; (2) non-small cell lung cancer adenocarcinoma without an EGFR mutation (NSCLC AC); (3) NSCLC with an EGFR mutation (NSCLC EGFRm AC); (4) NSCLC squamous cell carcinoma (NSCLC SCC); and (5) colon cancer. One-way sensitivity analyses and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to analyze uncertainty with regard to model parameters. In the base case, SBRT was cost effective for melanoma, with costs/net QALYs of $467,787/0.85. In patients with NSCLC, the most cost-effective strategies were SBRT for AC ($156,725/0.80), paclitaxel/carboplatin for SCC ($123,799/0.48), and erlotinib for EGFRm AC ($147,091/1.90). Stereotactic body radiation therapy was marginally cost-effective for EGFRm AC compared to erlotinib with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $126,303/QALY. For colon cancer, VATS wedge resection ($147,730/2.14) was the most cost-effective strategy. Variables with the greatest influence in the model were erlotinib-associated progression-free survival (EGFRm AC), toxicity (EGFRm AC), cost of SBRT (NSCLC SCC), and patient utilities (all histologies). Video-assisted thoracic surgery wedge resection or SBRT can be cost-effective in select

  1. Spinal metastases: multimodality imaging in diagnosis and stereotactic body radiation therapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabehdar Maralani, Pejman; Lo, Simon S; Redmond, Kristin; Soliman, Hany; Myrehaug, Sten; Husain, Zain A; Heyn, Chinthaka; Kapadia, Anish; Chan, Aimee; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-01-01

    Due to increased effectiveness of cancer treatments and increasing survival rates, metastatic disease has become more frequent compared to the past, with the spine being the most common site of bony metastases. Diagnostic imaging is an integral part of screening, diagnosis and follow-up of spinal metastases. In this article, we review the principles of multimodality imaging for tumor detection with respect to their value for diagnosis and stereotactic body radiation therapy planning for spinal metastases. We will also review the current international consensus agreement for stereotactic body radiation therapy planning, and the role of imaging in achieving the best possible treatment plan.

  2. Radiobiological mechanisms of stereotactic body radiation therapy and stereotactic radiation surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Kim, Won Woo; Park, In Hwan; Kim, Hee Jong; Lee, Eun Jin; Jung, Jae Hoon [Research Center for Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Lawrence Chin Soo; Song, Chang W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Despite the increasing use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) in recent years, the biological base of these high-dose hypo-fractionated radiotherapy modalities has been elusive. Given that most human tumors contain radioresistant hypoxic tumor cells, the radiobiological principles for the conventional multiple-fractionated radiotherapy cannot account for the high efficacy of SBRT and SRS. Recent emerging evidence strongly indicates that SBRT and SRS not only directly kill tumor cells, but also destroy the tumor vascular beds, thereby deteriorating intratumor microenvironment leading to indirect tumor cell death. Furthermore, indications are that the massive release of tumor antigens from the tumor cells directly and indirectly killed by SBRT and SRS stimulate anti-tumor immunity, thereby suppressing recurrence and metastatic tumor growth. The reoxygenation, repair, repopulation, and redistribution, which are important components in the response of tumors to conventional fractionated radiotherapy, play relatively little role in SBRT and SRS. The linear-quadratic model, which accounts for only direct cell death has been suggested to overestimate the cell death by high dose per fraction irradiation. However, the model may in some clinical cases incidentally do not overestimate total cell death because high-dose irradiation causes additional cell death through indirect mechanisms. For the improvement of the efficacy of SBRT and SRS, further investigation is warranted to gain detailed insights into the mechanisms underlying the SBRT and SRS.

  3. Future directions in therapy of whole body radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1989-01-01

    Clinicians have long known that marked granulocytopenia predisposed patients to bacterial infections either from pathogens or commensal organisms with which an individual usually lives in harmony. Evidence that infection was of major importance derives from several observations: (a) clinical observations of bacterial infection in human beings exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in reactor accidents, and in large animals dying from radiation exposure, (b) correlative studies on mortality rate, time of death, and incidence of positive culture in animals, (c) challenge of irradiated animals with normally non-virulent organisms, (d) studies of germ free mice and rats, and (e) studies of the effectiveness of antibiotics in reducing mortality rate. General knowledge and sound experimental data on animals and man clearly demonstrated that the sequelae of pancytopenia (bacterial infection, thrombopenic hemorrhage, and anemia) are the lethal factors. A lot of research was required to demonstrate that there were no mysterious radiations toxins, that hyperheparinemia was not a cause of radiation hemorrhage and that radiation hemorrhage could be prevented by fresh platelet transfusions

  4. Future directions in therapy of whole body radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1989-01-01

    Clinicians have long known that marked granulocytopenia predisposed patients to bacterial infections either from pathogens or commensal organisms with which an individual usually lives in harmony. Evidence that infection was of major importance derives from several observations: (a) clinical observations of bacterial infection in human beings exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in reactor accidents, and in large animals dying from radiation exposure, (b) correlative studies on mortality rate, time of death, and incidence of positive culture in animals, (c) challenge of irradiated animals with normally non-virulent organisms, (d) studies of germ free mice and rats, and (e) studies of the effectiveness of antibiotics in reducing mortality rate. General knowledge and sound experimental data on animals and man clearly demonstrated that the sequelae of pancytopenia (bacterial infection, thrombopenic hemorrhage, and anemia) are the lethal factors. A lot of research was required to demonstrate that there were no mysterious radiations toxins, that hyperheparinemia was not a cause of radiation hemorrhage and that radiation hemorrhage could be prevented by fresh platelet transfusions.

  5. Radiation therapy in leukemia (total body irradiation excluded)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peiffert, D.; Hoffstetter, S.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation techniques and indications in leukemias have been described in detail, yet prophylactic cranial irradiation in acute leukemia still has few indications. Cerebrospinal and testicular irradiation are reserved for relapsing disease. Radiation usually results in rapid functional improvement when used in neurologic emergencies and symptomatic neurologic or gross tumors relapses. Nevertheless, the improvements recently obtained by systemic chemotherapy have resulted in the reduction in the use of irradiation, especially in children, where it was considered deleterious with neuropsychological sequelae. Splenic irradiation remains useful for symptomatic myelo-proliferative syndrome. (authors)

  6. Advances in radiotherapy techniques and delivery for non-small cell lung cancer: benefits of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, proton therapy, and stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwanji, Tejan P; Mohindra, Pranshu; Vyfhuis, Melissa; Snider, James W; Kalavagunta, Chaitanya; Mossahebi, Sina; Yu, Jen; Feigenberg, Steven; Badiyan, Shahed N

    2017-04-01

    The 21st century has seen several paradigm shifts in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in early-stage inoperable disease, definitive locally advanced disease, and the postoperative setting. A key driver in improvement of local disease control has been the significant evolution of radiation therapy techniques in the last three decades, allowing for delivery of definitive radiation doses while limiting exposure of normal tissues. For patients with locally-advanced NSCLC, the advent of volumetric imaging techniques has allowed a shift from 2-dimensional approaches to 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). The next generation of 3DCRT, intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), have enabled even more conformal radiation delivery. Clinical evidence has shown that this can improve the quality of life for patients undergoing definitive management of lung cancer. In the early-stage setting, conventional fractionation led to poor outcomes. Evaluation of altered dose fractionation with the previously noted technology advances led to advent of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). This technique has dramatically improved local control and expanded treatment options for inoperable, early-stage patients. The recent development of proton therapy has opened new avenues for improving conformity and the therapeutic ratio. Evolution of newer proton therapy techniques, such as pencil-beam scanning (PBS), could improve tolerability and possibly allow reexamination of dose escalation. These new progresses, along with significant advances in systemic therapies, have improved survival for lung cancer patients across the spectrum of non-metastatic disease. They have also brought to light new challenges and avenues for further research and improvement.

  7. Single-Fraction Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Edward W; Jung, David L; Balagamwala, Ehsan H; Angelov, Lilyana; Suh, John H; Djemil, Toufik; Magnelli, Anthony; Chao, Samuel T

    2017-06-01

    Chordoma is a radioresistant tumor that presents a therapeutic challenge with spine involvement, as high doses of radiation are needed for local control while limiting dose to the spinal cord. The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy and safety of single-fraction spine stereotactic body radiation therapy for the treatment of spine chordoma. A retrospective review of our institutional database from 2006 to 2013 identified 8 patients (12 cases) with chordoma of the spine who were treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Surgical resection was performed in 7 of the 12 cases. The treatment volume was defined by the bony vertebral level of the tumor along with soft tissue extension appreciated on magnetic resonance imaging fusion. Medical records and imaging were assessed for pain relief and local control. Treatment toxicity was evaluated using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Median age was 59 years (range, 17-91). Median target volume was 48 cm 3 (1-304), and median prescription dose was 16 Gy (11-16). Median conformality index was 1.44 (1.14-3.21), and homogeneity index was 1.12 (1.05-1.19). With a median follow-up time of 9.7 months (.5-84), local control was achieved in 75% of the cases treated. One patient developed limited grade 2 spinal cord myelopathy that resolved with steroids. There were no other treatment toxicities from spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Single-fraction spine stereotactic body radiation therapy can be safely delivered to treat chordoma of the spine with the potential to improve pain symptoms. Although the early data are suggestive, long-term follow-up with more patients is necessary to determine the efficacy of spine stereotactic body radiation therapy in the treatment of chordoma of the spine.

  8. Quality of life after stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary and metastatic liver tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romero, Alejandra Mendez; Wunderink, Wouter; van Os, Rob M.; Nowak, Peter J. C. M.; Helimen, Ben J. M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Brandwijk, Rene P.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a high local control rate for primary and metastatic liver tumors. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of this treatment on the patient's quality of life. This is the first report of quality of life associated with liver SBRT.

  9. Biological-based optimization and volumetric modulated arc therapy delivery for stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diot, Quentin; Kavanagh, Brian; Timmerman, Robert; Miften, Moyed

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe biological-based optimization and Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation-based treatment planning for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in lung, liver, and prostate patients. Methods: Optimization strategies and VMAT planning parameters using a biological-based optimization MC planning system were analyzed for 24 SBRT patients. Patients received a median dose of 45 Gy [range, 34-54 Gy] for lung tumors in 1-5 fxs and a median dose of 52 Gy [range, 48-60 Gy] for liver tumors in 3-6 fxs. Prostate patients received a fractional dose of 10 Gy in 5 fxs. Biological-cost functions were used for plan optimization, and its dosimetric quality was evaluated using the conformity index (CI), the conformation number (CN), the ratio of the volume receiving 50% of the prescription dose over the planning target volume (Rx/PTV50). The quality and efficiency of the delivery were assessed according to measured quality assurance (QA) passing rates and delivery times. For each disease site, one patient was replanned using physical cost function and compared to the corresponding biological plan. Results: Median CI, CN, and Rx/PTV50 for all 24 patients were 1.13 (1.02-1.28), 0.79 (0.70-0.88), and 5.3 (3.1-10.8), respectively. The median delivery rate for all patients was 410 MU/min with a maximum possible rate of 480 MU/min (85%). Median QA passing rate was 96.7%, and it did not significantly vary with the tumor site. Conclusions: VMAT delivery of SBRT plans optimized using biological-motivated cost-functions result in highly conformal dose distributions. Plans offer shorter treatment-time benefits and provide efficient dose delivery without compromising the plan conformity for tumors in the prostate, lung, and liver, thereby improving patient comfort and clinical throughput. The short delivery times minimize the risk of patient setup and intrafraction motion errors often associated with long SBRT treatment

  10. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... novel targeted therapies can act as radiosensitizers. Systemic Radiation Therapy Certain cancers may be treated with radioactive drugs ... intravenous). This type of treatment is called systemic radiation therapy because the medicine goes to the entire body. ...

  11. Outcomes for patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy versus conventionally fractionated radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jim; Patel, Kirtesh; Switchenko, Jeffrey; Cassidy, Richard J; Hall, William A; Gillespie, Theresa; Patel, Pretesh R; Kooby, David; Landry, Jerome

    2017-09-15

    As systemic therapy has improved for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), efforts to improve local control with optimal radiotherapy may be critical. Although conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (CFRT) has more recently shown a limited role in LAPC, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an emerging approach with promising results. With no studies to date comparing SBRT with CFRT for LAPC, this study used the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) to evaluate these 2 modalities. With the NCDB, patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer cT2-4/N0-1/M0 adenocarcinoma of the pancreas diagnosed from 2004 to 2013 were analyzed. Radiation therapy delivered at ≤2 Gy was deemed CFRT, and radiation therapy delivered at ≥4 Gy per fraction was considered SBRT. Kaplan-Meier analysis, log-rank testing, and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression were performed with overall survival (OS) as the primary outcome. Propensity score matching was used. Among 8450 patients, 7819 (92.5%) were treated with CFRT, and 631 (7.5%) underwent SBRT. Receipt of SBRT was associated with superior OS in the multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.93; P < .001). With propensity score matching, 988 patients in all were matched, with 494 patients in each cohort. Within the propensity-matched cohorts, the median OS (13.9 vs 11.6 months) and the 2-year OS rate (21.7% vs 16.5%) were significantly higher with SBRT versus CFRT (P = .0014). In this retrospective review using a large national database, SBRT was associated with superior OS in comparison with CFRT for LAPC, and these findings remained significant in a propensity-matched analysis. Further prospective studies investigating these hypothesis-generating results are warranted. Cancer 2017;123:3486-93. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  12. 4π Noncoplanar Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Centrally Located or Larger Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Peng; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan; Long, Troy; Romeijn, Edwin; Low, Daniel A.; Kupelian, Patrick; Abraham, John; Yang, Yingli; Sheng, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric improvements in stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with larger or central lung tumors using a highly noncoplanar 4π planning system. Methods and Materials: This study involved 12 patients with centrally located or larger lung tumors previously treated with 7- to 9-field static beam intensity modulated radiation therapy to 50 Gy. They were replanned using volumetric modulated arc therapy and 4π plans, in which a column generation method was used to optimize the beam orientation and the fluence map. Maximum doses to the heart, esophagus, trachea/bronchus, and spinal cord, as well as the 50% isodose volume, the lung volumes receiving 20, 10, and 5 Gy were minimized and compared against the clinical plans. A dose escalation study was performed to determine whether a higher prescription dose to the tumor would be achievable using 4π without violating dose limits set by the clinical plans. The deliverability of 4π plans was preliminarily tested. Results: Using 4π plans, the maximum heart, esophagus, trachea, bronchus and spinal cord doses were reduced by 32%, 72%, 37%, 44%, and 53% (P≤.001), respectively, and R 50 was reduced by more than 50%. Lung V 20 , V 10 , and V 5 were reduced by 64%, 53%, and 32% (P≤.001), respectively. The improved sparing of organs at risk was achieved while also improving planning target volume (PTV) coverage. The minimal PTV doses were increased by the 4π plans by 12% (P=.002). Consequently, escalated PTV doses of 68 to 70 Gy were achieved in all patients. Conclusions: We have shown that there is a large potential for plan quality improvement and dose escalation for patients with larger or centrally located lung tumors using noncoplanar beams with sufficient quality and quantity. Compared against the clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy and static intensity modulated radiation therapy plans, the 4π plans yielded significantly and consistently improved tumor coverage and

  13. Risk Factors Associated With Symptomatic Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shiming; Zeng, Zhaochong; Ye, Luxi; Huang, Yan; He, Jian

    2017-06-01

    Radiation pneumonitis is the most frequent acute pulmonary toxicity following stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer. Here, we investigate clinical and dosimetric factors associated with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy. A total of 67 patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer who received stereotactic body radiation therapy at our institution were enrolled, and their clinicopathological parameters and dosimetric parameters were recorded and analyzed. The median follow-up period was 26.4 months (range: 7-48 months). In univariate analysis, tumor size ( P = .041), mean lung dose ( P = .028), V2.5 ( P = .024), V5 ( P = .014), V10 ( P = .004), V20 ( P = .024), V30 ( P = .020), V40 ( P = .040), and V50 ( P = 0.040) were associated with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, V10 ( P = .049) was significantly associated with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis. In conclusion, this study found that tumor size, mean lung dose, and V2.5 to V50 were risk factors markedly associated with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis. Our data suggested that lung V10 was the most significant factor, and optimizing lung V10 may reduce the risk of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis. For both central and peripheral stage I lung cancer, rate of radiation pneumonitis ≥grade 2 was low after stereotactic body radiation therapy with appropriate fraction dose.

  14. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, J.L.; Glatstein, E.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation oncologist encounters the critically ill immunosuppressed patient in four settings. First, the newly diagnosed cancer patient presents for initial evaluation and treatment, with immunosuppression from the cancer itself, malnutrition, concomitant infectious disease, prior drug or alcohol abuse or other medical problems. Second, the previously treated cancer patient presents with metastatic or recurrent primary cancer causing local symptoms. Immune dysfunction in this setting may be due to prior chemotherapy and/or radiation as well as any of the original factors. Third, the patient previously treated with radiation presents with a life-threatening problem possibly due to complications of prior therapy. In this setting, the radiation oncologist is asked to evaluate the clinical problem and to suggest whether radiation might be causing part or all of the problem and what can be done to treat these sequelae of radiation. Fourth, the patient with a benign diagnosis (not cancer) is seen with a problem potentially emeliorated by radiation (e.g., kidney transplant rejection, preparation for transplant, or intractable rheumatoid arthritis). This chapter reviews these four issues and presents clinical and radiobiologic principles on which recommendations for therapy are based

  15. Hematuria following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurka, Marie K; Chen, Leonard N; Bhagat, Aditi; Moures, Rudy; Kim, Joy S; Yung, Thomas; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T; Krishnan, Pranay; Suy, Simeng; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P

    2015-02-19

    Hematuria following prostate radiotherapy is a known toxicity that may adversely affect a patient's quality of life. Given the higher dose of radiation per fraction using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) there is concern that post-SBRT hematuria would be more common than with alternative radiation therapy approaches. Herein, we describe the incidence and severity of hematuria following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer at our institution. Two hundred and eight consecutive patients with prostate cancer treated with SBRT monotherapy with at least three years of follow-up were included in this retrospective analysis. Treatment was delivered using the CyberKnife® (Accuray) to doses of 35-36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. Toxicities were scored using the CTCAE v.4. Hematuria was counted at the highest grade it occurred in the acute and late setting for each patient. Cystoscopy findings were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Hematuria-associated bother was assessed via the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC)-26. The median age was 69 years with a median prostate volume of 39 cc. With a median follow-up of 48 months, 38 patients (18.3%) experienced at least one episode of hematuria. Median time to hematuria was 13.5 months. In the late period, there were three grade 3 events and five grade 2 events. There were no grade 4 or 5 events. The 3-year actuarial incidence of late hematuria ≥ grade 2 was 2.4%. On univariate analysis, prostate volume (p = 0.022) and history of prior procedure(s) for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) (p = 0.002) were significantly associated with hematuria. On multivariate analysis, history of prior procedure(s) for BPH (p prostate cancer was well tolerated with hematuria rates comparable to other radiation modalities. Patients factors associated with BPH, such as larger prostate volume, alpha antagonist usage, and prior history of procedures for BPH

  16. MO-B-201-00: Motion Management in Current Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    The motion management in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a key to success for a SBRT program, and still an on-going challenging task. A major factor is that moving structures behave differently than standing structures when examined by imaging modalities, and thus require special considerations and employments. Understanding the motion effects to these different imaging processes is a prerequisite for a decent motion management program. The commonly used motion control techniques to physically restrict tumor motion, if adopted correctly, effectively increase the conformity and accuracy of hypofractionated treatment. The effective application of such requires one to understand the mechanics of the application and the related physiology especially related to respiration. The image-guided radiation beam control, or tumor tracking, further realized the endeavor for precision-targeting. During tumor tracking, the respiratory motion is often constantly monitored by non-ionizing beam sources using the body surface as its surrogate. This then has to synchronize with the actual internal tumor motion. The latter is often accomplished by stereo X-ray imaging or similar techniques. With these advanced technologies, one may drastically reduce the treated volume and increase the clinicians’ confidence for a high fractional ablative radiation dose. However, the challenges in implementing the motion management may not be trivial and is dependent on each clinic case. This session of presentations is intended to provide an overview of the current techniques used in managing the tumor motion in SBRT, specifically for routine lung SBRT, proton based treatments, and newly-developed MR guided RT. Learning Objectives: Through this presentation, the audience will understand basic roles of commonly used imaging modalities for lung cancer studies; familiarize the major advantages and limitations of each discussed motion control methods; familiarize the major advantages and

  17. Outcomes for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and an Analysis of Predictors of Local Recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Tao, Randa [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rebueno, Neal C. [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Christensen, Eva N.; Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xin A. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Amini, Behrang [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tannir, Nizar M. [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tatsui, Claudio E.; Rhines, Laurence D. [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, USC Norris Cancer Hospital, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, California (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ghia, Amol J., E-mail: ajghia@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate local control, survival outcomes, and predictors of local relapse for patients treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 332 spinal metastases consecutively treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy between 2002 and 2012. The median follow-up for all living patients was 33 months (range, 0-111 months). Endpoints were overall survival and local control (LC); recurrences were classified as either in-field or marginal. Results: The 1-year actuarial LC and overall survival rates were 88% and 64%, respectively. Patients with local relapses had poorer dosimetric coverage of the gross tumor volume (GTV) compared with patients without recurrence (minimum dose [Dmin] biologically equivalent dose [BED] 23.9 vs 35.1 Gy, P<.001; D98 BED 41.8 vs 48.1 Gy, P=.001; D95 BED 47.2 vs 50.5 Gy, P=.004). Furthermore, patients with marginal recurrences had poorer prescription coverage of the GTV (86% vs 93%, P=.01) compared with those with in-field recurrences, potentially because of more upfront spinal canal disease (78% vs 24%, P=.001). Using a Cox regression univariate analysis, patients with a GTV BED Dmin ≥33.4 Gy (median dose) (equivalent to 14 Gy in 1 fraction) had a significantly higher 1-year LC rate (94% vs 80%, P=.001) compared with patients with a lower GTV BED Dmin; this factor was the only significant variable on multivariate Cox analysis associated with LC (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.29, 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.60) and also was the only variable significant in a separate competing risk multivariate model (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.62). Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy offers durable control for spinal metastases, but there is a subset of patients that recur locally. Patients with local relapse had significantly poorer tumor coverage, which was likely attributable to treatment planning directives that prioritized the

  18. Dose impact of a carbon fiber couch for stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, Hirofumi; Kanetake, Nagisa; Kawasaki, Keiichi; Iwashita, Yuki; Sakata, Junichi; Okuda, Tomoko; Araki, Fujio; Shimohigashi, Yoshinobu; Tomiyama, Yuki

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the dose attenuation caused by a carbon fiber radiation therapy table (Imaging Couch Top; ICT, BrainLab) and to evaluate the dosimetric impact of ICT during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in lung tumors. The dose attenuation of ICT was measured using an ionization chamber and modeled by means of a treatment planning system (TPS). SBRT was planned with and without ICT in a lung tumor phantom and ten cases of clinical lung tumors. The results were analyzed from isocenter doses and a dose-volume histogram (DVH): D 95 , D mean , V 20 , V 5 , homogeneity index (HI), and conformity index (CI). The dose attenuation of the ICT modeled with TPS agreed to within ±1% of the actually measured values. The isocenter doses, D 95 and D mean with and without ICT showed differences of 4.1-5% for posterior single field and three fields in the phantom study, and differences of 0.6-2.4% for five fields and rotation in the phantom study and six fields in ten clinical cases. The dose impact of ICT was not significant for five or more fields in SBRT. It is thus possible to reduce the dose effect of ICT by modifying the beam angle and beam weight in the treatment plan. (author)

  19. Frame-Based Immobilization and Targeting for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Bryan C.; Forster, Kenneth; Timmerman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Frame-based stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), such as that conducted with Elekta's Stereotactic Body Frame, can provide an extra measure of precision in the delivery of radiation to extracranial targets, and facilitates secure patient immobilization. In this paper, we review the steps involved in optimal use of an extra-cranial immobilization device for SBRT treatments. Our approach to using frame-based SBRT consists of 4 steps: patient immobilization, tumor and organ motion control, treatment/planning correlation, and daily targeting with pretreatment quality assurance. Patient immobilization was achieved with the Vac-Loc bag, which uses styrofoam beads to conform to the patient's shape comfortably within the body frame. Organ and motion control was assessed under fluoroscopy and controlled via a frame-mounted abdominal pressure plate. The compression screw was tightened until the diaphragmatic excursion range was < 1 cm. Treatment planning was performed using the Philips Pinnacle 6.2b system. In this treatment process, a 20 to 30 noncoplanar beam arrangement was initially selected and an inverse beam weight optimization algorithm was applied. Those beams with low beam weights were removed, leaving a manageable number of beams for treatment delivery. After planning, daily targeting using computed tomography (CT) to verify x-, y-, and z-coordinates of the treatment isocenter were used as a measure of quality assurance. We found our daily setup variation typically averaged < 5 mm in all directions, which is comparable to other published studies on Stereotactic Body Frame. Treatment time ranged from 30 to 45 minutes. Results demonstrate that patients have experienced high rates of local control with acceptable rates of severe side effects-by virtue of the tightly constrained treatment fields. The body frame facilitated comfortable patient positioning and quality assurance checks of the tumor, in relation to another set of independent set of coordinates

  20. Lymphocyte-Sparing Effect of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, Aaron T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Herman, Joseph M.; Dholakia, Avani S.; Moningi, Shalini [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lu, Yao [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Rosati, Lauren M.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Assadi, Ryan K.; Saeed, Ali M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Laheru, Daniel A. [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Weiss, Matthew J.; Wolfgang, Christopher L. [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Grossman, Stuart A. [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ye, Xiaobu [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ellsworth, Susannah G., E-mail: sbatkoy2@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced lymphopenia (RIL) is associated with inferior survival in patients with glioblastoma, lung cancer, and pancreatic cancer. We asked whether stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) decreases severity of RIL compared to conventional chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Methods and Materials: Serial total lymphocyte counts (TLCs) from patients enrolled in a prospective trial of SBRT for LAPC were compared to TLCs from an existing database of LAPC patients undergoing definitive CRT. SBRT patients received 33 Gy (6.6 Gy × 5 fractions). CRT patients received a median dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy × 28 fractions) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil (77%) or gemcitabine (23%) therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses (MVA) were used to identify associations between clinical factors and post-treatment TLC and between TLC and survival. Results: Thirty-two patients received SBRT and 101 received CRT. Median planning target volume (PTV) was smaller in SBRT (88.7 cm{sup 3}) than in CRT (344.6 cm{sup 3}; P<.001); median tumor diameter was larger for SBRT (4.6 cm) than for CRT (3.6 cm; P=.01). SBRT and CRT groups had similar median baseline TLCs. One month after starting radiation, 71.7% of CRT patients had severe lymphopenia (ie, TLC <500 cells/mm{sup 3} vs 13.8% of SBRT patients; P<.001). At 2 months, 46.0% of CRT patients remained severely lymphopenic compared with 13.6% of SBRT patients (P=.007). MVA demonstrated that treatment technique and baseline TLCs were significantly associated with post-treatment TLC at 1 but not 2 months after treatment. Higher post-treatment TLC was associated with improved survival regardless of treatment technique (hazard ratio [HR] for death: 2.059; 95% confidence interval: 1.310-3.237; P=.002). Conclusions: SBRT is associated with significantly less severe RIL than CRT at 1 month in LAPC, suggesting that radiation technique affects RIL and supporting previous modeling

  1. A whole body atlas for segmentation and delineation of organs for radiation therapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qatarneh, S.M.; Crafoord, J.; Kramer, E.L.; Maguire, G.Q.; Brahme, A.; Noz, M.E.; Hyoedynmaa, S.

    2001-01-01

    A semi-automatic procedure for delineation of organs to be used as the basis of a whole body atlas database for radiation therapy planning was developed. The Visible Human Male Computed Tomography (CT)-data set was used as a 'standard man' reference. The organ of interest was outlined manually and then transformed by a polynomial warping algorithm onto a clinical patient CT. This provided an initial contour, which was then adjusted and refined by the semi-automatic active contour model to find the final organ outline. The liver was used as a test organ for evaluating the performance of the procedure. Liver outlines obtained by the segmentation algorithm on six patients were compared to those manually drawn by a radiologist. The combination of warping and semi-automatic active contour model generally provided satisfactory segmentation results, but the procedure has to be extended to three dimensions

  2. Quality of Life After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Primary and Metastatic Liver Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Romero, Alejandra; Wunderink, Wouter; Os, Rob M. van; Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Brandwijk, Rene P.; Verhoef, Cornelis; IJzermans, Jan N.M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a high local control rate for primary and metastatic liver tumors. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of this treatment on the patient's quality of life. This is the first report of quality of life associated with liver SBRT. Methods and Materials: From October 2002 to March 2007, a total of 28 patients not suitable for other local treatments and with Karnofsky performance status of at least 80% were entered in a Phase I-II study of SBRT for liver tumors. Quality of life was a secondary end point. Two generic quality of life instruments were investigated, EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) and EuroQoL-Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-5D VAS), in addition to a disease-specific questionnaire, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ C-30). Points of measurement were directly before and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. Mean scores and SDs were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using paired-samples t-test and Student t-test. Results: The calculated EQ-5D index, EQ-5D VAS and QLQ C-30 global health status showed that mean quality of life of the patient group was not significantly influenced by treatment with SBRT; if anything, a tendency toward improvement was found. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy combines a high local control rate, by delivering a high dose per fraction, with no significant change in quality of life. Multicenter studies including larger numbers of patients are recommended and under development

  3. Black-Body Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Black-body radiation; thermal radiation; heat; electromagnetic radiation; Stefan's Law; Stefan–Boltzmann Law; Wien's Law; Rayleigh–Jeans Law; black-body spectrum; ultraviolet catastrophe; zero point energy; photon.

  4. Treatment Options in Oligometastatic Disease: Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy - Focus on Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Aaron T; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2017-03-01

    Improvements in systemic therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) have markedly extended survival, rendering local control of metastases to critical organs of increasing importance, especially in the oligometastatic setting where the disease may not yet have acquired the ability to widely disseminate. While surgical resection remains the gold standard for oligometastases in many organs, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) presents a non-invasive alternative for achieving local control. A literature review was performed to identify and summarize the findings of key prospective and retrospective studies that have shaped the field of SBRT for oligometastases to the lung, liver, and spine with a focus on oligometastases from CRC in particular. Modern dose-escalated SBRT regimens can achieve 1-year local control rates of 77-100%, 90-100%, and 81-95% for oligometastases involving the lung, liver, and spine, respectively. Rates of grade 3 or greater toxicity with contemporary SBRT techniques are consistently low at <10% in the lung, <5% in the liver, and <2%/8% for neurologic/non-neurologic toxicity in the spine, respectively. SBRT appears safe and effective for treating oligometastases involving the lung, liver, and spine. Randomized trials comparing SBRT to surgical resection and other local therapeutic modalities for the treatment of CRC oligometastases bear consideration.

  5. Spine stereotactic body radiation therapy plans: Achieving dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Linda X.; Shankar, Viswanathan; Shen, Jin; Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Mynampati, Dinesh; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Goddard, Lee; Basavatia, Amar; Fox, Jana; Garg, Madhur; Kalnicki, Shalom; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2015-01-01

    We report our experience of establishing planning objectives to achieve dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plans. Patients with spine lesions were treated using SBRT in our institution since September 2009. Since September 2011, we established the following planning objectives for our SBRT spine plans in addition to the cord dose constraints: (1) dose coverage—prescription dose (PD) to cover at least 95% planning target volume (PTV) and 90% PD to cover at least 99% PTV; (2) conformity index (CI)—ratio of prescription isodose volume (PIV) to the PTV < 1.2; (3) dose falloff—ratio of 50% PIV to the PTV (R 50% ); (4) and maximum dose in percentage of PD at 2 cm from PTV in any direction (D 2cm ) to follow Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915. We have retrospectively reviewed 66 separate spine lesions treated between September 2009 and December 2012 (31 treated before September 2011 [group 1] and 35 treated after [group 2]). The χ 2 test was used to examine the difference in parameters between groups. The PTV V 100% PD ≥ 95% objective was met in 29.0% of group 1 vs 91.4% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. The PTV V 90% PD ≥ 99% objective was met in 38.7% of group 1 vs 88.6% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. Overall, 4 plans in group 1 had CI > 1.2 vs none in group 2 (p = 0.04). For D 2cm , 48.3% plans yielded a minor violation of the objectives and 16.1% a major violation for group 1, whereas 17.1% exhibited a minor violation and 2.9% a major violation for group 2 (p < 0.01). Spine SBRT plans can be improved on dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff employing a combination of RTOG spine and lung SBRT protocol planning objectives

  6. Reirradiation spine stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrehaug, Sten; Sahgal, Arjun; Hayashi, Motohiro; Levivier, Marc; Ma, Lijun; Martinez, Roberto; Paddick, Ian; Régis, Jean; Ryu, Samuel; Slotman, Ben; De Salles, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal metastases that recur after conventional palliative radiotherapy have historically been difficult to manage due to concerns of spinal cord toxicity in the retreatment setting. Spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), also known as stereotactic radiosurgery, is emerging as an effective and safe means of delivering ablative doses to these recurrent tumors. The authors performed a systematic review of the literature to determine the clinical efficacy and safety of spine SBRT specific to previously irradiated spinal metastases. METHODS A systematic literature review was conducted, which was specific to SBRT to the spine, using MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Evidence-Based Medicine Database, National Guideline Clearinghouse, and CMA Infobase, with further bibliographic review of appropriate articles. Research questions included: 1) Is retreatment spine SBRT efficacious with respect to local control and symptom control? 2) Is retreatment spine SBRT safe? RESULTS The initial literature search retrieved 2263 articles. Of these articles, 160 were potentially relevant, 105 were selected for in-depth review, and 9 studies met all inclusion criteria for analysis. All studies were single-institution series, including 4 retrospective, 3 retrospective series of prospective databases, 1 prospective, and 1 Phase I/II prospective study (low- or very low-quality data). The results indicated that spine SBRT is effective, with a median 1-year local control rate of 76% (range 66%-90%). Improvement in patients' pain scores post-SBRT ranged from 65% to 81%. Treatment delivery was safe, with crude rates of vertebral body fracture of 12% (range 0%-22%) and radiation-induced myelopathy of 1.2%. CONCLUSIONS This systematic literature review suggests that SBRT to previously irradiated spinal metastases is safe and effective with respect to both local control and pain relief. Although the evidence is limited to low-quality data, SBRT can be a recommended treatment option

  7. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy as monotherapy for intermediate-risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Andrew W; Lei, Siyuan; Suy, Simeng; Lynch, John H; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Collins, Sean P; Wang, Hongkun; Oermann, Eric K; Sherer, Benjamin A; Uhm, Sunghae; Chen, Viola J; Pendharkar, Arjun V; Hanscom, Heather N; Kim, Joy S

    2013-01-01

    Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been advanced as monotherapy for low-risk prostate cancer. We examined the dose distributions and early clinical outcomes using this modality for the treatment of intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Forty-one sequential hormone-naïve intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients received 35–36.25 Gy of CyberKnife-delivered SBRT in 5 fractions. Radiation dose distributions were analyzed for coverage of potential microscopic ECE by measuring the distance from the prostatic capsule to the 33 Gy isodose line. PSA levels, toxicities, and quality of life (QOL) measures were assessed at baseline and follow-up. All patients completed treatment with a mean coverage by the 33 Gy isodose line extending >5 mm beyond the prostatic capsule in all directions except posteriorly. Clinical responses were documented by a mean PSA decrease from 7.67 ng/mL pretreatment to 0.64 ng/mL at the median follow-up of 21 months. Forty patients remain free from biochemical progression. No Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed. Mean EPIC urinary irritation/obstruction and bowel QOL scores exhibited a transient decline post-treatment with a subsequent return to baseline. No significant change in sexual QOL was observed. In this intermediate-risk patient population, an adequate radiation dose was delivered to areas of expected microscopic ECE in the majority of patients. Although prospective studies are needed to confirm long-term tumor control and toxicity, the short-term PSA response, biochemical relapse-free survival rate, and QOL in this interim analysis are comparable to results reported for prostate brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy. The Georgetown Institutional Review Board has approved this retrospective study (IRB 2009–510)

  8. Evaluation of initial setup errors of two immobilization devices for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Teshima, Teruki; Cárdenes, Higinia; Das, Indra J

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy and efficacy of two commonly used commercial immobilization systems for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in lung cancer. This retrospective study assessed the efficacy and setup accuracy of two immobilization systems: the Elekta Body Frame (EBF) and the Civco Body Pro-Lok (CBP) in 80 patients evenly divided for each system. A cone beam CT (CBCT) was used before each treatment fraction for setup correction in both devices. Analyzed shifts were applied for setup correction and CBCT was repeated. If a large shift (>5 mm) occurred in any direction, an additional CBCT was employed for verification after localization. The efficacy of patient setup was analyzed for 105 sessions (48 with the EBF, 57 with the CBP). Result indicates that the CBCT was repeated at the 1 st treatment session in 22.5% and 47.5% of the EBF and CBP cases, respectively. The systematic errors {left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), cranio-caudal (CC), and 3D vector shift: (LR 2 + AP 2 + CC 2 ) 1/2 (mm)}, were {0.5 ± 3.7, 2.3 ± 2.5, 0.7 ± 3.5, 7.1 ± 3.1} mm and {0.4 ± 3.6, 0.7 ± 4.0, 0.0 ± 5.5, 9.2 ± 4.2} mm, and the random setup errors were {5.1, 3.0, 3.5, 3.9} mm and {4.6, 4.8, 5.4, 5.3} mm for the EBF and the CBP, respectively. The 3D vector shift was significantly larger for the CBP (P patient comfort could dictate the use of CBP system with slightly reduced accuracy. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Acceptable Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Tumors Adjacent to the Central Biliary System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriguchi, Takahisa; Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Oku, Yohei; Aoki, Yousuke [Radiation Oncology Center, Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Shigematsu, Naoyuki [Department of Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kunieda, Etsuo, E-mail: kunieda-mi@umin.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokai University, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate biliary toxicity after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver tumors. Methods and Materials: Among 297 consecutive patients with liver tumors treated with SBRT of 35 to 50 Gy in 5 fractions, patients who were irradiated with >20 Gy to the central biliary system (CBS), including the gallbladder, and had follow-up times >6 months were retrospectively analyzed. Toxicity profiles, such as clinical symptoms and laboratory and radiologic data especially for obstructive jaundice and biliary infection, were investigated in relation to the dose volume and length relationship for each biliary organ. Results: Fifty patients with 55 tumors were irradiated with >20 Gy to the CBS. The median follow-up period was 18.2 months (range, 6.0-80.5 months). In the dose length analysis, 39, 34, 14, and 2 patients were irradiated with >20 Gy, >30 Gy, >40 Gy, and >50 Gy, respectively, to >1 cm of the biliary tract. Seven patients were irradiated with >20 Gy to >20% of the gallbladder. Only 2 patients experienced asymptomatic bile duct stenosis. One patient, metachronously treated twice with SBRT for tumors adjacent to each other, had a transient increase in hepatic and biliary enzymes 12 months after the second treatment. The high-dose area >80 Gy corresponded to the biliary stenosis region. The other patient experienced biliary stenosis 5 months after SBRT and had no laboratory changes. The biliary tract irradiated with >20 Gy was 7 mm and did not correspond to the bile duct stenosis region. No obstructive jaundice or biliary infection was found in any patient. Conclusions: SBRT for liver tumors adjacent to the CBS was feasible with minimal biliary toxicity. Only 1 patient had exceptional radiation-induced bile duct stenosis. For liver tumors adjacent to the CBS without other effective treatment options, SBRT at a dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions is a safe treatment with regard to biliary toxicity.

  10. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis for Delivery of Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perks, Julian R., E-mail: julian.perks@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Stanic, Sinisa; Stern, Robin L.; Henk, Barbara; Nelson, Marsha S.; Harse, Rick D.; Mathai, Mathew; Purdy, James A.; Valicenti, Richard K.; Siefkin, Allan D.; Chen, Allen M. [University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To improve the quality and safety of our practice of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), we analyzed the process following the failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) method. Methods: The FMEA was performed by a multidisciplinary team. For each step in the SBRT delivery process, a potential failure occurrence was derived and three factors were assessed: the probability of each occurrence, the severity if the event occurs, and the probability of detection by the treatment team. A rank of 1 to 10 was assigned to each factor, and then the multiplied ranks yielded the relative risks (risk priority numbers). The failure modes with the highest risk priority numbers were then considered to implement process improvement measures. Results: A total of 28 occurrences were derived, of which nine events scored with significantly high risk priority numbers. The risk priority numbers of the highest ranked events ranged from 20 to 80. These included transcription errors of the stereotactic coordinates and machine failures. Conclusion: Several areas of our SBRT delivery were reconsidered in terms of process improvement, and safety measures, including treatment checklists and a surgical time-out, were added for our practice of gantry-based image-guided SBRT. This study serves as a guide for other users of SBRT to perform FMEA of their own practice.

  11. Mortality following single-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy for central pulmonary oligometastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sung Jun; Mix, Michael; Rivers, Charlotte; Hennon, Mark; Gomez, Jorge; Singh, Anurag K

    2017-01-01

    The case of a 56-year-old male who developed bronchopulmonary hemorrhage after a course of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for centrally located squamous cell lung carcinoma is presented. The patient was previously treated with concurrent chemoradiation for stage IVA squamous cell carcinoma of the base of tongue. He showed no evidence of disease for 4 years until he developed a solitary metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma in the right hilum. He underwent a single fraction of 26 Gy with heterogeneity correction. He showed no evidence of disease for 13 months until he developed a sudden grade 4 bronchopulmonary hemorrhage. He underwent an urgent right pneumonectomy and later died of a post-operative complication. Pathologic analysis of the specimen revealed no evidence of tumor. Single-fraction SBRT of 26 Gy was sufficient to achieve complete response of his large central lung tumor. However, when treating patients with central lung tumors, some risk of mortality may be unavoidable with either SBRT or pneumonectomy.

  12. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver oligo-recurrence and oligo-progression from various tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Yu Jin; Kim, Mi Sook; Jang, Won Il; Seo, Young Seok; Cho, Chul Koo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Paik, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for patients with liver oligo-recurrence and oligo-progression from various primary tumors. Between 2002 and 2013, 72 patients with liver oligo-recurrence (oligo-metastasis with a controlled primary tumor) and oligo-progression (contradictory progression of a few sites of disease despite an overall tumor burden response to therapy) underwent SBRT. Of these, 9 and 8 patients with uncontrollable distant metastases and patients immediate loss to follow-up, respectively, were excluded. The total planning target volume was used to select the SBRT dose (median, 48 Gy; range, 30 to 60 Gy, 3–4 fractions). Toxicity was evaluated using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. We evaluated 55 patients (77 lesions) treated with SBRT for liver metastases. All patients had controlled primary lesions, and 28 patients had stable lesions at another site (oligo-progression). The most common primary site was the colon (36 patients), followed by the stomach (6 patients) and other sites (13 patients). The 2-year local control and progression-free survival rates were 68% and 22%, respectively. The 2- and 5-year overall survival rates were 56% and 20%, respectively. The most common adverse events were grade 1–2 fatigue, nausea, and vomiting; no grade ≥3 toxicities were observed. Univariate analysis revealed that oligo-progression associated with poor survival. SBRT for liver oligo-recurrence and oligo-progression appears safe, with similar local control rates. For liver oligo-progression, criteria are needed to select patients in whom improved overall survival can be expected through SBRT.

  13. Phase 1 Trial of Sorafenib and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brade, Anthony M., E-mail: anthony.brade@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ng, Sylvia; Brierley, James; Kim, John; Dinniwell, Robert; Ringash, Jolie; Wong, Rebecca R. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cho, Charles [Department of Radiation Oncology, Southlake Regional Cancer Centre, Newmarket, Ontario (Canada); Knox, Jennifer [Division of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Dawson, Laura A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximally tolerated dose of sorafenib delivered before, during, and after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in hepatocellular carinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had locally advanced Child-Pugh class A HCC, showed Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1, and were ineligible for standard local-regional therapies. Sorafenib was dose escalated in 2 strata: (1) low effective irradiated liver volume (veff) < 30% and (2) high veff 30%to 60%. Sorafenib (400 mg daily = dose level 1) was administered for 12 weeks, with 6 fractions SBRT delivered weeks 2 and 3, and escalation to full dose (400 mg twice daily) after 12 weeks as tolerated. Standard 3 + 3 cohorts with dose escalation of sorafenib were planned. Results: Sixteen patients (4 low veff, median dose 51 Gy; 12 high veff, median dose 33 Gy) were treated at 2 sorafenib dose levels. Of those patients 75% were had Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage C, and 63% had main branch portal vein invasion. In the low veff stratum, no dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were observed in 4 patients treated with SBRT and sorafenib 400 mg. Inb the high veff stratum: 2 of 3 evaluable patients treated with sorafenib 400 mg experienced DLT (grade 3 large bowel bleed and grade 4 bowel obstruction 51 and 27 days, respectively, after SBRT). One of 6 evaluable patients at dose level −1 (200 mg once daily) experienced a grade 3 tumor rupture at week 5. Median overall survival and in-field local progression have not been reached. Worsening of Child-Pugh liver function class was seen in 6 of 12 patients in the high veff stratum. Conclusions: Significant toxicity was observed in the high veff stratum, and concurrent SBRT with sorafenib is not recommended outside a clinical trial.

  14. Radiation therapy -- skin care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000735.htm Radiation therapy - skin care To use the sharing features on ... should treat your skin with care while receiving radiation therapy. Causes External radiation therapy uses high-powered x- ...

  15. Radiation-Induced Rib Fractures After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Risk Factors and Dose-Volume Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Kaori [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: shioyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Nonoshita, Takeshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshitake, Tadamasa [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohnishi, Kayoko [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Keiji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hirata, Hideki [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence, the clinical risk factors, and the dose-volume relationship of radiation-induced rib fracture (RIRF) after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: One hundred sixteen patients treated with SBRT for primary or metastatic lung cancer at our institution, with at least 6 months of follow-up and no previous overlapping radiation exposure, were included in this study. To determine the clinical risk factors associated with RIRF, correlations between the incidence of RIRF and the variables, including age, sex, diagnosis, gross tumor volume diameter, rib-tumor distance, and use of steroid administration, were analyzed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was also conducted. Regarding the maximum dose, V10, V20, V30, and V40 of the rib, and the incidences of RIRF were compared between the two groups divided by the cutoff value determined by the receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: One hundred sixteen patients and 374 ribs met the inclusion criteria. Among the 116 patients, 28 patients (46 ribs) experienced RIRF. The estimated incidence of rib fracture was 37.7% at 3 years. Limited distance from the rib to the tumor (<2.0 cm) was the only significant risk factor for RIRF (p = 0.0001). Among the dosimetric parameters used for receiver operating characteristic analysis, the maximum dose showed the highest area under the curve. The 3-year estimated risk of RIRF and the determined cutoff value were 45.8% vs. 1.4% (maximum dose, {>=}42.4 Gy or less), 51.6% vs. 2.0% (V40, {>=}0.29 cm{sup 3} or less), 45.8% vs. 2.2% (V30, {>=}1.35 cm{sup 3} or less), 42.0% vs. 8.5% (V20, {>=}3.62 cm{sup 3} or less), or 25.9% vs. 10.5% (V10, {>=}5.03 cm{sup 3} or less). Conclusions: The incidence of RIRF after hypofractionated SBRT is relatively high. The maximum dose and high-dose volume are strongly correlated with RIRF.

  16. Long-term safety and efficacy of fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantel, Frederick; Glatz, Stefan; Toussaint, Andre; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Patients with long life expectancy despite metastatic status might benefit from long-term local control of spinal metastases. Dose-intensified radiotherapy (RT) is believed to control tumor growth better and thus offers longer pain relief. This single-institution study reports on fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases in patients with good life expectancy based on performance status, extent of metastases, histology, and time to metastasis. Between 2004 and 2010, 36 treatment sites in 32 patients (median age 55 years; male 61 %; median Karnofsky performance score 85) were treated with fractionated SBRT. The median treatment dose was 60 Gy (range, 48.5-65 Gy) given in a median of 20 fractions (range, 17-33); the median maximum dose to the planning risk volume for the spinal cord (PRV-SC) was 46.6 Gy. All patients suffering from pain prior to RT reported pain relief after treatment; after a median follow-up of 20.3 months, 61 % of treatment sites were pain-free, another 25 % associated with mild pain. In 86 % of treatments, patients were free from neurological symptoms at the time of the last clinical follow-up. Acute grade 1 toxicities (CTCAE 3.0) were observed in 11 patients. Myelopathy did not occur in any patient. Radiologically controlled freedom from local progression was 92 and 84 % after 12 and 24 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 19.6 months. Patient selection resulted in long OS despite metastatic disease, and dose-intensified fractionated SBRT for spinal metastases was safe and achieved long-term local tumor control and palliation of pain. (orig.) [German] Patienten mit guter Lebenserwartung trotz metastasierter Erkrankung koennten von einer lang andauernden lokalen Kontrolle von Wirbelsaeulenmetastasen profitieren. Eine dosisintensivierte Radiotherapie (RT) kann vermutlich eine bessere Tumorkontrolle und daher eine laengere Schmerzpalliation erreichen. Ausgewertet wurden die monozentrischen

  17. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver tumours using flattening filter free beam: dosimetric and technical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancosu Pietro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To report the initial institute experience in terms of dosimetric and technical aspects in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT delivered using flattening filter free (FFF beam in patients with liver lesions. Methods and Materials From October 2010 to September 2011, 55 consecutive patients with 73 primary or metastatic hepatic lesions were treated with SBRT on TrueBeam using FFF beam and RapidArc technique. Clinical target volume (CTV was defined on multi-phase CT scans, PET/CT, MRI, and 4D-CT. Dose prescription was 75 Gy in 3 fractions to planning target volume (PTV. Constraints for organs at risk were: 700 cc of liver free from the 15 Gy isodose, Dmax max 0.1 cc 15 Gy Results Forty-three patients with a single lesion, nine with two lesions and three with three lesions were treated with this protocol. Target and organs at risk objectives were met for all patients. Mean delivery time was 2.8 ± 1.0 min. Pre-treatment plan verification resulted in a Gamma Agreement Index of 98.6 ± 0.8%. Mean on-line co-registration shift of the daily CBCT to the simulation CT were: -0.08, 0.05 and -0.02 cm with standard deviations of 0.33, 0.39 and 0.55 cm in, vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions respectively. Conclusions SBRT for liver targets delivered by means of FFF resulted to be feasible with short beam on time.

  18. Long-term safety and efficacy of fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantel, Frederick; Glatz, Stefan; Toussaint, Andre; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Patients with long life expectancy despite metastatic status might benefit from long-term local control of spinal metastases. Dose-intensified radiotherapy (RT) is believed to control tumor growth better and thus offers longer pain relief. This single-institution study reports on fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases in patients with good life expectancy based on performance status, extent of metastases, histology, and time to metastasis. Between 2004 and 2010, 36 treatment sites in 32 patients (median age 55 years; male 61 %; median Karnofsky performance score 85) were treated with fractionated SBRT. The median treatment dose was 60 Gy (range, 48.5-65 Gy) given in a median of 20 fractions (range, 17-33); the median maximum dose to the planning risk volume for the spinal cord (PRV-SC) was 46.6 Gy. All patients suffering from pain prior to RT reported pain relief after treatment; after a median follow-up of 20.3 months, 61 % of treatment sites were pain-free, another 25 % associated with mild pain. In 86 % of treatments, patients were free from neurological symptoms at the time of the last clinical follow-up. Acute grade 1 toxicities (CTCAE 3.0) were observed in 11 patients. Myelopathy did not occur in any patient. Radiologically controlled freedom from local progression was 92 and 84 % after 12 and 24 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 19.6 months. Patient selection resulted in long OS despite metastatic disease, and dose-intensified fractionated SBRT for spinal metastases was safe and achieved long-term local tumor control and palliation of pain. (orig.) [de

  19. Specific toxicity after stereotactic body radiation therapy to the central chest. A comprehensive review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oskan, Feras; Becker, Gerd; Bleif, Martin [Alb-Fils Kliniken GmbH, Department of Radiation Oncology, Goeppingen (Germany); CyberKnife Suedwest Centre, Radiochirurgicum, Goeppingen (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    The toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy in the central chest remains an unsettled issue. The collected data concerning the observed complications are poorly understood and are limited in their quantity and quality, thus hampering a precise delineation of treatment-specific toxicity. The majority of complications scored as toxicity grade 5, namely respiratory failure and fatal hemoptysis, are most likely related to multiple competing risks and occurred at different dose fractionation schemas, e. g., 10-12 fractions of 4-5 Gy, 5 fractions of 10 Gy, 3 fractions of 20-22 Gy, and 1 fraction of 15-30 Gy. Further investigations with longer follow-up and more details of patients' pretreatment and tumor characteristics are required. Furthermore, satisfactory documentation of complications and details of dosimetric parameters, as well as limitation of the wide range of possible fractionation schemes is also warranted for a better understanding of the risk factors relevant for macroscopic damage to the serially organized anatomic structure within the central chest. (orig.) [German] Das Risiko fuer schwere Nebenwirkungen der stereotaktischen Strahlentherapie bei zentralen Lungentumoren ist bisher schlecht definiert. Nicht nur die begrenzte Zahl der dokumentierten Ereignisse, sondern auch die Vielzahl der verwendeten Fraktionierungsschemata erschwert das Herausarbeiten valider prognostischer Faktoren. Auf Basis dieser Datenlage laesst sich das Risiko fuer Grad-5-Toxizitaeten, insbesondere Atemversagen und toedliche Blutungen, kaum einem bestimmten Dosis- oder Fraktionierungsschema, wie z. B. 10-12 Fraktionen mit 4-5 Gy, 5 Fraktionen mit 10 Gy, 3 Fraktionen mit 20-22 Gy und 1 Fraktion mit 15-30 Gy zuordnen, da multiple patientenspezifische, konkurrierende Risiken dabei einen wesentlichen Einfluss zu haben scheinen. Es wird zukuenftig erforderlich sein, praetherapeutische Patienten- und Tumorcharakteristika genauer zu erfassen, dosimetrische Parameter besser zu

  20. Prostate-specific antigen bounce following stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C. Vu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA bounce after brachytherapy has been well-documented. This phenomenon has also been identified in patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT. While the parameters that predict PSA bounce have been extensively studied in prostate brachytherapy patients, this study is the first to analyze the clinical and pathologic predictors of PSA bounce in prostate SBRT patients. Materials and Methods: Our institution has maintained a prospective database of patients undergoing SBRT for prostate cancer since 2006. Our study population includes patients between May 2006 and November 2011 who have at least 18 months of follow-up. All patients were treated using the CyberKnife treatment system. The prescription dose was 3500-3625cGy in 5 fractions.Results: 120 patients were included in our study. Median PSA follow-up was 24 months (range 18-78 months. 34 (28% patients had a PSA bounce. The median time to PSA bounce was 9 months, and the median bounce size was 0.50ng/mL. On univariate analysis, only younger age (p = .011 was shown to be associated with an increased incidence of PSA bounce. Other patient factors, including race, prostate size, prior treatment by hormones, and family history of prostate cancer, did not predict PSA bounces. None of the tumor characteristics studied, including Gleason score, pre-treatment PSA, T-stage, or risk classification by NCCN guidelines, was associated with increased incidence of PSA bounces. Younger age was the only statistically significant predictor of PSA bounce on multivariate analysis (OR = 0.937, p = 0.009.Conclusion: PSA bounce, which has been reported after prostate brachytherapy, is also seen in a significant percentage of patients after CyberKnife SBRT. Close observation rather than biopsy can be considered for these patients. Younger age was the only factor that predicted PSA bounce.

  1. Novel Technique for Hepatic Fiducial Marker Placement for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarraya, Hajer; Chalayer, Chloé; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Bonodeau, Francois; Lacornerie, Thomas; Mirabel, Xavier; Boulanger, Thomas; Taieb, Sophie; Kramar, Andrew; Lartigau, Eric; Ceugnart, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report experience with fiducial marker insertion and describe an advantageous, novel technique for fiducial placement in the liver for stereotactic body radiation therapy with respiratory tracking. Methods and Materials: We implanted 1444 fiducials (single: 834; linked: 610) in 328 patients with 424 hepatic lesions. Two methods of implantation were compared: the standard method (631 single fiducials) performed on 153 patients from May 2007 to May 2010, and the cube method (813 fiducials: 610 linked/203 single) applied to 175 patients from April 2010 to March 2013. The standard method involved implanting a single marker at a time. The novel technique entailed implanting 2 pairs of linked markers when possible in a way to occupy the perpendicular edges of a cube containing the tumor inside. Results: Mean duration of the cube method was shorter than the standard method (46 vs 61 minutes; P<.0001). Median numbers of skin and subcapsular entries were significantly smaller with the cube method (2 vs 4, P<.0001, and 2 vs 4, P<.0001, respectively). The rate of overall complications (total, major, and minor) was significantly lower in the cube method group compared with the standard method group (5.7% vs 13.7%; P=.013). Major complications occurred while using single markers only. The success rate was 98.9% for the cube method and 99.3% for the standard method. Conclusions: We propose a new technique of hepatic fiducial implantation that makes use of linked fiducials and involves fewer skin entries and shorter time of implantation. The technique is less complication-prone and is migration-resistant

  2. Stereotactic body radiation therapy as an ablative treatment for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Andres; Baumann, Anne-Sophie; Saunier-Kubs, Fleur; Salleron, Julia; Oldrini, Guillaume; Croisé-Laurent, Valérie; Barraud, Hélène; Ayav, Ahmed; Bronowicki, Jean-Pierre; Peiffert, Didier

    2015-05-01

    To describe efficacy and safety of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma. The records of 77 consecutive patients treated with SBRT for 97 liver-confined HCC were reviewed. A total dose of 45Gy in 3 fractions was prescribed to the 80% isodose line. Local control (LC), overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and toxicity were studied. The median follow-up was 12months. The median tumor diameter was 2.4cm. The LC rate was 99% at 1 and 2years. The 1 and 2-year OS were 81.8% and 56.6% respectively. The median time to progression was 9months (0-38). The rate of hepatic toxicity was 7.7% [1.6-13.7], 14.9% [5.7-23.2] and 23.1% [9.9-34.3] at 6months, 1year and 2years respectively. In multivariate analysis, female gender (HR 7.87 [3.14-19.69]), a BCLC B-C stage (HR 3.71 [1.41-9.76]), a sum of all lesion diameters ⩾2cm (HR 7.48 [2.09-26.83]) and a previous treatment (HR 0.10 [0.01-0.79]) were independent prognostic factors of overall survival. SBRT allows high local control for inoperable hepatocellular carcinomas. It should be considered when an ablative treatment is indicated in Child A patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dosimetric evaluation of simultaneous integrated boost during stereotactic body radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wensha, E-mail: wensha.yang@cshs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Reznik, Robert; Fraass, Benedick A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Nissen, Nicholas [Department of Surgery, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hendifar, Andrew [Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wachsman, Ashley [Department of Cross-Sectional Imaging Interventional Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Sandler, Howard; Tuli, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a promising way to treat locally advanced pancreatic cancer and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. A simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the region of vessel abutment or encasement during SBRT has the potential to downstage otherwise likely positive surgical margins. Despite the potential benefit of using SIB-SBRT, the ability to boost is limited by the local geometry of the organs at risk (OARs), such as stomach, duodenum, and bowel (SDB), relative to tumor. In this study, we have retrospectively replanned 20 patients with 25 Gy prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) and 33~80 Gy to the boost target volume (BTV) using an SIB technique for all patients. The number of plans and patients able to satisfy a set of clinically established constraints is analyzed. The ability to boost vessels (within the gross target volume [GTV]) is shown to correlate with the overlap volume (OLV), defined to be the overlap between the GTV + a 1(OLV1)- or 2(OLV2)-cm margin with the union of SDB. Integral dose, boost dose contrast (BDC), biologically effective BDC, tumor control probability for BTV, and normal tissue complication probabilities are used to analyze the dosimetric results. More than 65% of the cases can deliver a boost to 40 Gy while satisfying all OAR constraints. An OLV2 of 100 cm{sup 3} is identified as the cutoff volume: for cases with OLV2 larger than 100 cm{sup 3}, it is very unlikely the case could achieve 25 Gy to the PTV while successfully meeting all the OAR constraints.

  4. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kill any cancer cells that remain. Lifetime Dose Limits There is a limit to the amount of radiation an area of ... total dose of radiation more quickly or to limit damage to healthy cells. Different ways of delivering ...

  5. Inter-Fraction Tumor Volume Response during Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Correlated to Patient Variables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Salamekh

    Full Text Available Analyze inter-fraction volumetric changes of lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT and determine if the volume changes during treatment can be predicted and thus considered in treatment planning.Kilo-voltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT images obtained immediately prior to each fraction were used to monitor inter-fraction volumetric changes of 15 consecutive patients (18 lung nodules treated with lung SBRT at our institution (45-54 Gy in 3-5 fractions in the year of 2011-2012. Spearman's (ρ correlation and Spearman's partial correlation analysis was performed with respect to patient/tumor and treatment characteristics. Multiple hypothesis correction was performed using False Discovery Rate (FDR and q-values were reported.All tumors studied experienced volume change during treatment. Tumor increased in volume by an average of 15% and regressed by an average of 11%. The overall volume increase during treatment is contained within the planning target volume (PTV for all tumors. Larger tumors increased in volume more than smaller tumors during treatment (q = 0.0029. The volume increase on CBCT was correlated to the treatment planning gross target volume (GTV as well as internal target volumes (ITV (q = 0.0085 and q = 0.0039 respectively and could be predicted for tumors with a GTV less than 22 mL. The volume increase was correlated to the integral dose (ID in the ITV at every fraction (q = 0.0049. The peak inter-fraction volume occurred at an earlier fraction in younger patients (q = 0.0122.We introduced a new analysis method to follow inter-fraction tumor volume changes and determined that the observed changes during lung SBRT treatment are correlated to the initial tumor volume, integral dose (ID, and patient age. Furthermore, the volume increase during treatment of tumors less than 22mL can be predicted during treatment planning. The volume increase remained significantly less than the overall PTV expansion, and radiation

  6. Potentially curative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for single or oligometastasis to the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dongryul; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Pyo, Hongryull [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], Email: ahnyc@skku.edu; Seo, Jeong Min [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Radiological Science, Daewon Univ. College, Jecheon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Eun Hyuk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Background. To analyze the treatment outcomes of a potentially curative therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), for patients with single or oligometastasis to the lungs. Material and methods. Sixty-seven metastatic lung lesions in 57 patients were treated with SBRT between September 2001 and November 2010. All patients had single or oligo-metastasis to the lungs following a meticulous clinical work-up, including PET-CT scans. The lungs were the most common primary organ (33 lesions, 49.3%), followed by the head and neck (11 lesions, 16.4%), the liver (nine lesions, 13.5%), the colorectum (seven lesions, 10.4%), and other organs (seven lesions, 10.4%). Three different fractionation schedules were used: 50 Gy/5 fractions to four lesions (6.0%); 60 Gy/5 fractions to 44 lesions (65.7%); and 60 Gy/4 fractions to 19 lesions (28.3%). Results. Local tumor progression occurred in three lesions (4.5%). The three-year actuarial local control rate was 94.5%. Tumors larger than or equal to 2.5 cm showed poorer local control (98.3% vs. 77.8%, p <0.01). Metastatic tumors from the liver and colorectum showed lower local control rates than those from other organs (77.8%, 85.7%, and 100%, p =0.04). The two-year overall survival rate was 57.2%. Patients with tumors smaller than 2.5 cm had more favorable survival rates (64.0% vs. 38.9% at two-year, p =0.032). Patients with extrathoracic disease had poorer survival rates (66.1% vs. 0% at two-year, p =0.003). Patients with disease-free intervals longer than two years showed a trend toward good prognosis (71.1% vs. 51.1% at two-year, p =0.106). Grade 2 lung toxicity occurred in four patients (6.0%). One patient experienced Grade 5 lung toxicity following SBRT. Conclusion. SBRT for single or oligo-metastasis to the lung seems quite effective and safe. Tumor size, disease-free interval, and presence of extrathoracic disease are prognosticators for survival.

  7. Potentially curative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for single or oligometastasis to the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Dongryul; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Pyo, Hongryull; Seo, Jeong Min; Shin, Eun Hyuk

    2012-01-01

    Background. To analyze the treatment outcomes of a potentially curative therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), for patients with single or oligometastasis to the lungs. Material and methods. Sixty-seven metastatic lung lesions in 57 patients were treated with SBRT between September 2001 and November 2010. All patients had single or oligo-metastasis to the lungs following a meticulous clinical work-up, including PET-CT scans. The lungs were the most common primary organ (33 lesions, 49.3%), followed by the head and neck (11 lesions, 16.4%), the liver (nine lesions, 13.5%), the colorectum (seven lesions, 10.4%), and other organs (seven lesions, 10.4%). Three different fractionation schedules were used: 50 Gy/5 fractions to four lesions (6.0%); 60 Gy/5 fractions to 44 lesions (65.7%); and 60 Gy/4 fractions to 19 lesions (28.3%). Results. Local tumor progression occurred in three lesions (4.5%). The three-year actuarial local control rate was 94.5%. Tumors larger than or equal to 2.5 cm showed poorer local control (98.3% vs. 77.8%, p <0.01). Metastatic tumors from the liver and colorectum showed lower local control rates than those from other organs (77.8%, 85.7%, and 100%, p =0.04). The two-year overall survival rate was 57.2%. Patients with tumors smaller than 2.5 cm had more favorable survival rates (64.0% vs. 38.9% at two-year, p =0.032). Patients with extrathoracic disease had poorer survival rates (66.1% vs. 0% at two-year, p =0.003). Patients with disease-free intervals longer than two years showed a trend toward good prognosis (71.1% vs. 51.1% at two-year, p =0.106). Grade 2 lung toxicity occurred in four patients (6.0%). One patient experienced Grade 5 lung toxicity following SBRT. Conclusion. SBRT for single or oligo-metastasis to the lung seems quite effective and safe. Tumor size, disease-free interval, and presence of extrathoracic disease are prognosticators for survival

  8. Potentially curative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for single or oligometastasis to the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dongryul; Ahn, Yong Chan; Seo, Jeong Min; Shin, Eun Hyuk; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Pyo, Hongryull

    2012-05-01

    To analyze the treatment outcomes of a potentially curative therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), for patients with single or oligometastasis to the lungs. Sixty-seven metastatic lung lesions in 57 patients were treated with SBRT between September 2001 and November 2010. All patients had single or oligo-metastasis to the lungs following a meticulous clinical work-up, including PET-CT scans. The lungs were the most common primary organ (33 lesions, 49.3%), followed by the head and neck (11 lesions, 16.4%), the liver (nine lesions, 13.5%), the colorectum (seven lesions, 10.4%), and other organs (seven lesions, 10.4%). Three different fractionation schedules were used: 50 Gy/5 fractions to four lesions (6.0%); 60 Gy/5 fractions to 44 lesions (65.7%); and 60 Gy/4 fractions to 19 lesions (28.3%). Local tumor progression occurred in three lesions (4.5%). The three-year actuarial local control rate was 94.5%. Tumors larger than or equal to 2.5 cm showed poorer local control (98.3% vs. 77.8%, p <0.01). Metastatic tumors from the liver and colorectum showed lower local control rates than those from other organs (77.8%, 85.7%, and 100%, p =0.04). The two-year overall survival rate was 57.2%. Patients with tumors smaller than 2.5 cm had more favorable survival rates (64.0% vs. 38.9% at two-year, p =0.032). Patients with extrathoracic disease had poorer survival rates (66.1% vs. 0% at two-year, p =0.003). Patients with disease-free intervals longer than two years showed a trend toward good prognosis (71.1% vs. 51.1% at two-year, p =0.106). Grade 2 lung toxicity occurred in four patients (6.0%). One patient experienced Grade 5 lung toxicity following SBRT. SBRT for single or oligo-metastasis to the lung seems quite effective and safe. Tumor size, disease-free interval, and presence of extrathoracic disease are prognosticators for survival.

  9. Stereotactic body radiation therapy as an alternative treatment for small hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Min Yoon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Even with early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, patients are often ineligible for surgical resection, transplantation, or local ablation due to advanced cirrhosis, donor shortage, or difficult location. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT has been established as a standard treatment option for patients with stage I lung cancer, who are not eligible for surgery, and may be a promising alternative treatment for patients with small HCC who are not eligible for curative treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A registry database of 93 patients who were treated with SBRT for HCC between 2007 and 2009 was analyzed. A dose of 10-20 Gy per fraction was given over 3-4 consecutive days, resulting in a total dose of 30-60 Gy. The tumor response was determined using dynamic computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, which was performed 3 months after completion of SBRT. RESULTS: The median follow-up period was 25.6 months. Median size of tumors was 2 cm (range: 1-6 cm. Overall patients' survival rates at 1 and 3 years were 86.0% and 53.8%, respectively. Complete and partial tumor response were achieved in 15.5% and 45.7% of patients, respectively. Local recurrence-free survival rate was 92.1% at 3 years. Most local failures were found in patients with HCCs > 3 cm, and local control rate at 3 years was 76.3% in patients with HCC > 3 cm, 93.3% in patients with tumors between 2.1-3 cm, and 100% in patients with tumors ≤ 2 cm, respectively. Out-of-field intrahepatic recurrence-free survival rates at 1 and 3 years were 51.9% and 32.4%, respectively. Grade ≥ 3 hepatic toxicity was observed in 6 (6.5%. CONCLUSIONS: SBRT was effective in local control of small HCC. SBRT may be a promising alternative treatment for patients with small HCC which is unsuitable for other curative therapy.

  10. Basophilic round bodies in gastric biopsies little known by pathologists: iatrogenic yttrium 90 microspheres deriving from selective internal radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dong-Lan; Chan, John K C

    2013-10-01

    Selective internal radiation therapy is a relatively new technique that irradiates primary and metastatic liver cancer using yttrium 90 microspheres. Increasing reports have shown this to be a useful treatment for unresectable primary hepatocellular carcinoma and others metastases from colon, lung, breast, sarcoma, and ocular melanoma. On the other hand, more and more therapy-related complications have been described. Since the morphologic description of injured organs are relatively uncommon, we report 2 cases of selective internal radiation therapy-related gastric injury, which represent basophilic round bodies in gastric biopsies little known by pathologists. The appearances in esophagogastroduodenoscopy include gastrointestinal ulcer, edema, and bleeding. Histological findings are mucosal atrophy, mild to moderate cytologic atypia, edema of the stroma, and inflammatory infiltration. The most characteristic feature is the presence of round blue and dark microspheres in the stromal blood vessels.

  11. Evaluation of initial setup accuracy and intrafraction motion for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy using stereotactic body frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaohui; Bondeson, John C; Lewis, John H; Mannarino, Edward G; Friesen, Scott A; Wagar, Matthew M; Balboni, Tracy A; Alexander, Brian M; Arvold, Nils D; Sher, David J; Hacker, Fred L

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to evaluate the initial setup accuracy and intrafraction motion for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using stereotactic body frames (SBFs) and (2) to validate an in-house-developed SBF using a commercial SBF as a benchmark. Thirty-two spine SBRT patients (34 sites, 118 fractions) were immobilized with the Elekta and in-house (BHS) SBFs. All patients were set up with the Brainlab ExacTrac system, which includes infrared and stereoscopic kilovoltage x-ray-based positioning. Patients were initially positioned in the frame with the use of skin tattoos and then shifted to the treatment isocenter based on infrared markers affixed to the frame with known geometry relative to the isocenter. ExacTrac kV imaging was acquired, and automatic 6D (6 degrees of freedom) bony fusion was performed. The resulting translations and rotations gave the initial setup accuracy. These translations and rotations were corrected for by use of a robotic couch, and verification imaging was acquired that yielded residual setup error. The imaging/fusion process was repeated multiple times during treatment to provide intrafraction motion data. The BHS SBF had greater initial setup errors (mean±SD): -3.9±5.5mm (0.2±0.9°), -1.6±6.0mm (0.5±1.4°), and 0.0±5.3mm (0.8±1.0°), respectively, in the vertical (VRT), longitudinal (LNG), and lateral (LAT) directions. The corresponding values were 0.6±2.7mm (0.2±0.6°), 0.9±5.3mm (-0.2±0.9°), and -0.9±3.0mm (0.3±0.9°) for the Elekta SBF. The residual setup errors were essentially the same for both frames and were -0.1±0.4mm (0.1±0.5°), -0.2±0.4mm (0.0±0.4°), and 0.0±0.4mm (0.0±0.4°), respectively, in VRT, LNG, and LAT. The intrafraction shifts in VRT, LNG, and LAT were 0.0±0.4mm (0.0±0.3°), 0.0±0.5mm (0.0±0.4°), and 0.0±0.4mm (0.0±0.3°), with no significant difference observed between the 2 frames. These results showed that the combination of the ExacTrac system with either

  12. Systematic measurements of whole-body imaging dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hälg, Roger A.; Besserer, Jürgen; Schneider, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The full benefit of the increased precision of contemporary treatment techniques can only be exploited if the accuracy of the patient positioning is guaranteed. Therefore, more and more imaging modalities are used in the process of the patient setup in clinical routine of radiation therapy. The improved accuracy in patient positioning, however, results in additional dose contributions to the integral patient dose. To quantify this, absorbed dose measurements from typical imaging procedures involved in an image-guided radiation therapy treatment were measured in an anthropomorphic phantom for a complete course of treatment. The experimental setup, including the measurement positions in the phantom, was exactly the same as in a preceding study of radiotherapy stray dose measurements. This allows a direct combination of imaging dose distributions with the therapy dose distribution. Methods: Individually calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure absorbed dose in an anthropomorphic phantom at 184 locations. The dose distributions from imaging devices used with treatment machines from the manufacturers Accuray, Elekta, Siemens, and Varian and from computed tomography scanners from GE Healthcare were determined and the resulting effective dose was calculated. The list of investigated imaging techniques consisted of cone beam computed tomography (kilo- and megavoltage), megavoltage fan beam computed tomography, kilo- and megavoltage planar imaging, planning computed tomography with and without gating methods and planar scout views. Results: A conventional 3D planning CT resulted in an effective dose additional to the treatment stray dose of less than 1 mSv outside of the treated volume, whereas a 4D planning CT resulted in a 10 times larger dose. For a daily setup of the patient with two planar kilovoltage images or with a fan beam CT at the TomoTherapy unit, an additional effective dose outside of the treated volume of less than 0.4 mSv and 1

  13. Prostate-Specific Antigen Bounce Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Charles C.; Haas, Jonathan A.; Katz, Aaron E.; Witten, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce after brachytherapy has been well-documented. This phenomenon has also been identified in patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). While the parameters that predict PSA bounce have been extensively studied in prostate brachytherapy patients, this study is the first to analyze the clinical and pathologic predictors of PSA bounce in prostate SBRT patients. Materials and Methods: Our institution has maintained a prospective database of patients undergoing SBRT for prostate cancer since 2006. Our study population includes patients between May 2006 and November 2011 who have at least 18 months of follow-up. All patients were treated using the CyberKnife treatment system. The prescription dose was 35–36.25 Gy in five fractions. Results: One hundred twenty patients were included in our study. Median PSA follow-up was 24 months (range 18–78 months). Thirty-four (28%) patients had a PSA bounce. The median time to PSA bounce was 9 months, and the median bounce size was 0.50 ng/mL. On univariate analysis, only younger age (p = 0.011) was shown to be associated with an increased incidence of PSA bounce. Other patient factors, including race, prostate size, prior treatment by hormones, and family history of prostate cancer, did not predict PSA bounces. None of the tumor characteristics studied, including Gleason score, pre-treatment PSA, T-stage, or risk classification by NCCN guidelines, were associated with increased incidence of PSA bounces. Younger age was the only statistically significant predictor of PSA bounce on multivariate analysis (OR = 0.937, p = 0.009). Conclusion: PSA bounce, which has been reported after prostate brachytherapy, is also seen in a significant percentage of patients after CyberKnife SBRT. Close observation rather than biopsy can be considered for these patients. Younger age was the only factor that predicted PSA bounce. PMID:24478988

  14. Vertebral compression fractures after stereotactic body radiation therapy: a large, multi-institutional, multinational evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Maha Saada; Fahim, Daniel K; Gerszten, Peter C; Flickinger, John C; Sahgal, Arjun; Grills, Inga S; Sheehan, Jason; Kersh, Ronald; Shin, John; Oh, Kevin; Mantel, Frederick; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to identify factors contributing to an increased risk for vertebral compression fracture (VCF) following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal tumors. METHODS A total of 594 tumors were treated with spinal SBRT as primary treatment or re-irradiation at 8 different institutions as part of a multi-institutional research consortium. Patients underwent LINAC-based, image-guided SBRT to a median dose of 20 Gy (range 8-40 Gy) in a median of 1 fraction (range 1-5 fractions). Median patient age was 62 years. Seventy-one percent of tumors were osteolytic, and a preexisting vertebral compression fracture (VCF) was present in 24% of cases. Toxicity was assessed following treatment. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using a logistic regression method to determine parameters predictive for post-SBRT VCF. RESULTS At a median follow-up of 10.1 months (range 0.03-57 months), 80% of patients had local tumor control. At the time of last imaging follow-up, at a median of 8.8 months after SBRT, 3% had a new VCF, and 2.7% had a progressive VCF. For development of any (new or progressive) VCF following SBRT, the following factors were predictive for VCF on univariate analysis: short interval from primary diagnosis to SBRT (less than 36.8 days), solitary metastasis, no additional bone metastases, no prior chemotherapy, preexisting VCF, no MRI used for target delineation, tumor volume of 37.3 cm(3) or larger, equivalent 2-Gy-dose (EQD2) tumor of 41.8 Gy or more, and EQD2 spinal cord Dmax of 46.1 Gy or more. Preexisting VCF, solitary metastasis, and prescription dose of 38.4 Gy or more were predictive on multivariate analysis. The following factors were predictive of a new VCF on univariate analysis: solitary metastasis, no additional bone metastases, and no MRI used for target delineation. Presence of a solitary metastasis and lack of MRI for target delineation remained significant on multivariate analysis

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Oligometastases to the Lung: A Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuyttens, Joost J., E-mail: j.nuyttens@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Voort van Zyp, Noëlle C.M.G. van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Verhoef, Cornelis [Department of Surgical Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Maat, A. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Klaveren, Robertus J. van [Department of Pulmonology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Holt, Bronno van der [Clinical Trial Center, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Aerts, Joachim [Department of Pulmonology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Hoogeman, Mischa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To assess, in a phase 2 study, the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy for oligometastases to the lung in inoperable patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with lung metastases were included in this study if (1) the primary tumor was controlled; (2) patients were ineligible for or refused surgery and chemotherapy; and (3) patients had 5 or fewer metastatic lesions in no more than 2 organs. Large peripheral tumors were treated with a dose of 60 Gy (3 fractions), small peripheral tumors with 30 Gy (1 fraction), central tumors received 60 Gy (5 fractions), and mediastinal tumors or tumors close to the esophagus received 56 Gy (7 fractions). Results: Thirty patients with 57 metastatic lung tumors from various primary cancers were analyzed. The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 4-60 months). At 2 years, local control for the 11 central tumors was 100%, for the 23 peripheral tumors treated to 60 Gy it was 91%, and for the 23 tumors treated in a single 30-Gy fraction it was 74% (P=.13). This resulted in an overall local control rate at 1 year of 79%, with a 2-sided 80% confidence interval of 67% to 87%. Because the hypothesized value of 70% lies within the confidence interval, we cannot reject the hypothesis that the true local control rate at 1 year is ≤70%, and therefore we did not achieve the goal of the study: an actuarial local control of the treated lung lesions at 1 year of 90%. The 4-year overall survival rate was 38%. Grade 3 acute toxicity occurred in 5 patients. Three patients complained of chronic grade 3 toxicity, including pain, fatigue, and pneumonitis, and 3 patients had rib fractures. Conclusions: The local control was promising, and the 4-year overall survival rate was 38%. The treatment was well tolerated, even for central lesions.

  16. Early Tissue Effects of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Spinal Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steverink, Jasper G; Willems, Stefan M; Philippens, Marielle E P; Kasperts, Nicolien; Eppinga, Wietse S C; Versteeg, Anne L; van der Velden, Joanne M; Faruqi, Salman; Sahgal, Arjun; Verlaan, Jorrit-Jan

    2018-01-06

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a highly effective and potentially ablative treatment for complex spinal metastases. Recent data have suggested radiobiologic effects of SBRT that expand beyond the traditional concept of DNA damage. Antitumor immunity, vascular damage leading to tumor necrosis, and increased rates of tumor apoptosis have been implied; however, in-human evidence remains scarce. The present study reports unique pathologic confirmation of SBRT-induced biological effects within spinal metastases treated with preoperative SBRT. Ten patients with spinal metastases secondary to various solid tumors were treated with preoperative single-fraction SBRT (18 Gy) to the magnetic resonance imaging-defined macroscopic metastasis, followed by spinal stabilization within 24 hours. Perioperative samples of spinal metastases were obtained, and 6 patients also had a pre-SBRT biopsy specimen available for a matched comparison. The samples were stained for tumor necrosis on routine hematoxylin-eosin-stained slices and, subsequently, immunohistochemical staining for T cells (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+), natural killer cells (CD56+), endothelium (CD31+), and apoptotic activity (caspase-3). Perioperative biopsy specimens were obtained ∼6 hours (range 4.5-7.5) or 21 hours (range 18.5-22.5) after SBRT. Necrosis was observed in 83% of the 21-hour post-SBRT samples (5 of 6) compared with 0% of pre-SBRT biopsies (0 of 6) and 6-hour post-SBRT biopsies (0 of 4). Tumor cell apoptosis had increased greatly in the 21-hour post-SBRT samples compared with before and 6 hours after SBRT. The CD31+ vessel counts decreased after SBRT, as did mitotic activity. Both of the renal cell metastases displayed major decreases in vessel density. Desmoplastic reaction was visible in 67% (4 of 6) of the pre-SBRT samples compared with 100% (10 of 10) the post-SBRT samples. The T-cell and natural killer cell counts were relatively unaffected. High-dose single-fraction SBRT induced tumor

  17. Predictors of Liver Toxicity Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velec, Michael [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Haddad, Carol R. [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Craig, Tim [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wang, Lisa [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lindsay, Patricia; Brierley, James; Brade, Anthony; Ringash, Jolie; Wong, Rebecca; Kim, John [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Dawson, Laura A., E-mail: Laura.Dawson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To identify risk factors associated with a decline in liver function after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma treated on clinical trials of 6-fraction SBRT. Liver toxicity was defined as an increase in Child-Pugh (CP) score ≥2 three months after SBRT. Clinical factors, SBRT details, and liver dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters were tested for association with toxicity using logistic regression. CP class B patients were analyzed separately. Results: Among CP class A patients, 101 were evaluable, with a baseline score of A5 (72%) or A6 (28%). Fifty-three percent had portal vein thrombus. The median liver volume was 1286 cc (range, 766-3967 cc), and the median prescribed dose was 36 Gy (range, 27-54 Gy). Toxicity was seen in 26 patients (26%). Thrombus, baseline CP of A6, and lower platelet count were associated with toxicity on univariate analysis, as were several liver DVH-based parameters. Absolute and spared liver volumes were not significant. On multivariate analysis for CP class A patients, significant associations were found for baseline CP score of A6 (odds ratio [OR], 4.85), lower platelet count (OR, 0.90; median, 108 × 10{sup 9}/L vs 150 × 10{sup 9}/L), higher mean liver dose (OR, 1.33; median, 16.9 Gy vs 14.7 Gy), and higher dose to 800 cc of liver (OR, 1.11; median, 14.3 Gy vs 6.0 Gy). With 13 CP-B7 patients included or when dose to 800 cc of liver was replaced with other DVH parameters (eg, dose to 700 or 900 cc of liver) in the multivariate analysis, effective volume and portal vein thrombus were associated with an increased risk. Conclusions: Baseline CP scores and higher liver doses (eg, mean dose, effective volume, doses to 700-900 cc) were strongly associated with liver function decline 3 months after SBRT. A lower baseline platelet count and portal vein thrombus were also associated with an

  18. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Local Failure After Primary Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hearn, Jason W.D., E-mail: hearnj@ccf.org; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Djemil, Toufik; Stephans, Kevin L.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Local failure after definitive stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is uncommon. We report the safety and efficacy of SBRT for salvage of local failure after previous SBRT with a biologically effective dose (BED) of ≥100 Gy{sub 10}. Methods and Materials: Using an institutional review board–approved lung SBRT registry, we identified all patients initially treated for early-stage NSCLC between August 2004 and January 2012 who received salvage SBRT for isolated local failure. Failure was defined radiographically and confirmed histologically unless contraindicated. All patients were treated on a Novalis/BrainLAB system using ExacTrac for image guidance, and received a BED of ≥100 Gy{sub 10} for each SBRT course. Tumor motion control involved a Bodyfix vacuum system for immobilization along with abdominal compression. Results: Of 436 patients treated from August 2004 through January 2012, we identified 22 patients with isolated local failure, 10 of whom received SBRT for salvage. The median length of follow-up was 13.8 months from salvage SBRT (range 5.3-43.5 months). Median tumor size was 3.4 cm (range 1.7-4.8 cm). Two of the 10 lesions were “central” by proximity to the mediastinum, but were outside the zone of the proximal bronchial tree. Since completing salvage, 3 patients are alive and without evidence of disease. A fourth patient died of medical comorbidities without recurrence 13.0 months after salvage SBRT. Two patients developed distant disease only. Four patients had local failure. Toxicity included grade 1-2 fatigue (3 patients) and grade 1-2 chest wall pain (5 patients). There was no grade 3-5 toxicity. Conclusions: Repeat SBRT with a BED of ≥100 Gy{sub 10} after local failure in patients with early-stage medically inoperable NSCLC was well tolerated in this series and may represent a viable salvage strategy in select patients with peripheral tumors ≤5 cm.

  19. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Oligometastases to the Lung: A Phase 2 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuyttens, Joost J.; Voort van Zyp, Noëlle C.M.G. van der; Verhoef, Cornelis; Maat, A.; Klaveren, Robertus J. van; Holt, Bronno van der; Aerts, Joachim; Hoogeman, Mischa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess, in a phase 2 study, the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy for oligometastases to the lung in inoperable patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with lung metastases were included in this study if (1) the primary tumor was controlled; (2) patients were ineligible for or refused surgery and chemotherapy; and (3) patients had 5 or fewer metastatic lesions in no more than 2 organs. Large peripheral tumors were treated with a dose of 60 Gy (3 fractions), small peripheral tumors with 30 Gy (1 fraction), central tumors received 60 Gy (5 fractions), and mediastinal tumors or tumors close to the esophagus received 56 Gy (7 fractions). Results: Thirty patients with 57 metastatic lung tumors from various primary cancers were analyzed. The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 4-60 months). At 2 years, local control for the 11 central tumors was 100%, for the 23 peripheral tumors treated to 60 Gy it was 91%, and for the 23 tumors treated in a single 30-Gy fraction it was 74% (P=.13). This resulted in an overall local control rate at 1 year of 79%, with a 2-sided 80% confidence interval of 67% to 87%. Because the hypothesized value of 70% lies within the confidence interval, we cannot reject the hypothesis that the true local control rate at 1 year is ≤70%, and therefore we did not achieve the goal of the study: an actuarial local control of the treated lung lesions at 1 year of 90%. The 4-year overall survival rate was 38%. Grade 3 acute toxicity occurred in 5 patients. Three patients complained of chronic grade 3 toxicity, including pain, fatigue, and pneumonitis, and 3 patients had rib fractures. Conclusions: The local control was promising, and the 4-year overall survival rate was 38%. The treatment was well tolerated, even for central lesions

  20. Extended distance non-isocentric treatment in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT for lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Huang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To obtain the maximum differential non-coplanar beams angle for a faster dose dropping outside Plan Target Volume (PTV for lung cancer treated by Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT, an extended distance non-isocentric (EDNI treatment method was explored and developed.Methods: The EDNI requires delivering of the treatment beam at 120 cm or farther for sauce axial distance (SAD instead of standard 100 cm. This change provides a more compact dose distribution around PTV and the lower toxicity to organs at risk (OAR due to benefit of 120 cm SAD and more choice of beam and couch angle. A hand calculation formula for the translation between 100 SAD and EDNI was used to verify the treatment plan results. A phantom for end to end study based on this EDNI technique was used to compare with standard 100 SAD deliveries for SBRT. Three patients who underwent SBRT treatment were randomly chosen to demonstrate the benefits of EDNI technique. These treatment re-plans were applied to EDNI and evaluated for conformal index (CI of PTV, R50% of PTV, 2 cm distance (D2cm of PTV and Maximum dose (Dmaxof OARs to compare with original clinical plans.Results: All of the cases delivered by the EDNI technique satisfied dose requirements of RTOG 0263 and showed a faster dose dropping outside of PTV than standard SAD deliveries. The distance from PTV after 1.5 cm for the EDNI technique had a smaller maximum dose and much lower standard deviation for dose distribution. The EDNI applied plans for patients showed less R50% and D2cm of PTV (P≤ 0.05, also similar results for Dmax of esophagus, trachea and spinal cord.Conclusion: The EDNI method enhances the capabilities of linear accelerators as far as the increased gradient of dose drop-off outside of PTV is concerned. More angular separation between beams leads to more compact dose distributions, which allow decreasing volume of high dose exposure in SBRT treatments and better dose distribution on sensitive

  1. Statistical analysis of target motion in gated lung stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Bo; Yang Yong; Li Tianfang; Li Xiang; Heron, Dwight E; Huq, M Saiful

    2011-01-01

    An external surrogate-based respiratory gating technique is a useful method to reduce target margins for the treatment of a moving lung tumor. The success of this technique relies on a good correlation between the motion of the external markers and the internal tumor as well as the repeatability of the respiratory motion. In gated lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), the treatment time for each fraction could exceed 30 min due to large fractional dose. Tumor motion may experience pattern changes such as baseline shift during such extended treatment time. The purpose of this study is to analyze tumor motion traces in actual treatment situations and to evaluate the effect of the target baseline shift in gated lung SBRT treatment. Real-time motion data for both the external markers and tumors from 51 lung SBRT treatments with Cyberknife Synchrony technology were analyzed in this study. The treatment time is typically greater than 30 min. The baseline shift was calculated with a rolling average window equivalent to ∼20 s and subtracted from that at the beginning. The magnitude of the baseline shift and its relationship with treatment time were investigated. Phase gating simulation was retrospectively performed on 12 carefully selected treatments with respiratory amplitude larger than 5 mm and regular phases. A customized gating window was defined for each individual treatment. It was found that the baseline shifts are specific to each patient and each fraction. Statistical analysis revealed that more than 69% treatments exhibited increased baseline shifts with the lapse of treatment time. The magnitude of the baseline shift could reach 5.3 mm during a 30 min treatment. Gating simulation showed that tumor excursion was caused mainly by the uncertainties in phase gating simulation and baseline shift, the latter being the primary factor. With a 5 mm gating window, 2 out of 12 treatments in the study group showed significant tumor excursion. Baseline shifts

  2. Postoperative Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Spine Metastases: A Critical Review to Guide Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmond, Kristin J., E-mail: kjanson3@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lo, Simon S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Fisher, Charles [Department of Surgery, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-08-01

    Postoperative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for metastatic spinal tumors is increasingly being performed in clinical practice. Whereas the fundamentals of SBRT practice for intact spinal metastases are established, there are as yet no comprehensive practice guidelines for the postoperative indications. In particular, there are unique considerations for patient selection and treatment planning specific to postoperative spine SBRT that are critical for safe and effective management. The purpose of this critical review is to discuss the rationale for treatment, describe those factors affecting surgical decision making, introduce modern surgical trends, and summarize treatment outcomes for both conventional postoperative external beam radiation therapy and postoperative spine SBRT. Lastly, an in-depth practical discussion with respect to treatment planning and delivery considerations is provided to help guide optimal practice.

  3. Spatial and dose–response analysis of fibrotic lung changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevegeniy; Diot, Quentin; Kavanagh, Brian; Schefter, Tracey; Gaspar, Laurie; Miften, Moyed

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is becoming the standard of care for early stage nonoperable lung cancers. Accurate dose–response modeling is challenging for SBRT because of the decreased number of clinical toxicity events. As a surrogate for a clinical toxicity endpoint, studies have proposed to use radiographic changes in follow up computed tomography (CT) scans to evaluate lung SBRT normal tissue effects. The purpose of the current study was to use local fibrotic lung regions to spatially and dosimetrically evaluate lung changes in patients that underwent SBRT.Methods: Forty seven SBRT patients treated at our institution from 2003 to 2009 were used for the current study. Our patient cohort had a total of 148 follow up CT scans ranging from 3 to 48 months post-therapy. Post-treatment scans were binned into intervals of 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 months after the completion of treatment. Deformable image registration was used to align the follow up CT scans with the pretreatment CT and dose distribution. Areas of visible fibrotic changes were contoured. The centroid of each gross tumor volume (GTV) and contoured fibrosis volume was calculated and the fibrosis volume location and movement (magnitude and direction) relative to the GTV and 30 Gy isodose centroid were analyzed. To perform a dose–response analysis, each voxel in the fibrosis volume was sorted into 10 Gy dose bins and the average CT number value for each dose bin was calculated. Dose–response curves were generated by plotting the CT number as a function of dose bin and time posttherapy.Results: Both fibrosis and GTV centroids were concentrated in the upper third of the lung. The average radial movement of fibrosis centroids relative to the GTV centroids was 2.6 cm with movement greater than 5 cm occurring in 11% of patients. Evaluating dose–response curves revealed an overall trend of increasing CT number as a function of dose. The authors observed a CT number plateau at

  4. Stereotactic body radiation therapy with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a pilot trial demonstrating safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurka, Marie K; Collins, Sean P; Slack, Rebecca; Tse, Gary; Charabaty, Aline; Ley, Lisa; Berzcel, Liam; Lei, Siyuan; Suy, Simeng; Haddad, Nadim; Jha, Reena; Johnson, Colin D; Jackson, Patrick; Marshall, John L; Pishvaian, Michael J

    2013-03-01

    Concurrent chemoradiation is a standard option for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Concurrent conventional radiation with full-dose gemcitabine has significant toxicity. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) may provide the opportunity to administer radiation in a shorter time frame with similar efficacy and reduced toxicity. This Pilot study assessed the safety of concurrent full-dose gemcitabine with SBRT for LAPC. Patients received gemcitabine, 1000 mg/m2 for 6 cycles. During week 4 of cycle 1, patients received SBRT (25 Gy delivered in five consecutive daily fractions of 5 Gy prescribed to the 75-83% isodose line). Acute and late toxicities were assessed using NIH CTCAE v3. Tumor response was assessed by RECIST. Patients underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopy at baseline, 2, and 6 months to assess the duodenal mucosa. Quality of life (QoL) data was collected before and after treatment using the QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PAN26 questionnaires. Between September 2009 and February 2011, 11 patients enrolled with one withdrawal during radiation therapy. Patients had grade 1 to 2 gastrointestinal toxicity from the start of SBRT to 2 weeks after treatment. There were no grade 3 or greater radiation-related toxicities or delays for cycle 2 of gemcitabine. On endoscopy, there were no grade 2 or higher mucosal toxicities. Two patients had a partial response. The median progression free and overall survival were 6.8 and 12.2 months, respectively. Global QoL did not change between baseline and immediately after radiation treatment. SBRT with concurrent full dose gemcitabine is safe when administered to patients with LAPC. There is no delay in administration of radiation or chemotherapy, and radiation is completed with minimal toxicity.

  5. [Radiation therapy for malignant tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shumei; Konishi, Koji

    2008-04-01

    Radiation therapy uses ionizing radiation to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors, with consideration to minimize harmful damages to health tissues. About 30% of all people with cancer are treated with radiation therapy, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy. Radiation therapy may be internal or external. In brachytheraphy as the internal radiation therapy the radioisotope is implanted into or near the tumor by tubes as the container. And it is often used for patients with the tongue cancer. External radiation, the type most often used, comes from a machine outside the body. It is usually used for shrinking tumors with bony invasions such as gingival cancer and improving the pain in patients with bony metastasis. For the primary bone tumor the radiation therapy is not always used because the radiosensitivity of the almost primary bone tumor is low.

  6. Reirradiation of head and neck cancer focusing on hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Kodani, Naohiro; Ogita, Mikio; Sato, Kengo; Himei, Kengo

    2011-01-01

    Reirradiation is a feasible option for patients who do not otherwise have treatment options available. Depending on the location and extent of the tumor, reirradiation may be accomplished with external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, radiosurgery, or intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Although there has been limited experience with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (hSRT), it may have the potential for curative or palliative treatment due to its advanced precision technology, particularly for limited small lesion. On the other hand, severe late adverse reactions are anticipated with reirradiation than with initial radiation therapy. The risk of severe late complications has been reported to be 20- 40% and is related to prior radiotherapy dose, primary site, retreatment radiotherapy dose, treatment volume, and technique. Early researchers have observed lethal bleeding in such patients up to a rate of 14%. Recently, similar rate of 10-15% was observed for fatal bleeding with use of modern hSRT like in case of carotid blowout syndrome. To determine the feasibility and efficacy of reirradiation using modern technology, we reviewed the pertinent literature. The potentially lethal side effects should be kept in mind when reirradiation by hSRT is considered for treatment, and efforts should be made to minimize the risk in any future investigations

  7. Primary non-small cell lung cancer in a transplanted lung treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy. A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oskan, F.; University Hospital of Saarland, Homburg; Ganswindt, U.; Belka, C.; Manapov, F.

    2014-01-01

    The first case of primary lung cancer in a transplanted lung was described in 2001. Since then, only 5 cases of lung cancer in donated lung have been reported. We present one more patient with non-small cell cancer in the transplanted lung treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy. In most cases of primary lung cancer in transplanted lung, rapid progression of the cancer was reported. Occurrence of the locoregional failure in our case could be explained by factors related to the treatment protocol and also to underlying immunosuppression.

  8. Safety and Efficacy of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Pulmonary Metastases from High Grade Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niraj Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients with high-grade sarcoma (HGS frequently develop metastatic disease thus limiting their long-term survival. Lung metastases (LM have historically been treated with surgical resection (metastasectomy. A potential alternative for controlling LM could be stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT. We evaluated the outcomes from our institutional experience utilizing SBRT. Methods. Sixteen consecutive patients with LM from HGS were treated with SBRT between 2009 and 2011. Routine radiographic and clinical follow-up was performed. Local failure was defined as CT progression on 2 consecutive scans or growth after initial shrinkage. Radiation pneumonitis and radiation esophagitis were scored using Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC version 3.0. Results. All 16 patients received chemotherapy, and a subset (38% also underwent prior pulmonary metastasectomy. Median patient age was 56 (12–85, and median follow-up time was 20 months (range 3–43. A total of 25 lesions were treated and evaluable for this analysis. Most common histologies were leiomyosarcoma (28%, synovial sarcoma (20%, and osteosarcoma (16%. Median SBRT prescription dose was 54 Gy (36–54 in 3-4 fractions. At 43 months, local control was 94%. No patient experienced G2-4 radiation pneumonitis, and no patient experienced radiation esophagitis. Conclusions. Our retrospective experience suggests that SBRT for LM from HGS provides excellent local control and minimal toxicity.

  9. Hendee's radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlicki, Todd; Starkschall, George

    2016-01-01

    The publication of this fourth edition, more than ten years on from the publication of Radiation Therapy Physics third edition, provides a comprehensive and valuable update to the educational offerings in this field. Led by a new team of highly esteemed authors, building on Dr Hendee’s tradition, Hendee’s Radiation Therapy Physics offers a succinctly written, fully modernised update. Radiation physics has undergone many changes in the past ten years: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has become a routine method of radiation treatment delivery, digital imaging has replaced film-screen imaging for localization and verification, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is frequently used, in many centers proton therapy has become a viable mode of radiation therapy, new approaches have been introduced to radiation therapy quality assurance and safety that focus more on process analysis rather than specific performance testing, and the explosion in patient-and machine-related data has necessitated an ...

  10. Radiation therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomottogoo, G.

    1995-01-01

    The radiation therapy experienced at the hospital are classified into two sections:palliative and radically. A radically therapy can be done before or after surgery. Therapy after surgery is done when the results of the surgery have certain limits. The radiation therapy is accomplished within 2-3 weeks and 6 weeks at latest. A conclusion:1.To improving and increasing of radically radiation therapy method is necessary in the present time. 2.Monitoring, management and supervision capacity of the cancer radiation therapy for the nearest and future results should be strengthened

  11. Principles of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, M.P.; Share, F.S.; Goodman, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation oncology now represents the integration of knowledge obtained over an 80-year period from the physics and biology laboratories and the medical clinic. Such integration is recent; until the supervoltage era following World War II, the chief developments in these three areas for the most part were realized independently. The physics and engineering laboratories have now developed a dependable family of sources of ionizing radiations that can be precisely directed at tumor volumes at various depths within the body. The biology laboratory has provided the basic scientific support underlying the intensive clinical experience and currently is suggesting ways of using ionizing radiations more effectively, such as modified fractionation schedules relating to cell cycle kinetics and the use of drugs and chemicals as modifiers of radiation response and normal tissue reaction. The radiation therapy clinic has provided the patient stratum on which the acute and chronic effects of irradiation have been assessed, and the patterns of treatment success and failure identified. The radiation therapist has shared with the surgeon and medical oncologist the responsibility for clarifying the natural history of a large number of human neoplasms, and through such clarifications, has developed more effective treatment strategies. Several examples of this include the improved results in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease, squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, seminoma, and epithelial neoplasms of the upper aerodigestive tract

  12. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Compared With Radiofrequency Ablation for Inoperable Colorectal Liver Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hayeon, E-mail: kimh2@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Gill, Beant; Beriwal, Sushil; Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Roberts, Mark S. [Department of Health Policy and Management, University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Smith, Kenneth J. [Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis to determine whether stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a cost-effective therapy compared with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for patients with unresectable colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using a Markov model and 1-month cycle over a lifetime horizon. Transition probabilities, quality of life utilities, and costs associated with SBRT and RFA were captured in the model on the basis of a comprehensive literature review and Medicare reimbursements in 2014. Strategies were compared using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, with effectiveness measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). To account for model uncertainty, 1-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Strategies were evaluated with a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000 per QALY gained. Results: In base case analysis, treatment costs for 3 fractions of SBRT and 1 RFA procedure were $13,000 and $4397, respectively. Median survival was assumed the same for both strategies (25 months). The SBRT costs $8202 more than RFA while gaining 0.05 QALYs, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $164,660 per QALY gained. In 1-way sensitivity analyses, results were most sensitive to variation of median survival from both treatments. Stereotactic body radiation therapy was economically reasonable if better survival was presumed (>1 month gain) or if used for large tumors (>4 cm). Conclusions: If equal survival is assumed, SBRT is not cost-effective compared with RFA for inoperable colorectal liver metastases. However, if better local control leads to small survival gains with SBRT, this strategy becomes cost-effective. Ideally, these results should be confirmed with prospective comparative data.

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Re-irradiation of Persistent or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trovo, Marco, E-mail: marcotrovo33@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Pordenone (Italy); Minatel, Emilio; Durofil, Elena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Pordenone (Italy); Polesel, Jerry [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Pordenone (Italy); Avanzo, Michele [Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Pordenone (Italy); Baresic, Tania [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Pordenone (Italy); Bearz, Alessandra [Department of Medical Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Pordenone (Italy); Del Conte, Alessandro [Department of Medical Oncology, Pordenone General Hospital, Aviano, Pordenone (Italy); Franchin, Giovanni; Gobitti, Carlo; Rumeileh, Imad Abu; Trovo, Mauro G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Pordenone (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess toxicity and outcome of re-irradiation with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with recurrent or persistent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who were previously treated with radical radiation therapy (50-60 Gy). The secondary endpoint was to investigate whether there are dosimetric parameter predictors of severe radiation toxicity. Methods and Materials: The analysis was conducted in 17 patients with “in-field” recurrent/persistent centrally located NSCLC, who underwent re-irradiation with SBRT. SBRT consisted of 30 Gy in 5 to 6 fractions; these prescriptions would be equivalent for the tumor to 37.5 to 40 Gy, bringing the total 2-Gy-per-fraction cumulative dose to 87 to 100 Gy, considering the primary radiation therapy treatment. Actuarial analyses and survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and P values were estimated by the log-rank test, starting from the date of completion of SBRT. Dosimetric parameters from the subgroups with and without grade ≥3 pulmonary toxicity were compared using a 2-tailed Student t test. Results: The median follow-up was 18 months (range, 4-57 months). Only 2 patients had local failure, corresponding to a local control rate of 86% at 1 year. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall survival (OS) rates at 1 and 2 years were 59% and 29%, respectively; the median OS was 19 months. Four patients (23%) experienced grade 3 radiation pneumonitis, and 1 patient developed fatal pneumonitis. One patient died of fatal hemoptysis 2 months after the completion of SBRT. Unexpectedly, heart maximum dose, D5 (minimum dose to at least 5% of the heart volume), and D10 were correlated with risk of radiation pneumonitis (P<.05). Conclusions: Re-irradiation with SBRT for recurrent/persistent centrally located NSCLC achieves excellent results in terms of local control. However, the high rate of severe toxicity reported in our study is of concern.

  14. Dosimetric Implications of an Injection of Hyaluronic Acid for Preserving the Rectal Wall in Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.chapet@chu-lyon.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Udrescu, Corina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Tanguy, Ronan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Ruffion, Alain [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Fenoglietto, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Val d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France); Sotton, Marie-Pierre [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Devonec, Marian [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Colombel, Marc [Department of Urology, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France); Jalade, Patrice [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Val d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the contribution of ahyaluronic acid (HA) injection between the rectum and the prostate to reducing the dose to the rectal wall in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: As part of a phase 2 study of hypofractionated radiation therapy (62 Gy in 20 fractions), the patients received a transperineal injection of 10 cc HA between the rectum and the prostate. A dosimetric computed tomographic (CT) scan was systematically performed before (CT1) and after (CT2) the injection. Two 9-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy-SBRT plans were optimized for the first 10 patients on both CTs according to 2 dosage levels: 5 × 6.5 Gy (PlanA) and 5 × 8.5 Gy (PlanB). Rectal wall parameters were compared with a dose–volume histogram, and the prostate–rectum separation was measured at 7 levels of the prostate on the center line of the organ. Results: For both plans, the average volume of the rectal wall receiving the 90% isodose line (V90%) was reduced up to 90% after injection. There was no significant difference (P=.32) between doses received by the rectal wall on CT1 and CT2 at the base of the prostate. This variation became significant from the median plane to the apex of the prostate (P=.002). No significant differences were found between PlanA without HA and PlanB with HA for each level of the prostate (P=.77, at the isocenter of the prostate). Conclusions: HA injection significantly reduced the dose to the rectal wall and allowed a dose escalation from 6.5 Gy to 8.5 Gy without increasing the dose to the rectum. A phase 2 study is under way in our department to assess the rate of acute and late rectal toxicities when SBRT (5 × 8.5 Gy) is combined with an injection of HA.

  15. Dosimetric Implications of an Injection of Hyaluronic Acid for Preserving the Rectal Wall in Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapet, Olivier; Udrescu, Corina; Tanguy, Ronan; Ruffion, Alain; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Sotton, Marie-Pierre; Devonec, Marian; Colombel, Marc; Jalade, Patrice; Azria, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the contribution of ahyaluronic acid (HA) injection between the rectum and the prostate to reducing the dose to the rectal wall in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: As part of a phase 2 study of hypofractionated radiation therapy (62 Gy in 20 fractions), the patients received a transperineal injection of 10 cc HA between the rectum and the prostate. A dosimetric computed tomographic (CT) scan was systematically performed before (CT1) and after (CT2) the injection. Two 9-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy-SBRT plans were optimized for the first 10 patients on both CTs according to 2 dosage levels: 5 × 6.5 Gy (PlanA) and 5 × 8.5 Gy (PlanB). Rectal wall parameters were compared with a dose–volume histogram, and the prostate–rectum separation was measured at 7 levels of the prostate on the center line of the organ. Results: For both plans, the average volume of the rectal wall receiving the 90% isodose line (V90%) was reduced up to 90% after injection. There was no significant difference (P=.32) between doses received by the rectal wall on CT1 and CT2 at the base of the prostate. This variation became significant from the median plane to the apex of the prostate (P=.002). No significant differences were found between PlanA without HA and PlanB with HA for each level of the prostate (P=.77, at the isocenter of the prostate). Conclusions: HA injection significantly reduced the dose to the rectal wall and allowed a dose escalation from 6.5 Gy to 8.5 Gy without increasing the dose to the rectum. A phase 2 study is under way in our department to assess the rate of acute and late rectal toxicities when SBRT (5 × 8.5 Gy) is combined with an injection of HA

  16. Dosimetric Comparison of Real-Time MRI-Guided Tri-Cobalt-60 Versus Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Lung Cancer Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcieszynski, Andrzej P; Hill, Patrick M; Rosenberg, Stephen A; Hullett, Craig R; Labby, Zacariah E; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Geurts, Mark W; Bayliss, R Adam; Bayouth, John E; Harari, Paul M; Bassetti, Michael F; Baschnagel, Andrew M

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided radiation therapy has entered clinical practice at several major treatment centers. Treatment of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer with stereotactic body radiation therapy is one potential application of this modality, as some form of respiratory motion management is important to address. We hypothesize that magnetic resonance imaging-guided tri-cobalt-60 radiation therapy can be used to generate clinically acceptable stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans. Here, we report on a dosimetric comparison between magnetic resonance imaging-guided radiation therapy plans and internal target volume-based plans utilizing volumetric-modulated arc therapy. Ten patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer who underwent radiation therapy planning and treatment were studied. Following 4-dimensional computed tomography, patient images were used to generate clinically deliverable plans. For volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans, the planning tumor volume was defined as an internal target volume + 0.5 cm. For magnetic resonance imaging-guided plans, a single mid-inspiratory cycle was used to define a gross tumor volume, then expanded 0.3 cm to the planning tumor volume. Treatment plan parameters were compared. Planning tumor volumes trended larger for volumetric-modulated arc therapy-based plans, with a mean planning tumor volume of 47.4 mL versus 24.8 mL for magnetic resonance imaging-guided plans ( P = .08). Clinically acceptable plans were achievable via both methods, with bilateral lung V20, 3.9% versus 4.8% ( P = .62). The volume of chest wall receiving greater than 30 Gy was also similar, 22.1 versus 19.8 mL ( P = .78), as were all other parameters commonly used for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy. The ratio of the 50% isodose volume to planning tumor volume was lower in volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans, 4.19 versus 10.0 ( P guided tri-cobalt-60 radiation therapy is capable of delivering lung high

  17. Increased Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With a Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibitor (VEGFI) After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barney, Brandon M., E-mail: barney.brandon@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Markovic, Svetomir N. [Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Laack, Nadia N.; Miller, Robert C.; Sarkaria, Jann N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Macdonald, O. Kenneth [Therapeutic Radiologists Incorporated, Kansas City, Kansas (United States); Bauer, Heather J.; Olivier, Kenneth R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Gastrointestinal injury occurs rarely with agents that affect the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and with abdominal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). We explored the incidence of serious bowel injury (SBI) in patients treated with SBRT with or without vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor (VEGFI) therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-six patients with 84 primary or metastatic intra-abdominal lesions underwent SBRT (median dose, 50 Gy in 5 fractions). Of the patients, 20 (26%) received VEGFI within 2 years after SBRT (bevacizumab, n=14; sorafenib, n=4; pazopanib, n=1; sunitinib, n=1). The incidence of SBI (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0, grade 3-5 ulceration or perforation) after SBRT was obtained, and the relationship between SBI and VEGFI was examined. Results: In the combined population, 7 patients (9%) had SBI at a median of 4.6 months (range, 3-17 months) from SBRT. All 7 had received VEGFI before SBI and within 13 months of completing SBRT, and 5 received VEGFI within 3 months of SBRT. The 6-month estimate of SBI in the 26 patients receiving VEGFI within 3 months of SBRT was 38%. No SBIs were noted in the 63 patients not receiving VEGFI. The log–rank test showed a significant correlation between SBI and VEGFI within 3 months of SBRT (P=.0006) but not between SBI and radiation therapy bowel dose (P=.20). Conclusions: The combination of SBRT and VEGFI results in a higher risk of SBI than would be expected with either treatment independently. Local therapies other than SBRT may be considered if a patient is likely to receive a VEGFI in the near future.

  18. Accumulated Delivered Dose Response of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminath, Anand [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Massey, Christine [Department of Medical Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brierley, James D.; Dinniwell, Rob; Wong, Rebecca; Kim, John J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Velec, Michael [Department of Radiation Therapy, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brock, Kristy K. [Department of Medical Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Dawson, Laura A., E-mail: laura.dawson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the accumulated dose using image guided radiation therapy is a stronger predictor of clinical outcomes than the planned dose in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver metastases. Methods and Materials: From 2003 to 2009, 81 patients with 142 metastases were treated in institutional review board–approved SBRT studies (5-10 fractions). Patients were treated during free breathing (with or without abdominal compression) or with controlled exhale breath-holding. SBRT was planned on a static exhale computed tomography (CT) scan, and the minimum planning target volume dose to 0.5 cm{sup 3} (minPTV) was recorded. The accumulated minimum dose to the 0.5 cm{sup 3} gross tumor volume (accGTV) was calculated after performing dose accumulation from exported image guided radiation therapy data sets registered to the planning CT using rigid (2-dimensional MV/kV orthogonal) or deformable (3-dimensional/4-dimensional cone beam CT) image registration. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression models assessed the factors influencing the time to local progression (TTLP). Hazard ratios for accGTV and minPTV were compared using model goodness-of-fit and bootstrapping. Results: Overall, the accGTV dose exceeded the minPTV dose in 98% of the lesions. For 5 to 6 fractions, accGTV doses of >45 Gy were associated with 1-year local control of 86%. On univariate analysis, the cancer subtype (breast), smaller tumor volume, and increased dose were significant predictors for improved TTLP. The dose and volume were uncorrelated; the accGTV dose and minPTV dose were correlated and were tested separately on multivariate models. Breast cancer subtype, accGTV dose (P<.001), and minPTV dose (P=.02) retained significance in the multivariate models. The univariate hazard ratio for TTLP for 5-Gy increases in accGTV versus minPTV was 0.67 versus 0.74 (all patients; 95% confidence interval of difference 0.03-0.14). Goodness-of-fit testing confirmed the acc

  19. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Delivery in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Shisuo; Lockamy, Virginia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Zhou, Lin [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Cancer Center and State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Xue, Christine; LeBlanc, Justin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Glenn, Shonna [Xstrahl, Inc, Suwanee, Georgia (United States); Shukla, Gaurav; Yu, Yan; Dicker, Adam P.; Leeper, Dennis B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lu, You [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Cancer Center and State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Lu, Bo, E-mail: bo.lu@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: To implement clinical stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using a small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A murine model of multinodular Kras-driven spontaneous lung tumors was used for this study. High-resolution cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging was used to identify and target peripheral tumor nodules, whereas off-target lung nodules in the contralateral lung were used as a nonirradiated control. CBCT imaging helps localize tumors, facilitate high-precision irradiation, and monitor tumor growth. SBRT planning, prescription dose, and dose limits to normal tissue followed the guidelines set by RTOG protocols. Pathologic changes in the irradiated tumors were investigated using immunohistochemistry. Results: The image guided radiation delivery using the SARRP system effectively localized and treated lung cancer with precision in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung cancer. Immunohistochemical data confirmed the precise delivery of SBRT to the targeted lung nodules. The 60 Gy delivered in 3 weekly fractions markedly reduced the proliferation index, Ki-67, and increased apoptosis per staining for cleaved caspase-3 in irradiated lung nodules. Conclusions: It is feasible to use the SARRP platform to perform dosimetric planning and delivery of SBRT in mice with lung cancer. This allows for preclinical studies that provide a rationale for clinical trials involving SBRT, especially when combined with immunotherapeutics.

  20. Survival Outcomes of Patients Treated with Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Parotid Gland Tumors: a Retrospective Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, Sana D.; Snider, James W.; Wang, Hongkun; Wooster, Margaux; Lominska, Christopher; Deeken, John; Newkirk, Kenneth; Davidson, Bruce; Harter, K. William

    2012-01-01

    Background: to review a single-institution experience with the management of parotid malignancies treated by fractionated stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT). Findings: Between 2003 and 2011, 13 patients diagnosed with parotid malignancies were treated with adjuvant or definitive SBRT to a median dose of 33 Gy (range 25–40 Gy). There were 11 male and two female patients with a median age of 80. Ten patients declined conventional radiation treatment and three patients had received prior unrelated radiation therapy to neighboring structures with unavailable radiation records. Six patients were treated with definitive intent while seven patients were treated adjuvantly for adverse surgical or pathologic features. Five patients had clinical or pathologic evidence of lymph node disease. Conclusion: at a median follow-up of 14 months only one patient failed locally, and four failed distantly. The actuarial 2-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and local-regional control rates were 46, 84, and 47%, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed surgery as a positive predictor of overall survival while presence of gross disease was a negatively correlated factor (p < 0.05).

  1. Dose discrepancy between planning system estimation and measurement in spine stereotactic body radiation therapy: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing, Aitang; Vial Philip; Berry Megan; Ochoa, Cesar; Beeksma, Bradley

    2017-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to treat spinal metastases has shown excellent clinical outcomes for local control. High dose gradients wrapping around spinal cord make this treatment technically challenging. In this work, we present a spine SBRT case where a dosimetric error was identified during pre-treatment dosimetric quality assurance (QA). A patient with metastasis in T7 vertebral body consented to undergo SBRT. A dual arc volumetric modulated arc therapy plan was generated on the Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS) with a 6 MV Elekta machine using gantry control point spacing of 4°. Standard pre-treatment QA measurements were performed, including ArcCHECK, ion chamber in CTV and spinal cord (SC) region and film measurements in multiple planes. While the dose measured at CTV region showed good agreement with TPS, the dose measured to the SC was significantly higher than reported by TPS in the original and repeat plans. Acceptable agreement was only achieved when the gantry control point spacing was reduced to 3°. A potentially harmful dose error was identified by pre-treatment QA. TPS parameter settings used safely in conventional treatments should be re-assessed for complex treatments.

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of 4 different treatment modalities for curative-intent stereotactic body radiation therapy for isolated thoracic spinal metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing, 100853 (China); Department of Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, 88 Jiankang Road, Weihui, Henan, 453100 (China); Ma, Lin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing, 100853 (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hainan Branch of Chinese PLA General Hospital, Haitang Bay, Sanya, 572000 (China); Wang, Xiao-Shen; Xu, Wei Xu; Cong, Xiao-Hu; Xu, Shou-Ping; Ju, Zhong-Jian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing, 100853 (China); Du, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hainan Branch of Chinese PLA General Hospital, Haitang Bay, Sanya, 572000 (China); Cai, Bo-Ning [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing, 100853 (China); Yang, Jack [Department of Radiation Oncology, Monmouth Medical Center, 300 2nd Avenue, Long Branch, NJ 07740 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of 4 SBRT-capable dose delivery systems, CyberKnife (CK), Helical TomoTherapy (HT), Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) by Varian RapidArc (RA), and segmental step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) by Elekta, on isolated thoracic spinal lesions. CK, HT, RA, and IMRT planning were performed simultaneously for 10 randomly selected patients with 6 body types and 6 body + pedicle types with isolated thoracic lesions. The prescription was set with curative intent and dose of either 33 Gy in 3 fractions (3F) or 40 Gy in 5F to cover at least 90% of the planning target volume (PTV), correspondingly. Different dosimetric indices, beam-on time, and monitor units (MUs) were evaluated to compare the advantages/disadvantages of each delivery modality. In ensuring the dose-volume constraints for cord and esophagus of the premise, CK, HT, and RA all achieved a sharp conformity index (CI) and a small penumbra volume compared to IMRT. RA achieved a CI comparable to those from CK, HT, and IMRT. CK had a heterogeneous dose distribution in the target as its radiosurgical nature with less dose uniformity inside the target. CK had the longest beam-on time and the largest MUs, followed by HT and RA. IMRT presented the shortest beam-on time and the least MUs delivery. For the body-type lesions, CK, HT, and RA satisfied the target coverage criterion in 6 cases, but the criterion was satisfied in only 3 (50%) cases with the IMRT technique. For the body + pedicle-type lesions, HT satisfied the criterion of the target coverage of ≥90% in 4 of the 6 cases, and reached a target coverage of 89.0% in another case. However, the criterion of the target coverage of ≥90% was reached in 2 cases by CK and RA, and only in 1 case by IMRT. For curative-intent SBRT of isolated thoracic spinal lesions, RA is the first choice for the body-type lesions owing to its delivery efficiency (time); the second choice is CK or HT; HT is the

  3. Dosimetric evaluation of 4 different treatment modalities for curative-intent stereotactic body radiation therapy for isolated thoracic spinal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun; Ma, Lin; Wang, Xiao-Shen; Xu, Wei Xu; Cong, Xiao-Hu; Xu, Shou-Ping; Ju, Zhong-Jian; Du, Lei; Cai, Bo-Ning; Yang, Jack

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of 4 SBRT-capable dose delivery systems, CyberKnife (CK), Helical TomoTherapy (HT), Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) by Varian RapidArc (RA), and segmental step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) by Elekta, on isolated thoracic spinal lesions. CK, HT, RA, and IMRT planning were performed simultaneously for 10 randomly selected patients with 6 body types and 6 body + pedicle types with isolated thoracic lesions. The prescription was set with curative intent and dose of either 33 Gy in 3 fractions (3F) or 40 Gy in 5F to cover at least 90% of the planning target volume (PTV), correspondingly. Different dosimetric indices, beam-on time, and monitor units (MUs) were evaluated to compare the advantages/disadvantages of each delivery modality. In ensuring the dose-volume constraints for cord and esophagus of the premise, CK, HT, and RA all achieved a sharp conformity index (CI) and a small penumbra volume compared to IMRT. RA achieved a CI comparable to those from CK, HT, and IMRT. CK had a heterogeneous dose distribution in the target as its radiosurgical nature with less dose uniformity inside the target. CK had the longest beam-on time and the largest MUs, followed by HT and RA. IMRT presented the shortest beam-on time and the least MUs delivery. For the body-type lesions, CK, HT, and RA satisfied the target coverage criterion in 6 cases, but the criterion was satisfied in only 3 (50%) cases with the IMRT technique. For the body + pedicle-type lesions, HT satisfied the criterion of the target coverage of ≥90% in 4 of the 6 cases, and reached a target coverage of 89.0% in another case. However, the criterion of the target coverage of ≥90% was reached in 2 cases by CK and RA, and only in 1 case by IMRT. For curative-intent SBRT of isolated thoracic spinal lesions, RA is the first choice for the body-type lesions owing to its delivery efficiency (time); the second choice is CK or HT; HT is the

  4. Role of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Before Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: Retrospective Evaluation of Pathologic Response and Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannina, Edward Michael, E-mail: emmannina@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Slidell Memorial Hospital Regional Cancer Center, Slidell, Louisiana (United States); Cardenes, Higinia Rosa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Schneck Medical Center, Seymour, Indiana (United States); Lasley, Foster D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mercy Hospital, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Goodman, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Francis Healthcare, Cape Girardeau, Missouri (United States); Zook, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Community Hospital Anderson, Anderson, Indiana (United States); Althouse, Sandra [Department of Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Cox, John Alvin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbus Regional, Columbus, Indiana (United States); Saxena, Romil [Department of Pathology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Tector, Joseph [Department of Surgery, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Maluccio, Mary [Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze the results of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with early-stage, localized hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent definitive orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Methods and Materials: The subjects of this retrospective report are 38 patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent SBRT per institutional phase 1 to 2 eligibility criteria, before definitive OLT. Pre-OLT radiographs were compared with pathologic gold standard. Analysis of treatment failures and deaths was undertaken. Results: With median follow-up of 4.8 years from OLT, 9 of 38 patients (24%) recurred, whereas 10 of 38 patients (26%) died. Kaplan-Meier estimates of 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival are 77% and 74%, respectively. Sum longest dimension of tumors was significantly associated with disease-free survival (hazard ratio 1.93, P=.026). Pathologic response rate (complete plus partial response) was 68%. Radiographic scoring criteria performed poorly; modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors produced highest concordance (κ = 0.224). Explants revealed viable tumor in 74% of evaluable patients. Treatment failures had statistically larger sum longest dimension of tumors (4.0 cm vs 2.8 cm, P=.014) and non–statistically significant higher rates of lymphovascular space invasion (44% vs 17%), cT2 disease (44% vs 21%), ≥pT2 disease (67% vs 34%), multifocal tumors at time of SBRT (44% vs 21%), and less robust mean α-fetoprotein response (−25 IU/mL vs −162 IU/mL). Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy before to OLT is a well-tolerated treatment providing 68% pathologic response, though 74% of explants ultimately contained viable tumor. Radiographic response criteria poorly approximate pathology. Our data suggest further stratification of patients according to initial disease burden and treatment response.

  5. Role of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Before Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: Retrospective Evaluation of Pathologic Response and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannina, Edward Michael; Cardenes, Higinia Rosa; Lasley, Foster D; Goodman, Benjamin; Zook, Jennifer; Althouse, Sandra; Cox, John Alvin; Saxena, Romil; Tector, Joseph; Maluccio, Mary

    2017-04-01

    To analyze the results of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with early-stage, localized hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent definitive orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The subjects of this retrospective report are 38 patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent SBRT per institutional phase 1 to 2 eligibility criteria, before definitive OLT. Pre-OLT radiographs were compared with pathologic gold standard. Analysis of treatment failures and deaths was undertaken. With median follow-up of 4.8 years from OLT, 9 of 38 patients (24%) recurred, whereas 10 of 38 patients (26%) died. Kaplan-Meier estimates of 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival are 77% and 74%, respectively. Sum longest dimension of tumors was significantly associated with disease-free survival (hazard ratio 1.93, P=.026). Pathologic response rate (complete plus partial response) was 68%. Radiographic scoring criteria performed poorly; modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors produced highest concordance (κ = 0.224). Explants revealed viable tumor in 74% of evaluable patients. Treatment failures had statistically larger sum longest dimension of tumors (4.0 cm vs 2.8 cm, P=.014) and non-statistically significant higher rates of lymphovascular space invasion (44% vs 17%), cT2 disease (44% vs 21%), ≥pT2 disease (67% vs 34%), multifocal tumors at time of SBRT (44% vs 21%), and less robust mean α-fetoprotein response (-25 IU/mL vs -162 IU/mL). Stereotactic body radiation therapy before to OLT is a well-tolerated treatment providing 68% pathologic response, though 74% of explants ultimately contained viable tumor. Radiographic response criteria poorly approximate pathology. Our data suggest further stratification of patients according to initial disease burden and treatment response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. SU-E-J-89: Motion Effects On Organ Dose in Respiratory Gated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, T; Zhu, L [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia); Khan, M; Landry, J; Rajpara, R; Hawk, N [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Existing reports on gated radiation therapy focus mainly on optimizing dose delivery to the target structure. This work investigates the motion effects on radiation dose delivered to organs at risk (OAR) in respiratory gated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). A new algorithmic tool of dose analysis is developed to evaluate the optimality of gating phase for dose sparing on OARs while ensuring adequate target coverage. Methods: Eight patients with pancreatic cancer were treated on a phase I prospective study employing 4DCT-based SBRT. For each patient, 4DCT scans are acquired and sorted into 10 respiratory phases (inhale-exhale- inhale). Treatment planning is performed on the average CT image. The average CT is spatially registered to other phases. The resultant displacement field is then applied on the plan dose map to estimate the actual dose map for each phase. Dose values of each voxel are fitted to a sinusoidal function. Fitting parameters of dose variation, mean delivered dose and optimal gating phase for each voxel over respiration cycle are mapped on the dose volume. Results: The sinusoidal function accurately models the dose change during respiratory motion (mean fitting error 4.6%). In the eight patients, mean dose variation is 3.3 Gy on OARs with maximum of 13.7 Gy. Two patients have about 100cm{sup 3} volumes covered by more than 5 Gy deviation. The mean delivered dose maps are similar to plan dose with slight deformation. The optimal gating phase highly varies across the patient, with phase 5 or 6 on about 60% of the volume, and phase 0 on most of the rest. Conclusion: A new algorithmic tool is developed to conveniently quantify dose deviation on OARs from plan dose during the respiratory cycle. The proposed software facilitates the treatment planning process by providing the optimal respiratory gating phase for dose sparing on each OAR.

  7. MO-G-BRE-09: Validating FMEA Against Incident Learning Data: A Study in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, F; Cao, N; Young, L; Howard, J; Sponseller, P; Logan, W; Arbuckle, T; Korssjoen, T; Meyer, J; Ford, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Though FMEA (Failure Mode and Effects Analysis) is becoming more widely adopted for risk assessment in radiation therapy, to our knowledge it has never been validated against actual incident learning data. The objective of this study was to perform an FMEA analysis of an SBRT (Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy) treatment planning process and validate this against data recorded within an incident learning system. Methods: FMEA on the SBRT treatment planning process was carried out by a multidisciplinary group including radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and dosimetrists. Potential failure modes were identified through a systematic review of the workflow process. Failure modes were rated for severity, occurrence, and detectability on a scale of 1 to 10 and RPN (Risk Priority Number) was computed. Failure modes were then compared with historical reports identified as relevant to SBRT planning within a departmental incident learning system that had been active for two years. Differences were identified. Results: FMEA identified 63 failure modes. RPN values for the top 25% of failure modes ranged from 60 to 336. Analysis of the incident learning database identified 33 reported near-miss events related to SBRT planning. FMEA failed to anticipate 13 of these events, among which 3 were registered with severity ratings of severe or critical in the incident learning system. Combining both methods yielded a total of 76 failure modes, and when scored for RPN the 13 events missed by FMEA ranked within the middle half of all failure modes. Conclusion: FMEA, though valuable, is subject to certain limitations, among them the limited ability to anticipate all potential errors for a given process. This FMEA exercise failed to identify a significant number of possible errors (17%). Integration of FMEA with retrospective incident data may be able to render an improved overview of risks within a process

  8. A rapid, computational approach for assessing interfraction esophageal motion for use in stereotactic body radiation therapy planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Cardenas, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We present a rapid computational method for quantifying interfraction motion of the esophagus in patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy on a magnetic resonance (MR guided radiation therapy system. Methods and materials: Patients who underwent stereotactic body radiation therapy had simulation computed tomography (CT and on-treatment MR scans performed. The esophagus was contoured on each scan. CT contours were transferred to MR volumes via rigid registration. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine files containing contour points were exported to MATLAB. In-plane CT and MR contour points were spline interpolated, yielding boundaries with centroid positions, CCT and CMR. MR contour points lying outside of the CT contour were extracted. For each such point, BMR(j, a segment from CCT intersecting BMR(j, was produced; its intersection with the CT contour, BCT(i, was calculated. The length of the segment Sij, between BCT(i and BMR(j, was found. The orientation θ was calculated from Sij vector components:θ = arctan[(Sijy / (Sijx]A set of segments {Sij} was produced for each slice and binned by quadrant with 0° < θ ≤ 90°, 90° < θ ≤ 180°, 180° < θ ≤ 270°, and 270° < θ ≤ 360° for the left anterior, right anterior, right posterior, and left posterior quadrants, respectively. Slices were binned into upper, middle, and lower esophageal (LE segments. Results: Seven patients, each having 3 MR scans, were evaluated, yielding 1629 axial slices and 84,716 measurements. The LE segment exhibited the greatest magnitude of motion. The mean LE measurements in the left anterior, left posterior, right anterior, and right posterior were 5.2 ± 0.07 mm, 6.0 ± 0.09 mm, 4.8 ± 0.08 mm, and 5.1 ± 0.08 mm, respectively. There was considerable interpatient variability. Conclusions: The LE segment exhibited the greatest magnitude of mobility compared with the

  9. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis of 19 Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrelli, Fausto, E-mail: faupe@libero.it [Oncology Unit, Department of Oncology, ASST Bergamo Ovest, Treviglio (Italy); Comito, Tiziana [Department of Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy, Istituto Clinico Humanitas Cancer Center and Research Hospital, Milan (Italy); Ghidini, Antonio [Oncology Unit, Igea Hospital, Milan (Italy); Torri, Valter [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University and Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department-Humanitas Research Hospital, Milan (Italy); Scorsetti, Marta [Department of Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy, Istituto Clinico Humanitas Cancer Center and Research Hospital, Milan (Italy); Barni, Sandro [Oncology Unit, Department of Oncology, ASST Bergamo Ovest, Treviglio (Italy)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: Although surgery is the standard of care for resectable pancreatic cancer (PC), standard-dose chemoradiation therapy and chemotherapy alone are suitable for patients with unresectable disease. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an alternative, focused local therapy that delivers high radiation doses within a few fractions to the cancer, sparing the surrounding critical tissue. We performed a systematic review and pooled analysis of published trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this emerging treatment modality. Methods and Materials: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, EMBASE, SCOPUS, the Web of Science, and CINAHL for publications regarding SBRT for locally advanced PC. The 1-year overall survival (OS) rate was the primary endpoint, and the median OS, 2-year OS rate, 1-year locoregional control (LRC) rate, and grade 3 to 4 toxicities were the secondary endpoints. A multivariate random-effects meta-analysis was performed to calculate the aggregated OS rates at 1 and 2 years and the 1-year LRC rate. Results: A total of 19 studies, encompassing 1009 patients, were included in the present analysis. The pooled 1-year OS was 51.6% in 13 trials with data available. The median OS ranged from 5.7 to 47 months (median 17). The LRC rate at 1 year was 72.3%. Overall, the occurrence of severe adverse events did not exceed 10%. LRC appeared to correlate with the total SBRT dose and the number of fractions. Conclusions: The advantages of SBRT in terms of treatment time, satisfactory OS, and LRC indicate that it is an effective option for inoperable PC. However, a definitive validation of this treatment modality in large randomized studies is required, owing to the nonrandomized nature of the included studies and the limitations of small single-center series that include mixed populations.

  10. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis of 19 Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrelli, Fausto; Comito, Tiziana; Ghidini, Antonio; Torri, Valter; Scorsetti, Marta; Barni, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Although surgery is the standard of care for resectable pancreatic cancer (PC), standard-dose chemoradiation therapy and chemotherapy alone are suitable for patients with unresectable disease. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an alternative, focused local therapy that delivers high radiation doses within a few fractions to the cancer, sparing the surrounding critical tissue. We performed a systematic review and pooled analysis of published trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this emerging treatment modality. Methods and Materials: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, EMBASE, SCOPUS, the Web of Science, and CINAHL for publications regarding SBRT for locally advanced PC. The 1-year overall survival (OS) rate was the primary endpoint, and the median OS, 2-year OS rate, 1-year locoregional control (LRC) rate, and grade 3 to 4 toxicities were the secondary endpoints. A multivariate random-effects meta-analysis was performed to calculate the aggregated OS rates at 1 and 2 years and the 1-year LRC rate. Results: A total of 19 studies, encompassing 1009 patients, were included in the present analysis. The pooled 1-year OS was 51.6% in 13 trials with data available. The median OS ranged from 5.7 to 47 months (median 17). The LRC rate at 1 year was 72.3%. Overall, the occurrence of severe adverse events did not exceed 10%. LRC appeared to correlate with the total SBRT dose and the number of fractions. Conclusions: The advantages of SBRT in terms of treatment time, satisfactory OS, and LRC indicate that it is an effective option for inoperable PC. However, a definitive validation of this treatment modality in large randomized studies is required, owing to the nonrandomized nature of the included studies and the limitations of small single-center series that include mixed populations.

  11. Prospective Longitudinal Assessment of Quality of Life for Liver Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.klein@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jiang, Haiyan [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kim, John; Dinniwell, Rob; Brierley, James; Wong, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lockwood, Gina [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ringash, Jolie [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate quality of life (QoL), an important outcome owing to poor long-term survival, after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the liver. Methods and Materials: Patients (n=222) with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), liver metastases, or intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and Child-Pugh A liver function received 24-60 Gy of 6-fraction image-guided SBRT. Prospective QoL assessment was completed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30) and/or Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary (FACT-Hep, version 4) questionnaires at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Ten HCC patients with Child-Pugh B liver function were also treated. Results: The QLQ-C30 was available for 205 patients, and 196 completed the FACT-Hep. No difference in baseline QoL (P=.17) or overall survival (P=.088) was seen between the HCC, liver metastases, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma patients. Appetite loss and fatigue measured by the QLQ-C30 clinically and statistically worsened by 1 month after treatment but recovered by 3 months. At 3 and 12 months after treatment, respectively, the FACT-Hep score had improved relative to baseline in 13%/19%, worsened in 36%/27%, and remained stable in 51%/54%. Using the QLQ-C30 Global Health score, QoL improved in 16%/23%, worsened in 34%/39%, and remained stable in 50%/38% at 3 and 12 months, respectively. Median survival was 17.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.3-19.8 months). Higher baseline scores on both FACT-Hep and QLQ-C30 Global Health were associated with improved survival. Hazard ratios for death, per 10-unit decrease in QoL, were 0.90 (95% CI 0.83-0.98; P=.001) and 0.88 (95% CI 0.82-0.95; P=.001), respectively. Tumor size was inversely correlated with survival. Conclusions: Liver SBRT temporarily worsens appetite and fatigue, but not overall QoL. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is well tolerated and warrants

  12. Dosimetric analysis of varying cord planning organ at risk volume in spine stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Owen, MD, PhD

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Current guidelines may overestimate the risk of myelopathy from spine SBRT. The current study's population included both radiation-naïve and retreatment cases, but no myelopathy was observed despite exceeding recommended spine limits.

  13. NOTE: Individual radiation therapy patient whole-body phantoms for peripheral dose evaluations: method and specific software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alziar, I.; Bonniaud, G.; Couanet, D.; Ruaud, J. B.; Vicente, C.; Giordana, G.; Ben-Harrath, O.; Diaz, J. C.; Grandjean, P.; Kafrouni, H.; Chavaudra, J.; Lefkopoulos, D.; de Vathaire, F.; Diallo, I.

    2009-09-01

    This study presents a method aimed at creating radiotherapy (RT) patient-adjustable whole-body phantoms to permit retrospective and prospective peripheral dose evaluations for enhanced patient radioprotection. Our strategy involves virtual whole-body patient models (WBPM) in different RT treatment positions for both genders and for different age groups. It includes a software tool designed to match the anatomy of the phantoms with the anatomy of the actual patients, based on the quality of patient data available. The procedure for adjusting a WBPM to patient morphology includes typical dimensions available in basic auxological tables for the French population. Adjustment is semi-automatic. Because of the complexity of the human anatomy, skilled personnel are required to validate changes made in the phantom anatomy. This research is part of a global project aimed at proposing appropriate methods and software tools capable of reconstituting the anatomy and dose evaluations in the entire body of RT patients in an adapted treatment planning system (TPS). The graphic user interface is that of a TPS adapted to obtain a comfortable working process. Such WBPM have been used to supplement patient therapy planning images, usually restricted to regions involved in treatment. Here we report, as an example, the case of a patient treated for prostate cancer whose therapy planning images were complemented by an anatomy model. Although present results are preliminary and our research is ongoing, they appear encouraging, since such patient-adjusted phantoms are crucial in the optimization of radiation protection of patients and for follow-up studies.

  14. Fitting techniques of cell survival curves in high-dose region for use in stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, F W; Ahmad, S

    2009-03-21

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) uses high doses of radiation to treat tumors. The cell survival behavior at these high doses is subject to debate. We investigated this high-dose region by fitting a variety of formulas to cell survival data. Each of the formulas is motivated by a discussion of the theory of cell survival. Fourteen cell lines are examined. These are fit to a variety of equations. Among the equations include the traditional single-hit multi-target and linear quadratic as well as recent proposals such as the universal survival curve (USC). The chi(2)/df of each fit is compared to determine the best fit. While no formula is clearly superior for all cell lines, the newer formulas often provide better fits than the single-hit multi-target and linear quadratic. We recommend that the more recent formula discussed herein be used over the linear quadratic in dealing with the high-dose regions dealt with in SBRT.

  15. Radiation Therapy - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... W XYZ List of All Topics All Radiation Therapy - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, ... Information Translations Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) Expand Section Radiation Therapy - Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) ... Health Information Translations Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  16. Is Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy an Attractive Option for Unresectable Liver Metastases? A Preliminary Report From a Phase 2 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scorsetti, Marta; Arcangeli, Stefano; Tozzi, Angelo; Comito, Tiziana [Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Humanitas Cancer Center, Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, Milano (Italy); Alongi, Filippo, E-mail: filippo.alongi@humanitas.it [Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Humanitas Cancer Center, Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, Milano (Italy); Navarria, Pierina; Mancosu, Pietro; Reggiori, Giacomo [Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Humanitas Cancer Center, Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, Milano (Italy); Fogliata, Antonella [Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Torzilli, Guido [Surgery Department, Humanitas Cancer Center, Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, Milano (Italy); Tomatis, Stefano [Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Humanitas Cancer Center, Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, Milano (Italy); Cozzi, Luca [Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of high-dose stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of unresectable liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Patients with 1 to 3 liver metastases, with maximum individual tumor diameters less than 6 cm and a Karnofsky Performance Status of at least 70, were enrolled and treated by SBRT on a phase 2 clinical trial. Dose prescription was 75 Gy on 3 consecutive days. SBRT was delivered using the volumetric modulated arc therapy by RapidArc (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) technique. The primary end-point was in-field local control. Secondary end-points were toxicity and survival. Results: Between February 2010 and September 2011, a total of 61 patients with 76 lesions were treated. Among the patients, 21 (34.3%) had stable extrahepatic disease at study entry. The most frequent primary sites were colorectal (45.9%) and breast (18%). Of the patients, 78.7% had 1 lesion, 18.0% had 2 lesions, and 3.3% had 3 lesions. After a median of 12 months (range, 2-26 months), the in-field local response rate was 94%. The median overall survival rate was 19 months, and actuarial survival at 12 months was 83.5%. None of the patients experienced grade 3 or higher acute toxicity. No radiation-induced liver disease was detected. One patient experienced G3 late toxicity at 6 months, resulting from chest wall pain. Conclusions: SBRT for unresectable liver metastases can be considered an effective, safe, and noninvasive therapeutic option, with excellent rates of local control and a low treatment-related toxicity.

  17. Potentials and Limitations of Guiding Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Set-Up on Liver-Implanted Fiducial Markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderink, Wouter; Mendez Romero, Alejandra; Seppenwoolde, Yvette; Boer, Hans de; Levendag, Peter; Heijmen, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the potentials and limitations of guiding liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) set-up on liver-implanted fiducial markers. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing compression-supported SBRT in a stereotactic body frame received fluoroscopy at treatment preparation and before each treatment fraction. In fluoroscopic videos we localized the markers and diaphragm tip at expiration and the spine (measurements on free-breathing and abdominal compression). Day-to-day displacements, rotations (markers only), and deformations were determined. Marker guidance was compared to conventional set-up strategies in treatment set-up simulations. Results: For compression, day-to-day motion of markers with respect to their centers of mass (COM) was σ = 0.9 mm (random error SD), Σ = 0.4 mm (systematic error SD), and o and 7.2 o were observed. For markers not surrounding the tumor, e.g., 5 cm between respective COMs, these changes could effect residual tumor set-up errors up to 8.4 mm, 1.1 mm median (deformations), and 3.1 mm to 6.3 mm (rotations). Compression did not systematically contribute to deformations and rotations, since similar results were observed for free-breathing. Conclusions: If markers can be implanted near and around the tumor, residual set-up errors by marker guidance are small compared to those of conventional set-up methods, allowing high-precision tumor radiation set-up. However, substantial errors may result if markers are not implanted precisely, requiring further research to obtain adequate safety margins.

  18. SU-F-P-05: Initial Experience with an Independent Certification Program for Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solberg, T [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Robar, J [Capital District Health Authority, Halifax, NS (Canada); Gevaert, T [University Hospital Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Todorovic, M [Universitats-Klinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Howe, J [Associates In Medical Physics, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The ASTRO document “Safety is no accident: A FRAMEWORK FOR QUALITY RADIATION ONCOLOGY AND CARE” recommends external reviews of specialized modalities. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the implementation of such a program for Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body radiation Therapy (SBRT). Methods: The margin of error for SRS and SBRT delivery is significantly smaller than that of conventional radiotherapy and therefore requires special attention and diligence. The Novalis Certified program was created to fill an unmet need for specialized SRS / SBRT credentialing. A standards document was drafted by a panel of experts from several disciplines, including medical physics, radiation oncology and neurosurgery. The document, based on national and international standards, covers requirements in program structure, personnel, training, clinical application, technology, quality management, and patient and equipment QA. The credentialing process was modeled after existing certification programs and includes an institution-generated self-study, extensive document review and an onsite audit. Reviewers generate a descriptive report, which is reviewed by a multidisciplinary expert panel. Outcomes of the review may include mandatory requirements and optional recommendations. Results: 15 institutions have received Novalis Certification, including 3 in the US, 7 in Europe, 4 in Australia and 1 in Asia. 87 other centers are at various stages of the process. Nine reviews have resulted in mandatory requirements, however all of these were addressed within three months of the audit report. All reviews have produced specific recommendations ranging from programmatic to technical in nature. Institutions felt that the credentialing process addressed a critical need and was highly valuable to the institution. Conclusion: Novalis Certification is a unique peer review program assessing safety and quality in SRS and SBRT, while recognizing

  19. Local Hypothermia as a Radioprotector of the Rectal Wall During Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrycushko, Brian A., E-mail: Brian.Hrycushko@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Chopra, Rajiv [Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sayre, James W. [Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Radiology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Richardson, James A. [Department of Pathology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Department of Molecular Biology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Folkert, Michael R.; Timmerman, Robert D.; Medin, Paul M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the single-fraction dose-related incidence of rectal obstruction and/or bleeding in normothermic and hypothermic rectums of a rat model. Methods and Materials: A 1.9-cm length of rectum was irradiated with a single fraction in 57 Sprague-Dawley rats using a dedicated image-guided small animal irradiator and Monte Carlo–based treatment planning system. All rats had a rectal temperature control apparatus placed during irradiation and were stratified to achieve either a normothermic (37°C) or hypothermic (15°C) rectal wall temperature. Radiation was delivered to a 1-cm-diameter cylindrical volume about the cooling device and rectal wall. The radiation dose was escalated from 16 Gy up to 37 Gy to assess the dose response in each arm. The primary endpoint of this study was rectal obstruction and/or bleeding during a follow-up of 180 to 186 days. Histologic scoring was performed on all study rats. Results: Probit analysis showed a dose associated with a 50% incidence of rectal obstruction of 24.6 Gy and 40.8 Gy for normothermic and hypothermic arms, respectively. The occurrence of obstruction and/or bleeding correlated with the posttreatment histologic score for normothermic rats; however, there was no difference in histologic score between normothermic and hypothermic rats at the highest dose levels evaluated. Conclusions: A significant radioprotective effect was observed using local hypothermia during a single large dose of radiation for the functional endpoint of rectal obstruction and/or bleeding. A confirmatory study in a large animal model with anatomic and physiologic similarities to humans is suggested.

  20. Robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy for elderly medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam SD

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sana D Karam,1 Zachary D Horne,1 Robert L Hong,1,2 Nimrah Baig,1 Gregory J Gagnon,4 Don McRae,2 David Duhamel,3 Nadim M Nasr1,21Department of Radiation Oncology, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Hospital Center, Arlington, VA, USA; 3Department of Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine, Virginia Hospital Center, Arlington, VA, USA; 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Frederick Memorial Hospital, Frederick, MD, USAIntroduction: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is being increasingly applied in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC because of its high local efficacy. This study aims to examine survival outcomes in elderly patients with inoperable stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT.Methods: A total of 31 patients with single lesions treated with fractionated SBRT from 2008 to 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. A median prescribed dose of 48 Gy was delivered to the prescription isodose line, over a median of four treatments. The median biologically effective dose (BED was 105.6 (range 37.50–180, and the median age was 73 (65–90 years. No patient received concurrent chemotherapy.Results: With a median follow up of 13 months (range, 4–40 months, the actuarial median overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS were 32 months, and 19 months, respectively. The actuarial median local control (LC time was not reached. The survival outcomes at median follow up of 13 months were 80%, 68%, and 70% for LC, PFS, and OS, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed a BED of >100 Gy was associated with improved LC rates (P = 0.02, while squamous cell histology predicted for worse LC outcome at median follow up time of 13 months (P = 0.04. Increased tumor volume was a worse prognostic indicator of both LC and OS outcomes (P < 0.05. Finally, female gender was a better prognostic factor for OS than male gender (P = 0.006. There were no prognostic indicators of PFS that reached

  1. [Doses to organs at risk in conformational and stereotactic body radiation therapy: Liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debbi, K; Janoray, G; Scher, N; Deutsch, É; Mornex, F

    2017-10-01

    The liver is an essential organ that ensures many vital functions such as metabolism of bilirubin, glucose, lipids, synthesis of coagulation factors, destruction of many toxins, etc. The hepatic parenchyma can be irradiated during the management of digestive tumors, right basithoracic, esophagus, abdomen in toto or TBI. In addition, radiotherapy of the hepatic area, which is mainly stereotactic, now occupies a central place in the management of primary or secondary hepatic tumors. Irradiation of the whole liver, or part of it, may be complicated by radiation-induced hepatitis. It is therefore necessary to respect strict dosimetric constraints both in stereotactic and in conformational irradiation in order to limit the undesired irradiation of the hepatic parenchyma which may vary according to the treatment techniques, the basic hepatic function or the lesion size. The liver is an organ with a parallel architecture, so the average tolerable dose in the whole liver should be considered rather than the maximum tolerable dose at one point. The purpose of this article is to propose a development of dose recommendations during conformation or stereotactic radiotherapy of the liver. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiosensitivity Differences Between Liver Metastases Based on Primary Histology Suggest Implications for Clinical Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Caudell, Jimmy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); El-Haddad, Ghassan [Department of Interventional Radiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Berglund, Anders E.; Welsh, Eric A. [Department of Bioinformatics, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Yue, Binglin [Department of Biostastistics, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Hoffe, Sarah E.; Naghavi, Arash O.; Abuodeh, Yazan A.; Frakes, Jessica M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Eschrich, Steven A. [Department of Bioinformatics, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Torres-Roca, Javier F., E-mail: Javier.torresroca@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Evidence from the management of oligometastases with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) reveals differences in outcomes based on primary histology. We have previously identified a multigene expression index for tumor radiosensitivity (RSI) with validation in multiple independent cohorts. In this study, we assessed RSI in liver metastases and assessed our clinical outcomes after SBRT based on primary histology. Methods and Materials: Patients were identified from our prospective, observational protocol. The previously tested RSI 10 gene assay was run on samples and calculated using the published algorithm. An independent cohort of 33 patients with 38 liver metastases treated with SBRT was used for clinical correlation. Results: A total of 372 unique metastatic liver lesions were identified for inclusion from our prospective, institutional metadata pool. The most common primary histologies for liver metastases were colorectal adenocarcinoma (n=314, 84.4%), breast adenocarcinoma (n=12, 3.2%), and pancreas neuroendocrine (n=11, 3%). There were significant differences in RSI of liver metastases based on histology. The median RSIs for liver metastases in descending order of radioresistance were gastrointestinal stromal tumor (0.57), melanoma (0.53), colorectal neuroendocrine (0.46), pancreas neuroendocrine (0.44), colorectal adenocarcinoma (0.43), breast adenocarcinoma (0.35), lung adenocarcinoma (0.31), pancreas adenocarcinoma (0.27), anal squamous cell cancer (0.22), and small intestine neuroendocrine (0.21) (P<.0001). The 12-month and 24-month Kaplan-Meier rates of local control (LC) for colorectal lesions from the independent clinical cohort were 79% and 59%, compared with 100% for noncolorectal lesions (P=.019), respectively. Conclusions: In this analysis, we found significant differences based on primary histology. This study suggests that primary histology may be an important factor to consider in SBRT radiation dose selection.

  3. Clinical Outcomes After Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Patients With or Without a Prior Lung Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ying; Hermann, Gretchen; Lewis, John H; Aerts, Hugo J; Baldini, Elizabeth H; Chen, Aileen B; Colson, Yolonda L; Hacker, Fred L; Killoran, Joseph H; Kozono, David E; Wagar, Matthew; Wee, Jon O; Mak, Raymond H

    2016-11-04

    Tumor control (TC), toxicity and survival, following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) were compared between patients with and without a prior lung resection (PLR). The study is comprised of 130 patients with 141 peripheral tumors treated with SBRT at our institution from 2009 to 2013. Primary TC and lobar control (LC) were defined per RTOG 0236. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Survival/TC and toxicity were compared between patients with and without PLR using the Kaplan-Meier method and cumulative incidence, respectively. Fine and Gray regression was used for univariable/multivariable analysis for radiation pneumonitis (RP). Of the 130 patients with median age 70 years (range, 42 to 93 y), 50 had undergone PLR (median time between PLR and SBRT: 33 mo; range, 1 to 206), including pneumonectomy (12%), lobectomy (46%), wedge resection (42%). With a median follow-up of 21 months in survivors, the PLR group had better TC (1-y 100% vs. 93%; P<0.01) and increased grade ≥2 (RP; 1-y 12% vs. 1%; P<0.01). OS was not significantly different between the 2 groups (1-y 91% vs. 85%; P=0.24). On univariable/multivariable analyses, biologically effective dose was associated with TC (hazard ratios, 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-0.999; P=0.04). Chemotherapy use was associated with grade ≥2 RP for all patients (hazard ratios, 14.92; 95% confidence interval, 5.68-39.21; P<0.0001) in multivariable analysis. PLR was not associated with increased RP in multivariable analysis. Patients with PLR who receive lung SBRT for lung tumors have high local control and relatively low toxicity. SBRT is an excellent option to treat second lung tumors or pulmonary metastases in patients with PLR.

  4. Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Postoperative Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Solid Tumor Malignancies to the Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmond, Kristin J., E-mail: kjanson3@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Robertson, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lo, Simon S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Soltys, Scott G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Ryu, Samuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stony Brook Cancer Center, Stony Brook, New York (United States); McNutt, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chao, Samuel T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ghia, Amol [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Norris Cancer Center and Keck School of Medicine at University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sheehan, Jason [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To develop consensus contouring guidelines for postoperative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases. Methods and Materials: Ten spine SBRT specialists representing 10 international centers independently contoured the clinical target volume (CTV), planning target volume (PTV), spinal cord, and spinal cord planning organ at risk volume (PRV) for 10 representative clinical scenarios in postoperative spine SBRT for metastatic solid tumor malignancies. Contours were imported into the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research. Agreement between physicians was calculated with an expectation minimization algorithm using simultaneous truth and performance level estimation with κ statistics. Target volume definition guidelines were established by finding optimized confidence level consensus contours using histogram agreement analyses. Results: Nine expert radiation oncologists and 1 neurosurgeon completed contours for all 10 cases. The mean sensitivity and specificity were 0.79 (range, 0.71-0.89) and 0.94 (range, 0.90-0.99) for the CTV and 0.79 (range, 0.70-0.95) and 0.92 (range, 0.87-0.99) for the PTV), respectively. Mean κ agreement, which demonstrates the probability that contours agree by chance alone, was 0.58 (range, 0.43-0.70) for CTV and 0.58 (range, 0.37-0.76) for PTV (P<.001 for all cases). Optimized consensus contours were established for all patients with 80% confidence interval. Recommendations for CTV include treatment of the entire preoperative extent of bony and epidural disease, plus immediately adjacent bony anatomic compartments at risk of microscopic disease extension. In particular, a “donut-shaped” CTV was consistently applied in cases of preoperative circumferential epidural extension, regardless of extent of residual epidural extension. Otherwise more conformal anatomic-based CTVs were determined and described. Spinal instrumentation was consistently excluded from the CTV. Conclusions: We provide

  5. Clinical applicability of biologically effective dose calculation for spinal cord in fractionated spine stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Heon; Lee, Kyu Chan; Choi, Jinho; Ahn, So Hyun; Lee, Seok Ho; Sung, Ki Hoon; Kil, Se Hee

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether biologically effective dose (BED) based on linear-quadratic model can be used to estimate spinal cord tolerance dose in spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivered in 4 or more fractions. Sixty-three metastatic spinal lesions in 47 patients were retrospectively evaluated. The most frequently prescribed dose was 36 Gy in 4 fractions. In planning, we tried to limit the maximum dose to the spinal cord or cauda equina less than 50% of prescription or 45 Gy 2/2 . BED was calculated using maximum point dose of spinal cord. Maximum spinal cord dose per fraction ranged from 2.6 to 6.0 Gy (median 4.3 Gy). Except 4 patients with 52.7, 56.4, 62.4, and 67.9 Gy 2/2 , equivalent total dose in 2-Gy fraction of the patients was not more than 50 Gy 2/2 (12.1–67.9, median 32.0). The ratio of maximum spinal cord dose to prescription dose increased up to 82.2% of prescription dose as epidural spinal cord compression grade increased. No patient developed grade 2 or higher radiation-induced spinal cord toxicity during follow-up period of 0.5 to 53.9 months. In fractionated spine SBRT, BED can be used to estimate spinal cord tolerance dose, provided that the dose per fraction to the spinal cord is moderate, e.g. < 6.0 Gy. It appears that a maximum dose of up to 45–50 Gy 2/2 to the spinal cord is tolerable in 4 or more fractionation regimen

  6. Comparison of multi-leaf collimator tracking and treatment-couch tracking during stereotactic body radiation therapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrbar, Stefanie; Schmid, Simon; Jöhl, Alexander; Klöck, Stephan; Guckenberger, Matthias; Riesterer, Oliver; Tanadini-Lang, Stephanie

    2017-12-01

    Motion mitigation during prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) ensures optimal target coverage while reducing the risk of overdosage of nearby organs. The geometrical and dosimetrical performance of motion mitigation with the multileaf-collimator (MLC tracking) or the treatment couch (couch tracking) were compared. For ten prostate patients, SBRT treatment plans with integrated boosts were prepared using volumetric modulated arc technique. For the geometrical evaluation, a lead sphere at the beam isocenter was moved according to five prostate motion curves (i) without mitigation, (ii) with MLC tracking or (iii) with couch tracking. During irradiation, MV images were taken and the over-/underexposed areas were evaluated. For the dosimetrical evaluation, the plans were applied to a dosimetric phantom. Dose distributions with and without mitigation were evaluated inside the target structure and organs at risk. The median over-/underexposed area was reduced significantly from 2.02cm 2 without mitigation to 1.00cm 2 and 0.45cm 2 with MLC and couch tracking. Closest dosimetrical agreement to the static references was achieved with couch tracking. MLC and couch tracking at a conventional linear accelerator significantly improved the accuracy of prostate SBRT in the presence of motion, whereby couch tracking showed slightly better performance than MLC tracking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Kilovoltage Imaging of Implanted Fiducials to Monitor Intrafraction Motion With Abdominal Compression During Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Gastrointestinal Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorke, Ellen, E-mail: yorke@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Xiong, Ying [Department of Radiation Oncology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Han, Qian [Department of Radiotherapy, Henan Provincial People' s Hospital, Zhengzhou (China); Zhang, Pengpeng; Mageras, Gikas; Lovelock, Michael; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jian-Ping [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To assess intrafraction respiratory motion using a commercial kilovoltage imaging system for abdominal tumor patients with implanted fiducials and breathing constrained by pneumatic compression during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A pneumatic compression belt limited respiratory motion in 19 patients with radiopaque fiducials in or near their tumor during SBRT for abdominal tumors. Kilovoltage images were acquired at 5- to 6-second intervals during treatment using a commercial system. Intrafractional fiducial displacements were measured using in-house software. The dosimetric effect of the observed displacements was calculated for 3 sessions for each patient. Results: Intrafraction displacement patterns varied between patients and between individual treatment sessions. Averaged over 19 patients, 73 sessions, 7.6% of craniocaudal displacements exceeded 0.5 cm, and 1.2% exceeded 0.75 cm. The calculated single-session dose to 95% of gross tumor volume differed from planned by an average of −1.2% (range, −11.1% to 4.8%) but only for 4 patients was the total 3-session calculated dose to 95% of gross tumor volume more than 3% different from planned. Conclusions: Our pneumatic compression limited intrafractional abdominal target motion, maintained target position established at setup, and was moderately effective in preserving coverage. Commercially available intrafractional imaging is useful for surveillance but can be made more effective and reliable.

  8. Stereotactic body radiation therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma: Optimal treatment strategies based on liver segmentation and functional hepatic reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Po-Ming; Chung, Na-Na; Hsu, Wei-Chung; Chang, Feng-Ling; Jang, Chin-Jyh; Scorsetti, Marta

    2015-01-01

    To discuss current dosage for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and suggest alternative treatment strategies according to liver segmentation as defined by the Couinaud classification. SBRT is a safe and effective alternative treatment for HCC patients who are unable to undergo liver ablation/resection. However, the SBRT fractionation schemes and treatment planning strategies are not well established. In this article, the latest developments and key findings from research studies exploring the efficacy of SBRT fractionation schemes for treatment of HCC are reviewed. Patients' characteristics, fractionation schemes, treatment outcomes and toxicities were compiled. Special attention was focused on SBRT fractionation approaches that take into consideration liver segmentation according to the Couinaud classification and functional hepatic reserve based on Child-Pugh (CP) liver cirrhosis classification. The most common SBRT fractionation schemes for HCC were 3 × 10-20 Gy, 4-6 × 8-10 Gy, and 10 × 5-5.5 Gy. Based on previous SBRT studies, and in consideration of tumor size and CP classification, we proposed 3 × 15-25 Gy for patients with tumor size 5 cm or CP-B score. Treatment schemes in SBRT for HCC vary according to liver segmentation and functional hepatic reserve. Further prospective studies may be necessary to identify the optimal dose of SBRT for HCC.

  9. Uncertainties associated with treatments of hepatic lesions in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using respiratory tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charoy, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Oscar Lambret Center treated with Cyberknife R , since June 2007, liver lesions in stereotactic conditions with respiratory tracking using external LEDs correlated with seeds implanted near the target. Clinical results show excellent local control but there are still uncertainties in the preparation and delivery of treatment. The aims of this thesis are to identify and quantify these uncertainties, to define solutions and/or alternatives and to assess their added value. As a first step, the method of the target definition by the radiation oncologist is evaluated. Improvement of the method currently used in routine is considered, including the choice of the most appropriate imaging and the intervention of a second operator, expert in imaging (radiologist). The organ at risk and target movements induced by the respiratory motion are not taken into account in the treatment planning step, performed on the 3D images (the so-called planning CT). The dosimetric impact associated with this type of planning is evaluated using 4D Monte Carlo simulations that take into account patient and linear accelerator movements and the synchrony between both movements. The question of 4D planning as prospect of improvement is then investigated. Movements and deformations of the liver due to respiration are also implicated in the uncertainties involved in the treatment. The correlation model of external markers with the target, used for respiratory tracking, ignores eventual deformations and rotations within the liver. A study of the impact on the target tracking is performed. All these studies were conducted using real patient data sets. (author) [fr

  10. Vertebral Compression Fracture After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: A Review of the Pathophysiology and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruqi, Salman; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Whyne, Cari; Alghamdi, Majed; Wilson, Jefferson; Myrehaug, Sten; Soliman, Hany; Lee, Young; Maralani, Pejman; Yang, Victor; Fisher, Charles; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-10-18

    Vertebral compression fracture (VCF) is a challenging and not infrequent complication observed following spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). To summarize the data from the multiple studies that have been published, addressing the risk and predictive factors for VCF post-SBRT. A systematic literature review was conducted. Studies were selected if they specifically addressed risk factors for post-SBRT VCF in their analyses. A total of 11 studies were identified, reporting both the risk of VCF post-SBRT and an analysis of risk factors based on univariate and multivariate analysis. A total of 2911 spinal segments were treated with a crude VCF rate of 13.9%. The most frequently identified risk factors on multivariate analysis were: lytic disease (hazard ratio [HR] range, 2.76-12.2), baseline VCF prior to SBRT (HR range, 1.69-9.25), higher dose per fraction SBRT (HR range, 5.03-6.82), spinal deformity (HR range, 2.99-11.1), older age (HR range, 2.15-5.67), and more than 40% to 50% of vertebral body involved by tumor (HR range, 3.9-4.46). In the 9 studies that specifically reported on the use of post-SBRT surgical procedures, 37% of VCF had undergone an intervention (range, 11%-60%). VCF is an important adverse effect following SBRT. Risk factors have been identified to guide the selection of high-risk patients. Evidence-based algorithms with respect to patient selection and intervention are needed. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  11. Radiobiological Optimization in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Are We Ready to Apply Radiobiological Models?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco D’Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung tumors are often associated with a poor prognosis although different schedules and treatment modalities have been extensively tested in the clinical practice. The complexity of this disease and the use of combined therapeutic approaches have been investigated and the use of high dose-rates is emerging as effective strategy. Technological improvements of clinical linear accelerators allow combining high dose-rate and a more conformal dose delivery with accurate imaging modalities pre- and during therapy. This paper aims at reporting the state of the art and future direction in the use of radiobiological models and radiobiological-based optimizations in the clinical practice for the treatment of lung cancer. To address this issue, a search was carried out on PubMed database to identify potential papers reporting tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability for lung tumors. Full articles were retrieved when the abstract was considered relevant, and only papers published in English language were considered. The bibliographies of retrieved papers were also searched and relevant articles included. At the state of the art, dose–response relationships have been reported in literature for local tumor control and survival in stage III non-small cell lung cancer. Due to the lack of published radiobiological models for SBRT, several authors used dose constraints and models derived for conventional fractionation schemes. Recently, several radiobiological models and parameters for SBRT have been published and could be used in prospective trials although external validations are recommended to improve the robustness of model predictive capability. Moreover, radiobiological-based functions have been used within treatment planning systems for plan optimization but the advantages of using this strategy in the clinical practice are still under discussion. Future research should be directed toward combined regimens, in order to

  12. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer: a small academic hospital experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren B Factor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/Objective(s: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT has been shown to have increased local control and overall survival relative to conventional external beam radiation therapy in patients with medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Excellent rates of local control have been demonstrated both in clinical trials as well as in single-center studies at large academic institutions. However, there is limited data on the experiences of small academic hospitals with SBRT for Stage I NSCLC. The purpose of this study is to report the local control and overall survival rates in patients treated with SBRT for Stage I NSCLC at Winthrop-University Hospital (WUH, a small academic hospital. Materials/Methods: This is a retrospective review of 78 Stage I central and peripheral NSCLC tumors treated between December 2006 and July 2012 with SBRT at WUH. Treatment was given utilizing fiducials and a respiratory tracking system. If the fiducials were not trackable, a spine tracking system was used for tumor localization. CT-based planning was performed using the ray trace algorithm. Treatment was delivered over 4 consecutive days for central tumors to a dose of 4800 cGy delivered in 4 fractions. Peripheral tumors were treated to a dose of 6000 cGy in 3 consecutive fractions. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate local control and overall survival. Results: The median age was 78.5 years. 54% of the patient population was female. 67% of the tumors were Stage IA, and 33% of the tumors were Stage IB. 53% of the tumors were adenocarcinomas and 29% were squamous cell carcinomas, with the remainder being of unknown histology or NSCLC, not otherwise specified The 2-year local control rate was 87%, and the two-year overall survival was 68%. Conclusions: Our findings support that local control and overall survival at a small academic hospital are comparable to that of larger academic institutions' published experiences with SBRT for

  13. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver metastases from colorectal cancer: analysis of safety, feasibility, and early outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Adele Sorel Kress

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the 3rd leading cause of cancer-related death in the U.S. Many patients with CRC develop hepatic metastases as the sole site of metastases. Historical treatment options were limited to resection or conventional radiation therapy. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT has emerged as a rational treatment approach. This study reviews our experience with SBRT for patients with liver metastases from CRC.Material and Methods: Fourteen histologically confirmed hepatic CRC metastases in 11 consecutive patients were identified between November, 2004 and June, 2009 at Georgetown University. All patients underwent CT-based treatment planning; a few also had MRI or PET/CT. All patients had fiducial markers placed under CT guidance and were treated using the CyberKnife system. Treatment response and toxicities were examined; survival and local control were evaluated.Results: Most patients were treated to a single hepatic lesion (n=8, with a few treated to 2 lesions (n=3. Median treatment volume was 99.7 cm3, and lesions were treated to a median BED10 of 49.7 Gy (range: 28 – 100.8 Gy. Median follow-up was 21 months; median survival was 16.1 months, with 2-year actuarial survival of 25.7%. One-year local control was 72%. Among patients with post-treatment imaging, 8 had stable disease (80% and 2 had progressive disease (20% at first follow-up. The most common grade 1-2 acute toxicities included nausea and alterations in liver function tests; there was one grade 3 toxicity (elevated bilirubin, and no grade 4-5 toxicities.Discussion: SBRT is safe and feasible for the treatment of limited hepatic metastases from CRC. Our results compare favorably with outcomes from previous studies of SBRT. Further studies are needed to better define patient eligibility, study the role of combined modality treatment, optimize treatment parameters, and characterize quality of life after treatment.

  14. Toxicity After Central versus Peripheral Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: A Propensity Score Matched-Pair Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangona, Victor S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Aneese, Andrew M. [Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Rochester, Michigan (United States); Marina, Ovidiu; Hymas, Richard V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Ionascu, Dan; Robertson, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Rochester, Michigan (United States); Gallardo, Lori J. [Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Rochester, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Grills, Inga Siiner, E-mail: igrills@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Rochester, Michigan (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare toxicity after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for “central” tumors—within 2 cm of the proximal bronchial tree or with planning tumor volume (PTV) touching mediastinum—versus noncentral (“peripheral”) lung tumors. Methods and Materials: From November 2005 to January 2011, 229 tumors (110 central, 119 peripheral; T1-3N0M0 non–small-cell lung cancer and limited lung metastases) in 196 consecutive patients followed prospectively at a single institution received moderate-dose SBRT (48-60 Gy in 4-5 fractions [biologic effective dose=100-132 Gy, α/β=10]) using 4-dimensional planning, online image-guided radiation therapy, and institutional dose constraints. Clinical adverse events (AEs) were graded prospectively at clinical and radiographic follow-up using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Pulmonary function test (PFT) decline was graded as 2 (25%-49.9% decline), 3 (50.0%-74.9% decline), or 4 (≥75.0% decline). Central/peripheral location was assessed retrospectively on planning CT scans. Groups were compared after propensity score matching. Characteristics were compared with χ{sup 2} and 2-tailed t tests, adverse events with χ{sup 2} test-for-trend, and cumulative incidence using competing risks analysis (Gray's test). Results: With 79 central and 79 peripheral tumors matched, no differences in AEs were observed after 17 months median follow-up. Two-year cumulative incidences of grade ≥2 pain, musculoskeletal, pulmonary, and skin AEs were 14%, 5%, 6%, and 10% (central) versus 19%, 10%, 10%, and 3% (peripheral), respectively (P=.31, .38, .70, and .09). Grade ≥2 cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and central nervous system AEs were rare (<1%). Two-year incidences of grade ≥2 clinical AEs (28% vs 25%, P=.79), grade ≥2 PFT decline (36% vs 34%, P=.94), grade ≥3 clinical AEs (3% vs 7%, P=.48), and grade ≥3 PFT decline (0 vs 10%, P=.11) were similar for central versus peripheral

  15. The Comparison of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT andIntensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT for prostate cancer byNCCN risk groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Ricco

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of this study is to compare freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF between SBRT and IMRT for patients with organ confined prostate cancer treated between 2007 through 2012 utilizing the 2015 National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN risk stratification guidelines. A secondary objective is to compare our updated toxicity at last follow up compared to pretreatment with respect to bowel, bladder, sexual functioning, and need for invasive procedures between the two groups.METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 270 consecutive men treated with either SBRT (n=150 or IMRT (120 at a community hospital with two distinct radiation departments and referral patterns. Charts were reviewed for pretreatment and treatment factors including race, age, clinical T stage, initial PSA, Gleason score, use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT, treatment with SBRT vs. IMRT as well as stratification by 2015 NCCN guidelines. Kaplan Meier (KM methodology was used to estimate freedom from biochemical failure, with statistical comparisons accomplished using log rank tests. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to establish independent factors prognostic of biochemical failure. Descriptive statistics were used to describe toxicity graded by a modified RTOG late radiation morbidity scoring system. RESULTS: Significant prognostic factors in univariate analysis for FFBF included NCCN risk groups (p=0.0032, grade (p=0.019, and PSA (p=0.008. There was no significant difference in FFBF between SBRT vs. IMRT (p=0.46 with 6 year actuarial FFBF of 91.9% for SBRT and 88.9% for IMRT. Multivariable analysis revealed only the NCCN risk stratification to be significant predictor for FFBF (p=0.04. 4 year actuarial FFBF by NCCN risk stratification was 100% very low risk, 100% low risk, 96.5% intermediate risk, 94.5% high risk, and 72.7% very high risk. There were no grade 3 gastrointestinal (GI or genitourinary (GU toxicities for either

  16. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the lung cancer and your overall health. Radiation Therapy Radiation is a high-energy X-ray that ... surgery, chemotherapy or both depending upon the circumstances. Radiation therapy works within cancer cells by damaging their ability ...

  17. Volume of Lytic Vertebral Body Metastatic Disease Quantified Using Computed Tomography–Based Image Segmentation Predicts Fracture Risk After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibault, Isabelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de L' Universite de Québec–Université Laval, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Whyne, Cari M. [Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zhou, Stephanie; Campbell, Mikki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Atenafu, Eshetu G. [Department of Biostatistics, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Myrehaug, Sten; Soliman, Hany; Lee, Young K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ebrahimi, Hamid [Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yee, Albert J.M. [Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine a threshold of vertebral body (VB) osteolytic or osteoblastic tumor involvement that would predict vertebral compression fracture (VCF) risk after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), using volumetric image-segmentation software. Methods and Materials: A computational semiautomated skeletal metastasis segmentation process refined in our laboratory was applied to the pretreatment planning CT scan of 100 vertebral segments in 55 patients treated with spine SBRT. Each VB was segmented and the percentage of lytic and/or blastic disease by volume determined. Results: The cumulative incidence of VCF at 3 and 12 months was 14.1% and 17.3%, respectively. The median follow-up was 7.3 months (range, 0.6-67.6 months). In all, 56% of segments were determined lytic, 23% blastic, and 21% mixed, according to clinical radiologic determination. Within these 3 clinical cohorts, the segmentation-determined mean percentages of lytic and blastic tumor were 8.9% and 6.0%, 0.2% and 26.9%, and 3.4% and 15.8% by volume, respectively. On the basis of the entire cohort (n=100), a significant association was observed for the osteolytic percentage measures and the occurrence of VCF (P<.001) but not for the osteoblastic measures. The most significant lytic disease threshold was observed at ≥11.6% (odds ratio 37.4, 95% confidence interval 9.4-148.9). On multivariable analysis, ≥11.6% lytic disease (P<.001), baseline VCF (P<.001), and SBRT with ≥20 Gy per fraction (P=.014) were predictive. Conclusions: Pretreatment lytic VB disease volumetric measures, independent of the blastic component, predict for SBRT-induced VCF. Larger-scale trials evaluating our software are planned to validate the results.

  18. A method of surface marker location optimization for tumor motion estimation in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Bo; Park, Justin C.; Fan, Qiyong; Kahler, Darren; Liu, Chihray; Chen, Yunmei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Accurately localizing lung tumor localization is essential for high-precision radiation therapy techniques such as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Since direct monitoring of tumor motion is not always achievable due to the limitation of imaging modalities for treatment guidance, placement of fiducial markers on the patient’s body surface to act as a surrogate for tumor position prediction is a practical alternative for tracking lung tumor motion during SBRT treatments. In this work, the authors propose an innovative and robust model to solve the multimarker position optimization problem. The model is able to overcome the major drawbacks of the sparse optimization approach (SOA) model. Methods: The principle-component-analysis (PCA) method was employed as the framework to build the authors’ statistical prediction model. The method can be divided into two stages. The first stage is to build the surrogate tumor matrix and calculate its eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors. The second stage is to determine the “best represented” columns of the eigenvector matrix obtained from stage one and subsequently acquire the optimal marker positions as well as numbers. Using 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) and breath hold CT imaging data, the PCA method was compared to the SOA method with respect to calculation time, average prediction accuracy, prediction stability, noise resistance, marker position consistency, and marker distribution. Results: The PCA and SOA methods which were both tested were on all 11 patients for a total of 130 cases including 4DCT and breath-hold CT scenarios. The maximum calculation time for the PCA method was less than 1 s with 64 752 surface points, whereas the average calculation time for the SOA method was over 12 min with 400 surface points. Overall, the tumor center position prediction errors were comparable between the two methods, and all were less than 1.5 mm. However, for the extreme scenarios (breath hold), the

  19. Towards fast online intrafraction replanning for free-breathing stereotactic body radiation therapy with the MR-linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontaxis, C.; Bol, G. H.; Stemkens, B.; Glitzner, M.; Prins, F. M.; Kerkmeijer, L. G. W.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2017-09-01

    The hybrid MRI-radiotherapy machines, like the MR-linac (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) installed at the UMC Utrecht (Utrecht, The Netherlands), will be able to provide real-time patient imaging during treatment. In order to take advantage of the system’s capabilities and enable online adaptive treatments, a new generation of software should be developed, ranging from motion estimation to treatment plan adaptation. In this work we present a proof of principle adaptive pipeline designed for high precision stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) suitable for sites affected by respiratory motion, like renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We utilized our research MRL treatment planning system (MRLTP) to simulate a single fraction 25 Gy free-breathing SBRT treatment for RCC by performing inter-beam replanning for two patients and one volunteer. The simulated pipeline included a combination of (pre-beam) 4D-MRI and (online) 2D cine-MR acquisitions. The 4DMRI was used to generate the mid-position reference volume, while the cine-MRI, via an in-house motion model, provided three-dimensional (3D) deformable vector fields (DVFs) describing the anatomical changes during treatment. During the treatment fraction, at an inter-beam interval, the mid-position volume of the patient was updated and the delivered dose was accurately reconstructed on the underlying motion calculated by the model. Fast online replanning, targeting the latest anatomy and incorporating the previously delivered dose was then simulated with MRLTP. The adaptive treatment was compared to a conventional mid-position SBRT plan with a 3 mm planning target volume margin reconstructed on the same motion trace. We demonstrate that our system produced tighter dose distributions and thus spared the healthy tissue, while delivering more dose to the target. The pipeline was able to account for baseline variations/drifts that occurred during treatment ensuring target coverage at the end of the treatment fraction.

  20. Stereotactic body radiation therapy with or without transarterial chemoembolization for patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma: preliminary analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Ock; Choi, Ihl Bohng; Jang, Hong Seok; Kang, Young Nam; Jang, Ji Sun; Bae, Si Hyun; Yoon, Seung Kew; Chai, Gyu Young; Kang, Ki Mun

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this retrospective study was to evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for small non-resectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and SBRT combined with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for advanced HCC with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). Thirty one patients with HCC who were treated with SBRT were used for the study. We studied 32 HCC lesions, where 23 lesions (22 patients) were treated targeting small non-resectable primary HCC, and 9 lesions (9 patients) targeting PVTT using the Cyberknife. All the 9 patients targeting PVTT received TACE for the advanced HCC. Tumor volume was 3.6–57.3 cc (median, 25.2 cc) and SBRT dose was 30–39 Gy (median, 36 Gy) in 3 fractions for consecutive days for 70–85% of the planned target volume. The median follow up was 10.5 months. The overall response rate was 71.9% [small HCC: 82.6% (19/23), advanced HCC with PVTT: 44.4% (4/9)], with the complete and partial response rates of 31.3% [small HCC: 26.1% (6/23), advanced HCC with PVTT: 11.1% (1/9)], and 50.0% [small HCC: 56.5% (13/23), advanced HCC with PVTT: 33.3% (3/9)], respectively. The median survival period of small HCC and advanced HCC with PVTT patients was 12 months and 8 months, respectively. No patient experienced Grade 4 toxicity. SBRT for small HCC and SBRT combined with TACE for advanced HCC with PVTT showed feasible treatment modalities with minimal side effects in selected patients with primary HCC

  1. A generalized linear-quadratic model for radiosurgery, stereotactic body radiation therapy, and high-dose rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian Z; Huang, Zhibin; Lo, Simon S; Yuh, William T C; Mayr, Nina A

    2010-07-07

    Conventional radiation therapy for cancer usually consists of multiple treatments (called fractions) with low doses of radiation. These dose schemes are planned with the guidance of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, which has been the most prevalent model for designing dose schemes in radiation therapy. The high-dose fractions used in newer advanced radiosurgery, stereotactic radiation therapy, and high-dose rate brachytherapy techniques, however, cannot be accurately calculated with the traditional LQ model. To address this problem, we developed a generalized LQ (gLQ) model that encompasses the entire range of possible dose delivery patterns and derived formulas for special radiotherapy schemes. We show that the gLQ model can naturally derive the traditional LQ model for low-dose and low-dose rate irradiation and the target model for high-dose irradiation as two special cases of gLQ. LQ and gLQ models were compared with published data obtained in vitro from Chinese hamster ovary cells across a wide dose range [0 to approximately 11.5 gray (Gy)] and from animals with dose fractions up to 13.5 Gy. The gLQ model provided consistent interpretation across the full dose range, whereas the LQ model generated parameters that depended on dose range, fitted only data with doses of 3.25 Gy or less, and failed to predict high-dose responses. Therefore, the gLQ model is useful for analyzing experimental radiation response data across wide dose ranges and translating common low-dose clinical experience into high-dose radiotherapy schemes for advanced radiation treatments.

  2. Impact of Pretreatment Tumor Growth Rate on Outcome of Early-Stage Lung Cancer Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atallah, Soha; Cho, B.C. John; Allibhai, Zishan; Taremi, Mojgan; Giuliani, Meredith [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Le, Lisa W. [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brade, Anthony; Sun, Alexander; Bezjak, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hope, Andrew J., E-mail: andrew.hope@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of pretreatment tumor growth rate on outcomes in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A review was conducted on 160 patients with T1-T2N0M0 NSCLC treated with SBRT at single institution. The patient's demographic and clinical data, time interval (t) between diagnostic and planning computed tomography (CT), vital status, disease status, and cause of death were extracted from a prospectively kept database. Differences in gross tumor volume between diagnostic CT (GTV1) and planning CT (GTV2) were recorded, and growth rate was calculated by use of specific growth rate (SGR). Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed for overall survival (OS). Differences between groups were compared with a log-rank test. Multivariate analyses were performed by use of the Cox proportional hazard model with SGR and other relevant clinical factors. Cumulative incidence was calculated for local, regional, and distant failures by use of the competing risk approach and was compared with Gray's test. Results: The median time interval between diagnostic and planning CT was 82 days. The patients were divided into 2 groups, and the median SGR was used as a cut-off. The median survival times were 38.6 and 27.7 months for the low and high SGR groups, respectively (P=.03). Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (P=.01), sex (P=.04), SGR (P=.03), and GTV2 (P=.002) were predictive for OS in multivariable Cox regression analysis and, except sex, were similarly predictive for failure-free survival (FFS). The 3-year cumulative incidences of regional failure were 19.2% and 6.0% for the high and low SGR groups, respectively (P=.047). Conclusion: High SGR was correlated with both poorer OS and FFS in patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with SBRT. If validated, this measurement may be useful in identifying patients most likely to benefit from

  3. SU-E-P-40: Dosimetric Characteristics of Field Aperture Margin Design in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the dosimetric effects of field aperture margin design in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). Methods: Three artificial spherical PTVs, with diameter of 10mm, 20mm and 30mm, were created on CT images of a human body thoracic phantom. Seven non-coplanar isocentric fields were used for treatment planning. For each PTV, treatment plans with margins 0mm, 1mm, 2mm and 3mm were planned. Dosimetric comparison among plans was done considering the following parameters: prescribed isodose line for target coverage, maximum dose, mean dose as well as dose spillages of V80, V50, and V20. Results: Corresponding to aperture margins of 0mm, 1mm,2m and 3mm used in the treatment planning, the percentage of isodose line chosen for dose prescription increases from 65% to 93% for 10mm PTV, 70% to 92% for 20mm PTV, and 75% to 92% for 30mm PTV. The maximum dose decrease accordingly from 155.7% to 109.5% for 10mm PTV, 145% to 111.6% for 20mm PTV, 137% to 112.2% for 30mm PTV. The mean dose decrease from 138.% to 104.4% for 10mm PTV, 122.8% to 106.1% for 20mm PTV, 121.3% to 106% for 30mm PTV. Dose spillages (mm3) increase (V80−2.6 to 4.02, V50−4.55 to 9.3, V20–87.86 to 101.71) for 10 mm PTV, (V80−6.78 to 9.89, V50–13.46 to 20.4, V20-119.16 to 219.1) for 20 mm PTV, (V80–22.01 to 28.59, V50–41.56 to 52.66, V20-532.71 to 551.84) for 30 mm PTV. Conclusion: In SBRT treatment planning, tight field aperture margin requires prescribing dose to lower isodose line that leading to higher dose inhomogeneity and higher mean dose to PTV. Loose margin allows prescribing dose to higher isodose line, therefore improves the dose homogeneity. However, it increases dose spillages. Clinician could try different margins according to the PTV size and location of surrounding critical organs to optimize the dose delivered to the patient.

  4. A Study of volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy in case of multi-target liver cancer using flattening filter free beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Mi Sook; Yoon, In Ha; Hong, Dong Gi; Back, Geum Mun

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has proved its efficacy in several patient populations with primary and metastatic limited tumors. Because SBRT prescription is high dose level than Conventional radiation therapy. SBRT plan is necessary for effective Organ at risk (OAR) protection and sufficient Planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage. In particular, multi-target cases may result excessive doses to OAR and hot spot due to dose overlap. This study evaluate usefulness of Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in dosimetric and technical considerations using Flattening filter free (FFF) beam. The treatment plans for five patients, being treated on TrueBeam STx(Varian™, USA) with VMAT using 10MV FFF beam and Standard conformal radiotherapy (CRT) using 15MV Flattening filter (FF) beam. PTV, liver, duodenum, bowel, spinal cord, esophagus, stomach dose were evaluated using the dose volume histogram(DVH). Conformity index(CI), homogeneity index(HI), Paddick's index(PCI) for the PTV was assessed. Total Monitor unit (MU) and beam on time was assessed. Average value of CI, HI and PCI for PTV was 1.381±0.028, 1.096±0.016, 0.944±0.473 in VMAT and 1.381± 0.042, 1.136±0.042, 1.534±0.465 in CRT respectively. OAR dose in CRT plans evaluated 1.8 times higher than VMAT. Total MU in VMAT evaluated 1.3 times increase than CRT. Average beam on time was 6.8 minute in VMAT and 21.3 minute in CRT respectively. OAR dose in CRT plans evaluated 1.8 times higher than VMAT. Total MU in VMAT evaluated 1.3 times increase than CRT. Average beam on time was 6.8 minute in VMAT and 21.3 minute in CRT. VMAT for SBRT in multi-target liver cancer using FFF beam is effective treatment techniqe in dosimetric and technical considerations. VMAT decrease intra-fraction error due to treatment time shortening using high dose rate of FFF beam

  5. A Study of volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy in case of multi-target liver cancer using flattening filter free beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Mi Sook; Yoon, In Ha; Hong, Dong Gi; Back, Geum Mun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, ASAN Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has proved its efficacy in several patient populations with primary and metastatic limited tumors. Because SBRT prescription is high dose level than Conventional radiation therapy. SBRT plan is necessary for effective Organ at risk (OAR) protection and sufficient Planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage. In particular, multi-target cases may result excessive doses to OAR and hot spot due to dose overlap. This study evaluate usefulness of Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in dosimetric and technical considerations using Flattening filter free (FFF) beam. The treatment plans for five patients, being treated on TrueBeam STx(Varian™, USA) with VMAT using 10MV FFF beam and Standard conformal radiotherapy (CRT) using 15MV Flattening filter (FF) beam. PTV, liver, duodenum, bowel, spinal cord, esophagus, stomach dose were evaluated using the dose volume histogram(DVH). Conformity index(CI), homogeneity index(HI), Paddick's index(PCI) for the PTV was assessed. Total Monitor unit (MU) and beam on time was assessed. Average value of CI, HI and PCI for PTV was 1.381±0.028, 1.096±0.016, 0.944±0.473 in VMAT and 1.381± 0.042, 1.136±0.042, 1.534±0.465 in CRT respectively. OAR dose in CRT plans evaluated 1.8 times higher than VMAT. Total MU in VMAT evaluated 1.3 times increase than CRT. Average beam on time was 6.8 minute in VMAT and 21.3 minute in CRT respectively. OAR dose in CRT plans evaluated 1.8 times higher than VMAT. Total MU in VMAT evaluated 1.3 times increase than CRT. Average beam on time was 6.8 minute in VMAT and 21.3 minute in CRT. VMAT for SBRT in multi-target liver cancer using FFF beam is effective treatment techniqe in dosimetric and technical considerations. VMAT decrease intra-fraction error due to treatment time shortening using high dose rate of FFF beam.

  6. Simple Factors Associated With Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of the Thorax: A Pooled Analysis of 88 Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, GRU Cancer Center/Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia (United States); Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Yorke, Ellen D. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Li, Ling [Department of Radiation Oncology, GRU Cancer Center/Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia (United States); Department of Shanghai Cancer Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Das, Shiva [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado (United States); Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, New York (United States); Campbell, Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, GRU Cancer Center/Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia (United States); Xue, Jinyu [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center at Cooper, Camden, New Jersey (United States); Jackson, Andrew [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Grimm, Jimm [Bott Cancer Center, Holy Redeemer Hospital, Meadowbrook, Pennsylvania (United States); Milano, Michael T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); and others

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To study the risk factors for radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of the thorax. Methods and Materials: Published studies on lung toxicity in patients with early-stage non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or metastatic lung tumors treated with SBRT were pooled and analyzed. The primary endpoint was RILT, including pneumonitis and fibrosis. Data of RILT and risk factors were extracted from each study, and rates of grade 2 to 5 (G2+) and grade 3 to 5 (G3+) RILT were computed. Patient, tumor, and dosimetric factors were analyzed for their correlation with RILT. Results: Eighty-eight studies (7752 patients) that reported RILT incidence were eligible. The pooled rates of G2+ and G3+ RILT from all 88 studies were 9.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.15-11.4) and 1.8% (95% CI: 1.3-2.5), respectively. The median of median tumor sizes was 2.3 (range, 1.4-4.1) cm. Among the factors analyzed, older patient age (P=.044) and larger tumor size (the greatest diameter) were significantly correlated with higher rates of G2+ (P=.049) and G3+ RILT (P=.001). Patients with stage IA versus stage IB NSCLC had significantly lower risks of G2+ RILT (8.3% vs 17.1%, odds ratio = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.29-0.64, P<.0001). Among studies that provided detailed dosimetric data, the pooled analysis demonstrated a significantly higher mean lung dose (MLD) (P=.027) and V20 (P=.019) in patients with G2+ RILT than in those with grade 0 to 1 RILT. Conclusions: The overall rate of RILT is relatively low after thoracic SBRT. Older age and larger tumor size are significant adverse risk factors for RILT. Lung dosimetry, specifically lung V20 and MLD, also significantly affect RILT risk.

  7. Involved Node Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Aznar, Marianne C; Vogelius, Ivan R

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The involved node radiation therapy (INRT) strategy was introduced for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) to reduce the risk of late effects. With INRT, only the originally involved lymph nodes are irradiated. We present treatment outcome in a retrospective analysis using this strategy...... to 36 Gy). Patients attended regular follow-up visits until 5 years after therapy. RESULTS: The 4-year freedom from disease progression was 96.4% (95% confidence interval: 92.4%-100.4%), median follow-up of 50 months (range: 4-71 months). Three relapses occurred: 2 within the previous radiation field......, and 1 in a previously uninvolved region. The 4-year overall survival was 94% (95% confidence interval: 88.8%-99.1%), median follow-up of 58 months (range: 4-91 months). Early radiation therapy toxicity was limited to grade 1 (23.4%) and grade 2 (13.8%). During follow-up, 8 patients died, none from HL, 7...

  8. Radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide a uniquely comprehensive source of information on the entire field of radiation therapy physics. The very significant advances in imaging, computational, and accelerator technologies receive full consideration, as do such topics as the dosimetry of radiolabeled antibodies and dose calculation models. The scope of the book and the expertise of the authors make it essential reading for interested physicians and physicists and for radiation dosimetrists.

  9. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for abdominal targets using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc: Feasibility and clinical preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scorsetti, Marta; Bignardi, Mario; Alongi, Filippo; Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Castiglioni, Simona; Pentimalli, Sara; Tozzi, Angelo (IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano (Italy)), e-mail: pietro.mancosu@humanitas.it; Fogliata, Antonella; Cozzi, Luca (Oncology Inst. of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland))

    2011-05-15

    Purpose. To report early clinical experience in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivered using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc (RA) in patients with primary or metastatic tumours at abdominal sites. Material and methods. Thirty-seven consecutive patients were treated using RA. Of these, 16 had primary or metastatic liver tumours, nine had pancreatic cancer and 12 a nodal metastasis in the retro-peritoneum. Dose prescription varied from 45 to 75 Gy to the Clinical Target Volume in 3 to 6 fractions. The median follow-up was 12 months (6-22). Early local control and toxicity were investigated and reported. Results. Planning objectives on target volumes and organs at risk were met in most cases. Delivery time ranged from 2.8 +- 0.3 to 9.2 +- 2.4 minutes and pre-treatment plan verification resulted in a Gamma Agreement Index from 95.3 +- 3.8 to 98.3 +- 1.7%. At the time of analysis, local control (freedom from progression) at six months, was assessable in 24 of 37 patients and was achieved in 19 patients with a crude rate of 79.2%. Seven patients experienced treatment-related toxicity. Three patients experienced a mild and transient G1 enteritis and two showed a transient G1 liver damage. Two had late toxicity: one developed chronic enteritis causing G1 diarrhoea and G1 abdominal pain and one suffered at three months a G3 gastric bleeding. No patients experienced G4 acute toxicity. Conclusions. SBRT for abdominal targets delivered by means of RA resulted to be feasible with good early clinical results in terms of local control rate and acute toxicity profile. RA allowed to achieve required target coverage as well as to keep within normal tissue dose/volume constraints

  10. Assessment of radiation dermatitis using objective analysis for patients with breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy: influence of body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Kobayashi, Kana; Tsubokura, Takuji; Kodani, Naohiro; Aibe, Norihiro; Ikeno, Hiroyasu; Nishimura, Takuya

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of patient factors on radiation dermatitis for patients with breast cancer who underwent postoperative radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. The study population comprised 87 patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery followed by 50 Gy/25 fractions (median) of radiotherapy with or without boost radiation (10 Gy/5 fractions). We examined their treated and contralateral breast skin color by use of an objective analyzer, and expressed findings as L, a, b ratios by dividing by pre-RT values. Next, we examined correlation between patient factors (age, height, body weight, and body mass index, BMI) and change of L and a values by use of correlation coefficients. Radiation therapy caused changes in a and L ratios (p darkening) decreased by 10 % and reached a minimum value between completion of radiotherapy and 1 month after treatment. Although, age and height did not affect Δ value, body weight and BMI correlated significantly with Δa value (p = 0.0012 and 0.0017) not with ΔL value. Body weight and BMI predict degree of radiation dermatitis, and more reddish dermatitis was observed for heavier patients than for their lighter counterparts.

  11. Modeling Internal Radiation Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Theo E.; Pellegrini, M.; Fred, A.; Filipe, J.; Gamboa, H.

    2011-01-01

    A new technique is described to model (internal) radiation therapy. It is founded on morphological processing, in particular distance transforms. Its formal basis is presented as well as its implementation via the Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) transform. Its use for all variations of internal

  12. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced and Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer Is Effective and Well Tolerated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuong, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Springett, Gregory M. [Gastrointestinal Tumor Program, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Freilich, Jessica M.; Park, Catherine K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Weber, Jill M. [Gastrointestinal Tumor Program, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Mellon, Eric A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Hodul, Pamela J.; Malafa, Mokenge P.; Meredith, Kenneth L. [Gastrointestinal Tumor Program, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Hoffe, Sarah E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Shridhar, Ravi, E-mail: ravi.shridhar@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides high rates of local control (LC) and margin-negative (R0) resections for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC), respectively, with minimal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A single-institution retrospective review was performed for patients with nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer treated with induction chemotherapy followed by SBRT. SBRT was delivered over 5 consecutive fractions using a dose painting technique including 7-10 Gy/fraction to the region of vessel abutment or encasement and 5-6 Gy/fraction to the remainder of the tumor. Restaging scans were performed at 4 weeks, and resectable patients were considered for resection. The primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Seventy-three patients were evaluated, with a median follow-up time of 10.5 months. Median doses of 35 Gy and 25 Gy were delivered to the region of vessel involvement and the remainder of the tumor, respectively. Thirty-two BRPC patients (56.1%) underwent surgery, with 31 undergoing an R0 resection (96.9%). The median OS, 1-year OS, median PFS, and 1-year PFS for BRPC versus LAPC patients was 16.4 months versus 15 months, 72.2% versus 68.1%, 9.7 versus 9.8 months, and 42.8% versus 41%, respectively (all P>.10). BRPC patients who underwent R0 resection had improved median OS (19.3 vs 12.3 months; P=.03), 1-year OS (84.2% vs 58.3%; P=.03), and 1-year PFS (56.5% vs 25.0%; P<.0001), respectively, compared with all nonsurgical patients. The 1-year LC in nonsurgical patients was 81%. We did not observe acute grade ≥3 toxicity, and late grade ≥3 toxicity was minimal (5.3%). Conclusions: SBRT safely facilitates margin-negative resection in patients with BRPC pancreatic cancer while maintaining a high rate of LC in unresectable patients. These data support the expanded implementation of SBRT for pancreatic cancer.

  13. Current perspectives of radiation therapy. History of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itami, Jun

    2011-01-01

    More than 100 years have passed since the discovery of X-Strahlen by Roentgen. The history of radiation therapy has evolved under mutual stimulating relationships of the external beam radiation therapy by X-ray tubes and accelerators, and the internal radiation therapy employing radium and other radionuclides. The currently employed technologies in radiation therapy have its origin already till nineteen sixties and the development of physics and engineering have realized the original concept. (author)

  14. Hope for progress after 40 years of futility? Novel approaches in the treatment of advanced stage III and IV non-small-cell-lung cancer: Stereotactic body radiation therapy, mediastinal lymphadenectomy, and novel systemic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Simon Fung Fee; Warren, Graham W; Singh, Anurag K

    2012-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a leading cause of cancer mortality. The majority of patients present with advanced (stage III-IV) disease. Such patients are treated with a variety of therapies including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Despite decades of work, however, overall survival in this group has been resistant to any substantial improvement. This review briefly details the evolution to the current standard of care for advanced NSCLC, advances in systemic therapy, and novel techniques (stereotactic body radiation therapy [SBRT], and transcervical extended mediastinal lymphadenectomy [TEMLA] or video-assisted mediastinal lymphadenectomy [VAMLA]) that have been used in localized NSCLC. The utility of these techniques in advanced stage therapy and potential methods of combining these novel techniques with systemic therapy to improve survival are discussed.

  15. MO-F-BRCD-01: Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Updates on Clinical, Biological, and Physics/QA:SBRT (Part 1): Biological and Clinical Updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, P

    2012-06-01

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) is an important form of cancer therapy with increasingly broad application across a spectrum of tumor types in primary and metastatic settings. In this presentation the radiation biology, clinical experience from various trials, and cautionary updates on normal tissue tolerances will be presented. The effective radiobiology of SBRT and hypofractionated courses of therapy has become more evident with the increasing reports of retrospective clinical outcomes and prospective clinical trial results. Current open multi-institutional national cooperative trials will be reviewed. Accumulating clinical experiences are yielding new insights into practical aspects of tumor and normal tissue responses to high dose per fraction treatment. Indeed, SBRT has produced profound tumoricidal and ablative effects, however there is potential for grave toxicity and this demands that clinicians be knowledgeable regarding normal tissue tolerances for various hypofractionated courses. As a final note, the technology associated with SBRT has evolved remarkably in the last decade, and procedures that originally required hours to plan, with cumbersome quality assurance methods, arduous set-up times, and long protracted deliveries can now be performed in ever shorter time periods. Given these technology improvements and recognizing the great palliative potential of hypofractionated radiation therapy to relieve cancer symptoms quickly and efficiently, a new strategy to deliver SBRT in a single session called STAT RAD is presented for discussion. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Radiation Therapy for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make sure they are safe to use during radiation therapy. • Eat a balanced diet. If food tastes funny ... melanoma.org Skin Cancer Foundation www.skincancer.org Radiation Therapy Answers www.rtanswers.org LEARNING ABOUT CLINICAL TRIALS ...

  17. Advances in radiation therapy dosimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Paliwal, Bhudatt; Tewatia, Dinesh

    2009-01-01

    During the last decade, there has been an explosion of new radiation therapy planning and delivery tools. We went through a rapid transition from conventional three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments, and additional new techniques for motion-adaptive radiation therapy are being introduced. These advances push the frontiers in our effort to provide better patient care; and with the addition of IMRT, temporal dimensions are ma...

  18. The expanding role of stereotactic body radiation therapy in oligometastatic solid tumors: What do we know and where are we going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Julian C; Salama, Joseph K

    2017-01-01

    The spectrum hypothesis posits that there are distinct clinical states of metastatic progression. Early data suggest that aggressive treatment of more biologically indolent metastatic disease, characterized by metastases limited in number and destination organ, may offer an opportunity to alter the disease course, potentially allowing for longer survival, delay of systemic therapy, or even cure. The development of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has opened new avenues for the treatment of oligometastatic disease. Early data support the use of SBRT for treating oligometastases in a number of organs, with promising rates of treated metastasis control and overall survival. Ongoing investigation is required to definitively establish benefit, determine the appropriate treatment regimen, refine patient selection, and incorporate SBRT with systemic therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Cardiac effects of radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuohinen, Suvi; Turpeinen, Anu; Skyttä, Tanja; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa

    2015-01-01

    Because of increased life-expentancy cancer patients having undergone radiation therapy nowadays live longer, and late-appearing adverse effects are therefore playing a more significant role. Radiation therapy given to the chest is known to approximately double the risk of heart disease, the cumulative total radiation dose being the most important risk-increasing factor. The most significant adverse effects appear only years after the treatment. The mortality from late manifestations reduces the total benefit of radiation therapy. Patients with radiation therapy due to a cancer of the left breast or Hodgkin's lymphoma are particularly susceptible to cardiac effects. A safe radiation dose is not known.

  20. Radiation therapy for digestive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piedbois, P.; Levy, E.; Thirion, P.; Martin, L.; Calitchi, E.; Otmezguine, Y.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    This brief review of radiation therapy of digestive tumors in 1994 seeks to provide practical answers to the most commonly asked questions: What is the place of radiation therapy versus chemotherapy for the treatment of these patients ? What are the approved indications of radiation therapy and which avenues of research are being explored ? Radiation therapy is used in over two-thirds of patients referred to an oncology department for a gastrointestinal tract tumor. The main indications are reviewed: cancer of the rectum and anal canal and, to a lesser extent, cancer of the esophagus and pancreas. The main focuses of current research include radiation therapy-chemotherapy combinations, intraoperative radiation therapy, and radiation therapy of hepatobiliary tumors. (authors). 23 refs., 1 fig

  1. Survey of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Japan by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Narita, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Onishi, Hiroshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To recognize the current status of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in Japan, using a nationwide survey conducted by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group. Methods and Materials: The questionnaire was sent by mail to 117 institutions. Ninety-four institutions (80%) responded by the end of November 2005. Fifty-three institutions indicated that they have already started SBRT, and 38 institutions had been reimbursed by insurance. Results: A total of 1111 patients with histologically confirmed lung cancer were treated. Among these patients, 637 had T1N0M0 and 272 had T2N0M0 lung cancer. Metastatic lung cancer was found in 702 and histologically unconfirmed lung tumor in 291 patients. Primary liver cancer was found in 207 and metastatic liver cancer in 76 patients. The most frequent schedule used for primary lung cancer was 48Gy in 4 fractions at 22 institutions (52%), followed by 50Gy in 5 fractions at 11 institutions (26%) and 60Gy in 8 fractions at 4 institutions (10%). The tendency was the same for metastatic lung cancer. The average number of personnel involved in SBRT was 1.8 radiation oncologists, including 1.1 certified radiation oncologists, 2.8 technologists, 0.7 nurses, and 0.6 certified quality assurance personnel and 0.3 physicists. The most frequent amount of time for treatment planning was 61-120min, for quality assurance was 50-60min, and for treatment was 30min. There were 14 (0.6% of all cases) reported Grade 5 complications: 11 cases of radiation pneumonitis, 2 cases of hemoptysis, and 1 case of radiation esophagitis. Conclusion: The current status of SBRT in Japan was surveyed.

  2. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Single Fraction of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Compared With Single Fraction of External Beam Radiation Therapy for Palliation of Vertebral Bone Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hayeon, E-mail: kimh2@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Rajagopalan, Malolan S.; Beriwal, Sushil; Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Smith, Kenneth J. [Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been proposed for the palliation of painful vertebral bone metastases because higher radiation doses may result in superior and more durable pain control. A phase III clinical trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0631) comparing single fraction SBRT with single fraction external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in palliative treatment of painful vertebral bone metastases is now ongoing. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis to compare these strategies. Methods and Materials: A Markov model, using a 1-month cycle over a lifetime horizon, was developed to compare the cost-effectiveness of SBRT (16 or 18 Gy in 1 fraction) with that of 8 Gy in 1 fraction of EBRT. Transition probabilities, quality of life utilities, and costs associated with SBRT and EBRT were captured in the model. Costs were based on Medicare reimbursement in 2014. Strategies were compared using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), and effectiveness was measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). To account for uncertainty, 1-way, 2-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Strategies were evaluated with a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $100,000 per QALY gained. Results: Base case pain relief after the treatment was assumed as 20% higher in SBRT. Base case treatment costs for SBRT and EBRT were $9000 and $1087, respectively. In the base case analysis, SBRT resulted in an ICER of $124,552 per QALY gained. In 1-way sensitivity analyses, results were most sensitive to variation of the utility of unrelieved pain; the utility of relieved pain after initial treatment and median survival were also sensitive to variation. If median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT cost <$100,000 per QALY gained. Conclusion: SBRT for palliation of vertebral bone metastases is not cost-effective compared with EBRT at a $100,000 per QALY gained WTP threshold. However, if median survival is ≥11 months, SBRT costs ≤$100

  3. Nonsurgical treatment for cancer using radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogi, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    The number of people who are dying from cancer has been increasing in association with population aging. Radiation therapy is now one of the three major cancer treatment methods, along with surgery and chemotherapy. People used to consider radiation therapy only as a ''noninvasive cancer treatment''; however, with the ceaseless effort by medical experts and corporations, different radiation therapy types and techniques including the latest technical advances have come out one after another, and the improvements in radiation therapies have provided treatments that are not only less traumatizing to patients but also as effective and therapeutic as surgery in certain body regions. The importance of radiation therapy has become and will become even greater in the society with more elderly cancer patients who do not have the physical strength to undergo surgery. In this article, the history of radiation therapy, rapidly developed high-precision radiation therapy techniques, and unsolved issues are discussed, and then, ''MHI vero4DRT'', which is the high-precision image-guided radiation therapy equipment developed for solving such issues, is introduced. (author)

  4. Technical advances in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sause, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    Substantial advances have been made in radiation therapy. Many of these advances can be applied in most radiation therapy departments without expensive improvements in equipment. Changes in radiation fractionation, chemotherapeutic sensitization, intraoperative radiation, and interstitial implants can be performed with experience and improved physician training in most medium-sized departments. Advances that require investments in expensive equipment such as particle radiation and hyperthermia will need to be evaluated at designated treatment centers. 106 references

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Can Be Used Safely to Boost Residual Disease in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feddock, Jonathan, E-mail: jmfedd0@uky.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Arnold, Susanne M. [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Shelton, Brent J. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Sinha, Partha; Conrad, Gary [Department of Radiology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Chen, Li [Department of Biostatistics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Rinehart, John [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); McGarry, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a prospective, single-institution study evaluating the feasibility of conventional chemoradiation (CRT) followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as a means of dose escalation for patients with stage II-III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with residual disease. Methods and Materials: Patients without metastatic disease and with radiologic evidence of limited residual disease (≤5 cm) within the site of the primary tumor and good or complete nodal responses after standard CRT to a target dose of 60 Gy were considered eligible. The SBRT boost was done to achieve a total combined dose biological equivalent dose >100 Gy to the residual primary tumor, consisting of 10 Gy × 2 fractions (20 Gy total) for peripheral tumors, and 6.5 Gy × 3 fractions (19.5 Gy total) for medial tumors using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0813 definitions. The primary endpoint was the development of grade ≥3 radiation pneumonitis (RP). Results: After a median follow-up of 13 months, 4 patients developed acute grade 3 RP, and 1 (2.9%) developed late and persistent grade 3 RP. No patients developed grade 4 or 5 RP. Mean lung dose, V2.5, V5, V10, and V20 values were calculated for the SBRT boost, and none were found to significantly predict for RP. Only advancing age (P=.0147), previous smoking status (P=.0505), and high CRT mean lung dose (P=.0295) were significantly associated with RP development. At the time of analysis, the actuarial local control rate at the primary tumor site was 82.9%, with only 6 patients demonstrating recurrence. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based SBRT for dose escalation of limited residual NSCLC after definitive CRT was feasible and did not increase the risk for toxicity above that for standard radiation therapy.

  6. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, where the mortality rate of prostate cancer is lower than in Western countries, radical prostatectomy or hormonal therapy has been applied more frequently than radiation therapy. However, the number of patients with prostate cancer has been increasing recently and the importance of radiation therapy has rapidly been recognized. Although there have been no randomized trials, results from several institutions in Western countries suggest that similar results of cancer control are achieved with either radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. For higher-risk cases, conformal high-dose therapy or adjuvant hormonal therapy is more appropriate. In this article, the results of radiation therapy for prostate cancer were reviewed, with a view to the appropriate choice of therapy in Japan. (author)

  7. Smart Radiation Therapy Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Boateng, Francis; Kumar, Rajiv; Irvine, Darrell J; Formenti, Silvia; Ngoma, Twalib; Herskind, Carsten; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Hildenbrand, Georg Lars; Hausmann, Michael; Wenz, Frederik; Hesser, Juergen

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a crucial component of cancer care, used in the treatment of over 50% of cancer patients. Patients undergoing image guided RT or brachytherapy routinely have inert RT biomaterials implanted into their tumors. The single function of these RT biomaterials is to ensure geometric accuracy during treatment. Recent studies have proposed that the inert biomaterials could be upgraded to "smart" RT biomaterials, designed to do more than 1 function. Such smart biomaterials include next-generation fiducial markers, brachytherapy spacers, and balloon applicators, designed to respond to stimuli and perform additional desirable functions like controlled delivery of therapy-enhancing payloads directly into the tumor subvolume while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. More broadly, smart RT biomaterials may include functionalized nanoparticles that can be activated to boost RT efficacy. This work reviews the rationale for smart RT biomaterials, the state of the art in this emerging cross-disciplinary research area, challenges and opportunities for further research and development, and a purview of potential clinical applications. Applications covered include using smart RT biomaterials for boosting cancer therapy with minimal side effects, combining RT with immunotherapy or chemotherapy, reducing treatment time or health care costs, and other incipient applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of 3D printing techniques: Toward patient specific quality assurance spine-shaped phantom for stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Joo; Lee, Seu-Ran; Lee, Min-Young; Sohn, Jason W; Yun, Hyong Geon; Choi, Joon Yong; Jeon, Sang Won; Suh, Tae Suk

    2017-01-01

    Development and comparison of spine-shaped phantoms generated by two different 3D-printing technologies, digital light processing (DLP) and Polyjet has been purposed to utilize in patient-specific quality assurance (QA) of stereotactic body radiation treatment. The developed 3D-printed spine QA phantom consisted of an acrylic body phantom and a 3D-printed spine shaped object. DLP and Polyjet 3D printers using a high-density acrylic polymer were employed to produce spine-shaped phantoms based on CT images. Image fusion was performed to evaluate the reproducibility of our phantom, and the Hounsfield units (HUs) were measured based on each CT image. Two different intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans based on both CT phantom image sets from the two printed spine-shaped phantoms with acrylic body phantoms were designed to deliver 16 Gy dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and were compared for target coverage and normal organ-sparing. Image fusion demonstrated good reproducibility of the developed phantom. The HU values of the DLP- and Polyjet-printed spine vertebrae differed by 54.3 on average. The PTV Dmax dose for the DLP-generated phantom was about 1.488 Gy higher than that for the Polyjet-generated phantom. The organs at risk received a lower dose for the 3D printed spine-shaped phantom image using the DLP technique than for the phantom image using the Polyjet technique. Despite using the same material for printing the spine-shaped phantom, these phantoms generated by different 3D printing techniques, DLP and Polyjet, showed different HU values and these differently appearing HU values according to the printing technique could be an extra consideration for developing the 3D printed spine-shaped phantom depending on the patient's age and the density of the spinal bone. Therefore, the 3D printing technique and materials should be carefully chosen by taking into account the condition of the patient in order to accurately produce 3D printed patient-specific QA

  9. Characterization of 3D printing techniques: Toward patient specific quality assurance spine-shaped phantom for stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Joo Kim

    Full Text Available Development and comparison of spine-shaped phantoms generated by two different 3D-printing technologies, digital light processing (DLP and Polyjet has been purposed to utilize in patient-specific quality assurance (QA of stereotactic body radiation treatment. The developed 3D-printed spine QA phantom consisted of an acrylic body phantom and a 3D-printed spine shaped object. DLP and Polyjet 3D printers using a high-density acrylic polymer were employed to produce spine-shaped phantoms based on CT images. Image fusion was performed to evaluate the reproducibility of our phantom, and the Hounsfield units (HUs were measured based on each CT image. Two different intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans based on both CT phantom image sets from the two printed spine-shaped phantoms with acrylic body phantoms were designed to deliver 16 Gy dose to the planning target volume (PTV and were compared for target coverage and normal organ-sparing. Image fusion demonstrated good reproducibility of the developed phantom. The HU values of the DLP- and Polyjet-printed spine vertebrae differed by 54.3 on average. The PTV Dmax dose for the DLP-generated phantom was about 1.488 Gy higher than that for the Polyjet-generated phantom. The organs at risk received a lower dose for the 3D printed spine-shaped phantom image using the DLP technique than for the phantom image using the Polyjet technique. Despite using the same material for printing the spine-shaped phantom, these phantoms generated by different 3D printing techniques, DLP and Polyjet, showed different HU values and these differently appearing HU values according to the printing technique could be an extra consideration for developing the 3D printed spine-shaped phantom depending on the patient's age and the density of the spinal bone. Therefore, the 3D printing technique and materials should be carefully chosen by taking into account the condition of the patient in order to accurately produce 3D printed

  10. Radiation Therapy: Professions in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... measurements of radiation beam characteristics and do other safety tests on a regular basis. Therapeutic medical physicists have doctorates or master's degrees and have completed four years of college, two to four years of graduate school and typically one to two years of clinical ...

  11. Urethrogram-directed Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer in Patients with Contraindications to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ima ePaydar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-directed stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT has been established as a safe and effective treatment for prostate cancer. For patients with contraindications to MRI, CT-urethrogram is an alternative imaging approach to identify the location of the prostatic apex to guide treatment. This study sought to evaluate the safety of urethrogram-directed SBRT for prostate cancer.Methods: Between February 2009 and January 2014, 31 men with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated definitively with urethrogram-directed SBRT with or without supplemental intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT at Georgetown University Hospital. SBRT was delivered either as a primary treatment of 35-36.25 Gray (Gy in 5 fractions or as a boost of 19.5 Gy in 3 fractions followed by supplemental conventionally fractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (45-50.4 Gy. Toxicities were recorded and scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAE v.4.0.Results: The median patient age was 70 years with a median prostate volume of 38 cc. The median follow-up was 3.7 years. The patients were elderly (Median age = 70, and comorbidities were common (Carlson Comorbidity Index > 2 in 36%. 71% of patients utilized alpha agonists prior to treatment, and 9.7% had prior procedures for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. The 3-year actuarial incidence rates of > Grade 3 GU toxicity and > Grade 2 GI toxicity were 3.2% and 9.7%, respectively. There were no Grade 4 or 5 toxicities.Conclusions: MRI is the preferred imaging modality to guide prostate SBRT treatment. However, urethrogram-directed SBRT is a safe alternative for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer who are unable to undergo MRI.

  12. The physics of radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Faiz M

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Khan's classic textbook on radiation oncology physics is now in its thoroughly revised and updated Fourth Edition. It provides the entire radiation therapy team—radiation oncologists, medical physicists, dosimetrists, and radiation therapists—with a thorough understanding of the physics and practical clinical applications of advanced radiation therapy technologies, including 3D-CRT, stereotactic radiotherapy, HDR, IMRT, IGRT, and proton beam therapy. These technologies are discussed along with the physical concepts underlying treatment planning, treatment delivery, and dosimetry. This Fourth Edition includes brand-new chapters on image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and proton beam therapy. Other chapters have been revised to incorporate the most recent developments in the field. This edition also features more than 100 full-color illustrations throughout.

  13. The Impact of Tumor Size on Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allibhai, Zishan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); Taremi, Mojgan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stronach Regional Cancer Centre, Newmarket (Canada); Bezjak, Andrea; Brade, Anthony; Hope, Andrew J.; Sun, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); Cho, B.C. John, E-mail: john.cho@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) offers excellent control rates. Most published series deal mainly with small (usually <4 cm), peripheral, solitary tumors. Larger tumors are associated with poorer outcomes (ie, lower control rates, higher toxicity) when treated with conventional RT. It is unclear whether SBRT is sufficiently potent to control these larger tumors. We therefore evaluated and examined the influence of tumor size on treatment outcomes after SBRT. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and October 2010, 185 medically inoperable patients with early (T1-T2N0M0) NSCLC were treated on a prospective research ethics board-approved single-institution protocol. Prescription doses were risk-adapted based on tumor size and location. Follow-up included prospective assessment of toxicity (as per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and serial computed tomography scans. Patterns of failure, toxicity, and survival outcomes were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method, and the significance of tumor size (diameter, volume) with respect to patient, treatment, and tumor factors was tested. Results: Median follow-up was 15.2 months. Tumor size was not associated with local failure but was associated with regional failure (P=.011) and distant failure (P=.021). Poorer overall survival (P=.001), disease-free survival (P=.001), and cause-specific survival (P=.005) were also significantly associated with tumor size (with tumor volume more significant than diameter). Gross tumor volume and planning target volume were significantly associated with grade 2 or worse radiation pneumonitis. However, overall rates of grade ≥3 pneumonitis were low and not significantly affected by tumor or target size. Conclusions: Currently employed stereotactic body radiation therapy dose regimens can provide safe effective local therapy even for larger solitary NSCLC tumors (up to 5.7 cm

  14. Is robotic arm stereotactic body radiation therapy “virtual high dose ratebrachytherapy” for prostate cancer? An analysis of comparative effectiveness using published data [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaorsky, Nicholas George; Hurwitz, Mark D; Dicker, Adam P; Showalter, Timothy N; Den, Robert B

    2015-05-01

    High-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) monotherapy and robotic arm (i.e., CyberKnife) stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are emerging technologies that have become popular treatment options for prostate cancer. Proponents of both HDR-BT monotherapy and robotic arm SBRT claim that these modalities are as efficacious as intensity-modulated radiation therapy in treating prostate cancer. Moreover, proponents of robotic arm SBRT believe it is more effective than HDR-BT monotherapy because SBRT is non-invasive, touting it as 'virtual HDR-BT.' We perform a comparative effective analysis of the two technologies. The tumor control rates and toxicities of HDR-BT monotherapy and robotic arm SBRT are promising. However, at present, it would be inappropriate to state that HDR-BT monotherapy and robotic arm SBRT are as efficacious or effective as other treatment modalities for prostate cancer, which have stronger foundations of evidence. Studies reporting on these technologies have relatively short follow-up time, few patients and are largely retrospective.

  15. Basic physics of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selman, J.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the following chapter headings: simple mathematics gradiation therapy; matter and energy; the nature of radiation;reactions between radiation and matter; x-ray production and control; high-energy therapy units and particle accelerators; quantity of x rays and γ rays; x-ray quality; dosage in x-ray and γ-ray therapy; therapy planning; radioactivity and nuclear physics; implant therapy with radium, radon, and artificial radionuclides; surface therapy with β particles; medical use of radionuclides; radiobiology; radiotherapy with heavy particles; and protection in radiotherapy-health physics

  16. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for treatment of adrenal gland metastases from non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holy, Richard; Piroth, Marc; Pinkawa, Michael; Eble, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    Metastatic disease from a non-small cell lung cancer to the adrenal gland is common, and systemic treatment is the most frequent therapeutic option. Nevertheless, in patients suffering from an isolated adrenal metastasis, a survival benefit could be achieved after surgical resection. Stereotactic body radiation treatment (SBRT) increase local tumor control and could be an alternative option. We present our initial institutional experiences with SBRT for adrenal gland metastases. Between July 2002 and September 2009, 18 patients with a non-small cell lung cancer and adrenal metastasis received SBRT. An isolated adrenal metastasis was diagnosed in 13 patients, while 5 patients with multiple metastatic lesions had SBRT due to back pain. Depending on treatment intent and target size, the dose/fraction concept varied from 5 x 4 Gy to 5 x 8 Gy. Dose was given with an isotropic convergent beam technique to a median maximum dose of 132% to the target's central part. The mean clinical (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) was 89 cm³ (5-260 cm³) and 176 cm³ (20-422 cm³). A median progression-free survival time (PFS) of 4.2 months was obtained for the entire patient group, with a markedly increased PFS of 12 months in 13 patients suffering from an isolated metastasis of the adrenal gland. After a median follow-up of 21 months, 10 of 13 patients (77%) with isolated adrenal metastasis achieved local control. In these patients, median overall survival (OS) was 23 months. SBRT is a feasible and safe technique for lung cancer patients with adrenal gland metastasis. In patients with an isolated adrenal metastasis median OS of 23 months was excellent and comparable to data after surgical removal, but noninvasive. Acute side effects were mild.

  17. Benchmark Credentialing Results for NRG-BR001: The First National Cancer Institute-Sponsored Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Multiple Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hallaq, Hania A., E-mail: halhallaq@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Salama, Joseph K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Lowenstein, Jessica R. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group (IROC) Houston, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McNulty, Susan; Galvin, James M. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group (IROC) PHILADELPHIA RT, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Followill, David S. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group (IROC) Houston, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Pisansky, Thomas M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Winter, Kathryn A. [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); White, Julia R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Xiao, Ying [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group (IROC) PHILADELPHIA RT, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Matuszak, Martha M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The NRG-BR001 trial is the first National Cancer Institute–sponsored trial to treat multiple (range 2-4) extracranial metastases with stereotactic body radiation therapy. Benchmark credentialing is required to ensure adherence to this complex protocol, in particular, for metastases in close proximity. The present report summarizes the dosimetric results and approval rates. Methods and Materials: The benchmark used anonymized data from a patient with bilateral adrenal metastases, separated by <5 cm of normal tissue. Because the planning target volume (PTV) overlaps with organs at risk (OARs), institutions must use the planning priority guidelines to balance PTV coverage (45 Gy in 3 fractions) against OAR sparing. Submitted plans were processed by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core and assessed by the protocol co-chairs by comparing the doses to targets, OARs, and conformity metrics using nonparametric tests. Results: Of 63 benchmarks submitted through October 2015, 94% were approved, with 51% approved at the first attempt. Most used volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) (78%), a single plan for both PTVs (90%), and prioritized the PTV over the stomach (75%). The median dose to 95% of the volume was 44.8 ± 1.0 Gy and 44.9 ± 1.0 Gy for the right and left PTV, respectively. The median dose to 0.03 cm{sup 3} was 14.2 ± 2.2 Gy to the spinal cord and 46.5 ± 3.1 Gy to the stomach. Plans that spared the stomach significantly reduced the dose to the left PTV and stomach. Conformity metrics were significantly better for single plans that simultaneously treated both PTVs with VMAT, intensity modulated radiation therapy, or 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy compared with separate plans. No significant differences existed in the dose at 2 cm from the PTVs. Conclusions: Although most plans used VMAT, the range of conformity and dose falloff was large. The decision to prioritize either OARs or PTV coverage varied considerably, suggesting that

  18. Radiation therapy in palliative care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Hitoshi; Nishitani, Hiromu

    2005-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a valuable treatment for palliation of local symptoms with consistently high response rates in the relief and control of bone pain, neurological symptom, obstructive symptoms, and tumor hemorrhage. Over than 80% of patients who developed bone metastasis and superior vena cava syndrome obtained symptom relief by radiation therapy. Radiation therapy is also well established as an effective treatment for brain metastasis, improving symptoms and preventing progressive neurological deficits, and recently stereotactic irradiation had became a alternative treatment of surgery for small metastatic brain tumors. Both radiation therapy and surgery are effective in the initial treatment of malignant spinal cord compression syndrome, and no advantages of surgery over radiation therapy has been demonstrated in published series when patients have a previously conformed diagnosis of malignant disease and no evidence of vertebral collapse. The outcome of treatment depends primarily upon the speed of diagnosis and neurological status at initiation of treatment. It is very important to start radiation therapy before patient become non-ambulant. Low irradiation dose and short treatment period of palliative radiation therapy can minimize disruption and acute morbidity for the patients with advanced cancer with enabling control of symptoms and palliative radiation therapy is applicable to the patient even in poor general condition. (author)

  19. Stereotactic body radiation therapy via helical tomotherapy to replace brachytherapy for brachytherapy-unsuitable cervical cancer patients – a preliminary result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh CH

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chen-Hsi Hsieh,1–3 Hui-Ju Tien,1 Sheng-Mou Hsiao,4 Ming-Chow Wei,4 Wen-Yih Wu,4 Hsu-Dong Sun,4 Li-Ying Wang,5 Yen-Ping Hsieh,6 Yu-Jen Chen,3,7–9 Pei-Wei Shueng1,101Department of Radiation Oncology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Medicine, 3Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 5School and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Department of Senior Citizen Service Management, National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan; 7Department of Radiation Oncology, 8Department of Medical Research, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 9Graduate Institute of Sport Coaching Science, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan; 10Department of Radiation Oncology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, TaiwanAim: To review the experience and to evaluate the results of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT via helical tomotherapy (HT, for the treatment of brachytherapy-unsuitable cervical cancer.Methods: Between September 1, 2008 to January 31, 2012, nine cervical cancer patients unsuitable for brachytherapy were enrolled. All of the patients received definitive whole pelvic radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, followed by SBRT via HT.Results: The actuarial locoregional control rate at 3 years was 78%. The mean biological equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions of the tumor, rectum, bladder, and intestines was 76.0 ± 7.3, 73.8 ± 13.2, 70.5 ± 10.0, and 43.1 ± 7.1, respectively. Only two had residual tumors after treatment, and the others were tumor-free. Two patients experienced grade 3 acute toxicity: one had diarrhea; and another experienced thrombocytopenia. There were no grade 3 or 4 subacute toxicities. Three patients suffered from manageable rectal bleeding in

  20. A rapid and systemic complete response to stereotactic body radiation therapy and pembrolizumab in a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guozhu; Gu, Di; Zhang, Lanfang; Chen, Shijun; Wu, Dehua

    2017-08-03

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of local tumor would induce an abscopal effect that has been observed in several kinds of human cancers; one important mechanism may involve the improved activation of the host immune system. The immune checkpoint inhibitor can overcome immune tolerance and enhance the activation of antitumor T cells. The combined treatment of SBRT and checkpoint inhibitor may represent a new promising therapeutic approach. Herein, we reported a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treated with concurrent SBRT and anti-PD-1 antibody, pembrolizumab, by which the patient achieved an amazingly systemic complete response in only 2.2 months after starting treatment. This case report indicates that the advanced RCC may benefit from the combining treatment of local SBRT and PD-1 inhibitor and provide a useful paradigm worthy of establishing a clinical trial for patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.

  1. SU-E-J-31: Monitor Interfractional Variation of Tumor Respiratory Motion Using 4D KV Conebeam Computed Tomography for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, A; Prior, P; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 4DCT has been widely used to generate internal tumor volume (ITV) for a lung tumor for treatment planning. However, lung tumors may show different respiratory motion on the treatment day. The purpose of this study is to evaluate 4D KV conebeam computed tomography (CBCT) for monitoring tumor interfractional motion variation between simulation and each fraction of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods: 4D KV CBCT was acquired with the Elekta XVI system. The accuracy of 4D KV CBCT for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) was tested with a dynamic thorax motion phantom (CIRS, Virginia) with a linear amplitude of 2 cm. In addition, an adult anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson, Rando) with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters embedded at the center and periphery of a slab of solid water was used to measure the dose of 4D KV CBCT and to compare it with the dose with 3D KV CBCT. The image registration was performed by aligning\\ each phase images of 4D KV CBCT to the planning images and the final couch shifts were calculated as a mean of all these individual shifts along each direction.A workflow was established based on these quality assurance tests for lung cancer patients. Results: 4D KV CBCT does not increase imaging dose in comparison to 3D KV CBCT. Acquisition of 4D KV CBCT is 4 minutes as compared to 2 minutes for 3D KV CBCT. Most of patients showed a small daily variation of tumor respiratory motion about 2 mm. However, some patients may have more than 5 mm variations of tumor respiratory motion. Conclusion: The radiation dose does not increase with 4D KV CBCT. 4D KV CBCT is a useful tool for monitoring interfractional variations of tumor respiratory motion before SBRT of lung cancer patients.

  2. Noncoplanar Beam Angle Class Solutions to Replace Time-Consuming Patient-Specific Beam Angle Optimization in Robotic Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Linda; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Aluwini, Shafak; Heijmen, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate development of a recipe for the creation of a beam angle class solution (CS) for noncoplanar prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy to replace time-consuming individualized beam angle selection (iBAS) without significant loss in plan quality, using the in-house “Erasmus-iCycle” optimizer for fully automated beam profile optimization and iBAS. Methods and Materials: For 30 patients, Erasmus-iCycle was first used to generate 15-, 20-, and 25-beam iBAS plans for a CyberKnife equipped with a multileaf collimator. With these plans, 6 recipes for creation of beam angle CSs were investigated. Plans of 10 patients were used to create CSs based on the recipes, and the other 20 to independently test them. For these tests, Erasmus-iCycle was also used to generate intensity modulated radiation therapy plans for the fixed CS beam setups. Results: Of the tested recipes for CS creation, only 1 resulted in 15-, 20-, and 25-beam noncoplanar CSs without plan deterioration compared with iBAS. For the patient group, mean differences in rectum D 1cc , V 60GyEq , V 40GyEq , and D mean between 25-beam CS plans and 25-beam plans generated with iBAS were 0.2 ± 0.4 Gy, 0.1% ± 0.2%, 0.2% ± 0.3%, and 0.1 ± 0.2 Gy, respectively. Differences between 15- and 20-beam CS and iBAS plans were also negligible. Plan quality for CS plans relative to iBAS plans was also preserved when narrower planning target volume margins were arranged and when planning target volume dose inhomogeneity was decreased. Using a CS instead of iBAS reduced the computation time by a factor of 14 to 25, mainly depending on beam number, without loss in plan quality. Conclusions: A recipe for creation of robust beam angle CSs for robotic prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy has been developed. Compared with iBAS, computation times decreased by a factor 14 to 25. The use of a CS may avoid long planning times without losses in plan quality

  3. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma at the abdominal lymph nodes or postoperative stump including pancreatic stump and other stump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng XL

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Xian-Liang Zeng,* Huan-Huan Wang,* Mao-Bin Meng, Zhi-Qiang Wu, Yong-Chun Song, Hong-Qing Zhuang, Dong Qian, Feng-Tong Li, Lu-Jun Zhao, Zhi-Yong Yuan, Ping Wang Department of Radiation Oncology, Tianjin’s Clinical Research Center for Cancer and Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background and aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT using CyberKnife in the treatment of patients with recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma at the abdominal lymph node or stump after surgery. Patients and methods: Between October 1, 2006 and May 1, 2015, patients with recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma at the abdominal lymph node or stump after surgery were enrolled and treated with SBRT at our hospital. The primary end point was local control rate after SBRT. Secondary end points were overall survival, time to symptom alleviation, and toxicity, assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results: Twenty-four patients with 24 lesions (17 abdominal lymph nodes and seven stumps were treated with SBRT, of which five patients presented with abdominal lymph nodes and synchronous metastases in the liver and lung. The 6-, 12-, and 24-month actuarial local control rates were 95.2%, 83.8%, and 62.1%, respectively. For the entire cohort, the median overall survival from diagnosis and SBRT was 28.9 and 12.2 months, respectively. Symptom alleviation was observed in eleven of 14 patients (78.6% within a median of 8 days (range, 1–14 days after SBRT. Nine patients (37.5% experienced Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 grade 1–2 acute toxicities; one patient experienced grade 3 acute toxicity due to thrombocytopenia. Conclusion: SBRT is a safe and

  4. Noncoplanar Beam Angle Class Solutions to Replace Time-Consuming Patient-Specific Beam Angle Optimization in Robotic Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Linda, E-mail: l.rossi@erasmusmc.nl; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Aluwini, Shafak; Heijmen, Ben

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate development of a recipe for the creation of a beam angle class solution (CS) for noncoplanar prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy to replace time-consuming individualized beam angle selection (iBAS) without significant loss in plan quality, using the in-house “Erasmus-iCycle” optimizer for fully automated beam profile optimization and iBAS. Methods and Materials: For 30 patients, Erasmus-iCycle was first used to generate 15-, 20-, and 25-beam iBAS plans for a CyberKnife equipped with a multileaf collimator. With these plans, 6 recipes for creation of beam angle CSs were investigated. Plans of 10 patients were used to create CSs based on the recipes, and the other 20 to independently test them. For these tests, Erasmus-iCycle was also used to generate intensity modulated radiation therapy plans for the fixed CS beam setups. Results: Of the tested recipes for CS creation, only 1 resulted in 15-, 20-, and 25-beam noncoplanar CSs without plan deterioration compared with iBAS. For the patient group, mean differences in rectum D{sub 1cc}, V{sub 60GyEq}, V{sub 40GyEq}, and D{sub mean} between 25-beam CS plans and 25-beam plans generated with iBAS were 0.2 ± 0.4 Gy, 0.1% ± 0.2%, 0.2% ± 0.3%, and 0.1 ± 0.2 Gy, respectively. Differences between 15- and 20-beam CS and iBAS plans were also negligible. Plan quality for CS plans relative to iBAS plans was also preserved when narrower planning target volume margins were arranged and when planning target volume dose inhomogeneity was decreased. Using a CS instead of iBAS reduced the computation time by a factor of 14 to 25, mainly depending on beam number, without loss in plan quality. Conclusions: A recipe for creation of robust beam angle CSs for robotic prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy has been developed. Compared with iBAS, computation times decreased by a factor 14 to 25. The use of a CS may avoid long planning times without losses in plan quality.

  5. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy for elderly patients with stage IIB–IV nonsmall cell lung cancer who are ineligible for or refuse other treatment modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam SD

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sana D Karam,1 Zachary D Horne,2 Robert L Hong,2 Don McRae,2 David Duhamel,3 Nadim M Nasr2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver, CO, USA; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, 3Department of Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine, Virginia Hospital Center, Arlington, VA, USA Objective: In elderly patients with stage IIB–IV nonsmall cell lung cancer who cannot tolerate chemotherapy, conventionally fractionated radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. We present our experience with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT in the treatment of this patient population. Methods: Thirty-three patients with a median age of 80 years treated with fractionated SBRT were retrospectively analyzed. Most patients were smokers and had preexisting lung disease and either refused treatment or were ineligible. A median prescribed dose of 40 Gy was delivered to the prescription isodose line over a median of five treatments. The majority of patients (70% did not receive chemotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 9 months (range: 4–40 months, the actuarial median overall survival (OS and progression-free survival were 12 months for both. One year actuarial survival outcomes were 75%, 58%, 44%, and 48% for local control, regional control, progression-free survival, and OS, respectively. Increased volume of disease was a statistically significant predictor of worse OS. Three patients developed a grade 1 cough that peaked 3 weeks after treatment and resolved within 1 month. One patient developed grade 1 tracheal mucositis and three patients developed grade 1 pneumonitis. Both resolved 6 weeks after treatment. Three patients died within the first month of treatment, but the cause of death did not appear to be related to the treatment. Conclusion: Hypofractionated SBRT is a relatively safe and convenient treatment option for elderly patients with inoperable stage IIB–IV nonsmall cell lung cancer. However, given the small

  6. SU-E-T-642: Safety Procedures for Error Elimination in Cyberknife Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A; Alkafi, A; Al-Najjar, W; Moftah, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Cyberknife system is used for providing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) hypofractionation scheme. The whole treatment delivery is based on live imaging of the patient. The minor error made at any stage may bring severe radiation injury to the patient or damage to the system itself. Several safety measures were taken to make the system safer. Methods: The radiation treatment provided thru a 6MV linac attached to Kuka robot (Cyberknife G4, Accuray Inc. Sunnyvale, CA, USA). Several possible errors were identified related to patient alignment, treatment planning, dose delivery and physics quality assurance. During dose delivery, manual and visual checks were introduced to confirm pre and intra-treatment imaging to reduce possible errors. One additional step was introduced to confirm that software tracking-tools had worked correctly with highest possible confidence level. Robotic head move in different orientations over and around the patient body, the rigidity of linac-head cover and other accessories was checked periodically. The vender was alerted when a tiny or bigger piece of equipment needed additional interlocked support. Results: As of our experience treating 525 patients on Cyberknife during the last four years, we saw on and off technical issues. During image acquisition, it was made essential to follow the site-specific imaging protocols. Adequate anatomy was contoured to document the respective doses. Followed by auto-segmentation, manual tweaking was performed on every structure. The calculation box was enclosing the whole image during the final calculation. Every plan was evaluated on slice-by slice basis. To review the whole process, a check list was maintained during the physics 2nd-check. Conclusion: The implementation of manual and visual additional checks introduced along with automated checks for confirmation was found promising in terms of reduction in systematic errors and making the system

  7. Stereotactic radiation therapy combined with immunotherapy: augmenting the role of radiation in local and systemic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabi, Andrew B; Tran, Phuoc T; Lim, Michael; Drake, Charles G; Deweese, Theodore L

    2015-05-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy are two contemporary radiation modalities that can treat tumors in any area of the body using highly focused radiation. Recently, immunotherapy has established itself as a viable and powerful anticancer treatment. In this review we detail the rationale supporting a combination of immunotherapy and stereotactic radiation. Additionally, we discuss the evidence for the immune stimulatory effects of focused radiation and the role that radiation may play in enhancing the systemic treatment effects of immunotherapy.

  8. Optimization of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsubo, Masaaki

    1990-01-01

    In radiotherapy, dose optimization is to give adequate dose uniformly over target volume and minimize the dose to normal and adjacent critical organs. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze dose distribution in detail. This paper presents a method for quantitatively assessing treatment planning by analysis of dose distribution. For this purpose, several parameters were introduced, such as D T, min (minimum target absorbed dose), NUF (nonuniformity factor), volume rate of damaged lung and spinal cord, R T/T (ratio of target volume to treatment volume), LE (local efficiency), integral dose, etc. And some criteria were made using these parameters, and were applied to evaluate various plans in external beam radiation therapy for lung and esophagus cancer. In these parameters, NUF was especially useful to obtain three-dimensional dose information of target volume, and value of NUF was in agreement with the information provided by dose volume histogram. AP-PA parallel opposed fields technique was inferior in D T,min and NUF. In lung cancer, there was no spinal cord injury in oblique parallel opposed fields technique, and this technique is particularly useful when target volume is in posterior. In these two techniques, R T/T was small and hot spots were frequently observed. R T/T was largest in oblique wedged two-fields technique, but this technique was inferior in D T, min and NUF. About D T, min and NUF, four fields technique was the best, but in this technique spinal cord complication often occurred in case that target volume was in the middle. In moving beam technique (360deg rotation or arc), integral dose is large, and the more target volume is in posterior, the more often spinal cord complication occurs. In esophageal cancer, three fields technique was the best to avoid spinal cord injury. It seems that this method is very useful for optimization in radiation treatment planning. (author)

  9. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Radiofrequency Ablation With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Systemic Review and Pooled Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Nan; Shedden, Kerby; Zheng, Xiangpeng; Kong, Feng-Ming Spring

    2016-08-01

    To performed a systematic review and pooled analysis to compare clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. A comprehensive literature search for published trials from 2001 to 2012 was undertaken. Pooled analyses were performed to obtain overall survival (OS) and local tumor control rates (LCRs) and adverse events. Regression analysis was conducted considering each study's proportions of stage IA and age. Thirty-one studies on SBRT (2767 patients) and 13 studies on RFA (328 patients) were eligible. The LCR (95% confidence interval) at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years for RFA was 77% (70%-85%), 48% (37%-58%), 55% (47%-62%), and 42% (30%-54%) respectively, which was significantly lower than that for SBRT: 97% (96%-98%), 92% (91%-94%), 88% (86%-90%), and 86% (85%-88%) (P.05). The most frequent complication of RFA was pneumothorax, occurring in 31% of patients, whereas that for SBRT (grade ≥3) was radiation pneumonitis, occurring in 2% of patients. Compared with RFA, SBRT seems to have a higher LCR but similar OS. More studies with larger sample sizes are warranted to validate such findings. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Preliminary Results of a Phase 1 Dose-Escalation Trial for Early-Stage Breast Cancer Using 5-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Partial-Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Asal, E-mail: asal.rahimi@utsouthwestern.edu [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Thomas, Kimberly; Spangler, Ann [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Rao, Roshni; Leitch, Marilyn; Wooldridge, Rachel; Rivers, Aeisha [Department of Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Seiler, Stephen [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Albuquerque, Kevin; Stevenson, Stella [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Goudreau, Sally [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Garwood, Dan [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Haley, Barbara [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Euhus, David [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Heinzerling, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Levine Cancer Institute, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Ding, Chuxiong [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Gao, Ang; Ahn, Chul [Department of Statistics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Timmerman, Robert [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability of a dose-escalated 5-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy for partial-breast irradiation (S-PBI) in treating early-stage breast cancer after partial mastectomy; the primary objective was to escalate dose utilizing a robotic stereotactic radiation system treating the lumpectomy cavity without exceeding the maximum tolerated dose. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive nonlobular epithelial histologies and stage 0, I, or II, with tumor size <3 cm. Patients and physicians completed baseline and subsequent cosmesis outcome questionnaires. Starting dose was 30 Gy in 5 fractions and was escalated by 2.5 Gy total for each cohort to 40 Gy. Results: In all, 75 patients were enrolled, with a median age of 62 years. Median follow-up for 5 cohorts was 49.9, 42.5, 25.7, 20.3, and 13.5 months, respectively. Only 3 grade 3 toxicities were experienced. There was 1 dose-limiting toxicity in the overall cohort. Ten patients experienced palpable fat necrosis (4 of which were symptomatic). Physicians scored cosmesis as excellent or good in 95.9%, 100%, 96.7%, and 100% at baseline and 6, 12, and 24 months after S-PBI, whereas patients scored the same periods as 86.5%, 97.1%, 95.1%, and 95.3%, respectively. The disagreement rates between MDs and patients during those periods were 9.4%, 2.9%, 1.6%, and 4.7%, respectively. There have been no recurrences or distant metastases. Conclusion: Dose was escalated to the target dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions, with the occurrence of only 1 dose-limiting toxicity. Patients felt cosmetic results improved within the first year after surgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy. Our results show minimal toxicity with excellent cosmesis; however, further follow-up is warranted in future studies. This study is the first to show the safety, tolerability, feasibility, and cosmesis results of a 5-fraction dose-escalated S-PBI treatment for

  11. Preliminary Results of a Phase 1 Dose-Escalation Trial for Early-Stage Breast Cancer Using 5-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Partial-Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimi, Asal; Thomas, Kimberly; Spangler, Ann; Rao, Roshni; Leitch, Marilyn; Wooldridge, Rachel; Rivers, Aeisha; Seiler, Stephen; Albuquerque, Kevin; Stevenson, Stella; Goudreau, Sally; Garwood, Dan; Haley, Barbara; Euhus, David; Heinzerling, John; Ding, Chuxiong; Gao, Ang; Ahn, Chul; Timmerman, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability of a dose-escalated 5-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy for partial-breast irradiation (S-PBI) in treating early-stage breast cancer after partial mastectomy; the primary objective was to escalate dose utilizing a robotic stereotactic radiation system treating the lumpectomy cavity without exceeding the maximum tolerated dose. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive nonlobular epithelial histologies and stage 0, I, or II, with tumor size <3 cm. Patients and physicians completed baseline and subsequent cosmesis outcome questionnaires. Starting dose was 30 Gy in 5 fractions and was escalated by 2.5 Gy total for each cohort to 40 Gy. Results: In all, 75 patients were enrolled, with a median age of 62 years. Median follow-up for 5 cohorts was 49.9, 42.5, 25.7, 20.3, and 13.5 months, respectively. Only 3 grade 3 toxicities were experienced. There was 1 dose-limiting toxicity in the overall cohort. Ten patients experienced palpable fat necrosis (4 of which were symptomatic). Physicians scored cosmesis as excellent or good in 95.9%, 100%, 96.7%, and 100% at baseline and 6, 12, and 24 months after S-PBI, whereas patients scored the same periods as 86.5%, 97.1%, 95.1%, and 95.3%, respectively. The disagreement rates between MDs and patients during those periods were 9.4%, 2.9%, 1.6%, and 4.7%, respectively. There have been no recurrences or distant metastases. Conclusion: Dose was escalated to the target dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions, with the occurrence of only 1 dose-limiting toxicity. Patients felt cosmetic results improved within the first year after surgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy. Our results show minimal toxicity with excellent cosmesis; however, further follow-up is warranted in future studies. This study is the first to show the safety, tolerability, feasibility, and cosmesis results of a 5-fraction dose-escalated S-PBI treatment for

  12. The role of cytokines in development of hematological and immune disorders at radiation therapy for uterine body cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorochan, P.P.; Prokhach, N.E.; Gromakova, Yi.A.; Krugova, Yi.M.; Sukhyin, V.S.

    2013-01-01

    The changes in hematological and immune parameters in patients with uterine body cancer were analyzed by the stages of the combined treatment. The rol of cytokines in the development of hematologic and immune disorders was assessed

  13. Radiation therapy in the neonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littman, P.; D'Angio, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used in the management of children with cancer, but neonatal neoplasms are rare. Newborns represent 1.5% of the children with malignant diseases in the Tumor Registry at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia over the last 30 years. Thus, occasionally the pediatrics radiation therapist must consider treating the very young infant. The specific radiation effects on growth and development must be weighed in reaching a therapeutic decision. All children are vulnerable to the late effects of radiation therapy, but the neonates may be more susceptible because of the immaturity of important organs such as the brain, lung, liver, kidney, and bone. In general, radiation therapy, should be avoided during the first several weeks of life because of the potential increased sensitivity of the liver and kidneys during that period. If radiation therapy is used at all during infancy, the benefits must be weighed against the possibility of significant late effects. Increasing knowledge of pediatric neoplasms has shown that some tumors (such as mesoblastic nephroma) require no treatment except for surgical excision; and other tumors, such as Stage IV-S neuroblastoma, may require very little treatment. In those tumors that require radiation therapy, the use of chemotherapy may allow reduction of the radiation dose. Furthermore, alterations of time-dose-fractionation schemes and careful attention to tumor volume with the use of special techniques, such as ''shrinking fields,'' may decrease the late adverse effects of treatment

  14. Low incidence of new biochemical and clinical hypogonadism following hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT monotherapy for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahira John

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CyberKnife is an appealing delivery system for hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT because of its ability to deliver highly conformal radiation therapy to moving targets. This conformity is achieved via 100s of non-coplanar radiation beams, which could potentially increase transitory testicular irradiation and result in post-therapy hypogonadism. We report on our early experience with CyberKnife SBRT for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients and assess the rate of inducing biochemical and clinical hypogonadism. Methods Twenty-six patients were treated with hypofractionated SBRT to a dose of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. All patients had histologically confirmed low- to intermediate-risk prostate adenocarcinoma (clinical stage ≤ T2b, Gleason score ≤ 7, PSA ≤ 20 ng/ml. PSA and total testosterone levels were obtained pre-treatment, 1 month post-treatment and every 3 months thereafter, for 1 year. Biochemical hypogonadism was defined as a total serum testosterone level below 8 nmol/L. Urinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria v3; quality of life was assessed using the American Urological Association Symptom Score, Sexual Health Inventory for Men and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires. Results All 26 patients completed the treatment with a median 15 months (range, 13-19 months follow-up. Median pre-treatment PSA was 5.75 ng/ml (range, 2.3-10.3 ng/ml, and a decrease to a median of 0.7 ng/ml (range, 0.2-1.8 ng/ml was observed by one year post-treatment. The median pre-treatment total serum testosterone level was 13.81 nmol/L (range, 5.55 - 39.87 nmol/L. Post-treatment testosterone levels slowly decreased with the median value at one year follow-up of 10.53 nmol/L, significantly lower than the pre-treatment value (p Conclusions Hypofractionated SBRT offers the radiobiological benefit of a large fraction size and is well-tolerated by

  15. No Clinically Significant Changes in Pulmonary Function Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early- Stage Peripheral Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Analysis of RTOG 0236

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanic, Sinisa, E-mail: sinisa.stanic@carle.com [Carle Cancer Center and University of Illinois College of Medicine, Urbana, Illinois (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Timmerman, Robert D. [University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, Texas (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Barriger, Robert B. [Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Bezjak, Andrea [Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate pulmonary function test (PFT) results and arterial blood gas changes (complete PFT) following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to see whether baseline PFT correlates with lung toxicity and overall survival in medically inoperable patients receiving SBRT for early stage, peripheral, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: During the 2-year follow-up, PFT data were collected for patients with T1-T2N0M0 peripheral NSCLC who received effectively 18 Gy × 3 in a phase 2 North American multicenter study (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] protocol 0236). Pulmonary toxicity was graded by using the RTOG SBRT pulmonary toxicity scale. Paired Wilcoxon signed rank test, logistic regression model, and Kaplan-Meier method were used for statistical analysis. Results: At 2 years, mean percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in the first second and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide declines were 5.8% and 6.3%, respectively, with minimal changes in arterial blood gases and no significant decline in oxygen saturation. Baseline PFT was not predictive of any pulmonary toxicity following SBRT. Whole-lung V5 (the percentage of normal lung tissue receiving 5 Gy), V10, V20, and mean dose to the whole lung were almost identical between patients who developed pneumonitis and patients who were pneumonitis-free. Poor baseline PFT did not predict decreased overall survival. Patients with poor baseline PFT as the reason for medical inoperability had higher median and overall survival rates than patients with normal baseline PFT values but with cardiac morbidity. Conclusions: Poor baseline PFT did not appear to predict pulmonary toxicity or decreased overall survival after SBRT in this medically inoperable population. Poor baseline PFT alone should not be used to exclude patients with early stage lung cancer from treatment with SBRT.

  16. Hepatic arterial phase and portal venous phase computed tomography for dose calculation of stereotactic body radiation therapy plans in liver cancer: a dosimetric comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianghong; Li, Yan; Jiang, Qingfeng; Sun, Lan; Henderson, Fraser; Wang, Yongsheng; Jiang, Xiaoqin; Li, Guangjun; Chen, Nianyong

    2013-11-09

    To investigate the effect of computed tomography (CT) using hepatic arterial phase (HAP) and portal venous phase (PVP) contrast on dose calculation of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver cancer. Twenty-one patients with liver cancer were studied. HAP, PVP and non-enhanced CTs were performed on subjects scanned in identical positions under active breathing control (ABC). SBRT plans were generated using seven-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (7 F-3D-CRT), seven-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7 F-IMRT) and single-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) based on the PVP CT. Plans were copied to the HAP and non-enhanced CTs. Radiation doses calculated from the three phases of CTs were compared with respect to the planning target volume (PTV) and the organs at risk (OAR) using the Friedman test and the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. SBRT plans calculated from either PVP or HAP CT, including 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT plans, demonstrated significantly lower (p HAP CT and non-enhanced CT were less than 2% and 1% respectively. All mean dose differences between the three phases of CTs for OARs were less than 2%. Our data indicate that though the differences in dose calculation between contrast phases are not clinically relevant, dose underestimation (IE, delivery of higher-than-intended doses) resulting from CT using PVP contrast is larger than that resulting from CT using HAP contrast when compared against doses based upon non-contrast CT in SBRT treatment of liver cancer using VMAT, IMRT or 3D-CRT.

  17. Use of Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Lieu of Intracavitary Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Inoperable Endometrial Neoplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemmerer, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hernandez, Enrique; Ferriss, James S. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Valakh, Vladimir; Miyamoto, Curtis; Li, Shidong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Micaily, Bizhan, E-mail: bizhan.micaily@tuhs.temple.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Retrospective analysis of patients with invasive endometrial neoplasia who were treated with external beam radiation therapy followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost because of the inability to undergo surgery or brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We identified 11 women with stage I-III endometrial cancer with a median age of 78 years that were not candidates for hysterectomy or intracavitary brachytherapy secondary to comorbidities (91%) or refusal (9%). Eight patients were American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I (3 stage IA, 5 stage IB), and 3 patients were AJCC stage III. Patients were treated to a median of 4500 cGy at 180 cGy per fraction followed by SBRT boost (600 cGy per fraction Multiplication-Sign 5). Results: The most common side effect was acute grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity in 73% of patients, with no late toxicities observed. With a median follow-up of 10 months since SBRT, 5 patients (45%) experienced locoregional disease progression, with 3 patients (27%) succumbing to their malignancy. At 12 and 18 months from SBRT, the overall freedom from progression was 68% and 41%, respectively. Overall freedom from progression (FFP) was 100% for all patients with AJCC stage IA endometrial carcinoma, whereas it was 33% for stage IB at 18 months. The overall FFP was 100% for International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology grade 1 disease. The estimated overall survival was 57% at 18 months from diagnosis. Conclusion: In this study, SBRT boost to the intact uterus was feasible, with encouragingly low rates of acute and late toxicity, and favorable disease control in patients with early-stage disease. Additional studies are needed to provide better insight into the best management of these clinically challenging cases.

  18. Hepatic arterial phase and portal venous phase computed tomography for dose calculation of stereotactic body radiation therapy plans in liver cancer: a dosimetric comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Jianghong; Li, Yan; Jiang, Qingfeng; Sun, Lan; Henderson Jr, Fraser; Wang, Yongsheng; Jiang, Xiaoqin; Li, Guangjun; Chen, Nianyong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of computed tomography (CT) using hepatic arterial phase (HAP) and portal venous phase (PVP) contrast on dose calculation of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver cancer. Twenty-one patients with liver cancer were studied. HAP, PVP and non-enhanced CTs were performed on subjects scanned in identical positions under active breathing control (ABC). SBRT plans were generated using seven-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (7 F-3D-CRT), seven-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7 F-IMRT) and single-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) based on the PVP CT. Plans were copied to the HAP and non-enhanced CTs. Radiation doses calculated from the three phases of CTs were compared with respect to the planning target volume (PTV) and the organs at risk (OAR) using the Friedman test and the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. SBRT plans calculated from either PVP or HAP CT, including 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT plans, demonstrated significantly lower (p <0.05) minimum absorbed doses covering 98%, 95%, 50% and 2% of PTV (D98%, D95%, D50% and D2%) than those calculated from non-enhanced CT. The mean differences between PVP or HAP CT and non-enhanced CT were less than 2% and 1% respectively. All mean dose differences between the three phases of CTs for OARs were less than 2%. Our data indicate that though the differences in dose calculation between contrast phases are not clinically relevant, dose underestimation (IE, delivery of higher-than-intended doses) resulting from CT using PVP contrast is larger than that resulting from CT using HAP contrast when compared against doses based upon non-contrast CT in SBRT treatment of liver cancer using VMAT, IMRT or 3D-CRT

  19. Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with some form of gynecologic cancer this year. Cancers of the uterus and cervix are most common gynecologic cancers treated ... detected or removed by surgery. Radiation therapy kills ... of the uterus and cervix, called a hysterectomy. The surgeon may ...

  20. Malignant mesothelioma following radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, J; Mintzer, D; Warhol, M J

    1994-10-01

    Studies of the growing population of long-term survivors of cancer have led to increased recognition of the neoplastic complications of therapy. The causes of secondary malignancies are probably multifactorial, but radiation therapy and chemotherapy have certainly been implicated in the development of posttherapy neoplasia. A case of pleural mesothelioma after successful radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease is described with a review of radiation-associated mesotheliomas reported in the literature. In Hodgkin's disease, patients may receive radiation, chemotherapy, or combined treatment; the most common secondary malignancy is acute nonlymphocytic leukemia while sarcomas are the second most common solid tumors. Although mesothelioma is an uncommon sarcoma, its occurrence has been documented numerous times after exposure to diagnostic or therapeutic radiation.

  1. Incidence and Predictive Factors of Pain Flare After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Secondary Analysis of Phase 1/2 Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Hubert Y.; Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xin S. [Department of Symptom Research, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, USC Norris Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Rhines, Laurence D.; Tatsui, Claudio E. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer, Houston, Texas (United States); Amini, Behrang [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xin A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer, Houston, Texas (United States); Tannir, Nizar M. [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer, Houston, Texas (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer, Houston, Texas (United States); Ghia, Amol J., E-mail: AJGhia@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): To perform a secondary analysis of institutional prospective spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) trials to investigate posttreatment acute pain flare. Methods and Materials: Medical records for enrolled patients were reviewed. Study protocol included baseline and follow-up surveys with pain assessment by Brief Pain Inventory and documentation of pain medications. Patients were considered evaluable for pain flare if clinical note or follow-up survey was completed within 2 weeks of SBRT. Pain flare was defined as a clinical note indicating increased pain at the treated site or survey showing a 2-point increase in worst pain score, a 25% increase in analgesic intake, or the initiation of steroids. Binary logistic regression was used to determine predictive factors for pain flare occurrence. Results: Of the 210 enrolled patients, 195 (93%) were evaluable for pain flare, including 172 (88%) clinically, 135 (69%) by survey, and 112 (57%) by both methods. Of evaluable patients, 61 (31%) had undergone prior surgery, 57 (29%) had received prior radiation, and 34 (17%) took steroids during treatment, mostly for prior conditions. Pain flare was observed in 44 patients (23%). Median time to pain flare was 5 days (range, 0-20 days) after the start of treatment. On multivariate analysis, the only independent factor associated with pain flare was the number of treatment fractions (odds ratio = 0.66, P=.004). Age, sex, performance status, spine location, number of treated vertebrae, prior radiation, prior surgery, primary tumor histology, baseline pain score, and steroid use were not significant. Conclusions: Acute pain flare after spine SBRT is a relatively common event, for which patients should be counseled. Additional study is needed to determine whether prophylactic or symptomatic intervention is preferred.

  2. Incidence and Predictive Factors of Pain Flare After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Secondary Analysis of Phase 1/2 Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Hubert Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Wang, Xin S.; Chang, Eric L.; Rhines, Laurence D.; Tatsui, Claudio E.; Amini, Behrang; Wang, Xin A.; Tannir, Nizar M.; Brown, Paul D.; Ghia, Amol J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To perform a secondary analysis of institutional prospective spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) trials to investigate posttreatment acute pain flare. Methods and Materials: Medical records for enrolled patients were reviewed. Study protocol included baseline and follow-up surveys with pain assessment by Brief Pain Inventory and documentation of pain medications. Patients were considered evaluable for pain flare if clinical note or follow-up survey was completed within 2 weeks of SBRT. Pain flare was defined as a clinical note indicating increased pain at the treated site or survey showing a 2-point increase in worst pain score, a 25% increase in analgesic intake, or the initiation of steroids. Binary logistic regression was used to determine predictive factors for pain flare occurrence. Results: Of the 210 enrolled patients, 195 (93%) were evaluable for pain flare, including 172 (88%) clinically, 135 (69%) by survey, and 112 (57%) by both methods. Of evaluable patients, 61 (31%) had undergone prior surgery, 57 (29%) had received prior radiation, and 34 (17%) took steroids during treatment, mostly for prior conditions. Pain flare was observed in 44 patients (23%). Median time to pain flare was 5 days (range, 0-20 days) after the start of treatment. On multivariate analysis, the only independent factor associated with pain flare was the number of treatment fractions (odds ratio = 0.66, P=.004). Age, sex, performance status, spine location, number of treated vertebrae, prior radiation, prior surgery, primary tumor histology, baseline pain score, and steroid use were not significant. Conclusions: Acute pain flare after spine SBRT is a relatively common event, for which patients should be counseled. Additional study is needed to determine whether prophylactic or symptomatic intervention is preferred

  3. Assessment of efficacy of combined treatment for uterus body cancer with and without preoperative distant radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myikhanovs'kij, O.A.; Slobodyanyuk, O.V.; Skripnyik, L.D.; Krugova, Yi.M.; Shchit, N.M.; Sukhyin, V.S.; Kazmiruk, O.V.

    2006-01-01

    The study involved 298 patients with uterus body cancer (UBC). Radiomodification of pre-operative RT with 5-FU significantly improves the immediate results of treatment in patients with UBC when compared with the patients treated using multimodality treatment without radiomodification. Pre-operative RT without radiomodification is not expedient in patients with UBC

  4. Health-Related Quality of Life After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Results From a Multi-institutional Consortium of Prospective Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Christopher R., E-mail: crking@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Collins, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Fuller, Donald [Genesis Healthcare Partners, San Diego, California (United States); Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kupelian, Patrick; Steinberg, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Katz, Alan [Flushing Radiation Oncology, Flushing, New York (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the early and late health-related quality of life (QOL) outcomes among prostate cancer patients following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Patient self-reported QOL was prospectively measured among 864 patients from phase 2 clinical trials of SBRT for localized prostate cancer. Data from the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) instrument were obtained at baseline and at regular intervals up to 6 years. SBRT delivered a median dose of 36.25 Gy in 4 or 5 fractions. A short course of androgen deprivation therapy was given to 14% of patients. Results: Median follow-up was 3 years and 194 patients remained evaluable at 5 years. A transient decline in the urinary and bowel domains was observed within the first 3 months after SBRT which returned to baseline status or better within 6 months and remained so beyond 5 years. The same pattern was observed among patients with good versus poor baseline function and was independent of the degree of early toxicities. Sexual QOL decline was predominantly observed within the first 9 months, a pattern not altered by the use of androgen deprivation therapy or patient age. Conclusion: Long-term outcome demonstrates that prostate SBRT is well tolerated and has little lasting impact on health-related QOL. A transient and modest decline in urinary and bowel QOL during the first few months after SBRT quickly recovers to baseline levels. With a large number of patients evaluable up to 5 years following SBRT, it is unlikely that unexpected late adverse effects will manifest themselves.

  5. Circumferential or sectored beam arrangements for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of primary lung tumors: Effect on target and normal-structure dose-volume metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Mara W.; Kato, Catherine M.; Carson, Kelly M.P.; Matsunaga, Nathan M.; Arao, Robert F.; Doss, Emily J.; McCracken, Charles L.; Meng, Lu Z.; Chen, Yiyi; Laub, Wolfram U.; Fuss, Martin; Tanyi, James A.

    2013-01-01

    To compare 2 beam arrangements, sectored (beam entry over ipsilateral hemithorax) vs circumferential (beam entry over both ipsilateral and contralateral lungs), for static-gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery techniques with respect to target and organs-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume metrics, as well as treatment delivery efficiency. Data from 60 consecutive patients treated using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) formed the basis of this study. Four treatment plans were generated per data set: IMRT/VMAT plans using sectored (-s) and circumferential (-c) configurations. The prescribed dose (PD) was 60 Gy in 5 fractions to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (maximum PTV dose ∼ 150% PD) for a 6-MV photon beam. Plan conformality, R 50 (ratio of volume circumscribed by the 50% isodose line and the PTV), and D 2 cm (D max at a distance ≥2 cm beyond the PTV) were evaluated. For lungs, mean doses (mean lung dose [MLD]) and percent V 30 /V 20 /V 10 /V 5 Gy were assessed. Spinal cord and esophagus D max and D 5 /D 50 were computed. Chest wall (CW) D max and absolute V 30 /V 20 /V 10 /V 5 Gy were reported. Sectored SBRT planning resulted in significant decrease in contralateral MLD and V 10 /V 5 Gy , as well as contralateral CW D max and V 10 /V 5 Gy (all p max and D 5 /D 50 for the spinal cord with sectored planning did not reach statistical significance for static-gantry IMRT, although VMAT metrics did show a statistically significant decrease (all p 50 significantly improved with IMRT-s/VMAT-c (p 2 cm significantly improved with VMAT-c (p < 0.001). Plan delivery efficiency improved with sectored technique (p < 0.001); mean monitor unit (MU)/cGy of PD decreased from 5.8 ± 1.9 vs 5.3 ± 1.7 (IMRT) and 2.7 ± 0.4 vs 2.4 ± 0.3 (VMAT). The sectored configuration achieves unambiguous dosimetric advantages over circumferential arrangement in terms

  6. Partial breast radiation therapy - external beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinoma of the breast - partial radiation therapy; Partial external beam radiation - breast; Intensity-modulated radiation therapy - breast cancer; IMRT - breast cancer WBRT; Adjuvant partial breast - IMRT; APBI - IMRT; ...

  7. Cancer of the larynx: radiation therapy. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.C.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation therapy is the treatment of choice for a T1 and T2 tumor with normal cord mobility and/or an exophytic lesion. It not only provides excellent control of the disease, but also preserves a good, useful voice in approximately 90 percent of the irradiated patients. For a T2 lesion with impaired cord mobility and/or moderate ulceration, a trial course of radiotherapy is initially given. If the tumor shows good regression and/or a return of normal cord mobility after a dose of 4000 rads, radiation therapy may be continued to a curative dose level, about 6500 rads. Surgery is reserved for treating residual disease six to eight weeks after radiation therapy or for recurrence. A T3 lesion with complete cord fixation and/or deep ulceration with nodes does not respond favorably to radiation therapy, and a planned combination of irradiation and laryngectomy is advised. Disease that extends beyond the larynx, T4, is rarely curable by radiation therapy alone. If the lesion is still operable, a combined approach of radiation and surgery is preferred; if not, palliative radiation therapy is given. Lymph node metastases from laryngeal carcinoma indicate advanced disease and is managed by preoperative irradiation and radical neck dissection. Under a program of therapeutic individualization, two-thirds to three-quarters of patients with cancer of the larynx can be cured by irradiation with preservation of a good, useful voice. In the remainder, the larynx must be sacrificed to save the patient's life. The ultimate control of laryngeal cancer lies in eradicating the extensive primary lesion and metastatic nodes, a common problem in the management of squamous cell carcinoma elsewhere in the body

  8. Radiation Therapy of Pituitary Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Moon Baik; Hong, Seong Eong [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    Radiation treatment results were analyzed in a retrospective analysis of 47 patients with pituitary adenoma treated with radiation alone or combined with surgery from 1974 through 1987 at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology of Kyung Hee University. The 5-year overall survival rates for all patients was 80.4%. Radiation therapy was effective for improving visual symptoms and headache, but could not normalize amenorrhea and galactorrhoea. There was no difference of survival rate between radiation alone and combination with surgery. Prognostic factors such as age, sex, disease type, visual field, headache and surgical treatment were statistically no significant in survival rates of these patients.

  9. Radiation Therapy of Pituitary Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moon Baik; Hong, Seong Eong

    1989-01-01

    Radiation treatment results were analyzed in a retrospective analysis of 47 patients with pituitary adenoma treated with radiation alone or combined with surgery from 1974 through 1987 at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology of Kyung Hee University. The 5-year overall survival rates for all patients was 80.4%. Radiation therapy was effective for improving visual symptoms and headache, but could not normalize amenorrhea and galactorrhoea. There was no difference of survival rate between radiation alone and combination with surgery. Prognostic factors such as age, sex, disease type, visual field, headache and surgical treatment were statistically no significant in survival rates of these patients

  10. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Radiofrequency Ablation With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Systemic Review and Pooled Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Nan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital and Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Shedden, Kerby [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Zheng, Xiangpeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kong, Feng-Ming, E-mail: fskong@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To performed a systematic review and pooled analysis to compare clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive literature search for published trials from 2001 to 2012 was undertaken. Pooled analyses were performed to obtain overall survival (OS) and local tumor control rates (LCRs) and adverse events. Regression analysis was conducted considering each study's proportions of stage IA and age. Results: Thirty-one studies on SBRT (2767 patients) and 13 studies on RFA (328 patients) were eligible. The LCR (95% confidence interval) at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years for RFA was 77% (70%-85%), 48% (37%-58%), 55% (47%-62%), and 42% (30%-54%) respectively, which was significantly lower than that for SBRT: 97% (96%-98%), 92% (91%-94%), 88% (86%-90%), and 86% (85%-88%) (P<.001). These differences remained significant after correcting for stage IA and age (P<.001 at 1 year, 2 years, and 3 years; P=.04 at 5 years). The effect of RFA was not different from that of SBRT on OS (P>.05). The most frequent complication of RFA was pneumothorax, occurring in 31% of patients, whereas that for SBRT (grade ≥3) was radiation pneumonitis, occurring in 2% of patients. Conclusions: Compared with RFA, SBRT seems to have a higher LCR but similar OS. More studies with larger sample sizes are warranted to validate such findings.

  11. Correction for ‘artificial’ electron disequilibrium due to cone-beam CT density errors: implications for on-line adaptive stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disher, Brandon; Hajdok, George; Craig, Jeff; Gaede, Stewart; Battista, Jerry J; Wang, An

    2013-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has rapidly become a clinically useful imaging modality for image-guided radiation therapy. Unfortunately, CBCT images of the thorax are susceptible to artefacts due to scattered photons, beam hardening, lag in data acquisition, and respiratory motion during a slow scan. These limitations cause dose errors when CBCT image data are used directly in dose computations for on-line, dose adaptive radiation therapy (DART). The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of errors in CBCT numbers (HU), and determine the resultant effects on derived tissue density and computed dose accuracy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Planning CT (PCT) images of three lung patients were acquired using a Philips multi-slice helical CT simulator, while CBCT images were obtained with a Varian On-Board Imaging system. To account for erroneous CBCT data, three practical correction techniques were tested: (1) conversion of CBCT numbers to electron density using phantoms, (2) replacement of individual CBCT pixel values with bulk CT numbers, averaged from PCT images for tissue regions, and (3) limited replacement of CBCT lung pixels values (LCT) likely to produce artificial lateral electron disequilibrium. For each corrected CBCT data set, lung SBRT dose distributions were computed for a 6 MV volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique within the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The reference prescription dose was set such that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 54 Gy (i.e. D95). Further, we used the relative depth dose factor as an a priori index to predict the effects of incorrect low tissue density on computed lung dose in regions of severe electron disequilibrium. CT number profiles from co-registered CBCT and PCT patient lung images revealed many reduced lung pixel values in CBCT data, with some pixels corresponding to vacuum (−1000 HU). Similarly, CBCT data in a plastic lung

  12. Radiological differential diagnosis between fibrosis and recurrence after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frakulli, Rezarta; Salvi, Fabrizio; Balestrini, Damiano; Palombarini, Marcella; Akshija, Ilir; Cammelli, Silvia; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Zompatori, Maurizio; Frezza, Giovanni

    2017-12-01

    Parenchymal changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) make differential diagnosis between treatment outcomes and disease recurrence often difficult. The purpose of our study was to identify the radiographic features detectable at computed tomography (CT) scan [high-risk features (HRFs)] that allow enough specificity and sensitivity for early detection of recurrence. We retrospectively evaluated patients who underwent SBRT for inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The median delivered dose performed was 50 Gy in 5 fractions prescribed to 80% isodose. All patients underwent chest CT scan before SBRT and at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 months after, and then annually. Each CT scan was evaluated and benign and HRFs were recorded. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-CT was not used routinely. Forty-five patients were included (34 males, 11 females; median age: 77 years; stage IA: 77.8%, stage IB: 22.2%; median follow-up: 21.7 months). Two year and actuarial local control was 77%. HRFs were identified in 20 patients. The most significant predictor of relapse was an enlarging opacity at 12 months (P2 HRFs.

  13. Potential dosimetric benefits of adaptive tumor tracking over the internal target volume concept for stereotactic body radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karava, Konstantina; Ehrbar, Stefanie; Riesterer, Oliver; Roesch, Johannes; Glatz, Stefan; Klöck, Stephan; Guckenberger, Matthias; Tanadini-Lang, Stephanie

    2017-11-09

    Radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer has two major challenges: (I) the tumor is adjacent to several critical organs and, (II) the mobility of both, the tumor and its surrounding organs at risk (OARs). A treatment planning study simulating stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for pancreatic tumors with both the internal target volume (ITV) concept and the tumor tracking approach was performed. The two respiratory motion-management techniques were compared in terms of doses to the target volume and organs at risk. Two volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans (5 × 5 Gy) were created for each of the 12 previously treated pancreatic cancer patients, one using the ITV concept and one the tumor tracking approach. To better evaluate the overall dose delivered to the moving tumor volume, 4D dose calculations were performed on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scans. The resulting planning target volume (PTV) size for each technique was analyzed. Target and OAR dose parameters were reported and analyzed for both 3D and 4D dose calculation. Tumor motion ranged from 1.3 to 11.2 mm. Tracking led to a reduction of PTV size (max. 39.2%) accompanied with significant better tumor coverage (p<0.05, paired Wilcoxon signed rank test) both in 3D and 4D dose calculations and improved organ at risk sparing. Especially for duodenum, stomach and liver, the mean dose was significantly reduced (p<0.05) with tracking for 3D and 4D dose calculations. By using an adaptive tumor tracking approach for respiratory-induced pancreatic motion management, a significant reduction in PTV size can be achieved, which subsequently facilitates treatment planning, and improves organ dose sparing. The dosimetric benefit of tumor tracking is organ and patient-specific.

  14. Advances in radiation therapy dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paliwal Bhudatt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, there has been an explosion of new radiation therapy planning and delivery tools. We went through a rapid transition from conventional three-dimensional (3D conformal radiation therapy to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT treatments, and additional new techniques for motion-adaptive radiation therapy are being introduced. These advances push the frontiers in our effort to provide better patient care; and with the addition of IMRT, temporal dimensions are major challenges for the radiotherapy patient dosimetry and delivery verification. Advanced techniques are less tolerant to poor implementation than are standard techniques. Mis-administrations are more difficult to detect and can possibly lead to poor outcomes for some patients. Instead of presenting a manual on quality assurance for radiation therapy, this manuscript provides an overview of dosimetry verification tools and a focused discussion on breath holding, respiratory gating and the applications of four-dimensional computed tomography in motion management. Some of the major challenges in the above areas are discussed.

  15. Single-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Sequential Gemcitabine for the Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellenberg, Devin; Kim, Jeff; Christman-Skieller, Claudia; Chun, Carlene L.; Columbo, Laurie Ann; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Kunz, Pamela L.; Van Dam, Jacques; Quon, Andrew; Desser, Terry S.; Norton, Jeffrey; Hsu, Annie; Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Goodman, Karyn A.; Chang, Daniel T.; Koong, Albert C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase II trial evaluated the toxicity, local control, and overall survival in patients treated with sequential gemcitabine and linear accelerator-based single-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were enrolled on this prospective single-institution, institutional review board-approved study. Gemcitabine was administered on Days 1, 8, and 15, and SBRT on Day 29. Gemcitabine was restarted on Day 43 and continued for 3-5 cycles. SBRT of 25 Gy in a single fraction was delivered to the internal target volume with a 2- 3-mm margin using a nine-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique. Respiratory gating was used to account for breathing motion. Follow-up evaluations occurred at 4-6 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and every 3 months after SBRT. Results: All patients completed SBRT and a median of five cycles of chemotherapy. Follow-up for the 2 remaining alive patients was 25.1 and 36.4 months. No acute Grade 3 or greater nonhematologic toxicity was observed. Late Grade 3 or greater toxicities occurred in 1 patient (5%) and consisted of a duodenal perforation (G4). Three patients (15%) developed ulcers (G2) that were medically managed. Overall, median survival was 11.8 months, with 1-year survival of 50% and 2-year survival of 20%. Using serial computed tomography, the freedom from local progression was 94% at 1 year. Conclusion: Linear accelerator-delivered SBRT with sequential gemcitabine resulted in excellent local control of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Future studies will address strategies for reducing long-term duodenal toxicity associated with SBRT.

  16. Evaluation of useful treatment which uses dual-energy when curing lung-cancer patient with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hyeong Jun; Lee, Yeong Gyu; Kim, Yeong Jae; Park, Yeong Gyu [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Catholic University Seoul St Mary' s hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study will evaluate the clinical utility by applying clinical schematic that uses monoenergy or dual energy as according to the location of tumors to the stereotactic radiotherapy to compare the change in actual dose given to the real tumor and the dose that locates adjacent to the tumor. CT images from a total of 10 patients were obtained and the clinical planning were planned based on the volumetric modulated arc therapy on monoenergy and dual energy. To analyze the change factor in the tumor, Conformity Index(CI) and Homogeneity Index(HI) and maximum dose quantity were each calculated and comparing the dose distribution on normal tissues, v{sub 10} and v{sub 5}, first ⁓ fourth ribs closest to the tumor (1st ⁓ 4th Rib), Spinal Cord, Esophagus and Trachea were selected. Also, in order to confirm the accuracy on which the planned dose distribution is really measured, the 2-dimensional ion chamber array was used to measure the dose distribution. As of the tumor factor, CI and HI showed a number close to 1 when the two energies were used. As of the maximum dose, the front chest wall showed 2% and the dorsal tumor showed equivalent value. As of normal tissue, the front chest wall tumors were reduced by 4%, 5% when both energies were used in the adjacent rib and as of trachea, reduced by 11%, 17%. As of the dose in the lung, as of v{sub 10}, it reduced by 1.5%, v{sub 5} by 1%. As of the rear chest wall, when both energies were used, the ribs adjacent to the tumors showed 6%, 1%, 4%, 12% reduction, and in the lung dose distribution, v{sub 10} reduced by 3%, and v{sub 5} reduced by 3.1%. The dose measurement in all energies were in accordance to the results of Gamma Index 3mm/3%. Conclusion : It is considered that rather than using monoenergy, utilizing double energy in the clinical setting can be more effectively applied to the superficial tumors.

  17. 4π Noncoplanar Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Potential to Improve Tumor Control and Late Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rwigema, Jean-Claude M.; Nguyen, Dan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Heron, Dwight E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen, Allen M.; Lee, Percy; Wang, Pin-Chieh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Vargo, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Tenn, Stephen; Steinberg, Michael L.; Kupelian, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential benefit of 4π radiation therapy in recurrent, locally advanced, or metastatic head-and-neck cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven patients with 29 tumors who were treated using SBRT were included. In recurrent disease (n=26), SBRT was delivered with a median 44 Gy (range, 35-44 Gy) in 5 fractions. Three patients with sinonasal mucosal melanoma, metastatic breast cancer, and primary undifferentiated carcinoma received 35 Gy, 22.5 Gy, and 40 Gy in 5 fractions, respectively. Novel 4π treatment plans were created for each patient to meet the objective that 95% of the planning target volume was covered by 100% of the prescription dose. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) and 50% dose spillage volumes were compared against the delivered clinical SBRT plans. Local control (LC), late toxicity, tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability were determined. Results: Using 4π plans, mean/maximum doses to all OARs were reduced by 22% to 89%/10% to 86%. With 4π plans, the 50% dose spillage volume was decreased by 33%. Planning target volume prescription dose escalation by 10 Gy and 20 Gy were achieved while keeping doses to OARs significantly improved or unchanged from clinical plans, except for the carotid artery maximum dose at 20-Gy escalation. At a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 1-41 months), crude LC was 52%. The 2-year LC of 39.2% approximated the predicted mean TCP of 42.2%, which increased to 45.9% with 4π plans. For 10-Gy and 20-Gy dose escalation, 4π plans increased TCP from 80.1% and 88.1% to 85.5% and 91.4%, respectively. The 7.4% rate of grade ≥3 late toxicity was comparable to the predicted 5.6% mean normal tissue complication probability for OARs, which was significantly reduced by 4π planning at the prescribed and escalated doses. Conclusions: 4π plans may allow dose escalation with significant and consistent

  18. Radiation therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nho, Y. J.; Cho, J. G.; Ahn, S. D.; Choi, E. K.; Kim, J. H.; Kang, O. C.; Chang, H. S.

    1997-01-01

    This is a retrospective study to evaluate the results of radiation therapy and prognostic factors influencing the results in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. From October 1989 to May 1996, 56 patients were treated for nasopharyngeal carcinoma at Department of Radiation Oncology. According to stage, patients were distributed as follows: stage I (2), II (13), III (11), IV (30). Twenty-eight patients were treated with radiation therapy and weekly CDDP. After external beam radiotherapy of 60Gy, 46 patients received boost dose with intracavitary radiation and 9 patients with 3D conformal therapy. One patient received boost dose with 2 dimensional photon beam therapy. The tumor dose ranged from 69.4Gy to 86.2Gy with median dose of 74.4Gy. The follow-up period ranged from 5 months to 92 months with a median of 34 months. Forty-seven patients achieved complete response and 8 patients showed partial response. One patient showed minimal response. Patterns of failure were as follows: locoregional recurrence (8) and distant metastasis (18). Among these patients, 2 patients failed locoregionally and distantly, The sites of distant metastasis were bone (8), lung (8) and liver (4). Five years survival rate was 67.2% and 5 years disease-free survival rate was 53.6%. KPS (P=0.005) and response of radiation therapy (P=0.0001) were significant prognostic factors for overall survival. KPS (P=0.02) and response of radiation therapy (P=0.005) were significant prognostic factors for disease-free survival. This retrospective study showed that distant metastasis was the predominant pattern of relapse in nasopharyngeal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy or weekly CDDP did not influence the distant metastasis-free survival. For advanced T stage, 3D conformal therapy provided an improved dose coverage compared to ICR. But further follow-up was needed in patients with 3D conformal therapy to assess the efficacy of this therapy. Development of techniques of radiation therapy to improve locoregional

  19. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Spinal Metastases in the Postoperative Setting: A Secondary Analysis of Mature Phase 1-2 Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Randa; Bishop, Andrew J.; Brownlee, Zachary; Allen, Pamela K.; Settle, Stephen H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, USC Norris Cancer Hospital, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, California (United States); Wang, Xin [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Amini, Behrang [Department of Neuroradiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tannir, Nizar M. [Department of Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tatsui, Claudio; Rhines, Laurence D. [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ghia, Amol J., E-mail: ajghia@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes in patients treated on prospective phase 1-2 protocols with postoperative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and identify the associated prognostic variables. Methods and Materials: Sixty-six patients with 69 tumors were treated with SBRT on prospective phase 1-2 studies for spinal metastases between 2002 and 2010. All patients underwent SBRT after spine surgery, which included laminectomy, vertebrectomy, or a combination of these techniques. Renal cell carcinoma was the most common histology represented (n=35, 53%) followed by sarcomas (n=13, 20%). Thirty-one patients (47%) were treated with prior conventional radiation to the spine (median dose 30 Gy). Patients were followed up with spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies to determine the treated tumor control (TC). Pain and other symptom data were collected prospectively to determine treatment response and toxicity. Results: The median follow-up time was 30 months (range, 1-145 months) for all patients and 75 months for living patients (range, 6-145 months). The actuarial 1-year rate of TC was 85%, adjacent vertebral body control was 85%, and overall survival (OS) was 74% (median 29 months). On multivariate competing-risks analysis, sarcoma histology (subhazard ratio [SHR] = 2.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-5.6, P=.04) and larger preoperative tumor volumes (SHR=1.01, 95% CI 1.0-1.01, P=.006) were significantly associated with worse TC. Karnofsky performance status was the only significant predictor for OS on multivariate analysis. There were no differences in TC between patients treated with different surgical techniques or different preoperative or postoperative Bilsky grades. There were no grade 3 or higher neurologic toxicities. Conclusion: This study represents a large series of prospective data available on patients treated with SBRT in the postoperative setting. The combination of surgery with SBRT can offer patients with metastatic disease

  20. Radiation therapy in pseudotumour haemarthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lal, P.; Biswal, B.M.; Thulkar, S.; Patel, A.K.; Venkatesh, R.; Julka, P.K. [Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India). Departments of Radiation Oncology, Radiodiagnosis and Haematology

    1998-11-01

    Total or partial deficiency of factor VIII and IX in the coagulation cascade leads to haemophilia. Haemophilia affecting weight-bearing joints gives a `pseudotumour` or haemarthrosis-like condition. Surgery and cryoprecipitate infusions have been the treatment for this condition. Radiocolloids and radiation therapy have been used with some benefit. One case of ankle pseudotumour which was treated by low-dose external beam radiation is presented here. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 14 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Radiation therapy in pseudotumour haemarthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, P.; Biswal, B.M.; Thulkar, S.; Patel, A.K.; Venkatesh, R.; Julka, P.K.

    1998-01-01

    Total or partial deficiency of factor VIII and IX in the coagulation cascade leads to haemophilia. Haemophilia affecting weight-bearing joints gives a 'pseudotumour' or haemarthrosis-like condition. Surgery and cryoprecipitate infusions have been the treatment for this condition. Radiocolloids and radiation therapy have been used with some benefit. One case of ankle pseudotumour which was treated by low-dose external beam radiation is presented here. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  2. Drug delivery system and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Tokushi

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the review of radiation therapy, neutron capture therapy (NCT) and drug delivery system for the latter. In cancer radiation therapy, there are problems of body movement like breathing, needless irradiation of normal tissues, difficulty to decide the correct irradiation position and tumor morphology. NCT has advantages to overcome these, and since boron has a big cross section for thermal neutron, NPT uses the reaction 10 B(n, α) 7 Li in the target cancer which previously incorporated the boron-containing drug. During the period 1966-1996, 246 patients were treated with this in Japan and the treatment has been continued thereafter. The tasks for NCT are developments of drug delivery system efficient to deliver the drug into the tumor and of convenient neutron source like the accelerator. (S.I.)

  3. Evaluation of effect of body mass index and weight loss on survival of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Kuo-Ping; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Chang, Ting-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies report body-mass index (BMI) and percent weight loss (WL) to have prognostic significance when treating patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, most of these investigations studied patients treated using different radiotherapeutic techniques. We evaluated the predictive effect of these two nutrition-related measurements on therapeutic outcome in NPC patients who only received intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as part of their total treatment program. We retrospectively studied NPC patients treated with IMRT from January 2006 to February 2012. Cox proportional hazards was used to test the association of pretreatment BMI (<23 kg/m 2 vs. ≥23 kg/m 2 ) and percent weight loss (≥5 % vs. <5 %) during therapy and related survival rates while controlling for various potential confounders. Eighty-one (34 %) of the 238 patients had BMIs ≥23 kg/m 2 at pretreatment and 150 (63 %) had significant (≥5 %) weight loss. Median follow-up time was 41.71 months; median radiotherapy was 7.46 ± 0.77 weeks. Those with BMIs ≥23 kg/m 2 did not have a better 3-year overall survival (p = 0.672), 3-year disease specific survival (p = 0.341), 3-year locoregional free survival (p = 0.281), or 3-year distant metastatic free survival (p = 0.134). Those with significant WL (≥5 %) did not have worse 3-year clinical endpoints, even after stratifying magnitude of weight loss by BMI category. In sensitivity test, the adjusted hazard ratio remained statistically insignificant using different cutoffs for BMIs and percent weight loss. This study found no significant relationship between BMI and percent weight loss on survival of NPC patients receiving IMRT based therapy. Further studies might want to consider other nutrition related factors as prognostic indicators when studying the correlate between malnutrition and survival in this population. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-015-0443-3) contains supplementary material, which

  4. SU-F-P-28: A Method of Maximize the Noncoplanar Beam Orientations and Assure the Beam Delivery Clearance for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J [Presence St. Joseph Medical Ctr., Joliet, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Develop a method to maximize the noncoplanar beam orientations and assure the beam delivery clearance for SBRT, therefore, optimize the dose conformality to the target, increase the dose sparing to the critical normal organs and reduce the hot spots in the body. Methods: A SBRT body frame (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) was used for patient immobilization and target localization. The SBRT body frame has CT fiducials on its side frames. After patient’s CT scan, the radiation treatment isocenter was defined and its coordinators referring to the body frame was calculated in the radiation treatment planning process. Meanwhile, initial beam orientations were designed based on the patient target and critical organ anatomy. The body frame was put on the linear accelerator couch and positioned to the calculated isocenter. Initially designed beam orientations were manually measured by tuning the body frame position on the couch, the gantry and couch angles. The finalized beam orientations were put into the treatment planning for dosimetric calculations. Results: Without patient presence, an optimal set of beam orientations were designed and validated. The radiation treatment plan was optimized and guaranteed for delivery clearance. Conclusion: The developed method is beneficial and effective in SBRT treatment planning for individual patient. It first allows maximizing the achievable noncoplanar beam orientation space, therefore, optimize the treatment plan for specific patient. It eliminates the risk that a plan needs to be modified due to the gantry and couch collision during patient setup.

  5. Y90 selective internal radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Edward W; Thakor, Avnesh S; Tafti, Bashir A; Liu, David M

    2015-01-01

    Primary liver malignancies and liver metastases are affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Because of their late and advanced stage presentation, only 10% of patients can receive curative surgical treatment, including transplant or resection. Alternative treatments, such as systemic chemotherapy, ablative therapy, and chemoembolization, have been used with marginal survival benefits. Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT), also known as radioembolization, is a compelling alternative treatment option for primary and metastatic liver malignancies with a growing body of evidence. In this article, an introduction to SIRT including background, techniques, clinical outcomes, and complications is reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiation therapy and herpes zoster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Itsuo; Matsushima, Hideno; Yamada, Teruyo; Moriya, Hiroshi

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between herpes zoster and radiation therapy was discussed and the combination of herpes zoster with malignancies was observed. Reported were five cases of herpes zoster (four breast and one lung carcinoma) out of 317 cases of malignancies which were irradiated in our clinic and include considerations about the etiologic relationship. (J.P.N.)

  7. Effect of body mass index on shifts in ultrasound-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy for abdominal malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Mehee; Fuller, Clifton D.; Wang, Samuel J.; Siddiqi, Ather; Wong, Adrian; Thomas, Charles R.; Fuss, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: We investigated whether corrective shifts determined by daily ultrasound-based image-guidance correlate with body mass index (BMI) of patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) for abdominal malignancies. The utility of daily image-guidance, particularly for patients with BMI > 25.0, is examined. Materials and methods: Total 3162 ultrasound-directed shifts were performed in 86 patients. Direction and magnitude of shifts were correlated with pretreatment BMI. Bivariate statistical analysis and analysis of set-up correction data were performed using systematic and random error calculations. Results: Total 2040 daily alignments were performed. Average 3D vector of set-up correction for all patients was 12.1 mm/fraction. Directional and absolute shifts and 3D vector length were significantly different between BMI cohorts. 3D displacement averaged 4.9 mm/fraction and 6.8mm/fraction for BMI ≤ 25.0 and BMI > 25.0, respectively. Systematic error in all axes and 3D vector was significantly greater for BMI > 25.0. Differences in random error were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Set-up corrections derived from daily ultrasound-based IG-IMRT of abdominal tumors correlated with BMI. Daily image-guidance may improve precision of IMRT delivery with benefits assessed for the entire population, particularly patients with increased habitus. Requisite PTV margins suggested in the absence of daily image-guidance are significantly greater in patients with BMI > 25.0.

  8. Dosimetric feasibility of stereotactic body radiation therapy as an alternative to brachytherapy for definitive treatment of medically inoperable early stage endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Ryan; Chen, Quan; Best, Ryan; Libby, Bruce; Crandley, Edwin F; Showalter, Timothy N

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the dosimetric feasibility of definitive stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of medically inoperable early stage endometrial cancer. CT simulation scans from 10 medically inoperable early stage endometrial cancer patients previously treated with high dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy were used to generate Helical Tomotherapy (HT) plans using the IMRT mode with clinical target volumes (CTVs) that included the uterus plus cervix. A prescription dose of 34 Gy in 4 fractions was used. The SBRT dosimetry was compared to the 10 prior intracavitary brachytherapy plans normalized to a standard dose. Organs at risk (OARs) evaluated were the bladder, rectum, sigmoid, femoral heads, and other bowel, including both large and small bowel. The simulation CT and daily image guidance for 4 patients treated with this technique were evaluated to assess for interfraction variation in the uterine position and effects on dosimetry. Compared to intracavitary brachytherapy, HT SBRT produced significantly greater overall target coverage to the uterus, boost CTV, and PTV, with exception of the V150% of the uterus. HT SBRT significantly increased dose to the rectum, bowel, and femoral heads compared to intracavitary brachytherapy, though not outside of dose tolerance limits. Review of daily image guidance for patients treated with this technique demonstrated good reproducibility with a mean overlap index of 0.87 (range, 0.74 – 0.99). Definitive SBRT for medically inoperable early stage endometrial cancer appears to be a feasible treatment option. Future studies are warranted to evaluate long-term clinical outcomes with this technique, compared to HDR intracavitary brachytherapy

  9. Risk of Severe Toxicity According to Site of Recurrence in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Diane C.; Vargo, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ferris, Robert L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ohr, James [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Clump, David A.; Yau, Wai-Ying Wendy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Kim, Seungwon; Johnson, Jonas T. [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Bauman, Julie E. [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Branstetter, Barton F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Heron, Dwight E., E-mail: herond2@umpc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To report a 10-year update of our institutional experience with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for reirradiation of locally recurrent head and neck cancer, focusing on predictors of toxicity. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 291 patients treated with SBRT for recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck cancer between April 2002 and March 2013. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of severe acute and late toxicity. Patients with <3 months of follow-up (n=43) or who died within 3 months of treatment (n=21) were excluded from late toxicity analysis. Results: Median time to death or last clinical follow-up was 9.8 months among the entire cohort and 53.1 months among surviving patients. Overall, 33 patients (11.3%) experienced grade ≥3 acute toxicity and 43 (18.9%) experienced grade ≥3 late toxicity. Compared with larynx/hypopharynx, treatment of nodal recurrence was associated with a lower risk of severe acute toxicity (P=.03), with no significant differences in severe acute toxicity among other sites. Patients treated for a recurrence in the larynx/hypopharynx experienced significantly more severe late toxicity compared with those with oropharyngeal, oral cavity, base of skull/paranasal sinus, salivary gland, or nodal site of recurrence (P<.05 for all). Sixteen patients (50%) with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal recurrence experienced severe late toxicity, compared with 6-20% for other sites. Conclusions: Salvage SBRT is a safe and effective option for most patients with previously irradiated head and neck cancer. However, patients treated to the larynx or hypopharynx experience significantly more late toxicity compared with others and should be carefully selected for treatment, with consideration given to patient performance status, pre-existing organ dysfunction, and goals of care. Treatment toxicity in these patients may be mitigated with more conformal plans to allow for increased

  10. SU-F-R-53: CT-Based Radiomics Analysis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, E; Coroller, T; Narayan, V; Agrawal, V; Hou, Y; Romano, J; Franco, I; Mak, R; Aerts, H [Brigham Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is the standard of care for medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and has demonstrated excellent local control and survival. However, some patients still develop distant metastases and local recurrence, and therefore, there is a clinical need to identify patients at high-risk of disease recurrence. The aim of the current study is to use a radiomics approach to identify imaging biomarkers, based on tumor phenotype, for clinical outcomes in SBRT patients. Methods: Radiomic features were extracted from free breathing computed tomography (CT) images of 113 Stage I-II NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. Their association to and prognostic performance for distant metastasis (DM), locoregional recurrence (LRR) and survival was assessed and compared with conventional features (tumor volume and diameter) and clinical parameters (e.g. performance status, overall stage). The prognostic performance was evaluated using the concordance index (CI). Multivariate model performance was evaluated using cross validation. All p-values were corrected for multiple testing using the false discovery rate. Results: Radiomic features were associated with DM (one feature), LRR (one feature) and survival (four features). Conventional features were only associated with survival and one clinical parameter was associated with LRR and survival. One radiomic feature was significantly prognostic for DM (CI=0.670, p<0.1 from random), while none of the conventional and clinical parameters were significant for DM. The multivariate radiomic model had a higher median CI (0.671) for DM than the conventional (0.618) and clinical models (0.617). Conclusion: Radiomic features have potential to be imaging biomarkers for clinical outcomes that conventional imaging metrics and clinical parameters cannot predict in SBRT patients, such as distant metastasis. Development of a radiomics biomarker that can identify patients at high-risk of

  11. Active Breathing Control in Combination With Ultrasound Imaging: A Feasibility Study of Image Guidance in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Liver Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther; Meer, Skadi van der; Hendry, Janet; Buijsen, Jeroen; Visser, Peter; Fontanarosa, Davide; Lachaine, Martin; Lammering, Guido; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate tumor positioning in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of liver lesions is often hampered by motion and setup errors. We combined 3-dimensional ultrasound imaging (3DUS) and active breathing control (ABC) as an image guidance tool. Methods and Materials: We tested 3DUS image guidance in the SBRT treatment of liver lesions for 11 patients with 88 treatment fractions. In 5 patients, 3DUS imaging was combined with ABC. The uncertainties of US scanning and US image segmentation in liver lesions were determined with and without ABC. Results: In free breathing, the intraobserver variations were 1.4 mm in left-right (L-R), 1.6 mm in superior-inferior (S-I), and 1.3 mm anterior-posterior (A-P). and the interobserver variations were 1.6 mm (L-R), 2.8 mm (S-I), and 1.2 mm (A-P). The combined uncertainty of US scanning and matching (inter- and intraobserver) was 4 mm (1 SD). The combined uncertainty when ABC was used reduced by 1.7 mm in the S-I direction. For the L-R and A-P directions, no significant difference was observed. Conclusion: 3DUS imaging for IGRT of liver lesions is feasible, although using anatomic surrogates in the close vicinity of the lesion may be needed. ABC-based breath-hold in midventilation during 3DUS imaging can reduce the uncertainty of US-based 3D table shift correction

  12. Interpreting survival data from clinical trials of surgery versus stereotactic body radiation therapy in operable Stage I non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Pamela; Keogan, Kathleen; Crabtree, Traves; Colditz, Graham; Broderick, Stephen; Puri, Varun; Meyers, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    To identify the variability of short- and long-term survival outcomes among closed Phase III randomized controlled trials with small sample sizes comparing SBRT (stereotactic body radiation therapy) and surgical resection in operable clinical Stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Clinical Stage I NSCLC patients who underwent surgery at our institution meeting the inclusion/exclusion criteria for STARS (Randomized Study to Compare CyberKnife to Surgical Resection in Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer), ROSEL (Trial of Either Surgery or Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Early Stage (IA) Lung Cancer), or both were identified. Bootstrapping analysis provided 10,000 iterations to depict 30-day mortality and three-year overall survival (OS) in cohorts of 16 patients (to simulate the STARS surgical arm), 27 patients (to simulate the pooled surgical arms of STARS and ROSEL), and 515 (to simulate the goal accrual for the surgical arm of STARS). From 2000 to 2012, 749/873 (86%) of clinical Stage I NSCLC patients who underwent resection were eligible for STARS only, ROSEL only, or both studies. When patients eligible for STARS only were repeatedly sampled with a cohort size of 16, the 3-year OS rates ranged from 27 to 100%, and 30-day mortality varied from 0 to 25%. When patients eligible for ROSEL or for both STARS and ROSEL underwent bootstrapping with n=27, the 3-year OS ranged from 46 to 100%, while 30-day mortality varied from 0 to 15%. Finally, when patients eligible for STARS were repeatedly sampled in groups of 515, 3-year OS narrowed to 70-85%, with 30-day mortality varying from 0 to 4%. Short- and long-term survival outcomes from trials with small sample sizes are extremely variable and unreliable for extrapolation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and the Influence of Chemotherapy on Overall Survival for Large (≥5 Centimeter) Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); McMillan, Matthew T. [Department of Surgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grover, Surbhi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Simone, Charles B., E-mail: charles.simone@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for ≥5 cm lesions is poorly defined, largely owing to the low sample sizes in existing studies. The present analysis examined the SBRT outcomes and assessed the effect of chemotherapy in this population. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for primary non-small cell lung cancer ≥5 cm treated with SBRT (≤10 fractions). Patient, tumor, and treatment parameters were extracted. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Statistical methods involved Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results: From 2004 to 2012, data from 201 patients were analyzed. The median follow-up was 41.1 months. The median tumor size was 5.5 cm (interquartile range 5.0-6.0), with cT2a, cT2b, and cT3 disease in 24.9%, 53.2%, and 21.9%, respectively. The median total SBRT dose and fractionation was 50 Gy in 4 fractions, and 92.5% of the patients underwent SBRT with ≤5 fractions. The median OS was 25.1 months. Of the 201 patients, 15% received chemotherapy. The receipt of chemotherapy was associated with longer OS (median 30.6 vs 23.4 months; P=.027). On multivariable analysis, worse OS was seen with increasing age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.03; P=.012), poorly differentiated tumors (HR 2.06; P=.049), and T3 classification (HR 2.13; P=.005). On multivariable analysis, chemotherapy remained independently associated with improved OS (HR 0.57; P=.039). Conclusions: SBRT has utility in the setting of tumors ≥5 cm, with chemotherapy associated with improved OS in this subset. These hypothesis-generating data now raise the necessity of performing prospective analyses to determine whether chemotherapy confers outcome benefits after SBRT.

  14. Pain Flare Is a Common Adverse Event in Steroid-Naïve Patients After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: A Prospective Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Andrew; Zeng, Liang; Zhang, Liying; Lochray, Fiona; Korol, Renee; Loblaw, Andrew; Chow, Edward; Sahgal, Arjun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of pain flare after spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in steroid-naïve patients and identify predictive factors. Methods and Materials: Forty-one patients were treated with spine SBRT between February 2010 and April 2012. All patients had their pain assessed at baseline, during, and for 10 days after SBRT using the Brief Pain Inventory. All pain medications were recorded daily and narcotics converted to an oral morphine equivalent dose. Pain flare was defined as a 2-point increase in worst pain score as compared with baseline with no decrease in analgesic intake, a 25% increase in analgesic intake as compared with baseline with no decrease in worst pain score, or if corticosteroids were initiated at any point during or after SBRT because of pain. Results: The median age and Karnofsky performance status were 57.5 years (range, 27-80 years) and 80 (range, 50-100), respectively. Eighteen patients were treated with 20-24 Gy in a single fraction, whereas 23 patients were treated with 24-35 Gy in 2-5 fractions. Pain flare was observed in 68.3% of patients (28 of 41), most commonly on day 1 after SBRT (29%, 8 of 28). Multivariate analysis identified a higher Karnofsky performance status (P=.02) and cervical (P=.049) or lumbar (P=.02) locations as significant predictors of pain flare. In those rescued with dexamethasone, a significant decrease in pain scores over time was subsequently observed (P<.0001). Conclusions: Pain flare is a common adverse event after spine SBRT and occurs most commonly the day after treatment completion. Patients should be appropriately consented for this adverse event

  15. Pain Flare Is a Common Adverse Event in Steroid-Naïve Patients After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: A Prospective Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Zeng, Liang; Zhang, Liying; Lochray, Fiona; Korol, Renee; Loblaw, Andrew; Chow, Edward [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of pain flare after spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in steroid-naïve patients and identify predictive factors. Methods and Materials: Forty-one patients were treated with spine SBRT between February 2010 and April 2012. All patients had their pain assessed at baseline, during, and for 10 days after SBRT using the Brief Pain Inventory. All pain medications were recorded daily and narcotics converted to an oral morphine equivalent dose. Pain flare was defined as a 2-point increase in worst pain score as compared with baseline with no decrease in analgesic intake, a 25% increase in analgesic intake as compared with baseline with no decrease in worst pain score, or if corticosteroids were initiated at any point during or after SBRT because of pain. Results: The median age and Karnofsky performance status were 57.5 years (range, 27-80 years) and 80 (range, 50-100), respectively. Eighteen patients were treated with 20-24 Gy in a single fraction, whereas 23 patients were treated with 24-35 Gy in 2-5 fractions. Pain flare was observed in 68.3% of patients (28 of 41), most commonly on day 1 after SBRT (29%, 8 of 28). Multivariate analysis identified a higher Karnofsky performance status (P=.02) and cervical (P=.049) or lumbar (P=.02) locations as significant predictors of pain flare. In those rescued with dexamethasone, a significant decrease in pain scores over time was subsequently observed (P<.0001). Conclusions: Pain flare is a common adverse event after spine SBRT and occurs most commonly the day after treatment completion. Patients should be appropriately consented for this adverse event.

  16. Radiation dosimetry for radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Hee

    2001-01-01

    The radionuclide therapy is a protocol for tumor control by administering radionuclides as the cytotoxic agents. Radionuclides concentrated at the site of cancerous lesion are expected to kill the cancerous cells with minimal injury to the normal tissue. The efficacy of every radionuclide treatment can be evaluated by examining the toxicity to the lesion differentiated from that to the normal tissue. Radiation dosimerty is the procedure of quantitating the energy absorbed by target volumes of interest. Dosimetric information plays an indicator of the expected radiation damage and thus the therapeutic efficacy. This paper summarizes the dosimetric aspects in radionuclide therapy in terms of radionuclides of use, radionuclides of use, radiation dosimetry methodology and considerations for each treatment in practical use

  17. Circumferential or sectored beam arrangements for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of primary lung tumors: Effect on target and normal-structure dose-volume metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Mara W. [Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA (United States); Department of Physics, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA (United States); Kato, Catherine M. [Macalester College, St. Paul, MN (United States); Carson, Kelly M.P. [The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Matsunaga, Nathan M. [Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Arao, Robert F. [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Doss, Emily J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Portland, OR (United States); McCracken, Charles L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Meng, Lu Z. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Chen, Yiyi [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Laub, Wolfram U.; Fuss, Martin [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Tanyi, James A., E-mail: tanyij@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To compare 2 beam arrangements, sectored (beam entry over ipsilateral hemithorax) vs circumferential (beam entry over both ipsilateral and contralateral lungs), for static-gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery techniques with respect to target and organs-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume metrics, as well as treatment delivery efficiency. Data from 60 consecutive patients treated using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) formed the basis of this study. Four treatment plans were generated per data set: IMRT/VMAT plans using sectored (-s) and circumferential (-c) configurations. The prescribed dose (PD) was 60 Gy in 5 fractions to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (maximum PTV dose ∼ 150% PD) for a 6-MV photon beam. Plan conformality, R{sub 50} (ratio of volume circumscribed by the 50% isodose line and the PTV), and D{sub 2} {sub cm} (D{sub max} at a distance ≥2 cm beyond the PTV) were evaluated. For lungs, mean doses (mean lung dose [MLD]) and percent V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} Gy were assessed. Spinal cord and esophagus D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} were computed. Chest wall (CW) D{sub max} and absolute V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} were reported. Sectored SBRT planning resulted in significant decrease in contralateral MLD and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy}, as well as contralateral CW D{sub max} and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} (all p < 0.001). Nominal reductions of D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} for the spinal cord with sectored planning did not reach statistical significance for static-gantry IMRT, although VMAT metrics did show a statistically significant decrease (all p < 0.001). The respective measures for esophageal doses were significantly lower with sectored planning (p < 0.001). Despite comparable dose conformality, irrespective of planning configuration, R{sub 50} significantly improved with IMRT

  18. A Phase 1 Study of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation for Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer After Modified FOLFIRINOX (NCT01446458).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaib, Walid L; Hawk, Natalyn; Cassidy, Richard J; Chen, Zhengjia; Zhang, Chao; Brutcher, Edith; Kooby, David; Maithel, Shishir K; Sarmiento, Juan M; Landry, Jerome; El-Rayes, Bassel F

    2016-10-01

    A challenge in borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) management is the high rate of positive posterior margins (PM). Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows for higher radiation delivery dose with conformity. This study evaluated the maximal tolerated dose with a dose escalation plan level up to 45 Gy using SBRT in BRPC. A single-institution, 3 + 3 phase 1 clinical trial design was used to evaluate 4 dose levels of SBRT delivered in 3 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV) with a simultaneous in-field boost (SIB) to the PM. Dose level (DL) 1 was 30 Gy to the PTV, and for dose levels 2 through 4 (DL2-DL4) the dose was 36 Gy. The SIB dose to the PM was 6, 6, 7.5, and 9 Gy for DL-1, DL-2, DL-3, and DL-4, respectively. All patients received 4 treatments of modified FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, oxaliplatin) before SBRT. Thirteen patients with a median age of 64 years were enrolled. The median follow-up time was 18 months. The locations of the cancer were head (n=12) and uncinate/neck (n=1). One patient did not undergo SBRT. There were no grade 3 or 4 toxicities. Five patients did not undergo resection because of disease progression (1 local, 4 distant); 8 had R0 resection in the PM, and 5 of 8 had vessel reconstruction. Two patients had disease downstaged to T1 and T2 from T3 disease. Four patients are still alive, and 3 are disease free. The median overall survival for resected patients was not reached (9.3: not reached). The SBRT dose of 36 Gy with a 9-Gy SIB to the PM (total 45 Gy) delivered in 3 fractions is safe and well tolerated. The dose-limiting toxicity for a 45-Gy dose was not reached, and further dose escalations are needed in future trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Phase 1 Study of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation for Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer After Modified FOLFIRINOX (NCT01446458)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaib, Walid L.; Hawk, Natalyn [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Cassidy, Richard J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Chen, Zhengjia; Zhang, Chao [Department of Biostatistics, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Brutcher, Edith [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Kooby, David; Maithel, Shishir K.; Sarmiento, Juan M. [Department of Surgery, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Landry, Jerome [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); El-Rayes, Bassel F., E-mail: bassel.el-rayes@emoryhealthcare.org [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: A challenge in borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) management is the high rate of positive posterior margins (PM). Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows for higher radiation delivery dose with conformity. This study evaluated the maximal tolerated dose with a dose escalation plan level up to 45 Gy using SBRT in BRPC. Methods and Materials: A single-institution, 3 + 3 phase 1 clinical trial design was used to evaluate 4 dose levels of SBRT delivered in 3 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV) with a simultaneous in-field boost (SIB) to the PM. Dose level (DL) 1 was 30 Gy to the PTV, and for dose levels 2 through 4 (DL2-DL4) the dose was 36 Gy. The SIB dose to the PM was 6, 6, 7.5, and 9 Gy for DL-1, DL-2, DL-3, and DL-4, respectively. All patients received 4 treatments of modified FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, oxaliplatin) before SBRT. Results: Thirteen patients with a median age of 64 years were enrolled. The median follow-up time was 18 months. The locations of the cancer were head (n=12) and uncinate/neck (n=1). One patient did not undergo SBRT. There were no grade 3 or 4 toxicities. Five patients did not undergo resection because of disease progression (1 local, 4 distant); 8 had R0 resection in the PM, and 5 of 8 had vessel reconstruction. Two patients had disease downstaged to T1 and T2 from T3 disease. Four patients are still alive, and 3 are disease free. The median overall survival for resected patients was not reached (9.3: not reached). Conclusion: The SBRT dose of 36 Gy with a 9-Gy SIB to the PM (total 45 Gy) delivered in 3 fractions is safe and well tolerated. The dose-limiting toxicity for a 45-Gy dose was not reached, and further dose escalations are needed in future trials.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Identifies Novel Prognostic Imaging Biomarkers in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Yi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Song, Jie; Pollom, Erqi; Alagappan, Muthuraman [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Shirato, Hiroki [Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Chang, Daniel T.; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Li, Ruijiang, E-mail: rli2@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To identify prognostic biomarkers in pancreatic cancer using high-throughput quantitative image analysis. Methods and Materials: In this institutional review board–approved study, we retrospectively analyzed images and outcomes for 139 locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The overall population was split into a training cohort (n=90) and a validation cohort (n=49) according to the time of treatment. We extracted quantitative imaging characteristics from pre-SBRT {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, including statistical, morphologic, and texture features. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was built to predict overall survival (OS) in the training cohort using 162 robust image features. To avoid over-fitting, we applied the elastic net to obtain a sparse set of image features, whose linear combination constitutes a prognostic imaging signature. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to evaluate the association with OS, and concordance index (CI) was used to evaluate the survival prediction accuracy. Results: The prognostic imaging signature included 7 features characterizing different tumor phenotypes, including shape, intensity, and texture. On the validation cohort, univariate analysis showed that this prognostic signature was significantly associated with OS (P=.002, hazard ratio 2.74), which improved upon conventional imaging predictors including tumor volume, maximum standardized uptake value, and total legion glycolysis (P=.018-.028, hazard ratio 1.51-1.57). On multivariate analysis, the proposed signature was the only significant prognostic index (P=.037, hazard ratio 3.72) when adjusted for conventional imaging and clinical factors (P=.123-.870, hazard ratio 0.53-1.30). In terms of CI, the proposed signature scored 0.66 and was significantly better than competing prognostic indices (CI 0.48-0.64, Wilcoxon rank sum test P<1e-6

  1. Validation of High-Risk Computed Tomography Features for Detection of Local Recurrence After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peulen, Heike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mantel, Frederick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Guckenberger, Matthias [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Belderbos, José [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hope, Andrew; Giuliani, Meredith [Department of Radiation Oncology University of Toronto and Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Grills, Inga [Department of Radiation Oncology Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Sonke, Jan-Jakob, E-mail: j.sonke@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Fibrotic changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are difficult to distinguish from local recurrences (LR), hampering proper patient selection for salvage therapy. This study validates previously reported high-risk computed tomography (CT) features (HRFs) for detection of LR in an independent patient cohort. Methods and Materials: From a multicenter database, 13 patients with biopsy-proven LR were matched 1:2 to 26 non-LR control patients based on dose, planning target volume (PTV), follow-up time, and lung lobe. Tested HRFs were enlarging opacity, sequential enlarging opacity, enlarging opacity after 12 months, bulging margin, linear margin disappearance, loss of air bronchogram, and craniocaudal growth. Additionally, 2 new features were analyzed: the occurrence of new unilateral pleural effusion, and growth based on relative volume, assessed by manual delineation. Results: All HRFs were significantly associated with LR except for loss of air bronchogram. The best performing HRFs were bulging margin, linear margin disappearance, and craniocaudal growth. Receiver operating characteristic analysis of the number of HRFs to detect LR had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.97 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.9-1.0), which was identical to the performance described in the original report. The best compromise (closest to 100% sensitivity and specificity) was found at ≥4 HRFs, with a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 85%. A model consisting of only 2 HRFs, bulging margin and craniocaudal growth, resulted in a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 100%, with an AUC of 0.96 (95% CI 0.9-1.0) (HRFs ≥2). Pleural effusion and relative growth did not significantly improve the model. Conclusion: We successfully validated CT-based HRFs for detection of LR after SBRT for early-stage NSCLC. As an alternative to number of HRFs, we propose a simplified model with the combination of the 2 best HRFs

  2. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dholakia, Avani S.; Chaudhry, Muhammad; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Chang, Daniel T.; Raman, Siva P.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Su, Zheng; Pai, Jonathan; Oteiza, Katharine E.; Griffith, Mary E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Tryggestad, Erik; Pawlik, Timothy; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Koong, Albert C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV peak ) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Liver mean + [2 × Liver sd ]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results: Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n=19, 59%), 65 years or older (n=21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n=27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7-22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm 3 or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64-5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR 3.08, 95% CI 1.18-8.02, P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19-22.21, P=.029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07-10.48, P=.038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may assist in tailoring therapy

  3. Study on dependence of dose enhancement on cluster morphology of gold nanoparticles in radiation therapy using a body-centred cubic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sang Hee; Chung, Kwangzoo; Shin, Jung Wook; Cheon, Wonjoong; Han, Youngyih; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho

    2017-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) injected in a body for dose enhancement in radiation therapy are known to form clusters. We investigated the dependence of dose enhancement on the GNP morphology using Monte-Carlo simulations and compared the model predictions with experimental data. The cluster morphology was approximated as a body-centred cubic (BCC) structure by placing GNPs at the 8 corners and the centre of a cube with an edge length of 0.22-1.03 µm in a 4  ×  4  ×  4 µm3 water-filled phantom. We computed the dose enhancement ratio (DER) for 50 and 260 kVp photons as a function of the distance from the cube centre for 12 different cube sizes. A 10 nm-wide concentric shell shaped detector was placed up to 100 nm away from a GNP at the cube centre. For model validation, simulations based on BCC and nanoparticle random distribution (NRD) models were performed using parameters that corresponded to the experimental conditions, which measured increases in the relative biological effect due to GNPs. We employed the linear quadratic model to compute cell surviving fraction (SF) and sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER). The DER is inversely proportional to the distance to the GNPs. The largest DERs were 1.97 and 1.80 for 50 kVp and 260 kVp photons, respectively. The SF predicted by the BCC model agreed with the experimental value within 10%, up to a 5 Gy dose, while the NRD model showed a deviation larger than 10%. The SERs were 1.21  ±  0.13, 1.16  ±  0.11, and 1.08  ±  0.11 according to the experiment, BCC, and NRD models, respectively. We most accurately predicted the GNP radiosensitization effect using the BCC approximation and suggest that the BCC model is effective for use in nanoparticle dosimetry.

  4. Radiation therapy - questions to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about radiation therapy ... National Cancer Institute website. Radiation therapy and you: support for people with cancer. www.cancer.gov/publications/patient-education/radiationttherapy.pdf . Updated May 2007. Accessed December ...

  5. Radiation therapy in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terradas, M.; Santini, A.; Mara, C.

    2004-01-01

    Elderly patients, or those individuals over 65 or 70 depending on the different authors, represent the majority of cancer patients who treated with radiation therapy (RT), however there are very few publications that we provide information needed to evaluate the use of RT in the treatment elders regarding: indication of dose, tissue tolerance, toxicity and association with other therapeutic modalities. In the treatment process must take into account RT radiobiology Clinical applied to each patient and is more relevant in the elderly in which often are comorbid conditions and functional limitations normal tissues increases with age and disease coexisting vascular and connective influencing RT treatment. Chronological age does not correlate with the biological age for tolerance normal tissue, however frequently refers to healthy tissue in the elderly are less tolerant than healthy tissue RT adults young but no data in the literature to support it and perhaps those claims probably based on the presence of comorbid conditions or diseases associated or previous surgeries that influence the risk of tissue damage healthy. Studies conducted by the EORTC not show differences in toxicity acute and late age-related. Elderly patients tolerate RT like younger patients with comparable side effects. In the case of concurrent chronic diseases should take into account a possible modification of the dose and volume irradiated to prevent the risk develop permanent damage or sector body lest un irradiated able to compensate for the loss of function of the irradiated tissue; but we should always note that the dose reduction while reducing the risk of complications also decreases the chance of cure

  6. Radiation Therapy and Hearing Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Jackson, Andrew; Eisbruch, Avraham; Pan, Charlie C.; Flickinger, John C.; Antonelli, Patrick; Mendenhall, William M.

    2010-01-01

    A review of literature on the development of sensorineural hearing loss after high-dose radiation therapy for head-and-neck tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma is presented. Because of the small volume of the cochlea a dose-volume analysis is not feasible. Instead, the current literature on the effect of the mean dose received by the cochlea and other treatment- and patient-related factors on outcome are evaluated. Based on the data, a specific threshold dose to cochlea for sensorineural hearing loss cannot be determined; therefore, dose-prescription limits are suggested. A standard for evaluating radiation therapy-associated ototoxicity as well as a detailed approach for scoring toxicity is presented.

  7. Radiation therapy for carcinoma of the endometrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potish, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Carcinoma of the endometrium is the most common malignant tumor in the female genital tract. Radiation therapy continues to play a major role in the management of endometrial carcinoma, both as primary therapy and as adjuvant treatment. The utility of pelvic external beam therapy and intracavitary therapy is long established. However, the modern era of surgical staging has lead to an appreciation of the role of radiation therapy beyond the pelvis. Radiation therapy has been shown to be of particular benefit in peritoneal and nodal spread. The classic management of endometrial cancer is reviewed and relatively new and somewhat controversial topics, such as preoperative intracavitary therapy followed by external beam therapy are discussed

  8. Radiation therapy of gynecological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nori, D.; Hilaris, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of three parts: General Principles; Clinical Applications; and Special Topics. Some of the papers are: Introduction to Basic Radiobiology; Staging and Work-up Procedures for Patients with Gynecological Cancers; Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Cancer of the Cervix; Role of Interstitial Implantation in Gynecological Cancer; Role of Radiocolloids in Gynecological Cancer; Radiosensitizers and Protectors; and Management of Lymphoma Associated with Pregnancy

  9. Treatment charts in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macia, M.; De Blas, R.; Monfa, C.; Bonet, A.; Rubio, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    The radiotherapy treatment chart (dose prescription, set-up parameters, dose computation and daily dose recording form) represents an important working tool in radiotherapy, not only as a compilation of data, but also as a method of communication among physicians, physicists and technicians. In addition to administrative and medical data, physical and simulation data that are indispensable for the daily accurate reproduction of the therapy procedures should be recorded, as well as accurate daily entries of the fractional and cumulative absorbed doses. Moreover, any radiation therapy quality assurance programme must rely on the accessibility of the radiation treatment history and a correct record of the therapy protocol in order to be verifiable. We have analysed the treatment charts of 92 European Departments of Radiation Oncology, with the aim of identifying their salient characteristics and data recorded. The study shows strong differences among the charts analysed, not only in the amount of information recorded, but also in the kind of data and concepts used. (author) 6 refs., 1 fig

  10. Multibeam radiation therapy treatment application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manens, J.P.; Le Gall, G.; Chenal, C.; Ben Hassel, M.; Fresne, F.; Barillot, C.; Gibaud, B.; Lemoine, D.; Bouliou, A.; Scarabin, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    A software package has been developed for multibeam radiation therapy treatment application. We present in this study a computer-assisted dosimetric planning procedure which includes: i), an analytical stage for setting up the large volume via 2D and 3D displays; ii), a planning stage for issue of a treatment strategy including dosimetric simulations; and iii), a treatment stage to drive the target volume to the radiation unit isocenter. The combined use of stereotactic methods and multimodality imagery ensures spatial coherence and makes target definition and cognition of structure environment more accurate. The dosimetric planning suited to the spatial reference (the stereotactic frame) guarantees optimal distribution of the dose, computed by the original 3D volumetric algorithm. A computer-driven chair-framework cluster was designed to position the target volume at the radiation unit isocenter [fr

  11. Late complications of radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masaki, Norie [Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    There are cases in which, although all traces of acute radiation complications seem to have disappeared, late complications may appear months or years to become apparent. Trauma, infection or chemotherapy may sometimes recall radiation damage and irreversible change. There were two cases of breast cancer that received an estimated skin dose in the 6000 cGy range followed by extirpation of the residual tumor. The one (12 y.o.) developed atrophy of the breast and severe teleangiectasis 18 years later radiotherapy. The other one (42 y.o.) developed severe skin necrosis twenty years later radiotherapy after administration of chemotherapy and received skin graft. A case (52 y.o.) of adenoidcystic carcinoma of the trachea received radiation therapy. The field included the thoracic spinal cord which received 6800 cGy. Two years and 8 months after radiation therapy she developed complete paraplegia and died 5 years later. A truly successful therapeutic outcome requires that the patient be alive, cured and free of significant treatment-related morbidity. As such, it is important to assess quality of life in long-term survivors of cancer treatment. (author)

  12. Late complications of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaki, Norie

    1998-01-01

    There are cases in which, although all traces of acute radiation complications seem to have disappeared, late complications may appear months or years to become apparent. Trauma, infection or chemotherapy may sometimes recall radiation damage and irreversible change. There were two cases of breast cancer that received an estimated skin dose in the 6000 cGy range followed by extirpation of the residual tumor. The one (12 y.o.) developed atrophy of the breast and severe teleangiectasis 18 years later radiotherapy. The other one (42 y.o.) developed severe skin necrosis twenty years later radiotherapy after administration of chemotherapy and received skin graft. A case (52 y.o.) of adenoidcystic carcinoma of the trachea received radiation therapy. The field included the thoracic spinal cord which received 6800 cGy. Two years and 8 months after radiation therapy she developed complete paraplegia and died 5 years later. A truly successful therapeutic outcome requires that the patient be alive, cured and free of significant treatment-related morbidity. As such, it is important to assess quality of life in long-term survivors of cancer treatment. (author)

  13. Support Vector Machine-Based Prediction of Local Tumor Control After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klement, Rainer J.; Allgäuer, Michael; Appold, Steffen; Dieckmann, Karin; Ernst, Iris; Ganswindt, Ute; Holy, Richard; Nestle, Ursula; Nevinny-Stickel, Meinhard; Semrau, Sabine; Sterzing, Florian; Wittig, Andrea; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several prognostic factors for local tumor control probability (TCP) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been described, but no attempts have been undertaken to explore whether a nonlinear combination of potential factors might synergistically improve the prediction of local control. Methods and Materials: We investigated a support vector machine (SVM) for predicting TCP in a cohort of 399 patients treated at 13 German and Austrian institutions. Among 7 potential input features for the SVM we selected those most important on the basis of forward feature selection, thereby evaluating classifier performance by using 10-fold cross-validation and computing the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The final SVM classifier was built by repeating the feature selection 10 times with different splitting of the data for cross-validation and finally choosing only those features that were selected at least 5 out of 10 times. It was compared with a multivariate logistic model that was built by forward feature selection. Results: Local failure occurred in 12% of patients. Biologically effective dose (BED) at the isocenter (BED ISO ) was the strongest predictor of TCP in the logistic model and also the most frequently selected input feature for the SVM. A bivariate logistic function of BED ISO and the pulmonary function indicator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) yielded the best description of the data but resulted in a significantly smaller AUC than the final SVM classifier with the input features BED ISO , age, baseline Karnofsky index, and FEV1 (0.696 ± 0.040 vs 0.789 ± 0.001, P<.03). The final SVM resulted in sensitivity and specificity of 67.0% ± 0.5% and 78.7% ± 0.3%, respectively. Conclusions: These results confirm that machine learning techniques like SVMs can be successfully applied to predict treatment outcome after SBRT. Improvements over traditional TCP modeling are

  14. A Prospective Phase 2 Trial of Reirradiation With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Plus Cetuximab in Patients With Previously Irradiated Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargo, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ferris, Robert L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ohr, James [Division Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Clump, David A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Davis, Kara S.; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Kim, Seungwon; Johnson, Jonas T. [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Bauman, Julie E.; Gibson, Michael K. [Division Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Branstetter, Barton F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Heron, Dwight E., E-mail: herond2@umpc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Salvage options for unresectable locally recurrent, previously irradiated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (rSCCHN) are limited. Although the addition of reirradiation may improve outcomes compared to chemotherapy alone, significant toxicities limit salvage reirradiation strategies, leading to suboptimal outcomes. We therefore designed a phase 2 protocol to evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plus cetuximab for rSCCHN. Methods and Materials: From July 2007 to March 2013, 50 patients >18 years of age with inoperable locoregionally confined rSCCHN within a previously irradiated field receiving ≥60 Gy, with a Zubrod performance status of 0 to 2, and normal hepatic and renal function were enrolled. Patients received concurrent cetuximab (400 mg/m{sup 2} on day −7 and then 250 mg/m{sup 2} on days 0 and +8) plus SBRT (40-44 Gy in 5 fractions on alternating days over 1-2 weeks). Primary endpoints were 1-year locoregional progression-free survival and National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 graded toxicity. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 18 months (range: 10-70). The 1-year local PFS rate was 60% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 44%-75%), locoregional PFS was 37% (95% CI: 23%-53%), distant PFS was 71% (95% CI: 54%-85%), and PFS was 33% (95% CI: 20%-49%). The median overall survival was 10 months (95% CI: 7-16), with a 1-year overall survival of 40% (95% CI: 26%-54%). At last follow-up, 69% died of disease, 4% died with disease, 15% died without progression, 10% were alive without progression, and 2% were alive with progression. Acute and late grade 3 toxicity was observed in 6% of patients respectively. Conclusions: SBRT with concurrent cetuximab appears to be a safe salvage treatment for rSCCHN of short overall treatment time.

  15. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP3-04: Feasibility Study of Real-Time Ultrasound Monitoring for Abdominal Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Lin; Kien Ng, Sook; Zhang, Ying; Herman, Joseph; Wong, John; Ding, Kai [Department of Radiation Oncology, John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ji, Tianlong [Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Iordachita, Iulian [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tutkun Sen, H.; Kazanzides, Peter; Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A. [Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Ultrasound is ideal for real-time monitoring in radiotherapy with high soft tissue contrast, non-ionization, portability, and cost effectiveness. Few studies investigated clinical application of real-time ultrasound monitoring for abdominal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). This study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of real-time monitoring of 3D target motion using 4D ultrasound. Methods: An ultrasound probe holding system was designed to allow clinician to freely move and lock ultrasound probe. For phantom study, an abdominal ultrasound phantom was secured on a 2D programmable respiratory motion stage. One side of the stage was elevated than another side to generate 3D motion. The motion stage made periodic breath-hold movement. Phantom movement tracked by infrared camera was considered as ground truth. For volunteer study three healthy subjects underwent the same setup for abdominal SBRT with active breath control (ABC). 4D ultrasound B-mode images were acquired for both phantom and volunteers for real-time monitoring. 10 breath-hold cycles were monitored for each experiment. For phantom, the target motion tracked by ultrasound was compared with motion tracked by infrared camera. For healthy volunteers, the reproducibility of ABC breath-hold was evaluated. Results: Volunteer study showed the ultrasound system fitted well to the clinical SBRT setup. The reproducibility for 10 breath-holds is less than 2 mm in three directions for all three volunteers. For phantom study the motion between inspiration and expiration captured by camera (ground truth) is 2.35±0.02 mm, 1.28±0.04 mm, 8.85±0.03 mm in LR, AP, SI directly, respectively. The motion monitored by ultrasound is 2.21±0.07 mm, 1.32±0.12mm, 9.10±0.08mm, respectively. The motion monitoring error in any direction is less than 0.5 mm. Conclusion: The volunteer study proved the clinical feasibility of real-time ultrasound monitoring for abdominal SBRT. The phantom and volunteer ABC

  16. SU-E-J-260: Dose Recomputation Versus Dose Deformation for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Lung Tumors: A Dosimetric Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, M; Flynn, R; Xia, J; Bayouth, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric accuracy between recomputed dose and deformed dose for stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung tumors. Methods: Two non-small-cell lung cancer patients were analyzed in this study, both of whom underwent 4D-CT and breath-hold CT imaging. Treatment planning was performed using the breath-hold CT images for the dose calculation and the 4D-CT images for determining internal target volumes. 4D-CT images were reconstructed with ten breathing amplitude for each patient. Maximum tumor motion was 13 mm for patient 1, and 7 mm for patient 2. The delivered dose was calculated using the 4D-CT images and using the same planning parameters as for the breath-hold CT. The deformed dose was computed by deforming the planning dose using the deformable image registration between each binned CT and the breath-hold CT. Results: For patient 1, the difference between recomputed dose and deformed mean lung dose (MLD) ranged from 11.3%(0.5 Gy) to 1.1%(0.06 Gy), mean tumor dose (MTD) ranged from 0.4%(0.19 Gy) to −1.3%(−0.6 Gy), lung V20 ranged from +0.74% to −0.33%. The differences in all three dosimetric criteria remain relatively invariant to target motion. For patient 2, V20 ranged from +0.42% to −2.41%, MLD ranged from −0.2%(−0.05 Gy) to −10.4%(−2.12 Gy), and MTD ranged from −0.5%(−0.31 Gy) to −5.3%(−3.24 Gy). The difference between recomputed dose and deformed dose shows strong correlation with tumor motion in all three dosimetric measurements. Conclusion: The correlation between dosimetric criteria and tumor motion is patient-specific, depending on the tumor locations, motion pattern, and deformable image registration accuracy. Deformed dose can be a good approximation for recalculated dose when tumor motion is small. This research is supported by Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc and Iowa Center for Research By Undergraduates

  17. A Prospective Phase 2 Trial of Reirradiation With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Plus Cetuximab in Patients With Previously Irradiated Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargo, John A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Ohr, James; Clump, David A.; Davis, Kara S.; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Kim, Seungwon; Johnson, Jonas T.; Bauman, Julie E.; Gibson, Michael K.; Branstetter, Barton F.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Salvage options for unresectable locally recurrent, previously irradiated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (rSCCHN) are limited. Although the addition of reirradiation may improve outcomes compared to chemotherapy alone, significant toxicities limit salvage reirradiation strategies, leading to suboptimal outcomes. We therefore designed a phase 2 protocol to evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plus cetuximab for rSCCHN. Methods and Materials: From July 2007 to March 2013, 50 patients >18 years of age with inoperable locoregionally confined rSCCHN within a previously irradiated field receiving ≥60 Gy, with a Zubrod performance status of 0 to 2, and normal hepatic and renal function were enrolled. Patients received concurrent cetuximab (400 mg/m 2 on day −7 and then 250 mg/m 2 on days 0 and +8) plus SBRT (40-44 Gy in 5 fractions on alternating days over 1-2 weeks). Primary endpoints were 1-year locoregional progression-free survival and National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 graded toxicity. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 18 months (range: 10-70). The 1-year local PFS rate was 60% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 44%-75%), locoregional PFS was 37% (95% CI: 23%-53%), distant PFS was 71% (95% CI: 54%-85%), and PFS was 33% (95% CI: 20%-49%). The median overall survival was 10 months (95% CI: 7-16), with a 1-year overall survival of 40% (95% CI: 26%-54%). At last follow-up, 69% died of disease, 4% died with disease, 15% died without progression, 10% were alive without progression, and 2% were alive with progression. Acute and late grade 3 toxicity was observed in 6% of patients respectively. Conclusions: SBRT with concurrent cetuximab appears to be a safe salvage treatment for rSCCHN of short overall treatment time

  18. SU-F-J-137: Intrafractional Change of the Relationship Between Internal Fiducials and External Breathing Signal in Pancreatic Cancer Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, N; Murphy, J; Simpson, D; Cervino, L [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The use of respiratory gating for management of breathing motion during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) relies on a consistent relationship between the breathing signal and the actual position of the internal target. This relationship was investigated in patients treated for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Four patients with pancreatic cancer undergoing SBRT that had implanted fiducials in the tumor were included in this study. Treatment plans were generated based on the exhale phases (30–70%) from the pre-treatment 4DCT. The margin between the internal target volume (ITV) and the planning target volume was three mm. After patient setup using cone-beam CT, simultaneous fluoroscopic imaging and breathing motion monitoring were used during at least three breathing cycles to verify the fiducial position and to optimize the gating window. After treatment, fluoroscopic images were acquired for verification purposes and exported for retrospective analyses. Fiducial positions were determined using a template-matching algorithm. For each dataset, we established a linear relationship between the fiducial position and the anterior-posterior (AP) breathing signal. The relationships before and after treatment were compared and the dose distribution impact evaluated. Results: Seven pre- and post-treatment fluoroscopic pairs were available for fiducial position analyses in the superior-inferior (SI) and left-right (LR) directions, and five in the AP direction. Time between image acquisitions was typically six to eight minutes. An average absolute change of 1.2±0.7 mm (range: 0.1–1.7) of the SI fiducial position relative to the external signal was found. Corresponding numbers for the LR and AP fiducial positions were 0.9±1.0 mm (range: 0.2–3.0) and 0.5±0.4 mm (range: 0.2–1.2), respectively. The dose distribution impact was small in both the ITV and organs-at-risk. Conclusion: The relationship change between fiducial position and external breathing

  19. Dose-Escalated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Patients With Intermediate- and High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Initial Dosimetry Analysis and Patient Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotecha, Rupesh; Djemil, Toufik; Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Thousand, Richard A.; Vassil, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Stovsky, Mark; Berglund, Ryan K.; Klein, Eric A. [Department of Urology, Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Stephans, Kevin L., E-mail: stephak@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To report the short-term clinical outcomes and acute and late treatment-related genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities in patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2011 and 2014, 24 patients with prostate cancer were treated with SBRT to the prostate gland and proximal seminal vesicles. A high-dose avoidance zone (HDAZ) was created by a 3-mm expansion around the rectum, urethra, and bladder. Patients were treated to a minimum dose of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions, with a simultaneous dose escalation to a dose of 50 Gy to the target volume away from the HDAZ. Acute and late GU and GI toxicity outcomes were measured according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events toxicity scale, version 4. Results: The median follow-up was 25 months (range, 18-45 months). Nine patients (38%) experienced an acute grade 2 GU toxicity, which was medically managed, and no patients experienced an acute grade 2 GI toxicity. Two patients (8%) experienced late grade 2 GU toxicity, and 2 patients (8%) experienced late grade 2 GI toxicity. No acute or late grade ≥3 GU or GI toxicities were observed. The 24-month prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival outcome for all patients was 95.8% (95% confidence interval 75.6%-99.4%), and both biochemical failures occurred in patients with high-risk disease. All patients are currently alive at the time of this analysis and continue to be followed. Conclusions: A heterogeneous prostate SBRT planning technique with differential treatment volumes (low dose: 36.25 Gy; and high dose: 50 Gy) with an HDAZ provides a safe method of dose escalation. Favorable rates of biochemical control and acceptably low rates of acute and long-term GU and GI toxicity can be achieved in patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer treated with SBRT.

  20. Simulated Online Adaptive Magnetic Resonance–Guided Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Oligometastatic Disease of the Abdomen and Central Thorax: Characterization of Potential Advantages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henke, Lauren; Kashani, Rojano; Yang, Deshan; Zhao, Tianyu; Green, Olga; Olsen, Lindsey; Rodriguez, Vivian; Wooten, H. Omar; Li, H. Harold; Hu, Yanle; Bradley, Jeffrey; Robinson, Clifford; Parikh, Parag; Michalski, Jeff; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Olsen, Jeffrey R., E-mail: Jeffrey.R.Olsen@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To characterize potential advantages of online-adaptive magnetic resonance (MR)-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to treat oligometastatic disease of the non-liver abdomen and central thorax. Methods and Materials: Ten patients treated with RT for unresectable primary or oligometastatic disease of the non-liver abdomen (n=5) or central thorax (n=5) underwent imaging throughout treatment on a clinical MR image guided RT system. The SBRT plans were created on the basis of tumor/organ at risk (OAR) anatomy at initial computed tomography simulation (P{sub I}), and simulated adaptive plans were created on the basis of observed MR image set tumor/OAR “anatomy of the day” (P{sub A}). Each P{sub A} was planned under workflow constraints to simulate online-adaptive RT. Prescribed dose was 50 Gy/5 fractions, with goal coverage of 95% planning target volume (PTV) by 95% of the prescription, subject to hard OAR constraints. The P{sub I} was applied to each MR dataset and compared with P{sub A} to evaluate changes in dose delivered to tumor/OARs, with dose escalation when possible. Results: Hard OAR constraints were met for all P{sub Is} based on anatomy from initial computed tomography simulation, and all P{sub As} based on anatomy from each daily MR image set. Application of the P{sub I} to anatomy of the day caused OAR constraint violation in 19 of 30 cases. Adaptive planning increased PTV coverage in 21 of 30 cases, including 14 cases in which hard OAR constraints were violated by the nonadaptive plan. For 9 P{sub A} cases, decreased PTV coverage was required to meet hard OAR constraints that would have been violated in a nonadaptive setting. Conclusions: Online-adaptive MRI-guided SBRT may allow PTV dose escalation and/or simultaneous OAR sparing compared with nonadaptive SBRT. A prospective clinical trial is underway at our institution to evaluate clinical outcomes of this technique.

  1. SU-F-J-137: Intrafractional Change of the Relationship Between Internal Fiducials and External Breathing Signal in Pancreatic Cancer Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, N; Murphy, J; Simpson, D; Cervino, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The use of respiratory gating for management of breathing motion during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) relies on a consistent relationship between the breathing signal and the actual position of the internal target. This relationship was investigated in patients treated for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Four patients with pancreatic cancer undergoing SBRT that had implanted fiducials in the tumor were included in this study. Treatment plans were generated based on the exhale phases (30–70%) from the pre-treatment 4DCT. The margin between the internal target volume (ITV) and the planning target volume was three mm. After patient setup using cone-beam CT, simultaneous fluoroscopic imaging and breathing motion monitoring were used during at least three breathing cycles to verify the fiducial position and to optimize the gating window. After treatment, fluoroscopic images were acquired for verification purposes and exported for retrospective analyses. Fiducial positions were determined using a template-matching algorithm. For each dataset, we established a linear relationship between the fiducial position and the anterior-posterior (AP) breathing signal. The relationships before and after treatment were compared and the dose distribution impact evaluated. Results: Seven pre- and post-treatment fluoroscopic pairs were available for fiducial position analyses in the superior-inferior (SI) and left-right (LR) directions, and five in the AP direction. Time between image acquisitions was typically six to eight minutes. An average absolute change of 1.2±0.7 mm (range: 0.1–1.7) of the SI fiducial position relative to the external signal was found. Corresponding numbers for the LR and AP fiducial positions were 0.9±1.0 mm (range: 0.2–3.0) and 0.5±0.4 mm (range: 0.2–1.2), respectively. The dose distribution impact was small in both the ITV and organs-at-risk. Conclusion: The relationship change between fiducial position and external breathing

  2. SU-F-T-622: Comparative Analysis of Pencil Beam and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) of Thoracic Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badkul, R; Nicolai, W; Pokhrel, D; Jiang, H; Wang, F; Lominskac, C [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Ramanjappa, T [S. K. University, Anantapur, AP (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the impact of Pencil Beam(PB) and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm(AAA) dose calculation algorithms on OARs and planning target volume (PTV) in thoracic spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: Ten Spine SBRT patients were planned on Brainlab iPlan system using hybrid plan consisting of 1–2 non-coplanar conformal-dynamic arcs and few IMRT beams treated on NovalisTx with 6MV photon. Dose prescription varied from 20Gy to 30Gy in 5 fractions depending on the situation of the patient. PB plans were retrospectively recalculated using the Varian Eclipse with AAA algorithm using same MUs, MLC pattern and grid size(3mm).Differences in dose volume parameters for PTV, spinal cord, lung, and esophagus were analyzed and compared for PB and AAA algorithms. OAR constrains were followed per RTOG-0631. Results: Since patients were treated using PB calculation, we compared all the AAA DVH values with respect to PB plan values as standard, although AAA predicts the dose more accurately than PB. PTV(min), PTV(Max), PTV(mean), PTV(D99%), PTV(D90%) were overestimated with AAA calculation on average by 3.5%, 1.84%, 0.95%, 3.98% and 1.55% respectively as compared to PB. All lung DVH parameters were underestimated with AAA algorithm mean deviation of lung V20, V10, V5, and 1000cc were 42.81%,19.83%, 18.79%, and 18.35% respectively. AAA overestimated Cord(0.35cc) by mean of 17.3%; cord (0.03cc) by 12.19% and cord(max) by 10.5% as compared to PB. Esophagus max dose were overestimated by 4.4% and 5cc by 3.26% for AAA algorithm as compared to PB. Conclusion: AAA overestimated the PTV dose values by up to 4%.The lung DVH had the greatest underestimation of dose by AAA versus PB. Spinal cord dose was overestimated by AAA versus PB. Given the critical importance of accuracy of OAR and PTV dose calculation for SBRT spine, more accurate algorithms and validation of calculated doses in phantom models are indicated.

  3. Image quality of four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography obtained at various gantry rotation speeds for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy with fiducial markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimohigashi, Yoshinobu; Araki, Fujio; Maruyama, Masato; Yonemura, Keisuke; Nakaguchi, Yuji; Kai, Yudai; Toya, Ryo

    2018-01-01

    In this study, qualities of 4D cone-beam CT (CBCT) images obtained using various gantry rotation speeds (GRSs) for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with fiducial markers were quantitatively evaluated. Abdominal phantom containing a fiducial marker was moved along a sinusoidal waveform, and 4D-CBCT images were acquired with GRSs of 50-200° min -1 . We obtained the 4D-CBCT projection data from six patients who underwent liver SBRT and generated 4D-CBCT images at GRSs of 67-200° min -1 , by varying the number of projection data points. The image quality was evaluated based on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and structural similarity index (SSIM). The fiducial marker positions with different GRSs were compared with the setup values and a reference position in the phantom and clinical studies, respectively. The root mean square errors (RMSEs) were calculated relative to the reference positions. In the phantom study, the mean SNR, CNR, and SSIM decreased from 37.6 to 10.1, from 39.8 to 10.1, and from 0.9 to 0.7, respectively, as the GRS increased from 50 to 200° min -1 . The fiducial marker positions were within 2.0 mm at all GRSs. Similarly, in the clinical study, the mean SNR, CNR, and SSIM decreased from 50.4 to 13.7, from 24.2 to 6.0, and from 0.92 to 0.73, respectively. The mean RMSEs were 2.0, 2.1, and 3.6 mm for the GRSs of 67, 100, and 200° min -1 , respectively. We conclude that GRSs of 67 and 85° min -1 yield images of acceptable quality for 4D-CBCT in liver SBRT with fiducial markers. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Modeling Local Control After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Report From the Elekta Collaborative Lung Research Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohri, Nitin, E-mail: ohri.nitin@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grills, Inga S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Belderbos, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hope, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Guckenberger, Matthias [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Sonke, Jan-Jakob [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Xiao, Ying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment option for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using data collected by the Elekta Lung Research Group, we generated a tumor control probability (TCP) model that predicts 2-year local control after SBRT as a function of biologically effective dose (BED) and tumor size. Methods and Materials: We formulated our TCP model as follows: TCP = e{sup [BED10-c Asterisk-Operator L-TCD50]/k} Division-Sign (1 + e{sup [BED10-c Asterisk-Operator L-TCD50]/k}), where BED10 is the biologically effective SBRT dose, c is a constant, L is the maximal tumor diameter, and TCD50 and k are parameters that define the shape of the TCP curve. Least-squares optimization with a bootstrap resampling approach was used to identify the values of c, TCD50, and k that provided the best fit with observed actuarial 2-year local control rates. Results: Data from 504 NSCLC tumors treated with a variety of SBRT schedules were available. The mean follow-up time was 18.4 months, and 26 local recurrences were observed. The optimal values for c, TCD50, and k were 10 Gy/cm, 0 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively. Thus, size-adjusted BED (sBED) may be defined as BED minus 10 times the tumor diameter (in centimeters). Our TCP model indicates that sBED values of 44 Gy, 69 Gy, and 93 Gy provide 80%, 90%, and 95% chances of tumor control at 2 years, respectively. When patients were grouped by sBED, the model accurately characterized the relationship between sBED and actuarial 2-year local control (r=0.847, P=.008). Conclusion: We have developed a TCP model that predicts 2-year local control rate after hypofractionated SBRT for early-stage NSCLC as a function of biologically effective dose and tumor diameter. Further testing of this model with additional datasets is warranted.

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost After Concurrent Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase 1 Dose Escalation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T., E-mail: jhepel@lifespan.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Leonard, Kara Lynne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Safran, Howard [Division of Medical Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Division of Medical Oncology, Miriam Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Ng, Thomas [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Taber, Angela [Division of Medical Oncology, Miriam Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Khurshid, Humera; Birnbaum, Ariel [Division of Medical Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Wazer, David E.; DiPetrillo, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost to primary and nodal disease after chemoradiation has potential to improve outcomes for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A dose escalation study was initiated to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients received chemoradiation to a dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions and had primary and nodal volumes appropriate for SBRT boost (<120 cc and <60 cc, respectively). SBRT was delivered in 2 fractions after chemoradiation. Dose was escalated from 16 to 28 Gy in 2 Gy/fraction increments, resulting in 4 dose cohorts. MTD was defined when ≥2 of 6 patients per cohort experienced any treatment-related grade 3 to 5 toxicity within 4 weeks of treatment or the maximum dose was reached. Late toxicity, disease control, and survival were also evaluated. Results: Twelve patients (3 per dose level) underwent treatment. All treatment plans met predetermined dose-volume constraints. The mean age was 64 years. Most patients had stage III disease (92%) and were medically inoperable (92%). The maximum dose level was reached with no grade 3 to 5 acute toxicities. At a median follow-up time of 16 months, 1-year local-regional control (LRC) was 78%. LRC was 50% at <24 Gy and 100% at ≥24 Gy (P=.02). Overall survival at 1 year was 67%. Late toxicity (grade 3-5) was seen in only 1 patient who experienced fatal bronchopulmonary hemorrhage (grade 5). There were no predetermined dose constraints for the proximal bronchial-vascular tree (PBV) in this study. This patient's 4-cc PBV dose was substantially higher than that received by other patients in all 4 cohorts and was associated with the toxicity observed: 20.3 Gy (P<.05) and 73.5 Gy (P=.07) for SBRT boost and total treatment, respectively. Conclusions: SBRT boost to both primary and nodal disease after chemoradiation is feasible and well tolerated. Local control rates are encouraging, especially at doses ≥24

  6. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP3-04: Feasibility Study of Real-Time Ultrasound Monitoring for Abdominal Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Lin; Kien Ng, Sook; Zhang, Ying; Herman, Joseph; Wong, John; Ding, Kai; Ji, Tianlong; Iordachita, Iulian; Tutkun Sen, H.; Kazanzides, Peter; Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound is ideal for real-time monitoring in radiotherapy with high soft tissue contrast, non-ionization, portability, and cost effectiveness. Few studies investigated clinical application of real-time ultrasound monitoring for abdominal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). This study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of real-time monitoring of 3D target motion using 4D ultrasound. Methods: An ultrasound probe holding system was designed to allow clinician to freely move and lock ultrasound probe. For phantom study, an abdominal ultrasound phantom was secured on a 2D programmable respiratory motion stage. One side of the stage was elevated than another side to generate 3D motion. The motion stage made periodic breath-hold movement. Phantom movement tracked by infrared camera was considered as ground truth. For volunteer study three healthy subjects underwent the same setup for abdominal SBRT with active breath control (ABC). 4D ultrasound B-mode images were acquired for both phantom and volunteers for real-time monitoring. 10 breath-hold cycles were monitored for each experiment. For phantom, the target motion tracked by ultrasound was compared with motion tracked by infrared camera. For healthy volunteers, the reproducibility of ABC breath-hold was evaluated. Results: Volunteer study showed the ultrasound system fitted well to the clinical SBRT setup. The reproducibility for 10 breath-holds is less than 2 mm in three directions for all three volunteers. For phantom study the motion between inspiration and expiration captured by camera (ground truth) is 2.35±0.02 mm, 1.28±0.04 mm, 8.85±0.03 mm in LR, AP, SI directly, respectively. The motion monitored by ultrasound is 2.21±0.07 mm, 1.32±0.12mm, 9.10±0.08mm, respectively. The motion monitoring error in any direction is less than 0.5 mm. Conclusion: The volunteer study proved the clinical feasibility of real-time ultrasound monitoring for abdominal SBRT. The phantom and volunteer ABC

  7. Pelvic Nodal Dosing With Registration to the Prostate: Implications for High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishan, Amar U.; Lamb, James M.; Jani, Shyam S.; Kang, Jung J.; Steinberg, Michael L.; King, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether image guidance with rigid registration (RR) to intraprostatic markers (IPMs) yields acceptable coverage of the pelvic lymph nodes in the context of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) regimen. Methods and Materials: Four to seven kilovoltage cone-beam CTs (CBCTs) from 12 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were analyzed, allowing approximation of an SBRT regimen. The nodal clinical target volume (CTV N ) and bladder were contoured on all kilovoltage CBCTs. The V 100 CTV N , expressed as a ratio to the same parameter on the initial plan, and the magnitude of translational shift between RR to the IPMs versus RR to the pelvic bones, were computed. The ability of a multimodality bladder filling protocol to minimize bladder height variation was assessed in a separate cohort of 4 patients. Results: Sixty-five CBCTs were assessed. The average V 100 CTV N was 92.6%, but for a subset of 3 patients the average was 80.0%, compared with 97.8% for the others (P<.0001). The average overall and superior–inferior axis magnitudes of the bony-to-fiducial translations were significantly larger in the subgroup with suboptimal nodal coverage (8.1 vs 3.9 mm and 5.8 vs 2.4 mm, respectively; P<.0001). Relative bladder height changes were also significantly larger in the subgroup with suboptimal nodal coverage (42.9% vs 18.5%; P<.05). Use of a multimodality bladder-filling protocol minimized bladder height variation (P<.001). Conclusion: A majority of patients had acceptable nodal coverage after RR to IPMs, even when approximating SBRT. However, a subset of patients had suboptimal nodal coverage. These patients had large bony-to-fiducial translations and large variations in bladder height. Nodal coverage should be excellent if the superior–inferior axis bony-to-fiducial translation and the relative bladder height change (both easily measured on CBCT) are kept to a minimum. Implementation of a strict bladder filling protocol may achieve this

  8. Dose-Escalated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Patients With Intermediate- and High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Initial Dosimetry Analysis and Patient Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotecha, Rupesh; Djemil, Toufik; Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Thousand, Richard A.; Vassil, Andrew; Stovsky, Mark; Berglund, Ryan K.; Klein, Eric A.; Stephans, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the short-term clinical outcomes and acute and late treatment-related genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities in patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2011 and 2014, 24 patients with prostate cancer were treated with SBRT to the prostate gland and proximal seminal vesicles. A high-dose avoidance zone (HDAZ) was created by a 3-mm expansion around the rectum, urethra, and bladder. Patients were treated to a minimum dose of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions, with a simultaneous dose escalation to a dose of 50 Gy to the target volume away from the HDAZ. Acute and late GU and GI toxicity outcomes were measured according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events toxicity scale, version 4. Results: The median follow-up was 25 months (range, 18-45 months). Nine patients (38%) experienced an acute grade 2 GU toxicity, which was medically managed, and no patients experienced an acute grade 2 GI toxicity. Two patients (8%) experienced late grade 2 GU toxicity, and 2 patients (8%) experienced late grade 2 GI toxicity. No acute or late grade ≥3 GU or GI toxicities were observed. The 24-month prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival outcome for all patients was 95.8% (95% confidence interval 75.6%-99.4%), and both biochemical failures occurred in patients with high-risk disease. All patients are currently alive at the time of this analysis and continue to be followed. Conclusions: A heterogeneous prostate SBRT planning technique with differential treatment volumes (low dose: 36.25 Gy; and high dose: 50 Gy) with an HDAZ provides a safe method of dose escalation. Favorable rates of biochemical control and acceptably low rates of acute and long-term GU and GI toxicity can be achieved in patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer treated with SBRT.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Spinal Cord and Cauda Equina Motion in Supine Patients With Spinal Metastases Planned for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Chia-Lin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sussman, Marshall S. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Atenafu, Eshetu G. [Department of Biostatistics, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Letourneau, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ma, Lijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Soliman, Hany; Thibault, Isabelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cho, B. C. John; Simeonov, Anna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yu, Eugene [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fehlings, Michael G. [Department of Neurosurgery and Spine Program, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To assess motion of the spinal cord and cauda equina, which are critical neural tissues (CNT), which is important when evaluating the planning organ-at-risk margin required for stereotactic body radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed CNT motion in 65 patients with spinal metastases (11 cervical, 39 thoracic, and 24 lumbar spinal segments) in the supine position using dynamic axial and sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI, 3T Verio, Siemens) over a 137-second interval. Motion was segregated according to physiologic cardiorespiratory oscillatory motion (characterized by the average root mean square deviation) and random bulk shifts associated with gross patient motion (characterized by the range). Displacement was evaluated in the anteroposterior (AP), lateral (LR), and superior-inferior (SI) directions by use of a correlation coefficient template matching algorithm, with quantification of random motion measure error over 3 separate trials. Statistical significance was defined according to P<.05. Results: In the AP, LR, and SI directions, significant oscillatory motion was observed in 39.2%, 35.1%, and 10.8% of spinal segments, respectively, and significant bulk motions in all cases. The median oscillatory CNT motions in the AP, LR, and SI directions were 0.16 mm, 0.17 mm, and 0.44 mm, respectively, and the maximal statistically significant oscillatory motions were 0.39 mm, 0.41 mm, and 0.77 mm, respectively. The median bulk displacements in the AP, LR, and SI directions were 0.51 mm, 0.59 mm, and 0.66 mm, and the maximal statistically significant displacements were 2.21 mm, 2.87 mm, and 3.90 mm, respectively. In the AP, LR, and SI directions, bulk displacements were greater than 1.5 mm in 5.4%, 9.0%, and 14.9% of spinal segments, respectively. No significant differences in axial motion were observed according to cord level or cauda equina. Conclusions: Oscillatory CNT motion was observed to be relatively minor. Our results

  10. Anesthesia and monitoring during whole body radiation in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Nilsson, A; Hök, B

    1991-01-01

    During whole body radiation therapy of children, treatment may be done in places not equipped with acceptable scavenging systems for anesthetic gases and where clinical observation of the patient may be impossible. In order to solve this problem, the authors have used a total intravenous (IV...

  11. Development of local radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, Chang Woon; Chai, Jong Su; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seong Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Yong Sik; Lee, Hyun Moo

    1999-04-01

    The major limitations of radiation therapy for cancer are the low effectiveness of low LET and inevitable normal tissue damage. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a form of potent radiation therapy using Boron-10 having a high propensityof capturing theraml neutrons from nuclear reactor and reacting with a prompt nuclear reaction. Photodynamic therapy is a similiar treatment of modality to BNCT using tumor-seeking photosenistizer and LASER beam. If Boron-10 and photosensitizers are introduced selectively into tumor cells, it is theoretically possible to destroy the tumor and to spare the surrounding normal tissue. Therefore, BNCT and PDT will be new potent treatment modalities in the next century. In this project, we performed PDT in the patients with bladder cancers, oropharyngeal cancer, and skin cancers. Also we developed I-BPA, new porphyrin compounds, methods for estimation of radiobiological effect of neutron beam, and superficial animal brain tumor model. Furthermore, we prepared preclinical procedures for clinical application of BNCT, such as the macro- and microscopic dosimetry, obtaining thermal neutron flux from device used for fast neutron production in KCCH have been performed.

  12. Development of local radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, Chang Woon; Chai, Jong Su; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seong Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Yong Sik; Lee, Hyun Moo

    1999-04-01

    The major limitations of radiation therapy for cancer are the low effectiveness of low LET and inevitable normal tissue damage. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a form of potent radiation therapy using Boron-10 having a high propensityof capturing theraml neutrons from nuclear reactor and reacting with a prompt nuclear reaction. Photodynamic therapy is a similiar treatment of modality to BNCT using tumor-seeking photosenistizer and LASER beam. If Boron-10 and photosensitizers are introduced selectively into tumor cells, it is theoretically possible to destroy the tumor and to spare the surrounding normal tissue. Therefore, BNCT and PDT will be new potent treatment modalities in the next century. In this project, we performed PDT in the patients with bladder cancers, oropharyngeal cancer, and skin cancers. Also we developed I-BPA, new porphyrin compounds, methods for estimation of radiobiological effect of neutron beam, and superficial animal brain tumor model. Furthermore, we prepared preclinical procedures for clinical application of BNCT, such as the macro- and microscopic dosimetry, obtaining thermal neutron flux from device used for fast neutron production in KCCH have been performed

  13. Applications of Machine Learning for Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Nakamoto, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been highly advanced as image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) by making advantage of image engineering technologies. Recently, novel frameworks based on image engineering technologies as well as machine learning technologies have been studied for sophisticating the radiation therapy. In this review paper, the author introduces several researches of applications of machine learning for radiation therapy. For examples, a method to determine the threshold values for standardized uptake value (SUV) for estimation of gross tumor volume (GTV) in positron emission tomography (PET) images, an approach to estimate the multileaf collimator (MLC) position errors between treatment plans and radiation delivery time, and prediction frameworks for esophageal stenosis and radiation pneumonitis risk after radiation therapy are described. Finally, the author introduces seven issues that one should consider when applying machine learning models to radiation therapy.

  14. SU-F-T-106: A Dosimetric Study of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to Decrease Radiation Dose to the Thoracic Vertebral Bodies in Patients Receiving Concurrent Chemoradiation for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiCostanzo, Dominic; Barney, Christian L.; Bazan, Jose G. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Recent clinical studies have shown a correlation between radiation dose to the thoracic vertebral bodies (TVB) and the development of hematologic toxicity (HT) in patients receiving chemoradiation (CRT) for lung cancer (LuCa). The feasibility of a bone-marrow sparing (BMS) approach in this group of patients is unknown. We hypothesized that radiation dose to the TVB can be reduced with an intensity modulated radiation therapy(IMRT)/volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy(VMAT) without affecting plan quality. Methods: We identified LuCa cases treated with curative intent CRT using IMRT/VMAT from 4/2009 to 2/2015. The TVBs from T1–T10 were retrospectively contoured. No constraints were placed on the TVB structure initially. A subset were re-planned with BMS-IMRT/VMAT with an objective or reducing the mean TVB dose to <23 Gy. The following data were collected on the initial and BMS plans: mean dose to planning target volume (PTV), lungs-PTV, esophagus, heart; lung V20; cord max dose. Pairwise comparisons were performed using the signed rank test. Results: 94 cases received CRT with IMRT/VMAT. We selected 11 cases (7 IMRT, 4 VMAT) with a range of initial mean TVB doses (median 35.7 Gy, range 18.9–41.4 Gy). Median prescription dose was 60 Gy. BMS-IMRT/VMAT significantly reduced the mean TVB dose by a median of 10.2 Gy (range, 1.0–16.7 Gy, p=0.001) and reduced the cord max dose by 2.9 Gy (p=0.014). BMS-IMRT/VMAT had no impact on lung mean (median +17 cGy, p=0.700), lung V20 (median +0.5%, p=0.898), esophagus mean (median +13 cGy, p=1.000) or heart mean (median +16 cGy, p=0.365). PTV-mean dose was not affected by BMS-IMRT/VMAT (median +13 cGy, p=0.653). Conclusion: BMS-IMRT/VMAT was able to significantly reduce radiation dose to the TVB without compromising plan quality. Prospective evaluation of BMS-IMRT/VMAT in patients receiving CRT for LuCa is warranted to determine if this approach results in clinically significant reductions in HT.

  15. The Effect of Biologically Effective Dose and Radiation Treatment Schedule on Overall Survival in Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, John M. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Ross, Rudi [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Harder, Eileen M.; Mancini, Brandon R. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Soulos, Pamela R. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Finkelstein, Steven E.; Shafman, Timothy D.; Dosoretz, Arie P. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Evans, Suzanne B.; Husain, Zain A.; Yu, James B. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Decker, Roy H., E-mail: roy.decker@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of biologically effective dose (BED{sub 10}) and radiation treatment schedule on overall survival (OS) in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Using data from 65 treatment centers in the United States, we retrospectively reviewed the records of T1-2 N0 NSCLC patients undergoing SBRT alone from 2006 to 2014. Biologically relevant covariates, including dose per fraction, number of fractions, and time between fractions, were used to quantify BED{sub 10} and radiation treatment schedule. The linear-quadratic equation was used to calculate BED{sub 10} and to generate a dichotomous dose variable of <105 Gy versus ≥105 Gy BED{sub 10}. The primary outcome was OS. We used the Kaplan-Meier method, the log–rank test, and Cox proportional hazards regression with propensity score matching to determine whether prescription BED{sub 10} was associated with OS. Results: We identified 747 patients who met inclusion criteria. The median BED{sub 10} was 132 Gy, and 59 (7.7%) had consecutive-day fractions. Median follow-up was 41 months, and 452 patients (60.5%) had died by the conclusion of the study. The 581 patients receiving ≥105 Gy BED{sub 10} had a median survival of 28 months, whereas the 166 patients receiving <105 Gy BED{sub 10} had a median survival of 22 months (log–rank, P=.01). Radiation treatment schedule was not a significant predictor of OS on univariable analysis. After adjusting for T stage, sex, tumor histology, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, BED{sub 10} ≥105 Gy versus <105 Gy remained significantly associated with improved OS (hazard ratio 0.78, 95% confidence interval 0.62-0.98, P=.03). Propensity score matching on imbalanced variables within high- and low-dose cohorts confirmed a survival benefit with higher prescription dose. Conclusions: We found that dose escalation to 105 Gy BED

  16. Basal cell carcinoma after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimbo, Keisuke; Terashi, Hiroto; Ishida, Yasuhisa; Tahara, Shinya; Osaki, Takeo; Nomura, Tadashi; Ejiri, Hirotaka

    2008-01-01

    We reported two cases of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) that developed after radiation therapy. A 50-year-old woman, who had received an unknown amount of radiation therapy for the treatment of intracranial germinoma at the age of 22, presented with several tumors around the radiation ulcer. All tumors showed BCC. A 33-year-old woman, who had received an unknown amount of radiation therapy on the head for the treatment of leukemia at the age of 2, presented with a black nodule within the area of irradiation. The tumor showed BCC. We discuss the occurrence of BCC after radiation therapy. (author)

  17. Radiation therapy of the uterine cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Cervical and endometrial cancer of the uterus, and ovarian cancer are three major malignant diseases in gynecology in Japan. These diagnosis and therapy are almost established. In uterine cervical cancer, radiation therapy and surgery of these diseases are two main treatment methods, and both treatment results are almost the same. And radiation therapy is also used as postoperative treatment to patients with high risk factors. In endometrial cancer, surgery is main therapy. Radiation therapy is undergone only to medically inoperable cases preoperative radiation is widely carried out in Europe and America, but almost none in Japan. Postoperative irradiation is adapted to the cases with high risk factors. But recent advance of chemotherapy changes the importance of radiation therapy in such patients. I review the literatures of radiation therapy of uterine cervical cancer and of endometrial cancer. (author)

  18. Radiation therapy system and its accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yuzuru

    1990-01-01

    Three prerequisites for increasing accuracy of radiation therapy are considered. Firstly, every irradiation must be performed without errors according to irradiation conditions. Secondly, accurate quality assurance of equipments for radiation, diagnosis, radiation planning, and dosimetry must be maintained. Thirdly, new radiation planning system and treatment equipments with the introduction of computers are required. The purpose of this report is to discuss accuracy of radiation therapy, focusing on (I) the current status of radiation therapy system developed at the National Institute of Radiation Sciences (NIRS) in Japan and on (II) basic items and quality assurance for increasing accuracy of radiation therapy. Fast neutron therapy has been started with the NIRS cyclotron collimator in November 1975. The advent of X-ray CT has contributed to radiation therapy planning, in that it visualizes the inside structure of the patient stereoscopically. An optical positioning apparatus with CT scanner and a dedicated CT simulator have been developed, allowing the realization of more accurate conformation radiotherapy. Error or uncertainty poses a problem in radiation therapy and treatment system. The ICRU Report 24 describes that standard errors for biological changes in tolerance radiation doses should be within ±5%. The AAPM Report 13 describes that uncertainty for dosimetry with phantoms or dose distribution computation must be less than 2.5% and 4.2%, respectively. It is recommended that quality assurance program be introduced to decrease errors in radiation therapy. (N.K.)

  19. DNA repair related to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, W.

    1979-01-01

    The DNA excision repair capacity of peripheral human lymphocytes after radiation therapy has been analyzed. Different forms of application of the radiation during the therapy have been taken into account. No inhibition of repair was found if cells were allowed a certain amount of accomodation to radiation, either by using lower doses or longer application times. (G.G.)

  20. Anesthesia and monitoring during whole body radiation in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Nilsson, A; Hök, B

    1990-01-01

    During whole body radiation therapy of children, treatment may be done in places not equipped with acceptable scavenging systems for anesthetic gases and where clinical observation of the patient may be impossible. In order to solve this problem, the authors have used a total intravenous (IV) ane....... This anesthetic technique and the stethoscope have been used in seven children. The total IV anesthesia proved to be a useful method for children during whole body radiation. The modified stethoscope functioned very well and was a useful complement to the monitoring equipment....

  1. Anesthesia and monitoring during whole body radiation in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Nilsson, A; Hök, B

    1991-01-01

    During whole body radiation therapy of children, treatment may be done in places not equipped with acceptable scavenging systems for anesthetic gases and where clinical observation of the patient may be impossible. In order to solve this problem, the authors have used a total intravenous (IV) ane....... This anesthetic technique and the stethoscope have been used in seven children. The total IV anesthesia proved to be a useful method for children during whole body radiation. The modified stethoscope functioned very well and was a useful complement to the monitoring equipment....

  2. Hope for progress after 40 years of futility? Novel approaches in the treatment of advanced stage III and IV non-small-cell-lung cancer: Stereotactic body radiation therapy, mediastinal lymphadenectomy, and novel systemic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Fung, Simon Fung Fee; Warren, Graham W.; Singh, Anurag K.

    2012-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a leading cause of cancer mortality. The majority of patients present with advanced (stage III-IV) disease. Such patients are treated with a variety of therapies including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Despite decades of work, however, overall survival in this group has been resistant to any substantial improvement. This review briefly details the evolution to the current standard of care for advanced NSCLC, advances in systemic therapy, and ...

  3. Radiation therapy of thoracic and abdominal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaRue, S.M.; Gillette, S.M.; Poulson, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Until recently, radiotherapy of thoracic and abdominal tumors in animals has been limited. However, the availability of computerized tomography and other imaging techniques to aid in determining the extent of tumor, an increase in knowledge of dose tolerance of regional organs, the availability of isocentrically mounted megavoltage machines, and the willingness of patients to pursue more aggressive treatment is making radiation therapy of tumors in these regions far more common. Tumor remission has been reported after radiation therapy of thymomas. Radiation therapy has been used to treat mediastinal lymphoma refractory to chemotherapy, and may be beneficial as part of the initial treatment regimen for this disease. Chemodectomas are responsive to radiation therapy in human patients, and favorable response has also been reported in dogs. Although primary lung tumors in dogs are rare, in some cases radiation therapy could be a useful primary or adjunctive therapy. Lung is the dose-limiting organ in the thorax. Bladder and urethral tumors in dogs have been treated using intraoperative and external-beam radiation therapy combined with chemotherapy. These tumors are difficult to control locally with surgery alone, although the optimal method of combining treatment modalities has not been established. Local control of malignant perianal tumors is also difficult to achieve with surgery alone, and radiation therapy should be used. Intraoperative radiation therapy combined with external-beam radiation therapy has been used for the management of metastatic carcinoma to the sublumbar lymph nodes. Tolerance of retroperitoneal tissues may be decreased by disease or surgical manipulation

  4. Radiation therapy for operable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar, G.V.; Semikoz, N.G.; Bashejev, V.Kh.; Borota, O.V.; Bondarenko, M.V.; Kiyashko, O.Yu.

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a review of the literature on modern tendencies of radiation therapy application to treatment of operable rectal cancer. Many randomized control studies compared the efficacy of combination of radiation therapy (pre-operative or post-operative) and surgery versus surgery only demonstrating various results. Meta-analysis of the data on efficacy of combination of radiation therapy and standard surgery revealed 22 randomized control studies (14 with pre-operative radiation therapy and 8 with post-operative radiation therapy) with total number of 8507 patients (Colorectal Cancer Collaborative Group, 2000). The use of combination treatment reduced the number of isolated locoregional relapses both with pre-operative (22.5 - 12.5 %; p < 0.00001) and post-operative radiation therapy (25.8 - 16.7 %; p - 0.00001). The influence on total survival was not significant (62 % vs. 63 %; p - 0.06).

  5. Radiation Therapy and You: Support for People with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Terms Blogs and Newsletters Health Communications Publications Reports Radiation Therapy and You: Support for People With Cancer Radiation ... Copy This booklet covers: Questions and Answers About Radiation Therapy. Answers common questions, such as what radiation therapy ...

  6. Radiation therapy of peritoneal mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, G.; Recht, A.

    1986-01-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of peritoneal mesotheliomas remains ill-defined despite its association with the few long-term survivals reported for this disease. The rationale for local therapy is clear as the disease most often is confined to the peritoneal cavity at the time of initial diagnosis and remains there for much of the subsequent course. Effective local treatment of this intra-abdominal disease would likely improve survival. The absence of randomized studies has made analysis of the various treatments of the disease and the few reported success difficult. Nonetheless, scrutiny of the available data may offer insights and guide future clinical trials, as well as the clinician responsible for the treatment of current patients with peritoneal mesothelioma. The radiotherapeutic approach to oncology stresses anatomic considerations in an attempt to understand the patterns of spread of the primary tumor. The observed location and bulk of disease by clinical examination, radiologic study, surgical exploration, and autopsy suggest mechanisms of metastases (direct extension, lymphatic or hematogenous). This dictates the administration of radiation that best achieves a successful outcome

  7. Missed Radiation Therapy and Cancer Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients who miss radiation therapy sessions during cancer treatment have an increased risk of their disease returning, even if they eventually complete their course of radiation treatment, according to a new study.

  8. Radiation therapy services in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    combined with the components of adequate RT: localis- ing systems (computed tomography (CT) scanners and simulators), planning equipment, radiation machines for both teletherapy and brachytherapy, skilled therapy radiographers, physicists and radiation therapists. A survey was undertaken to determine the adequacy.

  9. Risk analysis of external radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvidsson, Marcus

    2011-09-01

    External radiation therapy is carried out via a complex treatment process in which many different groups of staff work together. Much of the work is dependent on and in collaboration with advanced technical equipment. The purpose of the research task has been to identify a process for external radiation therapy and to identify, test and analyze a suitable method for performing risk analysis of external radiation therapy

  10. Radiation therapy for prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Akira; Minowada, Shigeru; Tomoishi, Junzo; Kinoshita, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadayoshi

    1983-01-01

    A conformation radiotherapy system with collimators, whose openings can be controlled symmetrically by computerized techniques during rotational irradiation by a linear accelerator, has been developed for routine use in our hospital. Forty-four patients underwent radiation therapy, including this particular modality of radiotherapy, for prostatic cancer during the period of July 1976 through December 1981. Eight patients were classified as stage A, 10 stage B, 10 stage C, and 16 as stage D. Twenty-nine patients underwent conformation radiotherapy, two rotation radiotherapy, eight 2-port opposing technique radiotherapy, one 4-field radiotherapy, and four underwent a combination of 2-port opposing technique and conformation radiotherapy. Transient mild side effects such as diarrhea occurred in seven cases, while severe side effects such as rectal stricture or contracted bladder occurred in three cases. The latter occurred only in one case among 29 of conformation radiotherapy and in two among eight of 2-port opposing technique radiotherapy. The results of the treatment of short intervals in stage B, C, and D are as follows: prostatic size was reduced in 26 cases among 36, serum acid phosphatase level was reduced in 15 among 18 who had showed high acid phosphatase levels before treatment, although almost all cases underwent simultaneous hormonal therapy. The effects of radiotherapy alone were verified in two cases of stage B in which radiotherapy preceded hormonal therapy. Prostatic size and serum acid phosphatase level were reduced by radiotherapy alone. (author)

  11. Cognitive-Behavioral Body Image Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, James C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Randomly assigned 54 body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) subjects to cognitive behavior therapy or no treatment. BDD symptoms were significantly decreased in therapy subjects and the disorder was eliminated in 82 percent of cases at posttreatment and 77 percent at follow-up. Subjects' overall psychological symptoms and self-esteem also improved. (RJM)

  12. New modalities in radiation therapy for treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a generic term for a large group of diseases characterized by rapid creation of abnormal cells that grow beyond their usual boundaries, and which can then invade adjoining parts of the body and spread to other organs. Cancer mortality is the second and most common cause of death in the USA and in most European countries. In India, it is the fourth leading disease and the major cause of death. Cancer remains one of the most dreadful disease and approximately ten million cases of cancer occur in the world every year. The course of cancer treatment depends on the type of cancer, its location, and its state of advancement. Cancer is treated with surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, biological therapy and targeted therapy. Radiation therapy is an important an affordable modality for cancer treatment with minimal side effects. Radiation kills cancer cells with high-energy rays targeted directly to the tumor. Radiation therapy works by damaging the DNA and preventing its replication: therefore, it preferentially kills cancer cells, which rapidly divides. Radiation therapy is used for cure, control, and palliation of cancers in more than 60% of cancer patients. The goal of radiotherapy is to treat the cancer and spare the normal tissue as much as possible. Advances have been made in radiotherapy that allow delivery of higher doses of radiation to the tumor while sparing a greater amount of surrounding tissue, thus achieving more cures and fewer acute and long-term side effects. Technological advances and research are being continued to result in improvements in the field. Several new devices and techniques are used these days in radiotherapy for accurate treatment of cancer. Teletherapy (external radiation therapy) used focused radiation beams targeting well defined tumor through extremely detailed imaging scans. Conventional external beam radiation therapy (2DXRT) is delivered via two-dimensional beams using linear accelerator machines (X

  13. Radiation therapy sources, equipment and installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    The safety code for Telegamma Therapy Equipment and Installations, (AERB/SC/MED-1) and safety code for Brachytherapy Sources, Equipment and Installations, (AERB/SC/MED-3) were issued by AERB in 1986 and 1988 respectively. These codes specified mandatory requirements for radiation therapy facilities, covering the entire spectrum of operations ranging from the setting up of a facility to its ultimate decommissioning, including procedures to be followed during emergency situations. The codes also stipulated requirements of personnel and their responsibilities. With the advent of new techniques and equipment such as 3D-conformal radiation therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy, image guided radiation therapy, treatment planning system, stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic radiotherapy, portal imaging, integrated brachytherapy and endovascular brachytherapy during the last two decades, AERB desires that these codes be revised and merged into a single code titled Radiation Therapy Sources, Equipment, and Installations

  14. Melioidosis: reactivation during radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegasothy, B.V.; Goslen, J.B.; Salvatore, M.A.

    1980-05-01

    Melioidosis is caused by Pseudomonas pseudomallei, a gram-negative, motile bacillus which is a naturally occurring soil saprophyte. The organism is endemic in Southeast Asia, the Philippines, Australia, and parts of Central and South America. Most human disease occurs from infection acquired in these countries. Infection with P pseudomallei may produce no apparent clinical disease. Acute pneumonitis or septicemia may result from inhalation of the organism, and inoculation into sites of trauma may cause localized skin abscesses, or the disease may remain latent and be reactivated months or years later by trauma, burns, or pneumococcal pneumonia, diabetic ketoacidosis, influenza, or bronchogenic carcinoma. The last is probably the commonest form of melioidosis seen in the United States. We present the first case of reactivation of melioidosis after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the lung, again emphasizing the need to consider melioidosis in a septic patient with a history of travel, especially to Southeast Asia.

  15. Melioidosis: reactivation during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegasothy, B.V.; Goslen, J.B.; Salvatore, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Melioidosis is caused by Pseudomonas pseudomallei, a gram-negative, motile bacillus which is a naturally occurring soil saprophyte. The organism is endemic in Southeast Asia, the Philippines, Australia, and parts of Central and South America. Most human disease occurs from infection acquired in these countries. Infection with P pseudomallei may produce no apparent clinical disease. Acute pneumonitis or septicemia may result from inhalation of the organism, and inoculation into sites of trauma may cause localized skin abscesses, or the disease may remain latent and be reactivated months or years later by trauma, burns, or pneumococcal pneumonia, diabetic ketoacidosis, influenza, or bronchogenic carcinoma. The last is probably the commonest form of melioidosis seen in the United States. We present the first case of reactivation of melioidosis after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the lung, again emphasizing the need to consider melioidosis in a septic patient with a history of travel, especially to Southeast Asia

  16. The carcinogenicity of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzarello, D.J.; Roses, D.F.; Newall, J.; Barish, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Ionizing radiation as used for therapy for cancer is probably weakly carcinogenic at worst. The probability that cancers will be induced at a distance from the treatment volume is so small that it can only be inferred from experiences with large populations exposed to much higher radiation doses. The risk of cancer in and adjacent to the treatment volume also appears to be small, especially in adults. Intensive radiotherapy or radiotherapy of children 20 to 30 years ago appears to have induced secondary cancers in about 3 to 4 per cent of those treated, but modern practice has every expectation of reducing this incidence. No precise risk factor can be offered, but it seems likely that less than 3 to 4 per cent is a reasonable projection. The reason for the low carcinogenicity in the treatment volume probably lies in the fact that the irradiation dose is high and many cells are killed rather than transformed. The frequency of the induction of radiogenic cancer adjacent to or near the treatment volume is expected to vary according to the tissue exposed. It is not estimated to exceed a few per cent in the worst instances (for example, breast and thyroid gland) and is much less than 1 per cent in most tissues

  17. Targeted drugs in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favaudon, V.; Hennequin, C.; Hennequin, C.

    2004-01-01

    New drugs aiming at the development of targeted therapies have been assayed in combination with ionizing radiation over the past few years. The rationale of this concept comes from the fact that the cytotoxic potential of targeted drugs is limited, thus requiring concomitant association with a cytotoxic agent for the eradication of tumor cells. Conversely a low level of cumulative toxicity is expected from targeted drugs. Most targeted drugs act through inhibition of post-translational modifications of proteins, such as dimerization of growth factor receptors, prenylation reactions, or phosphorylation of tyrosine or serine-threonine residues. Many systems involving the proteasome, neo-angiogenesis promoters, TGF-β, cyclooxygenase or the transcription factor NF-κB, are currently under investigation in hopes they will allow a control of cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle progression, tumor angiogenesis and inflammation. A few drugs have demonstrated an antitumor potential in particular phenotypes. In most instances, however, radiation-drug interactions proved to be strictly additive in terms of cell growth inhibition or induced cell death. Strong potentiation of the response to radiotherapy is expected to require interaction with DNA repair mechanisms. (authors)

  18. The role of stereotactic body radiation therapy in oligometastatic colorectal cancer: Clinical case report of a long-responder patient treated with regorafenib beyond progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, Michela; Falcone, Rosa; Mazzuca, Federica; Archibugi, Livia; Castaldi, Nadia; Botticelli, Andrea; Osti, Mattia Falchetto; Marchetti, Paolo

    2017-12-01

    Regorafenib is the new standard third-line therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, the reported 1-year overall survival rate does not exceed 25%. A 55-year-old man affected by mCRC, treated with regorafenib combined with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), showing a durable response. After 6 months of regorafenib, a PET/CT scan revealed a focal uptake in a solid lung nodule which was treated with SBRT, whereas continuing regorafenib administration. Fourteen months later, the patient had further progression in a parasternal lymph node, but treatment with regorafenib was continued. The regorafenib-associated side effects, such us the hand-foot syndrome, were favorable managed by reducing the dose from 160 to 120 mg/day. Patient-reported outcome was characterized by a progression-free survival of approximately 3 years. in presence of oligometastatic progression, a local SBRT while retaining the same systemic therapy may be a better multidisciplinary approach. Moreover, disease progression is no longer an absolute contraindication for continuing the regorafenib treatment.

  19. Exposure Risks Among Children Undergoing Radiation Therapy: Considerations in the Era of Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Clayton B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Thompson, Holly M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Benedict, Stanley H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Seibert, J. Anthony [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Wong, Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Vaughan, Andrew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Recent improvements in toxicity profiles of pediatric oncology patients are attributable, in part, to advances in the field of radiation oncology such as intensity modulated radiation (IMRT) and proton therapy (IMPT). While IMRT and IMPT deliver highly conformal dose to targeted volumes, they commonly demand the addition of 2- or 3-dimensional imaging for precise positioning—a technique known as image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this manuscript we address strategies to further minimize exposure risk in children by reducing effective IGRT dose. Portal X rays and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are commonly used to verify patient position during IGRT and, because their relative radiation exposure is far less than the radiation absorbed from therapeutic treatment beams, their sometimes significant contribution to cumulative risk can be easily overlooked. Optimizing the conformality of IMRT/IMPT while simultaneously ignoring IGRT dose may result in organs at risk being exposed to a greater proportion of radiation from IGRT than from therapeutic beams. Over a treatment course, cumulative central-axis CBCT effective dose can approach or supersede the amount of radiation absorbed from a single treatment fraction, a theoretical increase of 3% to 5% in mutagenic risk. In select scenarios, this may result in the underprediction of acute and late toxicity risk (such as azoospermia, ovarian dysfunction, or increased lifetime mutagenic risk) in radiation-sensitive organs and patients. Although dependent on variables such as patient age, gender, weight, body habitus, anatomic location, and dose-toxicity thresholds, modifying IGRT use and acquisition parameters such as frequency, imaging modality, beam energy, current, voltage, rotational degree, collimation, field size, reconstruction algorithm, and documentation can reduce exposure, avoid unnecessary toxicity, and achieve doses as low as reasonably achievable, promoting a culture and practice of “gentle IGRT.”.

  20. Job satisfaction among radiation therapy educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swafford, Larry G; Legg, Jeffrey S

    2007-01-01

    Job satisfaction is one of the most consistent variables related to employee retention and is especially relevant considering the shortage of radiation therapists and radiation therapy educators in the United States. To investigate job satisfaction levels among radiation therapy educators certified by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists and employed in programs accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. The long form of the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ) was mailed to 158 radiation therapy educators to measure job satisfaction. Overall job satisfaction and subscales were calculated based on MSQ methodology. A total of 90 usable surveys were returned for a 56.9% response rate. With a "general satisfaction" score of 69.64, radiation therapy educators ranked in the lowest 25th percentile of the nondisabled norm scale for job satisfaction. Respondents reported higher degrees of job satisfaction on the moral values, social service and achievement subscales. Lower job satisfaction levels were associated with the company policies and practices, advancement and compensation subscales. Radiation therapy educators report low job satisfaction. Educational institutions must tailor recruitment and retention efforts to better reflect the positive aspects of being a radiation therapy educator. Furthermore, improving retention and recruitment efforts might help offset the current shortages of radiation therapy educators and, ultimately, clinical radiation therapists.

  1. Radiation therapy facilities in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballas, Leslie K.; Elkin, Elena B.; Schrag, Deborah; Minsky, Bruce D.; Bach, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: About half of all cancer patients in the United States receive radiation therapy as a part of their cancer treatment. Little is known, however, about the facilities that currently deliver external beam radiation. Our goal was to construct a comprehensive database of all radiation therapy facilities in the United States that can be used for future health services research in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: From each state's health department we obtained a list of all facilities that have a linear accelerator or provide radiation therapy. We merged these state lists with information from the American Hospital Association (AHA), as well as 2 organizations that audit the accuracy of radiation machines: the Radiologic Physics Center (RPC) and Radiation Dosimetry Services (RDS). The comprehensive database included all unique facilities listed in 1 or more of the 4 sources. Results: We identified 2,246 radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States as of 2004-2005. Of these, 448 (20%) facilities were identified through state health department records alone and were not listed in any other data source. Conclusions: Determining the location of the 2,246 radiation facilities in the United States is a first step in providing important information to radiation oncologists and policymakers concerned with access to radiation therapy services, the distribution of health care resources, and the quality of cancer care

  2. Influence of ionizing radiation on human body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Zdrojewicz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes positive and negative aspects of ionizing radiation and its effects on human body. Being a part of various medical procedures in medicine, ionising radiation has become an important aspect for both medical practitioners and patients. Commonly used in treatment, diagnostics and interventional radiology, its medical usage follows numerous rules, designed to reduce excessive exposure to ionizing radiation. Its widespread use makes it extremely important to research and confirm effects of various doses of radiation on patients of all ages. Two scientific theories, explaining radiation effects on human organism, stand in contrast: commonly accepted LNT-hypothesis and yet to be proven hormesis theory. Despite the fact that the current radiation protection standards are based on the linear theory (LNT-hypothesis, the hormesis theory arouses more and more interest, and numerous attempts are made to prove its validity. Further research expanding the knowledge on radiation hormesis can change the face of the future. Perhaps such researches will open up new possibilities for the use of ionizing radiation, as well as enable the calculation of the optimal and personalised radiation dose for each patient, allowing us to find a new “golden mean”. The authors therefore are careful and believe that these methods have a large future, primarily patient’s good should however be kept in mind.

  3. nano-particles in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billotey, Claire; Bourhis, Jean; Levy, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    After a recall of the history of radiation therapy this article outlines that the presence of a high electronic density material within a tumour can artificially and locally increase the radiation absorption. It outlines the benefit of the elaboration of nano-particles from such a material for the case of external radiation therapy (increase of material density and bioavailability of nano-particles) where nano-particles can even be introduced by intravenous injection. It describes the various possibility of using nano-particles in the case of internal radiation therapy or Curie therapy. It allows a much less invasive process, the possibility of direct injection into a tumour or a cavity, and the possibility of an increase of the dose received by cells. Other topics are briefly evoked: subcellular targeting by high atomic number nano-particles, and the radiation therapy approach by Nanobiotix

  4. Internal radiation dosimetry in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyeong Min; Lim, Sang Moo

    2006-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy has been continued for treatment of incurable diseases for past decades. Relevant evaluation of absorbed dose in radionuclide therapy in important to predict treatment output and essential for making treatment planning to prevent unexpected radiation toxicity. Many scientists in the field related with nuclear medicine have made effort to evolve concept and technique for internal radiation dosimetry. In this review, basic concept of internal radiation dosimetry if described and recent progress in method for dosimetry is introduced

  5. Chemotherapy and molecular target therapy combined with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy has been established as standard treatment approach for locally advanced head and neck cancer, esophageal cancer and so on through randomized clinical trials. However, radiation-related morbidity such as acute toxicity also increased as treatment intensity has increased. In underlining mechanism for enhancement of normal tissue reaction in chemo-radiation therapy, chemotherapy enhanced radiosensitivity of normal tissues in addition to cancer cells. Molecular target-based drugs combined with radiation therapy have been expected as promising approach that makes it possible to achieve cancer-specific enhancement of radiosensitivity, and clinical trials using combined modalities have been performed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In order to obtain maximum radiotherapeutic gain, a detailed understanding of the mechanism underlying the interaction between radiation and Molecular target-based drugs is indispensable. Among molecular target-based drugs, inhibitors targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its signal transduction pathways have been vigorously investigated, and mechanisms regarding the radiosensitizing effect have been getting clear. In addition, the results of randomized clinical trials demonstrated that radiation therapy combined with cetuximab resulted in improvement of overall and disease-specific survival rate compared with radiation therapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer. In this review, clinical usefulness of chemo-radiation therapy and potential molecular targets for potentiation of radiation-induced cell killing are summarized. (author)

  6. Risk management of radiation therapy. Survey by north Japan radiation therapy oncology group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Abe, Yoshinao; Yamada, Shogo; Hareyama, Masato; Nakamura, Ryuji; Sugita, Tadashi; Miyano, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    A North Japan Radiation Oncology Group (NJRTOG) survey was carried out to disclose the risk management of radiation therapy. During April 2002, we sent questionnaires to radiation therapy facilities in northern Japan. There were 31 replies from 27 facilities. Many incidents and accidents were reported, including old cases. Although 60% of facilities had a risk management manual and/or risk manager, only 20% had risk management manuals for radiation therapy. Eighty five percent of radiation oncologists thought that incidents may be due to a lack of manpower. Ninety percent of radiation oncologists want to know the type of cases happened in other facilities. The risk management system is still insufficient for radiation therapy. We hope that our data will be a great help to develop risk management strategies for radiation therapy for all radiation oncologists in Japan. (author)

  7. A Rat Body Phantom for Radiation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualls, Garry D.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Slaba, Tony C.; Walker, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    To reduce the uncertainties associated with estimating the biological effects of ionizing radiation in tissue, researchers rely on laboratory experiments in which mono-energetic, single specie beams are applied to cell cultures, insects, and small animals. To estimate the radiation effects on astronauts in deep space or low Earth orbit, who are exposed to mixed field broad spectrum radiation, these experimental results are extrapolated and combined with other data to produce radiation quality factors, radiation weighting factors, and other risk related quantities for humans. One way to reduce the uncertainty associated with such extrapolations is to utilize analysis tools that are applicable to both laboratory and space environments. The use of physical and computational body phantoms to predict radiation exposure and its effects is well established and a wide range of human and non-human phantoms are in use today. In this paper, a computational rat phantom is presented, as well as a description of the process through which that phantom has been coupled to existing radiation analysis tools. Sample results are presented for two space radiation environments.

  8. Study on external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Lee, Dong Hoon; Choi, Mun Sik; Yoo, Dae Heon; Lee, Hyo Nam; Kim, Kyeoung Jung

    1999-04-01

    To develop the therapy technique which promote accuracy and convenience in external radiation therapy, to obtain the development of clinical treatment methods for the global competition. The contents of the R and D were 1. structure, process and outcome analysis in radiation therapy department. 2. Development of multimodality treatment in radiation therapy 3. Development of computation using networking techniques 4. Development of quality assurance (QA) system in radiation therapy 5. Development of radiotherapy tools 6. Development of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) tools. The results of the R and D were 1. completion of survey and analysis about Korea radiation therapy status 2. Performing QA analysis about ICR on cervix cancer 3. Trial of multicenter randomized study on lung cancers 4. Setting up inter-departmental LAN using MS NT server and Notes program 5. Development of ionization chamber and dose-rate meter for QA in linear accelerator 6. Development on optimized radiation distribution algorithm for multiple slice 7. Implementation on 3 dimensional volume surface algorithm and 8. Implementation on adaptor and cone for IORT

  9. Study on external beam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Lee, Dong Hoon; Choi, Mun Sik; Yoo, Dae Heon; Lee, Hyo Nam; Kim, Kyeoung Jung

    1999-04-01

    To develop the therapy technique which promote accuracy and convenience in external radiation therapy, to obtain the development of clinical treatment methods for the global competition. The contents of the R and D were 1. structure, process and outcome analysis in radiation therapy department. 2. Development of multimodality treatment in radiation therapy 3. Development of computation using networking techniques 4. Development of quality assurance (QA) system in radiation therapy 5. Development of radiotherapy tools 6. Development of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) tools. The results of the R and D were 1. completion of survey and analysis about Korea radiation therapy status 2. Performing QA analysis about ICR on cervix cancer 3. Trial of multicenter randomized study on lung cancers 4. Setting up inter-departmental LAN using MS NT server and Notes program 5. Development of ionization chamber and dose-rate meter for QA in linear accelerator 6. Development on optimized radiation distribution algorithm for multiple slice 7. Implementation on 3 dimensional volume surface algorithm and 8. Implementation on adaptor and cone for IORT.

  10. Cardiovascular effects of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Jose A.G.; Leiva, Gustavo

    2001-01-01

    Therapeutic mediastinal irradiation can induce heart disease with variable degree of cardiac engagement. Heart disease manifestations depend on the grade of involvement of the different cardiac structures. During the first two years following irradiation, pericarditis with or without pericardial effusion is the most common manifestation of toxicity related to radiation therapy. Later on, after a latency period of five to ten years, a constrictive pericarditis may develop. Other type of late cardiac toxicities due to irradiation are restrictive cardiomyopathy, multiple valvular disease, coronary artery disease and different atrioventricular conduction disturbances. The therapeutic approach to this kind of heart disease has to be focused on its progressive course and in the possibility of a global involvement of all the cardiac structures. Pericardiectomy is strongly recommended for recurrent pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade. Cardiac surgery for myocardial revascularization or valvular disease can be performed with variable results; the presence of myocardial fibrosis can significantly affect perioperative management and long-term results. Cardiac transplantation is a promissory option for those patients with end-stage cardiac failure. Immunosuppressive regimens are not associated with recurrence of malignancy. (author) [es

  11. Extramammary Paget's disease: role of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrieri, M.; Back, M.F.

    2002-01-01

    Extra mammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is an uncommon premalignant skin condition that has been traditionally managed with surgery. A report of long-standing Paget's disease with transformation to invasive adenocarcinoma definitively managed with radiation therapy is presented. A review of cases of extramammary Paget's disease treated with radiation therapy is discussed. The use of radiation therapy should be considered in selected cases, as these studies demonstrate acceptable rates of local control when used as an adjunct to surgery, or as a definitive treatment modality. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  12. [Effects of radiation exposure on human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Kenji; Sasatani, Megumi

    2012-03-01

    There are two types of radiation health effect; acute disorder and late on-set disorder. Acute disorder is a deterministic effect that the symptoms appear by exposure above a threshold. Tissues and cells that compose the human body have different radiation sensitivity respectively, and the symptoms appear in order, from highly radiosensitive tissues. The clinical symptoms of acute disorder begin with a decrease in lymphocytes, and then the symptoms appear such as alopecia, skin erythema, hematopoietic damage, gastrointestinal damage, central nervous system damage with increasing radiation dose. Regarding the late on-set disorder, a predominant health effect is the cancer among the symptoms of such as cancer, non-cancer disease and genetic effect. Cancer and genetic effect are recognized as stochastic effects without the threshold. When radiation dose is equal to or more than 100 mSv, it is observed that the cancer risk by radiation exposure increases linearly with an increase in dose. On the other hand, the risk of developing cancer through low-dose radiation exposure, less 100 mSv, has not yet been clarified scientifically. Although uncertainty still remains regarding low level risk estimation, ICRP propound LNT model and conduct radiation protection in accordance with LNT model in the low-dose and low-dose rate radiation from a position of radiation protection. Meanwhile, the mechanism of radiation damage has been gradually clarified. The initial event of radiation-induced diseases is thought to be the damage to genome such as radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Recently, it is clarified that our cells could recognize genome damage and induce the diverse cell response to maintain genome integrity. This phenomenon is called DNA damage response which induces the cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, apoptosis, cell senescence and so on. These responses act in the direction to maintain genome integrity against genome damage, however, the death of large number of

  13. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank ... Cancer Treatment Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Introduction to Cancer Therapy (Radiation Oncology) ...

  14. Preoperative breast radiation therapy: Indications and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lightowlers, S V; Boersma, L J; Fourquet, A

    2017-01-01

    Preoperative breast radiation therapy (RT) is not a new concept, but older studies failed to change practice. More recently, there has been interest in revisiting preoperative RT using modern techniques. This current perspective discusses the indications, summarises the published literature...

  15. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim

    2014-01-01

    on Radiation Units and Measurements concepts of gross tumor volume, clinical target volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume are used for defining the targeted volumes. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated radiation therapy, breath-hold, image guided radiation therapy...... optimal imaging is available, is explained. A new concept, involved site radiation therapy (ISRT), is introduced as the standard conformal therapy for the scenario, commonly encountered, wherein optimal imaging is not available. There is increasing evidence that RT doses used in the past are higher than...... (ILROG) Steering Committee regarding the modern approach to RT in the treatment of HL, outlining a new concept of ISRT in which reduced treatment volumes are planned for the effective control of involved sites of HL. Nodal and extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are covered separately by ILROG...

  16. Pediatric radiation therapy. A Japanese nationwide survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Kenji; Nagata, Yasushi; Hirokawa, Yutaka

    2006-01-01

    A national survey on the current status of pediatric radiation therapy was performed in October 2004. We sent questionnaires to 638 radiotherapy facilities in Japan (except for Kansai area) and 245 responses were analyzed. According to the database of committee of Japanese Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (JASTRO), the number of pediatric patients who received radiation therapy during 2003 in Japan was 1,101. The most frequent pediatric malignancy was brain tumor, followed by leukemia and lymphoma. The total effort of radiation therapy for children was two to six times larger than that for adult patients. An additional fee seems to be necessary for the highly technical and laborious radiation therapy required for children. (author)

  17. Effect of radiation therapy against intracranial hemangiopericytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, Shozaburo; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi; Hamada, Jun-ichiro; Yoshioka, Susumu; Kochi, Masato; Ushio, Yukitaka; Nakahara, Tadashi; Kishida, Katsuaki.

    1992-01-01

    Seven cases of intracranial hemangiopericytoma were studied retrospectively to investigate the efficacy of radiation therapy. Tumor response evaluated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging was obvious after 20-30 Gy irradiation. The total reduction rate was 80-90% and continued as long as 5-7 months after treatment. In five patients receiving radiation therapy before radical removal, the tumors were easily removed without massive hemorrhage. Histological inspection of specimens after irradiation showed a significant disappearance of tumor cells. Pyknosis frequently occurred in endothelial cells, and proliferating vessels with hyalinoid degeneration were also seen. Reticulin fibers between tumor cells were fewer, split, or absent. Preoperative radiation therapy is useful in the treatment of hemangiopericytoma involving considerable surgical risk. Postoperative radiation therapy should be given even if removal is complete. (author)

  18. Modern radiation therapy for primary cutaneous lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Illidge, Tim

    2015-01-01

    , either as the sole treatment or as part of a multimodality approach. Radiation therapy of primary cutaneous lymphomas requires the use of special techniques that form the focus of these guidelines. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group has developed these guidelines after multinational...... meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group steering committee on the use of radiation therapy in primary cutaneous lymphomas in the modern era.......Primary cutaneous lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases. They often remain localized, and they generally have a more indolent course and a better prognosis than lymphomas in other locations. They are highly radiosensitive, and radiation therapy is an important part of the treatment...

  19. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasko, J.M.

    1982-12-01

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application.

  20. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasko, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application

  1. Nursing care update: Internal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowdermilk, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    Internal radiation therapy has been used in treating gynecological cancers for over 100 years. A variety of radioactive sources are currently used alone and in combination with other cancer treatments. Nurses need to be able to provide safe, comprehensive care to patients receiving internal radiation therapy while using precautions to keep the risks of exposure to a minimum. This article discusses current trends and issues related to such treatment for gynecological cancers.20 references

  2. Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Both Operable and Inoperable T1N0M0 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG0403

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Yasushi, E-mail: nagat@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Shibata, Taro [Japan Clinical Oncology Group Data Center, Center for Research Administration and Support, National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, Chuo (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Department of Image-Based Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Onimaru, Rikiya [Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Kozuka, Takuyo [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kunieda, Etsuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Tsutomu [Department of Radiology, Nihon University Itabashi Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nakagawa, Keiichi [Department of Radiology, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Hareyama, Masato [Department of Radiology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo (Japan); Takai, Yoshihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Ishikura, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, Koshigaya Municipal Hospital, Koshigaya (Japan)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in Japan Clinical Oncology Group study 0403, the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with T1N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligibility criteria included histologically or cytologically proven NSCLC, clinical T1N0M0. Prescribed dose was 48 Gy at the isocenter in 4 fractions. The primary endpoint was the percent (%) 3-year overall survival. The threshold % 3-year survival to be rejected was set at 35% for inoperable patients, whereas the expected % 3-year survival was 80% for operable patients. Results: Between July 2004 and November 2008, 169 patients from 15 institutions were registered. One hundred inoperable and 64 operable patients (total 164) were eligible. Patients' characteristics were 122 male, 47 female; median age 78 years (range, 50-91 years); adenocarcinomas, 90; squamous cell carcinomas, 61; others, 18. Of the 100 inoperable patients, the % 3-year OS was 59.9% (95% confidence interval 49.6%-68.8%). Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were observed in 10 and 2 patients, respectively. No grade 5 toxicity was observed. Of the 64 operable patients, the % 3-year OS was 76.5% (95% confidence interval 64.0%-85.1%). Grade 3 toxicities were observed in 5 patients. No grade 4 and 5 toxicities were observed. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for stage I NSCLC is effective, with low incidences of severe toxicity. This treatment can be considered a standard treatment for inoperable stage I NSCLC. This treatment is promising as an alternative to surgery for operable stage I NSCLC.

  3. Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Both Operable and Inoperable T1N0M0 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG0403.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Shibata, Taro; Onishi, Hiroshi; Kokubo, Masaki; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Onimaru, Rikiya; Kozuka, Takuyo; Kunieda, Etsuo; Saito, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Hareyama, Masato; Takai, Yoshihiro; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Ishikura, Satoshi

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate, in Japan Clinical Oncology Group study 0403, the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with T1N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eligibility criteria included histologically or cytologically proven NSCLC, clinical T1N0M0. Prescribed dose was 48 Gy at the isocenter in 4 fractions. The primary endpoint was the percent (%) 3-year overall survival. The threshold % 3-year survival to be rejected was set at 35% for inoperable patients, whereas the expected % 3-year survival was 80% for operable patients. Between July 2004 and November 2008, 169 patients from 15 institutions were registered. One hundred inoperable and 64 operable patients (total 164) were eligible. Patients' characteristics were 122 male, 47 female; median age 78 years (range, 50-91 years); adenocarcinomas, 90; squamous cell carcinomas, 61; others, 18. Of the 100 inoperable patients, the % 3-year OS was 59.9% (95% confidence interval 49.6%-68.8%). Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were observed in 10 and 2 patients, respectively. No grade 5 toxicity was observed. Of the 64 operable patients, the % 3-year OS was 76.5% (95% confidence interval 64.0%-85.1%). Grade 3 toxicities were observed in 5 patients. No grade 4 and 5 toxicities were observed. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for stage I NSCLC is effective, with low incidences of severe toxicity. This treatment can be considered a standard treatment for inoperable stage I NSCLC. This treatment is promising as an alternative to surgery for operable stage I NSCLC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. On probabilistically defined margins in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papiez, Lech; Langer, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Margins about a target volume subject to external beam radiation therapy are designed to assure that the target volume of tissue to be sterilized by treatment is adequately covered by a lethal dose. Thus, margins are meant to guarantee that all potential variation in tumour position relative to beams allows the tumour to stay within the margin. Variation in tumour position can be broken into two types of dislocations, reducible and irreducible. Reducible variations in tumour position are those that can be accommodated with the use of modern image-guided techniques that derive parameters for compensating motions of patient bodies and/or motions of beams relative to patient bodies. Irreducible variations in tumour position are those random dislocations of a target that are related to errors intrinsic in the design and performance limitations of the software and hardware, as well as limitations of human perception and decision making. Thus, margins in the era of image-guided treatments will need to accommodate only random errors residual in patient setup accuracy (after image-guided setup corrections) and in the accuracy of systems designed to track moving and deforming tissues of the targeted regions of the patient's body. Therefore, construction of these margins will have to be based on purely statistical data. The characteristics of these data have to be determined through the central limit theorem and Gaussian properties of limiting error distributions. In this paper, we show how statistically determined margins are to be designed in the general case of correlated distributions of position errors in three-dimensional space. In particular, we show how the minimal margins for a given level of statistical confidence are found. Then, how they are to be used to determine geometrically minimal PTV that provides coverage of GTV at the assumed level of statistical confidence. Our results generalize earlier recommendations for statistical, central limit theorem

  5. On probabilistically defined margins in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papiez, Lech; Langer, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2006-08-21

    Margins about a target volume subject to external beam radiation therapy are designed to assure that the target volume of tissue to be sterilized by treatment is adequately covered by a lethal dose. Thus, margins are meant to guarantee that all potential variation in tumour position relative to beams allows the tumour to stay within the margin. Variation in tumour position can be broken into two types of dislocations, reducible and irreducible. Reducible variations in tumour position are those that can be accommodated with the use of modern image-guided techniques that derive parameters for compensating motions of patient bodies and/or motions of beams relative to patient bodies. Irreducible variations in tumour position are those random dislocations of a target that are related to errors intrinsic in the design and performance limitations of the software and hardware, as well as limitations of human perception and decision making. Thus, margins in the era of image-guided treatments will need to accommodate only random errors residual in patient setup accuracy (after image-guided setup corrections) and in the accuracy of systems designed to track moving and deforming tissues of the targeted regions of the patient's body. Therefore, construction of these margins will have to be based on purely statistical data. The characteristics of these data have to be determined through the central limit theorem and Gaussian properties of limiting error distributions. In this paper, we show how statistically determined margins are to be designed in the general case of correlated distributions of position errors in three-dimensional space. In particular, we show how the minimal margins for a given level of statistical confidence are found. Then, how they are to be used to determine geometrically minimal PTV that provides coverage of GTV at the assumed level of statistical confidence. Our results generalize earlier recommendations for statistical, central limit theorem

  6. Radiation therapy apparatus having retractable beam stopper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coad, G.L.

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to a radiation therapy apparatus which utilized a linear translation mechanism for positioning a beam stopper. An apparatus is described wherein the beam stopper is pivotally attached to the therapy machine with an associated drive motor in such a way that the beam stopper retracts linearly

  7. 42 CFR 410.35 - X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.35 X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope. Medicare Part B pays for X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services, including radium therapy and...

  8. Evolution of radiation therapy: technology of today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, S.K.; Mishra, Shagun

    2013-01-01

    The three well established arms of treatment are surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. The management of cancer is multidisciplinary; Radiation Oncologists along with Surgical Oncologists and Medical Oncologists are responsible for cancer therapeutics. They all work in close collaboration with Pathologists and Radiologists for cancer diagnosis and staging and rely on Oncology Nurses, Physiotherapists, Occupational Therapists, Nutritionists and Social Workers for optimal treatment and rehabilitation of cancer patients. Therefore cancer management is a team work for getting the best results. Radiation therapy is one of the most effective methods of treating cancer

  9. Protective prostheses during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poole, T.S.; Flaxman, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    Current applications and complications in the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of oral malignancy are reviewed. Prostheses are used for decreasing radiation to vital structures not involved with the lesion but located in the field of radiation. With a program of oral hygiene and proper dental care, protective prostheses can help decrease greatly the morbidity seen with existing radiotherapy regimens

  10. Radiation Complications Following Breast Conserving Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikushima; Takegawa; Yasuda; Makimoto; Matsuzaki; Kashihara; Ueno; Sasa; Morimoto; Nishitani

    1998-10-25

    BACKGROUND: Breast conserving therapy is being established as a standard therapeutic procedure for early breast cancer in Japan. However, the indications of radiotherapy and a standardized therapeutic procedure have not been established yet. In this study, complications following radiotherapy were evaluated in patients who had previously undergone breast conserving therapy at Tokushima University Hospital. METHODS From October 1989 to March 1996, 60 women with stage I or II breast cancer underwent radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery, and all patients were followed-up for a median of 27 months. Radiation morbidity scoring of the breast and adjacent organs was performed using the toxity criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and European Organization for Research andTreatment of Cancer (EORTC). RESULTS: Only 1 patient developed local recurrence, and no distant metastasisor death was observed. The cause of recurrence in 1 case was considered to be due to extended intraductal component. Although transient dermal reaction was induced by irradiation of the breast, no side effects that may cause cosmetic problems were found. No serious radiation complications were found in the lungs, ribs, heart or other adjacent organs. CONCLUSION: The adverse reactions caused by irradiation does not reduce the merit of combined use of radiation therapy in breast conserving therapy, and therefore, are not the hesitation factor in application of radiotherapy.

  11. Radiation therapy for metastatic spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kida, Akio; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Taniguchi, Shuji; Sakai, Kazuaki

    2000-01-01

    The results of radiation therapy for metastatic spinal tumors were evaluated in terms of pain relief, improvement of neurological impairment, and survival. Between 1986 and 1995, 52 symptomatic patients with metastatic spinal tumors treated with radiation therapy were evaluated. The patients all received irradiation of megavoltage energy. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in terms of pain relief and improvement of neurological impairment. Pain relief was observed in 29 (61.7%) of 47 patients with pain. Therapy was effective for 17 (70.8%) of 24 patients without neurological impairment, and efficacy was detected in 12 (52.2%) of 23 patients with neurological impairment. Improvement of neurological symptoms was obtained in seven (25.0%) of 28 patients with neurological impairment. Radiation therapy was effective for pain relief in patients with metastatic spinal tumors. In patients with neurological impairment, less pain relief was observed than in those without impairment. Improvement of neurological impairment was restricted, but radiation therapy was thought to be effective in some cases in the early stage of neurological deterioration. Radiation therapy for metastatic spinal tumors contraindicated for surgery was considered effective for improvement of patients' activities of daily living. (author)

  12. Development of a Phase I/II Clinical Trial Using Sterotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    prostate (TURP) or cryotherapy to the prostate Plans for concurrent or post treatment adjuvant hormonal therapy or chemotherapy Concomitant antineoplastic ...other concomitant or post treatment adjuvant antineoplastic therapy while on this protocol including surgery, cryotherapy, conventionally fractionated...typically be the 60-90% line (rather than 95-100%); however, higher isodoses (hotspots) must be manipulated to occur within the target and not in

  13. Dosimetric implications associated to heterogeneity dose correction in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer; Implicaciones dosimetricas asociadas al calculo de dosis con correccion de heterogeneidad en radioterapia estereotaxica extracraneal (SBRT) de pulmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucca Aparicio, D.; Perez Moreno, J. M.; Fernandez Leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrila

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of lung lesions using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) requires algorithms with corrections that adequately model the behavior of narrow beams in the presence of tissue heterogeneities, although protocols such as RTOG 0236 excluded these kind of corrections. 100 cases were evaluated retrospectively following the RTOG 0813 and RTOG 0915 guidelines, by obtaining the deviations of the relevant dosimetric indicators from Monte Carlo (MC) and Pencil Beam (PB), maintaining the same configuration and monitor units (MU). Deviations between MC and PB have been classified according to the volume and density of the lesion. The greatest variations (up to 45% difference in D50%) are found for cases with lower volume and density, where the lesion is almost equivalent to lung tissue, given the higher proportion of air surrounding the periphery of the tumor, and the reduction of the radiation fields, resulting in a lack of electronic equilibrium that must be properly considered in the treatment planning system. These deviations involve dosimetric implications which are observable in clinical outcomes, determining how to proceed in treatment planning, to ensure that the actual dose delivered is performed accordingly to the prescription dose, while requiring the use of algorithms with a proper heterogeneity correction. (Author)

  14. Radiation therapy for cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mileikowsky, C.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for irradiating a patient comprising: a source of a radiation beam directed along a radiation axis; means mounting the source for pivotal movement about a first horizontal axis which intersects the source, is stationary with respect to the apparatus, and extends in a direction substantially normal to the radiation axis, whereby the beam is capable of an angular scan in a vertical plane; table means adapted to support a patient to be irradiated; and suspension means mounted the table means for arcuate movement to any positions angularly spaced about the first horizontal axis and for pivoting movement about a second horizontal axis displacement from and substantially parallel to the first horizontal axis. The suspension means maintain the second horizontal axis in substantially intersecting relation to the radiation axis in each of the positions while maintaining a fixed angular position of the table means with respect to the environment

  15. Radiation therapy of benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Order, S.E.; Donaldson, S.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on the evaluation and treatment of benign disease. The text begins with a chapter concerning standards of practice by an eminent malpractice lawyer, thereby clarifying the medical-legal implications of the radiation treatment of benign disease. The text then lists, in alphabetic order, those benign diseases which have been or are currently treated with radiotherapy for each disease entity. A feature is the survey of current radiation practice in the United States

  16. Impact of radiation therapy on sexual life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, T.; Gabelle Flandin, I.; Habold, D.; Hannoun-Levi, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of radiation therapy on sexual life. The analysis was based on a Pubmed literature review. The keywords used for this research were 'sexual, radiation, oncology, and cancer'. After a brief reminder on the anatomy and physiology, we explained the main complications of radiation oncology and their impact on sexual life. Preventive measures and therapeutic possibilities were discussed. Radiation therapy entails local, systematic and psychological after-effects. For women, vaginal stenosis and dyspareunia represent the most frequent side effects. For men, radiation therapy leads to erectile disorders for 25 to 75% of the patients. These complications have an echo often mattering on the patient quality of life of and on their sexual life post-treatment reconstruction. The knowledge of the indications and the various techniques of irradiation allow reducing its potential sexual morbidity. The information and the education of patients are essential, although often neglected. In conclusion, radiation therapy impacts in variable degrees on the sexual life of the patients. Currently, there are not enough preventive and therapeutic means. Patient information and the early screening of the sexual complications are at stake in the support of patients in the reconstruction of their sexual life. (authors)

  17. Radiation therapy of gastric carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Shogo

    1980-01-01

    A total of 136 cases with gastric cancer was treated with radiation and some anti-cancer drugs. The tumor responded markedly to radiation in 37% of 92 cases, irradiated more than 5000 rad and regressed completely in only 5% of them. Out of them, the permanent cure was achieved in 3% of T2-4 M0 cases. Serious complications, such as hemorrhagic gastritis, massive bleeding, chronic ulcer of the stomach and perforation, were also observed in a few per cent of them. It was suggested that in the treatment of inoperable gastric cancer, the combination treatment of radiation and chemotherapy should be chosen as a valuable therapeutic procedure to get a good palliation. (author)

  18. Results of radiation therapy in periarthritis humeroscapularis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze, J.; Schlichting, G.; Galalae, R.; Kimmig, B.; Koltze, H.

    2004-01-01

    Background: radiation therapy is applied in painful degenerative shoulder diseases. Aim of this work was to evaluate the contribution of radiation therapy to symptomatic improvement in periarthritis humeroscapularis. Methods: ninety-four patients with periarthritis humeroscapularis were treated in two institutions. Mean age was 68 years, sex distribution were 32 men and 62 women. In 58 cases the right side was affected, left in 36 cases. At single doses of 0,75 Gy once a week a total dose of 6 Gy was applied The treatment effect was evaluated by the standardized von Pannewitz-score at the end of the treatment up to 6 months thereafter. Results: the treatment results of all the 94 patients were documentated at the end of therapy. Seventy-one patients were followed at least for further 4 months. Radiogenic side-effects were not noticed. The symptoms of 54 patients (57.4%) were improved or vanished, in 40 cases the symptoms were not significantly affected (42.6%). Four months after therapy 42 of 71 patients were improved (59.2%), 29 unchanged (40.8%). The treatment effect occured typically up to 2 months after therapy, there were no age-related differences. Also in recurrent radiation therapies the symptoms improved, in 80 percent after one preceding therapy, however only in 31.2 percent after multiple prior radiotherapies. (orig.)

  19. Monte Carlo techniques in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Modern cancer treatment relies on Monte Carlo simulations to help radiotherapists and clinical physicists better understand and compute radiation dose from imaging devices as well as exploit four-dimensional imaging data. With Monte Carlo-based treatment planning tools now available from commercial vendors, a complete transition to Monte Carlo-based dose calculation methods in radiotherapy could likely take place in the next decade. Monte Carlo Techniques in Radiation Therapy explores the use of Monte Carlo methods for modeling various features of internal and external radiation sources, including light ion beams. The book-the first of its kind-addresses applications of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation technique in radiation therapy, mainly focusing on external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. It presents the mathematical and technical aspects of the methods in particle transport simulations. The book also discusses the modeling of medical linacs and other irradiation devices; issues specific...

  20. Liver cancer and selective internal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, C.

    2002-01-01

    Liver cancer is the biggest cancer-related killer of adults in the world. Liver cancer can be considered as two types: primary and secondary (metastatic). Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) is a revolutionary treatment for advanced liver cancer that utilises new technologies designed to deliver radiation directly to the site of tumours. SIRT, on the other hand, involves the delivery of millions of microscopic radioactive spheres called SIR-Spheres directly to the site of the liver tumour/s, where they selectively irradiate the tumours. The anti-cancer effect is concentrated in the liver and there is little effect on cancer at other sites such as the lungs or bones. The SIR-Spheres are delivered through a catheter placed in the femoral artery of the upper thigh and threaded through the hepatic artery (the major blood vessel of the liver) to the site of the tumour. The microscopic spheres, each approximately 35 microns (the size of four red blood cells or one-third the diameter of a strand of hair), are bonded to yttrium-90 (Y-90), a pure beta emitter with a physical half-life of 64.1 hours (about 2.67 days). The microspheres are trapped in the tumour's vascular bed, where they destroy the tumour from inside. The average range of the radiation is only 2.5 mm, so it is wholly contained within the patient's body; after 14 days, only 2.5 percent of the radioactive activity remains. The microspheres are suspended in water for injection. The vials are shipped in lead shields for radiation protection. Treatment with SIR-Spheres is generally not regarded as a cure, but has been shown to shrink the cancer more than chemotherapy alone. This can increase life expectancy and improve quality of life. On occasion, patients treated with SIR-Spheres have had such marked shrinkage of the liver cancer that the cancer can be surgically removed at a later date. This has resulted in a long-term cure for some patients. SIRTeX Medical Limited has developed three separate cancer

  1. The role of radiation therapy in childhood acute leukemia. A review from the viewpoint of basic and clinical radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Miwako

    2003-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been playing important roles in the treatment of childhood acute leukemia since the 1970s. The first is the preventive cranial irradiation for central nervous system therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The second is the total body irradiation as conditioning before bone marrow transplantation for children with acute myeloid leukemia in first remission and with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in second remission. Although some late effects have been reported, a part of them could be overcome by technical improvement in radiation and salvage therapy. Radiation therapy for children might have a successful outcome on a delicate balance between efficiencies and potential late toxicities. The role of radiation therapy for childhood acute leukemia was reviewed from the standpoint of basic and clinical radiation oncology in this paper. (author)

  2. Radiation Regulation Bodies in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavunda, R.D.

    2010-01-01

    Tthere are two types Regulatory Bodies in South Africa: department of Health - Radiation Control (DoH) and National Nuclear Regulator (NNR). The function DoH include of Promotion and maintenance of health within the framework of National health plan, Protection against injury or disease caused by technological devises, Protection against injury or disease caused by radiation, Promote safe and legal use of such products. The National Nuclear Regulator authorizes Nuclear Installation License, Nuclear Vessel License, Certificate of Registration and Certificate of Exemption. Some of the Electronic Products include licensing electro-medical products, Import or manufactured License conditions, Radiation workers, Report forms, Use and Radio-nuclides. Nuclear Authorization is the process of granting, by the National Nuclear Regulator, a written approval to applicants or / and operating organizations to perform nuclear related activities as detailed in the scope of the authorization. International Trade Administration Commission of South Africa (ITAC) issue license for import and export of all products including electronic X-Ray products and Radio-nuclides

  3. Advanced Small Animal Conformal Radiation Therapy Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sunil; Narayanasamy, Ganesh; Przybyla, Beata; Webber, Jessica; Boerma, Marjan; Clarkson, Richard; Moros, Eduardo G; Corry, Peter M; Griffin, Robert J

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a small animal conformal radiation therapy device that provides a degree of geometrical/anatomical targeting comparable to what is achievable in a commercial animal irradiator. small animal conformal radiation therapy device is capable of producing precise and accurate conformal delivery of radiation to target as well as for imaging small animals. The small animal conformal radiation therapy device uses an X-ray tube, a robotic animal position system, and a digital imager. The system is in a steel enclosure with adequate lead shielding following National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements 49 guidelines and verified with Geiger-Mueller survey meter. The X-ray source is calibrated following AAPM TG-61 specifications and mounted at 101.6 cm from the floor, which is a primary barrier. The X-ray tube is mounted on a custom-made "gantry" and has a special collimating assembly system that allows field size between 0.5 mm and 20 cm at isocenter. Three-dimensional imaging can be performed to aid target localization using the same X-ray source at custom settings and an in-house reconstruction software. The small animal conformal radiation therapy device thus provides an excellent integrated system to promote translational research in radiation oncology in an academic laboratory. The purpose of this article is to review shielding and dosimetric measurement and highlight a few successful studies that have been performed to date with our system. In addition, an example of new data from an in vivo rat model of breast cancer is presented in which spatially fractionated radiation alone and in combination with thermal ablation was applied and the therapeutic benefit examined.

  4. Radiation Therapy of Suprasellar Germ Cell Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Woo Yoon; Choi, Doo Ho; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Il Han; Ha, Sung Whan; Park, Charn Il

    1988-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed on 15 patients with suprasellar germ cell tumors treated by megavoltage external beam irradiation between Feb. 1979 and Dec. 1985. Follow-up period of survivors was 30 to 91 months. Histologic diagnosis was obtained before radiation therapy in 10 patients (9 germinomas and 1 mixed). Five patients were treated without histologic verification. In 9 patients with biopsy-proven germinomas radiation therapy was delivered to the craniospinal axis in 6, to the whole brain in 3. In 5 patients with mixed germ cell tumor or elevated tumor marker, irradiation was delivered to the craniospinal axis in 2, to the whole brain in 2, and to the primary site only in 1. Total doses ranged from 5,000 to 5,500 cGy to the primary site, 3,000 to 4,400 cGy to the whole brain, and 1,300 to 3,000 cGy to the spine. In these 14, local tumor was controlled and primary or spinal failure was not observed. One patient without elevated tumor marker was treated to the whole brain, The tumor was not controlled and he had spinal recurrence. It is proven that radiation therapy is an effective treatment for suprasellar germ cell tumors. The neuroendocrinologic presentation, tumor marker status, early response to radiation measured on CT seem to be useful means for selecting patients for radiation therapy when tissue diagnosis is not available

  5. Radiation therapy for resistant sternal hydatid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulger, S.; Barut, H.; Tunc, M.; Aydinkarahaliloglu, E.; Aydin, E.; Karaoglanoglu, N.; Gokcek, A.

    2013-01-01

    Hydatid disease is a zoonotic infectious disease for which there are known treatment procedures and effective antibiotics; however, there are resistant cases that do not respond to medication or surgery. We report a case diagnosed as hydatid disease of the chest wall and treated with radiation therapy (RT) after medical and surgical therapy had failed. In conclusion, RT represents an alternative treatment modality in resistant cases. (orig.)

  6. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended to generate high-energy neutrons for radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal...

  7. Clinical Implementation of a Model-Based In Vivo Dose Verification System for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy–Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatments Using the Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCowan, Peter M., E-mail: pmccowan@cancercare.mb.ca [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Asuni, Ganiyu [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Van Uytven, Eric [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); VanBeek, Timothy [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); McCurdy, Boyd M.C. [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Loewen, Shaun K. [Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ahmed, Naseer; Bashir, Bashir; Butler, James B.; Chowdhury, Amitava; Dubey, Arbind; Leylek, Ahmet; Nashed, Maged [CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To report findings from an in vivo dosimetry program implemented for all stereotactic body radiation therapy patients over a 31-month period and discuss the value and challenges of utilizing in vivo electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry clinically. Methods and Materials: From December 2013 to July 2016, 117 stereotactic body radiation therapy–volumetric modulated arc therapy patients (100 lung, 15 spine, and 2 liver) underwent 602 EPID-based in vivo dose verification events. A developed model-based dose reconstruction algorithm calculates the 3-dimensional dose distribution to the patient by back-projecting the primary fluence measured by the EPID during treatment. The EPID frame-averaging was optimized in June 2015. For each treatment, a 3%/3-mm γ comparison between our EPID-derived dose and the Eclipse AcurosXB–predicted dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and the ≥20% isodose volume were performed. Alert levels were defined as γ pass rates <85% (lung and liver) and <80% (spine). Investigations were carried out for all fractions exceeding the alert level and were classified as follows: EPID-related, algorithmic, patient setup, anatomic change, or unknown/unidentified errors. Results: The percentages of fractions exceeding the alert levels were 22.6% for lung before frame-average optimization and 8.0% for lung, 20.0% for spine, and 10.0% for liver after frame-average optimization. Overall, mean (± standard deviation) planning target volume γ pass rates were 90.7% ± 9.2%, 87.0% ± 9.3%, and 91.2% ± 3.4% for the lung, spine, and liver patients, respectively. Conclusions: Results from the clinical implementation of our model-based in vivo dose verification method using on-treatment EPID images is reported. The method is demonstrated to be valuable for routine clinical use for verifying delivered dose as well as for detecting errors.

  8. Postoperative radiation therapy for adenoid cystic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguchi, Masahiko; Shikama, Naoto; Gomi, Koutarou; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Arakawa, Kazukiyo; Sasaki, Shigeru; Takei, Kazuyoshi; Sone, Syusuke

    2000-01-01

    The authors retrospectively assessed the usefulness of postoperative radiation therapy after local resection of adenoid cystic carcinoma, with emphasis on organ-conserving treatment and the cosmetic results. Between 1985 and 1995, 32 patients underwent local resection followed by postoperative radiation therapy with curative and organ-conserving intent. None of patients received any form of chemotherapy as part of their initial treatment. Radiation therapy was carried out by techniques that were appropriate for the site and extension of each tumor. The 5-year local control, disease-free, and overall survival rates of all patients were 76%, 68%, and 86%, respectively. The 5-year local control rate and disease-free survival rate of patients with microscopically positive margins were 89% and 75%, respectively, and higher than in patients with macroscopically residual disease, but no significant difference in 5-year overall survival rate was observed. The postoperative cosmetic results in 29 patients with head and neck lesions were evaluated. No difference was documented between the cosmetic results postoperatively setting and after postoperative radiotherapy, and no significant differences in cosmetic results were observed according to radiation dose. The combination of local resection with organ-conserving intent and postoperative radiation therapy provided good cosmetic results in patients with T1 or T2 lesions. Postoperative radiation therapy with smaller fractions is useful, because good local control can be achieved in patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma having microscopically positive margins without inducing any late adverse reactions. However, the number of patients was too small and the follow-up period was too short to draw any definite conclusion in regard to fraction size. A much longer follow-up study with a larger number patients will be required to accurately determine the optimal treatment intensity and duration of treatment. (K.H.)

  9. Bullous pemphigoid after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duschet, P.; Schwarz, T.; Gschnait, F.

    1988-02-01

    Electron beam therapy applied to a lymph node metastasis from a squamous cell carcinoma was followed by the development of histologically and immunologically typical bullous pemphigoid, the lesions being initially strictly confined to the irradiation area. This observation suggests that the bullous pemphigoid antigen may be altered or unmasked by electron beam radiotherapy, leading subsequently to the production of autoantibodies. The disease in this case effectively responded to the administration of tetracycline and niacinamide, a therapeutic regimen described recently.

  10. Radiation Therapy for Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, In Kyu; Kim, Jae Choel [Kyungpook National University College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-15

    Purpose : A retrospective analysis for patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma who were treated with radiation was performed to assess the results of treatment and patterns of failure, and to identify the factors that might influence survival. Methods and Materials : From March 1985 through June 1993, 53 patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma were treated with either radiation therapy alone or combination of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University Hospital. Patients' ages ranged from 31 to 73 years with a median age of 54 years. There were 47 men and 6 women. Forty-two patients (79.2%) had squamous cell carcinoma, 10 patients (18.9%) had undifferentiated carcinoma and 1 patient (1.9%) had adenoid cystic carcinoma. There were 2 patients with stage I 12 patients with stage II, 12 patients with stage III and 27 patients with stage IV. According to the TNM classification, patients were distributed as follows: T1 7, T2 2, T3 10, T4 7, TX 1, and N0 17, N1 13, N2 21, N3 2. The primary tumor sites were tonsillar region in 36 patients (67.9%) base of the tongue in 12 patients (22.6%), and soft palate in 5 patients (9.4%). Twenty-five patients were treated with radiation therapy alone and twenty-eight patients were treated with one to three courses of chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy. Chemotherapeutic regimens used were either CF (cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil) or CVB (cisplatin, vincristine and bleomycin), Radiation therapy was delivered 180-200 cGy daily,five times a week using 6 MV X-ray with or without 8-10 MeV electron beams. A tumor dose ranged from 4500 cGy to 7740 cGy with a median dose of 7100 cGy. The follow-up time ranged from 4months to 99 months with a median of 21 months. Results : Thrity-seven patients (69.8%) achieved a CR (complete response) and PR (partial response) in 16 patients (30.2%) after radiation therapy. The overall survival rates were 47% at 2 years and 42% at

  11. Radiation between segments of the seated human body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft

    2002-01-01

    Detailed radiation properties for a thermal manikin were predicted numerically. The view factors between individual body-segments and between the body-segments and the outer surfaces were tabulated. On an integral basis, the findings compared well to other studies and the results showed...... that situations exist for which radiation between individual body segments is important....

  12. PET/CT in Radiation Therapy Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil

    2018-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an important component of the management of lymphoma patients. Most lymphomas are metabolically active and accumulate 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Positron emission tomography with computer tomography (PET/CT) imaging using FDG is used routinely in staging and treatment...

  13. Electron beams in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruinvis, I.A.D.

    1987-01-01

    Clinical electron beams in interaction with beam flattening and collimating devices are studied, in order to obtain the means for adequate electron therapy. A treatment planning method for arbitrary field shapes is developed that takes the properties of the collimated electron beams into account. An electron multiple-scattering model is extended to incorporate a model for the loss of electrons with depth, in order to improve electron beam dose planning. A study of ionisation measurements in two different phantom materials yields correction factors for electron beam dosimetry. (Auth.)

  14. Radiation therapy for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatani, Masashi; Matayoshi, Yoshinobu; Masaki, Norie

    1992-01-01

    From 1977 through 1989, 149 patients with esophageal carcinoma were treated with external irradiation (EI) with or without high-dose rate intraluminal irradiation (HDRII) using remote afterloading system. Concerning complete response group EI alone showed higher local control rate than EI + HDRII, especially in ulcerative type. Another problem is the EI field. Fourteen of 22 patients who were salvaged by surgery due to local recurrence after EI showed marginal or out-field metastasis of the lymph node. These preliminary results suggest that HDRII is not effective for the local control of the ulcerative lesion as a boost therapy, EI should be given for the entire regional lymph nodes. (author)

  15. Selective internal radiation therapy for liver tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundram, Francis X; Buscombe, John R

    2017-10-01

    Primary and secondary liver malignancies are common and associated with a poor prognosis. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice; however, many patients have unresectable disease. In these cases, several liver directed therapies are available, including selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT). SIRT is a multidisciplinary treatment involving nuclear medicine, interventional radiology and oncology. High doses of localised internal radiation are selectively delivered to liver tumour tissues, with relative sparing of adjacent normal liver parenchyma. Side effects are minimal and radiation protection measures following treatment are straightforward. In patients who have progressed following chemotherapy, clinical trials demonstrate prolonged liver progression-free survival. SIRT is offered at 10 centres in England via the NHS England Commissioning through Evaluation programme and is approved by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence for certain liver malignancies. SIRT holds unique promise for personalised treatment of liver tumours. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  16. Inter-scan and inter-observer tumour volume delineation variability on cone beam computed tomography in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ying; Lee, Stephanie; Agrawal, Vishesh; Romano, John; Baldini, Elizabeth H; Chen, Aileen B; Kozono, David E; Killoran, Joseph H; Wagar, Matthew; Hacker, Fred L; Aerts, Hugo Jwl; Lewis, John H; Mak, Raymond H

    2017-02-01

    Quantification of volume changes on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) during lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and for adaptive treatment planning. This study quantifies inter-scan and inter-observer variability in tumour volume delineation on CBCT. Three clinicians independently contoured the primary gross tumour volume (GTV) manually on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (post) for 19 NSCLC patients. Relative volume differences (RVD) were calculated between the pre- and post-CBCTs for a given treatment and between any two of three observers for a given CBCT. Coefficient of variation (CV) was used to quantitatively measure and compare the extent of variability. Inter-observer variability had a significantly higher CV of 0.15 ± 0.13 compared to inter-scan CV of 0.03 ± 0.04 with P < 0.0001. The greatest variability was observed with tumours (<2 cm in diameter) versus larger tumours with 95% limit of agreement (LOA) (Mean ± Standard Deviation) of 1.90% ± 19.55% vs. -0.97% ± 12.26% for inter-scan RVD and 29.99% ± 73.84% vs. 9.37% ± 29.95% for inter-observer RVD respectively. Inter-observer variability was greater than inter-scan variability for tumour volume delineation on CBCT with greatest variability for small tumours (<2 cm in diameter). LOA for inter-scan variability (~12%) helps defines a threshold for clinically meaningful tumour volume change during SBRT treatment for tumours with diameter greater than 2 cm, with larger thresholds needed for smaller tumours. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  17. A dosimetric study of a heterogeneous phantom for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy comparing Monte Carlo and pencil beam calculations to dose distributions measured with a 2-D diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curley, Casey Michael

    Monte Carlo (MC) and Pencil Beam (PB) calculations are compared to their measured planar dose distributions using a 2-D diode array for lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). The planar dose distributions were studied for two different phantom types: an in-house heterogeneous phantom and a homogeneous phantom. The motivation is to mimic the human anatomy during a lung SBRT treatment and incorporate heterogeneities into the pre-treatment Quality Assurance process, where measured and calculated planar dose distributions are compared before the radiation treatment. Individual and combined field dosimetry has been performed for both fixed gantry angle (anterior to posterior) and planned gantry angle delivery. A gamma analysis has been performed for all beam arrangements. The measurements were obtained using the 2-D diode array MapCHECK 2(TM). MC and PB calculations were performed using the BrainLAB iPlan RTRTM Dose software. The results suggest that with the heterogeneous phantom as a quality assurance device, the MC calculations result in closer agreements to the measured values, when using the planned gantry angle delivery method for composite beams. For the homogeneous phantom, the results suggest that the preferred delivery method is at the fixed anterior to posterior gantry angle. Furthermore, the MC and PB calculations do not show significant differences for dose difference and distance to agreement criteria 3%/3mm. However, PB calculations are in better agreement with the measured values for more stringent gamma criteria when considering individual beam whereas MC agreements are closer for composite beam measurements.

  18. Influence of Fractionation Scheme and Tumor Location on Toxicities After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Large (≥5 cm) Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Multi-institutional Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Shostrom, Valerie K. [Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Zhen, Weining; Zhang, Mutian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Braunstein, Steve E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Holland, John [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Hallemeier, Christopher L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Harkenrider, Matthew M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, Illinois (United States); Iskhanian, Adrian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Attia, Albert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Lee, Percy [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Wang, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Decker, Roy H. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); McGarry, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Simone, Charles B., E-mail: charlessimone@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: To describe the impact of fractionation scheme and tumor location on toxicities in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for ≥5-cm non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as part of a multi-institutional analysis. Methods: Patients with primary ≥5-cm N0 M0 NSCLC who underwent ≤5-fraction SBRT were examined across multiple high-volume SBRT centers. Collected data included clinical/treatment parameters; toxicities were prospectively assessed at each institution according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Patients treated daily were compared with those treated every other day (QOD)/other nondaily regimens. Stratification between central and peripheral tumors was also performed. Results: Ninety-two patients from 12 institutions were evaluated (2004-2016), with median follow-up of 12 months. In total there were 23 (25%) and 6 (7%) grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 toxicities, respectively. Grades 2 and 3 pulmonary toxicities occurred in 9% and 4%, respectively; 1 patient treated daily experienced grade 5 radiation pneumonitis. Of the entire cohort, 46 patients underwent daily SBRT, and 46 received QOD (n=40)/other nondaily (n=6) regimens. Clinical/treatment parameters were similar between groups; the QOD/other group was more likely to receive 3-/4-fraction schemas. Patients treated QOD/other experienced significantly fewer grade ≥2 toxicities as compared with daily treatment (7% vs 43%, P<.001). Patients treated daily also had higher rates of grade ≥2 pulmonary toxicities (P=.014). Patients with peripheral tumors (n=66) were more likely to receive 3-/4-fraction regimens than those with central tumors (n=26). No significant differences in grade ≥2 toxicities were identified according to tumor location (P>.05). Conclusions: From this multi-institutional study, toxicity of SBRT for ≥5-cm lesions is acceptable, and daily treatment was associated with a higher rate of toxicities.

  19. Combined therapy of urinary bladder radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaderin, V.P.; Polyanichko, M.F.

    1982-01-01

    A scheme of therapy of radiation cystitis is suggested. It was developed on the basis of evaluation of literature data and clinical of 205 patients with radiation injury of the urinary bladder. The method is based on general and local therapy of damaged tissues by antiinflammatory drugs, anesthetics and stimulators of reparative regeneration. Severe ulcerative and incrustation cystites, refractory to conservative therapy, were treated by surgery, using antiseptics and reparation stimulators before, during and after operation. As a result, there were hardly any complications after reconstruction of the bladder with intestinal and peritoneal tissues. 104 patients (96.1%) were cured completely and ability to work was restored in 70 patients (76.9%) [ru

  20. Radiation therapy of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Toshiki; Koga, Sukehiko; Anno, Hirofumi; Komai, Satoshi (Fujita-Gakuen Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan))

    1992-01-01

    During the decade from 1978 to 1987, 20 patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were treated with irradiation of 2000 cGy to the orbital tissue. We examined the effects of the therapy on 17 such patients. Exophthalmos tended to decrease. When the degree of deviation of the exophthalmic eye was small, the effect of therapy tended to be better than when it was large. Two cases that showed an increase in retrobulbar fatty tissue without thickening of the extraocular muscles did not respond as well as those that had thickening of the extraocular muscles. Diplopia tended to improve both subjectively and objectively. Ocular movement improved in 11 of the 17 patients. There were no serious radiation injuries after the radiation therapy, except for some transient swelling of the eyelid. (author).

  1. Computer models for optimizing radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duechting, W.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this contribution is to outline how methods of system analysis, control therapy and modelling can be applied to simulate normal and malignant cell growth and to optimize cancer treatment as for instance radiation therapy. Based on biological observations and cell kinetic data, several types of models have been developed describing the growth of tumor spheroids and the cell renewal of normal tissue. The irradiation model is represented by the so-called linear-quadratic model describing the survival fraction as a function of the dose. Based thereon, numerous simulation runs for different treatment schemes can be performed. Thus, it is possible to study the radiation effect on tumor and normal tissue separately. Finally, this method enables a computer-assisted recommendation for an optimal patient-specific treatment schedule prior to clinical therapy. (orig.) [de

  2. Database for radiation therapy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalev, S.; Cosby, S.; Leszczynski, K.; Chu, T.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have developed a database for images acquired during simulation and verification of radiation treatments. Simulation images originate as planning films that are digitized with a video camera, or through direct digitization of fluoroscopic images. Verification images may also be digitized from portal films or acquired with an on-line portal imaging system. Images are classified by the patient, the fraction, the field direction, static or dynamic (movie) sequences, and the type of processing applied. Additional parameters indicate whether the source is a simulation or treatment, whether images are digitized film or real-time acquisitions, and whether treatment is portal or double exposure for beam localization. Examples are presented for images acquired, processed, stored, and displayed with on-line portal imaging system (OPIUM) and digital simulation system (FLIP)

  3. Electron wedges for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lief, Eugene P.; Lo, Y.-C.; Humm, John L.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Brain tumors can be advantageously treated with electron over photon radiation, by exploiting the rapid fall-off in dose with depth. This advantage could be further enhanced by utilizing multiple electron beams. However, in some beam configurations, wedged dose profiles would be necessary for the dose uniformity. Unlike photons, shaped pieces of material placed in electron beam severely degrade the energy, give additional scattering and, therefore, are suboptimal. The purpose of this study was to create wedged electron fields, using intensity modulation. The combination of electron wedges enables a more uniform coverage of brain tumors with a reduced dose to normal tissue. Methods and Materials: Intensity modulation was performed for 10 to 50 MeV electrons using a narrow scanning elementary beam of a racetrack Microtron accelerator, delivering radiation pulses with coordinates and intensities prescribed by a custom scan matrix. Dispensing more pulses (or longer pulses) within the field to increase the local dose, one can sharpen the penumbra at depth and generate wedged dose distributions of arbitrary angle as well as many other desired profiles. We modulated the electron beams, measured dose distributions using film in an anthropomorphic phantom, and compared the results with conventional techniques. Results: Intensity modulation of electron beams decreases the 50-90% penumbra at depth by 40% and increases the flatness by 80%. Wedged profiles at depth can be created for any angle up to about 70 deg. , depending on the beam energy. Multiple modulated electron beams give smaller 20-70% but larger 70-100% isodose regions than photon beams. Conclusions: Electron beams can improve dose distributions in brain compared to the same number of photon beams, reducing the 20-70% isodoses region in normal tissue by 30%. Intensity modulation significantly improves the dose distribution from combined electron beams providing a sharper penumbra, better conformity, and

  4. Combination of Pre-Treatment DWI-Signal Intensity and S-1 Treatment: A Predictor of Survival in Patients with Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Sequential S-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify whether the combination of pre-treatment radiological and clinical factors can predict the overall survival (OS in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC treated with stereotactic body radiation and sequential S-1 (a prodrug of 5-FU combined with two modulators therapy with improved accuracy compared with that of established clinical and radiologic risk models. METHODS: Patients admitted with LAPC underwent diffusion weighted imaging (DWI scan at 3.0-T (b = 600 s/mm2. The mean signal intensity (SIb = 600 of region-of-interest (ROI was measured. The Log-rank test was done for tumor location, biliary stent, S-1, and other treatments and the Cox regression analysis was done to identify independent prognostic factors for OS. Prediction error curves (PEC were used to assess potential errors in prediction of survival. The accuracy of prediction was evaluated by Integrated Brier Score (IBS and C index. RESULTS: 41 patients were included in this study. The median OS was 11.7 months (2.8-23.23 months. The 1-year OS was 46%. Multivariate analysis showed that pre-treatment SIb = 600 value and administration of S-1 were independent predictors for OS. The performance of pre-treatment SIb = 600 and S-1 treatment in combination was better than that of SIb = 600 or S-1 treatment alone. CONCLUSION: The combination of pre-treatment SIb = 600 and S-1 treatment could predict the OS in patients with LAPC undergoing SBRT and sequential S-1 therapy with improved accuracy compared with that of established clinical and radiologic risk models.

  5. WE-AB-BRA-02: Development of Biomechanical Models to Describe Dose-Volume Response to Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, M; Polan, D; Feng, M; Lawrence, T; Haken, R Ten; Brock, K [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    with the biological characterization of patients’ response to radiation.

  6. Tumor Control Probability Modeling for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Early-Stage Lung Cancer Using Multiple Bio-physical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Tai, An; Lee, Percy; Biswas, Tithi; Ding, George X.; El Naqa, Isaam; Grimm, Jimm; Jackson, Andrew; Kong, Feng-Ming (Spring); LaCouture, Tamara; Loo, Billy; Miften, Moyed; Solberg, Timothy; Li, X Allen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To analyze pooled clinical data using different radiobiological models and to understand the relationship between biologically effective dose (BED) and tumor control probability (TCP) for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Method and Materials The clinical data of 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year actuarial or Kaplan-Meier TCP from 46 selected studies were collected for SBRT of NSCLC in the literature. The TCP data were separated for Stage T1 and T2 tumors if possible, otherwise collected for combined stages. BED was calculated at isocenters using six radiobiological models. For each model, the independent model parameters were determined from a fit to the TCP data using the least chi-square (χ2) method with either one set of parameters regardless of tumor stages or two sets for T1 and T2 tumors separately. Results The fits to the clinic data yield consistent results of large α/β ratios of about 20 Gy for all models investigated. The regrowth model that accounts for the tumor repopulation and heterogeneity leads to a better fit to the data, compared to other 5 models where the fits were indistinguishable between the models. The models based on the fitting parameters predict that the T2 tumors require about additional 1 Gy physical dose at isocenters per fraction (≤5 fractions) to achieve the optimal TCP when compared to the T1 tumors. Conclusion This systematic analysis of a large set of published clinical data using different radiobiological models shows that local TCP for SBRT of early-stage NSCLC has strong dependence on BED with large α/β ratios of about 20 Gy. The six models predict that a BED (calculated with α/β of 20) of 90 Gy is sufficient to achieve TCP ≥ 95%. Among the models considered, the regrowth model leads to a better fit to the clinical data. PMID:27871671

  7. Contemporary radiation therapy in combined modality therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Amol K; Terezakis, Stephanie A

    2015-05-01

    The advent of effective combination chemotherapy markedly changed the management of Hodgkin lymphoma, establishing combined modality therapy as the standard of care for most patients with this disease. In response, significant interest has been shown in refining the delivery of radiation in the combined modality setting such that toxicity is minimized while still preserving disease control. An understanding of the way in which radiation treatment fields, prescription dose, and advanced technology have evolved to accomplish these goals is critical. Moreover, fluency in the clinical literature exploring contemporary questions, such as the omission of radiation and response-based treatment, is equally important. Knowledge of these topics will yield both an appreciation of the value of radiation in the combined modality setting and the ability to better customize treatment regimens to individual patients. Copyright © 2015 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  8. Pulsed laser radiation therapy of skin tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, A.P.; Moskalik, K.G.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation from a neodymium laser was used to treat 846 patients with 687 precancerous lesions or benign tumors of the skin, 516 cutaneous carcinomas, 33 recurrences of cancer, 51 melanomas, and 508 metastatic melanomas in the skin. The patients have been followed for three months to 6.5 years. No relapses have been observed during this period. Metastases to regional lymph nodes were found in five patients with skin melanoma. Pulsed laser radiation may be successfully used in the treatment of precancerous lesions and benign tumors as well as for skin carcinoma and its recurrences, and for skin melanoma. Laser radiation is more effective in the treatment of tumors inaccessible to radiation therapy and better in those cases in which surgery may have a bad cosmetic or even mutilating effect. Laser beams can be employed in conjunction with chemo- or immunotherapy

  9. Combination radiation-adriamycin therapy: renoprival growth, functional and structural effects in the immature mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, S.S.; Moskowitz, P.S.; Canty, E.L.; Fajardo, L.F.

    1980-01-01

    The normal tissue effects of radiation-adriamycin combination therapy were studied in the renoprival weanling mouse in an attempt to determine whether compensatory renal growth inhibition from radiation and chemotherapy could be associated with structural or functional abnormalities. Weanling BLc/sub Fl/ mice underwent unilateral nephrectomy, then single fraction renal irradiation, LD 1/21 doses of adriamycin in 5 daily doses, or combination therapy with radiation and adriamycin. Animals were sacrificed at 3, 12, and 24 weeks. Compensatory renal growth, body growth, serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and renal morphology by light microscopy were evaluated. Significant compensatory renal growth inhibition from radiation-adriamycin therapy exceeded that produced by adriamycin alone and radiation alone, at all time periods (p < 0.005). Body growth inhibition from radiation-adriamycin therapy or adriamycin alone significantly exceeded that produced by radiation alone (p < 0.005). Kidney and body growth inhibition from radiation-adriamycin therapy was proportionately severe. Kidney growth inhibition proportionately exceeded body growth inhibition with radiation alone; body growth inhibition proportionately exceeded kidney growth inhibition with adriamycin alone. Comparable azotemia developed by 24 weeks in both the radiation alone (p < .005) and radiation-adriamycin animals (p < 0.005), but not in the adriamycin only animals. Morphologic alterations consisting of increased glomerular density, tubular atrophy, and stromal fibrosis occurred with greater severity in the radiation-adriamycin animals than in the radiation only animals by 24 weeks; no alterations were seen in the adriamycin only animals. Using histologic criteria 750 rad plus adriamycin produced comparable injury as seen with 1000 rad alone, thus adriamycin produced an apparent dose-modifying factor of 1.33

  10. External beam radiation therapy for recurrent sigmoid colorectal cancer. Retrospective analysis by group comparison between the radiation therapy alone and the radiation therapy combined with other therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churei, Hisahiko; Takeshita, Tsuyoshi; Hiraki, Yoshiyuki; Baba, Yasutaka; Hokotate, Hirohumi; Nakajo, Masayuki; Ohkubo, Kouichi; Miyaji, Noriaki

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate retrospectively clinical efficacy of curativeintent external beam radiation therapy for recurrent sigmoid colorectal cancer. As the radiation therapy of higher dose level combined with other therapies might improve pain control, tumor response, and prognosis, the total dose over 60 Gy was delivered except cases that were received surgery for the recurrent tumor. The study population consisted of 25 patients received the radiation therapy alone (RTA) and 24 patients received the radiation therapy combined with other one or two treatment modalities (RTC), which included surgery (tumor resection) in 15 cases, chemotherapy (low dose daily CDDP) in 13 cases, and hyperthermia in 6 cases. They received the radiation therapy from January, 1989 to June, 1996. Data on pain relief and tumor response were compared between the groups of RTA and RTC. The effect on pain relief was not different between the two groups. Tumor response appeared to be high in the patients combined with chemotherapy, but the difference was not statistically significant between the groups. There were no differences in the prognosis by the recurrent tumor size, the pain relief, and the tumor response. There was a statistically significant difference in the prognosis between the groups with and without extrapelvic distant metastases. A more effective treatment modality combined with the external radiation therapy is necessary to improve the clinical efficacy for the recurrent sigmoid colorectal cancer. (author)

  11. 21 CFR 892.5840 - Radiation therapy simulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiation therapy simulation system. 892.5840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5840 Radiation therapy simulation system. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy simulation system is a fluoroscopic or radiographic x-ray...

  12. 21 CFR 892.5750 - Radionuclide radiation therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide radiation therapy system. 892.5750... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5750 Radionuclide radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A radionuclide radiation therapy system is a device intended to permit an...

  13. Radiation therapy with fast neutrons: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.T.L.; Wambersie, A.

    2007-01-01

    Because of their biological effects fast neutrons are most effective in treating large, slow-growing tumours which are resistant to conventional X-radiation. Patients are treated typically 3-4 times per week for 4-5 weeks (sometimes in combination with X-radiation) for a variety of conditions such as carcinomas of the head and neck, salivary gland, paranasal sinus and breast; soft tissue, bone and uterine sarcomas and malignant melanomas. It is estimated that about 27,000 patients have undergone fast neutron therapy to date

  14. Determination of the radiation dose to the body due to external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, G.; Eckerl, H.

    1985-01-01

    Section 63 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance defines the basic requirement, determination of radiation dose to the body. The determination of dose equivalents for the body is the basic step in practical monitoring of dose equivalents or dose limits with regard to individuals or population groups, both for constant or varying conditions of exposure. The main field of monitoring activities is the protection of persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Conversion factors between body doses and radiation quantities are explained. (DG) [de

  15. Modern radiation therapy for extranodal lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena

    2015-01-01

    , involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far...... adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other...

  16. Radiation Therapy in Elderly Skin Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hee

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the long term results (local control, survival, failure, and complications) after radiation therapy for skin cancer in elderly patients. The study spanned from January 1990 to October 2002. Fifteen elderly patients with skin cancer were treated by radiotherapy at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. The age distribution of the patients surveyed was 72 to 95 years, with a median age of 78.8 years. The pathologic classification of the 15 patients included squamous cell carcinoma (10 patients), basal cell carcinoma (3 patients), verrucous carcinoma (1 patient) and skin adnexal origin carcinoma (1 patient). The most common tumor location was the head (13 patients). The mean tumor diameter was 4.9 cm (range 2 to 9 cm). The radiation dose was delivered via an electron beam of 6 to 15 MeV. The dose range was adjusted to the tumor diameter and depth of tumor invasion. The total radiation dose ranged from 50∼80 Gy (mean: 66 Gy) with a 2 Gy fractional dose prescribed to the 80% isodose line once a day and 5 times a week. One patient with lymph node metastasis was treated with six MV photon beams boosted with electron beams. The length of the follow-up periods ranged from 10 to 120 months with a median follow-up period of 48 months. The local control rates were 100% (15/15). In addition, the five year disease free survival rate (5YDFS) was 80% and twelve patients (80%) had no recurrence and skin cancer recurrence occurred in 3 patients (20%). Three patients have lived an average of 90 months (68∼120 months) without recurrence or metastasis. A total of 9 patients who died as a result of other causes had a mean survival time of 55.8 months after radiation therapy. No severe acute or chronic complications were observed after radiation therapy. Only minor complications including radiation dermatitis was treated with supportive care. The results suggest that radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment method for the treatment of skin cancer in

  17. Radiation therapy for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, S.M.; Gillette, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation therapy may be indicated for larger invasive tumors of the head and neck that may be difficult to surgically excise or for which surgery would be significantly disfiguring. Previous studies of oral squamous cell carcinomas indicate that it should be possible to control approximately 80% of all but the most advanced local or locoregional tumors. Aggressive radiation therapy to total doses of 56 Gy or greater may be required. That can be done by using smaller doses per fraction and gradually reducing the size of the field so that the highest dose is given only to the tumor with a relatively tight margin. Malignant melanomas can be controlled locally apparently with a few large fractions. Metastatic disease limits survival; therefore, some type of systemic therapy seems to be needed to improve survival of those patients. Canine oral fibrosarcomas require a very high dose for a reasonable probability of control. It seems that a dose of 56 Gy given in 3.3 Gy fractions might provide local control of 50% of the tumors. It is likely that a combination of surgery and radiation would significantly improve the probability for control. Oral squamous cell carcinomas of cats must also be treated very aggressively to improve local control. Tumors of the nasal cavity are usually very large and invasive at the time of diagnosis. Radiation therapy has been shown to be effective in some instances. It is possible that with better definition of the tumor through computerized tomography imaging and improved treatment planning, control of these difficult to manage nasal tumors can be improved

  18. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Geneva Foundation , Tacoma, WA 98402 REPORT DATE: November 2017 TYPE OF REPORT: Final PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE November 2017 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 08/04/2008 - 08/03/2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeted Radiation Therapy...REPORT NUMBER The Geneva Foundation 917 Pacific Ave, Suite 600 Tacoma, WA 98402 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR

  19. Sterotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Méndez Romero (Alejandra)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAs a common deposit for tumor cells, the liver is second only to the lymph nodes as a site of metastatic disease. Unfortunately, by the time patients present with liver metastases there is usually evidence of the systemic spread of the disease, and patients can not longer be considered

  20. Chronic neuroendocrinological sequelae of radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklar, C.A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Constine, L.S. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States)

    1995-03-30

    A variety of neuroendocrine disturbances are observed following treatment with external radiation therapy when the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA) is included in the treatment field. Radiation-induced abnormalities are generally dose dependent and may develop many years after irradiation. Growth hormone deficiency and premature sexual development can occur following doses as low as 18 Gy fractionated radiation and are the most common neuroendocrine problems noted in children. Deficiency of gonadotropins, thyroid stimulating hormone, and adrenocorticotropin are seen primarily in individuals treated with > 40 Gy HPA irradiation. Hyperprolactinemia can be seen following high-dose radiotherapy (>40 Gy), especially among young women. Most neuroendocrine disturbances that develop as a result of HPA irradiation are treatable; patients at risk require long-term endocrine follow-up. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Generalized Morphea after Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Kushi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 69-year-old woman who received external beam radiation for the treatment of breast cancer. Seven months later, she developed generalized morphea involving the area of irradiated skin of the breast as well as distant sites of the groin and distal lower extremity. Postirradiation morphea is an uncommon yet well-documented phenomenon, usually confined to the radiated site and the immediate surrounding tissue. To our knowledge, this is only the fourth reported case of morphea occurring distant from the radiation field. While most cases of postirradiation morphea have been shown to either resolve spontaneously or respond to topical corticosteroids, our patient required systemic therapy with methotrexate, which resulted in clinical improvement. With this paper, we hope to bring further awareness to this phenomenon and demonstrate a successful treatment response with the use of methotrexate in postirradiation generalized morphea.

  2. Fiber-optic dosimeters for radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Enbang; Archer, James

    2017-10-01

    According to the figures provided by the World Health Organization, cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 8.8 million deaths in 2015. Radiation therapy, which uses x-rays to destroy or injure cancer cells, has become one of the most important modalities to treat the primary cancer or advanced cancer. The newly developed microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), which uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of x-ray microbeams (typically 50 μm wide and separated by 400 μm) produced by synchrotron sources, represents a new paradigm in radiotherapy and has shown great promise in pre-clinical studies on different animal models. Measurements of the absorbed dose distribution of microbeams are vitally important for clinical acceptance of MRT and for developing quality assurance systems for MRT, hence are a challenging and important task for radiation dosimetry. On the other hand, during the traditional LINAC based radiotherapy and breast cancer brachytherapy, skin dose measurements and treatment planning also require a high spatial resolution, tissue equivalent, on-line dosimeter that is both economical and highly reliable. Such a dosimeter currently does not exist and remains a challenge in the development of radiation dosimetry. High resolution, water equivalent, optical and passive x-ray dosimeters have been developed and constructed by using plastic scintillators and optical fibers. The dosimeters have peak edge-on spatial resolutions ranging from 50 to 500 microns in one dimension, with a 10 micron resolution dosimeter under development. The developed fiber-optic dosimeters have been test with both LINAC and synchrotron x-ray beams. This work demonstrates that water-equivalent and high spatial resolution radiation detection can be achieved with scintillators and optical fiber systems. Among other advantages, the developed fiber-optic probes are also passive, energy independent, and radiation hard.

  3. Image-guided radiation therapy: physician's perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, T.; Anand Narayan, C.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of radiotherapy has been ontogenetically linked to medical imaging. Over the years, major technological innovations have resulted in substantial improvements in radiotherapy planning, delivery, and verification. The increasing use of computed tomography imaging for target volume delineation coupled with availability of computer-controlled treatment planning and delivery systems have progressively led to conformation of radiation dose to the target tissues while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Recent advances in imaging technology coupled with improved treatment delivery allow near-simultaneous soft-tissue localization of tumor and repositioning of patient. The integration of various imaging modalities within the treatment room for guiding radiation delivery has vastly improved the management of geometric uncertainties in contemporary radiotherapy practice ushering in the paradigm of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Image-guidance should be considered a necessary and natural corollary to high-precision radiotherapy that was long overdue. Image-guided radiation therapy not only provides accurate information on patient and tumor position on a quantitative scale, it also gives an opportunity to verify consistency of planned and actual treatment geometry including adaptation to daily variations resulting in improved dose delivery. The two main concerns with IGRT are resource-intensive nature of delivery and increasing dose from additional imaging. However, increasing the precision and accuracy of radiation delivery through IGRT is likely to reduce toxicity with potential for dose escalation and improved tumor control resulting in favourable therapeutic index. The radiation oncology community needs to leverage this technology to generate high-quality evidence to support widespread adoption of IGRT in contemporary radiotherapy practice. (author)

  4. A multi-institutional phase 2 trial of prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using continuous real-time evaluation of prostate motion with patient-reported quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, William C; Dess, Robert T; Litzenberg, Dale W; Li, Pin; Schipper, Matthew; Rosenthal, Seth A; Chang, Garrick C; Horwitz, Eric M; Price, Robert A; Michalski, Jeff M; Gay, Hiram A; Wei, John T; Feng, Mary; Feng, Felix Y; Sandler, Howard M; Wallace, Robert E; Spratt, Daniel E; Hamstra, Daniel A

    The use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer has been reported predominantly from single institutional studies, although concerns for broader adoption exist. From 2011 through 2013, 66 men were accrued to a phase 2 trial at 5 centers. SBRT consisted of 5 fractions of 7.4 Gy to a total dose of 37 Gy using conventional linear accelerators. Electromagnetic transponders were used for motion management. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was evaluated via the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite 26 questionnaire. Acute and late toxicities were collected according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Linear mixed modeling was performed to assess changes in HRQOL over time. Median follow-up was 36 months. All men had low- or intermediate-risk disease. There have been 0 biochemical recurrences. No grade 3 urinary or bowel toxicity was reported. Twenty-three percent of patients had acute grade 2 urinary toxicity, with 9% late grade 2 urinary toxicity. Four percent and 5% experienced acute or late grade 2+ bowel toxicity, respectively. Urinary bother and bowel HRQOL transiently decreased during the first 6 to 12 months post-SBRT, and then returned to baseline. In men with good erectile function at baseline, sexual HRQOL declined during the first 6 months and stabilized thereafter. On linear mixed modeling, the strongest predictor of sustained bowel and sexual HRQOL was baseline HRQOL. In this multi-institutional phase 2 clinical trial using continuous real-time evaluation of prostate motion, prostate SBRT has excellent intermediate-term tumor control with mild and expected treatment-related side effects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. SU-G-BRA-10: Marker Free Lung Tumor Motion Tracking by An Active Contour Model On Cone Beam CT Projections for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, M; Yuan, Y; Lo, Y [The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Wei, J [City College of New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel strategy to extract the lung tumor motion from cone beam CT (CBCT) projections by an active contour model with interpolated respiration learned from diaphragm motion. Methods: Tumor tracking on CBCT projections was accomplished with the templates derived from planning CT (pCT). There are three major steps in the proposed algorithm: 1) The pCT was modified to form two CT sets: a tumor removed pCT and a tumor only pCT, the respective digitally reconstructed radiographs DRRtr and DRRto following the same geometry of the CBCT projections were generated correspondingly. 2) The DRRtr was rigidly registered with the CBCT projections on the frame-by-frame basis. Difference images between CBCT projections and the registered DRRtr were generated where the tumor visibility was appreciably enhanced. 3) An active contour method was applied to track the tumor motion on the tumor enhanced projections with DRRto as templates to initialize the tumor tracking while the respiratory motion was compensated for by interpolating the diaphragm motion estimated by our novel constrained linear regression approach. CBCT and pCT from five patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy were included in addition to scans from a Quasar phantom programmed with known motion. Manual tumor tracking was performed on CBCT projections and was compared to the automatic tracking to evaluate the algorithm accuracy. Results: The phantom study showed that the error between the automatic tracking and the ground truth was within 0.2mm. For the patients the discrepancy between the calculation and the manual tracking was between 1.4 and 2.2 mm depending on the location and shape of the lung tumor. Similar patterns were observed in the frequency domain. Conclusion: The new algorithm demonstrated the feasibility to track the lung tumor from noisy CBCT projections, providing a potential solution to better motion management for lung radiation therapy.

  6. SU-G-BRA-10: Marker Free Lung Tumor Motion Tracking by An Active Contour Model On Cone Beam CT Projections for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, M; Yuan, Y; Lo, Y; Wei, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel strategy to extract the lung tumor motion from cone beam CT (CBCT) projections by an active contour model with interpolated respiration learned from diaphragm motion. Methods: Tumor tracking on CBCT projections was accomplished with the templates derived from planning CT (pCT). There are three major steps in the proposed algorithm: 1) The pCT was modified to form two CT sets: a tumor removed pCT and a tumor only pCT, the respective digitally reconstructed radiographs DRRtr and DRRto following the same geometry of the CBCT projections were generated correspondingly. 2) The DRRtr was rigidly registered with the CBCT projections on the frame-by-frame basis. Difference images between CBCT projections and the registered DRRtr were generated where the tumor visibility was appreciably enhanced. 3) An active contour method was applied to track the tumor motion on the tumor enhanced projections with DRRto as templates to initialize the tumor tracking while the respiratory motion was compensated for by interpolating the diaphragm motion estimated by our novel constrained linear regression approach. CBCT and pCT from five patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy were included in addition to scans from a Quasar phantom programmed with known motion. Manual tumor tracking was performed on CBCT projections and was compared to the automatic tracking to evaluate the algorithm accuracy. Results: The phantom study showed that the error between the automatic tracking and the ground truth was within 0.2mm. For the patients the discrepancy between the calculation and the manual tracking was between 1.4 and 2.2 mm depending on the location and shape of the lung tumor. Similar patterns were observed in the frequency domain. Conclusion: The new algorithm demonstrated the feasibility to track the lung tumor from noisy CBCT projections, providing a potential solution to better motion management for lung radiation therapy.

  7. Radiation therapy of psoriasis and parapsoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiskemann, A.

    1982-09-15

    Selective UV-Phototherapy with lambda 300-320 nm (SUP) as well as oral photochemotherapy with 8-methoxy-psoralen plus UVA-radiation (PUVA intern) are very effective in clearing the lesions of the generalized psoriasis and those of the chronic forms of parapsoriasis. Being treated with 4 suberythemal doses per week psoriasis patients are free or nearly free of symptoms after averagely 6.3 weeks of SUP-therapy or after 5.3 weeks of PUVA orally. The PUVA-therapy is mainly indicated in pustular, inverse and erythrodermic psoriasis as well as in parapsoriasis en plaques and variegata. In all other forms of psoriasis and in pityriasis lichenoides-chronica, we prefer the SUP-therapy because of less acute or chronic side effects, and because of its better practicability. X-rays are indicated in psoriais of nails, grenz-rays in superficial psoriatic lesions of the face, the armpits, the genitals and the anal region.

  8. SU-F-T-587: Quality Assurance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Patient Specific Plans: A Comparison Between MATRIXX and Delta4 QA Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, YC; Lu, SH; Chen, LH; Kuo, SH; Wang, CW [National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei City, Taiwan (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Patient-specific quality assurance (QA) is necessary to accurately deliver high dose radiation to the target, especially for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Unlike previous 2 dimensional (D) array QA devices, Delta{sup 4} can verify the dose delivery in 3D. In this study, the difference between calculated and measured dose distribution was compared with two QA devices (MATRIXX and Delta{sup 4}) to evaluate the delivery accuracy. Methods: Twenty-seven SRS/SBRT plans with VMAT were verified with point-dose and dose-map analysis. We use an ion chamber (A1SL, 0.053cc) for point-dose measurement. For verification of the dose map, the differences between the calculated and measured doses were analyzed with a gamma index using MATRIXX and Delta{sup 4} devices. The passing criteria for gamma evaluation were set at 3 mm for distance-to-agreement (DTA) and 3% for dose-difference. A gamma index less than 1 was defined as the verification passing the criteria and satisfying at least 95% of the points. Results: The mean prescribed dose and fraction was 40 ± 14.41 Gy (range: 16–60) and 10 ± 2.35 fractions (range: 1–8), respectively. In point dose analysis, the differences between the calculated and measured doses were all less than 5% (mean: 2.12 ± 1.13%; range: −0.55% to 4.45%). In dose-map analysis, the average passing rates were 99.38 ± 0.96% (range: 95.31–100%) and 100 ± 0.12% (range: 99.5%–100%) for MATRIXX and Delta{sup 4}, respectively. Even using criteria of 2%/2 mm, the passing rate of Delta{sup 4} was still more than 95% (mean: 99 ± 1.08%; range: 95.6%–100%). Conclusion: Both MATRIXX and Delta{sup 4} offer accurate and efficient verification for SRS/SBRT plans. The results measured by MATRIXX and Delta{sup 4} dosimetry systems are similar for SRS/SBRT performed with the VMAT technique.

  9. Radiation therapy in Africa: distribution and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, C.V.; Meghzifene, A.; Gueddari, B. el

    1999-01-01

    Africa is the least developed continent as regards radiation oncology resources. The documented ASR of cancer is of the order of 1 to 2 per 1000. With improving health care this is becoming more significant. This review was undertaken to help develop priorities for the region. Radiation Oncology departments in Africa were identified and a survey of their equipment performed. These were compared to the reported situation in 1991. Population tables for the year 2000 were compared to available megavoltage machines. Of 56 countries in Africa, only 22 are confidently known to have megavoltage therapy concentrated in the southern and northern extremes of the continent. The 155 megavoltage machines operating represents over 100% increase over the past 8 years. The population served by each megavoltage machine ranges from 0.6 million to 70 million per machine. Overall, only 50% of the population have some access to Radiation Oncology services. Progress has been made in initiating radiation oncology in Ghana, Ethiopia and Namibia. There has been some increase in machines in Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia. However, a large backlog exists for basic radiation services. (author.)

  10. Exposure of medical personnel to radiation during radionuclide therapy practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancelot, Sophie; Guillet, Benjamin; Sigrist, Sophie; Bourrelly, Marc; Waultier, Serge; Mundler, Oliver; Pisano, Pascale

    2008-04-01

    Radioisotopes that emit beta radiation are used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, of arthritic patients (radiosynovectomy) and treatment of bone metastases with, respectively, I-labelled lipiodol, colloidal citrate of Y or and Sm-labelled EDTMP. Radiation energy of these radioisotopes that emit beta or beta and gamma radiation (from 300 to 2000 keV) leads to an increase in radiation dose received by nuclear medicine staff. In this paper we focused on clinical and laboratory staff exposure during these types of metabolic radiation therapies. Cylindrical LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters were used to measure radiation-related whole-body doses (WBDs) and finger doses of the clinical staff. Exposure of the two radiopharmacists and three nurses taking part in I-labelled lipiodol, Y-colloid and Sm-EDTMP therapies, for 12 months in succession, were 146 microSv and 750 microSv, respectively, considering WBD, and 14.6 mSv and 6.5 mSv, respectively, considering finger doses. Extrapolated annual exposures (six radiosynovectomies per year) for the rheumatologists were estimated to be 21 microSv (WBD) and 13.2 mSv (finger dose). Extrapolated annual WBDs and finger doses (25 I-labelled lipiodol treatments per year) for radiologists were estimated to 165 microSv and 3.8 microSv, respectively. Fortunately, these doses were always lower than the limits reported in the European Directive EURATOM 96/29 05/13/1996 (WBD medical staff involved in all these clinical practices justifies dosimetry studies to validate protocols and radiation protection devices for each institution.

  11. Combined Therapy of Pegylated G-CSF and Alxn4100TPO Improves Survival and Mitigates Acute Radiation Syndrome after Whole-Body Ionizing Irradiation Alone and Followed by Wound Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Juliann G; Zhai, Min; Bolduc, David L; Smith, Joan T; Anderson, Marsha N; Ho, Connie; Lin, Bin; Jiang, Suping

    2017-11-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation alone or combined with traumatic tissue injury is a crucial life-threatening factor in nuclear and radiological incidents. Radiation injuries occur at the molecular, cellular, tissue and systemic levels; their mechanisms, however, remain largely unclear. Exposure to radiation combined with skin wounding, bacterial infection or burns results in greater mortality than radiation exposure alone in dogs, pigs, rats, guinea pigs and mice. In the current study we observed that B6D2F1/J female mice exposed to 60 Co gamma-photon radiation followed by 15% total-body-surface-area skin wounds experienced an increment of 25% higher mortality over a 30-day observation period compared to those subjected to radiation alone. Radiation exposure delayed wound healing by approximately 14 days. On day 30 post-injury, bone marrow and ileum in animals from both groups (radiation alone or combined injury) still displayed low cellularity and structural damage. White blood cell counts, e.g., neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils and platelets, still remained very low in surviving irradiated alone animals, whereas only the lymphocyte count was low in surviving combined injury animals. Likewise, in surviving animals from radiation alone and combined injury groups, the RBCs, hemoglobin, hematocrit and platelets remained low. We observed, that animals treated with both pegylated G-CSF (a cytokine for neutrophil maturation and mobilization) and Alxn4100TPO (a thrombopoietin receptor agonist) at 4 h postirradiation, a 95% survival (vehicle: 60%) over the 30-day period, along with mitigated body-weight loss and significantly reduced acute radiation syndrome. In animals that received combined treatment of radiation and injury that received pegylated G-CSF and Alxn4100TPO, survival was increased from 35% to 55%, but did not accelerate wound healing. Hematopoiesis and ileum showed significant improvement in animals from both groups (irradiation

  12. Aesthetic results following partial mastectomy and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matory, W.E. Jr.; Wertheimer, M.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Walton, R.L.; Love, S.; Matory, W.E.

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the aesthetic changes inherent in partial mastectomy followed by radiation therapy in the treatment of stage I and stage II breast cancer. A retrospective analysis of breast cancer patients treated according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast Project Protocol B-06 was undertaken in 57 patients from 1984 to the present. The size of mastectomy varied between 2 x 1 cm and 15 x 8 cm. Objective aesthetic outcome, as determined by physical and photographic examination, was influenced primarily by surgical technique as opposed to the effects of radiation. These technical factors included orientation of resections, breast size relative to size of resection, location of tumor, and extent and orientation of axillary dissection. Regarding cosmesis, 80 percent of patients treated in this study judged their result to be excellent or good, in comparison to 50 percent excellent or good as judged by the plastic surgeon. Only 10 percent would consider mastectomy with reconstruction for contralateral disease. Asymmetry and contour abnormalities are far more common than noted in the radiation therapy literature. Patients satisfaction with lumpectomy and radiation, however, is very high. This satisfaction is not necessarily based on objective criteria defining aesthetic parameters, but is strongly influenced by retainment of the breast as an original body part

  13. Radiation therapy for superior vena cava syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    We studied the effect of such variables as the symptom improvement rate, survival and prognostic factors on the treatment results of radiation therapy for Superior Vena Cava Syndrome (SVCS). From 1988 to 2003, seventy two patients with SVCS were treated with radiation therapy at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. The patients' ages ranged from 10 to 83 years old with the median age being 61, and sixty four patients were male. For the causes of the SVCS, 64 patients had lung cancer, four had metastatic lung cancer, two had malignant lymphoma and two had thymoma. The radiotherapy was delivered with 6-MV X-ray and all patients received above 900 cGy up to 6,600 cGy, with the median dose being 4,000 cGy. The follow-up periods were from 1 to 180 months with a median of 5.6 months. The main clinical manifestations were dyspnea (84.7%), facial edema (81.9%), arm edema (22.2%), neck vein distension (25%), hoarseness (12.5%) and facial plethora (5.6%). Eighty percent of patients achieved excellent to good symptom improvement and 19.4% experienced minimal improvement. The median survival period was 5.1 months, and overall survival rates were 17.7% at 2 years (2YOS) and 14.8% at five years (5YOS) for all the patients. The median survival period, the two and five year disease free survival rates were 4.3 months, 16.7% and 13.4% for the lung cancer patients, respectively. The total tumor dose was a statistically significant survival factor on the univariate analysis for the patients with lung cancer (2YSR; > 30 Gy, 25.6%, {<=} 30 Gy 6.7%, {rho} < 0.01). On the multivariated analysis, a higher total tumor dose ({rho} < 0.01) and younger age ({rho} < 0.05) were statistically significant factors of survival for the lung cancer patients. Patients with NSCLC showed better survival than did the patients with SCLC, but this was not statistically significant ({rho} > 0.05). Radiation therapy for the patients with SVCS due to

  14. Quantification of late complications after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Horst; Beck-Bornholdt, Hans-Peter; Svoboda, Vladimir; Alberti, Winfried; Herrmann, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of patients survive cancer after having received radiation therapy. Therefore, the occurrence of late normal tissue complications among long-term survivors is of particular concern. Methods: Sixty-three patients treated by radical surgery and irradiation for rectal carcinoma were subjected to an unconventional sandwich therapy. Preoperative irradiation was given in four fractions of 5 Gy each applied within 2 or 3 days; postoperative irradiation consisted mostly of 15x2 Gy (range, 20-40 Gy). A considerable proportion of these patients developed severe late complications (Radiother Oncol 53 (1999) 177). The data allowed a detailed analysis of complication kinetics, leading to a new model which was tested using data from the literature. Results: Data on late complications were obtained for eight different organs with a follow-up of up to 10 years. For the various organs, the percentage of patients being free from late complications, plotted as a function of time after start of radiation therapy, was adequately described by exponential regression. From the fit, the parameter p a was obtained, which is the percentage of patients at risk in a given year of developing a complication in a given organ during that year. The rate p a remained about constant with time. Following sandwich therapy, the annual incidence of complications in the bladder, ileum, lymphatic and soft tissue, and ureters was about the same (p a =10-14%/year), whereas complications in bone or dermis occurred at lower rates (4.7 or 7.5%/year, respectively). Discussion: Numerous data sets collected from published reports were analyzed in the same way. Many of the data sets studied were from patients in a series where there was a high incidence of late effects. Three types of kinetics for the occurrence of late effects after radiotherapy were identified: Type 1, purely exponential kinetics; Type 2, exponential kinetics, the slope of which decreased exponentially with time

  15. Optical Tracking Technology in Stereotactic Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Thomas H.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Bova, Frank J.; Friedman, William A.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Tome, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The last decade has seen the introduction of advanced technologies that have enabled much more precise application of therapeutic radiation. These relatively new technologies include multileaf collimators, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning, and intensity modulated radiotherapy in radiotherapy. Therapeutic dose distributions have become more conformal to volumes of disease, sometimes utilizing sharp dose gradients to deliver high doses to target volumes while sparing nearby radiosensitive structures. Thus, accurate patient positioning has become even more important, so that the treatment delivered to the patient matches the virtual treatment plan in the computer treatment planning system. Optical and image-guided radiation therapy systems offer the potential to improve the precision of patient treatment by providing a more robust fiducial system than is typically used in conventional radiotherapy. The ability to accurately position internal targets relative to the linac isocenter and to provide real-time patient tracking theoretically enables significant reductions in the amount of normal tissue irradiated. This report reviews the concepts, technology, and clinical applications of optical tracking systems currently in use for stereotactic radiation therapy. Applications of radiotherapy optical tracking technology to respiratory gating and the monitoring of implanted fiducial markers are also discussed

  16. External beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The intent of this course is to review the issues involved in the management of non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. -- The value of pre-treatment prognostic factors including stage, grade and PSA value will be presented, and their value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. -- Controversies involving the simulation process and treatment design will be presented. The value of CT scanning, Beams-Eye View, 3-D planning, intravesicle, intraurethral and rectal contrast will be presented. The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with them will be presented. -- The management of low stage, low to intermediate grade prostate cancer will be discussed. The dose, volume and timing of irradiation will be discussed as will the role of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, neutron irradiation and brachytherapy. The current status of radical prostatectomy and cryotherapy will be summarized. Treatment of locally advanced, poorly differentiated prostate cancer will be presented including a discussion of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones, dose-escalation and neutron irradiation. -- Strategies for post-radiation failures will be presented including data on cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy and hormonal therapy (immediate, delayed and/or intermittent). New areas for investigation will be reviewed. -- The management of patients post prostatectomy will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant radiation and therapeutic radiation for biochemical or clinically relapsed patients will be presented. This course hopes to present a realistic and pragmatic overview for treating patients with non-metastatic prostatic cancer

  17. Apparatus for examining a body by means of penetrating radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hounsfield, G.N.

    1976-01-01

    The invention relates to apparatus for examining a body by means of penetrating radiation in which a source of radiation produces a beam of radiation which passes through the body, and a detector receives the radiation emerging from the body. The source and the detector are mounted on a scanning structure which can undergo successive lateral scans at a succession of orbital positions so that a plane section of the body is traversed by a set of parallel beams at each of the body is traversed by a set of parallel beams at each of the orbital positions. A reference attenuator provides a known attenuation of the beam at the beginning of each lateral scan, and means are provided for modifying the output signals during each lateral scan in response to the signal obtained when the beam is passing through the reference attenuator. In this way compensation is effected for rapid changes in the sensitivity of the detector

  18. Why do patients drop out during radiation therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Seung Jae; Ahn, Yong Chan; Kim, Dae Yong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Kyu Chan; Chong, Won A; Kim, Hyun Joo; Wu, Hong Gyun

    1998-01-01

    This study is to see how much proportion of the patients receiving radiation therapy drop out during radiation therapy and to analyze the reason for the incomplete treatment. The base population of this study was 1,100 patients with registration numbers 901 through 2,000 at Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. Authors investigated the incidence of incomplete radiation therapy, which was defined as less than 95% of initially planned radiation dose, and the reasons for incomplete radiation therapy. One hundred and twenty eight patients (12%) did not complete the planned radiation therapy. The performance status of the incompletely treated patients was generally poorer than that of the base population, and the aim of radiation therapy was more commonly palliative. The most common reason for not completing the planned treatment was the patients' refusal of further radiation therapy because of the distrust of radiation therapy and/or the poor economic status. Careful case selection for radiation therapy with consideration of the socioeconomic status of the patients in addition to the clinical indication would be necessary for the reduction of incomplete treatment, especially in the palliative setting

  19. Oral care of the cancer patient receiving radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzhausen, T. (Medical Univ. of Southern Africa, Pretoria (South Africa). Dept. of Community Dentistry)

    1982-07-01

    Radiation therapy is frequently being used for the patient with oral cancer. The survival rate is increasing, due to more effective treatment technique. The question of whether any teeth should be extracted, the mode of therapy and the side effects of radiation like Xerostomia, caries, stomatitis, trismus and osteo-radionecrosis and also post radiation care are discussed.

  20. Oral care of the cancer patient receiving radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtzhausen, T.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation therapy is frequently being used for the patient with oral cancer. The survival rate is increasing, due to more effective treatment technique. The question of whether any teeth should be extracted, the mode of therapy and the side effects of radiation like Xerostomia, caries, stomatitis, trismus and osteo-radionecrosis and also post radiation care are discussed

  1. Two component-theory and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wideroee, R.

    1990-01-01

    The two component theory which describes the biological effect of X-ray and particle irradiation divides radiation into densely ionizing radiation (ion density in water greater than four ions per 100 A, i.e. LET>12 keV/μm) und loosely ionizing radiation with low ion densities. In case of densely ionizing radiation, the ions can produce breaks of both cords of DNA thus causing the death of the cell (α effect). Lower ion densities will produce only slight damages which are possibly lethal but can be partly repaired (β effect). If the cell parameters are known (L. Cohen 1983), the number of surviving cells after an irradiation can be calculated. The surviving lung cells and tumor cells (squamous cell carcinoma) have been calculated for a pulmonary irradiation with 30 MeV electrons and 200 keV X-rays (single doses of 2 and 5 Gy), respectively. The electron irradiation with single doses of 5 Gy turned out to be the most favorable therapy sparing the greatest number of lung cells and reducing the tumor cells in the most effective way (down to 1.6x10 -10 ). (orig.) [de

  2. Imaging after radiation therapy of thoracic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaye, B.; Wanet, M.; El Hajjam, M.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung disease (RILD) is frequent after therapeutic irradiation of thoracic malignancies. Many technique-, treatment-, tumor- and patient-related factors influence the degree of injury sustained by the lung after irradiation. Based on the time interval after the completion of the treatment RILD presents as early and late features characterized by inflammatory and fibrotic changes, respectively. They are usually confined to the radiation port. Though the typical pattern of RILD is easily recognized after conventional two-dimensional radiation therapy (RT), RILD may present with atypical patterns after more recent types of three or four-dimensional RT treatment. Three atypical patterns are reported: the modified conventional, the mass-like and the scar-like patterns. Knowledge of the various features and patterns of RILD is important for correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment. RILD should be differentiated from recurrent tumoral disease, infection and radiation-induced tumors. Due to RILD, the follow-up after RT may be difficult as response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST) criteria may be unreliable to assess tumor control particularly after stereotactic ablation RT (SABR). Long-term follow-up should be based on clinical examination and morphological and/or functional investigations including CT, PET-CT, pulmonary functional tests, MRI and PET-MRI. (authors)

  3. Radiation therapy in the treatment of hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Jin; Zhai Renyou

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of hilar cholangiocarcinoma is very rare worldwide. Radical resection is the only prognostic factor for long survival in patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Postoperative radiation therapy can improve local control and survival rates for patients with palliative resection, but it remains controversial in patients with radical resection. Biliary drainage can effectively release bile duct obstruction for the majority of patients with locally advanced disease, and may even prolong survival when combined with radiation therapy. Radiation therapy includes extrernal beam therapy alone, external beam therapy with intraluminal brachytheapy and new radiation technique, such as three dimentional conformal therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. The propective randomized clinical study is needed for further investigation in the role of combined modality therapy especially for hilar cholangiocarcinoma. (authors)

  4. Treatment of arterial lesions after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, D.; Jonsson, K.; Nilsson, M.; Takolander, R.

    1987-01-01

    Of 1,724 patients who underwent peripheral vascular operation, 12 (0.7 per cent) underwent radiation therapy of the areas including the relevant arteries one and one-half to 28 years (a mean of 15 years) previously; one patient had carcinoma of the breast, three had tumors of the neck and eight patients had malignant gynecologic disease. One patient with an occluded carotid artery was not actively treated, two underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and the remaining patients underwent different types of vascular reconstructions. These patients frequently have other radiation lesions as well with involvement of the skin, bladder or intestine, which may make them problematic from a surgical point of view. Extra-anatomic reconstructions or percutaneous transluminal angioplasty can be recommended. One patient died of malignant disease three years after arterial operation. Otherwise, the results of follow-up study for these patients did not differ from other patients who underwent arterial reconstruction

  5. Radiation therapy for carcinoma of the eyelid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Miwako; Takahashi, Mitsuhiro; Shinozaki, Jun; Kaneda, Koichi; Oda, Norio; Tabuchi, Yoshiko

    1987-01-01

    Between 1969 and 1985, 30 patients with carcinomas of the eyelid were treated by radiation, including 19 primary cases and 11 secondary cases. The latter were less controlable than the former. According to histology, there were 21 squamous cell carcinomas, 6 basal cell carcinomas and 3 adenocarcinomas. Among the 21 patients with squamous cell carcinomas, 5 had local recurrences, 10 had lymph node metastasis and 3 had distant metastasis. Patients with other histological classifications had no local recurrences, except for one who received incomplete therapy due to diabetes. Almost all of the controlled patients with squamous cell carcinomas were treated with a TDF value greater than 90. Although the visual function was damaged by irradiation in seven patients, the lesions of 6 of them were too advanced to avoid radiation injuries. (author)

  6. Impact of radiation therapy for benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, G.; Van Houtte, P.; Beauvois, S.; Roelandts, M.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation therapy of benign diseases represent a wide panel of indications. Some indications are clearly identified as treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVM), hyperthyroid ophthalmopathy, postoperative heterotopic bone formations or keloid scars. Some indications are under evaluation as complications induced by neo-vessels of age-related macular degeneration or coronary restenosis after angioplasty. Some indications remain controversial with poor evidence of efficiency as treatment of bursitis, tendinitis or Dupuytren's disease. Some indications are now obsolete such as warts, or contra-indicated as treatment of infant and children. (authors)

  7. Radiation therapy following targeted therapy in oligometastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravis, Gwenaelle; Faure, Marjorie; Rybikowski, Stanislas; Dermeche, Slimane; Tyran, Marguerite; Calderon, Benoit; Thomassin, Jeanne; Walz, Jochen; Salem, Naji

    2015-11-01

    Up to 40% of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with initially localized disease eventually develop metastasis following nephrectomy. The current standard of care for metastatic RCC (mRCC) is targeted therapy. However, complete response remains rare. A state of oligometastatic disease may exist, in which metastases are present in a limited number of locations; such cases may benefit from metastasis-directed local therapy, based on the evidence supporting resection of limited-volume metastases, allowing for improved disease control. We retrospectively analyzed 7 cases of response of RCC metastases, in patients treated with targeted therapies followed by radiation therapy (RT) of residual metastatic lesions in Paoli-Calmettes Institute (Marseille, France). We analyzed disease response rates, response to sequential strategy, relapse at the irradiated locations and disease evolution. The median follow-up was 34.1 months (range, 19.2-54.5 months). No progression at the irradiated sites was observed. A total of 5 patients had stable disease at the irradiated locations at the last follow-up; 3 remained in complete remission at the assessment, and 2 were stable. Excellent local response and clinical benefit may be achieved without added toxicity. In conclusion, sequential therapeutic strategies with RT following systemic treatment using sunitinib appear to be highly effective in patients with progressive mRCC and prompt the conduction of further confirmatory trials.

  8. Autism and Mind-Body Therapies: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourston, Sarah; Atchley, Rachel

    2017-05-01

    Mind-body therapies are often used by people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, there has been little examination into which types of mind-body therapies have been investigated for people with ASD and for what purposes. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the existing evidence for mind-body therapies for people with ASD, particularly to determine the types of mind-body therapies used and the outcomes that are targeted. PubMed, PsychInfo, and Scopus were searched using terms for ASD and mind-body therapies. Sixteen studies were selected for review; these studies tested interventions using mindfulness, meditation, yoga, Nei Yang Gong, and acceptance commitment therapy. Most study outcomes targeted behavior, psychological symptoms, and quality of life for children and adults with ASD as well as their parents. There was little overlap between studies on the types of mind-body therapies used and associated outcomes, and only three of the studies were randomized controlled trials. Most studies were small and uncontrolled. Some studies modified the mind-body therapies to increase accessibility for people with ASD. The evidence for mind-body therapies for people with ASD is limited and would benefit from larger randomized controlled trials.

  9. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms and the Use of Mind-Body Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Maulik P.; Wells, Rebecca Erwin; Zafonte, Ross; Davis, Roger B.; Yeh, Gloria Y.; Phillips, Russell S.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Neuropsychiatric symptoms affect 37% of US adults and present in many important diagnoses including post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and chronic pain. However, these symp