WorldWideScience

Sample records for body radiation injury

  1. Future directions in therapy of whole body radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1989-01-01

    Clinicians have long known that marked granulocytopenia predisposed patients to bacterial infections either from pathogens or commensal organisms with which an individual usually lives in harmony. Evidence that infection was of major importance derives from several observations: (a) clinical observations of bacterial infection in human beings exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in reactor accidents, and in large animals dying from radiation exposure, (b) correlative studies on mortality rate, time of death, and incidence of positive culture in animals, (c) challenge of irradiated animals with normally non-virulent organisms, (d) studies of germ free mice and rats, and (e) studies of the effectiveness of antibiotics in reducing mortality rate. General knowledge and sound experimental data on animals and man clearly demonstrated that the sequelae of pancytopenia (bacterial infection, thrombopenic hemorrhage, and anemia) are the lethal factors. A lot of research was required to demonstrate that there were no mysterious radiations toxins, that hyperheparinemia was not a cause of radiation hemorrhage and that radiation hemorrhage could be prevented by fresh platelet transfusions.

  2. Radiation-Associated Kidney Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kidneys are the dose-limiting organs for radiotherapy to upper abdominal cancers and during total body irradiation. The incidence of radiotherapy-associated kidney injury is likely underreported owing to its long latency and because the toxicity is often attributed to more common causes of kidney injury. The pathophysiology of radiation injury is poorly understood. Its presentation can be acute and irreversible or subtle, with a gradual progressive dysfunction over years. A variety of dose and volume parameters have been associated with renal toxicity and are reviewed to provide treatment guidelines. The available predictive models are suboptimal and require validation. Mitigation of radiation nephropathy with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and other compounds has been shown in animal models and, more recently, in patients.

  3. Morphological aspects of radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The injury to haemopoietic and lymphatic tissues produced by ionizing irradiation in various species of mammals including man is one of the major features of the biological effects of radiation (Bond et al. 1965,' Cottier, 1961). At the moment of injury and for a short time thereafter relatively little morphological evidence of cell damage in bone marrow other than cessation of cell division and DNA synthesis is seen. Within a few hours, however, depending on the level of exposure, major destruction of red bone marrow tissue can occur. In this chapter the histologic changes in bone marrow are summarized for correlation with the functional aspects of the change in the target tissue, particularly its cell renewal features and where possible the remarkable flux or migration of cells through bone marrow and lymphatic tissues. This latter topic of cellular traffic represents the outcome of extensive physiological studies on haemopoiesis and lymphopoiesis by mammalian radiobiologists. The initial injury, the structural changes and the physiological consequences are the first half of the radiation injury sequence. Regeneration also has morphological features of major importance to the understanding of radiation haematology. It is common to discuss radiation effects on biological materials from the point of view of external or internal sources of exposure. In addition exposure rate, whole body or partial body, type and quality of the ionizing source are features that must be taken into account. While these features are extremely important, the simplest approach to understanding histologic effects on the bone marrow is to assume acute penetrating whole-body exposure in the lethal range. With this background the differences related to variations in the conditions of exposure can usually be understood. The individual human or animal organism receiving the exposure must also be considered in the final outcome of the experience because age, sex, nutritional status and presence

  4. Chronic radiation injury with mice and dogs exposed to external whole-body irradiation at the Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes studies on chronic radiation injury in experimental animals and the extrapolation of derived injury parameters to man. Most of the large studies have used mice given single, weekly, or continuous exposure to cobalt-60 gamma rays, or, more recently, single or weekly exposure to fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor. Primary measures of injury have been life shortening and the associated major pathological changes, particularly neoplastic diseases. Recent and ongoing studies compare the effects of extremely low neutron exposures with gamma irradiations delivered as a single dose or in 60 equal weekly increments. Total neutron doses range from 1 to 40 rads; gamma-ray doses range from 22.5 to 600 rads. Selected genetic studies are performed concurrently to provide a nearly complete matrix of somatic and genetic effects of these low exposures. Studies with the beagle have complemented those with mice and have shown a strong parallelism in the responses of the two species. Present exposures are at 0.3, 0.75, and 1.88 rads per day of continuous gamma irradiation to test a model for the prediction of life shortening in man which has evolved from Argonne's long-term studies. The dog offers the opportunity for longitudinal clinical evaluations that are not possible in the mouse, to develop a broader view of the neoplastic disease spectrum, and to study the mechanisms of radiation induction of leukemia. Diverse statistical approaches have been used to measure excess risk, dose-response functions, and rates of injury and repair. Actuarial statistical methods have been favored since they permit a more direct means of extrapolation to man. 50 refs., 4 figs

  5. Interventional effect of laser acupoint radiation on the expression of Nissl body and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in newborn rat models with ischemic/hypoxic cerebral injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Some researches report that He-Ne laser can activate function of erythrocytes and increase content of blood and oxygen via bio-stimulating effect;therefore,it suspects that laser radiation at Baihui and Dazhui can partially increase blood circulation for oxygen-supplying content of brain and improve functional status of neurons.OBJECTIVE:To verify the effects of laser radiation at Baihui and Dazhui on the expression of Nissl body of brain tissue neurons and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in newborn rats with ischemic/hypoxic cerebral injury.DESIGN:Randomized controlled animal study.SETTING:Department of Neurological Histochemistry,Xianning University.MATERIALS:Forty Wistar rats of 7 - 8 days old,weighing 15 - 20 g and of both genders,were selected from Wuhan Experimental Animal Center.All the rats were randomly divided into sham operation group (n =8),model group (n =16) and radiation group (n =16).The experimental animals were disposed according to ethical criteria.BDNF kit was provided by Wuhan Boster Bioengineering Co.,Ltd.METHODS:The experiment was carried out in the Department of Neurological Histochemistry,Xianning University from April 2005 to October 2006.Rats in the radiation group and model group were performed with ligation of left common carotid artery,recovered at room temperature for 1-6 days,maintained in self-made hypoxic cabin under normal pressure and injected mixture gas (0.05 volume fraction of O2 and 0.92 volume fraction of N2) for 2 hours.In addition,rats in the sham operation group were treated with separation of left common carotid artery but not ligation and hypoxia.Rats in the model group were not given any treatment;while,rats in the radiation group were exposed with He-Ne laser of 63.28 nm in the wave length at Baihui and Dazhui acupoints on the second day after ischemia-hypoxia.The radiation was given for 10 minutes per day and once a day.Ten days were regarded as a course and the rats were exposed for 2 courses in

  6. Stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Simon S. [Univ. Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Case Comprehensive Cancer Center; Teh, Bin S. [The Methodist Hospital Cancer Center and Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States). Weill Cornell Medical College; Lu, Jiade J. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schefter, Tracey E. (eds.) [Colorado Univ., Aurora, CO (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-11-01

    Comprehensive an up-to-date account of the physical/technological, biological, and clinical aspects of SBRT. Examines in detail retrospective studies and prospective clinical trials for various organ sites from around the world. Written by world-renowned experts in SBRT from North America, Asia and Europe. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an innovative treatment for various primary and metastatic cancers, and the past five years have witnessed a quantum leap in its use. This book provides a comprehensive and up-to-date account of the physical/technological, biological, and clinical aspects of SBRT. It will serve as a detailed resource for this rapidly developing treatment modality. The organ sites covered include lung, liver, spine, pancreas, prostate, adrenal, head and neck, and female reproductive tract. Retrospective studies and prospective clinical trials on SBRT for various organ sites from around the world are examined, and toxicities and normal tissue constraints are discussed. This book features unique insights from world-renowned experts in SBRT from North America, Asia, and Europe. It will be necessary reading for radiation oncologists, radiation oncology residents and fellows, medical physicists, medical physics residents, medical oncologists, surgical oncologists, and cancer scientists.

  7. Plastic surgery of radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The review of the book - Plastic surgery of radiation injuries, -written by the staff members of the RAMS surgical centre, the creators of a number of original methods for reconstructive and plastic microsurgery Milanov N.O. and Shilov B.L., is presented. The book consists of introduction, four chapters and conclusion. The introduction deals with the terms of operational intervention and indications for choice of the method of operation. Peculiarities of radiation injuries and basic principles for selection the method of plastic art are considered in the first and second chapters. The third and fourth chapters are related to treatment of late radiation defects. The possibilities for earlier intervention are contained in the fourth chapter

  8. Expertise of body injuries in criminal procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutevska, A; Cakar, Z; Duma, A; Poposka, V

    2008-10-01

    In the every day practice of answering questions from the area of medicine, today there is growing need for forensic medical expertise of body injuries in the criminal procedure. Furthermore, when qualifying the body injury, the expert must possess knowledge and experience not only medical, but also he/she must be aware of the legal requirements and norms from the Code of Criminal Procedure and the Criminal Code of R. Macedonia. This will enable the expert to contribute to explanation and clarification of certain facts and issues related to the body injury. In this paper, by citing Articles 255 and 256 from the Code of Criminal Procedure, it is explained how expert can be adequately selected by the court. In addition to this, by citing Article 271 from the aforementioned Code, a way of analysing body injuries is defined; and finally, defining of body injuries is explained through citing of Article 130 and 131 from the Criminal Code of R. Macedonia, which is regarding body injury and grave body injury. The aim of this paper is to outline the method of performing these forensic medical expertises, i.e. by who and when can expertise of body injuries be asked and moreover, what is the legal and ethical responsiblity of the expert during the execution of the expertise. Additionally, the steps that the expert should follow when preparing a written statement and opinion for the type of the body injury are explained. More specifically, emphasis is placed on expert's requirements after examination of injured individual; after revision of the medical documentation during expertise of body injuries in criminal subjects; and providing oral statement and opinion during the criminal procedure.

  9. Non-invasive whole-body plethysmograph for assessment and prediction of radiation-induced lung injury using simultaneously acquired nitric oxide and lung volume measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a prevalent side effect in patients who undergo thoracic irradiation as part of their cancer treatment. Preclinical studies play a major role in understanding disease onset under controlled experimental conditions. The aim of this work is to develop a single-chambered optimized, non-invasive, whole-body plethysmograph prototype for unrestrained small animal lung volume measurements for preclinical RILI studies. The system is also designed to simultaneously obtain nitric oxide (NO) measurements of the expired breath. The device prototype was tested using computer simulations, phantom studies and in vivo measurements in experimental animal models of RILI. The system was found to improve resemblance to true breathing signal characteristics as measured by improved skewness (21.83%) and kurtosis (51.94%) in addition to increased overall signal sensitivity (3.61%) of the acquired breath signal, when compared to matching control data. NO concentration data was combined with breath measurements in order to predict early RILI onset. The system was evaluated using serial weekly measurements in hemi-thorax irradiated rats (n = 8) yielding a classification performance of 50.0%, 62.5%, 87.5% using lung volume only, NO only, and combined measurements of both, respectively. Our results indicate that improved performance could be achieved when measurements of lung volume are combined with those of NO. This would provide the overall plethysmography system with the ability to provide useful diagnostic and prognostic information for preclinical and, potentially, clinical thoracic dose escalation studies. (paper)

  10. High energy radiation effects on the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-energy radiation injuries and their risks were recognized, information on low-energy radiation injuries was also arranged, and with these backgrounds, countermeasures against prevention of radiation injuries were considered. Redintegration of DNA and mutation by radiation were described, and relationship between radiation injuries and dose was considered. Interaction of high-energy radiation and substances in the living body and injuries by the interaction were also considered. Expression method of risk was considered, and a concept of protection dose was suggested. Protection dose is dose equivalent which is worthy of value at the point where the ratio to permissible dose distributed among each part of the body is at its maximum in the distribution of dose equivalent formed within the body when standard human body is placed at a certain radiation field for a certain time. Significance and countermeasures of health examination which is under an abligation to make radiation workers receive health check were thought, and problems were proposed on compensation when radiation injuries should appear actually. (Tsunoda, M.)

  11. Frequencies of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes in mouse bone marrow induced by combined radiation-burn injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: In order to detect if any analysis of frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (fMPCE) in mouse bone marrow was possible to diagnose combined radiation-burn injuries. Methods: By using the index of fMPCE, the investigation was carried out in the conditions of burn injury alone, radiation injury alone and combined radiation-burn injury. Results: The fMPCE induced by 10% and 20% body surface area (BSA) burns were not significantly increased at 24h compared with untreated groups. The fMPCE induced by combined radiation-burn injury significantly lower than those by radiation alone, and the fMPCE in the 20% BSA combined radiation-burn injury groups were lower than those in 10% BSA groups. Conclusion: These results indicate that radiation combined burns have an effect to reduce the fMPCE induced by radiation injury. The reason may be due to the frequency of increase of PCE after burn injury

  12. Delayed Effects of Acute Radiation Exposure in a Murine Model of the H-ARS: Multiple-Organ Injury Consequent to Total Body Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unthank, Joseph L; Miller, Steven J; Quickery, Ariel K; Ferguson, Ethan L; Wang, Meijing; Sampson, Carol H; Chua, Hui Lin; DiStasi, Matthew R; Feng, Hailin; Fisher, Alexa; Katz, Barry P; Plett, P Artur; Sandusky, George E; Sellamuthu, Rajendran; Vemula, Sasidhar; Cohen, Eric P; MacVittie, Thomas J; Orschell, Christie M

    2015-11-01

    The threat of radiation exposure from warfare or radiation accidents raises the need for appropriate animal models to study the acute and chronic effects of high dose rate radiation exposure. The goal of this study was to assess the late development of fibrosis in multiple organs (kidney, heart, and lung) in survivors of the C57BL/6 mouse model of the hematopoietic-acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS). Separate groups of mice for histological and functional studies were exposed to a single uniform total body dose between 8.53 and 8.72 Gy of gamma radiation from a Cs radiation source and studied 1-21 mo later. Blood urea nitrogen levels were elevated significantly in the irradiated mice at 9 and 21 mo (from ∼22 to 34 ± 3.8 and 69 ± 6.0 mg dL, p irradiated controls) and correlated with glomerosclerosis (29 ± 1.8% vs. 64 ± 9.7% of total glomeruli, p irradiated controls). Glomerular tubularization and hypertrophy and tubular atrophy were also observed at 21 mo post-total body irradiation (TBI). An increase in interstitial, perivascular, pericardial and peribronchial fibrosis/collagen deposition was observed from ∼9-21 mo post-TBI in kidney, heart, and lung of irradiated mice relative to age-matched controls. Echocardiography suggested decreased ventricular volumes with a compensatory increase in the left ventricular ejection fraction. The results indicate that significant delayed effects of acute radiation exposure occur in kidney, heart, and lung in survivors of the murine H-ARS TBI model, which mirrors pathology detected in larger species and humans at higher radiation doses focused on specific organs.

  13. Combination of radiation injuries: pathogenesis, clinic, therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern notions on combined radiation injuries (CRI) are presented. Characteristic of injurious factors of nuclear explosion and common regularities of the CRI origination is given. The data on the CRI clinical peculiarities, diagnostics and treatment, principles of medical assistance for the injured on the stages of medical evacuation and recommendations on rehabilitation are presented

  14. Integrative Metabolic Signatures for Hepatic Radiation Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwin Jack Kurland

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD is a dose-limiting factor in curative radiation therapy (RT for liver cancers, making early detection of radiation-associated liver injury absolutely essential for medical intervention. A metabolomic approach was used to determine metabolic signatures that could serve as biomarkers for early detection of RILD in mice.Anesthetized C57BL/6 mice received 0, 10 or 50 Gy Whole Liver Irradiation (WLI and were contrasted to mice, which received 10 Gy whole body irradiation (WBI. Liver and plasma samples were collected at 24 hours after irradiation. The samples were processed using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.Twenty four hours after WLI, 407 metabolites were detected in liver samples while 347 metabolites were detected in plasma. Plasma metabolites associated with 50 Gy WLI included several amino acids, purine and pyrimidine metabolites, microbial metabolites, and most prominently bradykinin and 3-indoxyl-sulfate. Liver metabolites associated with 50 Gy WLI included pentose phosphate, purine, and pyrimidine metabolites in liver. Plasma biomarkers in common between WLI and WBI were enriched in microbial metabolites such as 3 indoxyl sulfate, indole-3-lactic acid, phenyllactic acid, pipecolic acid, hippuric acid, and markers of DNA damage such as 2-deoxyuridine. Metabolites associated with tryptophan and indoles may reflect radiation-induced gut microbiome effects. Predominant liver biomarkers in common between WBI and WLI were amino acids, sugars, TCA metabolites (fumarate, fatty acids (lineolate, n-hexadecanoic acid and DNA damage markers (uridine.We identified a set of metabolomic markers that may prove useful as plasma biomarkers of RILD and WBI. Pathway analysis also suggested that the unique metabolic changes observed after liver irradiation was an integrative response of the intestine, liver and kidney.

  15. Adult Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Radiation Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Juliann G

    2016-08-01

    Recent understanding of the cellular and molecular signaling activations in adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has provided new insights into their potential clinical applications, particularly for tissue repair and regeneration. This review focuses on these advances, specifically in the context of self-renewal for tissue repair and recovery after radiation injury. Thus far, MSCs have been characterized extensively and shown to be useful in mitigation and therapy for acute radiation syndrome and cognitive dysfunction. Use of MSCs for treating radiation injury alone or in combination with additional trauma is foreseeable. PMID:27356065

  16. Radiation-induced lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references

  17. Life After Traumatic Injury: How the Body Responds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Life After Traumatic Injury: How the Body Responds By Chelsea ... alive immediately after a traumatic injury to improving life after survival. Learn more: Fact Sheets on Sepsis and ...

  18. Behavioral endpoints for radiation injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Hunt, W. A.; Dalton, T. B.; Kandasamy, S. B.; Harris, A. H.; Ludewig, B.

    1994-10-01

    The relative behavioral effectiveness of heavy particles was evaluated. Using the taste aversion paradigm in rats, the behavioral toxicity of most types of radiation (including 20Ne and 40Ar) was similar to that of 60Co photons. Only 56Fe and 93Nb particles and fission neutrons were significantly more effective. Using emesis in ferrets as the behavioral endpoint, 56Fe particles and neutrons were again the most effective; however, 60Co photons were significantly more effective than 18 MeV electrons. These results suggest that LET does not completely predict behavioral effectiveness. Additionally, exposing rats to 10 cGy of 56Fe particles attenuated amphetamine-induced taste aversion learning. This behavior is one of a broad class of behaviors which depends on the integrity of the dopaminergic system and suggests the possibility of alterations in these behaviors following exposure to heavy particles in a space radiation environment.

  19. Hematological parameters after acute radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to clinical experiences of radiation accidents during the past two decades, utilization of measured hematologic changes as a direcrt indicator of the severity of radiation injury provides important information for diagnosis and prognostic evaluation in individual cases. Hematologic changes can be described in terms of prognostic categories based on the possible outcome of the acute radiation syndrome. The five categories suggested by Wald according to the grade of severity. By the actual application of this category to our experience of the 1971 Chiba accident of exposure to irridium 192, it was proved that the estimated dose was well correlated to the value by cytogenetic analysis and physical estimation used of thermo-luminescence phenomena. In hematological parameters, a decrease of lymphocytes occurs whithin 24 hours after the exposure. The level of this early lymphopenia is regarded as one of the best indicators of severity of radiation injury. For the decision of therapeutic procedures, however, the total granulocyte count and platelet count are more valuable to exclude severe infection and bleeding symptoms occurred one month after the exposure. The limitation of the approach by hematologic data must exist in the case exposed in a non-uniform fashion. To overwhelm this difficulty, the application of rapid marrow scanning by short-lived RI such as 52Fe is expected and the bone marrow imaging by magnetic resonance studies is more exciting. For more sensitive and technically easy-drived methods detecting hematologic injury, our new method of detecting micro-nucleus in polychromatic erythroblasts from cultured erythroid colonies from peripheral blood is now developing. Preliminary data have shown the sensitivity of this method is comparable to the cytogenetic study of pheripheral lymphocytes. (author)

  20. Advances in small intestinal ionizing radiation injury research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intestinal ionising radiation injuries are a dose limiting factor in the course of radiotherapy of abdominal and pelvic malignancies. In this paper it is reviewed that ionizing radiation injuries of small intestine,including clinical symptoms, epithelium and submucosa changes, signal molecular expression changes, histological and ultrastructure changes. The ongoing works of our laboratory on subjects of intestinal injuries induced by heavy ions and protection against these injuries are also presented. (authors)

  1. Injury and repair of astrocyte after ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrocyte is the most glial cell in the central nervous system. In the present experiment, radiation injury to the central nervous system (CNS) triggers a large network of cellular changes including neuron, glial cell and endothelial cell in morphology and metabolism and function. Astrocyte changes rapidly after ionizing radiation. There is a relationship between astrocyte and the pathologic process and function recover of damaged brain tissue following CNS injury. This suggests that astrocyte plays an important role in cure of clinical radiation injury

  2. Explanation of diagnostic criteria for external radiation bone injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National occupational health standard-Diagnostic Criteria for External Radiation Bone Injuries has been approved and issued by the Ministry of Health. Based on the extensive research of literature, systematic study of the relevant laws and regulations, this standard was enacted according to its making principles. It is mainly used for diagnosis of bone injury induced by radiation accident, and it also can serve as a guide to diagnose bone injury induced by medical radiation. To implement this standard, and to diagnose and treat the external radiation bone injuries patient correctly and promptly, the contents of this standard were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  3. Combined therapy of urinary bladder radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaderin, V.P.; Polyanichko, M.F. (Rostovskij-na-Donu Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Onkologicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1982-01-01

    A scheme of therapy of radiation cystitis is suggested. It was developed on the basis of evaluation of literature and clinical data of 205 patients with radiation injury of the urinary bladder. The method is based on general and local therapy of damaged tissues by antiinflammatory drugs, anesthetics and stimulators of reparative regeneration. Severe ulcerative and incrustation cystites, refractory to conservative therapy, were treated by surgery, using antiseptics and reparation stimulators before, during and after operation. As a result, there were hardly any complications after reconstruction of the bladder with intestinal and peritoneal tissues. 104 patients (96.1%) were cured completely and ability to work was restored in 70 patients (76.9%).

  4. Entanglement from thermal black body radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Two non--interacting quantum systems which couple to a common environment with many degrees of freedom initially in thermal equilibrium can become entangled due to the indirect interaction mediated through this heat bath. I examine here the dynamics of reservoir induced entanglement for a heat bath consisting of a thermal electro--magnetic radiation field, such as black body radiation or the cosmic microwave background, and show how the effect can be understood as result of an effective induc...

  5. [Penetrating head and brain injuries with nonmetal foreign bodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, A A; Okhlopkov, V A; Latyshev, Ya A; Serova, N K; Eolchiyan, S A

    2014-01-01

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are common in neurosurgical practice. Most of them are civil or war-time missile and blast injuries. This type of trauma is widely presented in neurosurgical publication, textbooks and clinical evidence-based guidelines. At the same time, PBI by non-metallic foreign bodies are very rare. All the data are limited to case reports and small series of cases. Moreover, there are no clinical consideration on diagnosis, treatment, complication, outcome and prognosis of PBI by non-metallic penetrating brain injuries. In this review all the data are summarized to provide recommendations on the diagnosis and treatment of PBI by non-metallic foreign bodies.

  6. Fractured identities: injury and the balletic body

    OpenAIRE

    Wainwright, Steven P.; Williams, Clare; Turner, Bryan S.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Social worlds shape human bodies and so it is inevitable that there are strong relationships between the body, professional dance and identity. In this article we draw on Bourdieu?s notions of habitus, and various forms of capital, as the main theoretical framework for our discussion. Our ethnography of the balletic body elicited dancers and ex-dancers? perceptions of their bodies and ...

  7. Preventive treatment of combined radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk of sepsis development increases when thermal burns and other trauma occur in combination with exposure to radiation. Only surgical correction of the life-threatening state recommends within 48 hours after irradiation. All other arrangements have to carry out when hemopoiesis recovery will complete. However exposed patients with combined injuries (CI) die during the first two or three weeks mainly due to sepsis. Therefore prophylaxis and preventive therapy of infectious complications are need early. Actual difficulties in choice of valid treatment procedure for acute radiation syndrome (ARS) exhibit additional aggravation under CI. The available facts prove decreasing early therapy efficiency for rather high dose exposure and wound trauma occurrence. The own results showed that bacterial polysaccharide pyrogenal, glycopin (synthetic analogue of muramil-dipeptide), thymus preparations (thymozin, thymotropin, thymogen), tuftsin, heterologic human and bovine immunoglobulins did not modify the low values of 30-day survival under CI (irradiation + thermal burn). Single injection of prodigiozan, zymozan and some other yeast polysaccharides in 1 hr after CI resulted at moderate increasing of survival. The main purpose of this study, which bases upon our understanding of CI pathogenesis, was search more effective means for preventive treatment of combined radiation injuries. Two groups of remedies were under study. The first group included so called 'biological response modifiers' (BRM). These agents may increase host defences to infection, macrophage's activity and hemopoietic growth factor's secretion. The second group included antibiotics that should be directed against the potential gram-negative as well as gram-positive pathogens and simultaneously be useful for selective decontamination of gastrointestinal tract. (author)

  8. Understanding of radiation protection in medicine. Pt. 1. Knowledge about radiation exposure and anxiety about radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a questionnaire we investigated whether radiation exposure in correctly understood by medical doctors (n=140), nurses (n=496) and the general public (n=236). Thirty-three percent of medical doctors, 53% of nurses and the general public did not know who is legally allowed to irradiate the human body. Forty-five percent of doctors, 63% of nurses and 48% of the general public complained of anxiety about radiation injury. Fifty-six percent of patients did not ask medical doctors or nurses for an explanation of the risk of exposure. Moreover, 64% of doctors did not explain the risk to patients. In addition, 21% of doctors, 46% of nurses and the general public incorrectly understood that x-rays remain in the examination room. Twenty-seven percent of doctors, 49% of nurses and 80% of the general public did not know the ten-day rule. In conclusion, the results of this questionnaire indicated that basic knowledge about radiation exposure was not adequate. To protect against medical radiation exposure, personnel who are licensed to irradiate to the human body should be well recognized by medical staff and the general public. It is also important that informed consent for radiological examinations be based on fundamental knowledge about radiation exposure. Therefore, to reach a general consensus on radiological examinations and to reduce individual exposure, general public education regarding radiation protection is required. Postgraduate education on radiation protection for medical doctors and nurses is also strongly recommended. (author)

  9. General discussion about enzymes activities of radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researching reliable and practical indicators of radiation injury, however, is very interesting and considerable department of scientific studies, practical and theoretical. Enzymes activities are among biochemical indicators which are changed after radiation injury. Activity of these specific proteins is important in regulation of every biochemical reaction in existing beings. Biological macromolecules can be damaged by radiation or the cell permeability can be changed. All of these influence directly on enzymes activities. In this paper we present the review of the all important enzymes, indicators of the radiation injury, which variances on reference to normal values are significant of the functional and the structural changes of essential organs (author)

  10. Plastic and reconstructive surgical treatment of the radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven cases of radiation injury are reported. Three of them were relatively superficial ''radiation dermatitis''. They received radical excision and free skin-grafting to the cosmetic and functional satisfaction. Eight patients had deeper injury, ''radiation ulcer''. Six cases were treated by ''local flap''. The local flap technique is the simplest and the most effective way to treat the radiation ulcer. The reason is 1) it is a one stage operation, 2) it has a permanent pedicle supplying good blood flow, 3) it has very close texture and color match to the area. However, a skin-grafting performed on one patient of radiation ulcer ended up with failure. The indication of the skin-grafting and the local flap was discussed from the point of the stage or degree of radiation injuries and the recommendable method is the skin-grafting to the radiation dermatitis and the local flap to the radiation ulcer. (auth.)

  11. Cardiac injury after 10 gy total body irradiation: indirect role of effects on abdominal organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenarczyk, Marek; Lam, Vy; Jensen, Eric; Fish, Brian L; Su, Jidong; Koprowski, Stacy; Komorowski, Richard A; Harmann, Leanne; Migrino, Raymond Q; Li, X Allen; Hopewell, John W; Moulder, John E; Baker, John E

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether radiation-induced injury to the heart after 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) is direct or indirect. Young male WAG/RijCmcr rats received a 10 Gy single dose using TBI, upper hemi-body (UHB) irradiation, lower hemi-body (LHB) irradiation, TBI with the kidneys shielded or LHB irradiation with the intestines shielded. Age-matched, sham-irradiated rats served as controls. The lipid profile, kidney injury, heart and liver morphology and cardiac function were determined up to 120 days after irradiation. LHB, but not UHB irradiation, increased the risk factors for cardiac disease as well as the occurrence of cardiac and kidney injury in a way that was quantitatively and qualitatively similar to that observed after TBI. Shielding of the kidneys prevented the increases in risk factors for cardiac disease. Shielding of the intestines did not prevent the increases in risk factors for cardiac disease. There was no histological evidence of liver injury 120 days after irradiation. Injury to the heart from irradiation appears to be indirect, supporting the notion that injury to abdominal organs, principally the kidneys, is responsible for the increased risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease after TBI and LHB irradiation.

  12. [Comparative Evaluation of Healing Wounds at a Local and Combined Radiation Injury in an Experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legeza, V I; Grebenyuk, A N; Kondakov, A Y; Zargarova, N I

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing activity of 20 different means of conservative treatment of radiation burns was studies in the experiments on the rats subjected to local β-radiation (at a dose of 60 Gy) and combined radiation damage (β-radiation at a dose of 60 Gy and the whole-body γ-irradiation at a dose of 4 Gy). It was found that reparative processes in the irradiated,skin in the case of the local radiation injuries are most effectively accelerated by ointments Biopin, Panthenol-Ratiopharm, IL-1β and Iruksol; Dimexidum solution; aerosols Olazol, Gipozol and Polkortolon; wound coverings Procell-super and Selenopol. Ointments containing IL-1β, Dimexidum solution, aerosols and wound coverings have a healing effect in the case of combined radiation injury. PMID:26964343

  13. Medical emergency center for radiation injuries in Zagreb, Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the way how radiation injuries due to a radiation accident can be treated. Several degrees of action will be provided in case of a NPP-Krsko nuclear accident. Medical treatment will be done in the Centre for Radiation Medicine and Protection in Clinical Hospital Centre Zagreb. (rieger)

  14. The modes of death in mammals exposed to whole body radiation (acute radiation syndromes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When an animal is exposed to a sufficient amount of radiation, there will be changes in many organs of the body, and as a result of either the effects in one particular organ or the interaction of effects in several organs, the animal as a whole will show characteristic syndromes. Some syndromes result inevitably in death. Others may or may not be lethal, depending on the extent of the tissue damage. The time of appearance of the syndromes, their duration, and the survival of the organism depend on many factors. Whole body acute doses of radiation produce the same spectrum of Central Nervous System (CNS), Gastrointestinal (GI) and Bone Marrow (BM) injury in man as was described for animals. Damage to the skin, ovary and testis are an integral and important part of the symptoms. (author)

  15. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.H. Bakkal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg. Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage.

  16. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage

  17. Skin injuries on the body and thigh of dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Carsten; Gröhn, Y.T.; Thysen, Iver

    1994-01-01

    An epidemiological study was conducted in 18 dairy herds with the objective to characterize those groups of cows where skin injuries to the body and thighs occurred most frequently. Data were analyzed with multivariable logistic regression. The epidemiologic patterns were different in first and l...

  18. Intestinal Microbiota-Derived Metabolomic Blood Plasma Markers for Prior Radiation Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Assessing whole-body radiation injury and absorbed dose is essential for remediation efforts following accidental or deliberate exposure in medical, industrial, military, or terrorist incidents. We hypothesize that variations in specific metabolite concentrations extracted from blood plasma would correlate with whole-body radiation injury and dose. Methods and Materials: Groups of C57BL/6 mice (n=12 per group) were exposed to 0, 2, 4, 8, and 10.4 Gy of whole-body gamma radiation. At 24 hours after treatment, all animals were euthanized, and both plasma and liver biopsy samples were obtained, the latter being used to identify a distinct hepatic radiation injury response within plasma. A semiquantitative, untargeted metabolite/lipid profile was developed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, which identified 354 biochemical compounds. A second set of C57BL/6 mice (n=6 per group) were used to assess a subset of identified plasma markers beyond 24 hours. Results: We identified a cohort of 37 biochemical compounds in plasma that yielded the optimal separation of the irradiated sample groups, with the most correlated metabolites associated with pyrimidine (positively correlated) and tryptophan (negatively correlated) metabolism. The latter were predominantly associated with indole compounds, and there was evidence that these were also correlated between liver and plasma. No evidence of saturation as a function of dose was observed, as has been noted for studies involving metabolite analysis of urine. Conclusions: Plasma profiling of specific metabolites related to pyrimidine and tryptophan pathways can be used to differentiate whole-body radiation injury and dose response. As the tryptophan-associated indole compounds have their origin in the intestinal microbiome and subsequently the liver, these metabolites particularly represent an attractive marker for radiation injury within blood plasma

  19. Intestinal Microbiota-Derived Metabolomic Blood Plasma Markers for Prior Radiation Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ó Broin, Pilib [Department of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Department of Mathematical Sciences, Yeshiva University, New York, New York (United States); Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya [Department of Medicine, Diabetes Center, Stable Isotope and Metabolomics Core Facility, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Saha, Subhrajit [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Hartil, Kirsten [Department of Medicine, Diabetes Center, Stable Isotope and Metabolomics Core Facility, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Chen, Emily I. [Department of Pharmacology, Proteomics Shared Resource, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldman, Devorah; Fleming, William Harv [Department of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Kurland, Irwin J. [Department of Medicine, Diabetes Center, Stable Isotope and Metabolomics Core Facility, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Guha, Chandan, E-mail: cguha@montefiore.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Golden, Aaron, E-mail: aaron.golden@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Department of Mathematical Sciences, Yeshiva University, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Assessing whole-body radiation injury and absorbed dose is essential for remediation efforts following accidental or deliberate exposure in medical, industrial, military, or terrorist incidents. We hypothesize that variations in specific metabolite concentrations extracted from blood plasma would correlate with whole-body radiation injury and dose. Methods and Materials: Groups of C57BL/6 mice (n=12 per group) were exposed to 0, 2, 4, 8, and 10.4 Gy of whole-body gamma radiation. At 24 hours after treatment, all animals were euthanized, and both plasma and liver biopsy samples were obtained, the latter being used to identify a distinct hepatic radiation injury response within plasma. A semiquantitative, untargeted metabolite/lipid profile was developed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, which identified 354 biochemical compounds. A second set of C57BL/6 mice (n=6 per group) were used to assess a subset of identified plasma markers beyond 24 hours. Results: We identified a cohort of 37 biochemical compounds in plasma that yielded the optimal separation of the irradiated sample groups, with the most correlated metabolites associated with pyrimidine (positively correlated) and tryptophan (negatively correlated) metabolism. The latter were predominantly associated with indole compounds, and there was evidence that these were also correlated between liver and plasma. No evidence of saturation as a function of dose was observed, as has been noted for studies involving metabolite analysis of urine. Conclusions: Plasma profiling of specific metabolites related to pyrimidine and tryptophan pathways can be used to differentiate whole-body radiation injury and dose response. As the tryptophan-associated indole compounds have their origin in the intestinal microbiome and subsequently the liver, these metabolites particularly represent an attractive marker for radiation injury within blood plasma.

  20. Ninety-nine years of radiation injuries in dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A German dentist, F.O. Walkhoff, has started dental radiography as early as two weeks after Roentgen's discovery on November 8, 1895. The purpose of this paper is to revisit radiation injuries by dividing the era into the era of Kells (before World War II) and the era of low exposure doses (after World War II). Edmund Kells (1856-1928), a pioneer of dental radiologist in the United States, has later become a victim of radiation injuries. During the era of Kells, skin radiation injuries were frequent among the group of dental and medical personnels. In the era of low exposure doses, cancers, leukemia, and genetic effects have begun to receive attention. Radiation injuries occurring in a dental practice are discussed in the context of the two eras. (N.K.) 43 refs

  1. Ninety-nine years of radiation injuries in dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Kadzuo (Nippon Dental Univ., Niigata (Japan). School of Dentistry at Niigata)

    1994-06-01

    A German dentist, F.O. Walkhoff, has started dental radiography as early as two weeks after Roentgen's discovery on November 8, 1895. The purpose of this paper is to revisit radiation injuries by dividing the era into the era of Kells (before World War II) and the era of low exposure doses (after World War II). Edmund Kells (1856-1928), a pioneer of dental radiologist in the United States, has later become a victim of radiation injuries. During the era of Kells, skin radiation injuries were frequent among the group of dental and medical personnels. In the era of low exposure doses, cancers, leukemia, and genetic effects have begun to receive attention. Radiation injuries occurring in a dental practice are discussed in the context of the two eras. (N.K.) 43 refs.

  2. Further approaches to biological indicators of radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite of the decades-long investigations, the search for proper biological indicator of radiation injuries did not result in techniques fulfilling all the requirements. So far, the most reliable assay is the dicentric chromosome aberration analysis. New developments have been made recently on a cytogenetic technique, the micronucleus assay, and for local injuries on the application of thermography

  3. Chinese prescription Shenlingbaizhu extract prevents radiation-induced small intestinal injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: to investigate the therapeutic effect of traditional Chinese prescription Shenlingbaizhu Extract on radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice. Methods: Proliferation improvement of irradiated intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) was tested by MTT assay in vitro. The preventive effect of the prescription was also tested in vivo. Mice were treated with Shenlingbaizhu by intragastric administration immediately after receiving local irradiation to the abdomen at a dose of 10 Gy (60Co γ-ray). The body mass, diarrhea and survival were recorded. The pathological changes in the jejunum of mice were stained by HE and observed. Results: Shenlingbaizhu Extract could significantly promote the proliferation of irradiated intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Shenlingbaizhu Extract treatment reduced the diarrhea of irradiated mice, improved the intestinal structural recovery and increased the mice survival. Conclusion: Traditional Chinese prescription Shenlingbaizhu Extract shows significant protective effect on radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice, providing data for clinical treatment of radiation-induced intestinal injury. (authors)

  4. [Foreign bodies--uncommon causes of GIT injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasala, P; Hadwiger, J; Gryga, A; Folprecht, M

    2009-09-01

    Injuries to various parts of the digestive tract caused by foreign bodies, frequently deliberately swallowed or inserted using various practics, are less common, however serious injuries. The symptomatology may be vague, credibility is often limited or anamnestic data may be intentionaly missing, which makes the diagnostic process tricky. Undefined, vague signs are related to specificities during the GIT perforation, so called hidden perforation. The recovery is commonly complicated, with a resulting handicap of stool incontinence or of colostomy. This is demonstrated on several subjects, treated in our surgical department. PMID:20052930

  5. [Foreign bodies--uncommon causes of GIT injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasala, P; Hadwiger, J; Gryga, A; Folprecht, M

    2009-09-01

    Injuries to various parts of the digestive tract caused by foreign bodies, frequently deliberately swallowed or inserted using various practics, are less common, however serious injuries. The symptomatology may be vague, credibility is often limited or anamnestic data may be intentionaly missing, which makes the diagnostic process tricky. Undefined, vague signs are related to specificities during the GIT perforation, so called hidden perforation. The recovery is commonly complicated, with a resulting handicap of stool incontinence or of colostomy. This is demonstrated on several subjects, treated in our surgical department.

  6. Neurogenic differentiation factor NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Du, Aonan; Xu, Jing; Ma, Yanchao; Cao, Han; Yang, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, especially the small intestine, is particularly sensitive to radiation, and is prone to radiation-induced injury as a result. Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is an evolutionarily-conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. NeuroD contains a protein transduction domain (PTD), which allows it to be exogenously delivered across the membrane of mammalian cells, whereupon its transcription activity can be unleashed. Whether NeuroD has therapeutic effects for radiation-induced injury remains unclear. In the present study, we prepared a NeuroD-EGFP recombinant protein, and explored its protective effects on the survival and intestinal damage induced by ionizing radiation. Our results showed that NeuroD-EGFP could be transduced into small intestine epithelial cells and tissues. NeuroD-EGFP administration significantly increased overall survival of mice exposed to lethal total body irradiation (TBI). This recombinant NeuroD also reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury and apoptosis, and improved crypt survival. Expression profiling of NeuroD-EGFP-treated mice revealed upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), a known inhibitor of apoptosis in mammalian cells. In conclusion, NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury, and provides a novel therapeutic clinical option for the prevention of intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and the treatment of victims of incidental exposure. PMID:27436572

  7. CHANGES OF IMMUNE FUNCTIONS AFTER RADIATION, BURNS AND COMBINED RADIATION-BURN INJURY IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎永堂; 冉新泽; 魏书庆

    1995-01-01

    The changes ot several immune functions were observed in rats after they were inflicted with 6 Gy gamma rays irradiation, 15% TBSA full thickness hrun and the combination of the 2 injuries. It was found that the ftmcldons of thymocytes and epienocytes suffered the most severe suppressinn in the 24th to 72nd hour after radiation injury and began to recover on the 7th day. In the rats with burn injury, the suppression on thymocytes and splenocytes were significantly less severe than that after radiation and recovered more rapidly. The effects of combined rediation-bura injury showed several characteristics. The suppression on the thymocytes was more severe with slower recovery as compared with that after single radiation injury only. The suppression on the splenocytes as a whole was similar to that after single radiation injury, but in the early stage after combined injury, the suppression was far more severe than that after radiation. Escharectccny and skin grafting on the burn wounds on the lst day after combined injury could accelerate the recovery on both the thymocytes and eplenocytes. Our findings indicated that the severity of the suppression on the immune functions due to combined radiadon-burrt injury might depend on the size of the burn wounds.

  8. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic finding...

  9. Acute Cerebrovascular Radiation Syndrome: Radiation Neurotoxicity , mechanisms of CNS radiation injury, advanced countermeasures for Radiation Protection of Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    Key words: Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome (Cv ARS), Radiation Neurotoxins (RNT), Neurotransmitters, Radiation Countermeasures, Antiradiation Vaccine (ArV), Antiradiation Blocking Antibodies, Antiradiation Antidote. Psychoneuroimmunology, Neurotoxicity. ABSTRACT: To review the role of Radiation Neurotoxins in triggering, developing of radiation induced central nervous system injury. Radiation Neurotoxins - rapidly acting blood toxic lethal agent, which activated after irradiation and concentrated, circulated in interstitial fluid, lymph, blood with interactions with cell membranes, receptors and cell compartments. Radiation Neurotoxins - biological molecules with high enzymatic activity and/or specific lipids and activated or modified after irradiation. The Radiation Neurotoxins induce increased permeability of blood vessels, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and developing severe disorder of blood macro- and micro-circulation. Principles of Radiation Psychoneuro-immunology and Psychoneuro-allergology were applied for determination of pathological processes developed after irradiation or selective administration of Radiation Neurotoxins to radiation naïve mammals. Effects of radiation and exposure to radiation can develop severe irreversible abnormalities of Central Nervous System, brain structures and functions. Antiradiation Vaccine - most effective, advanced methods of protection, prevention, mitigation and treatment and was used for of Acute Radiation Syndromes and elaboration of new technology for immune-prophylaxis and immune-protection against ϒ, Heavy Ion, Neutron irradiation. Results of experiments suggested that blocking, antitoxic, antiradiation antibodies can significantly reduce toxicity of Radiation Toxins. New advanced technology include active immune-prophylaxis with Antiradiation Vaccine and Antiradiation therapy that included specific blocking antibodies to Radiation Neurotoxins

  10. Therapy of combined radiation injuries with hemopoietic growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation accidents of the 5-7 th levels according to IAEA scale lead to life-threatening acute radiation syndrome and many patients will probably suffer from additional thermal burns. These combined injuries (CI) will be among the most difficult to achieve survival. Present therapeutic means need to augment with new approaches to stimulate host defence mechanisms, blood system recovery and to enhance survival. The evaluation of therapeutic properties of human recombinant G-CSF, IL-1,IL-2 and other so called 'biological response modifiers' on survival and blood recovery after CI was the purpose of this work. Experiments carried out with mice CBA x C57BL6 receiving 7 Gy total body irradiation followed by a full-thickness thermal bum of 10% of body surface. It established that G-CSF does not exhibit a positive modifying action on the damage level and on hematopoietic recovery. I.p two-four/fold infusion of IL-2 during the initial 2 days has provided a significant statistically survival increase from 40% (untreated mice with CI) to 86%. Single s.c IL-1 injection resulted in abrupt deterioration of the outcome when dealing with CI; three/fold administration of IL-1 in 2,4 and 6 days after CI did not increase survival. Extracellular yeast polysaccharides resulted only a 15 to 30% increase in survival it given 1 h after CI. The best results obtained when mixture of heat-killed L.acidophilus injected s.c immediately alter CI - survival has increased from 27% (untreated mice) to 80%. Revealed beneficial effects of IL-2 and biological response modifiers did not accompany by a corresponding correction of depressed hematological parameters

  11. [Stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, D; Martinage, G; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T; Makhloufi, S; Faivre, J-C; Thureau, S; Lartigau, É

    2016-10-01

    After the liver and lungs, bones are the third most common sites of cancer metastasis. Palliative radiotherapy for secondary bone tumours helps relieve pain, improve the quality of life and reduce the risk of fractures. Stereotactic body radiotherapy can deliver high radiation doses with very tight margins, which has significant advantages when treating tumours close to the spinal cord. Strict quality control is essential as dose gradient at the edge of the spinal cord is important. Optimal schedule is not defined. A range of dose-fractionation schedules have been used. Pain relief and local control are seen in over 80%. Toxicity rates are low, although vertebral fracture may occur. Ongoing prospective studies will help clarify its role in the management of oligometastatic patients. PMID:27614511

  12. Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract. Exposure to ionising radiation at medium to high doses results in the manifestation of mixed pathologies. Following the analysis of several radiation accidents it is clear that intestinal injury influences patient survival. However the appearance of the classically defined gastrointestinal syndrome is not always evident. Nevertheless injury to the gastrointestinal tract, in particular loss of barrier function, seems to play an important role in the development of Multiple Organ Failure such as reported in the recent accident at Tokai Mura. Ionising radiation overexposure results in changes in intestinal motility and nutrient, fluid and electrolyte absorption and secretion all which may contribute to the genesis of diarrhea. In addition to modified cellular transport properties for nutrients or electrolytes, important loss of epithelial cells is also a major contributing factor. Intestinal functions are controlled by many factors such as neurotransmitters, locally released mediators from endocrine cells or immunocompetent cells in addition to luminal agents. To date, treatment of radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury is mainly symptomatic. However treatments such as growth factors, anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as cellular transplantation remain to be validated in the radiation accident situation. (author)

  13. Human ghrelin mitigates intestinal injury and mortality after whole body irradiation in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Wang

    Full Text Available Widespread use of ionizing radiation has led to the realization of the danger associated with radiation exposure. Although studies in radiation countermeasures were initiated a half century ago, an effective therapy for a radiomitigator has not been identified. Ghrelin is a gastrointestinal hormone, and administration of ghrelin is protective in animal models of injuries including radiation combined injury. To test whether ghrelin can be protective in whole body irradiaton (WBI alone, male Sprague Dawley (SD rats were treated with human ghrelin (20 nmol/rat daily for 6 days starting at either 24 h or 48 h after 10 Gray (Gy WBI and survival outcome was examined. The 10 Gy WBI produced a LD70/30 model in SD rats (30% survival in 30 days. The survival rate in rats treated with ghrelin starting at 24 h was significantly improved to 63% and when treatment was initiated at 48 h, the survival remained at 61%. At 7 days post WBI, plasma ghrelin was significantly reduced from the control value. Ghrelin treatment starting at 24 h after WBI daily for 6 days improved histological appearance of the intestine, reduced gut permeability, serum endotoxin levels and bacterial translocation to the liver by 38%, 42% and 61%, respectively at day 7 post WBI. Serum glucose and albumin were restored to near control levels with treatment. Ghrelin treatment also attenuated WBI-induced intestinal apoptosis by 62% as evidenced by TUNEL staining. The expression of anti-apoptotic cell regulator Bcl-xl was decreased by 38% in the vehicle and restored to 75% of the control with ghrelin treatment. Increased expression of intestinal CD73 and pAkt were observed with ghrelin treatment, indicating protection of the intestinal epithelium after WBI. These results indicate that human ghrelin attenuates intestinal injury and mortality after WBI. Thus, human ghrelin can be developed as a novel mitigator for radiation injury.

  14. Effects of bone marrow transplantation and bone marrow shielding on the intestinal radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of hemopoietic tissue transplantation and bone marrow shielding on early intestinal injury in mice after high does gamma irradiation were studied. Fresh bone marrow cells (2 x 106) transplanted after 12 Gy and 10 Gy whole body irradiation had no protective effect on intestinal injury. In mice exposed to 14 Gy whole body or abdominal region irradiation, there was no difference in the decrease of intestinal epithelial cells and inhibition of crypt mitosis. Therefore hemopoietic tissue shielding could not reduce severity of intestinal damage. These results showed that the radiation injury of intestinal tract is essentially a direct effect of γ-ray and has not obvious relationship to the hemopoietic tissues

  15. Anesthesia for plastic reconstruction surgery of radiation injury of neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of anesthesia used in the plastic reconstruction of 18 cases of radiation injury of neck is reported. 17 cases were malignant tumor patients. After radiotherapy, their general condition was weak. The injury of neck skin and surrounding tissues was severe. Most operations were excision of the focus and repairing the wound using adjacent flap. The choice of anesthesia depended on the general condition, degree of injury and the procedure. Good pre-operative preparation, close monitoring and satisfactory airway control during operation are very important

  16. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Han, Bing [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Setoyama, Kentaro [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamamoto, Toshiyuki [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Guzman-Lepe, Jorge [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Galambos, Csaba [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Fong, Jason V. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamanouchi, Kosho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  17. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury

  18. Radiation injury of the normal and neoplastic prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostwick, D.G.; Egbert, B.M.; Fajardo, L.F.

    1982-09-01

    Tissue samples from 40 patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma treated by radiation therapy were evaluated simultaneously by three observers to establish criteria for distinguishing residual tumor from radiation-induced atypia. Sections from 10 patients irradiated for nonprostatic pelvic neoplasms served as controls in addition to pretreatment biopsies from the determinate group. Patients had been treated by external x-irradiation, the majority receiving 6200-7400 rad to the prostate and pelvis over 7 to 8 weeks. Positive (tumor) biopsy incidence in the determinate group was 80% at 18 months, 40% at 36 months, and 43% in later samples. The following features were characteristic of radiation injury in the prostate: decreased ratio of the number of tumor glands to stroma, atrophy and squamous-like metaplasia of non-neoplastic glands with or without atypia, stromal fibrosis, arterial lumenal narrowing due to myointimal proliferation, foam cells within vessel walls, and fibrosis and atrophy of seminal vesicles. Criteria not useful for diagnosing radiation injury included architectural pattern or differentiation of tumor, cytologic features of tumor cells, inflammatory infiltrate, and ratio of normal glands to stroma. Ionizing radiation produced characteristic lesions in neoplastic and non-neoplastic prostatic glands, stroma, and blood vessels, and the sum of these changes was a reliable indicator of prior radiotherapy. An understanding of the morphologic effects of radiation injury of the prostate allowed distinction between residual prostatic adenocarcinoma and radiation-induced atypia of non-neoplastic glands.

  19. Diagnosis of partial body radiation exposure in mice using peripheral blood gene expression profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Meadows

    Full Text Available In the event of a terrorist-mediated attack in the United States using radiological or improvised nuclear weapons, it is expected that hundreds of thousands of people could be exposed to life-threatening levels of ionizing radiation. We have recently shown that genome-wide expression analysis of the peripheral blood (PB can generate gene expression profiles that can predict radiation exposure and distinguish the dose level of exposure following total body irradiation (TBI. However, in the event a radiation-mass casualty scenario, many victims will have heterogeneous exposure due to partial shielding and it is unknown whether PB gene expression profiles would be useful in predicting the status of partially irradiated individuals. Here, we identified gene expression profiles in the PB that were characteristic of anterior hemibody-, posterior hemibody- and single limb-irradiation at 0.5 Gy, 2 Gy and 10 Gy in C57Bl6 mice. These PB signatures predicted the radiation status of partially irradiated mice with a high level of accuracy (range 79-100% compared to non-irradiated mice. Interestingly, PB signatures of partial body irradiation were poorly predictive of radiation status by site of injury (range 16-43%, suggesting that the PB molecular response to partial body irradiation was anatomic site specific. Importantly, PB gene signatures generated from TBI-treated mice failed completely to predict the radiation status of partially irradiated animals or non-irradiated controls. These data demonstrate that partial body irradiation, even to a single limb, generates a characteristic PB signature of radiation injury and thus may necessitate the use of multiple signatures, both partial body and total body, to accurately assess the status of an individual exposed to radiation.

  20. Effects of early escharectomy on rats with combined radiation-burn injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To provide evidence for beneficial effect of clinical therapy with early escharectomy on survival and wound healing in rats combined radiation-burn injury. Methods: Rats were exposed to 5 Gy whole-body γ-ray irradiation from a 60Co source and to thermal-radiation burn (10% TBSA, full thickness burn) successively by a 5 kW bromo-tungsten lamp. Then the animals were given anti-shock and anti-infection remedies. Early escharectomy and stitch (EES) at 24 h after injury, eschar-protecting treatment, or other treatment modalities were carried out. The 60-day survival rate, the duration of wound healing and the changes of the body weight of animals were observed. Results: The 60-day survival rate of EES group reached 78%, being higher than that of the no-escharectomy group (40%, P < 0.05) and even higher than that of the escharectomy with non-stitch group (15%, P < 0.01) and that of the control group (10%, P < 0.01). Besides, in the EES group, the wound showed no sign of infection and healed well, and the body weights recovered faster. Conclusions: EES is effective and available on this model of combined injuries. It is appropriate for operation at 24-48 h after injury

  1. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Kamran A. [Mayo Medical School, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Rose, Peter S. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Brinkmann, Debra H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Laack, Nadia N., E-mail: laack.nadia@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 {+-} 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10-40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

  2. Melatonin as Protection Against Radiation Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetner, D; Andersen, L P H; Rosenberg, J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Radiation is widely used in the treatment of various cancers and in radiological imaging procedures. Ionizing radiation causes adverse effects, leading to decreased quality of life in patients, by releasing free radicals that cause oxidative stress and tissue damage. The sleep......-hormone melatonin is a free radical scavenger, and induces several anti-oxidative enzymes. This review investigates the scientific literature on the protective effects of melatonin against exposure to ionizing radiation, and discusses the clinical potential of melatonin as prophylactic treatment against ionizing...... radiation damage. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed and included experimental or clinical studies written in English that investigated the protective effects of melatonin against gamma or X-ray irradiation in vivo. Studies were excluded if patients were treated with chemotherapy...

  3. Penetrating Scleral Injury with Intraocular Foreign Body. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anay Martínez Díaz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular trauma is a health problem in the world today and a common cause of visual impairment leading to severe sequelae and psychological disorders. The case of a 46-year-old male patient who attended the Ophthalmology emergency services of the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital of Cienfuegos, recounting that while hammering iron on iron he felt that something entered his right eye, is presented. He suffered from pain, tearing, red eye and blurred vision. A penetrating scleral injury with an intraocular foreign body was diagnosed. Its study was conducted through biomicroscopy, orbital x-ray and ocular ultrasound. Surgical treatment by extracapsular lens extraction with intraocular lens implantation was performed using Blumenthal technique and pars plana approach for removal of the intraocular foreign body.

  4. A rat model of radiation injury in the mandibular area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation technology focuses on delivering the radiation as precisely as possible to the tumor, nonetheless both acute and long-term damage to surrounding normal tissue may develop. Injuries to the surrounding normal tissue after radiotherapy of head and neck cancer are difficult to manage. An animal model is needed to elucidate good treatment modalities. The aim of this study was to establish a rat model where a certain radiation dose gives reproducible tissue reactions in the mandibular area corresponding to injuries obtained in humans. The left mandible of male Sprague Dawley rats was irradiated by external radiotherapy (single fraction 15 Gy, total dose 75 Gy) every second week five times. Endpoint was six weeks after last radiation treatment, and the test group was compared to non-irradiated controls. Morphological alterations of the soft tissues, bone and tooth formation, as well as alterations of salivation, vascularity and collagen content were assessed. An unpaired, non-parametric Mann–Whitney test was used to compare the statistical differences between the groups. Analysis of the soft tissues and mandible within the radiation field revealed severe unilateral alopecia and dermatitis of the skin, extensive inflammation of the submandibular gland with loss of serous secretory cells, hyperkeratinization and dense connective fiber bundles of the gingival tissue, and disturbed tooth development with necrosis of the pulp. Production of saliva and the vascularity of the soft tissues were significantly reduced. Furthermore, the collagen fibril diameter was larger and the collagen network denser compared to non-irradiated control rats. We have established an animal model of radiation injury demonstrating physiological and histological changes corresponding to human radiation injuries, which can be used for future therapeutic evaluations

  5. Stem cell, cytokine and plastic surgical management for radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing concern on systemic and local radiation injuries caused by nuclear power plant accident, therapeutic irradiation or nuclear terrorism should be treated and prevented properly for life-saving and improved wound management. We therefore reviewed our therapeutic regimens and for local radiation injuries and propose surgical methods reflecting the importance of the systemic and general conditions. For local radiation injuries, after careful and complete debridement, sequential surgeries with local flap, arterialized or perforator flap and to free flap are used when the patients' general conditions allow. Occasionally, undetermined wound margins in acute emergency radiation injuries and the regenerative surgical modalities should be attempted with temporal artificial dermis impregnated and sprayed with angiogenic factor such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and secondary reconstruction can be a candidate for demarcation and saving the donor morbidity. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs), together with angiogenic and mitogenic factor of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and an artificial dermis were applied over the excised irradiated skin defect are tested for differentiation and local stimulation effects in the radiation-exposed wounds. The perforator flap and artificial dermal template with growth factor were successful for reconstruction in patients who are suffering from complex underlying disease. Patients were uneventfully treated with minimal morbidities. The hMSCs are strongly proliferative even after 20 Gy irradiation in vitro. Immediate artificial dermis application impregnated with hMSCs and bFGF over the 20 Gy irradiated skin and soft tissues demonstrated the significantly improved fat angio genesis, architected dermal reconstitution and less inflammatory epidermal recovery. Even though emergent cases are more often experienced, detailed understanding of underlying diseases and rational

  6. Hedgehog signaling and radiation induced liver injury: a delicate balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabarriti, Rafi; Guha, Chandan

    2014-07-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) is a major limitation of radiation therapy (RT) for the treatment of liver cancer. Emerging data indicate that hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays a central role in liver fibrosis and regeneration after liver injury. Here, we review the potential role of Hh signaling in RILD and propose the temporary use of Hh inhibition during liver RT to radiosensitize HCC tumor cells and inhibit their progression, while blocking the initiation of the radiation-induced fibrotic response in the surrounding normal liver. PMID:26202634

  7. Radiation injury to the temporal bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guida, R.A.; Finn, D.G.; Buchalter, I.H.; Brookler, K.H.; Kimmelman, C.P. (New York Eye and Ear Infirmary/New York Medical College (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Osteoradionecrosis of the temporal bone is an unusual sequela of radiation therapy to the head and neck. Symptoms occur many years after the radiation is administered, and progression of the disease is insidious. Hearing loss (sensorineural, conductive, or mixed), otalgia, otorrhea, and even gross tissue extrusion herald this condition. Later, intracranial complications such as meningitis, temporal lobe or cerebellar abscess, and cranial neuropathies may occur. Reported here are five cases of this rare malady representing varying degrees of the disease process. They include a case of radiation-induced necrosis of the tympanic ring with persistent squamous debris in the external auditory canal and middle ear. Another case demonstrates the progression of radiation otitis media to mastoiditis with bony sequestration. Further progression of the disease process is seen in a third case that evolved into multiple cranial neuropathies from skull base destruction. Treatment includes systemic antibiotics, local wound care, and debridement in cases of localized tissue involvement. More extensive debridement with removal of sequestrations, abscess drainage, reconstruction with vascularized tissue from regional flaps, and mastoid obliteration may be warranted for severe cases. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has provided limited benefit.

  8. Rabbit model of radiation-induced lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Zong Du; Hua Ren; Jian-Fei Song; Li-Fei Zhang; Feng Lin; Hai-Yong Wang

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore the feasibility of establishing an animal model of chronic radiation-induced lung injury.Methods:Twenty-eightNewZealand white rabbits were randomly divided into3 groups(the right lung irradiation group, the whole lung irradiation group and the control group).Animal model of radiation-induced lung injury was established by high-does radiotherapy in the irradiation groups, then all rabbits underwentCT and pathological examinations at1,2,4,8,12,16 weeks, respectively after radiation.Results:Within4 weeks of irradiation, some rabbits in the right lung irradiation group and whole lung irradiation group died. CT and pathological examinations all showed acute radiation pneumonitis.At8-12 weeks after irradiation,CT scanning showed ground glass samples signs, patchy shadows and fibrotic stripes. Pathological examination showed the fibrosis pulmonary alveolar wall thickened obviously. Conclusions:The clinical animal model of chronic radiation-induced lung injury which corresponds to practical conditions in clinic can be successfully established.

  9. Fatal radiation pneumonia following subclinical busulfan injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soble, A.R.; Perry, H.

    1977-01-01

    A patient with polycythemia vera received a moderate dose (480 mg) of busulfan intermittently over a 6 year period and later developed Hodgkin's disease. Following split-course upper mantle, chest irradiation, he developed rapidly progressive, fatal pneumonia and bone marrow hypoplasia. It is postulated that the hyperacute organ failures (lung and bone marrow) resulted from augmentation of subclinical busulfan-induced damage of these organs by additive radiation effect. It is recommended that in patients who have had antineoplastic chemotherapy, major radiotherapy to the cervicothoracic region be accompanied by careful monitoring of respiratory and hematopoietic function, both before and during radiotherapy.

  10. Salivary biochemical markers as potential acute toxicity parameters for acute radiation injury: A study on small experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, S; Agrawal, P; Kumar, N; Mittal, G; Nishad, D K; Chaudhury, N K; Bhatnagar, A; Basu, M; Chhillar, N

    2016-03-01

    Researchers have been evaluating several biodosimetric/screening approaches to assess acute radiation injury, related to mass causality. Keeping in mind this background, we hypothesized that effect of whole-body irradiation in single fraction in graded doses can affect the secretion of various salivary components that could be used as acute radiation injury/toxicity marker, which can be used in screening of large population at the time of nuclear accidents/disaster. Thirty Sprague Dawley rats treated with whole-body cobalt-60 gamma irradiation of dose 1-5 Gy (dose rate: 0.95 Gy/min) were included in this study. Whole mixed saliva was collected from all animals before and after radiation up to 72 h postradiation. Saliva was analyzed for electrolytes, total protein, urea, and amylase. Intragroup comparison of salivary parameters at different radiation doses showed significant differences. Potassium was significantly increased as the dose increased from 1 Gy to 5 Gy (p 0.5). Sodium was significantly altered after 3-5 Gy (p 0.5), except 1 and 2 Gy, whereas changes in sodium level were nonsignificant (p > 0.5). Urea, total protein, and amylase levels were also significantly increased as the radiation dose increased (p 0.5). This study suggests that salivary parameters were sensitive toward radiation even at low radiation dose which can be used as a predictor of radiation injury. PMID:25813962

  11. Fermi golden rule for $N$-body systems in a black-body radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ostilli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    We review the calculation of the Fermi golden rule for a system of $N$-body dipoles, magnetic or electric, weakly interacting with a black-body radiation. By using the magnetic or electric field-field correlation function evaluated in the 1960s for the black body radiation, we deduce a general formula for the transition rates and study its limiting, fully coherent or fully incoherent, regimes.

  12. Radiological and Nuclear Emergencies: Medical Management of Radiation Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ravi Shankar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear radiation which could be in the form of alpha, beta, gamma rays, etc, could cause radioactive contamination, radiation burns, acute radiation syndrome or a combination of any of these above-mentioned disasters. Effects of radiation and the subsequent treatment depend on the severity of exposure and the organs directly involved. Radiation levels up to 200 rads lead to nausea and vomiting whilst radiation levels between 200 rads and 400 rads lead to diarrhea, vomiting and pneumonitis. Whilst 450 rads is lethal in 50 per cent population, doses above this cause increased fatality and organ involvement with the Central Nervous System being affected with 2000 rads radiation. Nuclear disaster management lies most importantly in identifying that patient who would recover if treated immediately. Whereas decontamination of skin and wounds is done first, immediate first aid may take priority in a seriously injured patient. In the event of internal contamination, effective decorporation maybe required. This is followed by prevention and treatment of infections in sterile conditions. Radiation burn injuries will require effective long-term management. Finally, what would be most important is the necessity to have suitable hospital care where bone marrow, stem cell transfusion and restitution of the immune system would take place.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(2, pp.113-117, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.830

  13. Experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to describe an experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. Methods: on this study eight six-month-old New Zealand male rabbits, with an average weight of 2.5kg were used. They were distributed in four groups (n=2 per group). The control group did not receive radiotherapy and the others received one radiotherapy session of 2000, 3000 and 4500 cGy, respectively. Photographic analysis and histopathological evaluation of the irradiated areas were carried out. Results: after 30 days, the animals from the control group had all their hair grown. In spite of that, the animals from group 2000 cGy had a 60-day alopecia and from group 3000 cGy, a 90-day alopecia. After the 30th day, the 3000cGy group demonstrated 90-day cutaneous radiation injuries, graded 3 and 4. One of the animals from group 4500 cGy died on the 7th day with visceral necrosis. The other from the same group had total skin necrosis. A progressive reduction of glands and blood vessels count and an increase on collagen deposition was observed. Conclusion: The proposed experimental model is reproducible. This study suggests that the dosage 4500cGy is excessive and the 3000 cGy is the most effective for this experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. (author)

  14. Bone marrow transplantation and other treatment after radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review deals mainly with current concepts about bone marrow transplantation as therapy for serious radiation injury. Such injury can be classified according to the following broadly defined dose ranges: (1) the supralethal range, leading mainly to the cerebral and intestinal syndromes; (2) the potentially lethal or therapeutic range which causes the bone marrow syndrome, and (3) the sublethal range which rarely leads to injury requiring therapy. The bone marrow syndrome of man and animals is discussed in detail. The optimal therapy for this syndrome is bone marrow transplantation in conjunction with conventional supportive treatment. The principal complications of such therapy are Graft versus Host Disease and a slow recovery of the recipient's immune system. Concerted research activities in a number of institutions have led to considerable progress in the field of bone marrow transplantation. Improved donor selection, new techniques for stem-cell separation and preservation, as well as effective barrier-nursing and antibiotic decontamination, have made bone marrow transplantation an accepted therapy for marrow depression, including the aplasia caused by excessive exposure to radiation. The review also contains a number of guidelines for the handling of serious radiation accidents. (Auth.)

  15. Experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirelles, Rafael Panisi de Campos [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Hochman, Bernardo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Cirurgia; Helene Junior, Americo; Fraga, Murillo Francisco Pires [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa de Sao Paulo (FCMSCSP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia. Divisao de Cirurgia Plastica; Lellis, Rute [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa de Sao Paulo (FCMSCSP), SP (Brazil). Divisao de Patologia; Ferreira, Lydia Masako, E-mail: rpcmeirelles@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: lydia.dcir@epm.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Mediciana. Divisao de Cirugia Plastica

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: to describe an experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. Methods: on this study eight six-month-old New Zealand male rabbits, with an average weight of 2.5kg were used. They were distributed in four groups (n=2 per group). The control group did not receive radiotherapy and the others received one radiotherapy session of 2000, 3000 and 4500 cGy, respectively. Photographic analysis and histopathological evaluation of the irradiated areas were carried out. Results: after 30 days, the animals from the control group had all their hair grown. In spite of that, the animals from group 2000 cGy had a 60-day alopecia and from group 3000 cGy, a 90-day alopecia. After the 30th day, the 3000cGy group demonstrated 90-day cutaneous radiation injuries, graded 3 and 4. One of the animals from group 4500 cGy died on the 7th day with visceral necrosis. The other from the same group had total skin necrosis. A progressive reduction of glands and blood vessels count and an increase on collagen deposition was observed. Conclusion: The proposed experimental model is reproducible. This study suggests that the dosage 4500cGy is excessive and the 3000 cGy is the most effective for this experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. (author)

  16. Dose Definition and Physical Dose Evaluation for the Human Body in External Radiation Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the bone marrow type of radiation sickness, it is possible to describe the injury to whole-body haematopoietic tissue using stem cell dose. In the case of highly non-uniform exposure, an extra-high local dose to certain parts of the body or absorbed dose to critical organs should be additionally described. To obtain objective dosimetric data from objects carried by the irradiated victims, the watch is an easily available accident dosemeter. Watch rubies can be used as thermoluminescence dosemeters, and the watch glass can be used in electron spin resonance dose measurement. (author)

  17. Neuronal apoptosis and neurofilament protein expression in the lateral geniculate body of cats following acute optic nerve injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The visual pathway have 6 parts, involving optic nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, lateral geniculate body, optic radiation and cortical striatum area. Corresponding changes may be found in these 6 parts following optic nerve injury. At present, studies mainly focus on optic nerve and retina, but studies on lateral geniculate body are few.OBJECTIVE: To prepare models of acute optic nerve injury for observing the changes of neurons in lateral geniculate body, expression of neurofilament protein at different time after injury and cell apoptosis under the optical microscope, and for investigating the changes of neurons in lateral geniculate body following acute optic nerve injury.DESIGN: Completely randomized grouping design, controlled animal experiment.SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Ji'nan Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Twenty-eight adult healthy cats of either gender and common grade, weighing from 2.0 to 3.5 kg, were provided by the Animal Experimental Center of Fudan University. The involved cats were divided into 2 groups according to table of random digit: normal control group (n =3) and model group (n =25). Injury 6 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 14 days five time points were set in model group for later observation, 5 cats at each time point. TUNEL kit (Bohringer-Mannheim company)and NF200& Mr 68 000 mouse monoclonal antibody (NeoMarkers Company) were used in this experiment.METHODS: This experiment was carried out in the Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Ji'nan Military Area Command of Chinese PLA between June 2004 and June 2005. ① The cats of model group were developed into cat models of acute intracranial optic nerve injury as follows: The anesthetized cats were placed in lateral position. By imitating operation to human, pterion approach was used. An incision was made at the joint line between outer canthus and tragus, and deepened along cranial base until white optic nerve via optic nerve pore

  18. The progress in research on the mechanism, prevention and treatment of radiation-induced lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During radiotherapy of chest tumor,many patients often develop radiation-induced lung injury (including radiation induced interstitial pneumonia or pulmonary fibrosis), which significantly affects their quality of life. Therefore, it is very important to study the mechanism, prevention, and treatment of radiation-induced lung injury. Herein a review of recent research advances in radiation-induced lung injury is made, in order to provide theoretical basis for further research. (authors)

  19. Clinical and dosimetric factors of radiation-induced esophageal injury: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Bo Qiao; Yan-Hui Zhao; Yan-Bin Zhao; Rui-Zhi Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical and dosimetric predictive factors for radiation-induced esophageal injury in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during threedimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 208 consecutive patients (146 men and 62 women) with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range 35-87 years). The clinical and treatment parameters including gender, age, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of carinal or subcarinal lymph nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy were studied. Clinical and dosimetric factors for radiation-induced acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury were analyzed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria.RESULTS: Twenty-five (12%) of the two hundred and eight patients developed acute or late grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Among them, nine patients had both acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury, two died of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus ≥60 Gy were significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Fifty-four (26%) of the two hundred and eight patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Among them, 25 (46%) developed grade 3-5 esophageal injury (P = 0.0001<0.01). However, nograde 3-5 esophageal injury occurred in patients who received a maximal point dose to the esophagus <60 Gy (P= 0.0001<0.01).CONCLUSION: Concurrent chemotherapy and the maximal esophageal point dose ≥60 Gy are significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury in patients with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT.

  20. Body composition of active persons with spinal cord injury and with poliomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study sought to evaluate the body composition of subjects with active spinal cord injuries and polio. Two groups of males and females, active, free-living, of similar ages and body mass index (BMI), were distributed according to the source of deficiency: SCI – low spinal cord injury (T5-T12) an...

  1. Prophylactic measures of radiation injuries by natural herbs and neutraceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation biology has gained greater relevance and significance in health and environmental issues. In the present time, nuclear terrorism and weapon related effects are raising much alarm and concern to public health. Obviously, radiation biology research has great potential in diagnosis, therapy and establishing standards for assessment risk from radiation exposure. The development of effective medical countermeasures against nuclear biological and chemical weapons is of immense importance to the defense of all nations and especially to those threatened by international terrorism. Chemical radiation protection is an important strategy to protect living being against deleterious effects of radiation. Earlier the synthetic chemical substances, which could minimize the pathological changes in the living system after exposure to ionizing radiation, were looked into. Medicinal plants are the local heritage with global importance. World is enclosed with a rich wealth of medicinal plants. Herbs have always been the principle form of medicine in India and presently they become popular. Over the last few years, interest in evaluating oriental medicinal herbs and edible phyto products for the use in anti-radiation strategies is encouraging and emerging as an acceptable approach for preventing the radiation induced lesions in many countries. Several Indian medicinal plants (Emblica officinalis, Rosemarinus officinalis, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Alstonia scholaris, Tinospora cordifolia, Phyllanthus niruri, Syzygium cumini, Aegle marmelos, Panax ginseng, Linum usitatissimum, Delonix regia etc) and antioxidant vitamins (C and E) have been tested in this laboratory by taking various biological end points for the possible use of natural products and phytochemicals to serve as radio protectors for medical countermeasures against radiation injuries, and the results obtained from such studies are highly encouraging and fruitful. It opens new avenues for the

  2. Assessment of recovery of the intestine after acute radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, A.R.; Cheeseman, C.I.; Thomson, A.B.

    1987-02-01

    Several aspects of intestinal function and morphology are affected by acute radiation damage, including changes in the activity of proliferative cells in the crypts, immune cell populations, and the transport of various substrates. This study was designed to compare the time course of the recovery of intestinal proliferation, transport, and leukocyte population following radiation injury. Rats received a single dose of 6 Gy to the abdomen from a /sup 137/Cs source and were studied 3, 7, and 14 days later. No changes in the passive uptake of L-glucose or D-leucine were observed in the jejunum. Active transport of D-glucose and maximal water uptake were reduced at 3 days but had returned to normal by 7 days, whereas L-leucine uptake required more than 7 days to return to control levels. Mucosal permeability, assessed by an in vivo potential difference technique, remained increased 7 days after irradiation. Ornithine decarboxylase, an indicator of DNA synthetic activity, was elevated following radiation treatment and remained so even after 14 days. By comparison, myeloperoxidase activity, used as a quantitative monitor of granulocyte numbers, was still reduced after 7 days. These data indicate that while certain parameters of gut function may return to normal soon after radiation injury, the recovery of other factors is more prolonged. Thus the return of transport function to normal values post irradiation may be viewed as an adaptive change rather than simply the recovery of the tissue.

  3. Kidney and lung injury in irradiated rats protected from acute death by partial-body shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninety-six CD-1 male rats were exposed to gamma-ray doses (0-25 Gy) in increments of 5 Gy. One femur, the surgically exteriorized GI tract, and the oral cavity were shielded during irradiation to protect against acute mortality from injury to the hematopoietic system, small intestine, and oral cavity. In addition, the thoraxes of half of the animals from each dose group were shielded. At approximately monthly intervals from 2 to 10 months after irradiation the hematocrit, plasma urea nitrogen (PUN), and 51Cr-EDTA clearance were measured. During the study 20 thorax-shielded and 19 thorax-irradiated animals died. All rats whose thoraxes received 25 Gy irradiation and three out of seven rats whose thoraxes received 20 Gy died 1 to 3 months postirradiation with massive pleural fluid accumulation. Shielding the thoraxes prevented this mode of death at these doses. Kidney injury was judged to be the primary cause of death of all thorax-shielded animals and 15- and 20-Gy thorax-irradiated animals. Animals with kidney damage had elevated PUN and reduced 51Cr-EDTA clearance and hematocrits. The relative merits of each of these end points in assessing radiation-induced kidney injury after total-body exposure are discussed

  4. Radiation between segments of the seated human body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft

    2002-01-01

    Detailed radiation properties for a thermal manikin were predicted numerically. The view factors between individual body-segments and between the body-segments and the outer surfaces were tabulated. On an integral basis, the findings compared well to other studies and the results showed that situ...

  5. Application of Multivariate Modeling for Radiation Injury Assessment: A Proof of Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Bolduc

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate radiation injury estimation algorithms were formulated for estimating severe hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS injury (i.e., response category three or RC3 in a rhesus monkey total-body irradiation (TBI model. Classical CBC and serum chemistry blood parameters were examined prior to irradiation (d 0 and on d 7, 10, 14, 21, and 25 after irradiation involving 24 nonhuman primates (NHP (Macaca mulatta given 6.5-Gy 60Co Υ-rays (0.4 Gy min−1 TBI. A correlation matrix was formulated with the RC3 severity level designated as the “dependent variable” and independent variables down selected based on their radioresponsiveness and relatively low multicollinearity using stepwise-linear regression analyses. Final candidate independent variables included CBC counts (absolute number of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and platelets in formulating the “CBC” RC3 estimation algorithm. Additionally, the formulation of a diagnostic CBC and serum chemistry “CBC-SCHEM” RC3 algorithm expanded upon the CBC algorithm model with the addition of hematocrit and the serum enzyme levels of aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase. Both algorithms estimated RC3 with over 90% predictive power. Only the CBC-SCHEM RC3 algorithm, however, met the critical three assumptions of linear least squares demonstrating slightly greater precision for radiation injury estimation, but with significantly decreased prediction error indicating increased statistical robustness.

  6. Radiation injury of canine bile duct induced by 103Pd metal stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess radiation injury of dog bile duct induced by 103Pd metal stent. Methods: Hybrid dogs with body weight form 15 to 20 kg were used. 103Pd metal stent was implanted into the common bile duct under anaesthesia, and the irradiation doses by 103Pd were 12.5 x 104 kBq, 16.6 x 104 kBq, 22.2 x 104 kBq, 25.9 x 104 kBq, 29.6 x 104 kBq and 3.7 x 105 kBq, respectively. Results: Radiation injury on the mucosa of the bile duct was observed in 12.5 x 104 kBq group, and the damage extended to the muscular layer in 22.2 x 104 kBq group. Perforation of the bile duct was observed in 3.7 x 105 kBq group. The dose-response curve of radiation injury at different doses of intra-biliary metal stent 103Pd showed the effective dose (ED50) to be 28.2 x 104 kBq. Conclusion: There is an obvious dose response relationship for in the 103Pd metal stent. The result is unimportant theoretical basis for application of 103Pd metal stent to clinical treatment of biliary cancer

  7. The Role of Proinflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-18 in Radiation Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Mang

    2016-08-01

    Massive radiation-induced inflammatory factors released from injured cells may cause innate and acquired immune reactions that can further result in stress response signal activity-induced local and systemic damage. IL-1 family members IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-33 play key roles in inflammatory and immune responses and have been recognized to have significant influences on the pathogenesis of diseases. IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-33 share similarities of cytokine biology, but differences exist in signaling pathways. A key component of the inflammatory reaction is the inflammasome, which is a caspase-1-containing multiprotein oligomer. Pathological stimuli such as radiation can induce inflammasome and caspase-1 activation, and subsequently cause maturation (activation) of pro-forms of IL-1 and IL-18 upon caspase-1 cleavage. This caspase-1 dependent and IL-1 and IL-18 associated cell damage is defined as pyroptosis. Activated IL-1 and IL-18 as proinflammatory cytokines drive pathology at different immune and inflammatory disorders through Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling. While the mechanisms of IL-1β-induced pathophysiology of diseases have been well studied, IL-18 has received less attention. The author recently reported that gamma radiation highly increased IL-1β, IL-18 and IL-33 expression in mouse thymus, spleen and/or bone marrow cells; also circulating IL-18 can be used as a radiation biomarker to track radiation injury in mice, minipigs, and nonhuman primates. This mini-review focuses on the role of IL-18 in response to gamma radiation-induced injury. PMID:27356067

  8. The Role of Proinflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-18 in Radiation Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Mang

    2016-08-01

    Massive radiation-induced inflammatory factors released from injured cells may cause innate and acquired immune reactions that can further result in stress response signal activity-induced local and systemic damage. IL-1 family members IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-33 play key roles in inflammatory and immune responses and have been recognized to have significant influences on the pathogenesis of diseases. IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-33 share similarities of cytokine biology, but differences exist in signaling pathways. A key component of the inflammatory reaction is the inflammasome, which is a caspase-1-containing multiprotein oligomer. Pathological stimuli such as radiation can induce inflammasome and caspase-1 activation, and subsequently cause maturation (activation) of pro-forms of IL-1 and IL-18 upon caspase-1 cleavage. This caspase-1 dependent and IL-1 and IL-18 associated cell damage is defined as pyroptosis. Activated IL-1 and IL-18 as proinflammatory cytokines drive pathology at different immune and inflammatory disorders through Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling. While the mechanisms of IL-1β-induced pathophysiology of diseases have been well studied, IL-18 has received less attention. The author recently reported that gamma radiation highly increased IL-1β, IL-18 and IL-33 expression in mouse thymus, spleen and/or bone marrow cells; also circulating IL-18 can be used as a radiation biomarker to track radiation injury in mice, minipigs, and nonhuman primates. This mini-review focuses on the role of IL-18 in response to gamma radiation-induced injury.

  9. Management of radiation injuries of vulva and vagina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Acute and late injuries of vulva and vagina are frequent and potentially serious complications in radiotherapy of gynecologic tumors. They still are reported poorly in literature. Methods: Based on a literature search a survey will be given of the modalities, which are used or recommended for prophylaxis or treatment of these radiation injuries. The principles of the different measures will be discussed with available study results. Results: Hygiene measures and the topical application of antimicrobial or granulation stimulating substances, which is mostly based on long standing clinical experience, are the principles of the treatment of acute reactions of vulva and vagina. The topical use of estrogen, which promotes proliferation of epithelium, is generally described in connection with treatment and prophylaxis of late radiation injuries. As a prophylaxis for the late reaction of vaginal stenosis, vaginal dilatation is recommended in literature. Conclusion: With the exception of a few reports on estrogen, there are no data about the effectiveness of the currently used medical substances. The local application of estrogen as prophylaxis of the acute reactions will therefore be examined in a prospective study. (orig.)

  10. Radiation injury of the rectum: Evaluation of surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred four patients, 80 women and 24 men, with radiation injury of the rectum following treatment for gynecologic and urologic malignancy were studied. In 50 patients, the rectal injury was treated surgically; 54 patients were treated conservatively. The age and sex distributions were the same in each group. In 63 patients, symptoms developed one month to one year after radiotherapy. The longest latent interval was 17 years. Of the 50 surgical patients, 23 had associated small bowel injury. The indications for surgery for the rectal injury were 1) proctitis unresponsive to conservative measures in 14 patients, 2) rectal stricture or fistula or both in 32, and 3) rectosigmoid perforation in four. Forty-one patients had external diversions. Eleven had intestinal continuity restored; six of the 11 had required the stoma for proctitis unresponsive to medical measures. Nineteen patients did not undergo colostomy closure, although symptoms were greatly improved. Diversion alone was insufficient treatment in the remaining 11 patients. Twenty-six patients died. The 12 deaths in the surgical group comprised four due to residual malignancy, four from post-operative complications, and four from unrelated causes. Of the 14 deaths in the nonsurgical group, 11 died of the primary malignancy and three of unrelated causes. Diversion is considered the safest form of treatment for rectovaginal fistulae, rectal strictures, and proctitis unresponsive to medical measures. Intestinal resection resulted in a sharp rise in the morbidity and mortality rates

  11. Radiation injury of the rectum: evaluation of surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred four patients, 80 women and 24 men, with radiation injury of the rectum following treatment for gynecologic and urologic malignancy were studied. In 50 patients, the rectal injury was treated surgically; 54 patients were treated conservatively. The age and sex distributions were the same in each group. In 63 patients, symptoms developed one month to one year after radiotherapy. The longest latent interval was 17 years. Of the 50 surgical patients, 23 had associated small bowel injury. The indications for surgery for the rectal injury were 1) proctitis unresponsive to conservative measures in 14 patients, 2) rectal stricture or fistula or both in 32, and 3) rectosigmoid perforation in four. Forty-one patients had external diversions. Eleven had intestinal continuity restored; six of the 11 had required the stoma for proctitis unresponsive to medical measures. Nineteen patients did not undergo colostomy closure, although symptoms wer greatly improved. Diversion alone was insufficient treatment in the remaining 11 patients. Twenty-six patients died. The 12 deaths in the surgical group comprised four due to residual malignancy, four from postoperative complications, and four from unrelated causes. Of the 14 deaths in the nonsurgical group, 11 died of the primary malignancy and three of unrelated causes. Diversion is considered the safest form of treatment for rectovaginal fistulae, rectal strictures, and proctitis unresponsive to medical measures. Intestinal resection resulted in sharp rise in the morbidity and mortality rates

  12. Skin Injuries Reduce Survival and Modulate Corticosterone, C-Reactive Protein, Complement Component 3, IgM, and Prostaglandin E 2 after Whole-Body Reactor-Produced Mixed Field (n + γ-Photons) Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Kiang, Juliann G; Ledney, G. David

    2013-01-01

    Skin injuries such as wounds or burns following whole-body γ-irradiation (radiation combined injury (RCI)) increase mortality more than whole-body γ-irradiation alone. Wound-induced decreases in survival after irradiation are triggered by sustained activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathways, persistent alteration of cytokine homeostasis, and increased susceptibility to systemic bacterial infection. Among these factors, radiation-induced increases in interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrat...

  13. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for centrally located lung lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyner, Melissa [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Salter, Bill J. [The Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Papanikolaou, Niko [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Fuss, Martin [Oregon Health and Science Univ., Portland (United States). Dept. of Radiation Medicine

    2006-09-15

    Presentation of outcomes of patients treated by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung lesions located within or touching a 2 cm zone around major airways. Serial tomotherapeutic SBRT has been planned and delivered at our institution since August 2001. Of 108 patients treated for primary and secondary lung tumors, nine harbored tumors (8 metastases, 1 recurrent NSCLC) located in close proximity to carina, right and left main bronchi, right and left upper lobe bronchi, intermedius, right middle lobe, lingular, or right and left lower lobe bronchi. SBRT was delivered to total doses of 36 Gy in 3 fractions (n=8) or 6 fractions (n=1), using a serial tomotherapy system (Nomos Peacock). We assessed local tumor control, clinical toxicity, normal tissue imaging changes, and overall survival. Median tumor volume was 26 cm{sup 3} (range 1.7 to 135 cm{sup 3}). Tumor locations were hilar (n=3), and parenchymal in six cases. Hilar lesions accounted for the three largest tumor volumes in the series. During a median follow-up of 10.6 months (range 2.5 to 41.5 months), all lesions treated were locally controlled as confirmed by CT or CT/PET imaging. Parenchymal imaging changes included focal lung fibrosis and major airway wall thickening. One occurrence of major airway occlusion (right lower lobe bronchus) was observed. This event was diagnosed by chest x-ray at 36 months, following treatment of the second largest hilar lesion in the present series. Based on the outcomes observed in this small sample series, SBRT for centrally located lung lesions appears feasible, was associated with low incidence of toxicities, and provided sustained local tumor control. However, long-term survival may be associated with major airway injury. As long-term follow-up in larger numbers of patients is lacking at this time, exclusion of patients with centrally located lesions may be considered when patients are treated in curative intent.

  14. Management of radiation injuries by natural herbs and neutraceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the era of expanding nuclear energy program all over world, the role of radiation biology has acquired greater relevance and significance in addressing the health and environment issues. In view of constant human exposure to background radiation both naturally and man made e.g nuclear power plants and weapons testing, consumer products, medical X-ray, uranium mining and milling etc., the radiobiological research has been devoted to induction of cancer and evaluation of genetic effects. In the present time, nuclear terrorism and weapon related effects are raising much alarm and concern to public health. Obviously, radiation biology research has great potential in diagnosis, therapy and establishing standards for assessment risk from radiation exposure. The development of effective medical countermeasures to protect, mitigate, and treat normal tissue injury needs urgent investigation for basic molecular mechanisms and developing appropriate ready to-use kits using relevant cellular, animal model and clinical trails for practical purposes. Since the use of synthetic compounds is associated with the inherent toxicity, attention in recent years has been directed towards developing radiation countermeasure agents from the natural sources and/or nature-identical molecules. The rich biodiversity available in the Indian subcontinent has yielded several new drugs that find application in the modern medicine and there is a like hood of discovering many more, Over the last few years, interest in evaluating oriental medicinal herbs and edible phyto products for the use in anti-radiation strategies is encouraging and emerging as an acceptable approach for preventing the radiation induced lesions in many countries. Several Indian medicinal plants (Emblica officinalis, Rosemarinus officinalis, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Alstonia scholaris, Tinospora cordifolia, Phyllanthus niruri, Svzvgiumcumini, Aegle marmelos etc) and antioxidant vitamins (C and E) have been tested in this

  15. Nonlocal Effects in Black Body Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bremm, G N

    2016-01-01

    Nonlocal electrodynamics is a formalism developed to include nonlocal effects in the measurement process caused by the non-inertial state of the observers. This theory modifies Maxwell's electrodynamics by eliminating the hypothesis of locality that assumes an accelerated observer simultaneously equivalent to a comoving inertial frame of reference. In this scenario, the transformation between an inertial and accelerated observer is generalized which affects the properties of physical fields. In particular, we analyze how an uniformly accelerated observer perceives a homogeneous and isotropic blackbody radiation. We show that all nonlocal effects are transient and most relevant in the first period of acceleration.

  16. Citrulline as a Biomarker in the Non-human Primate Total- and Partial-body Irradiation Models: Correlation of Circulating Citrulline to Acute and Prolonged Gastrointestinal Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jace W; Bennett, Alexander; Carter, Claire L; Tudor, Gregory; Hankey, Kim G; Farese, Ann M; Booth, Catherine; MacVittie, Thomas J; Kane, Maureen A

    2015-11-01

    The use of plasma citrulline as a biomarker for acute and prolonged gastrointestinal injury via exposure to total- and partial-body irradiation (6 MV LINAC-derived photons; 0.80 Gy min) in nonhuman primate models was investigated. The irradiation exposure covered gastrointestinal injuries spanning lethal, mid-lethal, and sub-lethal doses. The acute gastrointestinal injury was assessed via measurement of plasma citrulline and small intestinal histopathology over the first 15 d following radiation exposure and included total-body irradiation at 13.0 Gy, 10.5 Gy, and 7.5 Gy and partial-body irradiation at 11.0 Gy with 5% bone marrow sparing. The dosing schemes of 7.5 Gy total-body irradiation and 11.0 Gy partial-body irradiation included time points out to day 60 and day 180, respectively, which allowed for correlation of plasma citrulline to prolonged gastrointestinal injury and survival. Plasma citrulline values were radiation-dependent for all radiation doses under consideration, with nadir values ranging from 63-80% lower than radiation-naïve NHP plasma. The nadir values were observed at day 5 to 7 post irradiation. Longitudinal plasma citrulline profiles demonstrated prolonged gastrointestinal injury resulting from acute high-dose irradiation had long lasting effects on enterocyte function. Moreover, plasma citrulline did not discriminate between total-body or partial-body irradiation over the first 15 d following irradiation and was not predictive of survival based on the radiation models considered herein.

  17. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  18. The investigation of radiation enteritis, especially ileum injuries treated surgically

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Masanari; Watanabe, Satoshi; Honda, Ichiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yano, Yoshimasa; Hatano, Kazuo [Chiba Cancer Center Hospital (Japan)

    2000-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been widely used as one of several therapies for malignant disease of the lower abdomen. However, radiation enteritis was a severe side effect, and it was very difficult to treat and care. We report the cases of radiation enteritis that we encountered, especially ileum injuries. There were 27 regions in 23 patients: 10 obstipation, 8 fistula 6 perforation, 2 obstipation and perforation, 1 obstipation and fistula to urinary tract, and 1 perforation and bleeding of sigmoid colon. We treated these by combined bypass, resection of the bowels, external fistula, and others. Radiation enteritis is considered a progressive and irreversible disease, and many patients would experience recurrences over their lifetime, and in some cases would need multiple operations. The leakage and the short bowel after resection were severe problems, and in addition, we found that the abdominal wall was one of the difficult problems to treat and care, such as many external fistula and hardening of abdominal wall after polysurgery and radiation therapy. (author)

  19. Coniferyl Aldehyde Ameliorates Radiation Intestine Injury via Endothelial Cell Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ye Ji; Jung, Myung Gu; Lee, Yoonjin; Lee, Haejune [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yunsil [Ewha Woman' s Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Younggyu [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Cancer treatments related gastrointestinal toxicity has also been recognized as a significant economic burden. Especially, extensive apoptosis of microvascular endothelial cell of the lamina propria is the primary lesion initiating intestinal radiation damage after abdominal radiation therapy. Coniferyl aldehyde (CA) is phenolic compounds isolated from cork stoppers, and one of the major pyrolysis products of lignin. Shi H. was support for the empirical use of CA as a medicinal food for cardiovascular diseases. CA has positive effect in broad way but there is no consequence in radiation induced intestine damage. Here, we investigate effect of CA on small intestine after abdominal IR to mice in this study. In this study, CA increased the survival rate in C3H mice against 13.5 Gy abdominal IR. We found CA protects small intestine via preventing endothelial cell apoptosis and enhancing their angiogenic activity. CA also showed protective effect on crypt cell survival. Endothelial cell survival may affect crypt cell protection against IR. From this data, we concluded that CA is effective for protection against abdominal radiation injury. CA could ameliorate side-effect of radiation therapy.

  20. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Jun Lee

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day. Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis.

  1. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis. PMID:26114656

  2. Biochemical Indicators of Radiation Injury in Man. Proceedings of a Scientific Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an organism has suffered a radiation insult, knowledge of the dose and localization of the exposure is of the greatest importance for the treatment of any radiation damage. Supplementary to the information obtained from physical dosimetry, data obtained by biochemical indicators can, on the basis of metabolic changes in the irradiated organism, help in making early diagnosis, in assessing the extent of the radiation injury, and making a prognosis. Biochemical tests under optimal conditions would not depend on the quality and distribution of the dose in the body and would also reflect the sensitivity of the individual organisms. The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization convened a joint scientific meeting on Biochemical Indicators of Radiation Injury in Man in Paris-Le Vésinet, France, from 22 to 26 June 1970. The main purpose of the meeting was to discuss recent problems in determining which biochemical and metabolic changes occurring in irradiated organisms could be used as indicators of radiation injury and its extent, and could thus be of help in planning the proper treatment of the injured persons. During the meeting the results obtained with various biochemical indicators, and experimental techniques and laboratory methods used in this field, were evaluated and compared. Both research workers and clinicians were invited to participate at the meeting. They discussed the possible value of several tests, used successfully in experimental animals, for clinical application; ways of standardizing suitable tests; and mutual collaboration between laboratories and clinics. The outcome of their discussions is summarized in the conclusions and recommendations which are included in these Proceedings together with the papers presented

  3. Protective Effects of Lentinan against T Lymphocytes Injury in Mice under Chronic Radiation Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong; LI Ming-chun; FU Qing-jie

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of lentinan (LTN) on mice exposed to chronic radiation.Methods Animals were divided into three groups (n =10),they were animals exposed to radiation (Rad),normal control animals (Ctr),and irradiated animals treated with LTN (Rad + LTN).Animal model of chronic radiation stress injury was induced by irradiating mice with 60Co γ-ray for 6 weeks from Monday to Friday consecutively.Before radiation,the mice in Rad + LTN group were ip injected with 0.5 mL LTN (0.01 mg/mL),whereas mice in other groups were injected with 0.9% physiological saline.The effects of LTN treatment on irradiated mice were examined by histological analysis on the spleen.The cell numbers and viability of T lymphocytes,which were isolated from the spleen,were determined by Trypan blue staining.Nitric oxide (NO) production and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion in T lymphocytes were also measured.Results Chronic radiation significantly reduced the body weights and the spleen and thymus indexes,associated with reduced T lymphocytes viability and functions,and elevated NO production.Treatment with LTN significantly normalized the elevated NO production,and attenuated the negative outcomes resulting from radiation mentioned above.Conclusion The results suggest that radioprotective effect of LTN may be contributed by improved T lymphocytes viability and functions via regulating the NO and IL-2 production in T lymphocytes.

  4. Protective Effects of Lentinan against T Lymphocytes Injury in Mice under Chronic Radiation Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Yong; LI; Ming-chun; FU; Qing-jie

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of lentinan (LTN) on mice exposed to chronic radiation. Methods Animals were divided into three groups (n = 10), they were animals exposed to radiation (Rad), normal control animals (Ctr), and irradiated animals treated with LTN (Rad + LTN). Animal model of chronic radiation stress injury was induced by irradiating mice with 60 Co γ-ray for 6 weeks from Monday to Friday consecutively. Before radiation, the mice in Rad + LTN group were ip injected with 0.5 mL LTN (0.01 mg/mL), whereas mice in other groups were injected with 0.9% physiological saline. The effects of LTN treatment on irradiated mice were examined by histological analysis on the spleen. The cell numbers and viability of T lymphocytes, which were isolated from the spleen, were determined by Trypan blue staining. Nitric oxide (NO) production and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion in T lymphocytes were also measured. Results Chronic radiation significantly reduced the body weights and the spleen and thymus indexes, associated with reduced T lymphocytes viability and functions, and elevated NO production. Treatment with LTN significantly normalized the elevated NO production, and attenuated the negative outcomes resulting from radiation mentioned above. Conclusion The results suggest that radioprotective effect of LTN may be contributed by improved T lymphocytes viability and functions via regulating the NO and IL-2 production in T lymphocytes.

  5. Drug/radiation interactions and central nervous system injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central nervous system (CNS) injury caused by combined treatment with cranial radiation therapy (CRT) and chemotherapy is a complicated and difficult problem. Interactions between the two modalities at the cellular level, the effect of treatment sequencing, and chemotherapy and RT dosages are all poorly understood. While this is generally true and applicable to toxicities expressed in multiple organs and tissue types, it is particularly true for the brain. There are many clinical descriptions and situations that strongly implicate an enhanced neurotoxic potential for combined treatment compared to either therapy alone; there is a paucity of definitive experimental evidence, however, and few animal models that can be used to elucidate the nature and pathophysiology of this clinical association. This paper addresses the neurotoxic potential of a specific chemotherapeutic drug when combined with CRT; outlines whose drugs known to cause CNS injury when combined with CRT. Although many of the clinical situations are complicated because multiple cytotoxic agents have been used, usually only one is thought to contribute to the CNS injury. The authors discuss each drug separately

  6. Anesthesia and monitoring during whole body radiation in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Nilsson, A; Hök, B;

    1991-01-01

    During whole body radiation therapy of children, treatment may be done in places not equipped with acceptable scavenging systems for anesthetic gases and where clinical observation of the patient may be impossible. In order to solve this problem, the authors have used a total intravenous (IV) ane....... This anesthetic technique and the stethoscope have been used in seven children. The total IV anesthesia proved to be a useful method for children during whole body radiation. The modified stethoscope functioned very well and was a useful complement to the monitoring equipment....

  7. Taste aversions conditioned with partial body radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced taste aversion was compared in rats which received partial body exposure to the head or abdomen with rats receiving whole body irradiation. Exposure levels ranged from 25 to 300 roentgens (R). In additional groups, saccharin aversion to partial body gamma ray exposures of the abdomen were conditioned in animals which had prior experience with the saccharin solution. Aversion was measured with a single-bottle short-term test, a 23-hour preference test and by the number of days taken to recover from the aversion. Whole-body exposure was most effective in conditioning the aversion, and exposure of the abdominal area was more effective than exposure to the head. Also, the higher the exposure, the stronger the aversion. Rats receiving prior experience with the saccharin did not condition as well as control rats with no prior saccharin experience. The possible role of radiation-induced taste aversion in human radiotherapy patients was discussed. (author)

  8. Experimental radiation injury: combined MR imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model of radiation injury to the brain was developed in the cat. Definite radiation changes were demonstrated at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in four of six cats. These changes consisted of high-intensity abnormalities on images obtained with a long repetition time (TR) and a long echo time (TE), which were initially noted 208-285 days after irradiation. These changes were associated with gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhancement on short TR and inversion-recovery (IR) pulse sequences. Gd-DTPA enhancement and the high intensity on the long TR/TE images were identified at the same time and became more prominent throughout the study. Chemical-shift imaging and phosphorus spectroscopy demonstrated no notable changes despite clear-cut MR evidence of abnormalities. Sodium imaging was positive in one case. Correlation of MR and pathologic findings revealed areas of radiation necrosis and wallerian degeneration that corresponded to areas of Gd-DTPA enhancement on short TR and IR images and to areas of high intensity on long TR/TE images. Peripheral to the areas of Gd-DTPA enhancement were nonenhanced zones of high-signal-intensity abnormality on long TR/TE images, which represented regions of demyelination without necrosis. Gd-DTPA-enhanced proton imaging was the most sensitive method for detecting radiation damage in this animal model

  9. Early remodeling of nasal mucosa in rat model after radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the feature of nasal mucosa remodeling in experimental radiation injury. Methods: Fourty male rats were randomly divided into five groups, as control group and radiation injury groups (radiation dose were 20 Gy, 30 Gy, 40 Gy and 50 Gy). Each group had 8 rats. Two weeks after the last irradiation, the rats were killed and the nasal middle turbinates of the animals were removed. The tissue blocks were embedded in paraffin. The paraffin sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE), alcian blue- periodic acid-Schif (AB-PAS), and Masson Trichrome (MT). The infiltrating eosinophils in nasal mucosa were examined. AB-PAS positive cells in the surface epithelium in nasal mucosa were counted. The percentage of area in MT stained extracellular matrix in nasal mucosa and damage of epithelium were determined by an image analyzer. Results: The control group only presented a few eosinophils. Significant eosinophil infiltration was observed in the radiation injury groups, especially for the 30 Gy radiation injury group. Compared with the control group, there was no significant epithelial damage in 20 Gy radiation injury group. Significant epithelial damage were observed in the rest of radiation injury groups. The epithelial damage became more severe as the radiation dose increasing. A little but not significant increase in AB-PAS positive cells was observed in the mucos of the 20 Gy radiation injury group and significant increase in the 30 and 40 Gy groups. But in the 50 Gy radiation injury group, the AB-PAS positive cells were decreased compared with control group. The collagen fibrils in the mucosa of nasal middle turbinate in 20 Gy radiation injury group did not significantly increase.. But in the other groups, the increase was significant compared with that of control group. Furthermore, collagen fibrils increased as the radiation dose increased. Conclusions: Epithelial damage, goblet cells hyperplasia and extracellular matrix deposition are the

  10. Computed tomographic findings of radiation-induced acute adrenal injury with associated radiation nephropathy: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation nephropathy was first recognized in 1906. The kidney is a radiosensitive organ with a tolerance dose (5% complications in 5 years) of 20 Gray. The imaging findings of acute and chronic radiation induced renal injury are previously described. Radiation-induced adrenal injury, to our knowledge, has not been described in the literature. Unlike the kidneys and other upper abdominal organs, the adrenal glands are traditionally thought to be radio-resistant, protected from radiation-induced injury by proximity to adjacent organs and by the adrenal medulla which reportedly has increased radio-resistance. We present the computed tomographic imaging findings of a patient with acute radiation induced adrenal injury which resulted in adrenal insufficiency following radiotherapy of an adjacent thecal metastasis

  11. Protection Strategy of Sensitive Body Organs in Radiation Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Abolfath, Ramin M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate protection strategies of sensitive body anatomy against the irradiation to the cancerous moving tumors in intensity modulated radiation therapy. Inspired by optimization techniques developed in statistical physics and dynamical systems, we deploy a method based on variational principles and formulate an efficient genetic algorithm which enable us to search for global minima in a complex landscape of irradiation dose delivered to the radiosensitive organs at risk. We take advantage of the internal motion of body anatomy during radiation therapy to reduce the unintentional delivery of the radiation to sensitive organs. We show that the accurate optimization of the control parameters, compare to the conventional IMRT and widely used delivery based on static anatomy assumption, leads to a significant reduction of the dose delivered to the organs at risk.

  12. Attempt at a medicolegal assessment of radiation damage as bodily injury. Der Versuch einer gerichtsmedizinischen Beurteilung des Strahlenschadens als Koerperverletzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, J.

    1970-02-20

    The dissertation shows on which basis an unsuccessful therapy or the inevitable consequence of therapy, radiation damage, can be prosecuted under penal law as bodily injury. A description is given of the nature and the different types of ionizing radiation, effects on the cell and on the human organism, types of damage, different degrees of sensitivity of the various organs, signs and symptoms in the human body, maximum doses, legal restrictions for different patient groups and organs. The problems involved in objectification and establishing a causal relationship between ionizing radiation and the manifest damage are pointed out clearly. The legal part of the work examines negligence, obligation to inform the patient, obligation to exercise due care, failure to do so and malpractice as possible criteria for culpable infliction of bodily injury. (HSCH).

  13. Understanding the Pathophysiology and Challenges of Development of Medical Countermeasures for Radiation-Induced Vascular/Endothelial Cell Injuries: Report of a NIAID Workshop, August 20, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyamitra, Merriline M; DiCarlo, Andrea L; Taliaferro, Lanyn

    2016-08-01

    After the events of September 11, 2001, a decade of research on the development of medical countermeasures (MCMs) to treat victims of a radiological incident has yielded two FDA-approved agents to mitigate acute radiation syndrome. These licensed agents specifically target the mitigation of radiation-induced neutropenia and infection potential, while the ramifications of the exposure event in a public health emergency incident could include the entire body, causing additional acute and/or delayed organ/tissue injuries. Anecdotal data as well as recent findings from both radiation accident survivors and animal experiments implicate radiation-induced injury or dysfunction of the vascular endothelium leading to tissue and organ injuries. There are significant gaps in our understanding of the disease processes and progression, as well as the optimum approaches to develop medical countermeasures to mitigate radiation vascular injury. To address this issue, the Radiation and Nuclear Countermeasures Program of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) organized a one-day workshop to examine the current state of the science in radiation-induced vascular injuries and organ dysfunction, the natural history of the pathophysiology and the product development maturity of potential medical countermeasures to treat these injuries. Meeting presentations were followed by a NIAID-led open discussion among academic investigators, industry researchers and government agency representatives. This article provides a summary of these presentations and subsequent discussion from the workshop. PMID:27387859

  14. The establishment of brain radiation injury experimental model of SD rats with whole brain irradiation in wakefulness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To establish the brain radiation injury experimental model of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat being irradiated in wakefulness so that the side effects from the anesthetics can be eliminated. Methods: Experiment animals were divided into 4 groups randomly according to the difference of radiation dose. Each group involved 25 rats. 'Thermoplastic material fixing cage' was used to keep rats in wakefulness during irradiation. The whole brains of SD rats were irradiated by 4 MeV electron beam at a single dose of 0 Gy, 2 Gy, 15 Gy and 30 Gy, which was measured by therapy beam analyser and dosimeter. The scores of gross neurological symptoms and changes in body weight were sequentially evaluated twice every week after irradiation. The examination of the head skin inside the field was performed as well. The changes of the nerve cell in the hippocampus region of rats with the Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining were observed at the time of 6 hours, 1 day, 1 week and 1 month after irradiation. Results: The peak dosage depth of 4 MeV electron beam was 14.3 mm, and the dosimetry homogeneity of the radiation field was within 5%. The dose attenuation rate was less than 2.57% because of the thermoplastic material fixing cage. Intra-portal alopecia was observed in all the rats exposed to radiation at the dose of 30 Gy and in some of the rats exposed to radiation at the dose of 15 Gy. There was no significant difference in increasing trend of body weight and the score changes of the gross neurological symptoms in all groups. The obvious lesion was observed in the hippocampus region of rats after 30 Gy irradiated. Conclusion: The brain radiation injury experimental model of SD rat in wakefulness with whole brain radiation eliminates the side effects from the anesthetic. It appears to be an excellent model for studying on the brain radiation injury in the early stage

  15. CpG-Oligodeoxynucleotide Treatment Protects against Ionizing Radiation-Induced Intestine Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    Full Text Available the bone marrow and the intestine are the major sites of ionizing radiation (IR-induced injury. Our previous study demonstrated that CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN treatment mitigated IR-induced bone marrow injury, but its effect on the intestine is not known. In this study, we sought to determine if CpG-ODN have protective effect on IR-induced intestine injury, and if so, to determine the mechanism of its effect.Mice were treated with CpG-ODN after IR. The body weight and survival were daily monitored for 30 days consecutively after exposure. The number of surviving intestinal crypt was assessed by the microcolony survival assay. The number and the distribution of proliferating cell in crypt were evaluated by TUNEL assay and BrdU assay. The expression of Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3 in crypt were analyzed by Immunohistochemistry assay. The findings showed that the treatment for irradiated mice with CpG-ODN diminished body weight loss, improved 30 days survival, enhanced intestinal crypts survival and maintained proliferating cell population and regeneration in crypt. The reason might involve that CpG-ODN up-regulated the expression of Bcl-2 protein and down-regulated the expression of Bax protein and caspase-3 protein.CpG-ODN was effective in protection of IR-induced intestine injury by enhancing intestinal crypts survival and maintaining proliferating cell population and regeneration in crypt. The mechanism might be that CpG-ODN inhibits proliferating cell apoptosis through regulating the expression of apoptosis-related protein, such as Bax, Bcl-2 and caspase-3.

  16. Considerations of long-term radiation injury in nonhemopoietic tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute whole body doses resulting in long-term survival are limited to about 4-5 Gy if successful marrow transplantation is not performed, and the critical tissue at risk is the bone marrow. After doses approaching this limit, long-term somatic injury comprises cataracts, persistent but not permanent infertility in man, and temporary or permanent sterility in some women. If marrow tranplantation is successful, the acute dose can be increased to about 7.5 Gy. The limiting tissue now becomes the lung, and the limiting effect is pnenumonitis. Cataracts and infertility become more prevalent, and other long-term effects become apparent. The main additional nonhemopoietic somatic effects are restrictive and obstructive lung damage, and hormonal imbalances in children that result in retardation of sexual development and growth. There are also a few secondary malignancies and a few cases of leukoencephalopathy. However, the latter are associated with additional prophylactic treatments for CNS disease

  17. Management of radiation injuries of vulva and vagina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraunholz, I.B.; Schopohl, B.; Boettcher, H.D. [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Onkologie, Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Background: Acute and late injuries of vulva and vagina are frequent and potentially serious complications in radiotherapy of gynecologic tumors. They still are reported poorly in literature. Methods: Based on a literature search a survey will be given of the modalities, which are used or recommended for prophylaxis or treatment of these radiation injuries. The principles of the different measures will be discussed with available study results. Results: Hygiene measures and the topical application of antimicrobial or granulation stimulating substances, which is mostly based on long standing clinical experience, are the principles of the treatment of acute reactions of vulva and vagina. The topical use of estrogen, which promotes proliferation of epithelium, is generally described in connection with treatment and prophylaxis of late radiation injuries. As a prophylaxis for the late reaction of vaginal stenosis, vaginal dilatation is recommended in literature. Conclusion: With the exception of a few reports on estrogen, there are no data about the effectiveness of the currently used medical substances. The local application of estrogen as prophylaxis of the acute reactions will therefore be examined in a prospective study. (orig.) [Deutsch] Hintergrund: Akute und spaete Reaktionen an Vulva und Vagina sind haeufige und zum Teil schwerwiegende Nebenwirkungen der Strahlentherapie von gynaekologischen Tumoren, auf die in der Literatur kaum eingegangen wird. Methoden: Basierend auf einer umfangreichen Literaturrecherche, werden die Massnahmen, die zur Prophylaxe oder Therapie dieser Strahlenreaktionen zur Verfuegung stehen, systematisch zusammengestellt und, soweit verfuegbar, mit Ergebnissen aus Studien diskutiert. Ergebnisse: Hygienemassnahmen und die auf klinischen Erfahrungswerten basierende lokale Anwendung einer Vielzahl von mehr oder weniger antimikrobiell wirkenden oder granulationsfoerdernden Substanzen lassen sich als Grundprinzipien der Behandlung von akuten

  18. Protective Effect of Lycium ruthenicum Murr. Against Radiation Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yabin Duan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The protective effect of Lycium ruthenicum Murr. against radiation injury was examined in mice. Kunming mice were randomly divided into a control group, model group, positive drug group and L. ruthenicum high dose (8 g/kg, L. ruthenicum middle dose (4 g/kg, L. ruthenicum low dose (2 g/kg treatment groups, for which doses were administered the third day, seventh day and 14th day after irradiation. L. ruthenicum extract was administered orally to the mice in the three treatment groups and normal saline was administered orally to the mice in the control group and model group for 14 days. The positive group was treated with amifostine (WR-2721 at 30 min before irradiation. Except for the control group, the groups of mice received a 5 Gy quantity of X-radiation evenly over their whole body at one time. Body weight, hemogram, thymus and spleen index, DNA, caspase-3, caspase-6, and P53 contents were observed at the third day, seventh day, and 14th day after irradiation. L. ruthenicum could significantly increase the total red blood cell count, hemoglobin count and DNA contents (p < 0.05. The spleen index recovered significantly by the third day and 14th day after irradiation (p < 0.05. L. ruthenicum low dose group showed a significant reduction in caspase-3 and caspase-6 of serum in mice at the third day, seventh day, and 14th day after irradiation and L. ruthenicum middle dose group experienced a reduction in caspase-6 of serum in mice by the seventh day after irradiation. L. ruthenicum could decrease the expression of P53. The results showed that L. ruthenicum had protective effects against radiation injury in mice.

  19. Radiation doses from contaminant aerosol deposition to the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearly all assessments of radiation doses received following accidental airborne releases have focused on the contributions originating from the plume and from ground deposition. Very little thought has however been given to doses received from deposition directly onto humans. The results of recent experimental investigations of aerosol deposition to and clearance from human skin and clothing have been used to model the doses potentially received in an accident situation. It was found that both the skin dose from β-emitters and the whole body dose from γ-emitters may be significant compared with doses received through other pathways, such as external radiation from the environment. (au)

  20. Does granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exacerbate radiation-induced acute lung injury in rats?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Gouji; Awaya, Hitomi; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-08-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) frequently occurs as a complication of thoracic irradiation. However, the mechanism of RP is not well known. Activated neutrophils are a possible pathogenesis of RP. Neutrophil activation induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may exacerbate RP. We studied the effects of recombinant human G-CSF on acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation using rats. Animals were divided into three groups: sham irradiation with saline control, irradiation alone, and irradiation with G-CSF. Actual irradiation was given as a single fraction of 16 Gy delivered to the right hemithorax. G-CSF at a dose of 12 {mu}g/body was administered subcutaneously once a day from 14 to 18 days after actual irradiation. Lung injury was evaluated 21 days after irradiation by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid findings and the lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts in BAL fluid and the W/D ratio were significantly increased in the irradiation alone and the irradiation with G-CSF groups compared with those of the sham irradiation+saline control group. However, there was no significant difference observed between the irradiation alone and irradiation with G-CSF groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that postradiation administration of G-CSF does not exacerbate acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation in rats. (author)

  1. Body Image as a Mediator of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Brausch, Amy M.

    2012-01-01

    Attitudes towards the body have been largely overlooked as a potential risk factor for adolescent non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) despite theorizing that a negative body image may play a critical role in the development of this behavior. The current study used structural equation modeling to evaluate the fit of a theoretical model specifying body…

  2. [Studies on chemical protectors against radiation. XXXIII. Protective mechanisms of various compounds against skin injury induced by radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y; Kumazawa, N; Suzuki, M; Wang, C M; Ohta, S; Shinoda, M

    1991-01-01

    The radiation protective mechanisms on skin injury induced by soft X-irradiation were investigated by use of various radiation protective agents such as sulfur compounds (MEA, MEG, thiourea), nucleic acid constitutional compounds (adenosine, inosine), antioxidative compounds (sesamol, ferulic acid, ascorbic acid), crude drugs (Rosae Fructus, Anemarrhenae Rhizoma, Trapae Fructus, Forsythiae Fructus, Aloe arborescens). Scavenge action of activated oxygen, inhibitory effect of lipid peroxidation, induction of antioxidative protein and protective effect against damage of deoxyribonucleic acid and superoxide dismutase by X-irradiation were evaluated as the radiation protective mechanisms, and relationship between these results and protective effect of skin injury induced by radiation was studied. PMID:1905349

  3. Studies on chemical protectors against radiation, 33; Protective mechanisms of various compounds against skin injury induced by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yushi; Kumazawa, Noriko; Suzuki, Makoto; Wang Cheng-Ming; Ohta, Setsuko; Shinoda, Masato (Hoshi Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    The radiation protective mechanisms on skin injury induced by soft X-irradiation were investigated by use of various radiation protective agents such as sulfur compounds (MEA, MEG, thiourea), nucleic acid constitutional compounds (adenosine, inosine), antioxidative compounds (sesamol, ferulic acid, ascorbic acid), crude drugs (Rosae Fructus, Anemarrhenae Rhizoma, Trapae Fructus, Forsythiae Fructus, Aloe arborescens). Scavenge action of activated oxygen, inhibitory effect of lipid peroxidation, induction of antioxidative protein and protective effect against damage of deoxyribonucleic acid and superoxide dismutase by X-irradiation were evaluated as the radiation protective mechanisms, and relationship between these results and protective effect of skin injury induced by radiation was studied. (author).

  4. Preliminary radiation protection tests for the body height and body weight of the Chinese reference man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation protection standard recommended by ICRP was evaluated in terms of its suitability for Chinese people. The body height and weight of 100,325 healthy Chinese were measured and anatomical data collected from usable corpses of persons who died by accident or sudden death. The data included the size and weight of certain organs. 18 refs

  5. Altered pulmonary epithelial permeability in canine radiation lung injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, I.H.; el-Khatib, E.; Logus, J.W.; Man, G.C.; Jacques, J.; Man, S.F.

    1986-09-01

    A radioaerosol scanning technique measuring regional clearance of sodium pertechnetate (99mTcO-4) and 99mTc-labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (99mTc-DTPA) was used to assess changes in canine pulmonary epithelial permeability following lung irradiation. Doses of 2000 cGy (11 dogs), 1000 cGy (2 dogs), and 500 cGy (2 dogs) were given in one fraction to either the entire right hemithorax (500 cGy) or the right lower lung (1000 and 2000 cGy). Radioaerosol scans, chest roentgenograms, and computerized tomograms (CT) were obtained before and serially after irradiation. A dose of 2000 cGy resulted in a decrease in regional pulmonary epithelial permeability to both 99mTcO4- and 99mTc-DTPA; both showed significant decreases from the 2nd wk postirradiation onward. In comparison, CT and chest roentgenogram did not become abnormal until 7.1 +/- 2.8 (SD) and 8.2 +/- 2.6 wk, respectively. Doses of 1,000 and 500 cGy produced reversible decreases in 99mTcO4- clearance. Lung morphology showed definite changes of radiation pneumonitis after 2000 and 1000 cGy but not after 500 cGy at approximately 9, 17, and 12 wk postirradiation, respectively. These results suggest that dose-dependent changes in pulmonary physiology may precede obvious structural alterations in radiation lung injury.

  6. Radiation-induced hypoxia may perpetuate late normal tissue injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not hypoxia develops in rat lung tissue after radiation. Methods and Materials: Fisher-344 rats were irradiated to the right hemithorax using a single dose of 28 Gy. Pulmonary function was assessed by measuring the changes in respiratory rate every 2 weeks, for 6 months after irradiation. The hypoxia marker was administered 3 h before euthanasia. The tissues were harvested at 6 weeks and 6 months after irradiation and processed for immunohistochemistry. Results: A moderate hypoxia was detected in the rat lungs at 6 weeks after irradiation, before the onset of functional or histopathologic changes. The more severe hypoxia, that developed at the later time points (6 months) after irradiation, was associated with a significant increase in macrophage activity, collagen deposition, lung fibrosis, and elevation in the respiratory rate. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed an increase in TGF-β, VEGF, and CD-31 endothelial cell marker, suggesting a hypoxia-mediated activation of the profibrinogenic and proangiogenic pathways. Conclusion: A new paradigm of radiation-induced lung injury should consider postradiation hypoxia to be an important contributing factor mediating a continuous production of a number of inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines

  7. Management of an unusual craniofacial impalement injury by a metallic foreign body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Wha; Youn, Seung Ki; Kim, Jeong Tae; Cho, Seok Hyun; Kim, Youn Hwan; Hwang, Kyu Tae

    2012-03-01

    Craniofacial penetrating injuries caused by foreign bodies other than bullets or glass from traffic crashes are quite rare. Hence, there is a lack of knowledge regarding systematic management strategies or analysis of complications for craniomaxillofacial surgeons. Between 2002 and 2010, 82 patients underwent surgery for penetrating craniofacial injuries in 2 craniomaxillofacial trauma centers. Among these patients, we included patients who had retained foreign metallic bodies. Data regarding age, sex, injury materials, entrance, injured structures, operative records, and complications were reviewed retrospectively for 8 patients. All of the patients were evaluated precisely in the emergency department without removal of retained materials, and a multidisciplinary team approach was performed for the removal of the foreign body under general anesthesia.In this study, 6 men and 2 women presented with penetrating injuries that retained metal objects. The mean age of the patients was 44.3 years. All of the patients were hemodynamically stable, and no active bleeding was found. However, all of the patients had postoperative complications. Three patients had damaged vascular structures, and 3 patients had injuries to facial nerve branches. Seven patients had posttraumatic stress disorder. Two patients underwent subsequent emergent procedures because of massive bleeding and cerebrospinal fluid leakage.Penetrating injuries in the head and neck regions are complicated. Although a multidisciplinary team approach was performed from initial management to outpatient management in patients with unusual impalement injuries, numerous postoperative complications still remained. Preoperative patient informed consent was important.

  8. Activation of chemical biological defense mechanisms and remission of vital oxidative injury by low dose radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaoka, K. [Okayama University Medical School, Okayama (Japan); Nomura, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Kojima, S. [Science University of Tokyo, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    Excessive active oxygen produced in vivo by various causes is toxic. Accumulation of oxidation injuries due to excessive active causes cell and tissue injuries, inducing various pathologic conditions such as aging and carcinogenesis. On the other hand, there are chemical defense mechanisms in the body that eliminate active oxygen or repair damaged molecules, defending against resultant injury. It is interesting reports that appropriate oxidation stress activate the chemical biological defense mechanisms. In this study, to elucidate these phenomena and its mechanism by low dose radiation, we studied on the below subjects. Activation of chemical biological defense mechanisms by low dose radiation: (1) The effects radiation on lipid peroxide (LPO) levels in the organs, membrane fluidity and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were examined in rats and rabbits. Rats were irradiated with low dose X-ray over their entire bodies, and rabbits inhaled vaporized radon spring water, which primarily emitted {alpha}-ray. The following results were obtained. Unlike high dose X-ray, low dose X-ray and radon inhalation both reduced LPO levels and made the state of the SH-group on membrane-bound proteins closer to that of juvenile animals, although the sensitivity to radioactivity varied depending on the age of the animals and among different organs and tissues. The SOD activity was elevated, suggesting that low dose X-ray and radon both activate the host defensive function. Those changes were particularly marked in the organs related to immune functions of the animals which received low dose X-ray, while they were particularly marked in the brain after radon inhalation. It was also found that those changes continued for longer periods after low dose X-irradiation. (2) Since SOD is an enzyme that mediates the dismutation of O{sub 2}- to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the question as to whether the resultant H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is further detoxicated into H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} or not must

  9. Mental and growth retardation after medulloblastoma radiation therapy. MRI assessment of radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on 3 cases of a medulloblastoma and discuss the usefulness of calculating the T2 value from long-term follow-up MRIs of 1.5 T in order to analyze the cause of mental retardation. Of 13 medulloblastoma patients who were treated at our hospital from 1970 through 1984, 4 patients survived. Excluding 1 of these patients, a 2-year-old child, the remaining 3 cases are discussed. The 3 patients underwent surgery and received postoperative craniospinal irradiation and chemotherapy. The radiation dose (tumoral dose) was 40 to 85 Gy to the posterior fossa, 0 to 30.4 Gy to the spinal cord, and 25.6 to 35.2 Gy to the whole brain. The long-term effects were evaluated by calculating the T2 value and conducting a psychometric analysis from 2 to 11 years after radiation therapy. Their respective Tanaka-Vineland IQ test results were 32, 46, and 102 and their respective growth heights were -3.6 SD, -6.4 SD, and +0.18 SD. Growth hormone deficiencies were identified in all 3 patients. The decline in ability and failure to grow became more pronounced with time. The calculated T2 values showed alterations in the hippocampus, the occipital white matter, and the hypothalamus of all 3 patients. The hippocampal alteration contributed to a decline in intellectual ability and resulted in learning difficulties at school. It should be noted that in addition to whole-brain radiation that was pursued, the focal radiation provided delivers the same radiation dose to the hippocampus as to the tumor. Such a high radiation dose thus might be responsible for the decline in intellectual ability. Therefore, to avoid radiation injury to these areas, stereotactic radiosurgery must be planned for focal radiation therapy. (K.H.)

  10. Minimal length, maximal momentum and thermodynamics of black body radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Shababi, Homa

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study thermodynamics of black body radiation in the presence of quantum gravitational effects through a Generalized Uncertainty Principle that admits both a minimal measurable length and a maximal momentum. We focus on quantum gravity induced modifications of thermodynamical quantities in this framework. Some important issues such as the generalized Planck distribution, Wien s law and Dulong Petit law are studied in this setup with details.

  11. Gastrointestinal Toxicities With Combined Antiangiogenic and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollom, Erqi L.; Deng, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Pai, Reetesh K. [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Brown, J. Martin; Giaccia, Amato; Loo, Billy W.; Shultz, David B.; Le, Quynh Thu; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Combining the latest targeted biologic agents with the most advanced radiation technologies has been an exciting development in the treatment of cancer patients. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an ablative radiation approach that has become established for the treatment of a variety of malignancies, and it has been increasingly used in combination with biologic agents, including those targeting angiogenesis-specific pathways. Multiple reports have emerged describing unanticipated toxicities arising from the combination of SBRT and angiogenesis-targeting agents, particularly of late luminal gastrointestinal toxicities. In this review, we summarize the literature describing these toxicities, explore the biological mechanism of action of toxicity with the combined use of antiangiogenic therapies, and discuss areas of future research, so that this combination of treatment modalities can continue to be used in broader clinical contexts.

  12. Cosmological $N$-body simulations including radiation perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Brandbyge, Jacob; Tram, Thomas; Leclercq, Florent; Fidler, Christian; Hannestad, Steen

    2016-01-01

    Cosmological $N$-body simulations are the standard tool to study the emergence of the observed large-scale structure of the Universe. Such simulations usually solve for the gravitational dynamics of matter within the Newtonian approximation, thus discarding general relativistic effects such as the coupling between matter and radiation ($\\equiv$ photons and neutrinos). In this paper we investigate novel hybrid simulations which incorporate interactions between radiation and matter to the leading order in General Relativity, whilst evolving the matter dynamics in full non-linearity according to Newtonian theory. Our hybrid simulations come with a relativistic space-time and make it possible to investigate structure formation in a unified framework. In the present work we focus on simulations initialized at $z=99$, and show that the extracted matter power spectrum receives up to $3\\%$ corrections on very large scales through radiation. Our numerical findings compare favourably with linear analytical results from...

  13. Pathological changes after bone marrow and skin allograft transplantation in rats inflicted with severe combined radiation-burn injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone marrow and skin allografts from the same donor were transplanted to rats inflicted with 8 Gy γ-radiation combined with third degree burns of 15% body surface area within 6 hr post injury. Pathological changes of hematopoietic tissues and skin allografts were studied. All injured controls died within 7 days post injury without bone marrow regeneration; 50% of treated rats survived with living skin allografts on 50th day post injury. On days 100 and 480 post operation, grafted skin still survived well on recipients with normal ultrastructure. Epidermic cells of skin allografts proliferated on day 5, developed and repaired on day 10. Histological structure of the skin returned to normal on day 30 post operation. The regeneration of bone marrow appeared on 5th day, increased markedly on day 10, and almost completed on day 15 after bone marrow transplantation. However, the regeneration of lymphocytes in cortex of spleen and lymph nodes did not appear until day 15 of BMT. The results show that bone marrow and skin allograft transplantation at early time post injury in most severe combined radiation-burn injury have tremendous beneficial effects, and the skin allograft can survive for a long time

  14. Inhibition of Notch signaling reduces the number of surviving Dclk1+ reserve crypt epithelial stem cells following radiation injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Dongfeng; May, Randal; Sureban, Sripathi M; Weygant, Nathaniel; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Ali, Naushad; Li, Linheng; Barrett, Terrence; Houchen, Courtney W

    2014-03-01

    We have previously reported that doublecortin-like kinase 1 (Dclk1) is a putative intestinal stem cell (ISC) marker. In this report, we evaluated the use of Dclk1 as a marker of surviving ISCs in response to treatment with high-dose total body irradiation (TBI). Both apoptotic and mitotic Dclk1(+) cells were observed 24 h post-TBI associated with a corresponding loss of intestinal crypts observed at 84 h post-TBI. Although the Notch signaling pathway plays an important role in regulating proliferation and lineage commitment within the intestine, its role in ISC function in response to severe genotoxic injury is not yet fully understood. We employed the microcolony assay to functionally assess the effects of Notch inhibition with difluorophenacetyl-l-alanyl-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) on intestinal crypt stem cell survival following severe (>8 Gy) radiation injury. Following treatment with DAPT, we observed a nearly 50% reduction in the number of surviving Dclk1(+) crypt epithelial cells at 24 h after TBI and similar reduction in the number of surviving small intestinal crypts at 84 h. These data indicate that inhibition of Notch signaling decreases ISC survival following radiation injury, suggesting that the Notch signaling pathway plays an important role in ISC-mediated crypt regeneration. These results also suggest that crypt epithelial cell Dclk1 expression can be used as one potential marker to evaluate the early survival of ISCs following severe radiation injury.

  15. Overcoming black body radiation limit in free space: metamaterial superemitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslovski, Stanislav I.; Simovski, Constantin R.; Tretyakov, Sergei A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that the power spectral density of thermal radiation at a specific wavelength produced by a body of finite dimensions set up in free space under a fixed temperature could be made theoretically arbitrary high, if one could realize double negative metamaterials with arbitrary small loss and arbitrary high absolute values of permittivity and permeability (at a given frequency). This result refutes the widespread belief that Planck’s law itself sets a hard upper limit on the spectral density of power emitted by a finite macroscopic body whose size is much greater than the wavelength. Here we propose a physical realization of a metamaterial emitter whose spectral emissivity can be greater than that of the ideal black body under the same conditions. Due to the reciprocity between the heat emission and absorption processes such cooled down superemitter also acts as an optimal sink for the thermal radiation—the ‘thermal black hole’—which outperforms Kirchhoff-Planck’s black body which can absorb only the rays directly incident on its surface. The results may open a possibility to realize narrowband super-Planckian thermal radiators and absorbers for future thermo-photovoltaic systems and other devices.

  16. Mitigating the Effects of Xuebijing Injection on Hematopoietic Cell Injury Induced by Total Body Irradiation with γ rays by Decreasing Reactive Oxygen Species Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deguan Li

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic injury is the most common side effect of radiotherapy. However, the methods available for the mitigating of radiation injury remain limited. Xuebijing injection (XBJ is a traditional Chinese medicine used to treat sepsis in the clinic. In this study, we investigated the effects of XBJ on the survival rate in mice with hematopoietic injury induced by γ ray ionizing radiation (IR. Mice were intraperitoneally injected with XBJ daily for seven days after total body irradiation (TBI. Our results showed that XBJ (0.4 mL/kg significantly increased 30-day survival rates in mice exposed to 7.5 Gy TBI. This effect may be attributable to improved preservation of white blood cells (WBCs and hematopoietic cells, given that bone marrow (BM cells from XBJ-treated mice produced more granulocyte-macrophage colony forming units (CFU-GM than that in the 2 Gy/TBI group. XBJ also decreased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS by increasing glutathione (GSH and superoxide dismutase (SOD levels in serum and attenuated the increased BM cell apoptosis caused by 2 Gy/TBI. In conclusion, these findings suggest that XBJ enhances the survival rate of irradiated mice and attenuates the effects of radiation on hematopoietic injury by decreasing ROS production in BM cells, indicating that XBJ may be a promising therapeutic candidate for reducing hematopoietic radiation injury.

  17. Experimental studies on radiation injury of the salivary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Kazuko

    1987-06-01

    Parotid glands of male Wistar rats were irradiated. In the first group, the animals were irradiated by 4 fractions of 4 different daily doses ; 4.7 Gy, 5.7 Gy, 6.6 Gy and 7.4 Gy. Each dose corresponds to 30 Gy, 40 Gy, 50 Gy and 60 Gy by ordinary 2 Gy-a-day irradiation respectively in the estimation of TDF value. Degree of radiation injury and recovery of the parotid glands was examined histologically, and the area ratio (acini/total gland) was calculated at 1, 3 and 6 months after the completion of irradiation. In the second group, the animals were irradiated by the following schedule ; 10 fractions of 3.6 Gy daily (I-group) and 20 fractions of 1.8 Gy (II a-group), 2.2 Gy (II b-group) and 2.9 Gy (II c-group) twice-a-day, for 2 weeks, 5 days per week. Histological changes of parotid glands the irradiation, such as collapse of acini, degeneration of acinar cells, dilatation of ducts, fibrosis and fatty replacement were found. These changes increased corresponding to the absorbed dose. In 60 Gy-group the area ratio (acini/total gland) decreased with time, 1, 3 and 6 months after the irradiation (40 %, 20 % and 10 % of the control group, respectively), while, there was no remarkable change in 50 Gy-group (60 %) and 40 Gy-group (70 - 80 %). Whereas the area ratio in 30 Gy-group decreased at 1 and 3 months (80 - 85 %), it increased up to the nearly equal level of the control group at 6 months after the irradiation. It was suggested that the borderline dose which allowed the salivary gland to recover from radiation injury existed between 30 Gy and 40 Gy. The area ratio of II b-group at 1 and 3 months after the irradiation (50 %, 48 %) was nearly equal to that of I-group (53 %, 57 %). While the area ratio of II a-group (71 %, 73 %) was larger than that of I-group with a statistical significance. (J.P.N.).

  18. Incorporating Human Body Mass in Standards of Helmet Impact Protection against Traumatic Brain Injury

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, Eric G

    2009-01-01

    Impact induced traumatic brain injury (ITBI) describes brain injury from head impact not necessarily accompanied by skull fracture. For sufficiently abrupt head impact decelerations, ITBI results from brain tissue stress incurred as the brain crashes into the inside of the skull wall, displacing the surrounding cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). Proper helmet cushioning can damp the impact force and reduce ITBI. But force is mass times acceleration and commonly used helmet blunt impact standards are based only on acceleration thresholds. Here I show how this implies that present standards overestimate the minimum acceleration onset for ITBI by implicitly assuming that the brain is mechanically decoupled from the body. I quantify how an arbitrary orientation of the body with respect to impact direction increases the effective mass that should be used in calculating the required damping force and injury threshold accelerations. I suggest a practical method to incorporate the body mass and impact angle into ITBI helme...

  19. Changes of malonaldehyde, cathepsin D and α2-macroglobulin (α2M) after ionizing radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increases in levels of malonaldehyde in plasma, liver and kidney, and increases of tissue kallikrein in kidney and urine were found in Wistar rats after total body 60Co irradiation with lethal doses. Increased activities of cathepsin D in spleen was associated with a marked reduction of splenic weight. The levels of α2M and activities of αM in plasma were both increased with increasing radiation doses, but the increase of α2M levels in spleen was slower and lower than that in liver, kidney and skin. It seems that the effectiveness of α2M in the treatment of rats after total body irradiation might be related with its binding action with cathepsin D and other proteases in spleen and other radiosensitive tissues. One case of acute and two cases of chronic skin radiation injury were treated with α2M preparation, either with or without surgical operation. There were decrease in levels of malonaldehyde as well in activities of cathepsin D, and increase in activities of superoxide dismutase. It suggests that α2M preparation might be useful for both inhibiting excess proteases and scavenging oxygen free radicals

  20. Modulation of radiation injuries in rats receiving multiple doses of Aloe Vera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study has been performed to examine the efficacy of Aloe vera juice (Aloe barbadensis Miller) against radiation injuries of 7 Gy whole body gamma irradiation (single dose). Inductions of lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, (TBARS)) of biomembranes lipids as well as the subsequent changes in the activities of subcellular organelle marker enzymes were discussed. Activities of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), acid phosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase (marker enzymes of mitochondria, lysosome and microsomes, respectively) were estimated. The activities of these enzymes were also measured in cytosol. Subcellular fractionation's were performed in liver, heart and spleen tissues. Aloe vera was supplemented daily to rats (0.25 ml/kg body wt/day) by gavage, 5 days before irradiation and treatment was extended for 10 days post irradiation. Experimental investigations were performed on the 3rd and 10th day after exposure to radiation. The results obtained indicated that, Aloe vera administration has significantly minimized the radiation-induced increase in the amount of TBARS in different cell fractions as compared with control rats. Significant amelioration in the activities of organelles marker enzymes GDH, acid phosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase was observed from 3rd up to 10th days for the 3 tissues. The results also detected improvement in cytosolic enzyme activities due to Aloe vera intake. It could be suggested that the diverse active constituents of Aloe vera play a significant role in decreasing the peroxidation of subcellular membrane lipids induced by radiation exposure, prevent diffusion of organelle enzymes to cytosol and consequently salvage the integrity of living cell

  1. Inhibition of intestinal epithelial apoptosis improves survival in a murine model of radiation combined injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Enjae; Perrone, Erin E; Brahmamdan, Pavan; McDonough, Jacquelyn S; Leathersich, Ann M; Dominguez, Jessica A; Clark, Andrew T; Fox, Amy C; Dunne, W Michael; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-01-01

    World conditions place large populations at risk from ionizing radiation (IR) from detonation of dirty bombs or nuclear devices. In a subgroup of patients, ionizing radiation exposure would be followed by a secondary infection. The effects of radiation combined injury are potentially more lethal than either insult in isolation. The purpose of this study was to determine mechanisms of mortality and possible therapeutic targets in radiation combined injury. Mice were exposed to IR with 2.5 Gray (Gy) followed four days later by intratracheal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). While either IR or MRSA alone yielded 100% survival, animals with radiation combined injury had 53% survival (p = 0.01). Compared to IR or MRSA alone, mice with radiation combined injury had increased gut apoptosis, local and systemic bacterial burden, decreased splenic CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, B cells, NK cells, and dendritic cells, and increased BAL and systemic IL-6 and G-CSF. In contrast, radiation combined injury did not alter lymphocyte apoptosis, pulmonary injury, or intestinal proliferation compared to IR or MRSA alone. In light of the synergistic increase in gut apoptosis following radiation combined injury, transgenic mice that overexpress Bcl-2 in their intestine and wild type mice were subjected to IR followed by MRSA. Bcl-2 mice had decreased gut apoptosis and improved survival compared to WT mice (92% vs. 42%; p<0.01). These data demonstrate that radiation combined injury results in significantly higher mortality than could be predicted based upon either IR or MRSA infection alone, and that preventing gut apoptosis may be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24204769

  2. Inhibition of intestinal epithelial apoptosis improves survival in a murine model of radiation combined injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enjae Jung

    Full Text Available World conditions place large populations at risk from ionizing radiation (IR from detonation of dirty bombs or nuclear devices. In a subgroup of patients, ionizing radiation exposure would be followed by a secondary infection. The effects of radiation combined injury are potentially more lethal than either insult in isolation. The purpose of this study was to determine mechanisms of mortality and possible therapeutic targets in radiation combined injury. Mice were exposed to IR with 2.5 Gray (Gy followed four days later by intratracheal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. While either IR or MRSA alone yielded 100% survival, animals with radiation combined injury had 53% survival (p = 0.01. Compared to IR or MRSA alone, mice with radiation combined injury had increased gut apoptosis, local and systemic bacterial burden, decreased splenic CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, B cells, NK cells, and dendritic cells, and increased BAL and systemic IL-6 and G-CSF. In contrast, radiation combined injury did not alter lymphocyte apoptosis, pulmonary injury, or intestinal proliferation compared to IR or MRSA alone. In light of the synergistic increase in gut apoptosis following radiation combined injury, transgenic mice that overexpress Bcl-2 in their intestine and wild type mice were subjected to IR followed by MRSA. Bcl-2 mice had decreased gut apoptosis and improved survival compared to WT mice (92% vs. 42%; p<0.01. These data demonstrate that radiation combined injury results in significantly higher mortality than could be predicted based upon either IR or MRSA infection alone, and that preventing gut apoptosis may be a potential therapeutic target.

  3. The Protective Role of Ginkgo Biloba against Radiation Induced Injury on Rat Gastro-intestinal Tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginkgo Biloba extract (EGb 761) is an antioxidant substance exhibits a wide variety of biological activities. The present study was performed to evaluate oxidative stress and inflammatory parameters of gastrointestinal injury induced by exposing rats to acute doses of γ-rays and the potential value of EGb 761 in preventing changes in these parameters. Male albino rats were treated orally with the extract in a dose of 100 mg/ kg for 7 successive days before whole body exposure to acute radiation levels of 2 and 6 Gray (Gy). Control groups were run concurrently. The rats were sacrificed 3 days after irradiation. Various inflammatory mediators and biochemical parameters were determined in the stomach and intestine. Both tissues were also examined histopathologically. Exposure to radiation led to dose dependent changes in the level of oxidative stress biomarkers (elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and nitrite associated with a glutathione (GSH) decrease as well as in the level of inflammatory parameters (elevation of Tumour necrosis factorα (TNF-α) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) associated with depletion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Pre-treatment with EGb 761 protected against the changes in both oxidative stress biomarkers and inflammatory mediators. EGb 761 exerted a protective effect against the radiation induced gastrointestinal damage, possibly through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties.

  4. Injuries among Portuguese kitesurfers: The most affected body regions A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Silva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic sports keep rising in popularity. Kitesurfing is a high-risk sport that combines aspects of several water sports. The dangers of high-risk sports have been widely studied. Kitesurfing is a relatively new water sport, and the understanding of the injuries due to its practice has not yet been largely investigated. The purpose of this study is to investigate the most common types and causes of injuries among Portuguese kitesurfers. The data was collected using a retrospective 12 months web-based questionnaire. A total of n= 87 kitesurfers, mostly from the North, showed that 75.9% have a kitesurfing initiation course and 57.5% use protective equipment. A total of 60.9% has been injured in the 12 month’s period, being the knee and the lumbar spine the most common body injury. A reasonable number of injuries occurred while performing a landing or a maneuver, being 53.9% of the injuries reported as a new injury. This 12 month’s retrospective study supports earlier studies and provides basis knowledge about the incidence of Portuguese kitesurfers injuries. The data support the benefits of physical fitness (p< 0.05 in injuries prevention.

  5. Radiative human body cooling by nanoporous polyethylene textile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Po-Chun; Song, Alex Y.; Catrysse, Peter B.; Liu, Chong; Peng, Yucan; Xie, Jin; Fan, Shanhui; Cui, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Thermal management through personal heating and cooling is a strategy by which to expand indoor temperature setpoint range for large energy saving. We show that nanoporous polyethylene (nanoPE) is transparent to mid-infrared human body radiation but opaque to visible light because of the pore size distribution (50 to 1000 nanometers). We processed the material to develop a textile that promotes effective radiative cooling while still having sufficient air permeability, water-wicking rate, and mechanical strength for wearability. We developed a device to simulate skin temperature that shows temperatures 2.7° and 2.0°C lower when covered with nanoPE cloth and with processed nanoPE cloth, respectively, than when covered with cotton. Our processed nanoPE is an effective and scalable textile for personal thermal management.

  6. 放烧复合伤的治疗研究%Studies on the treatment of combined radiation-burn injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程天民; 冉新泽

    2008-01-01

    Combined radiation-bum injuries mainly occur under the circumstances of nuclear explosion, nuclear accident, nuclear terrorism, depleted uranium attack, as well as secondary injuries following attack on nuclear installation. Combination of burn and radiation injuries bring along more serious whole body damage, more complicated pathological mechanism and much more difficult management. Research progress on the pathological mechanism and medical management of several key links of combined injury were discussed in this paper.①En-hancement of early first aid and prevention of early death of wounded. ②Damage and restoration of hemopoetic function.③Disturbance of immune function and prevention and treatment of infection (mainly on the intestinla mucosa immunity and enter-ological infection).④Management of burn wound.⑤The uole of several important measures in the comprehensive treatment.

  7. Thermalization of magnetized electrons from black body radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an interesting mechanism whereby an electron in a strong magnetic field can have both the parallel and perpendicular motions come into thermal equilibrium with black body radiation. The mechanism does not include any collisions with other particles and can overcome the extreme slowing of thermalization of highly magnetized particles at low temperatures. The mechanism depends upon the magnetic field strength having a spatial variation. We provide results from two example cases. This mechanism could affect the temperatures that can be achieved in experiments devoted to trapping antihydrogen

  8. Evaluation of body appendage injuries to juvenile signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus: relationships and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouba A.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive behaviour occurs frequently in crayfish and commonly results in injuries to body appendages. This study aimed to evaluate injuries to antennae, chelae, and walking legs of juvenile signal crayfish after seven months of rearing at high stocking density. We suggest that the high incidence of antennae injuries (66.8% is related to their delicate structure and exposed position, which makes them vulnerable to damage. Chelae were more frequently injured (45.5% than walking legs (7.8–23.6%. Considering the robustness of these structures and the scarcity of animals with both chelae missing and/or regenerating (4.9%, it seemed that injured animals were often killed by less injured ones. Antennae of crayfish with a single injured chela were more frequently injured on the side of the body with the damaged chela, and a similar pattern was observed for walking legs. Expanding on previous research reporting a negative relationship only between incidence of chela injury and crayfish size, we found this relationship to be significant for all evaluated appendages. We hypothesize that any injury and accompanying regeneration may have significant impact on subsequent injuries, overall growth, and reproductive success, and may result in death through cannibalism.

  9. Using a whole body counter to attract a younger generation to radiation and radiation protection topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently there is a lack of young academics in the nuclear field especially in the field of radiation protection RP. One of the reasons is the very small number of students in the so called STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) which distribute among the different topics in these fields. One important task to overcome the foreseeable shortage of RP professionals is to attract pupils to this field. In routine monitoring the whole body counter of the Institute of Radiation Research (ISF) is used to identify and quantify radioactive materials that are incorporated in the human body using the technique of gamma spectroscopy. The in-vivo monitoring lab participates in activities for pupils at school level, e.g. Kinderuniversitaet, practical studies of secondary level pupils and 'Girls day'. Pupils that come to the lab are ages 14 to 18. The whole body counter is an optimal tool for these children to experience (natural) radioactivity and radiation protection issues. First pupils get a short introduction on radioactivity and gamma spectroscopy at a level adjusted to their current knowledge. After this they are measuring themselves in the whole body counter. A routine measurement of 300 s is able to show the natural occurring K-40 in their bodies. After their own measurements they do calibration measurements using a bottle phantom with a set up adjusted to their own body weights. The bottle phantom is filled with a potassium chloride (KCl) solution and contains no other radioactivity than the natural K-40 content of the KCl. Thus no further radiation protection measures need to be taken for using this phantom. A simple Excel-Sheet is then used to estimate their own K-40 activity by comparing the spectra of their measurement to the ones of the calibration measurements. This 'hands on' experience and the connection of radiation and their own bodies often is a 'eureka' effect and opens discussion on preconceptions of radiation and the need of RP

  10. The Protective Effects of 5-Methoxytryptamine-α-lipoic Acid on Ionizing Radiation-Induced Hematopoietic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deguan Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants are prospective radioprotectors because of their ability to scavenge radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS. The hematopoietic system is widely studied in radiation research because of its high radiosensitivity. In the present study, we describe the beneficial effects of 5-methoxytryptamine-α-lipoic acid (MLA, which was synthesized from melatonin and α-lipoic acid, against radiation-induced hematopoietic injury. MLA administration significantly enhanced the survival rate of mice after 7.2 Gy total body irradiation. The results showed that MLA not only markedly increased the numbers and clonogenic potential of hematopoietic cells but also decreased DNA damage, as determined by flow cytometric analysis of histone H2AX phosphorylation. In addition, MLA decreased the levels of ROS in hematopoietic cells by inhibiting NOX4 expression. These data demonstrate that MLA prevents radiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome by increasing the number and function of and by inhibiting DNA damage and ROS production in hematopoietic cells. These data suggest MLA is beneficial for the protection of radiation injuries.

  11. Late sequelae of retained foreign bodies after world war II missile injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surov, Alexey; Thermann, Florian; Behrmann, Curd; Spielmann, Rolf-Peter; Kornhuber, Malte

    2012-09-01

    A number of people injured during the second world war harbour foreign bodies such as grenade splinters or bullets in some part of the body. Most of these metal fragments remain clinically silent. Some of them, however, may cause delayed complications. The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of delayed complications associated with foreign bodies after world war II injuries. 159 patients with retained foreign bodies after world war II injuries were retrospectively identified radiologically in our data bases in the time interval from 1997 to 2009. Diverse delayed complications secondary to the metal objects were diagnosed in 3 cases (2%): one patient with grenade splinter migration into the choledochal duct, one case with pseudotumoural tissue reaction, and one patient with late osteomyelitis. The time from injury to clinical presentation varied from 56 to 61 years. PubMed and Medline were screened for additional cases with delayed sequelae after foreign body acquisition during the 2nd world war. A 30 year search period from 1980 up to date was selected. 15 cases were identified here. Our study demonstrates that health consequences of the 2nd world war extend into the present time, and therefore physicians should be aware of the presence of hidden foreign bodies and their different possible late reactions.

  12. Combat body armor and injuries to the head, face, and neck region: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Darryl; Beirne, Ross

    2013-04-01

    There has been a reported increase in combat-related head, face, and neck (HFN) injuries among service personnel wearing combat body armor (CBA) that have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. Modern ceramic plate CBA has decreased the incidence of fatal-penetrating injuries to the torso but offers no protection to the limbs and face which remain exposed to gunshot wounds and fragments from explosive devices. The aim of this review was to systematically summarize the literature reporting on HFN injuries sustained by combat personnel wearing CBA and to highlight recommendations for increased protection to the facial region. Three major contributing factors were identified with this proportional increase in HFN injuries, namely the increased survivability of soldiers because of CBA, fragments injuries from explosive devices, and the lack of protection to the face and limbs. There appears to be no evidence to suggest that by virtue of wearing CBA the likelihood of sustaining an HFN injury increases as such, but a higher incidence of fragment injuries to the HFN region may be due to the more common use of improvised explosive devicess and other explosive devices. Further development of lightweight protection for the face is needed.

  13. Combat body armor and injuries to the head, face, and neck region: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Darryl; Beirne, Ross

    2013-04-01

    There has been a reported increase in combat-related head, face, and neck (HFN) injuries among service personnel wearing combat body armor (CBA) that have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. Modern ceramic plate CBA has decreased the incidence of fatal-penetrating injuries to the torso but offers no protection to the limbs and face which remain exposed to gunshot wounds and fragments from explosive devices. The aim of this review was to systematically summarize the literature reporting on HFN injuries sustained by combat personnel wearing CBA and to highlight recommendations for increased protection to the facial region. Three major contributing factors were identified with this proportional increase in HFN injuries, namely the increased survivability of soldiers because of CBA, fragments injuries from explosive devices, and the lack of protection to the face and limbs. There appears to be no evidence to suggest that by virtue of wearing CBA the likelihood of sustaining an HFN injury increases as such, but a higher incidence of fragment injuries to the HFN region may be due to the more common use of improvised explosive devicess and other explosive devices. Further development of lightweight protection for the face is needed. PMID:23707828

  14. Self-Injury and Disordered Eating: Expressing Emotion Dysregulation through the Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Peat, Christine M.; Claes, Laurence; Smits, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that emotion dysregulation, body-related concerns, and depressive symptoms are associated with nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and disordered eating (DE) separately and in combination. However, it has been difficult to ascertain to what extent these constructs contribute to NSSI and DE given the relatively small…

  15. Trajectories in the course of body mass index after spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Sonja; Post, Marcel W.; Hoekstra, Trynke; Valent, Linda J.; Faber, Willemijn X.; van der Woude, Lucas H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify different trajectories of the course of body mass index (BMI) after spinal cord injury (SCI) and to study whether other cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, lipid profile) follow the same trajectories. DESIGN: Multicenter prospective cohort study with measurements at t

  16. Radiation combined injury models to study the effects of interventions and wound biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawaski, Janice A; Yates, Charles R; Miller, Duane D; Kaffes, Caterina C; Sabek, Omaima M; Afshar, Solmaz F; Young, Daniel A; Yang, Yunzhi; Gaber, M Waleed

    2014-12-01

    In the event of a nuclear detonation, a considerable number of projected casualties will suffer from combined radiation exposure and burn and/or wound injury. Countermeasure assessment in the setting of radiation exposure combined with dermal injury is hampered by a lack of animal models in which the effects of interventions have been characterized. To address this need, we used two separate models to characterize wound closure. The first was an open wound model in mice to study the effect of wound size in combination with whole-body 6 Gy irradiation on the rate of wound closure, animal weight and survival (morbidity). In this model the addition of interventions, wound closure, subcutaneous vehicle injection, topical antiseptic and topical antibiotics were studied to measure their effect on healing and survival. The second was a rat closed wound model to study the biomechanical properties of a healed wound at 10 days postirradiation (irradiated with 6 or 7.5 Gy). In addition, complete blood counts were performed and wound pathology by staining with hematoxylin and eosin, trichrome, CD68 and Ki67. In the mouse open wound model, we found that wound size and morbidity were positively correlated, while wound size and survival were negatively correlated. Regardless of the wound size, the addition of radiation exposure delayed the healing of the wound by approximately 5-6 days. The addition of interventions caused, at a minimum, a 30% increase in survival and improved mean survival by ∼9 days. In the rat closed wound model we found that radiation exposure significantly decreased all wound biomechanical measurements as well as white blood cell, platelet and red blood cell counts at 10 days post wounding. Also, pathological changes showed a loss of dermal structure, thickening of dermis, loss of collagen/epithelial hyperplasia and an increased density of macrophages. In conclusion, we have characterized the effect of a changing wound size in combination with radiation

  17. Reactive oxygen species perpetuate radiation-induced lung injury: causes and cures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk of unacceptable radiation-induced lung injury remains a significant limiting factor in the current treatment of the tumors involving the thoracic region. Despite advances in normal tissue radiobiology, demonstrating that ionizing radiation triggers a cascade of genetic and molecular events that proceed during a latent period of pulmonary injury, the precise mechanisms underlying radiation-induced lung injury remain unclear. Based on our recent results, we propose a new paradigm of radiation-induced lung injury hypothesizing that hypoxia plays a central role in generating a non-healing wound response that perpetuates radiation lung injury through continuous generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and expression/activation of cytokines. Several lines of evidence from our group support this hypothesis. Using electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin trapping we have demonstrated the presence of ROS in rat lungs 13 weeks after irradiation. In a transgenic mouse model we have shown that overexpression of extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD), an important scavenger of ROS, ameliorates RT-induced lung injury. In addition, our data show that synthetic superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic compounds can be used to target ROS and reduce RT-induced lung damage. The findings noted above indicating a role for chronic ROS expression in the perpetuation of a wound healing response, suggest that long term SOD mimetic administration may be an effective therapeutic intervention. This strategy may reduce the risk of radiation-induced lung injury at standard radiation doses and may allow for higher doses of radiation to be delivered to selected tumors without increasing the risk of pulmonary complications

  18. The tolerance of the human body to automobile collision impact - a systematic review of injury biomechanics research, 1990-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Jason L; Lopez-Valdes, Francisco J; Duprey, Sonia; Bose, Dipan; Del Pozo de Dios, Eduardo; Subit, Damien; Gillispie, Tim; Crandall, Jeff R; Segui-Gomez, Maria

    2015-07-01

    Road traffic injuries account for 1.3 million deaths per year world-wide. Mitigating both fatalities and injuries requires a detailed understanding of the tolerance of the human body to external load. To identify research priorities, it is necessary to periodically compare trends in injury tolerance research to the characteristics of injuries occurring in the field. This study sought to perform a systematic review on the last twenty years of experimental injury tolerance research, and to evaluate those results relative to available epidemiologic data. Four hundred and eight experimental injury tolerance studies from 1990-2009 were identified from a reference index of over 68,000 papers. Examined variables included the body regions, ages, and genders studied; and the experimental models used. Most (20%) of the publications studied injury to the spine. There has also been a substantial volume of biomechanical research focused on upper and lower extremity injury, thoracic injury, and injury to the elderly - although these injury types still occur with regularity in the field. In contrast, information on pediatric injury and physiological injury (especially in the central nervous system) remains lacking. Given their frequency of injury in the field, future efforts should also include improving our understanding of tolerances and protection of vulnerable road users (e.g., motorcyclists, pedestrians).

  19. Micronucleus frequency in peripheral lymphocytes for the differential diagnosis of radiation injuries combined with thermal burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation was conducted to determine if any analysis of micronucleus frequency in human peripheral lymphocytes was useful to diagnostically differentiate radiation injuries in the presence of thermal burns. In the first part of the study, 27 patients with burns of various degrees were tested to determine if the peripheral lymphocytes stimulated in vitro for mitotic division would contain micronuclei--a type of chromosomal aberration inducible by many genotoxic substances. Data showed that the frequency of micronuclei did not increase with burn injury but did correlate with age. Therefore, it is suggested that in cases of radiation injuries combined with burns, the pathologic process related to the latter type of injury does not influence the differential diagnostic value of the micronucleus test. In the second part of the study, the validity of this hypothesis was tested in guinea pigs exposed to various doses of gamma-radiation (between 0.5 and 4.0 Gy) and then inflicted with thermal burns. The results confirmed that when radiation injuries and thermal burns coexist, the micronucleus test is a reliable biologic indicator of radiation injury

  20. Liver Injury Induced by Anticancer Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Maor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic chemotherapy prolongs survival of patients with advanced and metastatic tumors. This is, however, a double-edged sword with many adverse effects. Since the liver has a rich blood supply and plays an active role in the metabolism of medications, it is not surprising that there can be hepatic injury related to chemotherapy. In addition, radioembolization may affect the parenchyma of normal and cirrhotic livers. We review chemotherapy-associated liver injury in patients with colorectal liver metastases, including downsizing chemotherapy and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We discuss the mechanism of the hepatic injury, secondary to reactive oxygen species, and the spectrum of hepatic injury including, steatosis, steatohepatitis, hepatic sinusoidal injury and highlight the pharmacogenomics of such liver insults. Methods for reducing and treating the hepatotoxicity are discussed for specific agents including tamxifen and the newly introduced targeted antibodies.

  1. TGF-beta, radiation-induced pulmonary Injury and lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vujaskovic, Z; Groen, HJM

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether changes in TGF-beta plasma levels during radiation therapy may be useful in predicting radiation-induced pulmonary injury and tumour response in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Materials and methods: Plasma TGF-beta was investigated in 27 patients with stag

  2. Radiation-Related Injuries and Their Management: An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Wunderle, Kevin; Gill, Amanjit S.

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (in the form of X-rays) is used for the majority of procedures in interventional radiology. This review article aimed at promoting safer use of this tool through a better understanding of radiation dose and radiation effects, and by providing guidance for setting up a quality assurance program. To this end, the authors describe different radiation descriptive quantities and their individual strengths and challenges, as well as the biologic effects of ionizing radiation, inc...

  3. Circulating interleukin-18 as a biomarker of total-body radiation exposure in mice, minipigs, and nonhuman primates (NHP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cam T Ha

    Full Text Available We aim to develop a rapid, easy-to-use, inexpensive and accurate radiation dose-assessment assay that tests easily obtained samples (e.g., blood to triage and track radiological casualties, and to evaluate the radioprotective and therapeutic effects of radiation countermeasures. In the present study, we evaluated the interleukin (IL-1 family of cytokines, IL-1β, IL-18 and IL-33, as well as their secondary cytokines' expression and secretion in CD2F1 mouse bone marrow (BM, spleen, thymus and serum in response to γ-radiation from sublethal to lethal doses (5, 7, 8, 9, 10, or 12 Gy at different time points using the enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA, immunoblotting, and cytokine antibody array. Our data identified increases of IL-1β, IL-18, and/or IL-33 in mouse thymus, spleen and BM cells after total-body irradiation (TBI. However, levels of these cytokines varied in different tissues. Interestingly, IL-18 but not IL-1β or IL-33 increased significantly (2.5-24 fold and stably in mouse serum from day 1 after TBI up to 13 days in a radiation dose-dependent manner. We further confirmed our finding in total-body γ-irradiated nonhuman primates (NHPs and minipigs, and demonstrated that radiation significantly enhanced IL-18 in serum from NHPs 2-4 days post-irradiation and in minipig plasma 1-3 days post-irradiation. Finally, we compared circulating IL-18 with the well known hematological radiation biomarkers lymphocyte and neutrophil counts in blood of mouse, minipigs and NHPs and demonstrated close correlations between these biomarkers in response to radiation. Our results suggest that the elevated levels of circulating IL-18 after radiation proportionally reflect radiation dose and severity of radiation injury and may be used both as a potential biomarker for triage and also to track casualties after radiological accidents as well as for therapeutic radiation exposure.

  4. Capabilities for Clinical Management of Radiation Injuries of the Nikiforov Russian Center of Emergency and Radiation Medicine (EMERCOM of Russia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksanin, S

    2016-09-01

    This article presents an overview of the capabilities for clinical management of radiation injuries available at the Nikiforov Russian Center of Emergency and Radiation Medicine (NRCERM) of the Ministry of the Russian Federation for Civil Defense, Emergencies and Elimination of Consequences of Natural Disasters (EMERCOM). NRCERM is a federal state budgetary institution and the Russian Federation's head organization for providing medical assistance for persons overexposed to ionizing radiation, responders to radiation emergencies and people evacuated from radiation contaminated areas. As the WHO Collaborating Center for Treatment and Rehabilitation of Accident Recovery Workers of Nuclear and Other Disasters and a member of the WHO Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network (REMPAN), NRCERM is prepared to provide assistance and technical support in case of a radiation accident. For this purpose, NRCERM hospitals are equipped with technologically advanced facilities and possess well-trained specialist staff.

  5. Protective effect of catecholestrogens against 60Co γ-ray radiation injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When 10-week-old male BALB/c mice received whole-body irradiation with a single dose of 8 Gy 60Co γ-ray and catecholestrogen 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2) was subcutaneously injected 3 hours before and after the irradiation, 30-day survival rate of the mice was 70%, while the survival rate of the mice administered the other test samples was as follows; 2-hydroxyestrone, 20%; 2-hydroxyestriol, 20%; 4-hydroxyestradiol, 0%; 2-methoxyestrone, 0%; 2-methoxyestradiol, 0%; 2-methoxyestriol, 0%; estrone, 0%; estradiol, 5%; estriol, 0%; control, 5%. Lipid peroxide level in the liver of mice markedly increased on the 4th day after the irradiation. However, this increase in the lipid peroxide level was significantly suppressed by the administration of 2-OHE2. The radiation-induced anemia, leukopenia, and atrophy of the thymus were significantly protected by the administration of 2-OHE2. These results indicate that 2-OHE2 had a potent inhibitory effect on radiation injury. (author)

  6. Polylogarithmic representation of radiative and thermodynamic properties of thermal radiation in a given spectral range: II. Real-body radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2015-01-01

    The general analytical expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of a real-body are obtained in a finite range of frequencies at different temperatures. The frequency dependence of the spectral emissivity is represented as a power series. The Stefan-Boltzmann law, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, internal energy density, enthalpy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, and total emissivity are expressed in terms of the polylogarithm functions. The general expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions are applied for the study of thermal radiation of liquid and solid zirconium carbide. These functions are calculated using experimental data for the frequency dependence of the normal spectral emissivity in the visible-near infrared range at the melting (freezing) point. The gaps between the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions of liquid and solid zirconium carbide are observed. The g...

  7. Expression and significance of EGFR protein in model of radiation injury in mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The expression of EGFR protein was studied by SABC immunohistochemistry in 40 cases of model of radiation injury in mouse skin. Methods: Experiment animals were divided into four groups according to radiation dose. Results: The positive rates were 27.0%, 49.3%, 72.2%, 87.6% in 5 Gy group, 15 Gy group, 30 Gy group, 45 Gy group respectively, showing significant difference (P < 0.01). While the positive rate was 10.8% in normal control group, with significant difference (P < 0.01) compared with each radiation group. Conclusion: The enhancement of expression of EGFR in accordance with the increasing of radiation dose in certain dose range might be one important factor related to c-erbB-1 gene activated and enlarged by radiation, and the overexpression of EGFR protein might be related to poor healing in radiation skin injury

  8. Acute radiation syndrome, c.aused by single whole-body external irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general characteristic of conceptions of the material substrate of various forms and types of radiation injuries from the moment of a wide use of radiation energy and radioactive substances up to the present time, the dependence of structural changes on the type of ionizing radiation, dose and forms of its effect, are presented. The pathological anatomy of particular manifestations of acute radiation disease in various systems of the organism is described. The attention is paid to the variant of radiation disease taking place during non-uniform general irradiation. Local and general morphological changes which develop in skin, hyperdermic fat and skeleton muscles simultaneously in the zone of massive local effect against the background of the general radiation injury, are described for the first time. Delayed alterations in blood vessels and interstitial tissue after the acute radiation disease are described as well as the pathomorphology and histochemistry of trophic disorders in the acute and delayed periods of acute radiation disease

  9. Energy shift due to anisotropic black body radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Flambaum, Victor V; Safronova, Marianna S

    2015-01-01

    In many applications a source of the black-body radiation (BBR) can be highly anisotropic. This leads to the BBR shift that depends on tensor polarizability and on the projection of the total angular momentum of ions and atoms in a trap. We derived formula for the anisotropic BBR shift and performed numerical calculations of this effect for Ca$^+$ and Yb$^+$ transitions of experimental interest. These ions used for a design of high-precision atomic clocks, fundamental physics tests such as search for the Lorentz invariance violation and space-time variation of the fundamental constants, and quantum information. Anisotropic BBR shift may be one of the major systematic effect in these experiments.

  10. Polylogarithmic Representation of Radiative and Thermodynamic Properties of Thermal Radiation in a Given Spectral Range: II. Real-Body Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    There are several classes of materials and space objects for which the frequency dependence of the spectral emissivity is represented as a power series. Therefore, the study of the properties of thermal radiation for these real bodies is an important task for both fundamental science and industrial applications. The general analytical expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions of a real body are obtained in a finite range of frequencies at different temperatures. The Stefan-Boltzmann law, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, internal energy density, enthalpy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, and total emissivity are expressed in terms of the polylogarithm functions. The obtained general expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions are applied for the study of thermal radiation of liquid and solid zirconium carbide. These functions are calculated using experimental data for the frequency dependence of the normal spectral emissivity in the visible and near-infrared range at the melting (freezing) point. The gaps between the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions of liquid and solid zirconium carbide are observed. The general analytical expressions obtained can easily be presented in the wavenumber domain.

  11. Attenuative effects of G-CSF in radiation induced intestinal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joong Sun; Gong, Eun Ji; Kim, Sung Dae; Heo, Kyu; Ryoo, Seung Bum; Yang, Kwang Mo [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been reported to protect from radiationinduced myelosuppression. Growing evidence suggests that G-CSF also has many important non-hematopoietic functions in other tissues, including the intestine (Kim et al., 2010; Kim et al., 2011). However, little is known about the influence of G-CSF on intestinal injury. Examination 12 hours after radiation (5 Gy) revealed that the G-CSF treated mice were significantly protected from apoptosis of jejunal crypt, compared with radiation controls. G-CSF treatment attenuated intestinal morphological changes such as decreased survival crypt, the number of villi, villous shortening, crypt depth and length of basal lamina of 10 enterocytes compared with the radiation control 3.5 days after radiation (10 Gy). G-CSF attenuated the change of peripheral blood from radiation-induced myelosuppression and displayed attenuation of mortality in lethally-irradiated (10 Gy) mice. The present results support the suggestion that G-CSF administrated prior to radiation plays an important role in the survival of irradiated mice, possibly due to the protection of hematopoietic cells and intestinal stem cells against radiation. The results indicate that G-CSF protects from radiation-mediated intestinal damage and from hematopoietic injury. G-CSF treatment may be useful clinically in the prevention of injury following radiation.

  12. Spinal cord injury affects the interplay between visual and sensorimotor representations of the body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionta, Silvio; Villiger, Michael; Jutzeler, Catherine R; Freund, Patrick; Curt, Armin; Gassert, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The brain integrates multiple sensory inputs, including somatosensory and visual inputs, to produce a representation of the body. Spinal cord injury (SCI) interrupts the communication between brain and body and the effects of this deafferentation on body representation are poorly understood. We investigated whether the relative weight of somatosensory and visual frames of reference for body representation is altered in individuals with incomplete or complete SCI (affecting lower limbs’ somatosensation), with respect to controls. To study the influence of afferent somatosensory information on body representation, participants verbally judged the laterality of rotated images of feet, hands, and whole-bodies (mental rotation task) in two different postures (participants’ body parts were hidden from view). We found that (i) complete SCI disrupts the influence of postural changes on the representation of the deafferented body parts (feet, but not hands) and (ii) regardless of posture, whole-body representation progressively deteriorates proportionally to SCI completeness. These results demonstrate that the cortical representation of the body is dynamic, responsive, and adaptable to contingent conditions, in that the role of somatosensation is altered and partially compensated with a change in the relative weight of somatosensory versus visual bodily representations. PMID:26842303

  13. Alterations in body composition and spasticity following subtetanic neuromuscular electrical stimulation training in spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Crowe, MB, BCh, BAO

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this prospective cohort study was to investigate alterations in body composition variables and spasticity following subtetanic neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES training in an adult population with spinal cord injury (SCI. Fourteen sedentary adults with SCI (thoracic [T]4–T11; American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale A/B; time since injury: 10.17 +/– 11.17 yr were recruited from the National SCI database. Four adhesive electrodes (175 cm2 each were placed bilaterally on the proximal and distal quadriceps and hamstrings muscle groups and subtetanic contractions were elicited using a handheld NMES device. Lean body mass (LBM and other body composition variables were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Spasticity was measured using the Spinal Cord Assessment Tool for Spastic Reflexes (SCATs and visual analog scales. Verbal and written feedback was obtained to subjectively evaluate spasticity. LBM and spasticity measurements were taken before and after an 8 wk NMES training program in order to assess change. A statistically significant increase in lower-limb LBM, i.e., muscle tissue (p > 0.001, and a reduction in SCATs (p < 0.001 score, indicating reduced spasticity, was observed. Subjective responses were positive. Improvements in body composition and SCATs scores indicate that subtetanic NMES training elicits favorable responses and may have important clinical implications for an SCI population.

  14. Nigella sativa oil Ameliorates ionizing Radiation induced cellular injury in Male Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigella sativa (NS), commonly known as black seed, is a plant spices in which thymoquinone is the main active ingredient isolated from the black seeds. The seeds of Nigella sativa are used in herbal medicine all over the world for the treatment and prevention of a number of diseases. The aim of this study was focused on investigating the possible protective effect of NS against gamma radiation induced nephrotoxicity and inflammatory changes in male albino rats. Twenty four albino rats were divided into four equal groups as follows: control group, irradiated group (animals subjected to whole body gamma irradiation at a dose of 6 Gy), treated group (rats treated with 0.2 ml/kg, i.p., NS oil for 4 weeks), and treated irradiated group (animals treated with 0.2 mL/kg, i.p., NS oil for 4 weeks then exposed to whole body gamma irradiation at a dose of 6 Gy). The obtained results revealed that the administration of Nigella sativa oil to irradiated rats significantly ameliorated the changes induced in kidney antioxidant system; catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities as well as reduced glutathione concentration. Also, NS oil restored the kidney function indices (urea and creatinine) near normal level when compared with their equivalent values in irradiated rats. In addition, the changes in serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) activities were markedly improved compared to the corresponding values of irradiated group. The histopathological results showed distinctive pattern of ischemic renal injury in irradiated group, while in treated- irradiated group the renal tissues showed relatively well-preserved architecture with or without focal degeneration. In conclusion, NS acts in the kidney as a potent scavenger of free radicals to prevent or ameliorates the toxic effects of gamma irradiation as shown in the biochemical and histopathological study and also NS oil might provide substantial protection against

  15. Protective Effects of 5-Androstendiol (5-AED) on Radiation-induced Intestinal Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joong Sun; Lee, Seung Sook; Jang, Won Suk; Lee, Sun Joo; Park, Sun Hoo; Kim, MinSook; Cho, Soo Youn [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Chang Jong; Kim, Sung Ho [Chonnam National University College of Veterinary Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    We examined the radioprotective effects of 5-androstendiol (5-AED), a natural hormone produced in the reticularis of the adrenal cortex, as a result of intestinal damage in gamma-irradiated C3H/HeN mice. Thirty mice (C3H/HeN) were divided into three groups; 1) non-irradiated control group, 2) irradiated group, and 3) 5-AED-treated group prior to irradiation. Next, 5-AED (50 mg/kg per body weight) was subcutaneously injected 24 hours before irradiation. The mice were whole-body irradiated with 10 Gy for the histological examination of jejunal crypt survival and the determination of the villus morphology including crypt depth, crypt size, number of villi, villus height, and length of basal lamina, as well as 5 Gy for the detection of apoptosis. The 5-AED pre-treated group significantly increased the survival of the jejunal crypt, compared to irradiation controls (p<0.05 vs. irradiation controls at 3.5 days after 10 Gy). The evaluation of morphological changes revealed that the administration of 5-AED reduced the radiation-induced intestinal damages such as villus shortening and increased length of the basal lamina of enterocytes (p<0.05 vs irradiation controls on 3.5 day after 10 Gy, respectively). The administration of 5-AED decreased the radiation-induced apoptosis in the intestinal crypt, with no significant difference between the vehicle and 5-AED at 12 hours after 5 Gy. The results of this study suggest that the administration of 5-AED has a protective effect on intestinal damage induced by {gamma}-irradiation. In turn, these results suggest that 5-AED could be a useful candidate for radioprotection against intestinal mucosal injury following irradiation.

  16. Radiation injury of the skin following diagnostic and interventional fluoroscopic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many radiation injuries to the skin, resulting from diagnostic and interventional fluoroscopic procedures, have been reported in recent years. In some cases skin damage was severe and debilitating. We analyzed 72 reports of skin injuries for progression and location of injury, type and number of procedures, and contributing patient and operator factors. Most cases (46) were related to coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). A smaller number was documented after cardiac radiofrequency catheter ablation (12), transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement (7), neuroradiological interventions (3) and other procedures (4). Important factors leading to skin injuries were long exposure times over the same skin area, use of high dose rates, irradiation through thick tissue masses, hypersensitivity to radiation, and positioning of arms or breasts into the radiation entrance beam. Physicians were frequently unaware of the high radiation doses involved and did not recognize the injuries as radiation induced. Based on these findings, recommendations to reduce dose and improve patient care are provided. (author)

  17. Avoidance of radiation injuries from medical interventional procedures, ICRP Publication 85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interventional radiology (fluoroscopically-guided) techniques are being used by an increasing number of clinicians not adequately trained in radiation safety or radiobiology. Many of these interventionists are not aware of the potential for injury from these procedures or the simple methods for decreasing their incidence. Many patients are not being counselled on the radiation risks, nor followed up when radiation doses from difficult procedures may lead to injury. Some patients are suffering radiation-induced skin injuries and younger patients may face an increased risk of future cancer. Interventionists are having their practice limited or suffering injury, and are exposing their staff to high doses. In some interventional procedures, skin doses to patients approach those experienced in some cancer radiotherapy fractions. Radiation-induced skin injuries are occurring in patients due to the use of inappropriate equipment and, more often, poor operational technique. Injuries to physicians and staff performing interventional procedures have also been observed. Acute radiation doses (to patients) may cause erythema at 2 Gy, cataract at 2 Gy, permanent epilation at 7 Gy, and delayed skin necrosis at 12 Gy. Protracted (occupational) exposures to the eye may cause cataract at 4 Gy if the dose is received in less than 3 months, at 5.5 Gy if received over a period exceeding 3 months. Practical actions to control dose to the patient and to the staff are listed. The absorbed dose to the patient in the area of skin that receives the maximum dose is of priority concern. Each local clinical protocol should include, for each type of interventional procedure, a statement on the cumulative skin doses and skin sites associated with the various parts of the procedure. Interventionists should be trained to use information on skin dose and on practical techniques to control dose. Maximum cumulative absorbed doses that appear to approach or exceed 1 Gy (for procedures that may be

  18. Specific effect of electromagnetic radiation of SHF on genome and some genetic processes in the norm and in case of radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modifying effect of electromagnetic radiation of SHF in a wide frequency range on chromosomal aberration yield in various biological objects which is an important test of radiation injury at molecular-cellular level was studied. The presented results testify to the ability of SHF electromagnetic radiation specific effect on the processes of gene expression and to SHD ability to modify radiation injuries at various levels. 13 refs.; 3 figs

  19. Amylase and blood cell-count hematological radiation-injury biomarkers in a rhesus monkey radiation model-use of multiparameter and integrated biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective medical management of suspected radiation exposure incidents requires the recording of dynamic medical data (clinical signs and symptoms), biological assessments of radiation exposure, and physical dosimetry in order to provide diagnostic information to the treating physician and dose assessment for personnel radiation protection records. The need to rapidly assess radiation dose in mass-casualty and population-monitoring scenarios prompted an evaluation of suitable biomarkers that can provide early diagnostic information after exposure. We investigated the utility of serum amylase and hematological blood-cell count biomarkers to provide early assessment of severe radiation exposures in a non-human primate model (i.e., rhesus macaques; n=8) exposed to whole-body radiation of 60Co-gamma rays (6.5 Gy, 40cGymin-1). Serum amylase activity was significantly elevated (12.3±3.27- and 2.6±0.058-fold of day zero samples) at 1 and 2-days, respectively, after radiation. Lymphocyte cell counts decreased (≤15% of day zero samples) 1 and 2 days after radiation exposure. Neutrophil cell counts increased at day one by 1.9(±0.38)-fold compared with levels before irradiation. The ratios of neutrophil to lymphocyte cell counts increased by 13(±2.66)- and 4.23(±0.95)-fold at 1 and 2 days, respectively, after irradiation. These results demonstrate that increases in serum amylase activity along with decreases of lymphocyte counts, increases in neutrophil cell counts, and increases in the ratio of neutrophil to lymphocyte counts 1 day after irradiation can provide enhanced early triage discrimination of individuals with severe radiation exposure and injury. Use of the biodosimetry assessment tool (BAT) application is encouraged to permit dynamic recording of medical data in the management of a suspected radiological casualty

  20. Managing the stigma: Exploring body image experiences and self-presentation among people with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Alysse Bailey

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Using modified constructivist grounded theory, the purpose of this study was to explore body image experiences in people with spinal cord injury. Nine participants (five women, four men varying in age (21–63 years, type of injury (C3-T7; complete and incomplete, and years post-injury (4–36 years took part in semi-structured in-depth interviews. The following main categories were found: appearance, weight concerns, negative functional features, impact of others, body disconnection, hygiene and incontinence, and self-presentation. Findings have implications for the health and well-being of those living with a spinal cord injury.

  1. Protection from radiation injury by elemental diet: does added glutamine change the effect?

    OpenAIRE

    McArdle, A. H.

    1994-01-01

    The feeding of a protein hydrolysate based 'elemental' diet supplemented with added glutamine did not provide superior protection to the small intestine of dogs subjected to therapeutic pelvic irradiation. Comparison of diets with and without the added glutamine showed significant protection of the intestine from radiation injury. Both histological examination and electron microscopy showed lack of tissue injury with both diets. The activity of the free radical generating enzymes, scavengers,...

  2. The need for and the importance of biological indicators of radiation effects with special reference to injuries in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for further research on the existing and new biological indicators of radiation injury has been expressed. The studies on the radiation-induced alterations of membrane structure and function stimulated investigations aiming to develop an indicator based on membrane-phenomena. The co-ordinated research programme on ''Cell Membrane Probes as Biological Indicators of Radiation Injury in Radiation Accidents'' was initiated in mid 1977 and terminated in 1980. Within this programme many basic observations were made in connection with altered features of various animal and human cell membranes. Molecular, biophysical, biochemical and cell biological approaches were performed. The rapid reaction within minutes or hours of membranes against relatively low doses of various types of irradiations were described and the effects proved to be transitory, i.e. membrane regeneration occurred within hours. These dose- and timedependent alterations suggest the possibility of developing a biological indicator which would give signals at the earliest period after radiation injury when no other biological informations are available. The importance of a system of biological indicators is emphasized. (author)

  3. Potency preservation following stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erectile dysfunction after prostate radiation therapy remains an ongoing challenge and critical quality of life issue. Given the higher dose of radiation per fraction using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) there is concern that post-SBRT impotency would be higher than conventional radiation therapy approaches. This study sought to evaluate potency preservation and sexual function following SBRT for prostate cancer. Between February 2008 and March 2011, 216 men with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated definitively with SBRT monotherapy at Georgetown University Hospital. Potency was defined as the ability to have an erection firm enough for intercourse with or without sexual aids while sexual activity was defined as the ability to have an erection firm enough for masturbation and foreplay. Patients who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) were excluded from this study. Ninety-seven hormone-naïve men were identified as being potent at the initiation of therapy and were included in this review. All patients were treated to 35–36.25 Gy in 5 fractions delivered with the CyberKnife Radiosurgical System (Accuray). Prostate specific antigen (PSA) and total testosterone levels were obtained pre-treatment, every 3 months for the first year and every 6 months for the subsequent year. Sexual function was assessed with the Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM), the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC)-26 and Utilization of Sexual Medication/Device questionnaires at baseline and all follow-up visits. Ninety-seven men (43 low-, 50 intermediate- and 4 high-risk) at a median age of 68 years (range, 48–82 years) received SBRT. The median pre-treatment PSA was 5.9 ng/ml and the minimum follow-up was 24 months. The median pre-treatment total serum testosterone level was 11.4 nmol/L (range, 4.4-27.9 nmol/L). The median baseline SHIM was 22 and 36% of patients utilized sexual aids prior to treatment. Although potency rates declined following

  4. Effect of radiation sickness on the progress and treatment of mechanical and thermal injuries. [In German

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, K.

    1964-04-01

    It has been estimated that 70 or 75% of persons exposed to atomic weapons would suffer mechanical and thermal injuries, and that 30% receive radiation injuries. Of the total persons injured, 75% would suffer combinations of these injuries. As a result the various injurious agents, complexes of injury conditions, would be observed. These include leukopenia and impaired resistance to infection, shortened delay in appearance o irradiation symptoms, intensified evidence of shock, and an increased tendency toward hemorrhage, with increased sensitivity to blood loss. The author discusses a wide range of general and specific medical procedures and drugs that can be used to treat and support recovery of persons with combined radiation and mechanical or thermal injuries. Some general treatment procedures include absolute isolation and rest, special dietetic supplementation, strict medical supervision to prevent acute hemorrhage or circulatory failure, and parenteral administration of fluids. Other special measures include treatment of the primary reactions to injury by antihistamines, sedatives, antibiotics, hormones, support of circulation, blood transfusions, etc.

  5. A functionally relevant tool for the body following spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariella Pazzaglia

    Full Text Available A tool such as a prosthetic device that extends or restores movement may become part of the identity of the person to whom it belongs. For example, some individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI adapt their body and action representation to incorporate their wheelchairs. However, it remains unclear whether the bodily assimilation of a relevant external tool develops as a consequence of altered sensory and motor inputs from the body or of prolonged confinement sitting or lying in the wheelchair. To explore such relationships, we used a principal component analysis (PCA on collected structured reports detailing introspective experiences of wheelchair use in 55 wheelchair-bound individuals with SCI. Among all patients, the regular use of a wheelchair induced the perception that the body's edges are not fixed, but are instead plastic and flexible to include the wheelchair. The PCA revealed the presence of three major components. In particular, the functional aspect of the sense of embodiment concerning the wheelchair appeared to be modulated by disconnected body segments. Neither an effect of time since injury nor an effect of exposure to/experience of was detected. Patients with lesions in the lower spinal cord and with loss of movement and sensation in the legs but who retained upper body movement showed a higher degree of functional embodiment than those with lesions in the upper spinal cord and impairment in the entire body. In essence, the tool did not become an extension of the immobile limbs; rather, it became an actual tangible substitution of the functionality of the affected body part. These findings suggest that the brain can incorporate relevant artificial tools into the body schema via the natural process of continuously updating bodily signals. The ability to embody new essential objects extends the potentiality of physically impaired persons and can be used for their rehabilitation.

  6. The sense of the body in individuals with spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bigna Lenggenhager

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that the basic foundations of the self lie in the brain systems that represent the body. Specific sensorimotor stimulation has been shown to alter the bodily self. However, little is known about how disconnection of the brain from the body affects the phenomenological sense of the body and the self. Spinal cord injury (SCI patients who exhibit massively reduced somatomotor processes below the lesion in the absence of brain damage are suitable for testing the influence of body signals on two important components of the self-the sense of disembodiment and body ownership. We recruited 30 SCI patients and 16 healthy participants, and evaluated the following parameters: (i depersonalization symptoms, using the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (CDS, and (ii measures of body ownership, as quantified by the rubber hand illusion (RHI paradigm. We found higher CDS scores in SCI patients, which show increased detachment from their body and internal bodily sensations and decreasing global body ownership with higher lesion level. The RHI paradigm reveals no alterations in the illusory ownership of the hand between SCI patients and controls. Yet, there was no typical proprioceptive drift in SCI patients with intact tactile sensation on the hand, which might be related to cortical reorganization in these patients. These results suggest that disconnection of somatomotor inputs to the brain due to spinal cord lesions resulted in a disturbed sense of an embodied self. Furthermore, plasticity-related cortical changes might influence the dynamics of the bodily self.

  7. Methods of experimental study of radiation injuries to organs and tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presented review of literature points to a great variety of quantitative methods for studying radiation injuries to many of the organs. Choice of a method depends on the problem of investigation that should be directed primarily at a possibility of applying the data obtained in clinical practice. This application can be realized at present by evaluation of radiation injuries at the tissue level, while further development of methods for in vitro cultivation of tissues, as it has already been realized for hemopoietic and some other tissues, is required for determination of radiosensitivity of certain cells in differet human tissues

  8. Impact of an angiotensin analogue in treating thermal and combined radiation injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Sachin Suresh

    Background: In recent years there has been a growing concern regarding the use of nuclear weapons by terrorists. Such incidents in the past have shown that radiation exposure is often accompanied by other forms of trauma such as burns, wounds or infection; leading to increased mortality rates among the affected individuals. This increased risk with combined radiation injury has been attributed to the delayed wound healing observed in this injury. The Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) has emerged as a critical regulator of wound healing. Angiotensin II (A-II) and Angiotensin (1-7) [A(1-7)] have been shown to accelerate the rate of wound healing in different animal models of cutaneous injury. Nor-Leu3-Angiotensin (1-7) [Nor-Leu3-A (1-7)], an analogue of A(1-7), is more efficient than both A-II and A(1-7) in its ability to improve wound healing and is currently in phase III clinical trials for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Aims: The three main goals of this study were to; 1) Develop a combined radiation and burn injury (CRBI) model and a radiation-induced cutaneous injury model to study the pathophysiological effects of these injuries on dermal wound healing; 2) To treat thermal and CRBI injuries using Nor-Leu 3-A (1-7) and decipher the mechanism of action of this peptide and 3) Develop an in-vitro model of CRBI using dermal cells in order to study the effect of CRBI on individual cell types involved in wound healing. Results: CRBI results in delayed and exacerbated apoptosis, necrosis and inflammation in injured skin as compared to thermal injury by itself. Radiation-induced cutaneous injury shows a radiation-dose dependent increase in inflammation as well as a chronic inflammatory response in the higher radiation exposure groups. Nor-Leu3-A (1-7) can mitigate thermal and CRBI injuries by reducing inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage while increasing the rate of proliferation of dermal stem cells and re-epithelialization of injured skin. The in

  9. Dysuria Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einsley-Marie eJanowski

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dysuria following prostate radiation therapy is a common toxicity that adversely affects patients’ quality of life and may be difficult to manage. Methods: 204 patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT from 2007 to 2010 for localized prostate carcinoma with a minimum follow up of three years were included in this retrospective review of prospectively collected data. All patients were treated to 35-36.25Gy in 5 fractions delivered with robotic SBRT with real time fiducial tracking. Dysuria and other lower urinary tract symptoms were assessed via Question 4b (Pain or burning on urination of the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC-26 and the American Urological Association (AUA Symptom Score at baseline and at routine follow up. Results: 204 patients (82 low-, 105 intermediate-, and 17 high risk according to the D’Amico classification at a median age of 69 years (range 48-91 received SBRT for their localized prostate cancer with a median follow up of 47 months. Bother associated with dysuria significantly increased from a baseline of 12% to a maximum of 43% at one month (p<0.0001. There were two distinct peaks of moderate to severe dysuria bother at 1 month and at 6-12 months, with 9% of patients experiencing a late transient dysuria flare. While a low level of dysuria was seen through the first two years of follow-up, it returned to below baseline by two years (p=0.91. The median baseline AUA score of 7.5 significantly increased to 11 at 1 month (p<0.0001 and returned to 7 at 3 months (p= 0.54. Patients with dysuria had a statistically higher AUA score at baseline and at all follow-ups up to 30 months. Dysuria significantly correlated with dose and AUA score on multivariate analysis. Frequency and strain significantly correlated with dysuria on stepwise multivariate analysis.Conclusions: The rate and severity of dysuria following SBRT is comparable to patients treated with other radiation modalities.

  10. Total Body Irradiation in the "Hematopoietic" Dose Range Induces Substantial Intestinal Injury in Non-Human Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junru; Shao, Lijian; Hendrickson, Howard P; Liu, Liya; Chang, Jianhui; Luo, Yi; Seng, John; Pouliot, Mylene; Authier, Simon; Zhou, Daohong; Allaben, William; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The non-human primate has been a useful model for studies of human acute radiation syndrome (ARS). However, to date structural changes in various parts of the intestine after total body irradiation (TBI) have not been systematically studied in this model. Here we report on our current study of TBI-induced intestinal structural injury in the non-human primate after doses typically associated with hematopoietic ARS. Twenty-four non-human primates were divided into three groups: sham-irradiated control group; and total body cobalt-60 (60Co) 6.7 Gy gamma-irradiated group; and total body 60Co 7.4 Gy gamma-irradiated group. After animals were euthanized at day 4, 7 and 12 postirradiation, sections of small intestine (duodenum, proximal jejunum, distal jejunum and ileum) were collected and fixed in 10% formalin. The intestinal mucosal surface length, villus height and crypt depths were assessed by computer-assisted image analysis. Plasma citrulline levels were determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Total bone marrow cells were counted and hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow were analyzed by flow cytometer. Histopathologically, all segments exhibited conspicuous disappearance of plicae circulares and prominent atrophy of crypts and villi. Intestinal mucosal surface length was significantly decreased in all intestinal segments on day 4, 7 and 12 after irradiation (P 0.05). Crypt depth was also significantly reduced in all segments on day 4, 7 and 12 after irradiation (P irradiation, consistent with intestinal mucosal injury. Both 6.7 and 7.4 Gy TBI reduced total number of bone marrow cells. And further analysis showed that the number and function of CD45(+)CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitors in bone marrow decreased significantly. In summary, TBI in the hematopoietic ARS dose range induces substantial intestinal injury in all segments of the small bowel. These findings underscore the importance of maintaining the

  11. First Patagonian Course on 'Diagnosis and Therapy of Injuries Induced by Ionizing Radiation'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Patagonia there are academic centers, health and industrial facilities that use ionizing radiations in its usual practices. However, they do not have protocols that respond to local needs. For this reason was held from October 5 to November 10, 2012 in Bariloche Atomic Center, a training course for health personnel. The range of topics covered ranged from the definition of dosimetry quantities, types of radiation and biological dosimetry, biological effects, radiation acute syndrome, radiation-induced cutaneous syndrome, internal contamination, screening in radiological emergencies, etc.The course provided a theoretical and practical guide about how to recognize and treat people exposed to radiations, guidelines for acting in radiological emergencies and a perception of the psychosocial impact of the radiation accidents.The result was a pocket book for health personnel that will be used in case of having a patient with radiation induced injury

  12. Fetal liver cells transplantation in the treatment of extremely severe acute radiation injuries induced by large dose irradiation in leukemic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven cases of extremely severe acute radiation injuries treated with fetal liver cells transplantation (FLT) are reported. Patients received 6-8 Gy whole body irradiation which was followed by an infusion of fetal liver cell suspension. Hematological reconstitution occurred in all patients and temporary chimera developed in 3 patients after FLT. There were no difference between the hematologic reconstitution in patients with or without chimera

  13. Lung deformations and radiation-induced regional lung collapse in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To differentiate radiation-induced fibrosis from regional lung collapse outside of the high dose region in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods: Lung deformation maps were computed from pre-treatment and post-treatment computed tomography (CT) scans using a point-to-point translation method. Fifty anatomical landmarks inside the lung (vessel or airway branches) were matched on planning and follow-up scans for the computation process. Two methods using the deformation maps were developed to differentiate regional lung collapse from fibrosis: vector field and Jacobian methods. A total of 40 planning and follow-ups CT scans were analyzed for 20 lung SBRT patients. Results: Regional lung collapse was detected in 15 patients (75%) using the vector field method, in ten patients (50%) using the Jacobian method, and in 12 patients (60%) by radiologists. In terms of sensitivity and specificity the Jacobian method performed better. Only weak correlations were observed between the dose to the proximal airways and the occurrence of regional lung collapse. Conclusions: The authors presented and evaluated two novel methods using anatomical lung deformations to investigate lung collapse and fibrosis caused by SBRT treatment. Differentiation of these distinct physiological mechanisms beyond what is usually labeled “fibrosis” is necessary for accurate modeling of lung SBRT-induced injuries. With the help of better models, it becomes possible to expand the therapeutic benefits of SBRT to a larger population of lung patients with large or centrally located tumors that were previously considered ineligible

  14. Lung deformations and radiation-induced regional lung collapse in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diot, Quentin, E-mail: quentin.diot@ucdenver.edu; Kavanagh, Brian; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Gaspar, Laurie; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Garg, Kavita [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To differentiate radiation-induced fibrosis from regional lung collapse outside of the high dose region in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods: Lung deformation maps were computed from pre-treatment and post-treatment computed tomography (CT) scans using a point-to-point translation method. Fifty anatomical landmarks inside the lung (vessel or airway branches) were matched on planning and follow-up scans for the computation process. Two methods using the deformation maps were developed to differentiate regional lung collapse from fibrosis: vector field and Jacobian methods. A total of 40 planning and follow-ups CT scans were analyzed for 20 lung SBRT patients. Results: Regional lung collapse was detected in 15 patients (75%) using the vector field method, in ten patients (50%) using the Jacobian method, and in 12 patients (60%) by radiologists. In terms of sensitivity and specificity the Jacobian method performed better. Only weak correlations were observed between the dose to the proximal airways and the occurrence of regional lung collapse. Conclusions: The authors presented and evaluated two novel methods using anatomical lung deformations to investigate lung collapse and fibrosis caused by SBRT treatment. Differentiation of these distinct physiological mechanisms beyond what is usually labeled “fibrosis” is necessary for accurate modeling of lung SBRT-induced injuries. With the help of better models, it becomes possible to expand the therapeutic benefits of SBRT to a larger population of lung patients with large or centrally located tumors that were previously considered ineligible.

  15. Automated fiducial marker planning for thoracic stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Jason D.; Rai, Lav; Wibowo, Henky; Tsalyuk, Serge; Anderson, Eric D.

    2012-02-01

    Stereotactic body-radiation therapy (SBRT) has gained acceptance in treating lung cancer. Localization of a thoracic lesion is challenging as tumors can move significantly with breathing. Some SBRT systems compensate for tumor motion with the intrafraction tracking of targets by two stereo fluoroscopy cameras. However, many lung tumors lack a fluoroscopic signature and cannot be directly tracked. Small radiopaque fiducial markers, acting as fluoroscopically visible surrogates, are instead implanted nearby. The spacing and configuration of the fiducial markers is important to the success of the therapy as SBRT systems impose constraints on the geometry of a fiducial-marker constellation. It is difficult even for experienced physicians mentally assess the validity of a constellation a priori. To address this challenge, we present the first automated planning system for bronchoscopic fiducial-marker placement. Fiducial-marker planning is posed as a constrained combinatoric optimization problem. Constraints include requiring access from a navigable airway, having sufficient separation in the fluoroscopic imaging planes to resolve each individual marker, and avoidance of major blood vessels. Automated fiducial-marker planning takes approximately fifteen seconds, fitting within the clinical workflow. The resulting locations are integrated into a virtual bronchoscopic planning system, which provides guidance to each location during the implantation procedure. To date, we have retrospectively planned over 50 targets for treatment, and have implanted markers according to the automated plan in one patient who then underwent SBRT treatment. To our knowledge, this approach is the first to address automated bronchoscopic fiducialmarker planning for SBRT.

  16. Prospective analysis of body mass index during and up to 5 years after discharge from inpatient spinal cord injury rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Sonja; Post, Marcel W. M.; Sluis, Tebbe A.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Postma, K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of overweight/obesity and the course of the body mass index (BMI) in persons with spinal cord injury during and after inpatient rehabilitation. Design: Multi-centre longitudinal study. Subjects: A total of 184 persons with spinal cord injury. Methods: BMI was

  17. Radiation Injury After a Nuclear Detonation: Medical Consequences and the Need for Scarce Resources Allocation

    OpenAIRE

    DiCarlo, Andrea L.; Maher, Carmen; Hick, John L.; Hanfling, Dan; Dainiak, Nicholas; Chao, Nelson; Bader, Judith L; Coleman, C. Norman; Weinstock, David M.

    2011-01-01

    A 10-kiloton (kT) nuclear detonation within a US city could expose hundreds of thousands of people to radiation. The Scarce Resources for a Nuclear Detonation Project was undertaken to guide community planning and response in the aftermath of a nuclear detonation, when demand will greatly exceed available resources. This article reviews the pertinent literature on radiation injuries from human exposures and animal models to provide a foundation for the triage and management approaches outline...

  18. An Immunohistochemical Panel to Assess Ultraviolet Radiation Associated Oxidative Skin Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Mamalis, A; Fiadorchanka, N; L. ADAMS; Serravallo, M; Heilman, E; Siegel, D; Brody, N; Jagdeo, J

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation results in a significant loss in years of healthy life, approximately 1.5 million disability-adjusted life years, and is associated with greater than 60,000 deaths annually worldwide that are attributed to melanoma and other skin cancers. Currently, there are no standardized biomarkers or assay panels to assess oxidative stress skin injury patterns in human skin exposed to ionizing radiation. Using biopsy specimens from chronic solar UV-exposed and UV-protected skin...

  19. Recombinant human MFG-E8 attenuates intestinal injury and mortality in severe whole body irradiation in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Ajakaiye

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI syndrome component of acute radiation syndrome (ARS results from depletion of immature parenchymal stem cells after high dose irradiation and contributes significantly to early mortality. It is associated with severe, irreparable damage in the GI tract and extremely low survival. There is a need for the development of viable mitigators of whole body irradiation (WBI due to the possibility of unexpected high level radiation exposure from nuclear accidents or attacks. We therefore examined the effect of recombinant human milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (rhMFG-E8 in mitigating damage after WBI. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 10 Gy WBI using Cesium-137 as the radiation source. The animals in the treatment group received rhMFG-E8 (166 µg/kg BW subcutaneously once a day with the first dose given 6 h after WBI. Blood and tissue samples from the ileum were collected after 3 days of treatment. A separate cohort of animals was treated for 7 days and the 21 day mortality rate was determined. Treatment with rhMFG-E8 significantly improved the survival from 31% to 75% over 21 days. Furthermore, rhMFG-E8 treatment resulted in a 36% reduction in the radiation injury intestinal mucosal damage score, corresponding to visible histological changes. MFG-E8 gene expression was significantly decreased in WBI-induced animals as compared to sham controls. Treatment with rhMFG-E8 increased p53 and p21 expression by 207% and 84% compared to untreated controls. This was accompanied by an 80% increase in the expression of anti-apoptotic cell regulator Bcl-2. p53 and p21 levels correlate with improved survival after radiation injury. These cell regulators arrest the cell after DNA damage and enable DNA repair as well as optimize cell survival. Taken together, these results indicate that rhMFG-E8 ameliorates the GI syndrome and improves survival after WBI by minimizing intestinal cell damage and optimizing recovery.

  20. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid analogue mitigates kidney injury in a rat model of radiation nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hye Khan, Md Abdul; Fish, Brian; Wahl, Geneva; Sharma, Amit; Falck, John R; Paudyal, Mahesh P; Moulder, John E; Imig, John D; Cohen, Eric P

    2016-04-01

    Arachidonic acid is metabolized to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) by CYP epoxygenases, and EETs are kidney protective in multiple pathologies. We determined the ability of an EET analogue, EET-A, to mitigate experimental radiation nephropathy. The kidney expression of the EET producing enzyme CYP2C11 was lower in rats that received total body irradiation (TBI rat) compared with non-irradiated control. At 12 weeks after TBI, the rats had higher systolic blood pressure and impaired renal afferent arteriolar function compared with control, and EET-A or captopril mitigated these abnormalities. The TBI rats had 3-fold higher blood urea nitrogen (BUN) compared with control, and EET-A or captopril decreased BUN by 40-60%. The urine albumin/creatinine ratio was increased 94-fold in TBI rats, and EET-A or captopril attenuated that increase by 60-90%. In TBI rats, nephrinuria was elevated 30-fold and EET-A or captopril decreased it by 50-90%. Renal interstitial fibrosis, tubular and glomerular injury were present in the TBI rats, and each was decreased by EET-A or captopril. We further demonstrated elevated renal parenchymal apoptosis in TBI rats, which was mitigated by EET-A or captopril. Additional studies revealed that captopril or EET-A mitigated renal apoptosis by acting on the p53/Fas/FasL (Fas ligand) apoptotic pathway. The present study demonstrates a novel EET analogue-based strategy for mitigation of experimental radiation nephropathy by improving renal afferent arteriolar function and by decreasing renal apoptosis.

  1. Ghrelin Therapy Improves Survival after Whole-Body Ionizing Irradiation or Combined with Burn or Wound: Amelioration of Leukocytopenia, Thrombocytopenia, Splenomegaly, and Bone Marrow Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliann G. Kiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to ionizing radiation alone (RI or combined with traumatic tissue injury (CI is a crucial life-threatening factor in nuclear and radiological events. In our laboratory, mice exposed to 60Co-γ-photon radiation (9.5 Gy, 0.4 Gy/min, bilateral followed by 15% total-body-surface-area skin wounds (R-W CI or burns (R-B CI experienced an increment of ≥18% higher mortality over a 30-day observation period compared to RI alone. CI was accompanied by severe leukocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, erythropenia, and anemia. At the 30th day after injury, numbers of WBC and platelets still remained very low in surviving RI and CI mice. In contrast, their RBC, hemoglobin, and hematocrit were recovered towards preirradiation levels. Only RI induced splenomegaly. RI and CI resulted in bone-marrow cell depletion. In R-W CI mice, ghrelin (a hunger-stimulating peptide therapy increased survival, mitigated body-weight loss, accelerated wound healing, and increased hematocrit. In R-B CI mice, ghrelin therapy increased survival and numbers of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and platelets and ameliorated bone-marrow cell depletion. In RI mice, this treatment increased survival, hemoglobin, and hematocrit and inhibited splenomegaly. Our novel results are the first to suggest that ghrelin therapy effectively improved survival by mitigating CI-induced leukocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, and bone-marrow injury or the RI-induced decreased hemoglobin and hematocrit.

  2. Quercetin prevents pyrrolizidine alkaloid clivorine-induced liver injury in mice by elevating body defense capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Ji

    Full Text Available Quercetin is a plant-derived flavonoid that is widely distributed in nature. The present study is designed to analyze the underlying mechanism in the protection of quercetin against pyrrolizidine alkaloid clivorine-induced acute liver injury in vivo. Serum transaminases, total bilirubin analysis, and liver histological evaluation demonstrated the protection of quercetin against clivorine-induced liver injury. Terminal dUTP nick end-labeling assay demonstrated that quercetin reduced the increased amount of liver apoptotic cells induced by clivorine. Western-blot analysis of caspase-3 showed that quercetin inhibited the cleaved activation of caspase-3 induced by clivorine. Results also showed that quercetin reduced the increase in liver glutathione and lipid peroxidative product malondialdehyde induced by clivorine. Quercetin reduced the enhanced liver immunohistochemical staining for 4-hydroxynonenal induced by clivorine. Results of the Mouse Stress and Toxicity PathwayFinder RT2 Profiler PCR Array demonstrated that the expression of genes related with oxidative or metabolic stress and heat shock was obviously altered after quercetin treatment. Some of the alterations were confirmed by real-time PCR. Our results demonstrated that quercetin prevents clivorine-induced acute liver injury in vivo by inhibiting apoptotic cell death and ameliorating oxidative stress injury. This protection may be caused by the elevation of the body defense capacity induced by quercetin.

  3. Factors Predictive of Symptomatic Radiation Injury After Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Intracerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, Christopher, E-mail: cherbert@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); McKenzie, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Redekop, Gary [Division of Neurosurgery, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Hsu, Fred [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Abbotsford, BC (Canada); Gete, Ermias; Gill, Brad; Lee, Richard; Luchka, Kurt [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Haw, Charles [Division of Neurosurgery, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Lee, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster, BC (Canada); Toyota, Brian [Division of Neurosurgery, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Martin, Montgomery [Department of Medical Imaging, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate predictive factors in the development of symptomatic radiation injury after treatment with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for intracerebral arteriovenous malformations and relate the findings to the conclusions drawn by Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC). Methods and Materials: Archived plans for 73 patients who were treated at the British Columbia Cancer Agency were studied. Actuarial estimates of freedom from radiation injury were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used for analysis of incidence of radiation injury. Log-rank test was used to search for dosimetric parameters associated with freedom from radiation injury. Results: Symptomatic radiation injury was exhibited by 14 of 73 patients (19.2%). Actuarial rate of symptomatic radiation injury was 23.0% at 4 years. Most patients (78.5%) had mild to moderate deficits according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. On univariate analysis, lesion volume and diameter, dose to isocenter, and a V{sub x} for doses {>=}8 Gy showed statistical significance. Only lesion diameter showed statistical significance (p < 0.05) in a multivariate model. According to the log-rank test, AVM volumes >5 cm{sup 3} and diameters >30 mm were significantly associated with the risk of radiation injury (p < 0.01). The V{sub 12} also showed strong association with the incidence of radiation injury. Actuarial incidence of radiation injury was 16.8% if V{sub 12} was <28 cm{sup 3} and 53.2% if >28 cm{sup 3} (log-rank test, p = 0.001). Conclusions: This study confirms that the risk of developing symptomatic radiation injury after radiosurgery is related to lesion diameter and volume and irradiated volume. Results suggest a higher tolerance than proposed by QUANTEC. The widely differing findings reported in the literature, however, raise considerable uncertainties.

  4. Radiological and functional assessment of radiation-induced lung injury in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vujaskovic, Z; Down, JD; van t'Veld, AA; Mooyaart, EL; Meertens, H; Piers, DA; Szabo, BG; Konings, AWT

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an experimental model to measure localized radiation-induced lung injury using multiple end-points including breathing frequency, high-resolution computed tomography (CT), and radionuclide perfusion. The rats were anaesthetized and the right lung irradiated wi

  5. [The future of hyperbaric oxygen therapy: added value in the treatment of late radiation injury?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geel, A.N. van; Poortmans, P.; Koppert, L.B.

    2015-01-01

    There is some evidence for the benefit of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in late radiation tissue injury (LRTI) affecting the head, neck and lower bowel, but there is little evidence for or against the benefit in other tissues (e.g. the breast) affected by LRTI. There is a need for large prospective tria

  6. Body regard as a moderator of the relation between emotion dysregulation and nonsuicidal self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J; Bagge, Courtney L; Tull, Matthew T; Gratz, Kim L

    2013-10-01

    Despite research documenting a strong association between emotion dysregulation and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), the moderators of this association have received little attention. Thus, it remains unclear why some individuals with heightened emotion dysregulation engage in NSSI and others do not. Body regard (i.e., how one perceives, experiences, and cares for the body) may be one such moderator, explaining the risk for NSSI among some individuals with emotion dysregulation. The current study used structural equation modeling within a sample of 398 undergraduates (26% reporting NSSI, mean frequency = 25.16, SD = 40.5) to test the interactive effect of emotion dysregulation and body regard on NSSI frequency when controlling for negative affect and borderline personality disorder symptoms. The interaction model provided a strong fit to the data and showed that emotion regulation was associated with NSSI only when low levels of body regard were present. Results suggest that body regard may be important to understanding who engages in NSSI within the context of emotion dysregulation. Possible mechanisms underlying the interaction between body regard and emotion dysregulation are discussed along with treatment and prevention implications.

  7. Delayed radiation injury of gut-exposed and gut-shielded mice. I. The decrement in resistance to continuous gamma-ray stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, J.F.; Archuleta, R.F.; London, J.E.; Prine, J.R.

    1977-02-01

    Two mouse strains (RF/J and C57B1/6J) were exposed to x-ray doses totaling 400, 800, or 1200 rad. Total doses were given in 200-rad fractions at 7-day intervals to the whole body, gut only, or gut shielded. Animals treated as above (conditioned) were divided into 2 groups to form a two-part investigation. X-ray-conditioned and control mice were subjected to a continuous gamma-ray stress (challenge exposure) 28 days after the last x-ray dose. Delayed injury was measured as a reduction in mean after-survival (MAS) time and was observed in whole-body, gut-conditioned, and gut-shielded groups. The cause of death was attributed to hemopoietic hypoplasia in all groups. MAS reduction in all conditioned groups in both strains was linear with dose within the dose range used. Delayed injury per volume dose (measured as a reduction in MAS) was independent of the tissue initially conditioned with an acute dose of x rays. Thus, delayed injury per unit weight of gut tissue exposed was equal to that of either whole-body or gut-shielded radiation injury. Comparative weight loss observations during the continuous gamma-ray challenge exposure revealed a decrement in metabolic processes associated with body weight maintenance. This decrement was seen in all x-ray-conditioned groups.

  8. Methods for assessing the extent of acute radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous radiation accidents have shown that the medical management of exposed persons cannot be performed without the use of 'biological indicators' of effect and of repair. For the clinical management of a patient with the acute radiation syndrome, it is essential to obtain information on the subjective symptomatology as well as on laboratory parameters, especially during the first 3 to 6 days after exposure. The medical doctor responsible for the clinical care of patients has to rely on the use of what has been described as 'sequential diagnosis'. This approach consists essentially of the determination of a limited number of parameters as a function of time. From the analysis of the pattern of the determined and evaluated signs and symptoms in the first hours and days, one is able to characterize patients according to type and severity of symptomatology. This has been clearly demonstrated in the Moscow - Ulm Radiation Accident Database (MURAD) developed in a collaborative project between the Institute of Biophysics in Moscow and the Department of Clinical Physiology and Occupational Medicine of the University of Ulm. On the basis of the radiation accident clinical response pattern observed early after irradiation, one is able to develop a first approach for therapeutic strategies. It is the purpose of this contribution to outline the diagnostic and prognostic significance of blood cell changes and to discuss the following problem areas: significance and elements of a sequential diagnosis; significance of blood lymphocytes for radiation accident diagnosis; significance of blood granulocyte changes for the prognosis of the acute radiation syndrome; analysis of granulocyte changes by means of regulated system models; utilization of indicators of response and repair for planning therapeutic options

  9. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wen-Yen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jen, Yee-Min, E-mail: yeeminjen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Meei-Shyuan [School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Li-Ping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cardinal Tien Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chang-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Ko, Kai-Hsiung [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Kuen-Tze; Lin, Jang-Chun; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Lin, Chun-Shu; Su, Yu-Fu; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Chang, Yao-Wen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of Cyberknife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its effect on survival in patients of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: This was a matched-pair study. From January 2008 to December 2009, 36 patients with 42 lesions of unresectable recurrent HCC were treated with SBRT. The median prescribed dose was 37 Gy (range, 25 to 48 Gy) in 4-5 fractions over 4-5 consecutive working days. Another 138 patients in the historical control group given other or no treatments were selected for matched analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 14 months for all patients and 20 months for those alive. The 1- and 2-year in-field failure-free rates were 87.6% and 75.1%, respectively. Out-field intrahepatic recurrence was the main cause of failure. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 64.0%, and median time to progression was 8.0 months. In the multivariable analysis of all 174 patients, SBRT (yes vs. no), tumor size ({<=}4 cm vs. >4 cm), recurrent stage (stage IIIB/IV vs. I) and Child-Pugh classification (A vs. B/C) were independent prognostic factors for OS. Matched-pair analysis revealed that patients undergoing SBRT had better OS (2-year OS of 72.6% vs. 42.1%, respectively, p = 0.013). Acute toxicities were mild and tolerable. Conclusion: SBRT is a safe and efficacious modality and appears to be well-tolerated at the dose fractionation we have used, and its use correlates with improved survival in this cohort of patients with recurrent unresectable HCC. Out-field recurrence is the major cause of failure. Further studies of combinations of SBRT and systemic therapies may be reasonable.

  10. Small Bowel Dose Tolerance for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCouture, Tamara A; Xue, Jinyu; Subedi, Gopal; Xu, Qianyi; Lee, Justin T; Kubicek, Gregory; Asbell, Sucha O

    2016-04-01

    Inconsistencies permeate the literature regarding small bowel dose tolerance limits for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments. In this review, we organized these diverse published limits with MD Anderson at Cooper data into a unified framework, constructing the dose-volume histogram (DVH) Risk Map, demonstrating low-risk and high-risk SBRT dose tolerance limits for small bowel. Statistical models of clinical data from 2 institutions were used to assess the safety spectrum of doses used in the exposure of the gastrointestinal tract in SBRT; 30% of the analyzed cases had vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors (VEGFI) or other biological agents within 2 years before or after SBRT. For every dose tolerance limit in the DVH Risk Map, the probit dose-response model was used to estimate the risk level from our clinical data. Using the current literature, 21Gy to 5cc of small bowel in 3 fractions has low toxicity and is reasonably safe, with 6.5% estimated risk of grade 3 or higher complications, per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. In the same fractionation for the same volume, if lower risk is required, 16.2Gy has an estimated risk of only 2.5%. Other volumes and fractionations are also reviewed; for all analyzed high-risk small bowel limits, the risk is 8.2% or less, and the low-risk limits have 4% or lower estimated risk. The results support current clinical practice, with some possibility for dose escalation. PMID:27000513

  11. Protective Effects of Ibuprofen and L-Carnitine Against Whole Body Gamma Irradiation-Induced Duodenal Mucosal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meryem Akpolat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ibuprofen and L-carnitine have been demonstrated to provide radioprotective activity to the hamster against whole body sublethal irradiation. The purpose of this study is to test those antioxidant drugs, each of which has the capacity of inhibiting mucosal injury, as topical radioprotectants for the intestine. Material and Methods: The male hamsters were divided into the following four groups (n=6: group 1: control group, received saline, 1 ml/100 g by gavage, as placebo. Group 2: irradiated-control group, received whole body irradiation of 8 Gy as a single dose plus physiological saline. The animals in groups 3 and 4 were given a daily dose of 10 mg/kg of ibuprofen and 50 mg/kg of L-carnitine for 15 days respectively, before irradiation with a single dose of 8 Gy. Twenty-four hours after radiation exposure, the hamsters were sacrificed and samples were taken from the duodenum, and the histopatological determinations were carried out. Results: Morphologically, examination of the gamma irradiated duodenum revealed the presence of shortening and thickening of villi and flattening of enterocytes, massive subepithelial lifting. Pretreatment of ibuprofen and L-carnitine with irradiation reduced these histopathological changes. Conclusion: Ibuprofen and L-carnitine administrated by the oral route may be a good radioprotector against small intestinal damage in patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  12. Early administration of IL-6RA does not prevent radiation-induced lung injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation pneumonia and subsequent radiation lung fibrosis are major dose-limiting complications for patients undergoing thoracic radiotherapy. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pleiotropic cytokine and plays important roles in the regulation of immune response and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether anti-IL-6 monoclonal receptor antibody (IL-6RA) could ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury in mice. BALB/cAnNCrj mice having received thoracic irradiation of 21 Gy were injected intraperitoneally with IL-6RA (MR16-1) or control rat IgG twice, immediately and seven days after irradiation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to examine the plasma level of IL-6 and serum amyloid A (SAA). Lung injury was assessed by histological staining with haematoxylin and eosin or Azan, measuring lung weight, and hydroxyproline. The mice treated with IL-6RA did not survive significantly longer than the rat IgG control. We observed marked up-regulation of IL-6 in mice treated with IL-6RA 150 days after irradiation, whereas IL-6RA temporarily suppressed early radiation-induced increase in the IL-6 release level. Histopathologic assessment showed no differences in lung section or lung weight between mice treated with IL-6RA and control. Our findings suggest that early treatment with IL-6RA after irradiation alone does not protect against radiation-induced lung injury

  13. Early administration of IL-6RA does not prevent radiation-induced lung injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoue Takehiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation pneumonia and subsequent radiation lung fibrosis are major dose-limiting complications for patients undergoing thoracic radiotherapy. Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine and plays important roles in the regulation of immune response and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether anti-IL-6 monoclonal receptor antibody (IL-6RA could ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury in mice. Methods BALB/cAnNCrj mice having received thoracic irradiation of 21 Gy were injected intraperitoneally with IL-6RA (MR16-1 or control rat IgG twice, immediately and seven days after irradiation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to examine the plasma level of IL-6 and serum amyloid A (SAA. Lung injury was assessed by histological staining with haematoxylin and eosin or Azan, measuring lung weight, and hydroxyproline. Results The mice treated with IL-6RA did not survive significantly longer than the rat IgG control. We observed marked up-regulation of IL-6 in mice treated with IL-6RA 150 days after irradiation, whereas IL-6RA temporarily suppressed early radiation-induced increase in the IL-6 release level. Histopathologic assessment showed no differences in lung section or lung weight between mice treated with IL-6RA and control. Conclusions Our findings suggest that early treatment with IL-6RA after irradiation alone does not protect against radiation-induced lung injury.

  14. The simple exposure dose calculation method in interventional radiology and one case of radiation injury (alopecia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interventional radiology (IVR) is less invasive than surgery, and has rapidly become widespread due to advances in instruments and X-ray apparatuses. However, radiation exposure of long-time fluoroscopy induces the risk of radiation injury. We estimated the exposure dose in the patient who underwent IVR therapy and developed radiation injury (alopecia). The patient outcome and the method of estimating the exposure dose are reported. The estimation method of exposure dose was roughly estimated by real-time expose dose during exam. It is a useful indicator for the operator to know the exposure dose during IVR. We, radiological technologist must to know call attention to the role of radiological technicians during IVR. (author)

  15. Comparative proteomic profiling and possible toxicological mechanism of acute injury induced by carbon ion radiation in pubertal mice testes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong

    2016-07-01

    We investigated potential mechanisms of acute injury in pubertal mice testes after exposure to carbon ion radiation (CIR). Serum testosterone was measured following whole-body irradiation with a 2Gy carbon ion beam. Comparative proteomic profiling and Western blotting were applied to identify potential biomarkers and measure protein expression, and terminal dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) was performed to detect apoptotic cells. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were used to investigate protein localization. Serum testosterone was lowest at 24h after CIR, and 10 differentially expressed proteins were identified at this time point that included eIF4E, an important regulator of initiation that combines with mTOR and 4EBP1 to control protein synthesis via the mTOR signalling pathway during proliferation and apoptosis. Protein expression and localization studies confirmed their association with acute injury following exposure to CIR. These three proteins may be useful molecular markers for detecting abnormal spermatogenesis following exposure to environmental and cosmic radiation

  16. The high frequency acoustic radiation from the boundary layer of an axisymmetric body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fuxin; MA Lin; MA Zhiming

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of acoustic radiation from the boundary layer of an axisymmetric body is analyzed, and its sound pressure spectrum is predicted. It is shown that the acoustic radiation results from the transition region and the turbulent boundary layer; and that the acoustic radiation from transition region is predominant at low frequencies; while the turbulent boundary layer has the decisive effect on acoustic radiation at high frequencies. The calculated values are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Normal Tissue Protectors Against Radiation Injury (Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Uma Devi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiation damages normal tissues that can adversely affect the success of cancer radiotherapy, safety of nuclear installation workers and military personnel, and public exposed to nuclear accidents. Certain chemicals are able to protect against the harmful effects of radiation. But more than 50 years of research has produced only one approved radioprotective drug, WR-2721 or amifostine. The general utility of WR-2721 is limited by its inherent toxicity and high cost. Efforts to find non-toxic radioprotectors have revealed the promising properties of some medicinal plants. This is an attempt to review the recent publications on radioprotectors and to identify the research needs relevant to developing countries.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(2, pp.105-112, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.829

  18. Pyruvate metabolism: A therapeutic opportunity in radiation-induced skin injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hyun; Kang, Jeong Wook [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Won [Department of Plastic Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sang Ho [Department of Dermatology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sil [College of Pharmacy & Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewah Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun-Jung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jaeho, E-mail: jjhmd@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-08

    Ionizing radiation is used to treat a range of cancers. Despite recent technological progress, radiation therapy can damage the skin at the administration site. The specific molecular mechanisms involved in this effect have not been fully characterized. In this study, the effects of pyruvate, on radiation-induced skin injury were investigated, including the role of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2) signaling pathway. Next generation sequencing (NGS) identified a wide range of gene expression differences between the control and irradiated mice, including reduced expression of PDK2. This was confirmed using Q-PCR. Cell culture studies demonstrated that PDK2 overexpression and a high cellular pyruvate concentration inhibited radiation-induced cytokine expression. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated radiation-induced skin thickening and gene expression changes. Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness and inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicated that regulation of the pyruvate metabolic pathway could provide an effective approach to the control of radiation-induced skin damage. - Highlights: • The effects of radiation on skin thickness in mice. • Next generation sequencing revealed that radiation inhibited pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 expression. • PDK2 inhibited irradiation-induced cytokine gene expression. • Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness.

  19. Possibilities and methods for biochemical assessment of radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensitive review (77 references) is made of the application of biochemical diagnostic methods for assessment of radiation diseases. A brief characteristics of several biochemical indicators is given: deoxycytidine, thymidine, ρ-aminoisocarboxylic acid, DNA-ase, nucleic acids. Influence of such factors as age, sex, season etc. is studied by means of functional biochemical indicators as: creatine, triptophanic metabolites, 5-hydroxy-indolacetic acid, biogenic amines, serum proteins, enzymes, etc

  20. Therapy of radiation injuries of the rat marginal periodontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of different consistencies of food and of ionizing radiations on the marginal periodontium of female Wistar rats was studied. Microorganisms play an important part in the development of inflammatory histological reactions. Chlorhexidine and metronidazole treatment, resp., revealed a favourable effect on the inflammatory alterations of the periodontium. The evaluation was based on semiquantitative identification of plaques as well as on histological investigations of the interdental col and of the subepithelial connective tissue

  1. Radiobiological mechanisms of stereotactic body radiation therapy and stereotactic radiation surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Kim, Won Woo; Park, In Hwan; Kim, Hee Jong; Lee, Eun Jin; Jung, Jae Hoon [Research Center for Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Lawrence Chin Soo; Song, Chang W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Despite the increasing use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) in recent years, the biological base of these high-dose hypo-fractionated radiotherapy modalities has been elusive. Given that most human tumors contain radioresistant hypoxic tumor cells, the radiobiological principles for the conventional multiple-fractionated radiotherapy cannot account for the high efficacy of SBRT and SRS. Recent emerging evidence strongly indicates that SBRT and SRS not only directly kill tumor cells, but also destroy the tumor vascular beds, thereby deteriorating intratumor microenvironment leading to indirect tumor cell death. Furthermore, indications are that the massive release of tumor antigens from the tumor cells directly and indirectly killed by SBRT and SRS stimulate anti-tumor immunity, thereby suppressing recurrence and metastatic tumor growth. The reoxygenation, repair, repopulation, and redistribution, which are important components in the response of tumors to conventional fractionated radiotherapy, play relatively little role in SBRT and SRS. The linear-quadratic model, which accounts for only direct cell death has been suggested to overestimate the cell death by high dose per fraction irradiation. However, the model may in some clinical cases incidentally do not overestimate total cell death because high-dose irradiation causes additional cell death through indirect mechanisms. For the improvement of the efficacy of SBRT and SRS, further investigation is warranted to gain detailed insights into the mechanisms underlying the SBRT and SRS.

  2. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  3. Adaptive Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Planning for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Yujiao [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Zhang, Fan [Occupational and Environmental Safety Office, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yin, Fang-Fang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai, Jing, E-mail: jing.cai@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of adaptive planning on lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Forty of 66 consecutive lung SBRT patients were selected for a retrospective adaptive planning study. CBCT images acquired at each fraction were used for treatment planning. Adaptive plans were created using the same planning parameters as the original CT-based plan, with the goal to achieve comparable comformality index (CI). For each patient, 2 cumulative plans, nonadaptive plan (P{sub NON}) and adaptive plan (P{sub ADP}), were generated and compared for the following organs-at-risks (OARs): cord, esophagus, chest wall, and the lungs. Dosimetric comparison was performed between P{sub NON} and P{sub ADP} for all 40 patients. Correlations were evaluated between changes in dosimetric metrics induced by adaptive planning and potential impacting factors, including tumor-to-OAR distances (d{sub T-OAR}), initial internal target volume (ITV{sub 1}), ITV change (ΔITV), and effective ITV diameter change (Δd{sub ITV}). Results: 34 (85%) patients showed ITV decrease and 6 (15%) patients showed ITV increase throughout the course of lung SBRT. Percentage ITV change ranged from −59.6% to 13.0%, with a mean (±SD) of −21.0% (±21.4%). On average of all patients, P{sub ADP} resulted in significantly (P=0 to .045) lower values for all dosimetric metrics. Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} was found to correlate with changes in dose to 5 cc (ΔD5cc) of esophagus (r=0.61) and dose to 30 cc (ΔD30cc) of chest wall (r=0.81). Stronger correlations between Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} and ΔD30cc of chest wall were discovered for peripheral (r=0.81) and central (r=0.84) tumors, respectively. Conclusions: Dosimetric effects of adaptive lung SBRT planning depend upon target volume changes and tumor-to-OAR distances. Adaptive lung SBRT can potentially reduce dose to adjacent OARs if patients present large tumor volume shrinkage during the treatment.

  4. Radiation injuries to bones of the thorax after irradiation of carcinoma of the breast and lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the state of 396 patients undergoing radiotherapy for carcinoma of the breast and carcinoma of the lung gave the following results. During treatment of carcinoma of the breast, radiation injuries, mainly of the ribs and clavicle, were found in 11 of 158 patients treated (7.0 +/- 2.0 percent), more frequently after x-ray therapy (in nine of 70 cases, 12.9 +/- 4.0 percent). In the case of x-ray therapy, the minimal focal dose causing radiation injury to bone was 4,500 rads. The larger the dose and the shorter the course of treatment, the more frequently these changes were found. During treatment of carcinoma of the lung, radiation injuries were discovered in the ribs in ten patients and in the spine in one (of 238 patients treated). The frequency was 4.6 +/- 1.4 percent. They occurred after treatment on a linear accelerator with a frequency of 5.1 +/- 1.6 percent, and after treatment on the γ-ray apparatus in 1 of 27 patients. The minimal focal dose causing injury to bone when a linear accelerator was used was 5,000 rad. If the skin above the region of injury remained intact, clinical manifestations of the lesion were minimal. Repeated observations over a course of several years showed that the changes developed slowly and that consolidation of a radiation fracture can take place. On the whole, the course of the process is directly dependent on the size of the dose given

  5. Sequential changes of lamellar body hydrolases during ozone-induced alveolar injury and repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glew, R.H.; Basu, A.; Shelley, S.A.; Paterson, J.F.; Diven, W.F.; Montgomery, M.R.; Balis, J.U.

    1989-05-01

    Lamellar body hydrolases in acutely damaged and regenerating type II cells were determined using an established rat model with well-defined stages of bronchiolo-alveolar injury and repair. Lamellar bodies were isolated from control and ozone-exposed (3.0 ppm for 8 hours) adult male rats by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and analyzed for their content of six different lysosomal hydrolases. Immediately after 3 ppm ozone exposure (zero-time) there was a significant decrease in specific enzyme activity (units/mg protein) of five lamellar body hydrolases and these activities remained depressed for at least 24 hours after exposure. In addition, total enzyme activity (units/lung) was reduced at zero-time for beta-hexosaminidase and at 24 hours postexposure for alpha-mannosidase and alpha-L-fucosidase. During the reparative and recovery stages (48 to 96 hours) the hydrolases demonstrated variable elevations in both specific activity and total activity (units/lung). Characteristically, beta-hexosaminidase and beta-galactosidase reached supranormal values at 96 hours, whereas alpha-mannosidase remained below normal levels through the recovery stage. Moreover, at 24 to 48 hours the lamellar body fraction demonstrated prominent enzyme depletion relative to the expanding pool of stored surfactant. It is concluded that acute ozone stress initiates the development of hydrolase deficiency within the lamellar bodies of injured and regenerating type II cells. This deficiency state is followed by asynchronous lamellar body hydrolase elevations that reflect distinct patterns of response rather than uniform return to normal condition. The lysosomal enzyme changes of lamellar bodies may be pathogenetically linked to the development of associated alterations in the storage and secretion of surfactant.

  6. On the thermodynamics of the conversion of partially polarized black-body radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Badescu, V.

    1992-01-01

    This paper considers a model consisting of : (i) a source of partially polarized black-body radiation (the pump), (ii) a thermally radiative or non-radiative ambient sink and (iii) two energy converters. The first converter (RH) transforms the energy of the black-body radiation into heat, while the second one (HW) (which has a non-zero entropy generation rate) uses that heat to produce work. The entropy-generation rates in the two converters are non-negative only when some conditions are sati...

  7. Effects of radiation on stability of triangular equilibrium points in elliptic restricted three body problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutan Singh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the stability of triangular Lagrangian points in the elliptical restricted three body problem, under the effect of radiation pressure stemming from the more massive primary on the infinitesimal. We adopted a set of rotating pulsating axes centered at the centre of mass of the two primaries Sun and Jupiter. We have exploited method of averaging used by Grebenikov, throughout the analysis of stability of the system. The critical mass ratio depends on the radiation pressure, eccentricity and the range of stability decreases as the radiation parameter increases.   Keywords: Dynamical system, elliptical restricted three body problems, lagrangian points, radiation pressure, and stability.

  8. Traumatic endophthalmitis following penetrating ocular injuries with retained intraocular foreign bodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜彩辉; 张卯年

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the outcome and analyze the methods of surgical treatment of traumatic endophthalmitis following penetrating eye injuries with retained eye foreign bodies.Methods: A total of 62 consecutive cases (58 men, 4 women) from January 1999 to December 2001 with IOFBs following penetrating eye injuries were retrospectively studied. The ages ranged from 8 to 46 years (mean 23 years). Sixty patients (63 eyes) underwent pars plana vitreotomy and 1 patient underwent external magnet extraction. The follow-up ranged from 3 to 36 months (mean 12.5 months). Results: Ten eyes developed endophthalmitis, among which 7 (10.94%) were diagnosed preoperatively. The most frequently cultured organism was Staphylococcus epidermis (44.44%, 4/9). Postoperatively, retinal detachment due to vitreoretinal proliferation occurred in 5 patients with endophthalmitis and in 9 patients without endophthalmitis. All the retinal detachments were reattached with additional vitreoretinal surgery. Two eyes with endophthalmitis and two without endophthalmitis were eviscerated.Conclusions: Post-traumatic endophthalmitis with intraocular foreign bodies (IOFBs) deserves great attention because of its high incidence and poor prognosis. Vitrectomy is suggested for the treatment of IOFBs and its complications, and it should be performed as soon as possible. Routine intravenous administration of antibiotics combined with periocular injection and topical antibiotics postoperatively are recommended.

  9. Evaluation of lumbar vertebra injury risk to the seated human body when exposed to vertical vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayari, H.; Thomas, M.; Doré, S.; Serrus, O.

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this research is to numerically determine the levels of vibration not to exceed accordingly to the corresponding dynamic stresses in the lumbar rachis when exposed to whole-body vibrations in order to identify the risk of adverse health effect to which professional heavy equipment drivers are particularly prone. A parametric finite element model of the lumbar rachis is generated in order to compute the modal parameters, the dynamic stresses and forces under harmonic excitations in a seated posture. The stress analysis reveals that the areas exposed to the highest fracture risk are the cancellous bone of the vertebral body as well as the vertebral endplate when vertical vibrations are transmitted from a seat to the lumbar spine of a driver. An injury risk factor has been developed in order to estimate the risk of adverse health effect arising from mechanical vibrations. It is shown that the injury risk factor increases with the age and consequently that the excitation amplitude must be limited to lower levels when age increases.

  10. Prevention and Treatment of Functional and Structural Radiation Injury in the Rat Heart by Pentoxifylline and Alpha-Tocopherol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a severe side effect of thoracic radiotherapy. This study examined the effects of pentoxifylline (PTX) and α-tocopherol on cardiac injury in a rat model of RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats received fractionated local heart irradiation with a daily dose of 9 Gy for 5 days and were observed for 6 months after irradiation. Rats were treated with a combination of PTX, 100 mg/kg/day, and α-tocopherol (20 IU/kg/day) and received these compounds either from 1 week before until 6 months after irradiation or starting 3 months after irradiation, a time point at which histopathologic changes become apparent in our model of RIHD. Results: Radiation-induced increases in left ventricular diastolic pressure (in mm Hg: 35 ± 6 after sham-irradiation, 82 ± 11 after irradiation) were significantly reduced by PTX and α-tocopherol (early treatment: 48 ± 7; late treatment: 53 ± 6). PTX and α-tocopherol significantly reduced deposition of collagen types I (radiation only: 3.5 ± 0.2 μm2 per 100 μm2; early treatment: 2.7 ± 0.8; late treatment: 2.2 ± 0.2) and III (radiation only: 13.9 ± 0.8; early treatment: 11.0 ± 1.2; late treatment: 10.6 ± 0.8). On the other hand, radiation-induced alterations in heart/body weight ratios, myocardial degeneration, left ventricular mast cell densities, and most echocardiographic parameters were not significantly altered by PTX and α-tocopherol. Conclusions: Treatment with PTX and α-tocopherol may have beneficial effects on radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular function, both when started before irradiation and when started later during the process of RIHD

  11. New strategies for the prevention of radiation injury. Possible implications for countering radiation hazards of long-term space travel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed, T.; Kumar, S.; Whitnall, M. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States). Radiation Casualty Management] [and others

    2002-12-01

    New strategies for the prevention of radiation injuries are currently being explored with the ultimate aim of developing globally radioprotective, nontoxic pharmacologics. The prophylactic treatments under review encompass such diverse pharmacologic classes as novel immunomodulators, nutritional antioxidants, and cytokines. An immunomodulator that shows promise is 5-androstenediol (AED), a well-tolerated, long-acting and rostene steroid with broad-spectrum radioprotective attributes that include not only protection against acute tissue injury, but also reduced susceptibility to infectious agents, as well as reduced rates of neoplastic transformation. Other potentially useful radioprotectants currently under study include the nutraceutical vitamin E and analogs, a chemically-engineered cytokine, interleukin-1{beta}, and a sustained-release formulation of an aminothiol, amifostine. Results suggest that a new paradigm is evolving for the prophylaxes of radiation injuries, based on use of newly identified, nontoxic, broad-spectrum prophylactic agents whose protective action may be leveraged by subsequent postexposure use of cytokines with organ-specific reparative functions. (author)

  12. Visual assessment of the radiation distribution in the ISS Lab module: visualization in the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saganti, P. B.; Zapp, E. N.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    The US Lab module of the International Space Station (ISS) is a primary working area where the crewmembers are expected to spend majority of their time. Because of the directionality of radiation fields caused by the Earth shadow, trapped radiation pitch angle distribution, and inherent variations in the ISS shielding, a model is needed to account for these local variations in the radiation distribution. We present the calculated radiation dose (rem/yr) values for over 3,000 different points in the working area of the Lab module and estimated radiation dose values for over 25,000 different points in the human body for a given ambient radiation environment. These estimated radiation dose values are presented in a three dimensional animated interactive visualization format. Such interactive animated visualization of the radiation distribution can be generated in near real-time to track changes in the radiation environment during the orbit precession of the ISS.

  13. [Effect of ionizing radiation on the living body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    Since the Fukushima nuclear plant accident following the great East Japan earthquake on March 11, 2011, we have been warned to be careful about possible radiation exposure almost every day in newspapers and on TV. Radioactive iodine ((131)I) and cesium ((134)Cs, (137)Cs) produced by nuclear reactions were released into the air during and after the accident, and have been scattered by the winds in Tohoku and in the Kanto district. Even today, 2 years after the accident, there is great public concern about possible pollution of foodstuffs and fishery products with radioactive cesium, not only in Japan, but also in other countries. On the other hand, decontamination work has been proceeding, including removal of contaminated soil near the accident site. Since the accident, many media reports have continued to tell us only that current dose levels of radiation are not dangerous to human health. But, many people are not satisfied with such vague statements, and want to understand the situation in more detail. So, it is important to provide basic education about the effects of radiation to the general public. I am a professor of the Department of Radiation Biosciences at Tokyo University of Science, and so I am very familiar with radiation and its dangers. So, in my lecture today, we would like to explain the effects of radiation and put the present situation into perspective, so that people will better understand the risks, and not be unnecessarily afraid.

  14. Advances of imaging on differential diagnosis between recurrence of glioma and radiation-induced brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differentiating recurrence of glioma from radiation-induced brain injury is a central challenge in neuro-oncology. The 2 very different outcomes after brain tumor treatment often appear similar on traditional imaging studies. They may even manifest with similar clinical symptoms. Distinguishing treatment injury from tumor recurrence is crucial for diagnosis and treatment planning. In this article, we reviewed the latest developments and key findings from research studies exploring the efficacy of structural and functional imaging modalities in differentiating treatment injury from tumor recurrence with DWI, MRS, DCE-MR, DSC-MR, PET, and SPECT. And we discussed the advantages and disadvantages of each approach to provide useful information for making proper diagnosis and treatment planning. (authors)

  15. Probabilities of Radiation Myelopathy Specific to Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to Guide Safe Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Weinberg, Vivian [University of California San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center Biostatistics Core, San Francisco, California (United States); Ma, Lijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Chang, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California and University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Chao, Sam [Department of Radiation Oncology and Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Muacevic, Alexander [European Cyberknife Center Munich in affiliation with University Hospitals of Munich, Munich (Germany); Gorgulho, Alessandra [Department of Neurosurgery, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Soltys, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Gerszten, Peter C. [Departments of Neurological Surgery and Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ryu, Sam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Angelov, Lilyana [Department of Radiation Oncology and Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Gibbs, Iris [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Wong, C. Shun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Larson, David A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Dose-volume histogram (DVH) results for 9 cases of post spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) radiation myelopathy (RM) are reported and compared with a cohort of 66 spine SBRT patients without RM. Methods and Materials: DVH data were centrally analyzed according to the thecal sac point maximum (Pmax) volume, 0.1- to 1-cc volumes in increments of 0.1 cc, and to the 2 cc volume. 2-Gy biologically equivalent doses (nBED) were calculated using an {alpha}/{beta} = 2 Gy (units = Gy{sub 2/2}). For the 2 cohorts, the nBED means and distributions were compared using the t test and Mann-Whitney test, respectively. Significance (P<.05) was defined as concordance of both tests at each specified volume. A logistic regression model was developed to estimate the probability of RM using the dose distribution for a given volume. Results: Significant differences in both the means and distributions at the Pmax and up to the 0.8-cc volume were observed. Concordant significance was greatest for the Pmax volume. At the Pmax volume the fit of the logistic regression model, summarized by the area under the curve, was 0.87. A risk of RM of 5% or less was observed when limiting the thecal sac Pmax volume doses to 12.4 Gy in a single fraction, 17.0 Gy in 2 fractions, 20.3 Gy in 3 fractions, 23.0 Gy in 4 fractions, and 25.3 Gy in 5 fractions. Conclusion: We report the first logistic regression model yielding estimates for the probability of human RM specific to SBRT.

  16. An athymic rat model of cutaneous radiation injury designed to study human tissue-based wound therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe a pilot study for a novel preclinical model used to test human tissue-based therapies in the setting of cutaneous radiation injury. A protocol was designed to irradiate the skin of athymic rats while sparing the body and internal organs by utilizing a non-occlusive skin clamp along with an x-ray image guided stereotactic irradiator. Each rat was irradiated both on the right and the left flank with a circular field at a 20 cm source-to-surface distance (SSD). Single fractions of 30.4 Gy, 41.5 Gy, 52.6 Gy, 65.5 Gy, and 76.5 Gy were applied in a dose-finding trial. Eight additional wounds were created using the 41.5 Gy dose level. Each wound was photographed and the percentage of the irradiated area ulcerated at given time points was analyzed using ImageJ software. No systemic or lethal sequelae occurred in any animals, and all irradiated skin areas in the multi-dose trial underwent ulceration. Greater than 60% of skin within each irradiated zone underwent ulceration within ten days, with peak ulceration ranging from 62.1% to 79.8%. Peak ulceration showed a weak correlation with radiation dose (r = 0.664). Mean ulceration rate over the study period is more closely correlated to dose (r = 0.753). With the highest dose excluded due to contraction-related distortions, correlation between dose and average ulceration showed a stronger relationship (r = 0.895). Eight additional wounds created using 41.5 Gy all reached peak ulceration above 50%, with all healing significantly but incompletely by the 65-day endpoint. We developed a functional preclinical model which is currently used to evaluate human tissue-based therapies in the setting of cutaneous radiation injury. Similar models may be widely applicable and useful the development of novel therapies which may improve radiotherapy management over a broad clinical spectrum

  17. Protective effects of alpha lipoic acid on radiation-induced salivary gland injury in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Kim, Kyung Mi; Jung, Myeong Hee; Jung, Jung Hwa; Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Park, Jung Je; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radiation therapy is a treatment for patients with head and neck (HN) cancer. However, radiation exposure to the HN often induces salivary gland (SG) dysfunction. We investigated the effect of α-lipoic acid (ALA) on radiation-induced SG injury in rats. Results ALA preserved acinoductal integrity and acinar cell secretary function following irradiation. These results are related to the mechanisms by which ALA inhibits oxidative stress by inhibiting gp91 mRNA and 8-OHdG expression and apoptosis of acinar cells and ductal cells by inactivating MAPKs in the early period and expression of inflammation-related factors including NF-κB, IκB-α, and TGF-β1 and fibrosis in late irradiated SG. ALA effects began in the acute phase and persisted for at least 56 days after irradiation. Materials and Methods Rats were assigned to followings: control, ALA only (100 mg/kg, i.p.), irradiated, and ALA administered 24 h and 30 min prior to irradiation. The neck area including the SG was evenly irradiated with 2 Gy per minute (total dose, 18 Gy) using a photon 6-MV linear accelerator. Rats were killed at 4, 7, 28, and 56 days after radiation. Conclusions Our results show that ALA could be used to ameliorate radiation-induced SG injury in patients with HN cancer. PMID:27072584

  18. "It's all about acceptance": A qualitative study exploring a model of positive body image for people with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, K Alysse; Gammage, Kimberley L; van Ingen, Cathy; Ditor, David S

    2015-09-01

    Using modified constructivist grounded theory, the purpose of the present study was to explore positive body image experiences in people with spinal cord injury. Nine participants (five women, four men) varying in age (21-63 years), type of injury (C3-T7; complete and incomplete), and years post-injury (4-36 years) were recruited. The following main categories were found: body acceptance, body appreciation and gratitude, social support, functional gains, independence, media literacy, broadly conceptualizing beauty, inner positivity influencing outer demeanour, finding others who have a positive body image, unconditional acceptance from others, religion/spirituality, listening to and taking care of the body, managing secondary complications, minimizing pain, and respect. Interestingly, there was consistency in positive body image characteristics reported in this study with those found in previous research, demonstrating universality of positive body image. However, unique characteristics (e.g., resilience, functional gains, independence) were also reported demonstrating the importance of exploring positive body image in diverse groups.

  19. "It's all about acceptance": A qualitative study exploring a model of positive body image for people with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, K Alysse; Gammage, Kimberley L; van Ingen, Cathy; Ditor, David S

    2015-09-01

    Using modified constructivist grounded theory, the purpose of the present study was to explore positive body image experiences in people with spinal cord injury. Nine participants (five women, four men) varying in age (21-63 years), type of injury (C3-T7; complete and incomplete), and years post-injury (4-36 years) were recruited. The following main categories were found: body acceptance, body appreciation and gratitude, social support, functional gains, independence, media literacy, broadly conceptualizing beauty, inner positivity influencing outer demeanour, finding others who have a positive body image, unconditional acceptance from others, religion/spirituality, listening to and taking care of the body, managing secondary complications, minimizing pain, and respect. Interestingly, there was consistency in positive body image characteristics reported in this study with those found in previous research, demonstrating universality of positive body image. However, unique characteristics (e.g., resilience, functional gains, independence) were also reported demonstrating the importance of exploring positive body image in diverse groups. PMID:26002149

  20. Estimated Risk Level of Unified Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Dose Tolerance Limits for Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Jimm; Sahgal, Arjun; Soltys, Scott G; Luxton, Gary; Patel, Ashish; Herbert, Scott; Xue, Jinyu; Ma, Lijun; Yorke, Ellen; Adler, John R; Gibbs, Iris C

    2016-04-01

    A literature review of more than 200 stereotactic body radiation therapy spine articles from the past 20 years found only a single article that provided dose-volume data and outcomes for each spinal cord of a clinical dataset: the Gibbs 2007 article (Gibbs et al, 2007(1)), which essentially contains the first 100 stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) spine treatments from Stanford University Medical Center. The dataset is modeled and compared in detail to the rest of the literature review, which found 59 dose tolerance limits for the spinal cord in 1-5 fractions. We partitioned these limits into a unified format of high-risk and low-risk dose tolerance limits. To estimate the corresponding risk level of each limit we used the Gibbs 2007 clinical spinal cord dose-volume data for 102 spinal metastases in 74 patients treated by spinal radiosurgery. In all, 50 of the patients were previously irradiated to a median dose of 40Gy in 2-3Gy fractions and 3 patients developed treatment-related myelopathy. These dose-volume data were digitized into the dose-volume histogram (DVH) Evaluator software tool where parameters of the probit dose-response model were fitted using the maximum likelihood approach (Jackson et al, 1995(3)). Based on this limited dataset, for de novo cases the unified low-risk dose tolerance limits yielded an estimated risk of spinal cord injury of ≤1% in 1-5 fractions, and the high-risk limits yielded an estimated risk of ≤3%. The QUANTEC Dmax limits of 13Gy in a single fraction and 20Gy in 3 fractions had less than 1% risk estimated from this dataset, so we consider these among the low-risk limits. In the previously irradiated cohort, the estimated risk levels for 10 and 14Gy maximum cord dose limits in 5 fractions are 0.4% and 0.6%, respectively. Longer follow-up and more patients are required to improve the risk estimates and provide more complete validation. PMID:27000514

  1. Estimated Risk Level of Unified Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Dose Tolerance Limits for Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Jimm; Sahgal, Arjun; Soltys, Scott G; Luxton, Gary; Patel, Ashish; Herbert, Scott; Xue, Jinyu; Ma, Lijun; Yorke, Ellen; Adler, John R; Gibbs, Iris C

    2016-04-01

    A literature review of more than 200 stereotactic body radiation therapy spine articles from the past 20 years found only a single article that provided dose-volume data and outcomes for each spinal cord of a clinical dataset: the Gibbs 2007 article (Gibbs et al, 2007(1)), which essentially contains the first 100 stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) spine treatments from Stanford University Medical Center. The dataset is modeled and compared in detail to the rest of the literature review, which found 59 dose tolerance limits for the spinal cord in 1-5 fractions. We partitioned these limits into a unified format of high-risk and low-risk dose tolerance limits. To estimate the corresponding risk level of each limit we used the Gibbs 2007 clinical spinal cord dose-volume data for 102 spinal metastases in 74 patients treated by spinal radiosurgery. In all, 50 of the patients were previously irradiated to a median dose of 40Gy in 2-3Gy fractions and 3 patients developed treatment-related myelopathy. These dose-volume data were digitized into the dose-volume histogram (DVH) Evaluator software tool where parameters of the probit dose-response model were fitted using the maximum likelihood approach (Jackson et al, 1995(3)). Based on this limited dataset, for de novo cases the unified low-risk dose tolerance limits yielded an estimated risk of spinal cord injury of ≤1% in 1-5 fractions, and the high-risk limits yielded an estimated risk of ≤3%. The QUANTEC Dmax limits of 13Gy in a single fraction and 20Gy in 3 fractions had less than 1% risk estimated from this dataset, so we consider these among the low-risk limits. In the previously irradiated cohort, the estimated risk levels for 10 and 14Gy maximum cord dose limits in 5 fractions are 0.4% and 0.6%, respectively. Longer follow-up and more patients are required to improve the risk estimates and provide more complete validation.

  2. Radiation flaw detector for testing non-uniform surface bodies of revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation flaw detector for testing bodies of revolution with non-uniform surface, welded joints, etc., based on spatial filtration and differentiation of ionizing radiation flux has been described. The calculation of the most important unit of flaw detector - integrators - is made. Experimental studies of the sensitivity have shown, that the radiation flaw detector can be used for rapid testing of products with the sensitivity comparable with the sensitivity of radiographic testing of steel

  3. A preclinical rodent model of radiation induced lung injury for medical countermeasure screening in accordance with the FDA animal rule

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Isabel L.; Xu, Puting; Hadley, Caroline; Katz, Barry P.; McGurk, Ross; Down, Julian D.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of pre-clinical murine model development is to establish that the pathophysiological outcome of our rodent model of radiation-induced lung injury is sufficiently representative of the anticipated pulmonary response in the human population. This objective is based on concerns that the C57BL/6J strain may not be the most appropriate preclinical model of lethal radiation lung injury in humans. In this study, we assessed this issue by evaluating the relationship between morbidity (pul...

  4. A case of radiation pulmonary injury simulating bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia following postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Toshiyuki; Iwata, Masaru; Yoshida, Norio; Katagiri, Akira; Takeda, Naoya [Kariya General Hospital, Aichi (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    A 57-year-old female underwent conservative surgery for a left sided breast cancer, and received 48 Gy postoperative radiation therapy. One year later, a chest CT scan disclosed bilateral patchy ground glass opacities. She had no subjective symptom. These abnormal opacities disappeared spontaneously without any treatment. We considered this was a radiation lung injury simulating bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia. We emphasize that the symptomless and spontaneous resolution of this type of lung injury should be kept is mind. (author)

  5. Radiation Injury Treatment Network®: Preparedness Through a Coalition of Cancer Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Cullen

    2016-08-01

    This article provides an overview of Radiation Injury Treatment Network® (RITN), its preparedness activities and capabilities, including training and educating over 11,500 hospital staff, coordinating over 500 exercises, developing treatment guidelines, developing standard operating procedures, and being recognized by the U.S. federal government as a national response asset. The RITN provides comprehensive evaluation and treatment for victims with marrow toxic injuries. Many of the casualties from the detonation of an improvised nuclear device (IND) (a.k.a. terrorist nuclear bomb) with only radiation injuries will be salvageable; however, they would require outpatient and/or inpatient care. Recognizing this, the U.S. National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP), U.S. Navy, and American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) collaboratively developed RITN, which comprises medical centers with expertise in the management of bone marrow failure. The medical community will undoubtedly be taxed by the resulting medical surge from an IND despite the well-defined United States emergency medical system, the National Disaster Medical System; however, one area that is unique for radiological disasters is the care for casualties with acute radiation syndrome. Hematologists and oncologists purposefully expose their cancer patients to high doses of radiation and toxic chemicals for chemotherapy as they treat their patients, resulting in symptoms not unlike casualties with exposure to ionizing radiation from a radiological disaster. This makes the staff from cancer centers ideal for the specialized care that will be required for thousands of casualties following a mass casualty radiological incident. The RITN is a model for how a collaborative effort can fill a readiness gap-through its network of 76 hospitals, blood donor centers, and cord blood banks, the RITN is preparing to provide outpatient care and specialized supportive care to up to 63,000 radiological casualties

  6. Anesthesia and monitoring during whole body radiation in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Nilsson, A; Hök, B;

    1990-01-01

    ) anesthetic technique using midazolam, pancuronium, and fentanyl. With midazolam as the only hypnotic agent, the problem with scavenging is solved, and a computer simulation of the plasma concentration of midazolam is presented. A modified stethoscope for monitoring during radiation also has been developed...

  7. Radiation-induced skin injury in the animal model of scleroderma: implications for post-radiotherapy fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Stephen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation therapy is generally contraindicated for cancer patients with collagen vascular diseases (CVD such as scleroderma due to an increased risk of fibrosis. The tight skin (TSK mouse has skin which, in some respects, mimics that of patients with scleroderma. The skin radiation response of TSK mice has not been previously reported. If TSK mice are shown to have radiation sensitive skin, they may prove to be a useful model to examine the mechanisms underlying skin radiation injury, protection, mitigation and treatment. Methods The hind limbs of TSK and parental control C57BL/6 mice received a radiation exposure sufficient to cause approximately the same level of acute injury. Endpoints included skin damage scored using a non-linear, semi-quantitative scale and tissue fibrosis assessed by measuring passive leg extension. In addition, TGF-β1 cytokine levels were measured monthly in skin tissue. Results Contrary to our expectations, TSK mice were more resistant (i.e. 20% to radiation than parental control mice. Although acute skin reactions were similar in both mouse strains, radiation injury in TSK mice continued to decrease with time such that several months after radiation there was significantly less skin damage and leg contraction compared to C57BL/6 mice (p Conclusion TSK mice are not recommended as a model of scleroderma involving radiation injury. The genetic and molecular basis for reduced radiation injury observed in TSK mice warrants further investigation particularly to identify mechanisms capable of reducing tissue fibrosis after radiation injury.

  8. The TGF-β/Smad repressor TG-interacting factor 1 (TGIF1 plays a role in radiation-induced intestinal injury independently of a Smad signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hneino

    Full Text Available Despite advances in radiation delivery protocols, exposure of normal tissues during the course of radiation therapy remains a limiting factor of cancer treatment. If the canonical TGF-β/Smad pathway has been extensively studied and implicated in the development of radiation damage in various organs, the precise modalities of its activation following radiation exposure remain elusive. In the present study, we hypothesized that TGF-β1 signaling and target genes expression may depend on radiation-induced modifications in Smad transcriptional co-repressors/inhibitors expressions (TGIF1, SnoN, Ski and Smad7. In endothelial cells (HUVECs and in a model of experimental radiation enteropathy in mice, radiation exposure increases expression of TGF-β/Smad pathway and of its target gene PAI-1, together with the overexpression of Smad co-repressor TGIF1. In mice, TGIF1 deficiency is not associated with changes in the expression of radiation-induced TGF-β pathway-related transcripts following localized small intestinal irradiation. In HUVECs, TGIF1 overexpression or silencing has no influence either on the radiation-induced Smad activation or the Smad3-dependent PAI-1 overexpression. However, TGIF1 genetic deficiency sensitizes mice to radiation-induced intestinal damage after total body or localized small intestinal radiation exposure, demonstrating that TGIF1 plays a role in radiation-induced intestinal injury. In conclusion, the TGF-β/Smad co-repressor TGIF1 plays a role in radiation-induced normal tissue damage by a Smad-independent mechanism.

  9. Stereotactic body radiation therapy versus conventional radiation therapy in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Stefan Starup; Schytte, Tine; Jensen, Henrik R;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is now an accepted and patient friendly treatment, but still controversy exists about its comparability to conventional radiation therapy (RT). The purpose of this single...... and SBRT predicted improved prognosis. However, staging procedure, confirmation procedure of recurrence and technical improvements of radiation treatment is likely to influence outcomes. However, SBRT seems to be as efficient as conventional RT and is a more convenient treatment for the patients....

  10. Pyruvate metabolism: A therapeutic opportunity in radiation-induced skin injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyun; Kang, Jeong Wook; Lee, Dong Won; Oh, Sang Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Eun-Jung; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-05-01

    Ionizing radiation is used to treat a range of cancers. Despite recent technological progress, radiation therapy can damage the skin at the administration site. The specific molecular mechanisms involved in this effect have not been fully characterized. In this study, the effects of pyruvate, on radiation-induced skin injury were investigated, including the role of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2) signaling pathway. Next generation sequencing (NGS) identified a wide range of gene expression differences between the control and irradiated mice, including reduced expression of PDK2. This was confirmed using Q-PCR. Cell culture studies demonstrated that PDK2 overexpression and a high cellular pyruvate concentration inhibited radiation-induced cytokine expression. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated radiation-induced skin thickening and gene expression changes. Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness and inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicated that regulation of the pyruvate metabolic pathway could provide an effective approach to the control of radiation-induced skin damage. PMID:25797627

  11. Radiation-Induced Testicular Injury and Its Amelioration by Tinospora cordifolia (An Indian Medicinal Plant Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this investigation is to determine the deleterious effects of sub lethal gamma radiation on testes and their possible inhibition by Tinospora cordifolia extract (TCE. For this purpose, one group of male Swiss albino mice was exposed to 7.5 Gy gamma radiation to serve as the irradiated control, while the other group received TCE (75 mg/kg b. wt./day orally for 5 consecutive days half an hr before irradiation to serve as experimental. Exposure of animals to 7.5 Gy gamma radiation resulted into significant decrease in body weight, tissue weight, testes- body weight ratio and tubular diameter up to 15 days of irradiation. Cent percent mortality was recorded by day 17th in irradiated control, whereas all animals survived in experimental group. TCE pretreatment rendered significant increase in body weight, tissue weight, testes- body weight ratio and tubular diameter at various intervals as compared to irradiated group. Radiation induced histological lesions in testicular architecture were observed more severe in irradiated control then the experimental. TCE administration before irradiation significantly ameliorated radiation induced elevation in lipid peroxidation and decline in glutathione concentration in testes. These observations indicate the radio- protective potential of Tinospora cordifolia root extract in testicular constituents against gamma irradiation in mice.

  12. Computation of radiation from wire antennas on conducting bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, N. Christian; Hansen, Jesper; Jensen, Niels E.

    1974-01-01

    A theoretical formulation, in terms of combined magnetic and electric field integral equations, is presented for the class of electromagnetic problems in which one or more wire antennas are connected to a conducting body of arbitrary shape. The formulation is suitable for numerical computation...

  13. Searches for skin injury-related genes induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review describes investigations concerning the skin and radiation exposure, and molecular effects of radiation on the skin partly based on authors' studies on searches in the title and for signaling cascade. Depending on the dose and its rate, radiation induces injuries like erythema, edema, alopecia, erosion, ulcer and cancer. Comprehensive analysis of the skin injury-related genes is now possible on the human genome chips (DNA micro-array) and on RNA/protein obtained from exposed epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts using such molecular biological means as reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern/Western blotting and cyto/histochemistry. Authors have actually revealed that mRNA of ATF3, which regulates the gene transcription, is increased depending on the dose in the exposed human keratinocytes, and ATF3 is accumulated in the nucleus. Authors have also studied the up- and down-streams of signaling cascade of ATF3 to show phosphorylations of p53 and H2AX at exposure to high dose radiation in cells above and in intact mouse. Basic findings in the skin like above can be useful in future for estimation of exposed dose and for risk assessment as well as the present hematological findings. (T.I)

  14. Computerized tomography versus perfusion lung scanning in canine radiation lung injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, I.H.; Logus, J.W.; El-Khatib, E.; Battista, J.J.; Ferri, H.; Lentle, B.C.; Man, G.C.; Man, S.F. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1990-03-01

    Computerized tomographic (CT) measurements of lung density were obtained before and serially after thoracic irradiation in dogs to detect the alterations caused by radiation therapy. Fourteen mongrel dogs were given either 2000 cGy (Group A, 10 dogs, right lower zone irradiation), 1000 cGy (Group B, 2 dogs, right lower zone irradiation), or 500 cGy (Group C, 2 dogs, right lung irradiation) in one fraction. Once before and bi-weekly after irradiation, the anesthetized dogs had thoracic CT scans. CT numbers for the irradiated area were compared to their preirradiation control values. Macro-aggregated albumin (MAA) perfusion lung scans were also obtained before and at weekly intervals after irradiation and were evaluated visually and quantitatively for abnormalities. When both these tests were abnormal, or at the end of the scheduled study, the dogs were sacrificed to confirm radiation lung injury histologically. Our results showed that CT numbers (as a measure of tissue density) were higher with higher doses of radiation. Among all the techniques used, only the quantitative assessment of macro-aggregated albumin perfusion scan detected abnormalities in all the dogs given 2000 cGy. Their abnormalities correlated well with the presence of radiation lung damage histologically, however, the applicability of these methods in the detection of early injury has to be further evaluated.

  15. GSN antibody pretreatment aggravates radiation-induced lung injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced lung injury is one of the main dose limiting factors for thoracic radiation therapy. Gelsolin (GSN) is a widespread, multifunctional regulator of cellular structure and metabolism. In this work, the roles of GSN in radiation-induced lung injury in Balb/c mice were studied. The GSN levels in plasma reduced progressively in 72 hours after irradiation, and then increased gradually. GSN contents in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid increased after thoracic irradiation, whereas mRNA levels of GSN in the lung tissue decreased significantly within 24 hours after irradiation and then increased again. Mice were intravenously injected with 50 μg GSN antibody 0.5 hour before 20 Gy of thoracic irradiation. GSN antibody pretreatment increased lung inflammation, protein concentration in the BAL fluid and leukocytes infiltration in the irradiated mice. The activities of superoxidase dismutase (SOD) in the plasma and the BAL fluid in irradiated mice injected with GSN antibody were less than that of control groups, whereas the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) increased. These results suggest that pretreatment of GSN antibody may aggravate radiation-induced pneumonitis. (authors)

  16. Location of alien bodies in a media according to the data of scattering gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locations of alien bodies in a medium are studied by the method of model experiment using scattering γ-radiation. 60Co and 137Cs were used as radiation sources. The scattering bodies were made in the form of aluminium, iron and lead cylinders of different diameters inserted inside hollow cylindrical water, aluminium and iron media. The cases are reviewed when the alien bodies are in the center of cylindrical media. The obtained data are presented in the graphical form and in the form of tables. 4 refs., 4 figs. 1 tab

  17. The effects of solar radiation and black body re-radiation on thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, Simon; Parsons, Ken

    2008-04-01

    When the sun shines on people in enclosed spaces, such as in buildings or vehicles, it directly affects thermal comfort. There is also an indirect effect as surrounding surfaces are heated exposing a person to re-radiation. This laboratory study investigated the effects of long wave re-radiation on thermal comfort, individually and when combined with direct solar radiation. Nine male participants (26.0 +/- 4.7 years) took part in three experimental sessions where they were exposed to radiation from a hot black panel heated to 100 degrees C; direct simulated solar radiation of 600 Wm(-2) and the combined simulated solar radiation and black panel radiation. Exposures were for 30 min, during which subjective responses and mean skin temperatures were recorded. The results showed that, at a surface temperature of 100 degrees C (close to maximum in practice), radiation from the flat black panel provided thermal discomfort but that this was relatively small when compared with the effects of direct solar radiation. It was concluded that re-radiation, from a dashboard in a vehicle, for example, will not have a major direct influence on thermal comfort and that existing models of thermal comfort do not require a specific modification. These results showed that, for the conditions investigated, the addition of re-radiation from internal components has an effect on thermal sensation when combined with direct solar radiation. However, it is not considered that it will be a major factor in a real world situation. This is because, in practice, dashboards are unlikely to maintain very high surface temperatures in vehicles without an unacceptably high air temperature. This study quantifies the contribution of short- and long-wave radiation to thermal comfort. The results will aid vehicle designers to have a better understanding of the complex radiation environment. These include direct radiation from the sun as well as re-radiation from the dashboard and other internal surfaces.

  18. Dose–Volume Metrics Associated With Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify dose–volume factors associated with radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 74 patients who underwent SBRT for primary lung cancer. The prescribed dose for SBRT was uniformly 48 Gy in four fractions at the isocenter. RP was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v.3. Symptomatic RP was defined as grade 2 or worse. Optimal cut-offs dividing the patient population into two subgroups based on the incidence of symptomatic RP were sought using the following dose–volume metrics: PTV volume (ml), mean lung dose (Gy), and V5, V10, V15, V20, V25, V30, V35, and V40 (%) of both lungs excluding the PTV. Results: With a median follow-up duration of 31.4 months, symptomatic RP was observed in 15 patients (20.3%), including 1 patient with grade 3. Optimal cut-offs for pulmonary dose–volume metrics were V25 and V20. These two factors were highly correlated with each other, and V25 was more significant. Symptomatic RP was observed in 14.8% of the patients with V25 <4.2%, and the rate was 46.2% in the remainder (p = 0.019). PTV volume was another significant factor. The symptomatic RP rate was significantly lower in the group with PTV <37.7 ml compared with the larger PTV group (11.1% vs. 34.5%, p = 0.020). The patients were divided into three subgroups (patients with PTV <37.7 ml; patients with, PTV ≥37.7 ml and V25 <4.2%; and patients with PTV ≥37.7 ml and V25 ≥4.2%); the incidence of RP grade 2 or worse was 11.1%, 23.5%, and 50.0%, respectively (p = 0.013). Conclusions: Lung V25 and PTV volume were significant factors associated with RP after SBRT.

  19. Development of Functional Foods for Body Protection Using Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously developed two herbal compositions(HemoHIM, HemoTonic) that protects immune/hematopoietic system and self-renewal tissues against radiation and enhances immune/hematopoietic functions. In this study, we tried to expand its usability by verifying its protective activity against various harmful stimuli as well as radiation. HemoHIM was shown to be highly effective in reducing immune/hematopoietic damage, particularly, normalizing the Th1/Th2 imbalance, which seemed to be a result of increased production of IL-12p70 by APC and enhanced NK cell activity. Also HemoHIM was shown to have protective activities against UV-induced skin damage, immune system damage by an anticancer drug (CP), immune depression by old age and stress, and inflammation. Finally it was confirmed in a human study that HemoHIM improves the immune cell functions and cytokine production. Based on these results, HemoHIM has been approved as a health functional food for immunomodulation by Korea FDA and succeeded in its industrialization. Meanwhile, to develop functional foods for the reduction of chronic radiation damage (carcinogenesis), we have screened natural products for inhibitory activities against carcinogenesis-related factors, and developed two anti-carcinogenic compositions. Also 6 single compounds were isolated and identified from radioprotective natural products and elucidated some synergistic protection by several single compounds and established a basis for the development of advanced technology for radioprotection. Also, to obtain the applicability of radiation technology for the safe sanitatation and distribution of functional food materials, we verified the toxicological safety, stability of activity and active components of irradiated medicinal herbs

  20. Development of Functional Foods for Body Protection Using Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, S. K.; Jung, U. H.; Park, H. R.

    2007-07-15

    We have previously developed two herbal compositions(HemoHIM, HemoTonic) that protects immune/hematopoietic system and self-renewal tissues against radiation and enhances immune/hematopoietic functions. In this study, we tried to expand its usability by verifying its protective activity against various harmful stimuli as well as radiation. HemoHIM was shown to be highly effective in reducing immune/hematopoietic damage, particularly, normalizing the Th1/Th2 imbalance, which seemed to be a result of increased production of IL-12p70 by APC and enhanced NK cell activity. Also HemoHIM was shown to have protective activities against UV-induced skin damage, immune system damage by an anticancer drug (CP), immune depression by old age and stress, and inflammation. Finally it was confirmed in a human study that HemoHIM improves the immune cell functions and cytokine production. Based on these results, HemoHIM has been approved as a health functional food for immunomodulation by Korea FDA and succeeded in its industrialization. Meanwhile, to develop functional foods for the reduction of chronic radiation damage (carcinogenesis), we have screened natural products for inhibitory activities against carcinogenesis-related factors, and developed two anti-carcinogenic compositions. Also 6 single compounds were isolated and identified from radioprotective natural products and elucidated some synergistic protection by several single compounds and established a basis for the development of advanced technology for radioprotection. Also, to obtain the applicability of radiation technology for the safe sanitatation and distribution of functional food materials, we verified the toxicological safety, stability of activity and active components of irradiated medicinal herbs

  1. A study of radiation-induced cerebral vascular injury in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Ye

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate radiation-induced carotid and cerebral vascular injury and its relationship with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC patients. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Fifty eight NPC patients with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis (TLN were recruited in the study. Duplex ultrasonography was used to scan bilateral carotid arterials to evaluate the intima-media thickness (IMT and occurrence of plaque formation. Flow velocities of bilateral middle cerebral arteries (MCAs, internal carotid arteries (ICAs and basal artery (BA were estimated through Transcranial Color Doppler (TCD. The results were compared with data from 33 patients who were free from radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis after radiotherapy and 29 healthy individuals. RESULTS: Significant differences in IMT, occurrence of plaques of ICAs and flow velocities of both MCAs and ICAs were found between patients after radiotherapy and healthy individuals (p<0.05. IMT had positive correlation with post radiation interval (p = 0.049. Compared with results from patients without radiation-induced TLN, the mean IMT was significantly thicker in patients with TLN (p<0.001. Plaques were more common in patients with TLN than patients without TLN (p = 0.038. In addition, flow velocities of MCAs and ICAs in patients with TLN were much faster (p<0.001, p<0.001. Among patients with unilateral TLN, flow velocity of MCAs was significantly different between ipsilateral and contralateral sides to the lesion (p = 0.001. CONCLUSION: Thickening of IMT, occurrence of plaque formation and hemodynamic abnormality are more common in patients after radiotherapy, especially in those with TLN, compared with healthy individuals.

  2. An experimental study on acute brain radiation injury: Dynamic changes in proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the correlation with histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui, E-mail: lihui@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Li, Jian-peng, E-mail: lijp@sysucc.org.cn [Department of Radiology, Dongguan People' s Hospital, Dongguan City (China); Lin, Cheng-guang, E-mail: linchg@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Xue-wen, E-mail: liuxw@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Geng, Zhi-jun, E-mail: gengzhj@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Mo, Yun-xian, E-mail: moyx@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Rong, E-mail: zhangr@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xie, Chuan-miao, E-mail: xchuanm@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation between the alterations of single-voxel {sup 1}H MRS and the histopathological characteristics of radiation brain injury following radiation. Materials and methods: Twenty-seven rabbits were randomized into nine groups to receive radiation with a single dose of 25 Gy. The observation time points included a pre-radiation and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 wk following radiation. Each treatment group underwent conventional MRI and single-voxel {sup 1}H MRS, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr) were observed over the region of interest, and the presence or absence of lactate (Lac) and lipid (Lip) was detected. Histological specimens of each group were obtained after image acquisition. Results: The values of Cho were significantly increased in the first 3 wk, and decreased over the following 5 wk after radiation. Levels of NAA showed a trend toward a decrease 5 wk after radiation. The levels of Cr were not changed between before and after radiation. The Cho/NAA metabolic ratio was significantly increased in weeks 6, 7, and 8 following irradiation, compared to pre-radiation values. Vascular and glial injury appeared on 2 wk after RT in the histology samples, until 4 wk after RT, necrosis of the oligodendrocytes, neuronal degeneration and demyelination could be observed. Conclusions: MRS is sensitive to detect metabolic changes following radiation, and can be used in the early diagnosis of radiation brain injury.

  3. Experimental research of prednisolone in new zealand white rabbits with radiation induced lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the preventive and therapeutic effect of Prednisolone in radiation injury of lungs. Methods: 45 male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups with 15 in each; the blank group (a), the irradiation group (b) and the group with irradiation and Prednisolone (c). Group (a) has no other treatment. Group (b) was given injections Sodium Chloride on the first day of irradiation, with 0.1 ml/kg/d for 4 weeks. Group (c) was given intraperitoneal injections of Prednisolone on the first day of irradiation, with 0.4 mg/kg/d for 4 weeks. CT scanning was performs before irradiation and the 1, 3, 5 months after the irradiation. The animals were killed by cutting off the neck after 1, 3, 5 months of radiation. The right lungs were removed to give HE staining and immunohistochemical staining for the histological evaluation. Results: No significant changes were found in group a in CT scanning. The pathological changes in group c is less than serious than those in group b. Group c is less serious than in pathological changes those in group b. Immunohistochemical results; One, three, and five months after irradiation, the number of positive cells were highest in group b, and was significantly higher in group c than in group a. Conclusion: High dose irradiation of the lung of New Zealand rabbit tissue can successfully abtain the established radiation-induced lung injury animal models. Prednisolon can reduce the radiation-induced lung injury in rabbits New Zealand, and has a certain preventive effect. (authors)

  4. Development of radiation injury model in musculocutaneous flaps used for breast reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: Occasionally it becomes necessary to treat women who have undergone a mastectomy and immediate musculocutaneous flap breast reconstruction with radiation therapy for microscopically positive margins. Radiation therapy is known to have a wide range of deleterious effects on living tissue and, specifically composite flaps. Small vessel thrombosis, necrosis, lymphedema, fibroblast dysfunction, and severe contracture are just a few of these effects that may lead to flap compromise. An animal model of the TRAM flap has been described: however, a thorough review of the literature finds a few experimental studies on the effects of radiation on musculocutaneous flaps. This study is designed to produce a reproducible and quantitative model of radiation injury that can service as a basis for further investigation. Materials and Methods: Eleven adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a standardized rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap based on the superior epigastric artery. Two control rats had flaps raised but did not receive radiation. The flaps were allowed to heal six weeks and the remaining rats were randomized to three groups of three rats each. The first group received 2000 rads in five fractions, the second 3000 rads in ten fractions, and the third 3000 rads in 15 fractions. Radiation was delivered via a dual energy clinical linear accelerator centered over the flap. The rats were sacrificed at eight weeks from the last dose of radiation. The flaps were subjected to elasticity measuring by standard Instron tensiometer, total surface area measurements and standard histology stains, as well as elastin stains and Masson Trichrome stains. Results: The total area of the flap measured by Mocha analysis decreased in all rats from the initial 30 cm2. However, the decrease in irradiated flaps was greater when compared to non-irradiated controls and the degree of contracture increased as the amount of radiation increased. Control flaps averaged 16.27 cm2

  5. MR imaging of late radiation therapy- and chemotherapy-induced injury: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation to the brain and adjuvant chemotherapy may produce late delayed changes from several months to years after treatment of intracranial malignancies with a reported prevalence of 5-24%. The pattern of treatment-related injury may vary from diffuse periventricular white matter lesions to focal or multifocal lesions. Differentiation of treatment-related injury from tumor progression/recurrence may be difficult with conventional MR imaging (MRI). With both disease processes, the characteristic but nonspecific imaging features are vasogenic edema, contrast enhancement, and mass effect. This pictorial essay presents MRI spectra of late therapy-induced injuries in the brain with a particular emphasis on radiation necrosis, the most common and severe form. Novel MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), proton MR spectroscopy (MRS), and perfusion MRI, improve the possibilities of better characterization of treatment-related changes. Advanced MRI techniques allow for the assessment of metabolism and physiology and may increase specificity for therapy-induced changes. (orig.)

  6. Acute and delayed radiation injuries in the small intestine and colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The group of patients with severe actinic intestinal injuries consists of 67 patients, 46 female and 21 male. The main indication of irradiation were gynaecologic tumours with 67%. The irradiation was carried out with a telekobalt unit combined with radium. From the pathogenetic point of view, acute inflammation and necrobiotic processes in the intestinal mucosa and a restriction of the ability to regenerate are the main radiation-induced acute injuries; delayed injuries are mainly the narrowing and rarefaction of the vessels with lacking capillary budding. The cause of the completely different intervals of up to 26 years until the manifestation of the delayed injury remained unclear. The majority of the delayed symptoms were unspecific; therefore, the danger of misinterpretation was pointed out. A resection with primary anastomosis of the ends of the intestines is the goal to be reached operation-technically. The postoperative complication rate was 45.0%. The most frequent complications were the recurrence of a fistula and the formation of a new fistula, respectively, followed by anastomotic and wound insufficiency, and gastrointestinal bleedings. The postoperative lethality was 18.3%. The causes of death were, according to their frequency, peritonitis, acute failure of the coronary circulation, pneumonia, and massive bleedings. (orig./MG)

  7. Self-injurious behavior and foreign body entrapment in the root canal of a mandibular lateral incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B N Rangeeth

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-injurious behavior is a deliberate alteration or damage without suicidal indent. Herein, we report a patient who had caused intentionally self-trauma to his left lower permanent canine and placed a long metallic foreign body into the root canal. History revealed a habit of placing metallic objects in the form of stapler pins into the mouth, but closer examination revealed the habit to be more as a method of self-injurious behavior. Following an episode of severe pain, the tooth was endodontically treated after removal of the foreign body that was corroding. Clinical significance of the case report is that the patient may just be put off as having a habit of inserting foreign objects into the mouth, but the behavior was more self-injurious in nature.

  8. Evaluation of morphological changes of the skin after radiation-induced injury in Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cancer covers a heterogeneous group of more than 100 diseases with different etiology and prognosis. Radiotherapy is one of the most commonly used treatment modalities, aiming at the destruction of cancer cells, using ionizing radiation. One of the limiting factors of radiotherapy is that radiation promotes the death of tumor cells in addition to injure healthy tissue neighboring the tumor, and may cause their death. Irradiation of the skin, accidental or for therapeutic purposes can trigger many injuries culminating in fibrosis, which implies functional alteration of the body. The evaluation of morphological effects associated with skin irradiation becomes essential to develop more effective radiation strategies and decreased morbidity; and in case of accidents, proper handling of the victim.Evaluate radio-induced dermal changes using a Wistar rats model irradiated with 10, 40 and 60Gy. Male Wistar rats, aged approximately three months, were pre-anesthetized with midazolam and xylazine and anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital, shaved in the back, immobilized on polystyrene support in the prone position and irradiated with doses of 10, 40 and 60 Gy, with 4MeV nominal energy electron beams. The skin was irradiated in a 3cm2 field, and used 0.5cm of tissue equivalent material, to obtain a homogeneous dose distribution. After irradiation, the animals remained on constant evaluation, and the lesions were recorded photographically. The animals were divided into groups and were killed on the irradiation day, 5, 10, 15, 25 and 100 days after irradiation. The skin was fixed in 10% formaldehyde; the samples were embedded in paraffin and cut. The sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, picrosirius red and immuno stained with antibody anti-TGF beta1. Another part of the tissue was fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde and processed for scanning electron microscopy. It was observed macroscopically the appearance of skin lesions similar to burns on the entire irradiated area

  9. Do fentanyl and morphine influence body temperature after severe burn injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Steven Alexander; Beers, Ryan J; Lentz, Christopher W

    2011-01-01

    Fentanyl lacks the antiinflammatory properties of morphine. Morphine attenuates the inflammatory response through differential stimulation of μ-receptor subtypes. Patients who receive morphine during coronary artery bypass graft have been shown to experience less postoperative fever than those who receive fentanyl. Patients who receive continuous fentanyl infusions in increased room temperatures after thermal injury may be at increased risk to experience higher body temperature than those who receive morphine. The records of 28 patients with >20%TBSA burn in 30 intensive care unit rooms (13 received fentanyl and 15 received morphine or hydromorphone) and 12 trauma patients who received fentanyl in 22°C intensive care unit rooms were reviewed. Mean maximum core temperature and percentage of temperature recordings > 39°C in the first 48 hours of admission were compared between burn patients who received fentanyl, those who did not, and with trauma patients. Burn patients exposed to fentanyl experienced significantly higher temperatures (40.1 ± 0.9°C) compared with those given morphine (38.7 ± 0.8°C) and compared with trauma patients (37.5 ± 2.4°C), P Burn patients on fentanyl had temperatures > 39°C for a higher percentage of time (33 ± 27%) than those without fentanyl (7.2 ± 13%) and trauma patients (1 ± 2.8%), P Burn patients who receive fentanyl in 30°C rooms experience higher body temperatures and are febrile for a higher percentage of time than those receiving morphine only. Morphine has well-established antiinflammatory properties and likely attenuates the postburn inflammatory response more than fentanyl, resulting in lower body temperatures. This phenomenon needs to be further investigated in additional studies.

  10. The value of multimodal magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of glioma recurrence and radiation brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-zhi GE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the application of a combination of diFFusion weighted imaging (DWI, perfusion weighted imaging (PWI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS in the differential diagnosis of glioma recurrence and radiation brain injury. Methods The clinical and imaging data of 32 patients were retrospectively analyzed, including 15 cases of glioma recurrence and 17 cases of radiation brain injury, admitted from Jan. 2011 to Dec. 2013 in General Hospital of Beijing Command. The DWI, PWI and MRS data of the 32 patients were retrospectively analyzed. The following values were compared between abnormal enhancement area and contralateral normal area: magnetic resonance apparent diFFusion coeFFcient (ADC, relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF, relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV, relative mean transit time (rMTT, choline/creatine (Cho/Cr and choline/N-acetyl aspartate (Cho/ NAA ratio. Results No statistical significance of ADC and rMTT values was found between glioma recurrence group and radiation brain injury group (P>0.05; The maximum and average rCBF and rCBV values were significantly higher in glioma recurrence group than in radiation brain injury group (P0.05. The ratios of Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA were higher in glioma recurrence group than in radiation brain injury group (P<0.05. The diagnostic sensitivity of PWI to glioma recurrence was 80.0%, of MRS was 73.3%, and of PWI combined with MRS was 93.3%. The diagnostic sensitivity of PWI to radiation brain injury was 82.4%, of MRS was 70.6%, and of PWI combined with MRS was 88.2%. Conclusion Combined application of multimodal magnetic resonance imaging technology may improve the diagnostic accuracy to glioma recurrence and radiation brain injury, thus provide a good guidance for clinical treatment. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.11.13

  11. Expression of ICAM-1 in mice with radiation induced lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in mice with radiation induced lung injury and to study the function of ICAM-1. Methods: The thoraces of C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either sham irradiation or single fraction of 12 Gy. Two groups were defined as received sham-irradiation (C group) and underwent irradiation (X group). Mice were sacrificed at hours 1, 24, 72 and weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 after irradiation. The lung tissues were removed and processed for definitive analysis, including HE and Masson staining, the hydroxyproline content, the immunohistochemistry and the real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Results: Compared with C group, there was a significant histological and pathologic change in X group. And there was a significantly elevated level of positive cell counts of ICAM-1 and inflammatory cells in X group (P<0.01). Similarly, there was a significantly elevated level of hydroxyproline in X group(P<0.05). Moreover, the results of real-time quantitative RT-PCR showed that the relative mRNA expression of cytokine ICAM-1 in X group was significantly higher than that of C group(P<0.01). Conclusions: As an important cytokine in radiation-induced lung injury, ICAM-1 can not only mediate the inflammation cells adherence and infiltration, but also be involved in radiation induced lung fibrosis. (authors)

  12. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survival in patients with unresectable pancreatic carcinoma is poor. Studies by Mayo Clinic and the Gastrointestinal Tumor Study Group (GITSG) have established combined modality treatment with chemotherapy and radiation as the standard of care. Use of gemcitabine-based chemotherapy alone has also been shown to provide a benefit, but 5‑year overall survival still remains less than 5%. Conventional radiotherapy is traditionally delivered over a six week period and high toxicity is seen with the concomitant use of chemotherapy. In contrast, SBRT can be delivered in 3–5 days and, when used as a component of combined modality therapy with gemcitabine, disruption to the timely delivery of chemotherapy is minimal. Early single-institution reports of SBRT for unresectable pancreatic carcinoma demonstrate excellent local control with acceptable toxicity. Use of SBRT in unresectable pancreatic carcinoma warrants further investigation in order to improve the survival of patients with historically poor outcomes

  13. Intrabiliary radiation inhibits smooth muscle formation and biliary duct remodelling after balloon overstretching injury in dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何贵金; 高沁怡; 莫宾; 戴显伟; 姜维国; 孙铎; 陈平健

    2004-01-01

    Background Internal metallic stents have been widely used in clinical practice, but a high postoperative restenosis rate limits its application. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of intrabiliary radiation on muscle formation and biliary duct remodeling after biliary duct balloon injury in dogs. Methods Twenty male dogs (15-20 kg) were randomly divided into treatment group (n=10) and control group (n=10). Balloon overstretching injury was induced using a balloon catheter placed across the biliary duct. Subsequently, a 103Pd radioactive stent was positioned at the target site in each animal in the treatment group, providing the injured biliary duct with a radiation dose of 12.58×107 Bq. Dogs in the control group received Ni-Ti stents. All the dogs were killed one month after initial injury. The injured sections were dissected free from the dogs, and were processed for histological and morphological study. Cross-sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Masson's trichrome, and Verhoef-van Giesen. Muscle formation area and lumen area were determined using a computer-assisted image analysis system. Results Compared with the control group, 103Pd radioactive stents significantly reduced muscle formation area (78.3%, P<0.01), and percentage area of stenosis [control stents: (60.0±21.6)%, 103Pd radioactive stents: (31.6±9.5)%]. In addition, in the treatment group, the biliary duct lumen area was significantly larger than that in the control group (P<0.01). Conclusions 103Pd radioactive stents providing a radioactive dose of 12.58×107 Bq are effective in reducing muscle formation and biliary duct remodeling after balloon overstretching injury.

  14. Total body fat percentage and body mass index and the association with lower extremity injuries in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Eva; Verhagen, Evert; Holst, René;

    2014-01-01

    Overweight youths are generally recognised as being at increased risk of sustaining lower extremity injuries in sports. However, previous studies are inconclusive and choices for measuring overweight are manifold....

  15. Medical follow-up of the localized radiation injuries of the victim of the Peruvian radiation accident. Chapter 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident happened on 20 February 1999 at the Yanango hydroelectric power plant, which is located in jungle in the San Ramon District of Junin Department, approximately 300 km east of Lima where a welder picked up the unshielded 192Ir source, with his right hand and placed it in the back right pocket of his trousers (at the time of writing the investigation has not established how the source came to be outside the camera). There are a number of unusual aspects of this accident. While the calculated doses were higher than the biological and clinical indicators would suggest, there were uncertainties in source location and duration of exposure. There were major discrepancies in the calculated organ doses and the doses assessed in biological (cytogenetic) and clinical dosimetry. One good explanation for the difference is the unstable location of the source over the thigh and the marked inhomogeneity of exposure. The bone marrow in the skull, cervical spine and upper thorax have likely had enough stems cells to prevent severe marrow depression. The local tissue reaction also was less than expected. The patient was treated with dexamethasone until approximately day 30 post-exposure. It was stopped at that time due to infection of the wound, and the necrosis and radiation induced changes around the wound and perineum. Dexamethasone appears to have played a role in decreasing the early clinical effects but it does not seem to have affect on long term outcome. It is not clear whether early hemipelvectomy would have affected the outcome, although it would have saved the patient's long, painful and expensive hospital course. This is one of the first case of local radiation injuries in which cytokines were used. Most cases of local radiation injury do not have significant bone marrow depression. G-CSF was given at day 34 post-exposure but whether this had a beneficial effect in this case is unclear for some experts. A number of authors feel that the response to cytokines

  16. β-Arrestin-2 modulates radiation-induced intestinal crypt progenitor/stem cell injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Tian, H; Jiang, J; Yang, Y; Tan, S; Lin, X; Liu, H; Wu, B

    2016-09-01

    Intestinal crypt progenitor/stem (ICPS) cell apoptosis and vascular endothelial cell apoptosis are responsible for the initiation and development of ionizing radiation (IR)-evoked gastrointestinal syndrome. The signaling mechanisms underlying IR-induced ICPS cell apoptosis remain largely unclear. Our findings provide evidence that β-arrestin-2 (βarr2)-mediated ICPS cell apoptosis is crucial for IR-stimulated intestinal injury. βArr2-deficient mice exhibited decreased ICPS cell and intestinal Lgr5(+) (leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5-positive) stem cell apoptosis, promoted crypt proliferation and reproduction, and protracted survival following lethal doses of radiation. Radioprotection in the ICPS cells isolated from βarr2-deficient mice depended on prolonged nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation via direct interaction of βarr2 with IκBα and subsequent inhibition of p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Unexpectedly, βarr2 deficiency had little effect on IR-induced intestinal vascular endothelial cell apoptosis in mice. Consistently, βarr2 knockdown also provided significant radioresistance by manipulating NF-κB/PUMA signaling in Lgr5(+) cells in vitro. Collectively, these observations show that targeting the βarr2/NF-κB/PUMA novel pathway is a potential radiomitigator for limiting the damaging effect of radiotherapy on the gastrointestinal system. Significance statement: acute injury to the intestinal mucosa is a major dose-limiting complication of abdominal radiotherapy. The issue of whether the critical factor for the initiation of radiation-induced intestinal injury is intestinal stem cell apoptosis or endothelial cell apoptosis remains unresolved. βArrs have recently been found to be multifunctional adaptor of apoptosis. Here, we found that β-arrestin-2 (βarr2) deficiency was associated with decreased radiation-induced ICPS cell apoptosis, which prolonged survival in

  17. Radiation from an accelerating neutral body: The case of rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarman, Tolga; Arik, Metin; Kholmetskii, Alexander L.

    2013-11-01

    diatomic molecule, for instance). If the object reaches its final state in a given medium, say air, and "friction" is present, such as the case of a dental drill, then energy should keep being supplied to it, to overcome friction, which is present either inside the "inner mechanism of rotation" or in its surroundings. In other words, the object in the latter case, would be constantly subject to a friction force, countering its motion, and tending to make it fall to lower rotational energy states. Any fluctuations in the power supply, on the other hand, will slow down the rotating object, no matter how indiscernibly. The small decrease in the rotational velocity is yet reincreased by restoring the power supply, thus perpetually securing a stationary rotational motion. Thereby, the object in this final state, due to fluctuations in either friction or power supply, or both, shall further be expected to emit a radiation of energy , where is the final angular velocity of the object in rotation. What is more is that our team has very successfully measured what is predicted here, and they will report their experimental results in a subsequent article. The approach presented here seems to shed light on the mysterious sonoluminescence. It also triggers the possibility of sensing earthquakes due to radiation that should be emitted by the faults, on which the seismic stress keeps increasing until the crackdown. By the same token, also two colliding (neutral) objects are expected to emit radiation.

  18. Modifying effect of nitrogen salts on the development of radiation injury to plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preirradiation of seeds with a dose of 100 Gy decreases the activity of a membrane enzyme, glucose-6-phosphates, changes the ratio of lipid components of membranes of the photosynthetic apparatus, and activates lipid peroxidation resulting in the accumulation of malonic dialdehyde and conjugated dienes. Nitrogen salts (NH4+) introduced into the incubation medium with ''irradiated'' chloroplasts reduce the radiation injury to membranes which if indicated by the increase in the oxidation resistant phospholipid fractions (for instance, phosphatidylcholine and spingomyelin), diminution of lipid peroxidation and increase in glucoso-6-phosphatase activity

  19. Different imaging methods in the assessment of radiation-induced lung injury following hemithorax irradiation for pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have characterized the radiation-induced lung-injury on serial chest X-rays, CTs and ultralow field MRs and evaluated the clinical value and cost/benefit ratio of the different imaging methods in 30 patients receiving high-dose hemithorax irradiation for pleural mesothelioma. Lung injury was severe in all patients, but non-specific and essentially as described in text-books. CT provided no clinically relevant, cost effective diagnostic advantage over conventional X-rays in the detection of early or late radiation-induced lung injury, but it was necessary for the evaluation of the disease status of the mesothelioma. The possible advantage of MR over CT could not be evaluated and needs further studies. Optimal time-points for imaging CTs or MRs to detect early radiation-induced lung injury following high dose hemithorax irradiation were during the latter part of the treatment or very shortly after the end of the irradiation. Late injury or irreversible fibrosis develop rapidly after 6 months and was clearly documented by chest X-rays. The authors recommend serial chest X-rays at 1-2, 6 and 12 months following radiotherapy as a cost-effective method for the detection of radiation-induced lung injury with additional CTs to document the stage of mesothelioma, when needed. (author). 31 refs.; 4 figs

  20. Construction and evaluation of thoracic injury risk curves for a finite element human body model in frontal car crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Vazquez, Manuel; Davidsson, Johan; Brolin, Karin

    2015-12-01

    There is a need to improve the protection to the thorax of occupants in frontal car crashes. Finite element human body models are a more detailed representation of humans than anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs). On the other hand, there is no clear consensus on the injury criteria and the thresholds to use with finite element human body models to predict rib fractures. The objective of this study was to establish a set of injury risk curves to predict rib fractures using a modified Total HUman Model for Safety (THUMS). Injury criteria at the global, structural and material levels were computed with a modified THUMS in matched Post Mortem Human Subjects (PMHSs) tests. Finally, the quality of each injury risk curve was determined. For the included PMHS tests and the modified THUMS, DcTHOR and shear stress were the criteria at the global and material levels that reached an acceptable quality. The injury risk curves at the structural level did not reach an acceptable quality.

  1. A comparison of robotic arm versus gantry linear accelerator stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zaorsky,Nicholas; Avkshtol,Vladimir; Dong, Yanqun; Hayes, Shelly; Hallman,Mark; Price, Robert; Sobczak, Mark; Horwitz, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Vladimir Avkshtol, Yanqun Dong, Shelly B Hayes, Mark A Hallman, Robert A Price, Mark L Sobczak, Eric M Horwitz,* Nicholas G Zaorsky* Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer diagnosed in men in the United States besides skin cancer. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT; 6–15 ...

  2. Selenoprotein P Inhibits Radiation-Induced Late Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and Normal Cell Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckers, Jaimee C.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Xiao, Wusheng; Sarsour, Ehab H.; Goswami, Prabhat C., E-mail: prabhat-goswami@uiowa.edu

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation is a common mode of cancer therapy whose outcome is often limited because of normal tissue toxicity. We have shown previously that the accumulation of radiation-induced late reactive oxygen species (ROS) precedes cell death, suggesting that metabolic oxidative stress could regulate cellular radiation response. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether selenoprotein P (SEPP1), a major supplier of selenium to tissues and an antioxidant, regulates late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated normal human fibroblasts (NHFs). Methods and Materials: Flow cytometry analysis of cell viability, cell cycle phase distribution, and dihydroethidium oxidation, along with clonogenic assays, were used to measure oxidative stress and toxicity. Human antioxidant mechanisms array and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were used to measure gene expression during late ROS accumulation in irradiated NHFs. Sodium selenite addition and SEPP1 overexpression were used to determine the causality of SEPP1 regulating late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated NHFs. Results: Irradiated NHFs showed late ROS accumulation (4.5-fold increase from control; P<.05) that occurs after activation of the cell cycle checkpoint pathways and precedes cell death. The mRNA levels of CuZn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxiredoxin 3, and thioredoxin reductase 1 increased approximately 2- to 3-fold, whereas mRNA levels of cold shock domain containing E1 and SEPP1 increased more than 6-fold (P<.05). The addition of sodium selenite before the radiation treatment suppressed toxicity (45%; P<.05). SEPP1 overexpression suppressed radiation-induced late ROS accumulation (35%; P<.05) and protected NHFs from radiation-induced toxicity (58%; P<.05). Conclusion: SEPP1 mitigates radiation-induced late ROS accumulation and normal cell injury.

  3. Bioassay program: determination of I-131 body burden among radiation workers and nuclear medicine laboratory technicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, E.B.; Napenas, D.; San Jose, V.; Juan, N.

    The body burden of I-131 was determined among the radiation workers of the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) who are directly involved in I-131 processing and nuclear laboratory technicians of University of Santo Tomas and Veterans Hospital, who handle and dispense I-131 to patients. The routine monitoring was done by urine analysis. The untreated urine samples were counted directly for 4000 seconds using Nal(Tl) scintillation detector coupled to an ND66 microcomputer-based multichannel analyzer. Urine samples of radiation workers of PAEC who are not involved in I-131 processing and non-radiation workers were also assayed for comparison. For radiation workers of PAEC who are directly involved in processing I-131, the estimated body burden of I-131 ranged from <0.055 to 8.53 uCi (282 urine samples). These values were higher than those observed for radiation workers not involved in the handling or processing of I-131 with estimated body burden of I-131 ranging from <0.055 to 0.52 uCi (48 urine samples) or than those observed from non-radiation workers (<0.055 uCi). The maximum permissible burden of I-131 is 0.7 uCi.

  4. Plasma amylase activity as a biochemical indicator of radiation injury to salivary glands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becciolini, A.; Giannardi, G.; Cionini, L.; Porciani, S.; Fallai, C.; Pirtoli, L. (Florence Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia)

    1984-01-01

    Irradiation of the salivary glands produces a rapid increase of salivary amylase in serum, released by the highly radiation sensitive serous cells of the glands. Serial assays of salivary amylase in serum were performed in patients treated by radiation to the upper neck region. The changes observed were compared with the amount of salivary gland mass irradiated and with the dose fractionation modality used. The irradiated volume included either the entire salivary gland mass or less than 50 per cent of the gland. Two fractionation modalities were used: a conventional fractionation of 2 Gy per day, 5 times a week, or a multiple daily fractionation of 2 Gy, 3 times a day in two series of 4 days with a 4-day interval. Both parameters (salivary gland mass irradiated and fractionation modality used) significantly influenced the shape of the amylase curve in the serum. Serum amylase may therefore be considered a reliable biologic indicator of early injury to the salivary glands.

  5. Plasma amylase activity as a biochemical indicator of radiation injury to salivary glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of the salivary glands produces a rapid increase of salivary amylase in serum, released by the highly radiation sensitive serous cells of the glands. Serial assays of salivary amylase in serum were performed in patients treated by radiation to the upper neck region. The changes observed were compared with the amount of salivary gland mass irradiated and with the dose fractionation modality used. The irradiated volume included either the entire salivary gland mass or less than 50 per cent of the gland. Two fractionation modalities were used: a conventional fractionation of 2 Gy per day, 5 times a week, or a multiple daily fractionation of 2 Gy, 3 times a day in two series of 4 days with a 4-day interval. Both parameters (salivary gland mass irradiated and fractionation modality used) significantly influenced the shape of the amylase curve in the serum. Serum amylase may therefore be considered a reliable biologic indicator of early injury to the salivary glands. (Auth.)

  6. The surgical treatment of radiation injuries after radiotherapy for uterine carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outcome of serious radiation injuries to the pelvic viscera in 400 patients treated by radiotherapy for carcinoma of the uterus between January 1974 and December 1978 has been reviewed. Twenty-eight instances of serious radiation damage have been found, 13 of predominantly small bowel damage, 11 of predominantly large bowel damage and 4 of bladder damage. Many patients had involvement at multiple sites. Fourteen patients have died, and 9 survivors have artificial abdominal stomas. Leaking anastomoses and progressive sepsis were major problems in the postoperative period and could be related either to inadequate resection of irradiated bowel or to damage to other organs at operation. The possibilities of earlier diagnosis and better surgical procedures are discussed. (author)

  7. Murine partial-body radiation exposure model for biodosimetry studies - Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, William F., E-mail: blakely@afrri.usuhs.mil [Uniformed Services University, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Scientific Research Department, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Sandgren, David J., E-mail: Sandgren@afrri.usuhs.mil [Uniformed Services University, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Scientific Research Department, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Nagy, Vitaly, E-mail: nagy@afrri.usuhs.mil [Uniformed Services University, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Scientific Research Department, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Kim, Sung-Yop, E-mail: kimy@afrri.usuhs.mil [Uniformed Services University, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Scientific Research Department, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Ossetrova, Natalia I., E-mail: ossetrova@afrri.usuhs.mil [Uniformed Services University, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Scientific Research Department, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    The objective of the present study was to establish a murine partial-body radiation exposure model for studies supporting the identification and validation of novel biological dosimetry diagnostic assays. A lead shielding - Plexiglas irradiation apparatus with cutouts to permit irradiation of single-mouse-holder constrained CD2F1 male mice to total-body (3/3), mid- and lower-body (2/3), mid-body only (1/3), and 100% lead shielding sham-treated (0 Gy) controls (0/3) with a 250-kVp X-ray source (dose: 6 Gy, dose rate: 0.50 Gy min{sup -1}) was used. Doses and dose uniformity were measured using alanine - electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and ionization chambers. Dosimetry mapping results showed {approx}2 and {approx}12% non-uniformity in the radiation fields for the two smaller (1/3, 2/3) and one larger (3/3) fields, respectively. Hematology results showed no marked differences in neutrophil and platelet counts 1 and 2 days (d) after irradiation. The lymphocyte counts, as expected, demonstrate a progressive decline below baseline levels 1 and 2 d after irradiation with increasing fraction of the body exposed, while the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratios show the inverse effect, with a progressive increase with the fraction of body exposed. The bone marrow biomarker, Flt3 ligand, demonstrated a progressive increase in values with increasing fraction of the body exposed; the 2 d response was enhanced compared to 1 d. The radioresponse 1 d after irradiation for the acute phase reactant protein biomarker, serum amyloid A (SAA) that is synthesized by the liver, was significantly influenced depending on whether the mouse head was in the radiation field. Use of multiple biomarkers based on hematology and proteomic targets provide an enhancement in early-phase partial-body radiation exposure assessment.

  8. Evaluation of Possible Methods and Approaches for Registering of Non-Ionizing Radiation Emitted from the Human Body

    OpenAIRE

    Ignat Ignatov; Oleg Mosin; Hugo Niggli; Christos Drossinakis; Georg Tyminski

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of evaluation of possible biophysical methods and approaches for registering of various non-ionizing radiation (NIR) wave types of the human body in the optic and electromagnetic range. Various types of NIR (electromagnetic waves, infrared radiation, thermo radiation, bioluminiscence) emitted from the human body were reviewed. In particular the results on the spontaneous biophoton emission and the delayed luminescence from the human body were submitted along wi...

  9. Radiation-induced brain injury: low-hanging fruit for neuroregeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Terry C; Awad, Ahmed J; Li, Matthew D; Grant, Gerald A

    2016-05-01

    Brain radiation is a fundamental tool in neurooncology to improve local tumor control, but it leads to profound and progressive impairments in cognitive function. Increased attention to quality of life in neurooncology has accelerated efforts to understand and ameliorate radiation-induced cognitive sequelae. Such progress has coincided with a new understanding of the role of CNS progenitor cell populations in normal cognition and in their potential utility for the treatment of neurological diseases. The irradiated brain exhibits a host of biochemical and cellular derangements, including loss of endogenous neurogenesis, demyelination, and ablation of endogenous oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. These changes, in combination with a state of chronic neuroinflammation, underlie impairments in memory, attention, executive function, and acquisition of motor and language skills. Animal models of radiation-induced brain injury have demonstrated a robust capacity of both neural stem cells and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells to restore cognitive function after brain irradiation, likely through a combination of cell replacement and trophic effects. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells exhibit a remarkable capacity to migrate, integrate, and functionally remyelinate damaged white matter tracts in a variety of preclinical models. The authors here critically address the opportunities and challenges in translating regenerative cell therapies from rodents to humans. Although valiant attempts to translate neuroprotective therapies in recent decades have almost uniformly failed, the authors make the case that harnessing human radiation-induced brain injury as a scientific tool represents a unique opportunity to both successfully translate a neuroregenerative therapy and to acquire tools to facilitate future restorative therapies for human traumatic and degenerative diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:27132524

  10. Autologous adipose-derived regenerative cells are effective for chronic intractable radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective therapy for chronic radiation injuries, such as ulcers, is prone to infection. Stiffness is expected since the therapeutic radiation often involves wider and deeper tissues and often requires extensive debridement and reconstruction, which are not sometimes appropriate for elderly and compromised hosts. Autologous adipose-derived regenerative cells (ADRCs) are highly yielding, forming relatively elderly aged consecutive 10 cases, 63.6±14.9 y (52-89 y), with mean radiation dose of 75.0±35.4 Gy (50-120 Gy) were included with at least 10-month follow-up. Minimal debridement and ADRC injection in the wound bed and margin along with the injection of mixture of fat and ADRCs in the periphery were tested for efficacy and regenerated tissue quality by clinically as well as imaging by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Uncultured ADRCs of 1.6±1.3 x 107 cells were obtained. All cases healed uneventfully after 6.6±3.2 weeks (2-10 weeks) post-operatively. The done site morbidity was negligible and without major complications, such as paralysis or massive haematoma. The regenerated tissue quality was significantly superior to the pre-operative one and the mixture of fat and ADRCs connected to the intact tissue was very soft and pliable. Mean follow-up at 1.9±0.8 y (0.9-2.9 y) revealed no recurrence or new ulceration after treatment. Thus, the ADRCs treatment for decades-long radiation injuries is effective, safe and improves the quality of wounds. (authors)

  11. Opportunities for Radiosensitization in the Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moding, Everett J; Mowery, Yvonne M; Kirsch, David G

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) utilizing a small number of high-dose radiation therapy fractions continues to expand in clinical application. Although many approaches have been proposed to radiosensitize tumors with conventional fractionation, how these radiosensitizers will translate to SBRT remains largely unknown. Here, we review our current understanding of how SBRT eradicates tumors, including the potential contributions of endothelial cell death and immune system activation. In addition, we identify several new opportunities for radiosensitization generated by the move toward high dose per fraction radiation therapy. PMID:27441746

  12. Three-dimensional dose-response models of risk for radiation injury carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of computer graphics in conjunction with three-dimensional models of dose-response relationships for chronic exposure to ionizing radiation dramaticly clarifies the separate and interactive roles of competing risks. The three dimensions are average dose rate, exposure time, and risk. As an example, the functionally injurious and carcinogenic responses after systemic uptake of Ra-226 by beagles, mice and people with consequent alpha particle irradiation of the bone are represented by three-dimensional dose-rate/time/response surfaces that demonstrate the contributions with the passage of time of the competing deleterious responses. These relationships are further evaluated by mathematical stripping with three-dimensional illustrations that graphically show the resultant separate contribution of each effect. Radiation bone injury predominates at high dose rates and bone cancer at intermediate dose rates. Low dose rates result in spontaneous deaths from natural aging, yielding a type of practical threshold for bone cancer induction. Risk assessment is benefited by the insights that become apparent with these three-dimensional models. The improved conceptualization afforded by them contributes to planning and evaluating epidemiological analyses and experimental studies

  13. Protective effect of vitamin A on acute radiation injury in the small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyzadeoglu, Murat; Balkan, Mujdat; Demiriz, Murat; Dirican, Bahar; Oner, Koksal; Pak, Yucel [Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara (Turkey); Tibet, Hasan

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of vitamin A on the development of early radiation-induced reactions in the rat small intestine. The early effects of intraoperative gamma-radiation on the small bowel utilizing the terminal ileum of Sprague-Dawley rats and the protective effect of supplemental vitamin A on acute radiation injury were investigated. Three groups were included in the study: group I (10 rats) was the surgical control group; group II (13 rats) underwent only intraoperative irradiation; and group III (10 rats) was the vitamin A plus irradiation group. Exteriorized terminal ileal segments of groups II and III were exposed to a single fraction of 20 Gy of intraoperative gamma-irradiation. On the seventh postoperative day, terminal ileal segments of all rats were resected and histopathologically evaluated for ulceration, enteritis cystica profunda, atypical epithelial regeneration, fibrosis, vascular sclerosis, and inflammatory process. Although none of the above findings were present in the surgical control group, group III rats experienced less severe effects than group II rats. The results suggest the early side effects of radiation may be prevented by vitamin A supplementation. (author)

  14. Amelioration of radiation-induced skin injury by adenovirus-mediated heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) overexpression in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced skin injury remains a serious concern for radiation therapy. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme catabolism, has been reported to have potential antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties. However, the role of HO-1 in radiation-induced skin damage remains unclear. This study aims to elucidate the effects of HO-1 on radiation-induced skin injury in rats. A control adenovirus (Ad-EGFP) and a recombinant adenovirus (Ad-HO1-EGFP) were constructed. Rats were irradiated to the buttock skin with a single dose of 45 Gy followed by a subcutaneous injection of PBS, 5 × 109 genomic copies of Ad-EGFP or Ad-HO1-EGFP (n = 8). After treatment, the skin MDA concentration, SOD activity and apoptosis were measured. The expression of antioxidant and pro-apoptotic genes was determined by RT-PCR and real-time PCR. Skin reactions were measured at regular intervals using the semi-quantitative skin injury score. Subcutaneous injection of Ad-HO1-EGFP infected both epidermal and dermal cells and could spread to the surrounding regions. Radiation exposure upregulated the transcription of the antioxidant enzyme genes, including SOD-1, GPx2 and endogenous HO-1. HO-1 overexpression decreased lipid peroxidation and inhibited the induction of ROS scavenging proteins. Moreover, HO-1 exerted an anti-apoptotic effect by suppressing FAS and FASL expression. Subcutaneous injection of Ad-HO1-EGFP demonstrated significant improvement in radiation-induced skin injury. The present study provides evidences for the protective role of HO-1 in alleviating radiation-induced skin damage in rats, which is helpful for the development of therapy for radiation-induced skin injury

  15. HGF Gene Modification in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury by Modulating Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wang

    Full Text Available Effective therapeutic strategies to address intestinal complications after radiation exposure are currently lacking. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which display the ability to repair the injured intestine, have been considered as delivery vehicles for repair genes. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF-gene-modified MSCs on radiation-induced intestinal injury (RIII.Female 6- to 8-week-old mice were radiated locally at the abdomen with a single 13-Gy dose of radiation and then treated with saline control, Ad-HGF or Ad-Null-modified MSCs therapy. The transient engraftment of human MSCs was detected via real-time PCR and immunostaining. The therapeutic effects of non- and HGF-modified MSCs were evaluated via FACS to determine the lymphocyte immunophenotypes; via ELISA to measure cytokine expression; via immunostaining to determine tight junction protein expression; via PCNA staining to examine intestinal epithelial cell proliferation; and via TUNEL staining to detect intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis.The histopathological recovery of the radiation-injured intestine was significantly enhanced following non- or HGF-modified MSCs treatment. Importantly, the radiation-induced immunophenotypic disorders of the mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches were attenuated in both MSCs-treated groups. Treatment with HGF-modified MSCs reduced the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the tight junction protein ZO-1, and promoted the proliferation and reduced the apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.Treatment of RIII with HGF-gene-modified MSCs reduces local inflammation and promotes the recovery of small intestinal histopathology in a mouse model. These findings might provide an effective therapeutic strategy for RIII.

  16. An athymic rat model of cutaneous radiation injury designed to study human tissue-based wound therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifkin Lucas H

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To describe a pilot study for a novel preclinical model used to test human tissue-based therapies in the setting of cutaneous radiation injury. Methods A protocol was designed to irradiate the skin of athymic rats while sparing the body and internal organs by utilizing a non-occlusive skin clamp along with an x-ray image guided stereotactic irradiator. Each rat was irradiated both on the right and the left flank with a circular field at a 20 cm source-to-surface distance (SSD. Single fractions of 30.4 Gy, 41.5 Gy, 52.6 Gy, 65.5 Gy, and 76.5 Gy were applied in a dose-finding trial. Eight additional wounds were created using the 41.5 Gy dose level. Each wound was photographed and the percentage of the irradiated area ulcerated at given time points was analyzed using ImageJ software. Results No systemic or lethal sequelae occurred in any animals, and all irradiated skin areas in the multi-dose trial underwent ulceration. Greater than 60% of skin within each irradiated zone underwent ulceration within ten days, with peak ulceration ranging from 62.1% to 79.8%. Peak ulceration showed a weak correlation with radiation dose (r = 0.664. Mean ulceration rate over the study period is more closely correlated to dose (r = 0.753. With the highest dose excluded due to contraction-related distortions, correlation between dose and average ulceration showed a stronger relationship (r = 0.895. Eight additional wounds created using 41.5 Gy all reached peak ulceration above 50%, with all healing significantly but incompletely by the 65-day endpoint. Conclusions We developed a functional preclinical model which is currently used to evaluate human tissue-based therapies in the setting of cutaneous radiation injury. Similar models may be widely applicable and useful the development of novel therapies which may improve radiotherapy management over a broad clinical spectrum.

  17. Problems concerning the parenteral nutrition within the complex therapy of radiation injuries of the intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloventantor, V.Yu.; Kurpesheva, A.K.; Kaplan, M.A.; Bardychev, M.S.; Khmelevskii, Ya.M. (Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Obninsk. Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Meditsinskoj Radiologii)

    1982-01-01

    The treatment results of 52 patients with radiation enterocolitis and rectosygmoiditis are reported. The complex therapy included a partial or a complete parenteral nutrition according to the indication. The treatment caused an improvement in 86.7% of the cases, no changes in 5.7% and a deterioration of the condition in 7.6%. The additional nutritive therapy rendered it possible to hold the cell mass of the body constant and to decrease the protein losses of the gastrointestinal tract significantly.

  18. Radiation from perfect mirrors starting from rest and accelerating forever and the black body spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Calogeracos, A

    2002-01-01

    We address the question of radiation emission from a perfect mirror that starts from rest and follows the trajectory z=-ln(cosht) ad infinitum. We show that a correct derivation of the black body spectrum via the calculation of Bogolubov amplitudes requires consideration of the whole trajectory and not just of its asymptotic part.

  19. Radiation from perfect mirrors starting from rest and accelerating forever and the black body spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We address the question of radiation emission from a perfect mirror that starts from rest and follows the trajectory z=-ln(cosh t) until t→∞. We show that a correct derivation of the black body spectrum via the calculation of the Bogolubov amplitudes requires consideration of the whole trajectory and not just of its asymptotic part. (author)

  20. Quantitative analysis of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in acute radiation-induced liver injury: An animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Jun; Chen, Shu-Bo; WU, SHU-JUN; Sun, Ping; XIN, TIAN-YOU; CHEN, YING-ZHEN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine and assess contrast-enhanced ultrasound in the early diagnosis of acute radiation-induced liver injury in a rat model. Sixty female rats were used, with 50 rats being utilized to produce an animal model of liver injury with a single dose of stereotactic X-ray irradiation of 20 Gy. Ten rats from the injury group and 2 rats from the control group were randomly selected on days 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28, and examined by contrast-enhanced ultrasound and histo...

  1. Clinical study of the radioprotective effects of Amifostine (YM-08310, WR-2721) on chronic radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, I.; Nagai, T.; Miyaishi, K.; Maehara, Y.; Niibe, H.

    1986-06-01

    We have previously reported that Amifostine, a radioprotective agent, was effective in treating acute radiation mucositis in the head and neck region. We found that when a considerable amount of Amifostine accumulates in the salivary glands, it may be useful in preventing chronic disturbances of salivary secretion. We have observed an increase in the uptake of Ga-67-citrate to the salivary glands when they were irradiated. In this paper, the radioprotective effects of Amifostine, in treating chronic radiation injury of the salivary glands, were studied, using the cessation of an increase in uptake of Ga-67-citrate after radiotherapy as the criterion. The subjects were 105 patients, (280 salivary glands in Ga-scintigrams) with malignancy of the head and neck region treated by irradiation from 1978 to 1984. Ga-negative glands were recognized in 97%, that is, 36 out of 37 glands, before irradiation, and the figure decreased to 19%, seven out of 37, within 1 to 2 weeks (10Gy less than or equal to) after the start of radiotherapy. In patients who were irradiated with more than 30 Gy and in whom scintigraphy was performed at 6 months or more after radiotherapy, Ga-negative glands were recognized in 18 out of 41 glands, 44%, with Amifostine, compared with 13%, four out of 32 glands, without Amifostine. A difference was recognized between these two groups in the negative change in Ga-67 uptake after radiotherapy (p less than 0.05). These facts suggest that Amifostine may have a radioprotective effect on chronic radiation injury.

  2. The lazaroid U74389G protects normal brain from stereotactic radiosurgery-induced radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To test an established model of stereotactic radiosurgery-induced radiation injury with pretreatments of either methylprednisolone or the lazaroid U74389G. Methods and Materials: Nine cats received stereotactic radiosurgery with a linear accelerator using an animal radiosurgery device. Each received a dose of 125.0 Gy prescribed to the 84% isodose shell to the anterior limb of the right internal capsule. One animal received no pretreatment, two received citrate vehicle, three received 30 mg/kg of methylprednisolone, and three received 5 mg/kg of U74389G. After irradiation, the animals had frequent neurologic examinations, and neurologic deficits developed in all of them. Six months after the radiation treatment, the animals were anesthetized, and had gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) scans, followed by Evans blue dye perfusion, euthanasia, and brain fixation. Results: Magnetic resonance scans revealed a decrease in the size of the lesions from a mean volume of 0.45 ± 0.06 cm3 in the control, vehicle-treated, and methylprednisolone-treated animals to 0.22 ± 0.14 cm3 in the U74389G-treated group. The scans also suggested the absence of necrosis and ventricular dilatation in the lazaroid-treated group. Gross pathology revealed that lesions produced in the untreated, vehicle-treated, and methylprednisolone-treated cats were similar and were characterized by a peripheral zone of Evans blue dye staining with a central zone of a mature coagulative necrosis and focal hemorrhage. However, in the U74389G-treated animals, the lesions were found to have an area of Evans blue dye staining, but lacked discrete areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. Conclusion: These results suggest that the lazaroid U74389G protects the normal brain from radiation injury produced by stereotactic radiosurgery

  3. Cost-appropriateness of whole body vs limited bone imaging for suspected focal sports injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone imaging has been recognized as a useful diagnostic tool in detecting the presence of focal musculoskeletal injury when radiographs are normal. A retrospective review of bone images in a small number of amateur athletes indicates that secondary injuries were commonly detected at sites different from the site of musculoskeletal pain being evaluated for injury. While a larger study will be necessary to confirm the data, this review suggests that it is medically justified and cost-appropriate to perform imaging of the entire skeleton as opposed to imaging limited to the anatomic site of pain and suspected injury

  4. Pathological vertebral fracture after stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung metastases. Case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a radiation technique used in patients with oligometastatic lung disease. Lung and chest wall toxicities have been described in the patients but pathological vertebral fracture is an adverse effect no reported in patients treated with SBRT for lung metastases. A 68-year-old woman with the diagnosis of a recurrence of a single lung metastatic nodule of urothelial carcinoma after third line of chemotherapy. The patient received a hypo-fractionated course of SBRT.A 3D-conformal multifield technique was used with six coplanar and one non-coplanar statics beams. A total dose of 48 Gy in three fractions over six days was prescribed to the 95% of the CTV. Ten months after the SBRT procedure, a CT scan showed complete response of the metastatic disease without signs of radiation pneumonitis. However, rib and vertebral bone toxicities were observed with the fracture-collapse of the 7th and 8th vertebral bodies and a fracture of the 7th and 8th left ribs. We report a unique case of pathological vertebral fracture appearing ten months after SBRT for an asymptomatic growing lung metastases of urothelial carcinoma. Though SBRT allows for minimization of normal tissue exposure to high radiation doses SBRT tolerance for vertebral bone tissue has been poorly evaluated in patients with lung tumors. Oncologists should be alert to the potential risk of fatal bone toxicity caused by this novel treatment. We recommend BMD testing in all woman over 65 years old with clinical risk factors that could contribute to low BMD. If low BMD is demonstrated, we should carefully restrict the maximum radiation dose in the vertebral body in order to avoid intermediate or low radiation dose to the whole vertebral body

  5. Late radiation injuries of the intestine and their treatment. [Side effects of x-ray and gamma therapy of gynecologic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardychev, M.S.; Kurpesheva, A.K.; Kaplan, M.A.

    1978-12-01

    Late radiation injuries of the intestine are frequent after radiation therapy of malignant tumors of female genitalia and some other tumors in which the intestine gets into the irradiation field. On the basis of the analysis of 80 patients with late radiation injuries of intestine which developed at remote terms after radiation therapy of cervix uteri cancer and corpus uteri (65 patients) and other tumors, peculiarities of the clinical course and treatment of radiation enterocolitis, rectosigmoidites, and rectites are discussed. In 39 patients, these injuries were concomitant with late radiation injuries of the skin and subcutaneous soft tissues. The clinical course of radiation injuries of the intestine was defined by the character of the pathological process in the intestine and was more sharply marked in patients suffering from radiation enterocolites. It was established that one of the pathogenetic mechanisms of late radiation injuries of the intestine was a disorder of the absorption function of the intestine. Local treatment of radiation injuries of the intestine should be combined with a general one the important component of which is a parenteral diet.

  6. Penetrating thoracic injury with retained foreign body: can video-assisted thoracic surgery take up the leading role in acute management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peter S Y; Chan, Herman H M; Lau, Rainbow W H; Capili, Freddie G; Underwood, Malcolm J; Wan, Innes Y P

    2016-08-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is widely adopted in acute management of patient with thoracic trauma, but its use in penetrating thoracic injuries with retained foreign bodies were rarely reported. We described three of such cases using VATS as the first line approach. Identification of injuries, control of bleeders, clot evacuation, resection of damaged lung parenchyma and safe retrieval of foreign bodies were all performed via complete VATS within short operative time. Patient were uneventfully discharged during early post-operative period. We suggest that, for haemodynamically stable patients, VATS offers a safe and minimally-invasive alternative to conventional thoracotomy for penetrating thoracic injury with retained foreign bodies.

  7. Relative effect of radiation dose rate on hemopoietic and nonhemopoietic lethality of total-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were undertaken to determine the influence of dose rate on the toxicity of total-body irrdiation (TBI) with and without syngeneic bone-marrow rescue in mice. The results showed a much greater dose-rate dependence for death from nonhemopoietic toxicity than from bone-marrow ablation, with the ratio of LD50's increasing from 1.73 at 25 cGy/min to 2.80 at 1 cGy/min. At the higher dose rates, dose-limiting nonhemopoietic toxicity resulted from late organ injury, affecting the lungs, kidneys, and liver. At 1 cGy/min the major dose-limiting nonhemopoietic toxicity was acute gastrointestinal injury. The implications of these results in the context of TBI in preparation for bone-marrow transplantation are discussed. 15 refs., 4 figs

  8. Risks of exposure to ionizing and millimeter-wave radiation from airport whole-body scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, John E

    2012-06-01

    Considerable public concern has been expressed around the world about the radiation risks posed by the backscatter (ionizing radiation) and millimeter-wave (nonionizing radiation) whole-body scanners that have been deployed at many airports. The backscatter and millimeter-wave scanners currently deployed in the U.S. almost certainly pose negligible radiation risks if used as intended, but their safety is difficult-to-impossible to prove using publicly accessible data. The scanners are widely disliked and often feared, which is a problem made worse by what appears to be a veil of secrecy that covers their specifications and dosimetry. Therefore, for these and future similar technologies to gain wide acceptance, more openness is needed, as is independent review and regulation. Publicly accessible, and preferably peer-reviewed evidence is needed that the deployed units (not just the prototypes) meet widely-accepted safety standards. It is also critical that risk-perception issues be handled more competently. PMID:22494369

  9. Succinylcholine-induced hyperkalemia in the rat following radiation injury to muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairoli, V.J.; Ivankovich, A.D.; Vucicevic, D.; Patel, K.

    1982-02-01

    During anesthetic preparation of a patient who had received routine radiation therapy for sarcoma of the leg, cardiac collapse occurred following succinylcholine (SCh) administration. Experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that radiation injury to muscle might cause increased sensitivity to SCh similar to that reported in patients with muscle trauma, severe burns, and lesions causing muscle denervation. Venous plasma potassium levels and arterial blood gas tensions were measured in rats after they were given SCh (3 mg/kg) at various times following /sup 60/Co irradiation of the hind legs. Nonirradiated rats responded to SCh with a slight but statistically significant increase in plasma K+. Rats subjected to high levels of radiation (10,000 to 20,000 R) and given SCh 4 to 7 days later responded in the same way as the control rats. Plasma K+ levels in rats exposed to a fractionated irradiated dosage (2500 R given twice with a 1-week interval) followed by SCh 1 week later were similar to those in the control group, but when SCh was given 2 weeks later (3 weeks after initial irradiation) there was a marked elevation of plasma K+, from 3.6 to 7.7 meq/L, a statistically significant increase.

  10. Succinylcholine-induced hyperkalemia in the rat following radiation injury to muscle. [60Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairoli, V.J.; Ivankovich, A.D.; Vucicevic, D.; Patel, K.

    1982-02-01

    During anesthetic preparation of a patient who had received routine radiation therapy of sarcoma of the leg, cardiac collapse occurred following succinylcholine (SCh) administration. Experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that radiation injury to muscle might cause increased sensitivity to SCh similar to that reported in patients with muscle trauma, severe burns, and lesions causing muscle denervation. Venous plasma potassium levels and arterial blood gas tensions were measured in rats after they were given SCh (3 mg/kg) at various times following 60Co irradiation of the hind legs. Nonirradiated rats responded to SCh with a slight but statistically significant increase in plasma K+. Rats subjected to high levels of radiation (10,000 to 20,000 R) and given SCh 4 to 7 days later responded in the same way as the control rats. Plasma K+ levels in rats exposed to a fractionated irradiated dosage (25000 R given twice with a 1-week interval) followed by SCh 1 week later were similar to those in the control group, but when SCh was given 2 weeks later (3 weeks after initial irradiation) there was a marked elevation of plasma K+, from 3.6 to 7.7 meq/L, a statistically significant increase.

  11. Practical approaches to effective management of intestinal radiation injury: Benefit of resectional surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nikolaos Perrakis; Evangelos Athanassiou; Dimitra Vamvakopoulou; Maria Kyriazi; Haris Kappos; Nikolaos C Vamvakopoulos; Iakovos Nomikos

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the outcome of patients undergoing surgical resection of the bowel for sustained radiation-induced damage intractable to conservative management.METHODS: During a 7-year period we operated on 17 cases (5 male, 12 female) admitted to our surgical department with intestinal radiation injury (IRI). They were originally treated for a pelvic malignancy by surgical resection followed by postoperative radiotherapy. During follow-up, they developed radiation enteritis requiring surgical treatment due to failure of conservative management.RESULTS: IRI was located in the terminal ileum in 12 patients, in the rectum in 2 patients, in the descending colon in 2 patients, and in the cecum in one patient. All patients had resection of the affected region(s). There were no postoperative deaths, while 3 cases presented with postoperative complications (17.7%). All patients remained free of symptoms without evidence of recurrence of IRI for a median follow-up period of 42 mo (range, 6-96 mo).CONCLUSION: We report a favorable outcome without IRI recurrence of 17 patients treated by resection of the diseased bowel segment.

  12. The role of alveolar epithelium in radiation-induced lung injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine Almeida

    Full Text Available Pneumonitis and fibrosis are major lung complications of irradiating thoracic malignancies. In the current study, we determined the effect of thoracic irradiation on the lungs of FVB/N mice. Survival data showed a dose-dependent increase in morbidity following thoracic irradiation with single (11-13 Gy and fractionated doses (24-36 Gy of (137Cs γ-rays. Histological examination showed a thickening of vessel walls, accumulation of inflammatory cells, collagen deposition, and regional fibrosis in the lungs 14 weeks after a single 12 Gy dose and a fractionated 30 Gy dose; this damage was also seen 5 months after a fractionated 24 Gy dose. After both single and fractionated doses, i] aquaporin-5 was markedly decreased, ii] E-cadherin was reduced and iii] prosurfactant Protein C (pro-SP-c, the number of pro-SP-c(+ cells and vimentin expression were increased in the lungs. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed co-localization of pro-SP-c and α-smooth muscle actin in the alveoli after a single dose of 12 Gy. These data suggest that, i] the FVB/N mouse strain is sensitive to thoracic radiation ii] aquaporin-5, E-cadherin, and pro-SP-c may serve as sensitive indicators of radiation-induced lung injury; and iii] the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition may play an important role in the development of radiation-induced lung fibrosis.

  13. Speaking through the Body: The Incidence of Self-Injury, Piercing, and Tattooing among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizenman, Marta; Jensen, Mary Ann Conover

    2007-01-01

    Self-injurious behaviors were compared with tattooing and piercing in a college population. Findings indicate a high prevalence of self-injury. Students who self-injured were motivated by a desire to alleviate emotional pain; students who tattooed and pierced by self-expression. Students who self-injured scored higher than students who tattooed…

  14. Injury, imagery, and self-esteem in dance healthy minds in injured bodies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin-Bates, Sanna M; Walker, Imogen J; Baker, Jo; Garner, Jocelyn; Hardy, Cinzia; Irvine, Sarah; Jola, Corinne; Laws, Helen; Blevins, Peta

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate a selection of psychological variables (help-seeking behaviors, mental imagery, self-esteem) in relation to injury among UK dancers. We recruited 216 participants from eight dance styles and six levels of involvement. It was found that 83.5% of the participants had experienced at least one injury in the past year. The most common response to injury was to inform someone, and most continued to dance when injured, albeit carefully. Physical therapy was the most common treatment sought when an injury occurred (38.1%), and dancers seemed to follow recommendations offered. Injured and non-injured dancers did not differ in their imagery frequencies (facilitative, debilitative, or injury-related) and scored similarly (and relatively high) in self-esteem. Neither facilitative nor debilitative imagery was correlated with self-esteem, but dancers who engaged in more facilitative imagery in general also reported doing so when injured. Altogether, it appears that injury is not related to dancers' self-esteem or imagery, at least not when injuries are mild or moderate. Even so, such conclusions should be made with caution, given that most dancers do sustain at least one injury each year. PMID:21703096

  15. Acute Radiation Syndrome Severity Score System in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossetrova, Natalia I; Ney, Patrick H; Condliffe, Donald P; Krasnopolsky, Katya; Hieber, Kevin P

    2016-08-01

    Radiation accidents or terrorist attacks can result in serious consequences for the civilian population and for military personnel responding to such emergencies. The early medical management situation requires quantitative indications for early initiation of cytokine therapy in individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and effective triage tools for first responders in mass-casualty radiological incidents. Previously established animal (Mus musculus, Macaca mulatta) total-body irradiation (γ-exposure) models have evaluated a panel of radiation-responsive proteins that, together with peripheral blood cell counts, create a multiparametic dose-predictive algorithm with a threshold for detection of ~1 Gy from 1 to 7 d after exposure as well as demonstrate the acute radiation syndrome severity score systems created similar to the Medical Treatment Protocols for Radiation Accident Victims developed by Fliedner and colleagues. The authors present a further demonstration of the acute radiation sickness severity score system in a mouse (CD2F1, males) TBI model (1-14 Gy, Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min) based on multiple biodosimetric endpoints. This includes the acute radiation sickness severity Observational Grading System, survival rate, weight changes, temperature, peripheral blood cell counts and radiation-responsive protein expression profile: Flt-3 ligand, interleukin 6, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, thrombopoietin, erythropoietin, and serum amyloid A. Results show that use of the multiple-parameter severity score system facilitates identification of animals requiring enhanced monitoring after irradiation and that proteomics are a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposure, enhancing accuracy and discrimination index for acute radiation sickness response categories and early prediction of outcome. PMID:27356057

  16. The study of the effect of interleukin-1β against the combined radiation-thermal injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiments were carried out on F1 (CBA x C57B16) male-mice. It was shown that, in contrast to a therapeutic effect of IL-1 for the solely irradiated mice, a single subcutaneous injection of 100 μg/kg recombinant human IL-1β in 4 h after a combined radiation-thermal injury (CRTI) increased significantly the death rate of the animals within the first 2-4 days. Administration of 150 ng IL-1 per mouse in 4, 24 or 48 h after the CRTI decreased an average life-span of mice. A single injection of cytokine in 5 days after the CRTI increased the survival rate by 45 %. Repeated injections IL-1 with a dose of 100 pg per mouse in 2, 4 and 6 days after the CRTI did not aid in the haematological indices and did not affect the survival rate of the animals. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  17. Noncultured Autologous Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Therapy for Chronic Radiation Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadanori Akita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing concern on chronic radiation injuries should be treated properly for life-saving improvement of wound management and quality of life. Recently, regenerative surgical modalities should be attempted with the use of noncultured autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs with temporal artificial dermis impregnated and sprayed with local angiogenic factor such as basic fibroblast growth factor, and secondary reconstruction can be a candidate for demarcation and saving the donor morbidity. Autologous adipose-derived stem cells, together with angiogenic and mitogenic factor of basic fibroblast growth factor and an artificial dermis, were applied over the excised irradiated skin defect and tested for Patients who were uneventfully healed with minimal donor-site morbidity, which lasts more than 1.5 years.

  18. Inhibitory effect of MgSO4 on calcium overload after radiation-induced brain injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the neuroprotective effect of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4 ) on radiation-induced acute brain injuries. Methods: A total of 60 mature Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: blank control group, experimental control group and experimental therapy group. The whole brain of SD rats of experimental control group and experimental therapy group was irradiated to a dose of 20 Gy using 6 MeV electrons. Magnesium sulfate was injected intraperitoneally into the rats of experimental therapy group before and after irradiation for five times. At different time points (24 h, 7 days, 14 days, 30 days after irradiation), the brain tissue was taken. Plasma direct reading spectrography was used to measure the contents of Ca2+, Mg2+ in brain tissue, and the percentage of brain water content was calculated with the wet-dry weight formula. Results: Compared with the blank control group, the percentage of brain water and content of Ca2+ in brain of the experimental control group increased markedly (P2+ decreased significantly (P2+ in brain of the experimental therapy group were significantly lower than those of the experimental control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Magnesium sulfate used in the early stage after irradiation can inhibit the calcium overload in rat brain , and attenuate brain edema and injuries. (authors)

  19. Role of MMP-12 on tissue remodeling at early stage of radiation-induced pulmonary injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the role of MMP-12 on tissue remodeling at early stage of radiation- induced pulmonary injury. Methods: Wistar rats irradiated by 60Co γ-rays to the whole lungs were sacrificed at 1, 2, 4 weeks. MMP-12 mRNA expression was detected by RT-PCR. MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-12 activities were determined by zymography. The degradation and collapse of elastin were determined by tissue elastin particular staining; the 'cross talking' phenomenon between alveolar type II cells and mesenchymal cells was observed under electron microscope; the expression of TGF-β1 and TNF-α in BALF was detected by ELISA. The expression of α-SMA was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: The mRNA expression of MMP-12 displayed a significant elevation at 1, 2, 4 weeks after irradiation. MMP-12 activity increased at 2, 4 weeks after irradiation. Elastin began to degrade and collapse at 1 week, which became worst 4 weeks after irradiation. The cross talking phenomenon was found under electron microscope. The expression of TGF-β1, TNF-α and α-SMA was increased gradually as time elapse after irradiation. Conclusions: 60Co γ-ray irradiation can promote pulmonary MMP-12 expression, initiate pulmonary tissue remodeling by degradation of elastin, and make the pulmonary injury develop towards pulmonary fibrosis eventually. (authors)

  20. beta1-integrin-mediated signaling essentially contributes to cell survival after radiation-induced genotoxic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordes, N; Seidler, J; Durzok, R;

    2006-01-01

    Integrin-mediated adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins confers resistance to radiation- or drug-induced genotoxic injury. To analyse the underlying mechanisms specific for beta1-integrins, wild-type beta1A-integrin-expressing GD25beta1A cells were compared to GD25beta1B cells, which express...

  1. Radiation enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... often are no good treatments for chronic radiation enteritis that is more severe. Medicines such as cholestyramine, ...

  2. Radiation injuries of the pelvis and proximal parts of the femur after irradiation of carcinoma of the cervix uteri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data relating to 244 patients with carcinoma of the cervix uteri treated by intensive radiotherapy are given. Radiation injury of bone was diagnosed in 12 cases (4.9 +/- 1.4 percent). After x-ray therapy alone they were found in five of 59 patients treated (8.5 +/- 3.6 percent), and after γ-ray therapy in one of 171 cases (0.6 +/- 0.6 percent). The minimal focal dose of x-ray therapy causing radiation injury to bone was 5,000 rads. With an increase in dose, the frequency of injuries also increased. Radiation injury was found after γ-ray therapy with an absorbed dose of 7,000 rads. The radiological features of radiation injury of bones after irradiation of malignant tumors of the pelvis are increasing osteoporosis and the appearance of foci of sclerosis and osteolysis. Necrotic areas of various sizes may be formed. A fracture of the neck of the femur may be prevented in some cases by taking precautionary measures. Healing of an injured part depends on the size of the dose given. Large doses completely suppressed the reparative powers of the bone. Unlike changes that are traumatic in nature, radiation fractures of the pelvic bones and the proximal part of the femur have a mild clinical course; sometimes the patients continue to use the lower limb, simply complaining of pain that may vary in severity. Metastasization of tumors of the uterus to the pelvic bones is possible but infrequent. Metastases are usually associated with increasing pain

  3. Maternal Body Mass Index and Risk of Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Blomberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To estimate the association between maternal obesity and risk of three different degrees of severity of obstetric anal sphincter injury. Methods. The study population consisted of 436,482 primiparous women with singleton term vaginal cephalic births between 1998 and 2011 identified in the Swedish Medical Birth Registry. Women were grouped into six categories of BMI. BMI 18.5–24.9 was set as reference. Primary outcome was third-degree perineal laceration, partial or total, and fourth-degree perineal laceration. Adjustments were made for year of delivery, maternal age, fetal head position at delivery, infant birth weight and instrumental delivery. Results. The overall prevalence of third- or four-degree anal sphincter injury was 6.6% (partial anal sphincter injury 4.6%, total anal sphincter injury 1.2%, unclassified as either partial and total 0.2%, or fourth degree lacerations 0.6%. The risk for a partial, total, or a fourth-degree anal sphincter injury decreased with increasing maternal BMI most pronounced for total anal sphincter injury where the risk among morbidly obese women was half that of normal weight women, OR 0.47 95% CI 0.28–0.78. Conclusion. Obese women had a favourable outcome compared to normal weight women concerning serious pelvic floor damages at birth.

  4. Inhaled /sup 147/Pm and/or total-body gamma radiation: Early mortality and morbidity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipy, R.E.; Lauhala, K.E.; McGee, D.R.; Cannon, W.C.; Buschbom, R.L.; Decker, J.R.; Kuffel, E.G.; Park, J.F.; Ragan, H.A.; Yaniv, S.S.; Scott, B.R.

    1989-05-01

    Rats were given doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation and/or lung burdens of /sup 147/Pm (in fused aluminosilicate particles) within lethal ranges in an experiment to determine and compare morbidity and mortality responses for the radiation insults within 1 year after exposure. Radiation-induced morbidity was assessed by measuring changes in body weights, hematologic parameters, and pulmonary-function parameters. Acute mortality and morbidity from inhaled promethium were caused primarily by radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis that occurred more than 53 days after exposure. Acute mortality and morbidity from total-body gamma irradiation occurred within 30 days of exposure and resulted from the bone-marrow radiation syndrome. Gamma radiation caused transient morbidity, reflected by immediately depressed blood cell levels and by reduced body weight gain in animals that survived the acute gamma radiation syndrome. Inhaled promethium caused a loss of body weight and diminished pulmonary function, but its only effect on blood cell levels was lymphocytopenia. Combined gamma irradiation and promethium lung burdens were synergistic, in that animals receiving both radiation insults had higher morbidity and mortality rates than would be predicted based on the effect of either kind of radiation alone. Promethium lung burdens enhanced the effect of gamma radiation in rats within the first 30 days of exposure, and gamma radiation enhanced the later effect of promethium lung burdens. 70 refs., 68 figs., 21 tabs.

  5. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for the primary treatment of localized prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Oliai, Caspian; Lanciano, Rachelle; Sprandio, Brian; Yang, Jun; Lamond, John; Arrigo, Steven; Good, Michael; Mooreville, Michael; Garber, Bruce; Brady, Luther W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The low alpha/beta ratio of prostate cancer suggests that hypofractionated schemes of dose-escalated radiotherapy should be advantageous. We report our experience using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the primary treatment of prostate cancer to assess efficacy and toxicity. Methods From 2007 to 2010, 70 patients (51 % low risk, 31 % intermediate risk, and 17 % high risk) with localized prostate cancer were treated with SBRT using the CyberKnife system. One-third of pa...

  6. A VARIATIONAL EXPECTATION-MAXIMIZATION METHOD FOR THE INVERSE BLACK BODY RADIATION PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiantao Cheng; Tie Zhou

    2008-01-01

    The inverse black body radiation problem, which is to reconstruct the area tempera-ture distribution from the measurement of power spectrum distribution, is a well-known ill-posed problem. In this paper, a variational expectation-maximization (EM) method is developed and its convergence is studied. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the variational EM method is more efficient and accurate than the traditional methods, in-cluding the Tikhonov regularization method, the Landweber method and the conjugate gradient method.

  7. Pulmonary radiation injury: identification of risk factors associated with regional hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova-Jiresova, Alena; van Luijk, Peter; van Goor, Harry; Kampinga, Harm H; Coppes, Robert P

    2005-05-01

    Effective radiation treatment of thoracic tumors is often limited by radiosensitivity of surrounding tissues. Several experimental studies have suggested variations in radiosensitivity of different pulmonary regions. Mice and rat studies in part contradict each other and urge for a more detailed analysis. This study was designed to obtain a more comprehensive insight in radiation injury development, expression, and its regional heterogeneity in lung. The latter is obviously highly critical for optimization of radiotherapy treatment plans and may shed light on the mechanisms of lung dysfunction after irradiation. Six different but volume-equal regions in rat lung were irradiated. Whereas the severity of damage, as seen in histologic analysis, was comparable in all regions, the degree of lung dysfunction, measured as breathing rates, largely varied. During the pneumonitic phase (early: 6-12 weeks), the most sensitive regions contained a substantial part of alveolar lung parenchyma. Also, a trend for hypersensitivity was observed when the heart lay in the irradiation field. In the fibrotic phase (late: 34-38 weeks), lung parenchyma and heart-encompassing regions were the most sensitive. No impact of the heart was observed during the intermediate phase (16-28 weeks). The severity of respiratory dysfunction after partial thoracic irradiation is likely governed by an interaction between pulmonary and cardiac functional deficits. As a repercussion, more severe acute and delayed toxicity should be expected after combined lung and heart irradiation. This should be considered in the process of radiotherapy treatment planning of thoracic malignancies. PMID:15867350

  8. Effect of the synthetic carbon-mineral sorbent and antibiotics on the development of combined radiation and thermal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Male Wistar rats exposed to whole-body γ-irradiation at the dose of 7.5 Gy. Full sickness thermal bum 15% of body surface inflicted immediately after irradiation. Experimental study of the therapeutic efficacy of enterosorption alone or in combination with antibiotics doxycyclin and cyprofloxacyn performed. The strong decrease of bacterial endotoxemia, toxic oligopeptides' level and general blood toxicity revealed after treatment compared with non-treated animals with combined injuries. Corrections of postirradiation intestinal disbacteriosis revealed too. The best result observed when carbon mineral sorbent and antibiotics administered daily within the first 10-14 days after combined injury. Survival of treated animals increased up to 80% (all rats of control group died during 30 days after combined injury)

  9. Musculoskeletal Extremity Injuries in School-aged Children with special focus on overuse injuries, seasonal variation and body composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Eva

    Ph.d. afhandlingen “Musculoskeletal Extremity Injuries in School-aged Children” er en undersøgelse af forekomsten af skader i arme og ben relateret til fysisk aktivitet. Baggrunden for studiet er, at på trods af de mange gavnlige effekter af at børn er fysisk aktive, så kan ’bivirkningen’ være...... at undersøge en bredt sammensat gruppe af skolebørn med en metode, der tillod at alle skadestyper blev indfanget, var at kortlægge det generelle skadesbillede blandt børn. I alt 1259 skolebørn i alderen 6 til 12 år deltog i en ugentlig registrering af skader i arme og ben i perioden november 2008 til juli 2011....... Denne registrering blev foretaget vha. ugentlige SMS spørgsmål til forældrene og undersøgelse af børnene ved fysioterapeuter, kiropraktorer og læge tilknyttet studiet. Skader diagnosticeret i andre kliniske sammenhænge (f.eks. skadestue) blev indsamlet i samme periode for at opnå en komplet...

  10. Recent progress in defining mechanisms and potential targets for prevention of normal tissue injury after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to optimize treatments for cancer on the basis of relative risks for normal tissue injury has important implications in oncology, because higher doses of radiation might, in some diseases, improve both local control and survival. To achieve this goal, a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for radiation-induced toxicity will be essential. Recent research has demonstrated that ionizing radiation triggers a series of genetic and molecular events, which might lead to chronic persistent alterations in the microenvironment and an aberrant wound-healing response. Disrupted epithelial-stromal cell communication might also be important. With the application of a better understanding of fundamental biology to clinical practice, new approaches to treating and preventing normal tissue injury can focus on correcting these disturbed molecular processes

  11. Foreign body orbital cyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanfard, Younes; Heegard, Steffen; Fledelius, Hans C.;

    2001-01-01

    Ophthalmology, penetrating orbital injury, orbital foreign body, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), histology......Ophthalmology, penetrating orbital injury, orbital foreign body, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), histology...

  12. An athymic mouse model to mimic cobalt-60 cutaneous radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosca, Rodrigo Crespo; Ferreira, Danilo Cardenuto; Napolitano, Celia Marina; Santin, Stefany Plumeri; Dornelles, Leonardo Dalla Porta; Alvarenga, Eluara Ortigoso; Mathor, Monica Beatriz, E-mail: rcmosca@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Propose: Cutaneous wound from irradiation is the most common complication in radiotherapy treatment, and can be lead to mortality. We describe an athymic mouse model to mimic cutaneous radiation injury by Cobalt-60. Methods: A protocol was including dosimetry with silicon diodes,10x10x5 cm arrangement made by four lead bricks and PVC pipe designed to immobilize the athymic mouse in order to irradiate one clamped back skin point that was subdivided in four parts. To get the measurements of dose rates on the arrangement in Panoramic Irradiator, it was used a silicon diode encased in an opaque protection for ambient light and connected to an electric cable, forming a dosing probe. The currents generated in diode sensitive volume as a function of time of exposure to gamma radiation coming from the radiator, with dose rate of 0,015 Gy/min in positions 1, 0,021 Gy/min in position 2, 0,55 Gy/min in position 3 and 1,45 Gy/min in position four. After the dosimetry, each athymic mouse was anesthetized using Xylazine and Ketamine dilution and entered into a PVC pipe and a small portion of skin (1 cm{sup 3}) was clamped. This tube was then fixed to arrangement and the athymic mouse was irradiate for 60 min, than it was being returned to its cage. Results: The wound was visualized in all animals and photographed after 5 days of irradiation, with the emergence of ulceration after 9 days. No systemic or lethal sequelae occurred or visualized in any animals. Late clinical signs included a wound healing after 22 days. Conclusion: While still being a baseline study, we created a new functional preclinical animal model that can be used for new therapies and may improve radiotherapy management. (author)

  13. Management of postoperative radiation injury of the urinary bladder by hyperbaric oxygen (HBO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peusch-Dreyer, D.; Dreyer, K.H. [Zentrum fuer Tauch- und Ueberdruckmedizin (ZETUeM), Bremen (Germany); Mueller, C.D. [Druckkammerzentrum Magdeburg (Germany); Carl, U. [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Universitaet Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Aim: In many case reports the success of treatment of late complications of radiotherapy with hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) has been shown. This synopsis attempts to review HBO in the treatment of chronic radiation injury of the bladder. Patients and methods: Three female patients who had developed urge-incontinence after a Wertheim operation and combined brachy-teletherapy with cobalt-60 and afterloading and did not respond to various drug therapies, were treated with HBO to a maximum of 40 applications. Results: In all patients HBO haltered and inverted the dynamic process underlying chronic bladder changes after irradiation. Rationales for the HBO are the reduction of tissue hypoxia and the induction of neoangiogenesis. Conclusions: There are no prospective trials up to date showing the benefit of HBO to urinary disorders caused by radiation cystitis. The positive results of our retrospective study should encourage clinicians to initiate prospective studies with the use of HBO in the treatment of radiation cystitis. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Ueber die erfolgreiche Anwendung der hyperbaren Sauerstofftherapie (HBO) zur Behandlung von Strahlenspaetkomplikationen ist in zahlreichen Publikationen berichtet worden. Ziel dieser Arbeit ist es, den Einsatz der HBO bei der Behandlung von Miktionsbeschwerden bei chronisch radiogenen Harnblasenschaeden zu bewerten. Patienten und Methode: Drei Patientinnen, die nach einer kombinierten Brachyteletherapie mit Kobalt 60 und Afterloading nach Wertheim-Operation unter einer medikamentoes nicht zu beeinflussenden Urge-Inkontinenz litten, wurden der HBO mit maximal 40 Behandlungen zugefuehrt. Ergebnisse: Die HBO war bei allen Patientinnen in der Lage, den dynamischen Krankheitsprozess der Strahlenzystitis aufzuhalten und teilweise umzukehren. Grundlage hierfuer ist die Beseitigung der Gewebshypoxie. Dieses wiederum stellt die Voraussetzung fuer eine Neovaskularisation im bestrahlten Gewebe dar. Schlussfolgerung: Prospektive Studien

  14. Radiation injury in the mouse kidney. I. Sequential light microscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 1 year, sequential morphologic study of radiation-induced renal disease has been carried out in 260 mice. Both kidneys were irradiated locally, either with single doses (SD) (1100 to 1900 rad) or with 10 fractions over 9 elapsed days (total doses of 3500 to 5000 rad). The most striking alterations occurred in glomeruli and consisted of progressive replacement of capillary walls and capillary lumina by an acidophilic, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive material, containing basement-membrane fragments. These lesions appeared initially at 3 months, and increased in both degree and extent as a function of time. Tubular atrophy and stromal fibrosis was not seen before 4 months, and, although progressive, they did not reach the severity of the glomerular damage. Lesions of vessels larger than capillaries were extremely rare even at the end of observation (12 months) when glomeruli were already totally obliterated. In both fractionated and single dose studies, the lesions progressed with time. The survival of the SD mice was directly related to dose and time of observation; none of the mice receiving 1900 rad SD survived beyond 10 months, while 90 percent of those receiving 1100 rad SD were alive at 12 months. Although available data are not sufficient to determine the initial site(s) of radiation injury in the renal parenchyma, this light microscopic study and preliminary electron microscopic observations suggest that at least some of the initial lesions occur in glomeruli. The late lesions in the glomeruli of these mice are identical to those seen in specimens of humans with advanced radiation nephropathy. The murine model thus appears to be appropriate for the study of the pathogenesis of this condition

  15. Body potassium content and 40K radiation dose to Iranian subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study 215 Iranian subjects including 180 males and 35 females were investigated for potassium body contents, its variations with age, weight, body build index, and slenderness, as well as the radiation dose due to 40K. The average total body potassium is 147 ± 22 g for males and 100 ± 16 g for females. The average potassium concentrations for males and females are 1.98 ± 0.34 and 1.60 ± 0.29 g kg-1 body weight, respectively. The potassium content decreases with age for both sexes. The 40K concentration decreases with slenderness in both sexes, particularly in females. The total body potassium increases with body build index for males, while its value is constant for females less than 40 y, and increases for females more than 40 y. The average effective doses due to 40K are 187 ± 32 μSv y-1 for males and 150 ± 27 μSv y-1 for females. (author)

  16. Optimizing whole-body kinematics to minimize valgus knee loading during sidestepping: implications for ACL injury risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, C J; Lloyd, D G; Elliott, B C; Reinbolt, J A

    2012-05-11

    The kinematic mechanisms associated with elevated externally applied valgus knee moments during non-contact sidestepping and subsequent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk are not well understood. To address this issue, the residual reduction algorithm (RRA) in OpenSim was used to create nine subject-specific, full-body (37 degrees of freedom) torque-driven simulations of athletic males performing unplanned sidestep (UnSS) sport tasks. The RRA was used again to produce an optimized kinematic solution with reduced peak valgus knee torques during the weight acceptance phase of stance. Pre-to-post kinematic optimization, mean peak valgus knee moments were significantly reduced by 44.2 Nm (p=0.045). Nine of a possible 37 upper and lower body kinematic changes in all three planes of motion were consistently used during the RRA to decrease peak valgus knee moments. The generalized kinematic strategy used by all nine simulations to reduce peak valgus knee moments and subsequent ACL injury risk during UnSS was to redirect the whole-body center of mass medially, towards the desired direction of travel. PMID:22387123

  17. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium prevents radiation-induced liver injury by inhibiting inflammation and protecting sinusoidal endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current management of radiation-induced liver injury is limited. Sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC) apoptosis and inflammation are considered to be initiating events in hepatic damage. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory actions during hepatic irradiation, acting via paracrine mechanisms. This study aims to examine whether MSC-derived bioactive components are protective against radiation-induced liver injury in rats. MSC-conditioned medium (MSC-CM) was generated from rat bone marrow–derived MSCs. The effect of MSC-CM on the viability of irradiated SECs was examined by flow cytometric analysis. Activation of the Akt and ERK pathways was analyzed by western blot. MSC-CM was also delivered to Sprague–Dawley rats immediately before receiving liver irradiation, followed by testing for pathological features, changes in serum hyaluronic acid, ALT, and inflammatory cytokine levels, and liver cell apoptosis. MSC-CM enhanced the viability of irradiated SECs in vitro and induced Akt and ERK phosphorylation in these cells. Infusion of MSC-CM immediately before liver irradiation provided a significant anti-apoptotic effect on SECs and improved the histopathological features of injury in the irradiated liver. MSC-CM also reduced the secretion and expression of inflammatory cytokines and increased the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. MSC-derived bioactive components could be a novel therapeutic approach for treating radiation-induced liver injury. (author)

  18. SU-E-J-247: Time Evolution of Radiation-Induced Lung Injury After Stereotactic Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Quantitative metrics to assess patient-specific radiation-induced lung injury have the potential to guide individualization of therapy and be early indicators of recurrence. Here we investigate computed tomography (CT) density changes in normal lung after stereotactic Proton Therapy. Methods: Participants in a phase-I clinical trial for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with protons are analyzed on a rolling basis. The dataset includes 9 patients with 34 CT images to date. Follow-up images are registered to the planning CT using deformable image registration and the change in CT density is correlated to the dose to examine the time-evolution of Hounsfield Unit (HU) changes after large doses of proton radiation. Results: The lung density observed on the follow-up images increases significantly with dose for all dose levels above 5 Gy(RBE) (p<0.001) for 8/9 patients. The change per unit dose [HU/Gy] varies significantly among the patients, from 0.1 (for the one patient without significant correlation) to 5.7 ΔHU/Gy(RBE). The current population average of ΔHU/Gy(RBE) is 2.1, i.e. a 1 Gy(RBE) increase in dose leads on average to a 2.1 HU increase in CT density. The slope of the dose-response curve is constant for all timepoints investigated (from 3–24+ months). Additionally a pronounced non-linearity in the dose response curve is noted for long follow-up times (>18 months). Conclusion: CT density changes have a robust correlation with proton dose, quantitatively similar to photon dose, and may allow estimation of a patient’s intrinsic radiosensitivity after proton therapy. The stability of the correlation with time however diverges from what is known about CT response after photon irradiation. This could have important implications for clinical decision-making during proton therapy for lung cancer, especially for scheduling of follow-up CT/PET imaging and diagnosis of recurrence

  19. SU-E-J-247: Time Evolution of Radiation-Induced Lung Injury After Stereotactic Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassberger, C; Sharp, G; Fintelmann, F; Paganetti, H; Willers, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantitative metrics to assess patient-specific radiation-induced lung injury have the potential to guide individualization of therapy and be early indicators of recurrence. Here we investigate computed tomography (CT) density changes in normal lung after stereotactic Proton Therapy. Methods: Participants in a phase-I clinical trial for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with protons are analyzed on a rolling basis. The dataset includes 9 patients with 34 CT images to date. Follow-up images are registered to the planning CT using deformable image registration and the change in CT density is correlated to the dose to examine the time-evolution of Hounsfield Unit (HU) changes after large doses of proton radiation. Results: The lung density observed on the follow-up images increases significantly with dose for all dose levels above 5 Gy(RBE) (p<0.001) for 8/9 patients. The change per unit dose [HU/Gy] varies significantly among the patients, from 0.1 (for the one patient without significant correlation) to 5.7 ΔHU/Gy(RBE). The current population average of ΔHU/Gy(RBE) is 2.1, i.e. a 1 Gy(RBE) increase in dose leads on average to a 2.1 HU increase in CT density. The slope of the dose-response curve is constant for all timepoints investigated (from 3–24+ months). Additionally a pronounced non-linearity in the dose response curve is noted for long follow-up times (>18 months). Conclusion: CT density changes have a robust correlation with proton dose, quantitatively similar to photon dose, and may allow estimation of a patient’s intrinsic radiosensitivity after proton therapy. The stability of the correlation with time however diverges from what is known about CT response after photon irradiation. This could have important implications for clinical decision-making during proton therapy for lung cancer, especially for scheduling of follow-up CT/PET imaging and diagnosis of recurrence.

  20. Prenatal and neonatal radiation injury and lymphohematopoietic development in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunologic and hematopoietic responses were studied in beagle dogs following prenatal or neonatal irradiation to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on the developing lymphohematopoietic system. In prenatally-irradiated dogs thymic medullary volumes were significantly reduced at birth, but had returned to control levels by 12 weeks of age. Irradiated dogs exhibited a significant reduction in primary humoral antibody responses and showed a concurrent decrease in T helper lymphocytes in the peripheral blood. In neonatally-irradiated dogs lymphocyte blastogenic responses were sharply decreased at 8 weeks, but returned to control levels by 12 weeks of age. Contact sensitivity to dinitrochlorobenzene was decreased, indicating reduced cell-mediated immune responses. Alterations in peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations included decreases in B cells and increases in T cells, possibly due to increased numbers of T suppressor cells. There were significant reductions in body size and body tissue weights in all irradiated dogs, although these were more severe and persistent in the prenatally-irradiated dogs. These data show that prenatally or neonatally-irradiated dogs have significantly postnatal immunologic and hematopoietic defects. The effect on bone marrow function in prenatally-irradiated dogs was more severe and persistent than in neonatally-irradiated animals; however, the neonatally-irradiated dogs exhibited more severe alterations in lymphocyte subpopulations than did the prenatally-irradiated dogs. The observation of altered lymphocyte subpopulations suggests altered immunoregulation and raises some important questions relating to radiation-induced immunodeficiency and increased susceptibility to clinical disease, including neoplasia

  1. Estimation of the temperature of a radiating body by measuring the stationary temperatures of a thermometer placed at different distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragán, V. M.; Villaluenga, J. P. G.; Izquierdo-Gil, M. A.; Pérez-Cordón, R.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a novel method for determining the temperature of a radiating body. The experimental method requires only very common instrumentation. It is based on the measurement of the stationary temperature of an object placed at different distances from the body and on the application of the energy balance equation in a stationary state. The method allows one to obtain the temperature of an inaccessible radiating body when radiation measurements are not available. The method has been applied to the determination of the filament temperature of incandescent lamps of different powers.

  2. Malformations and body injuries in a hybrid zone of crested newts (Caudata: Salamandridae: Triturus cristatus superspecies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Mačát

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Morphological abnormalities occur frequently in wild amphibian populations. We analysed malformation and injuries in the hybrid zone of three crested newt species, in the Czech Republic. In total, 274 individuals from 35 localities in South Moravia (Czech Republic were examined during the period 2010-2014. Malformations were found in eight newts (2.9% from seven localities. Injuries were recorded on 59 newts (21.5%. Proportions of tail crest injuries was significantly higher (P ˂ 0.1 in males than in females and the probability of being injured was significantly higher (P ˂ 0.01 for adult individuals. We discuss gene mutation, parasitism and predation as possible explanations for our observations.

  3. Raman spectroscopy delineates radiation-induced injury and partial rescue by amifostine in bone: a murine mandibular model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felice, Peter A; Gong, Bo; Ahsan, Salman; Deshpande, Sagar S; Nelson, Noah S; Donneys, Alexis; Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine; Morris, Michael D; Buchman, Steven R

    2015-05-01

    Despite its therapeutic role in head and neck cancer, radiation administration degrades the biomechanical properties of bone and can lead to pathologic fracture and osteoradionecrosis. Our laboratories have previously demonstrated that prophylactic amifostine administration preserves the biomechanical properties of irradiated bone and that Raman spectroscopy accurately evaluates bone composition ex vivo. As such, we hypothesize that Raman spectroscopy can offer insight into the temporal and mechanical effects of both irradiation and amifostine administration on bone to potentially predict and even prevent radiation-induced injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (350-400 g) were randomized into control, radiation exposure (XRT), and amifostine pre-treatment/radiation exposure groups (AMF-XRT). Irradiated animals received fractionated 70 Gy radiation to the left hemi-mandible, while AMF-XRT animals received amifostine just prior to radiation. Hemi-mandibles were harvested at 18 weeks after radiation, analyzed via Raman spectroscopy, and compared with specimens previously harvested at 8 weeks after radiation. Mineral (ρ958) and collagen (ρ1665) depolarization ratios were significantly lower in XRT specimens than in AMF-XRT and control specimens at both 8 and 18 weeks. amifostine administration resulted in a full return of mineral and collagen depolarization ratios to normal levels at 18 weeks. Raman spectroscopy demonstrates radiation-induced damage to the chemical composition and ultrastructure of bone while amifostine prophylaxis results in a recovery towards normal, native mineral and collagen composition and orientation. These findings have the potential to impact on clinical evaluations and interventions by preventing or detecting radiation-induced injury in patients requiring radiotherapy as part of a treatment regimen. PMID:25319554

  4. Precipitation of radiation injury in kidney epithelium reveals a low fractionation sensitivity (α/β = 12.5 Gy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the first report of a fractionation response for a normally late-responding tissue being characteristic of that for early-responding tissues, when assayed acutely by precipitating the radiation injury. The data suggest that the kidney may respond much more severely than expected to cytotoxic trauma given shortly after multifractionated irradiation, because of the greater amount of injury yet to be repaired at these early times after low than after high dose-per-fraction regimens. Also, this effect may be relevant to the interpretation of the response of tissues in general to dose fractionation. (author)

  5. Support of physical-technical radiation planning in patients with prostata carcinoma by means of whole-body computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Every radiation field yields a standard irradiation technique in the application of megavolt-devices. For physical-technical radiation planning the adjustment with the therapy simulator is necessary. The small-field radiation therapy is to plan more easily, if whole-body-computer tomogram sections are available. In large-field radiation therapy those are not needed. This is valid especially for constant fields. In the case of irradiation with telecobalt, movement irradiation are in question, especially when whole body tomogramms are helpful. (DG)

  6. Basic research of the relationship between irradiation dose and volume in radiation-induced pulmonary injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Qing-song; WANG Ping; WANG Jing; WANG Wei; WANG Jun; YUAN Zhi-yong

    2009-01-01

    Background Irradiation dose and volume are the major physical factors of radiation-induced lung injury.The study investigated the relationships between the irradiation dose and volume in radiation-induced lung injury by setting up a model of graded volume irradiation of the rat lung.Methods Animals were randomly assigned to three groups.The ELEKTA precise 2.03 treatment plan system was applied to calculate the irradiation dose and volume.The treatment plan for the three groups was:group 1 received a "high dose to a small volume" (25% volume group) with the mean irradiation volume being 1.748 cm3 (25% lung volume);the total dose and mean lung dose (MLD) were 4610 cGy and 2006 cGy,respectively (bilateral AP-PA fields,source to axis distance (SAD)=100 cm,6MVX,single irradiation);Group 2 received a "low dose to a large volume" (100% volume group) with the mean irradiation volume being 6.99 cm3 (100% lung volume);the total dose was 1153 cGy.MLD was 2006 cGy,which was the same as that of group 1 (bilateral AP-PA fields,SAD = 100 cm,6MVX,single irradiation);Group 3 was a control group.With the exception of receiving no irradiation,group 3 had rest steps that were the same as those of the experimental groups.After irradiation,functional,histopathological,and CT changes were compared every two weeks till the 16th week.Results Functionally,after irradiation breath rate (BR) increases were observed in both group 1 and group 2,especially during the period of 6th-8th weeks.The changes of BR in the 100% volume group were earlier and faster.For the 25% volume group,although pathology was more severe,hardly any obvious increase in BR was observed.Radiographic changes were observed during the early period (the 4th week) and the most obvious changes manifested during the mediated period (the 8th week).The extensiveness of high density and the decreased lung permeability were presented in the 100% volume group,and ground glass opacity and patchy consolidation were presented in the 25

  7. Experimental studies on pathogenesis of the brain radiation injury in early stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Tian [Suzhou Medical Coll., Jiangsu (China). 2nd Affiliated Hospital; Shiyao Bao; Weibo Yin; Chunfeng Liu; Zhilin Zhang

    2000-05-01

    To investigate the pathogenesis of the brain radiation injury in the early stage, a series of experiments were performed as below. The SD rats halfbrain were irradiated by the single dose of 10, 20, and 30 Gy of 4 MeV electron, all those experiments were performed in 1 day to 3 months after radiation. The neurological symptoms, the weight and the skin response inside the field of all the rats were evaluated sequentially. The measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using hydrogen gas generated by electrolysis, the calculation of the brain water content percentage with wet-dry weight formula. The DNA contents and the quantities of bcl-2 protein were analyzed by flow cytometry. The brain histological sections were scanned to assess the present or absence of white matter necrosis in the region of hippocampus, and then the hippocampus region was observed for the morphological changes of the blood vessel, neuroglial, and the neurons. Some of the data were analyzed by the Student t test. Intra-portal alopecia was observed in all rats which received 30 Gy and some rats which received 20 Gy, the abnormal neurological signs were not found in all the rats, but the tend of weight increase was less pronounced in 1-3 months in the irradiated rats than those unirradiated. By comparison the unirradiated hemisphere, the rCBF of the contralateral brain decreased in most of the rats. In 20 Gy and 30 Gy groups, rCBF decreased areas expand gradually along with the prolong of observation time, from the nucleus caudate putamen, to the frontal cortex and then the hippocampus, the rCBF of whole the irradiated hemibrain was reduced significantly at 3 month after radiation. The water content of the irradiated halfbrain increased progressively, it means the brain edema exists in the meantime. By comparison the unirradiation halfbrain, the apoptosis of the hippocampus cells in the irradiated brain increased, and the expression of bcl-2 protein decreased at the meantime, and those

  8. Protective effect of DL-3-n-Butylphthalide on radiation injury of rat brain tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect and its mechanism of DL-3-n-Butylphthalide on the brain damage in rats following whole brain irradiation. Methods: A total of 120 male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-irradiation group, irradiation group and DL-3-n-Butylphthalide group. The model of whole-brain irradiation was established by exposing rat brain to 4 MeV X-rays with a single-dose of 10 Gy. The rats were intraperitoneally injected with DL-3-n-Butylphthalide at the dosages of 0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg once a day. The contents of malondialdehyde and super oxide dismutase activity were measured, while the expressions of apoptosis-associated genes and the ultrastructural changes in hippocampus were examined by immunohistochemistry staining and electron microscope, respectively. Results: After irradiation, the content of malondialdehyde and the expression of apoptosis gene bax in rat brain tissue increased while the activity of super oxide dismutase (SOD) and the expression of anti-apoptosis gene bcl-2 decreased. Apoptosis was also observed in the neurons of hippocampus CA1. Compared with irradiation group, the content of malondialdehyde and the expression of bax gene in the DL-3-n-Butylphthalide group wen significantly reduced (t=-3.89 - -1.96, 2.72-3.48, P<0.05), while the activity of SOD and bcl-2 gene were significantly elevated (t=2.94-3.76, -3.18 - -2.08, P<0.05), and the injury degree of neuron structure in the DL-3-n-Butylphthalide group was slighter than that in the irradiation group. Conclusions: DL-3-n-Butylphthalide executes protective effects in a dose-dependent manner against the radiation injury in rats brain by reducing the induction of malondialdehyde, raising the activity of SOD and inhibiting the generation of apoptosis. (authors)

  9. In vivo characterization of early-stage radiation skin injury in a mouse model by two-photon microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Won Hyuk; Shim, Sehwan; Wang, Taejun; Yoon, Yeoreum; Jang, Won-Suk; Myung, Jae Kyung; Park, Sunhoo; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) injury is tissue damage caused by high energy electromagnetic waves such as X-ray and gamma ray. Diagnosis and treatment of IR injury are difficult due to its characteristics of clinically latent post-irradiation periods and the following successive and unpredictable inflammatory bursts. Skin is one of the many sensitive organs to IR and bears local injury upon exposure. Early-stage diagnosis of IR skin injury is essential in order to maximize treatment efficiency and to prevent the aggravation of IR injury. In this study, early-stage changes of the IR injured skin at the cellular level were characterized in an in vivo mouse model by two-photon microscopy (TPM). Various IR doses were applied to the mouse hind limbs and the injured skin regions were imaged daily for 6 days after IR irradiation. Changes in the morphology and distribution of the epidermal cells and damage of the sebaceous glands were observed before clinical symptoms. These results showed that TPM is sensitive to early-stage changes of IR skin injury and may be useful for its diagnosis. PMID:26755422

  10. Syndesmosis injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injuries to the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis commonly result from high-energy ankle injuries. They can occur as isolated ligamentous injuries and can be associated with ankle fractures. Syndesmotic injuries can create a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for musculoskeletal physicians. Recent literature has added considerably to the body of knowledge pertaining to injury mechanics and treatment outcomes, but there remain a number of controversies regarding diagnostic tests, imp...

  11. Effect of prophylactic hyperbaric oxygen treatment for radiation-induced brain injury after stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prophylactic effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy for radiation-induced brain injury in patients with brain metastasis treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: The data of 78 patients presenting with 101 brain metastases treated with SRS between October 1994 and September 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 32 patients with 47 brain metastases were treated with prophylactic HBO (HBO group), which included all 21 patients who underwent subsequent or prior radiotherapy and 11 patients with common predictors of longer survival, such as inactive extracranial tumors and younger age. The other 46 patients with 54 brain metastases did not undergo HBO (non-HBO group). Radiation-induced brain injuries were divided into two categories, white matter injury (WMI) and radiation necrosis (RN), on the basis of imaging findings. Results: Radiation-induced brain injury occurred in 5 lesions (11%) in the HBO group (2 WMIs and 3 RNs) and in 11 (20%) in the non-HBO group (9 WMIs and 2 RNs). The WMI was less frequent for the HBO group than for the non-HBO group (p = 0.05), although multivariate analysis by logistic regression showed that WMI was not significantly correlated with HBO (p = 0.07). The 1-year actuarial probability of WMI was significantly better for the HBO group (2%) than for the non-HBO group (36%) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The present study showed a potential value of prophylactic HBO for Radiation-induced WMIs, which justifies further evaluation to confirm its definite benefit

  12. Dietary Pectin Increases Intestinal Crypt Stem Cell Survival following Radiation Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureban, Sripathi M; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Weygant, Nathaniel; Ali, Naushad; Lightfoot, Stan A; Ding, Kai; Umar, Shahid; Schlosser, Michael J; Houchen, Courtney W

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal damage is a devastating adverse effect of radiation therapy. We have recently reported that expression of Dclk1, a Tuft cell and tumor stem cell (TSC) marker, 24h after high dose total-body gamma-IR (TBI) can be used as a surrogate marker for crypt survival. Dietary pectin has been demonstrated to possess chemopreventive properties, whereas its radioprotective property has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of dietary pectin on ionizing radiation (IR)-induced intestinal stem cell (ISC) deletion, crypt and overall survival following lethal TBI. C57BL/6 mice received a 6% pectin diet and 0.5% pectin drinking water (pre-IR mice received pectin one week before TBI until death; post-IR mice received pectin after TBI until death). Animals were exposed to TBI (14 Gy) and euthanized at 24 and 84h post-IR to assess ISC deletion and crypt survival respectively. Animals were also subjected to overall survival studies following TBI. In pre-IR treatment group, we observed a three-fold increase in ISC/crypt survival, a two-fold increase in Dclk1+ stem cells, increased overall survival (median 10d vs. 7d), and increased expression of Dclk1, Msi1, Lgr5, Bmi1, and Notch1 (in small intestine) post-TBI in pectin treated mice compared to controls. We also observed increased survival of mice treated with pectin (post-IR) compared to controls. Dietary pectin is a radioprotective agent; prevents IR-induced deletion of potential reserve ISCs; facilitates crypt regeneration; and ultimately promotes overall survival. Given the anti-cancer activity of pectin, our data support a potential role for dietary pectin as an agent that can be administered to patients receiving radiation therapy to protect against radiation-induces mucositis.

  13. Body Mass Index, Modulated by Lateral Posterior Tibial Slope, Predicts ACL Injury Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojicic, Katherine M.; Beaulieu, Melanie L.; Krieger, Daniel Imaizumi; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Wojtys, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Intervention strategies to prevent ACL injury rely on increasing knowledge of risk factors. While several modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for ACL rupture have been identified, the interaction between them remains unknown. The aim of this study was to quantify the relationship between BMI and several knee geometries as potential risk factors for ACL injury. We hypothesized that an increased BMI in the presence of an increased posterior tibial slope or middle cartilage slope would increase risk of ACL injury. We also hypothesized that an increased BMI in the presence of a decreased posterior meniscal height or meniscal bone angle would result in an increased risk of ACL injury. Methods: Sagittal knee MRI files from 76 ACL-injured and 42 non-injured subjects were gathered from the institution’s archive. The PTS, MCS, PMH, and MBA were measured using the circle method and compared with BMI from the subject demographic. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistical regression. Figure 1 details measurements made for each knee geometry. Results: Univariate analysis of PTS showed increases in PTS significantly increase the odds of ACL tear (p = 0.043, OR =1.12). Univariate analysis of MCS showed increases of MCS significantly increase the odds of ACL tear (p = 0.037, OR = 1.12). Multivariate analysis of PTS and BMI centered around the mean (PTS*cBMI) showed increases of PTS in combination with increases in cBMI significantly increases the odds of ACL rupture (p value = .050, OR = 1.03). Table 1 shows predicted increases in ACL injury risk for combinations of increases in PTS and BMI. Conclusion: An increase in BMI will increase the risk of ACL tear when an increase in lateral posterior tibial slope is present. An increase in lateral posterior tibial slope or lateral middle cartilage slope increases the risk of an ACL tear.

  14. Hepato protective effect of Spirulina Against Gamma Radiation and Carbon Tetrachloride induced Liver Injury in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vast biodiversity of nature provides bioactive compounds that may be useful in the fight against chronic diseases. Although there are a number of drugs available in the market, long time use may cause a number of side effects. Spirulina is a microscopic and filamentous cyanobacterium that contains essential amino acids, essential fatty acids, vitamins, minerals and anti-oxidative components. In the present study, Spirulina platensis has been investigated as a possible modifier of radiation and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced hepatic damage in albino rats. In the experiment, a total of 60 rats were used and divided into six groups of ten rats each: group 1, normal untreated rats; group 2, animals received only Spirulina (10 mg/kg) for 30 consecutive days; group 3, animals were exposed to 4 Gy whole body gamma radiation as a single shot dose; group 4, animals were injected intraperitoneally with CCl4 in olive oil (5 ml/kg i.p.) twice a week for four weeks ; group 5, rats were given orally Spirulina (10 mg/kg) for 30 days then exposed to 4 Gy gamma radiation as a single shot dose; and group 6, rats were given orally Spirulina (10 mg/kg) for 30 days and injected intraperitoneally with CCl4 in olive oil (5 ml/kg i.p.) twice a week for four weeks. The results revealed that animals treated with CCl4 or exposed to gamma radiation showed significant increase in the levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β). Also, a marked increase in the liver tissue thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) was observed. On the other hand, decrease in glutathione (GSH), glutathione transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) was observed in liver tissues of animal treated with CCl4 or exposed to gamma radiation. Oral pretreatment of rats with aqueous extract of Spirulina counteracted the radiation or CCl4 -induced lipid

  15. Quantitative Evaluation of Rabbit Brain Injury after Cerebral Hemisphere Radiation Exposure Using Generalized q-Sampling Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Yu Shen

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is widely used for the treatment of brain tumors and may result in cellular, vascular and axonal injury and further behavioral deficits. The non-invasive longitudinal imaging assessment of brain injury caused by radiation therapy is important for determining patient prognoses. Several rodent studies have been performed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, but further studies in rabbits and large mammals with advanced magnetic resonance (MR techniques are needed. Previously, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to evaluate radiation-induced rabbit brain injury. However, DTI is unable to resolve the complicated neural structure changes that are frequently observed during brain injury after radiation exposure. Generalized q-sampling imaging (GQI is a more accurate and sophisticated diffusion MR approach that can extract additional information about the altered diffusion environments. Therefore, herein, a longitudinal study was performed that used GQI indices, including generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA, quantitative anisotropy (QA, and the isotropic value (ISO of the orientation distribution function and DTI indices, including fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD over a period of approximately half a year to observe long-term, radiation-induced changes in the different brain compartments of a rabbit model after a hemi-brain single dose (30 Gy radiation exposure. We revealed that in the external capsule, the GFA right to left (R/L ratio showed similar trends as the FA R/L ratio, but no clear trends in the remaining three brain compartments. Both the QA and ISO R/L ratios showed similar trends in the all four different compartments during the acute to early delayed post-irradiation phase, which could be explained and reflected the histopathological changes of the complicated dynamic interactions among astrogliosis, demyelination and vasogenic edema. We suggest that GQI is a promising non-invasive technique and

  16. Clinical results of stereotactic body frame based fractionated radiation therapy for primary or metastatic thoracic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang Min [Univ. of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology] (and others)

    2006-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy for treating primary or metastatic thoracic tumors using a stereotactic body frame. Between January 1998 and February 2004, 101 lesions from 91 patients with thoracic tumors were prospectively reviewed. A dose of 10-12 Gy per fraction was given three to four times over consecutive days to a total dose of 30-48 Gy (median 40 Gy). The overall response rate was 82%, with 20 (22%) complete responses and 55 (60%) partial responses. The one- and two-year local progression free survival rates were 90% and 81%, respectively. The patients who received 48 Gy showed a better local tumor control than those who received less than 48 Gy (Fisher exact test; p=0.004). No pulmonary complications greater than a RTOG toxicity criteria grade 2 were observed. The experience of stereotactic body frame based radiation therapy appears to be a safe and promising treatment modality for the local management of primary or metastatic lung tumors. The optimal total dose, fractionation schedule and treatment volume need to be determined after a further follow-up of these results.

  17. The energy expenditure of people with spinal cord injury whilst walking compared to an able-bodied population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Vosloo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the field of spinal cord injury (SCI research there is an emphasis on the ability to ambulate.Purpose: To determine the ambulation energy expenditure (EE and factors that affect ambulation EE in SCI participants compared to able-bodied participants.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Participants were recruited from seven SCI rehabilitation units within the Johannesburg area. The following were used: demographic questionnaire to capture participants’ characteristics, modified Ashworth scale for spasticity; goniometer for range of movement (ROM; American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA scale for patient classification; accelerometer for EE and the six-minute walk test (6MWT for endurance. Characteristics of the study participants were summarised using descriptive statistics. Data were analysed as follows: two-sample t-test for comparison between the able-bodied and SCI sample and Pearson product moment correlations for relationship between identified factors and EE.Results: Participants comprised 45 in the SCI group and 21 in the able-bodied group. The mean energy expenditure per metre (EE/m for the SCI participants was 0.33 (± 0.29 calories compared to 0.08 (± 0.02 calories for the able-bodied participants. A decrease in walking velocity resulted in an increase in EE. For SCI participants, every decrease in degree of hip flexion ROM resulted in a 0.003 increase in EE/m walked. A unit decrease in velocity resulted in an increase of 0.41 in EE/m walked. Energy expenditure per metre decreased from ASIA A to ASIA D. Crutch walking utilised 0.34 calories per metre less energy than walking frames (p = 0.03.Conclusion: Based on this study’s findings, factors to consider in order to maximise energy efficiency whilst walking are maintaining hip flexion ROM and optimising velocity of walking.Keywords: Energy expenditure; Factors affecting energy expenditure; Range of motion; Walking Velocity

  18. Radiation-induced late brain injury and the protective effect of traditional Chinese medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate whether radiation-induced late injury of the brain can be ameliorated by traditional Chinese Medicine through blocking the primary events. Methods: This trial included five animal groups: sham irradiation, irradiation only, and three treatment groups. The whole brain of BALB/C mouse was irradiated with 22 Gy by using a 6 MV linear accelerator. Step down method was used to evaluate the study and memory abilities. Mouse weight was also recorded every week before and after irradiation. On D90, all mice alive were euthanized and Glee's silver dye method and Bielschousky silver dye method were used to detect the senile plaque and the neurofibrillary tangle. One-Way ANOVA was used to evaluate the differences among the groups in the various aspects of study and memory abilities as well as quality of life. Kaplan-Meier was used to evaluate the survival. Log-rank was used to detect the differences among the survival groups. Results: 1. There was no significant difference in survival among the treatment groups, even though Salvia Miltiorrhiza (SM) was able to improve the quality of life. As to the cognition function, it was shown that whole brain radiation would make a severe cognition damage with the learning and memorizing ability of the irradiated mice being worse than those of the sham irradiation group. The Traditional Chinese Medicine Salvia Miltiorrhiza possesses the role of a protective agent against cognition function damage induced by irradiation. 2. Glee's silver dye and Bielschousky silver dye show much more senile plaque and the neurofibrillary tangle in brain tissue of R group and R + 654-2 group than those in the R + SM group. Conclusions: Salvia Miltiorrhiza is able to protect the mouse from cognition function damage induced by irradiation and improve the quality of life by ameliorating the primary events, though it does not improve the survival

  19. Aerosol-induced lung injuries observed by synchrotron radiation X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue Weisheng [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhang Guilin [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)], E-mail: glzhang@sinap.ac.cn; Liu Ping; Sun Jianqi [Key Laboratory of Systems Biomedicine, Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Hwu Yeukuang [Institute of Physics, Acamemia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei (China); Je, Jung Ho [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Tan Mingguang [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Li Yan [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)], E-mail: liyan@sinap.ac.cn

    2007-09-15

    Adverse health effects are associated with the inhalation of a variety of atmospheric particles. To study the lung injuries caused by aerosol PM{sub 2.5}, synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique was used. Nude mice were inoculated with PM{sub 2.5} samples collected from suburban area (JD), industrial area (BS) and traffic tunnel (DPQ) of Shanghai. From X-ray phase-contrast images of lung tissues, apart from blood vessels and structures of alveoli, even hemorrhage spots of several microns caused by the inflammation were clearly observed. The studies showed that the PM{sub 2.5} samples collected from the traffic tunnel (DPQ) produced higher level of lung injury, followed by the aerosol samples collected from industrial area (BS) and suburban area (JD). Our studies also helped us to understand the process of lung injuries caused by aerosol particles.

  20. Aerosol-induced lung injuries observed by synchrotron radiation X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Weisheng; Zhang, Guilin; Liu, Ping; Sun, Jianqi; Hwu, Yeukuang; Je, Jung Ho; Tan, Mingguang; Li, Yan

    2007-09-01

    Adverse health effects are associated with the inhalation of a variety of atmospheric particles. To study the lung injuries caused by aerosol PM2.5, synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique was used. Nude mice were inoculated with PM2.5 samples collected from suburban area (JD), industrial area (BS) and traffic tunnel (DPQ) of Shanghai. From X-ray phase-contrast images of lung tissues, apart from blood vessels and structures of alveoli, even hemorrhage spots of several microns caused by the inflammation were clearly observed. The studies showed that the PM2.5 samples collected from the traffic tunnel (DPQ) produced higher level of lung injury, followed by the aerosol samples collected from industrial area (BS) and suburban area (JD). Our studies also helped us to understand the process of lung injuries caused by aerosol particles.

  1. Whole body [{sup 11}C]-dihydrotetrabenazine imaging of baboons: biodistribution and human radiation dosimetry estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, Rajan [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Neuroscience, Division of Brain Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Harris, Paul; Leibel, Rudolph [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Simpson, Norman; Parsey, Ramin [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); Van Heertum, Ronald [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Neuroscience, Division of Brain Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Mann, J.J. [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Neuroscience, Division of Brain Imaging, New York, NY (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 abundance quantified using the radiotracer [{sup 11}C]-dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) has been used to study diagnosis and pathogenesis of dementia and psychiatric disorders in humans. In addition, it may be a surrogate marker for insulin-producing pancreatic beta cell mass, useful for longitudinal measurements using positron emission tomography to track progression of autoimmune diabetes. To support the feasibility of long-term repeated administrations, we estimate the biodistribution and dosimetry of [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ in humans. Five baboon studies were acquired using a Siemens ECAT camera. After transmission scanning, 165-210 MBq of [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ were injected, and dynamic whole body emission scans were conducted. Time-activity data were used to obtain residence times and estimate absorbed radiation dose according to the MIRD model. Most of the injected tracer localized to the liver and the lungs, followed by the intestines, brain, and kidneys. The highest estimated absorbed radiation dose was in the stomach wall. The largest radiation dose from [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ is to the stomach wall. This dose estimate, as well as the radiation dose to other radiosensitive organs, must be considered in evaluating the risks of multiple administrations. (orig.)

  2. Bone marrow transplantation rescues intestinal mucosa after whole body radiation via paracrine mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Our previous study reveals bone marrow transplantation (BMT) recruits host marrow-derived myelomonocytic cells to radiation-injured intestine, enhancing stromal proliferation, leading secondarily to epithelial regeneration. In this study, we propose BMT ameliorates intestinal damage via paracrine mechanisms. Materials and methods: Angiogenic cytokines within the intestinal mucosa of mice after whole body irradiation (WBI) with or without BMT were measured by cytokine array and ELISA. BM conditioned medium (BMCM) with or without treatment with neutralizing antibodies to angiogenic cytokines were continuously infused into mice for three days after radiation. Carrageenan was used to deplete myelomonocytic cells of mice. Results: BMT increased VEGF, bFGF and other angiogenic and chemotactic cytokines in the intestinal mucosa within 24 h after WBI. Infusion of BMCM ameliorated radiation-induced intestinal damage with improved stromal activity and prolonged survival of mice. Neutralization of bFGF, PDGF and other angiogenic cytokines within BMCM abolished the mitigating effect to the intestine. Pretreatment of carrageenan to recipient mice reversed some of the cytokine levels, including VEGF, bFGF and IGF within the intestinal mucosa after BMT. Conclusions: Our result suggests BMT recruits host myelomonocytic cells and enhances intestinal stroma proliferation after radiation by secreting cytokines enhancing angiogenesis and chemotaxis. Host myelomonocytic cells further uplift the paracrine effect to enhance intestinal mucosal recovery.

  3. Whole body [11C]-dihydrotetrabenazine imaging of baboons: biodistribution and human radiation dosimetry estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 abundance quantified using the radiotracer [11C]-dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) has been used to study diagnosis and pathogenesis of dementia and psychiatric disorders in humans. In addition, it may be a surrogate marker for insulin-producing pancreatic beta cell mass, useful for longitudinal measurements using positron emission tomography to track progression of autoimmune diabetes. To support the feasibility of long-term repeated administrations, we estimate the biodistribution and dosimetry of [11C]-DTBZ in humans. Five baboon studies were acquired using a Siemens ECAT camera. After transmission scanning, 165-210 MBq of [11C]-DTBZ were injected, and dynamic whole body emission scans were conducted. Time-activity data were used to obtain residence times and estimate absorbed radiation dose according to the MIRD model. Most of the injected tracer localized to the liver and the lungs, followed by the intestines, brain, and kidneys. The highest estimated absorbed radiation dose was in the stomach wall. The largest radiation dose from [11C]-DTBZ is to the stomach wall. This dose estimate, as well as the radiation dose to other radiosensitive organs, must be considered in evaluating the risks of multiple administrations. (orig.)

  4. [Studies on chemical protectors against radiation. XXXI. Protection effects of Aloe arborescens on skin injury induced by X-irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y; Ohta, S; Shinoda, M

    1990-11-01

    Protective effects of Aloe arborescens (AA) on mouse skin injury induced by soft X-irradiation were examined. The mechanisms on radiation protection by measuring scavenge activity of activated oxygen, protective effects of nucleic acid, induction of antioxidative protein and so on were further investigated. Consequently a significant protective effect of skin injury was observed in AA S6-3-b. As the mechanisms of radiation protection in AA, the following matters were found. AA S6-3-b showed scavenge activity of hydroxyl radicals generated by Haber-Weiss reaction. AA S6-3-b suppressed the changes of activity in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase at 7d after soft X-irradiation. Metallothionein was induced in the skin and liver against normal mice at 24 h after administration of AA S6-3-b. PMID:2082014

  5. Studies on chemical protectors against radiation, 31; Protection effects of Aloe arborescens on skin injury induced by X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yushi; Ohta, Setsuko; Shinoda, Masato (Hoshi Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-11-01

    Protective effects of Aloe arborescens (AA) on mouse skin injury induced by soft X-irradiation were examined. The mechanisms on radiation protection by measuring scavenge activity of activated oxygen, protective effects of nucleic acid, induction of antioxidative protein and so on were further investigated. Consequently a significant protective effect of skin injury was observed in AA S6-3-b. As the mechanisms of radiation protection in AA, the following matters were found. AA S6-3-b showed scavenge activity of hydroxyl radicals generated by Haber-Weiss reaction. AA S6-3-b suppressed the changes of activity in superoxide dismutase and gluthathione peroxidase at 7d after soft X-irradiation. Metallothionein was induced in the skin and liver against normal mice at 24 h after administration of AA S6-3-b. (author).

  6. Motions of Kepler circumbinary planets in restricted three-body problem under radiating primaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dermawan, B., E-mail: budider@as.itb.ac.id; Hidayat, T., E-mail: taufiq@as.itb.ac.id [Astronomy Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Huda, I. N., E-mail: ibnu.nurul@students.itb.ac.id; Mandey, D., E-mail: mandey.de@gmail.com; Utama, J. A., E-mail: judhistira@yahoo.com; Tampubolon, I., E-mail: ihsan.tampubolon@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Wibowo, R. W., E-mail: ridlo.w.wibowo@gmail.com [Department of Computational Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    By observing continuously a single field of view in the sky, Kepler mission reveals outstanding results on discoveries of exoplanets. One of its recent progress is the discoveries of circumbinary planets. A circumbinary planet is an exoplanet that moves around a binary system. In this study we investigate motions of Kepler circumbinary planets belong to six binary systems, namely Kepler-16, -34, -35, -38, -47, and -413. The motions are considered to follow the Restricted Three-Body Problem (RTBP). Because the primaries (central massive objects) are stars, they are both radiatives, while the planet is an infinitesimal object. The primaries move in nearly circular and elliptic orbits with respect to their center of masses. We describe, in general, motions of the circumbinary planets in RTBP under radiating primaries. With respect to the averaged zero velocity curves, we show that motions of the exoplanets are stable, in accordance with their Hill stabilities.

  7. Long-term administration of a small molecular weight catalytic metalloporphyrin antioxidant, AEOL 10150, protects lungs from radiation-induced injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether administration of a catalytic antioxidant, Mn(III) tetrakis(N,N'-diethylimidazolium-2-yl) porphyrin, AEOL 10150, with superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic properties, reduces the severity of radiation-induced injury to the lung from single-dose irradiation (RT) of 28 Gy. Methods and Materials: Rats were randomly divided into four different dose groups (0, 1, 10, and 30 mg/kg/day of AEOL 10150), receiving either short-term (1 week) or long-term (10 weeks) drug administration via osmotic pumps. Rats received single-dose irradiation (RT) of 28 Gy to the right hemithorax. Breathing rates, body weights, blood samples, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess lung damage. Results: There was no significant difference in any of the study endpoints between the irradiated controls and the three groups receiving RT and short-term administration of AEOL 10150. For the long-term administration, functional determinants of lung damage 20 weeks postradiation were significantly worse for RT + phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and RT + 1 mg/kg/day of AEOL 10150 as compared with the irradiated groups treated with higher doses of AEOL 10150 (10 or 30 mg/kg/day). Lung histology at 20 weeks revealed a significant decrease in structural damage and collagen deposition in rats receiving 10 or 30 mg/kg/day after radiation in comparison to the RT + PBS and 1 mg/kg/day groups. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a significant reduction in macrophage accumulation, oxidative stress, and hypoxia in rats receiving AEOL 10150 (10 or 30 mg/kg/day) after lung irradiation compared with the RT + PBS and 1 mg/kg/day groups. Conclusions: The chronic administration of a novel catalytic antioxidant, AEOL 10150, demonstrates a significant protective effect from radiation-induced lung injury. AEOL 10150 has its primary impact on the cascade of events after irradiation, and adding the drug before irradiation and its short-term administration have no significant

  8. Pulmonary radiation injury manifested by signs of bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia after postoperative breast cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogata, Kenichi; Shibata, Kazumi; Nishio, Tetsuo [Kitakyusyu Municipal Medical Center, Fukuoka (Japan); Kawarada, Yuji; Hara, Nobuyuki

    1999-12-01

    A 67-year-old woman underwent surgery for cancer of both breast (right: mastectomy, left: conserving surgery), and received 60 Gy radiation to the left postoperative breast. Three months later, cough and fever developed. A chest radiograph demonstrated infiltrative shadows in the left lung field. Transbronchial lung biopsy specimens disclosed organizing exudates in the alveolar spaces and bronchioles. After treatment with prednisolone, the clinical symptoms and radiographic infiltrates disappeared. This was a case of pulmonary radiation injury pathologically manifested by signs of bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia. (author)

  9. Delayed radiation injury to the retrobulbar optic nerves and chiasm. Clinical syndrome and treatment with hyperbaric oxygen and corticosteroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roden, D.; Bosley, T.M.; Fowble, B.; Clark, J.; Savino, P.J.; Sergott, R.C.; Schatz, N.J. (Neuro-Ophthalmology Service, Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Thirteen patients with delayed radiation injury to the optic nerves and chiasm were treated with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) and corticosteroids. These patients experienced painless, abrupt loss of vision in one (6 patients) or both (7 patients) eyes between 4 and 35 months after receiving radiation doses of at least 4500 cGy to the region of the chiasm. Diagnostic evaluation including neuro-imaging and lumbar puncture showed no recurrent tumor and no other cause for visual loss. No patient's vision improved during treatment or follow-up lasting between 1 and 4 years. There were no serious complications of treatment.

  10. Finite width of the sonic event horizon and grey body Hawking radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Vinish, Y

    2014-01-01

    Finite width of the analog event horizon is determined by the nonlinearity length in the Kerr nonlinear optical system, which is discussed here, or by the healing length in Bose-Einstein condensates. The various eigen modes of fluctuations are found in the immediate vicinity of the event horizon and the scattering matrix due to the finite width horizon is calculated to within the leading order correction in the nonlinearity length. The Hawking radiation is found to be that of a grey body with the emissivity larger than one. A procedure of paraxial quantization of the fluctuation field is discussed and its connection to the conventional quantization of the electromagnetic field is demonstrated.

  11. Radiative characteristics of ice-covered fresh- and brackish-water bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Leppäranta, Matti; Erm, Ants; Arst, Helgi; Reinart, Anu

    2006-01-01

    The structure and optics of ice and snow overlying bodies of water were studied in the years 2000–2003. The data were collected in the northern temperate region (nine Estonian and Finnish lakes and one brackish water site, Santala Bay, in the Gulf of Finland). In the present paper we describe the results concerning the radiative characteristics of the system “snow + ice cover on the water”: albedo, attenuation of light, and planar and scalar irradiances through the ice. The basic data consist...

  12. A new treatment of radiation behaviour beyond one-body observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koji, Niita [Reasearch Organization for Information Science anf Technology (RIST), Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Yosuke, Iwamoto; Tatsuhiko, Sato; Norihiro, Matsuda; Yukio, Sakamoto; Hiroshi, Nakashima [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Hiroshi, Iwase [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    We propose a new treatment of radiation behaviour in transport calculations by introducing an event generator model in which we combine the nuclear data and the reaction models so as to trace all correlations of ejected particles keeping the energy and momentum conservation in a collision. By this new model, we can estimate the fluctuations around the mean values of one-body observables, for example, the deposit energy distribution in a cell, which cannot be obtained by the transport calculations based on the Boltzmann equation with the nuclear data. (authors)

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aridgides, Paul; Bogart, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has had a profound impact on the treatment paradigm for medically inoperable patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Local control and survival outcomes from prospective collaborative trials using SBRT have been highly favorable in this challenging patient population. Further study in medically operable patients is ongoing; however, randomized trials to help answer this question have terminated early because of poor accrual. Available prospective and retrospective data are discussed for the use of SBRT with regard to the medically inoperable and operable patient populations, as well as considerations for fractionation, dose, and toxicity. PMID:27427521

  14. Determining astrophysical three-body radiative capture reaction rates from inclusive Coulomb break-up measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Casal, J; Arias, J M; Gómez-Camacho, J

    2016-01-01

    A relationship between the Coulomb inclusive break-up probability and the radiative capture reaction rate for weakly-bound three-body systems is established. This direct link provides a robust procedure to estimate the reaction rate for nuclei of astrophysical interest by measuring inclusive break-up processes at different energies and angles. This might be an advantageous alternative to the determination of reaction rates from the measurement of $B(E1)$ distributions through exclusive Coulomb break-up experiments. In addition, it provides a reference to assess the validity of different theoretical approaches that have been used to calculate reaction rates. The procedure is applied to $^{11}$Li ($^{9}$Li+n+n) and $^6$He ($^{4}$He+n+n) three-body systems for which some data exist.

  15. Radiation and diffraction analysis of a cylindrical body with a moon pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hua-wei; ZHANG Hong-sheng

    2013-01-01

    An analytical solution is presented for the radiation and the diffraction of a cylindrical body with a moon pool floating on the surface of water with a finite depth.The expressions for the potentials are obtained by the method of separation of variables,and the unknown coefficients are determined by the boundary conditions and the matching requirements on the interface.The effects of the moon pool on the hydrodynamic characteristics of the body are investigated.Some peaks are observed on the curves of the added mass and damping coefficients,corresponding to the resonant frequencies of the moon pool.The internal free surface moves like a piston at a certain low resonant frequency.

  16. Crossing the line: increasing body size in a trans-Wallacean lizard radiation (Cyrtodactylus, Gekkota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Paul M; Skipwith, Phillip; Lee, Michael S Y

    2014-10-01

    The region between the Asian and Australian continental plates (Wallacea) demarcates the transition between two differentiated regional biotas. Despite this striking pattern, some terrestrial lineages have successfully traversed the marine barriers of Wallacea and subsequently diversified in newly colonized regions. The hypothesis that these dispersals between biogeographic realms are correlated with detectable shifts in evolutionary trajectory has however rarely been tested. Here, we analyse the evolution of body size in a widespread and exceptionally diverse group of gekkotan lizards (Cyrtodactylus), and show that a clade that has dispersed eastwards and radiated in the Australopapuan region appears to have significantly expanded its body size 'envelope' and repeatedly evolved gigantism. This pattern suggests that the biotic composition of the proto-Papuan Archipelago provided a permissive environment in which new colonists were released from evolutionary constraints operating to the west of Wallacea.

  17. Determining astrophysical three-body radiative capture reaction rates from inclusive Coulomb break-up measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, J.; Rodríguez-Gallardo, M.; Arias, J. M.; Gómez-Camacho, J.

    2016-04-01

    A relationship between the Coulomb inclusive break-up probability and the radiative capture reaction rate for weakly bound three-body systems is established. This direct link provides a robust procedure to estimate the reaction rate for nuclei of astrophysical interest by measuring inclusive break-up processes at different energies and angles. This might be an advantageous alternative to the determination of reaction rates from the measurement of B (E 1 ) distributions through exclusive Coulomb break-up experiments. In addition, it provides a reference to assess the validity of different theoretical approaches that have been used to calculate reaction rates. The procedure is applied to 11Li (9Li+n +n ) and 6He (4He+n +n ) three-body systems for which some data exist.

  18. Radiation-induced inflammatory markers of brain injury are modulated by PPARdelta activation in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnegg, Caroline Isabel

    As a result of improvements in cancer therapy and health care, the population of long-term cancer survivors is growing. For these approximately 12 million long-term cancer survivors, brain metastases are a significant risk. Fractionated partial or whole-brain irradiation (fWBI) is often required to treat both primary and metastatic brain cancer. Radiation-induced normal tissue injury, including progressive cognitive impairment, however, can significantly affect the well-being of the approximately 200,000 patients who receive these treatments each year. Recent reports indicate that radiation-induced brain injury is associated with chronic inflammatory and oxidative stress responses, as well as increased microglial activation in the brain. Anti-inflammatory drugs may, therefore, be a beneficial therapy to mitigate radiation-induced brain injury. We hypothesized that activation of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor delta (PPARō) would prevent or ameliorate radiation-induced brain injury, including cognitive impairment, in part, by alleviating inflammatory responses in microglia. For our in vitro studies, we hypothesized that PPARō activation would prevent the radiation-induced inflammatory response in microglia following irradiation. Incubating BV-2 murine microglial cells with the (PPAR)ō agonist, L-165041, prevented the radiation-induced increase in: i) intracellular ROS generation, ii) Cox-2 and MCP-1 expression, and iii) IL-1β and TNF-α message levels. This occured, in part, through PPARō-mediated modulation of stress activated kinases and proinflammatory transcription factors. PPARō inhibited NF-κB via transrepression by physically interacting with the p65 subunit, and prevented activation of the PKCα/MEK1/2/ERK1/2/AP-1 pathway by inhibiting the radiation-induced increase in intracellular ROS generation. These data support the hypothesis that PPARō activation can modulate the radiation-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in

  19. A comparison of robotic arm versus gantry linear accelerator stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avkshtol, Vladimir; Dong, Yanqun; Hayes, Shelly B; Hallman, Mark A; Price, Robert A; Sobczak, Mark L; Horwitz, Eric M; Zaorsky, Nicholas G

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer diagnosed in men in the United States besides skin cancer. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT; 6–15 Gy per fraction, up to 45 minutes per fraction, delivered in five fractions or less, over the course of approximately 2 weeks) is emerging as a popular treatment option for prostate cancer. The American Society for Radiation Oncology now recognizes SBRT for select low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. SBRT grew from the notion that high doses of radiation typical of brachytherapy could be delivered noninvasively using modern external-beam radiation therapy planning and delivery methods. SBRT is most commonly delivered using either a traditional gantry-mounted linear accelerator or a robotic arm-mounted linear accelerator. In this systematic review article, we compare and contrast the current clinical evidence supporting a gantry vs robotic arm SBRT for prostate cancer. The data for SBRT show encouraging and comparable results in terms of freedom from biochemical failure (>90% for low and intermediate risk at 5–7 years) and acute and late toxicity (cancer-specific mortality) cannot be compared, given the indolent course of low-risk prostate cancer. At this time, neither SBRT device is recommended over the other for all patients; however, gantry-based SBRT machines have the abilities of treating larger volumes with conventional fractionation, shorter treatment time per fraction (~15 minutes for gantry vs ~45 minutes for robotic arm), and the ability to achieve better plans among obese patients (since they are able to use energies >6 MV). Finally, SBRT (particularly on a gantry) may also be more cost-effective than conventionally fractionated external-beam radiation therapy. Randomized controlled trials of SBRT using both technologies are underway. PMID:27574585

  20. Ataxia Telangiectasia–Mutated Gene Polymorphisms and Acute Normal Tissue Injuries in Cancer Patients After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Studies of the association between ataxia telangiectasia–mutated (ATM) gene polymorphisms and acute radiation injuries are often small in sample size, and the results are inconsistent. We conducted the first meta-analysis to provide a systematic review of published findings. Methods and Materials: Publications were identified by searching PubMed up to April 25, 2014. Primary meta-analysis was performed for all acute radiation injuries, and subgroup meta-analyses were based on clinical endpoint. The influence of sample size and radiation injury incidence on genetic effects was estimated in sensitivity analyses. Power calculations were also conducted. Results: The meta-analysis was conducted on the ATM polymorphism rs1801516, including 5 studies with 1588 participants. For all studies, the cut-off for differentiating cases from controls was grade 2 acute radiation injuries. The primary meta-analysis showed a significant association with overall acute radiation injuries (allelic model: odds ratio = 1.33, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.71). Subgroup analyses detected an association between the rs1801516 polymorphism and a significant increase in urinary and lower gastrointestinal injuries and an increase in skin injury that was not statistically significant. There was no between-study heterogeneity in any meta-analyses. In the sensitivity analyses, small studies did not show larger effects than large studies. In addition, studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries showed larger effects than studies with low incidence. Power calculations revealed that the statistical power of the primary meta-analysis was borderline, whereas there was adequate power for the subgroup analysis of studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries. Conclusions: Our meta-analysis showed a consistency of the results from the overall and subgroup analyses. We also showed that the genetic effect of the rs1801516 polymorphism on acute radiation injuries was

  1. Ataxia Telangiectasia–Mutated Gene Polymorphisms and Acute Normal Tissue Injuries in Cancer Patients After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Lihua [Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun (China); Cui, Jingkun [Department of Internal Medicine, Nanling School District Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun (China); Tang, Fengjiao; Cong, Xiaofeng [Cancer Center, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun (China); Han, Fujun, E-mail: fujun_han@aliyun.com [Cancer Center, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Studies of the association between ataxia telangiectasia–mutated (ATM) gene polymorphisms and acute radiation injuries are often small in sample size, and the results are inconsistent. We conducted the first meta-analysis to provide a systematic review of published findings. Methods and Materials: Publications were identified by searching PubMed up to April 25, 2014. Primary meta-analysis was performed for all acute radiation injuries, and subgroup meta-analyses were based on clinical endpoint. The influence of sample size and radiation injury incidence on genetic effects was estimated in sensitivity analyses. Power calculations were also conducted. Results: The meta-analysis was conducted on the ATM polymorphism rs1801516, including 5 studies with 1588 participants. For all studies, the cut-off for differentiating cases from controls was grade 2 acute radiation injuries. The primary meta-analysis showed a significant association with overall acute radiation injuries (allelic model: odds ratio = 1.33, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.71). Subgroup analyses detected an association between the rs1801516 polymorphism and a significant increase in urinary and lower gastrointestinal injuries and an increase in skin injury that was not statistically significant. There was no between-study heterogeneity in any meta-analyses. In the sensitivity analyses, small studies did not show larger effects than large studies. In addition, studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries showed larger effects than studies with low incidence. Power calculations revealed that the statistical power of the primary meta-analysis was borderline, whereas there was adequate power for the subgroup analysis of studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries. Conclusions: Our meta-analysis showed a consistency of the results from the overall and subgroup analyses. We also showed that the genetic effect of the rs1801516 polymorphism on acute radiation injuries was

  2. Sports injuries of the ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, G A

    1972-07-01

    The author describes common sports injuries involving the ear. Such injuries include hematoma, lacerations, foreign bodies (tattoo), and thermal injuries. Ear canal injuries include swimmer's ear and penetrating injuries. Tympanum injuries include tympanic membrane perforations, ossicular discontinuity, eustachian tube dysfunction, temporal bone fractures and traumatic facial nerve palsy. Inner ear injuries include traumatic sensorineural deafness. The author emphasizes the management of these injuries.

  3. Synchronous malignant vagal paraganglioma with contralateral carotid body paraganglioma treated by radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devlina Chakarvarty

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Paragangliomas are rare tumors and very few cases of malignant vagal paraganglioma with synchronous carotid body paraganglioma have been reported. We report a case of a 20-year old male who presented with slow growing bilateral neck masses of eight years duration. He had symptoms of dysphagia to solids, occasional mouth breathing and hoarseness of voice. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC performed where he lived showed a sinus histiocytosis and he was administered anti-tubercular treatment for six months without any improvement in his symptoms. His physical examination revealed pulsatile, soft to firm, non-tender swellings over the anterolateral neck confined to the upper-mid jugulo-diagastric region on both sides. Direct laryngoscopy examination revealed a bulge on the posterior pharyngeal wall and another over the right lateral pharyngeal wall. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, 99mTc-labeled octreotide scan and angiography diagnosed the swellings as carotid body paraganglioma, stage III on the right side with left-sided vagal malignant paraganglioma. Surgery was ruled out as a high morbidity with additional risk to life was expected due to the highly vascular nature of the tumor. The patient was treated with radiation therapy by image guided radiation to a dose of 5040cGy in 28 fractions. At a follow-up at 16 months, the tumors have regressed bilaterally and the patient can take solids with ease.

  4. Integral Dose and Radiation-Induced Secondary Malignancies: Comparison between Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano G. Masciullo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to compare the integral dose received by non-tumor tissue (NTID in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT with modified LINAC with that received by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, estimating possible correlations between NTID and radiation-induced secondary malignancy risk. Eight patients with intrathoracic lesions were treated with SBRT, 23 Gy × 1 fraction. All patients were then replanned for 3D-CRT, maintaining the same target coverage and applying a dose scheme of 2 Gy × 32 fractions. The dose equivalence between the different treatment modalities was achieved assuming α/β = 10Gy for tumor tissue and imposing the same biological effective dose (BED on the target (BED = 76Gy10. Total NTIDs for both techniques was calculated considering α/β = 3Gy for healthy tissue. Excess absolute cancer risk (EAR was calculated for various organs using a mechanistic model that includes fractionation effects. A paired two-tailed Student t-test was performed to determine statistically significant differences between the data (p ≤ 0.05. Our study indicates that despite the fact that for all patients integral dose is higher for SBRT treatments than 3D-CRT (p = 0.002, secondary cancer risk associated to SBRT patients is significantly smaller than that calculated for 3D-CRT (p = 0.001. This suggests that integral dose is not a good estimator for quantifying cancer induction. Indeed, for the model and parameters used, hypofractionated radiotherapy has the potential for secondary cancer reduction. The development of reliable secondary cancer risk models seems to be a key issue in fractionated radiotherapy. Further assessments of integral doses received with 3D-CRT and other special techniques are also strongly encouraged.

  5. Effect of Body Habitus on Radiation Dose During CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Spine Injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Ronald J; Nguyen, Giao B; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Stinnett, Sandra S; Hoang, Jenny K; Kranz, Peter G

    2014-10-31

    This study investigated the degree to which body habitus influences radiation dose during CT fluoroscopy (CTF)-guided lumbar epidural steroid injections (ESI). An anthropomorphic phantom containing metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detectors was scanned at two transverse levels to simulate upper and lower lumbar CTF-guided ESI. Circumferential layers of adipose-equivalent material were sequentially added to model patients of three sizes: small (cross-sectional dimensions 25×30 cm), average (34×39 cm), and oversize (43×48 cm). Point dose rates to skin and internal organs within the CTF beam were measured. Scattered point dose rates 5 cm from the radiation beam were also measured. Direct point dose rates to the internal organs ranged from 0.05-0.11 mGy/10mAs in the oversized phantom, and from 0.18-0.43 mGy/10mAs in the small phantom. Skin direct point dose rates ranged from 0.69-0.71 mGy/10mAs in the oversized phantom and 0.88-0.94 mGy/10mAs in the small phantom. This represents a 180-310% increase in organ point dose rates and 24-36% increase in skin point dose rates in the small habitus compared with the oversize habitus. Scatter point dose rates increased by 83-117% for the small compared to the oversize phantom. Decreasing body habitus results in substantial increases in direct organ and skin point doses as well as scattered dose during simulated CTF-guided procedures. Failure to account for individual variations in body habitus will result in inaccurate dose estimation and inappropriate choice of tube current in CTF-guided procedures.

  6. Micro glial responses after focal radiation-induced injury are affected by α-difluoro methylornithine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to quantify microglial and astrocytic cell responses after focal 125I irradiation of normal brain and to determine the effects of an intravenous infusion of α-difluoro methylornithine (DFMO) on those responses. Methods and Materials: Adult beagle dogs were irradiated using high activity 125I sources. Saline or DFMO (75 mg/kg/day) was infused for 18 days, and 1 to 10 weeks later brain tissues were collected. Immunohistochemical stains were used to label phagocytes and amoeboid microglia (lectin RCA-1), astrocytes (GFAP), and cells synthesizing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (BrdU). Cell densities (cells/mm2) and BrdU labeling indices were quantified. Results: In dogs infused with saline, increases in phagocytes and amoeboid microglia were observed at 1-2 weeks and 4 weeks, respectively. The labeling indices for phagocytes and amoeboid microglia peaked at 4 weeks with maximum values of 4.8 and 13.4%, respectively. Astrocyte cell numbers increased from 2-6 weeks following irradiation; increased labeling indices were observed after 2 weeks. An infusion of DFMO significantly suppressed BrdU labeling and delayed the increase in cell numbers for phagocytes and amoeboid microglia. In both treatment groups, the proportion of total BrdU labeling accounted for by phagocytes was maximum 1 week after irradiation and then decreased. The proportion of total BrdU labeling accounted for by amoeboid microglia and astrocytes was zero for 2 weeks and then increased. Conclusions: Microglial reactions after focal irradiation involve the phagocytic and amoeboid cell forms and are characterized by increased BrdU uptake and increased cell number. DFMO significantly alters these responses. Changes in astrocyte cell number and BrdU labeling may be related to changes in microglia. Studies of cell responses and their modification may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of radiation injury, and to new strategies to optimize the use of

  7. Single administration of p2TA (AB103, a CD28 antagonist peptide, prevents inflammatory and thrombotic reactions and protects against gastrointestinal injury in total-body irradiated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salida Mirzoeva

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to elucidate the action of the CD28 mimetic peptide p2TA (AB103 that attenuates an excessive inflammatory response in mitigating radiation-induced inflammatory injuries. BALB/c and A/J mice were divided into four groups: Control (C, Peptide (P; 5 mg/kg of p2TA peptide, Radiation (R; total body irradiation with 8 Gy γ-rays, and Radiation + Peptide (RP; irradiation followed by p2TA peptide 24 h later. Gastrointestinal tissue damage was evaluated by analysis of jejunum histopathology and immunohistochemistry for cell proliferation (Cyclin D1 and inflammation (COX-2 markers, as well as the presence of macrophages (F4/80. Pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and KC as well as fibrinogen were quantified in plasma samples obtained from the same mice. Our results demonstrated that administration of p2TA peptide significantly reduced the irradiation-induced increase of IL-6 and fibrinogen in plasma 7 days after exposure. Seven days after total body irradiation with 8 Gy of gamma rays numbers of intestinal crypt cells were reduced and villi were shorter in irradiated animals compared to the controls. The p2TA peptide delivery 24 h after irradiation led to improved morphology of villi and crypts, increased Cyclin D1 expression, decreased COX-2 staining and decreased numbers of macrophages in small intestine of irradiated mice. Our study suggests that attenuation of CD28 signaling is a promising therapeutic approach for mitigation of radiation-induced tissue injury.

  8. Radiation-Induced Rib Fractures After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Risk Factors and Dose-Volume Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Kaori [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: shioyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Nonoshita, Takeshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshitake, Tadamasa [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohnishi, Kayoko [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Keiji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hirata, Hideki [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence, the clinical risk factors, and the dose-volume relationship of radiation-induced rib fracture (RIRF) after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: One hundred sixteen patients treated with SBRT for primary or metastatic lung cancer at our institution, with at least 6 months of follow-up and no previous overlapping radiation exposure, were included in this study. To determine the clinical risk factors associated with RIRF, correlations between the incidence of RIRF and the variables, including age, sex, diagnosis, gross tumor volume diameter, rib-tumor distance, and use of steroid administration, were analyzed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was also conducted. Regarding the maximum dose, V10, V20, V30, and V40 of the rib, and the incidences of RIRF were compared between the two groups divided by the cutoff value determined by the receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: One hundred sixteen patients and 374 ribs met the inclusion criteria. Among the 116 patients, 28 patients (46 ribs) experienced RIRF. The estimated incidence of rib fracture was 37.7% at 3 years. Limited distance from the rib to the tumor (<2.0 cm) was the only significant risk factor for RIRF (p = 0.0001). Among the dosimetric parameters used for receiver operating characteristic analysis, the maximum dose showed the highest area under the curve. The 3-year estimated risk of RIRF and the determined cutoff value were 45.8% vs. 1.4% (maximum dose, {>=}42.4 Gy or less), 51.6% vs. 2.0% (V40, {>=}0.29 cm{sup 3} or less), 45.8% vs. 2.2% (V30, {>=}1.35 cm{sup 3} or less), 42.0% vs. 8.5% (V20, {>=}3.62 cm{sup 3} or less), or 25.9% vs. 10.5% (V10, {>=}5.03 cm{sup 3} or less). Conclusions: The incidence of RIRF after hypofractionated SBRT is relatively high. The maximum dose and high-dose volume are strongly correlated with RIRF.

  9. Radiative capture reaction for $^{17}$Ne formation within a full three-body model

    CERN Document Server

    Casal, J; de Diego, R; Arias, J M; Rodríguez-Gallardo, M

    2016-01-01

    Background: The breakout from the hot CNO cycles can trigger the rp-process in type I X-ray bursts. In this environment, a competition between $^{15}\\text{O}(\\alpha,\\gamma){^{19}\\text{Ne}}$ and the two-proton capture reaction $^{15}\\text{O}(2p,\\gamma){^{17}\\text{Ne}}$ is expected. Purpose: Determine the three-body radiative capture reaction rate for ${^{17}\\text{Ne}}$ formation including sequential and direct, resonant and non-resonant contributions on an equal footing. Method: Two different discretization methods have been applied to generate $^{17}$Ne states in a full three-body model: the analytical transformed harmonic oscillator method and the hyperspherical adiabatic expansion method. The binary $p$--$^{15}$O interation has been adjusted to reproduce the known spectrum of the unbound $^{16}$F nucleus. The dominant E1 contributions to the $^{15}\\text{O}(2p,\\gamma){^{17}\\text{Ne}}$ reaction rate have been calculated from the inverse photodissociation process. Results: Three-body calculations provide a rel...

  10. Safeguarding radiation protection by the V-1 nuclear power plant operator and checking the job by hygiene service bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection in the V-1 nuclear power plant is controlled by a dosimetry service unit on the basis of information on the radiation situation obtained using stationary and portable dosimetric systems. Hygiene services bodies check the work by separate tests and measurements. It was found that the radiation burden of the nuclear power staff has so far been minimal. No environmental impact has been recorded of the V-1 nuclear power plant, even when available sensitive radiometric methods were used. The radiation protection aspects of the first refuelling are also mentioned. (author)

  11. Low Incidence of Fatigue after Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjeev eDash

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fatigue is a common side-effect of conventional prostate cancer radiation therapy. The increased delivery precision necessitated by the high dose per fraction of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT offers the potential of reduce target volumes and hence the exposure of normal tissues to high radiation doses. Herein, we examine the level of fatigue associated with SBRT treatment.Methods: Forty patients with localized prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated SBRT, and a minimum of 12 months follow-up were included in this analysis. Self-reported fatigue and other quality of life measures were assessed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-SBRT.Results: Mean levels of fatigue were elevated at 1 month post-SBRT compared to baseline values (p=0.02. Fatigue at the 3-month follow-up and later were higher but not statistically significantly different compared to baseline. African-American patients reported higher fatigue post-SBRT than Caucasian patients. Fatigue was correlated with hormonal symptoms as measured by the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC quality of life questionnaire, but not with urinary, bowel, or sexual symptoms. Age, co-morbidities, smoking, prostate specific antigen (PSA levels, testosterone levels, and tumor stage were not associated with fatigue. Conclusion: This is the first study to investigate fatigue as a side-effect of SBRT. In contrast to standard radiation therapy, results suggest SBRT-related fatigue is short-term rather than a long-term side effect of SBRT. These results also suggest post-SBRT fatigue to be a more frequent complication in African-Americans than Caucasians.

  12. Emesis as a Screening Diagnostic for Low Dose Rate (LDR) Total Body Radiation Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarata, Andrew S; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Demidenko, Eugene; Flood, Ann B; Swartz, Harold M; Ali, Arif N

    2016-04-01

    Current radiation disaster manuals list the time-to-emesis (TE) as the key triage indicator of radiation dose. The data used to support TE recommendations were derived primarily from nearly instantaneous, high dose-rate exposures as part of variable condition accident databases. To date, there has not been a systematic differentiation between triage dose estimates associated with high and low dose rate (LDR) exposures, even though it is likely that after a nuclear detonation or radiologic disaster, many surviving casualties would have received a significant portion of their total exposure from fallout (LDR exposure) rather than from the initial nuclear detonation or criticality event (high dose rate exposure). This commentary discusses the issues surrounding the use of emesis as a screening diagnostic for radiation dose after LDR exposure. As part of this discussion, previously published clinical data on emesis after LDR total body irradiation (TBI) is statistically re-analyzed as an illustration of the complexity of the issue and confounding factors. This previously published data includes 107 patients who underwent TBI up to 10.5 Gy in a single fraction delivered over several hours at 0.02 to 0.04 Gy min. Estimates based on these data for the sensitivity of emesis as a screening diagnostic for the low dose rate radiation exposure range from 57.1% to 76.6%, and the estimates for specificity range from 87.5% to 99.4%. Though the original data contain multiple confounding factors, the evidence regarding sensitivity suggests that emesis appears to be quite poor as a medical screening diagnostic for LDR exposures. PMID:26910032

  13. Development of a metabolomic radiation signature in urine from patients undergoing total body irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiakis, Evagelia C; Mak, Tytus D; Anizan, Sebastien; Amundson, Sally A; Barker, Christopher A; Wolden, Suzanne L; Brenner, David J; Fornace, Albert J

    2014-04-01

    The emergence of the threat of radiological terrorism and other radiological incidents has led to the need for development of fast, accurate and noninvasive methods for detection of radiation exposure. The purpose of this study was to extend radiation metabolomic biomarker discovery to humans, as previous studies have focused on mice. Urine was collected from patients undergoing total body irradiation at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at 4-6 h postirradiation (a single dose of 1.25 Gy) and 24 h (three fractions of 1.25 Gy each). Global metabolomic profiling was obtained through analysis with ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). Prior to further analyses, each sample was normalized to its respective creatinine level. Statistical analysis was conducted by the nonparametric Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and the Fisher's exact test and markers were validated against pure standards. Seven markers showed distinct differences between pre- and post-exposure samples. Of those, trimethyl-l-lysine and the carnitine conjugates acetylcarnitine, decanoylcarnitine and octanoylcarnitine play an important role in the transportation of fatty acids across mitochondria for subsequent fatty acid β-oxidation. The remaining metabolites, hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid are the final products of the purine catabolism pathway, and high levels of excretion have been associated with increased oxidative stress and radiation induced DNA damage. Further analysis revealed sex differences in the patterns of excretion of the markers, demonstrating that generation of a sex-specific metabolomic signature will be informative and can provide a quick and reliable assessment of individuals in a radiological scenario. This is the first radiation metabolomics study in human urine laying the foundation for the use of metabolomics in biodosimetry and providing confidence in biomarker

  14. Comparing models for quantitative risk assessment: an application to the European Registry of foreign body injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchialla, Paola; Scarinzi, Cecilia; Snidero, Silvia; Gregori, Dario

    2016-08-01

    Risk Assessment is the systematic study of decisions subject to uncertain consequences. An increasing interest has been focused on modeling techniques like Bayesian Networks since their capability of (1) combining in the probabilistic framework different type of evidence including both expert judgments and objective data; (2) overturning previous beliefs in the light of the new information being received and (3) making predictions even with incomplete data. In this work, we proposed a comparison among Bayesian Networks and other classical Quantitative Risk Assessment techniques such as Neural Networks, Classification Trees, Random Forests and Logistic Regression models. Hybrid approaches, combining both Classification Trees and Bayesian Networks, were also considered. Among Bayesian Networks, a clear distinction between purely data-driven approach and combination of expert knowledge with objective data is made. The aim of this paper consists in evaluating among this models which best can be applied, in the framework of Quantitative Risk Assessment, to assess the safety of children who are exposed to the risk of inhalation/insertion/aspiration of consumer products. The issue of preventing injuries in children is of paramount importance, in particular where product design is involved: quantifying the risk associated to product characteristics can be of great usefulness in addressing the product safety design regulation. Data of the European Registry of Foreign Bodies Injuries formed the starting evidence for risk assessment. Results showed that Bayesian Networks appeared to have both the ease of interpretability and accuracy in making prediction, even if simpler models like logistic regression still performed well.

  15. An Appreciation for the Rabbit Ladderlike Modeling of Radiation-induced Lung Injury with High-energy X-Ray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Ming Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the utility of rabbit ladderlike model of radiation-induced lung injury (RILI for the future investigation of computed tomography perfusion. Methods: A total of 72 New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into two groups: 36 rabbits in the test group were administered 25 Gy of single fractionated radiation to the whole lung of unilateral lung; 36 rabbits in the control group were sham-radiated. All rabbits were subsequently sacrificed at 1, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 h, and 1, 2, 4, 8,1 6, 24 weeks after radiation, and then six specimens were extracted from the upper, middle and lower fields of the bilateral lungs. The pathological changes in these specimens were observed with light and electron microscopy; the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-a and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 in local lung tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry. Results: (1 Radiation-induced lung injury occurred in all rabbits in the test group. (2 Expression of TNF-a and TGF-β1 at 1 h and 48 h after radiation, demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the test and control groups (each P 0.05. At greater than 48 h postradiation the relative amount of collagen fibers in the test groups significantly differ from the control groups (each P < 0.05, correlating well with the time postradiation (r = 0.99318. Conclusions: A consistent and reliable rabbit model of RILI can be generated in gradient using 25 Gy of high-energy X-ray, which can simulate the development and evolution of RILI.

  16. COX-2 inhibitors are contraindicated for treatment of combined injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, W; Kiang, J G; Cary, L; Elliott, T B; Pellmar, T C; Ledney, G D

    2009-12-01

    Casualties of radiation dispersal devices, nuclear detonation or major ionizing radiation accidents, in addition to radiation exposure, may sustain physical and/or thermal trauma. Radiation exposure plus additional tissue trauma is known as combined injury. There are no definitive therapeutic agents. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an inducible enzyme expressed in pathological disorders and radiation injury, plays an important role in inflammation and the production of cytokines and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and could therefore affect the outcome for victims of combined injury. The COX-2 inhibitors celecoxib and meloxicam were evaluated for their therapeutic value against combined injury in mice. In survival studies, the COX-2 inhibitors had no beneficial effect on 30-day survival, wound healing or body weight gain after radiation injury alone or after combined injury. Meloxicam accelerated death in both wounded and combined injury mice. These drugs also induced severe hepatic toxicity, exaggerated inflammatory processes, and did not enhance hematopoietic cell regeneration. This study points to potential contraindications for use of COX-2 inhibitors in patients undergoing therapy for radiation injury and combined injury. PMID:19929415

  17. Outcomes for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and an Analysis of Predictors of Local Recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Tao, Randa [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rebueno, Neal C. [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Christensen, Eva N.; Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xin A. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Amini, Behrang [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tannir, Nizar M. [Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tatsui, Claudio E.; Rhines, Laurence D. [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, USC Norris Cancer Hospital, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, California (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ghia, Amol J., E-mail: ajghia@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate local control, survival outcomes, and predictors of local relapse for patients treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 332 spinal metastases consecutively treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy between 2002 and 2012. The median follow-up for all living patients was 33 months (range, 0-111 months). Endpoints were overall survival and local control (LC); recurrences were classified as either in-field or marginal. Results: The 1-year actuarial LC and overall survival rates were 88% and 64%, respectively. Patients with local relapses had poorer dosimetric coverage of the gross tumor volume (GTV) compared with patients without recurrence (minimum dose [Dmin] biologically equivalent dose [BED] 23.9 vs 35.1 Gy, P<.001; D98 BED 41.8 vs 48.1 Gy, P=.001; D95 BED 47.2 vs 50.5 Gy, P=.004). Furthermore, patients with marginal recurrences had poorer prescription coverage of the GTV (86% vs 93%, P=.01) compared with those with in-field recurrences, potentially because of more upfront spinal canal disease (78% vs 24%, P=.001). Using a Cox regression univariate analysis, patients with a GTV BED Dmin ≥33.4 Gy (median dose) (equivalent to 14 Gy in 1 fraction) had a significantly higher 1-year LC rate (94% vs 80%, P=.001) compared with patients with a lower GTV BED Dmin; this factor was the only significant variable on multivariate Cox analysis associated with LC (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.29, 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.60) and also was the only variable significant in a separate competing risk multivariate model (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.62). Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy offers durable control for spinal metastases, but there is a subset of patients that recur locally. Patients with local relapse had significantly poorer tumor coverage, which was likely attributable to treatment planning directives that prioritized the

  18. Natural radioactivity and radiation index of the major plutonic bodies in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural radioactivity of the major plutonic bodies in Greece, as well as the assessment of any potential health hazard due to their usage as decorative building materials is studied. One hundred and twenty one samples from every major plutonic body in Greece, including various rock-types from gabbro to granite, have been measured for their natural radioactivity using γ-spectrometry methodology. According to the experimental results, the natural radioactivity levels were ranged up to 315 Bq kg−1 for 226Ra, up to 376 Bq kg−1 for 232Th and up to 1632 Bq kg−1 for 40K, with arithmetic mean values and standard deviations of 74 (±51), 85 (±54) and 881 (±331) Bq kg−1 respectively, which are below the international representative mean values for granite stones. The excess on the effective dose received annually indoors due to granite tiles usage is estimated considering a standard room model where granite tiles with 1.5 cm in thickness cover only the floor of the room. The increment on the external γ-radiation effective dose rate shows a Gaussian distribution well dispersed below 0.3 mSv y−1, presenting a mean value of 0.14 (±0.06) mSv y−1. In case of the internal α-radiation a log-normal distribution is appeared scattering below 0.5 mSv y−1 with a mean value 0.19 (±0.13) mSv y−1, for a well-ventilated living environment. In case of a poor-ventilated room the increment on internal effective dose rate is estimated with a mean value 0.27 (±0.19) mSv y−1 scattering below 0.8 mSv y−1. The majority of the samples increase the external as well as the internal dose less than 30% of the maximum permitted limit of the effective dose rate. Therefore, at least from radiological point of view, the plutonic rocks of Greece could be safely used as decorative building materials. -- Highlights: • Data upon natural radioactivity of all the major plutons of Greece are presented. • The samples from Pelagonian zone present the lower excess of the total

  19. Radiation-induced acute brain injury and the protective effect of traditional Chinese medicine-salvia miltiorrhiza

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To understand the expression of acute brain injury induced by radiation and the protective effect of traditional Chinese Medicine in BALB/C mouse. Methods: The whole brain of BALB/C mouse was irradiated to a dose of 25 Gy using a 6 MV X linear accelerator. Ten hours later, the brain tissue and blood sample were taken. Thiobarbituric acid reaction was used to detect the malonaldehyde substitute for the lipid peroxide. Immunohistochemical method was used to detect the expression of ICAM-1 on D1, 2, 3, and 10 after having received radiation. One-Way ANOVA was used to evaluate the differences in the values of LPO in the brain tissue and plasma between the groups. The difference of expression of ICAM-1 between the groups was compared by χ2 method. Results: Two hundred and twelve female BALB/C mice were divided into five groups: Control group, Radiation alone group (R), R + dexamethasone group, R + 654-2 group and R + Salvia Miltiorrhiza group. The contents of LPO in the mouse brain tissue 10 hours after 25 Gy of whole brain irradiation were as follows (mean ± standard error): Control group (1975.5±94.2) nmol/g, Radiation alone group (R) (3417.3±109.7) nmol/g, R + dexamethasone group (3113.6±178.1) nmol/g, R + 654-2 group (3406.4±159.1) nmol/g, R + Salvia Miltiorrhiza group (2981.5±140.1) nmol/g. Salvia Miltiorrhiza significantly reduced the LPO increase induced by irradiation (P<0.05). There were no significant differences between the other groups in the change of LPO in the plasma 10 hours after whole brain irradiation. The expression of ICAM-1 after whole brain irradiation was time-dependent . There was an increase of expression of ICAM-1 24 hours after irradiation, reaching the peak at 48 hours. Salvia Miltiorrhiza and dexamethasone strongly inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 when compared with radiation only, with the difference significant (P<0.01). Conclusions: The change of LPO content in the BALB/C mouse brain tissue and the increase in

  20. A pilot study of topical intrarectal application of amifostine for prevention of late radiation rectal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Clinical symptomatic late injury to the rectal wall occurs in about one-third of patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation. Reducing the physical dose to the anterior rectal wall without a similar reduction in the posterior peripheral zone is difficult because of the proximity of the prostate to the anterior rectal wall. On the basis of our previous observations in an animal model that intrarectal application of amifostine resulted in very high concentrations of amifostine and its active metabolite WR-1065 in the rectal wall, a Phase I dose-escalation clinical trial was undertaken. Methods and Materials: Twenty-nine patients with localized prostate cancer were accrued. Eligibility criteria included histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma, Karnofsky performance status ≥70, and no pelvic lymphadenopathy or distant metastases. The total dose to the prostate was 70.2 Gy in 20 patients and 73.8 Gy in 9 patients. Therapy was delivered using a 4-field technique with three-dimensional conformal planning. Amifostine was administered intrarectally as an aqueous solution 30 min before irradiation on the first 15 days of therapy. Amifostine was escalated in cohorts from 500 to 2500 mg. Proctoscopy was performed before therapy and at 9 months after completion. Most patients underwent repeat proctoscopy at 18 months. On Days 1 and 10 of radiotherapy, serum samples were collected for pharmacokinetic studies. The clinical symptoms (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale) and a proctoscopy score were assessed during follow-up. Results: All patients completed therapy with no amifostine-related toxicity at any dose level. The application was feasible and well tolerated. No substantial systemic absorption occurred. With a median follow-up of 26 months, 9 patients (33%) developed rectal bleeding (8 Grade 1, 1 Grade 2). At 9 months, 16 and 3 patients developed Grade 1 and Grade 2 telangiectasia, respectively. This was mostly confined to the anterior

  1. On the Legal Responsibility for the Body Injury in Sports%体育人身伤害法律责任研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王胜伟

    2012-01-01

    Body injuries are easily happened in sports, the regulations of laws about personal injuries do not distinguish general body injury and sports injury in our country and cant effectively solve the disputes. It is not only unfavorable to protect the athletes' right, but also was disadvantageous to the development of sports, Thus we analyze the particularity of the sports injury, adopt the different principle to investigate legal responsibility according to the degree of the athletes fault that caused personal injury, which can reduce the legal dispute, reduce athletes arxiety and improve people's enthusiasm for sports.%体育运动容易造成人身伤害,我国现有法律有关人身伤害的规定没有区分一般人身伤害与体育伤害,不能有效解决体育伤害的纠纷,既不利于保护运动员的权益,也不利于体育运动的发展,因而分析体育运动伤害的特殊性,根据运动员在运动中造成人身伤害的过错程度,采用不同的原则追究法律责任,可以减少法律纠纷,让运动员减少顾虑,提高全民的运动积极性。

  2. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Provide Protection against Radiation-Induced Liver Injury by Antioxidative Process, Vasculature Protection, Hepatocyte Differentiation, and Trophic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Francois

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the potential therapeutic effect of the infusion of hMSCs for the correction of liver injuries, we performed total body radiation exposure of NOD/SCID mice. After irradiation, mir-27b level decreases in liver, increasing the directional migration of hMSCs by upregulating SDF1α. A significant increase in plasmatic transaminases levels, apoptosis process in the liver vascular system, and in oxidative stress were observed. hMSC injection induced a decrease in transaminases levels and oxidative stress, a disappearance of apoptotic cells, and an increase in Nrf2, SOD gene expression, which might reduce ROS production in the injured liver. Engrafted hMSCs expressed cytokeratin CK18 and CK19 and AFP genes indicating possible hepatocyte differentiation. The presence of hMSCs expressing VEGF and Ang-1 in the perivascular region, associated with an increased expression of VEGFr1, r2 in the liver, can confer a role of secreting cells to hMSCs in order to maintain the endothelial function. To explain the benefits to the liver of hMSC engraftment, we find that hMSCs secreted NGF, HGF, and anti-inflammatory molecules IL-10, IL1-RA contributing to prevention of apoptosis, increasing cell proliferation in the liver which might correct liver dysfunction. MSCs are potent candidates to repair and protect healthy tissues against radiation damages.

  3. Effects of applied strain on radiation damage generation in body-centered cubic iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeler, Benjamin, E-mail: bwbeeler@ucdavis.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Materials Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Asta, Mark [Department of Materials Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hosemann, Peter [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grønbech-Jensen, Niels [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Mathematics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Radiation damage in body-centered cubic (BCC) Fe has been extensively studied by computer simulations to quantify effects of temperature, impinging particle energy, and the presence of extrinsic particles. However, limited investigation has been conducted into the effects of mechanical stresses and strain. In a reactor environment, structural materials are often mechanically strained, and an expanded understanding of how this strain affects the generation of defects may be important for predicting microstructural evolution and damage accumulation under such conditions. In this study, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations in which various types of homogeneous strains are applied to BCC Fe and the effect on defect generation is examined. It is found that volume-conserving shear strains yield no statistically significant variations in the stable number of defects created via cascades in BCC Fe. However, strains that result in volume changes are found to produce significant effects on defect generation.

  4. Effects of applied strain on radiation damage generation in body-centered cubic iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, Benjamin; Asta, Mark; Hosemann, Peter; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels

    2015-04-01

    Radiation damage in body-centered cubic (BCC) Fe has been extensively studied by computer simulations to quantify effects of temperature, impinging particle energy, and the presence of extrinsic particles. However, limited investigation has been conducted into the effects of mechanical stresses and strain. In a reactor environment, structural materials are often mechanically strained, and an expanded understanding of how this strain affects the generation of defects may be important for predicting microstructural evolution and damage accumulation under such conditions. In this study, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations in which various types of homogeneous strains are applied to BCC Fe and the effect on defect generation is examined. It is found that volume-conserving shear strains yield no statistically significant variations in the stable number of defects created via cascades in BCC Fe. However, strains that result in volume changes are found to produce significant effects on defect generation.

  5. New symbol launched to warn public about radiation dangers. Supplementary symbol aims to help reduce needless deaths and injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: With radiating waves, a skull and crossbones and a running person, a new ionizing radiation warning symbol is being introduced to supplement the traditional international symbol for radiation, the three cornered trefoil. The new symbol is being launched today by the IAEA and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) to help reduce needless deaths and serious injuries from accidental exposure to large radioactive sources. It will serve as a supplementary warning to the trefoil, which has no intuitive meaning and little recognition beyond those educated in its significance. 'I believe the international recognition of the specific expertise of both organizations will ensure that the new standard will be accepted and applied by governments and industry to improve the safety of nuclear applications, protection of people and the environment', said Ms. Eliana Amaral, Director, Division of Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety, IAEA. The new symbol is aimed at alerting anyone, anywhere to the potential dangers of being close to a large source of ionizing radiation, the result of a five-year project conducted in 11 countries around the world. The symbol was tested with different population groups - mixed ages, varying educational backgrounds, male and female - to ensure that its message of 'danger- stay away' was crystal clear and understood by all. 'We can't teach the world about radiation,' said Carolyn Mac Kenzie, an IAEA radiation specialist who helped develop the symbol, 'but we can warn people about dangerous sources for the price of sticker.' The new symbol, developed by human factor experts, graphic artists, and radiation protection experts, was tested by the Gallup Institute on a total of 1 650 individuals in Brazil, Mexico, Morocco, Kenya, Saudi Arabia, China, India, Thailand, Poland, Ukraine and the United States. The symbol is intended for IAEA Category 1, 2 and 3 sources defined as dangerous sources capable of death or serious injury

  6. Prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease stratified by body mass index categories in patients with wheelchair-dependent paraplegia after spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Flank, Peter; Wahman, Kerstin; Levi, Richard; Fahlström, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess risk factors for cardiovascular disease at different body mass index values in persons with wheelchair-dependent paraplegia after spinal cord injuries. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: A total of 135 individuals, age range 18-79 years, with chronic (>= 1 year) post-traumatic paraplegia. Methods: Body mass index was stratified into 6 categorical groups. Cardiovascular disease risk factors for hypertension, diabetes mellitus and a serum lipid profile were analyse...

  7. Protective effect of inhalation of hydrogen gas on radiation-induced dermatitis and skin injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Sadahiro; Fujita, Masanori; Ishihara, Masayuki; Tachibana, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Yoritsuna; Kaji, Tatsumi; Kawauchi, Toshio; Kanatani, Yasuhiro

    2014-11-01

    The effect of inhalation of hydrogen-containing gas (1.3% hydrogen + 20.8% oxygen + 77.9% nitrogen) (HCG) on radiation-induced dermatitis and on the healing of healing-impaired skin wounds in rats was examined using a rat model of radiation-induced skin injury. An X-ray dose of 20 Gy was irradiated onto the lower part of the back through two holes in a lead shield. Irradiation was performed before or after inhalation of HCG for 2 h. Inhalation of HCG significantly reduced the severity of radiodermatitis and accelerated healing-impaired wound repair. Staining with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) and 8-hydroxy-2(')-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) showed that the proportion of apoptotic keratinocytes and the level of staining in the X-irradiated skin of rats that pre-inhaled HCG were significantly lower than that of rats which did not pre-inhale HCG. Cutaneous full-thickness wounds were then created in the X-irradiated area to examine the time-course of wound healing. X-irradiation significantly increased the time required for wound healing, but the inhalation of HCG prior to the irradiation significantly decreased the delay in wound healing compared with the control and post-inhalation of HCG groups. Therefore, radiation-induced skin injury can potentially be alleviated by the pre-inhalation of HCG.

  8. Whole-body low dose radiation promotes the efficiency of conventional radiotherapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiotherapy is the most commonly used local treatment of cancer. However, the large dose needed for local control often limits its successful use. In view of the stimulatory effect of low dose radiation (LDR) on anticancer immunity an experimental study of the effect of whole-body LDR on the outcome of conventional local radiotherapy of cancer was designed with an aim at reducing the total dose and promoting treatment efficiency. With a Lewis lung cancer model in mice it was observed that a regimen of 2 Gy x 3 per week for 2 weeks with a total local dose of 12 Gy resulted in only 23% reduction of tumor volume in 1 month as| compared with untreated control, while substitution of the second, third, fifth and sixth doses of 2 Gy with whole-body irradiation (WBI) of 0.075 Gy with a total local dose of 4 Gy plus 0.3 Gy WBI caused a 69% reduction of tumor volume in the same period. Since gene therapy with Egr-IL-18-B7.1 in combination with local X-rays showed better control of mouse I melanoma than local radiotherapy alone, a trial was made with this plasmid in the above Lewis lung cancer model. The results showed that in the 12 Gy protocol the tumor volume) reduction was 42% and in the 4 Gy local plus 0.3 Gy WBI protocol the tumor volume reduction was 77% in one month. This better control of cancer growth was apparently related to the stimulation of anticancer immunity by WBI with low doses and facilitation of IL-18) and B7.1 expression from the cancer cells in the gene therapy group resulting in up-regulation of immunity. It is concluded that WBI with low doses in combination with conventional radiotherapy exerts a significant promoting effect manifested in reduction in local radiation dose and improvement in tumor control

  9. Lymphocyte-Sparing Effect of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Aaron T.; Herman, Joseph M.; Dholakia, Avani S.; Moningi, Shalini; Lu, Yao; Rosati, Lauren M.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Assadi, Ryan K.; Saeed, Ali M.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Weiss, Matthew J.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Ford, Eric; Grossman, Stuart A.; Ye, Xiaobu; Ellsworth, Susannah G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced lymphopenia (RIL) is associated with inferior survival in patients with glioblastoma, lung cancer, and pancreatic cancer. We asked whether stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) decreases severity of RIL compared to conventional chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Methods and Materials Serial total lymphocyte counts (TLCs) from patients enrolled in a prospective trial of SBRT for LAPC were compared to TLCs from an existing database of LAPC patients undergoing definitive CRT. SBRT patients received 33 Gy (6.6 × Gy 5 fractions). CRT patients received a median dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy × 28 fractions) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil (77%) or gemcitabine (23%) therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses (MVA) were used to identify associations between clinical factors and post-treatment TLC and between TLC and survival. Results Thirty-two patients received SBRT and 101 received CRT. Median planning target volume (PTV) was smaller in SBRT (88.7 cm3) than in CRT (344.6 cm3; P<.001); median tumor diameter was larger for SBRT (4.6 cm) than for CRT (3.6 cm; P=.01). SBRT and CRT groups had similar median baseline TLCs. One month after starting radiation, 71.7% of CRT patients had severe lymphopenia (ie, TLC <500 cells/mm3 vs 13.8% of SBRT patients; P<.001). At 2 months, 46.0% of CRT patients remained severely lymphopenic compared with 13.6% of SBRT patients (P=.007). MVA demonstrated that treatment technique and baseline TLCs were significantly associated with post-treatment TLC at 1 but not 2 months after treatment. Higher post-treatment TLC was associated with improved survival regardless of treatment technique (hazard ratio [HR] for death: 2.059; 95% confidence interval: 1.310–3.237; P=.002). Conclusions SBRT is associated with significantly less severe RIL than CRT at 1 month in LAPC, suggesting that radiation technique affects RIL and supporting previous modeling studies. Given the association of

  10. Gene expression arrays as a tool to unravel mechanisms of normal tissue radiation injury and prediction of response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jacqueline JCM Kruse; Fiona A Stewart

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 5 years there has been a rapid increase in the use of microarray technology in the field of cancer research. The majority of studies use microarray analysis of tumor biopsies for profiling of molecular characteristics in an attempt to produce robust classifiers for prognosis. There are now several published gene sets that have been shown to predict for aggressive forms of breast cancer, where patients are most likely to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy and tumors most likely to develop distant metastases, or be resistant to treatment. The number of publications relating to the use of microarrays for analysis of normal tissue damage, after cancer treatment or genotoxic exposure, is much more limited. A PubMed literature search was conducted using the following keywords and combination of terms: radiation, normal tissue, microarray, gene expression profiling, prediction. With respect to normal tissue radiation injury, microarrays have been used in three ways: (1) to generate gene signatures to identify sensitive and resistant populations (prognosis); (2) to identify sets of biomarker genes for estimating radiation exposure, either accidental or as a result of terrorist attack (diagnosis); (3) to identify genes and pathways involved in tissue response to injury (mechanistic). In this article we will review all (relevant) papers that covered our literature search criteria on microarray technology as it has been applied to normal tissue radiation biology and discuss how successful this has been in defining predisposition markers for radiation sensitivity or how it has helped us to unravel molecular mechanisms leading to acute and late tissue toxicity. We also discuss some of the problems and limitations in application and interpretation of such data.

  11. Comparison of mental health between individuals with spinal cord injury and able-bodied controls in Neiva, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leia A. Harper, BS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Although research has investigated the mental health of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI, an overwhelming majority of this research has been conducted in the United States, Western Europe, and other developed countries. The purpose of this study was to compare the mental health of individuals with SCI with able-bodied controls in Neiva, Colombia, South America. Subjects included 40 Colombians with SCI and 42 age- and sex-matched controls (N = 82. The groups did not differ based on age, sex, years of education, or socioeconomic status. However, controls were twice as likely to be married. Four measures assessed mental health, including satisfaction with life (Satisfaction with Life Scale, depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9, self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. In comparison with able-bodied controls, individuals with SCI reported significantly lower mental health on both depressive symptoms and satisfaction with life. These effect sizes were medium and large, respectively. The groups did not differ significantly on measures of self-esteem or anxiety. Mental health of individuals with SCI should be considered a central part of SCI rehabilitation interventions, particularly in Latin America.

  12. Cyberknife Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Nonresectable Tumors of the Liver: Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Goyal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT has emerged as a treatment option for local tumor control of primary and secondary malignancies of the liver. We report on our updated experience with SBRT in patients with non-resectable tumors of the liver. Methods. Our first 17 consecutive patients (mean age 58.1 years receiving SBRT for HCC (=6, IHC (=3, and LM (=8 are presented. Mean radiation dose was 34Gy delivered over 1–3 fractions. Results. Treated patients had a mean decrease in maximum pretreatment tumor diameter from 6.9±4.6 cm to 5.0±2.1 cm at three months after treatment (<.05. The mean total tumor volume reduction was 44% at six months (<.05. 82% of all patients (14/17 achieved local control with a median follow-up of 8 months. 100% of patients with HCC (=6 achieved local control. Patients with surgically placed fiducial markers had no complications related to marker placement. Conclusion. Our preliminary results showed that SBRT is a safe and effective local treatment modality in selected patients with liver malignancies with minimal adverse events. Further studies are needed to define its role in the management of these malignancies.

  13. 脊髓损伤患者身体组成的研究①%Study of Body Composition in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury (review)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雪甫

    2013-01-01

      脊髓损伤发病率有逐年上升的趋势,脊髓损伤患者常出现肥胖、肌肉萎缩、骨质疏松等身体组成成分改变。本文综述了近年关于脊髓损伤患者身体组成的研究进展。%There is an increasing trend in the incidence of spinal cord injury, body composition change such as obesity, muscular dystro-phy and osteoporosis, which often occur in patients with spinal cord injury. This article summarized the research progress in recent years on body composition in patients with spinal cord injury.

  14. [Autotelic activities aimed at the alteration of the human body from socially accepted to pathological forms: about non-suicidal self-injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmar, Sandor

    2016-03-01

    The author lays down that non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) constitutes an increasingly more common and serious public health problem, especially during the age of adolescence. In spite of the fact that the phenomenon has been known since the beginning of human mankind even in animals, we have not been able to either give a clear explanation or prevent its spreading yet. The author reviews the conceptual disturbances, behavioural phenotypes, cultural-historical and mythological antecedents related to self-injury, just as the controversial concepts, reasons of unclearness of the concepts, and clinical classification of self-injuries, and he outlines a new categorisation/ classification of the explanation of autotelic activities aimed at the alteration of the human body. He reviews the relationship between self-injuries and other psychological signs and symptoms and psychiatric illnesses, the explanations of developing self-injurious behaviour and further research directions. Besides the different models of self-injury he presents a holistic model. Besides the therapeutic guidelines of self-injurious behaviour, he calls the attention to the importance of genetic and nervous system researches, psychological and spiritual research, the importance of mental education and prevention, and he also lists some more essential questions future researchers have to find the answers for if we would like all children to be allowed to enter the adults' world in a healthy and sound state.

  15. Body weight-supported gait training for restoration of walking in people with an incomplete spinal cord injury: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Wessels; C. Lucas; I. Eriks; S. de Groot

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of body weight-supported gait training on restoration of walking, activities of daily living, and quality of life in persons with an incomplete spinal cord injury by a systematic review of the literature. Methods: Cochrane, MEDLINE, EM BASE, CINAHL, PEDro, DocOnline

  16. BODY WEIGHT-SUPPORTED GAIT TRAINING FOR RESTORATION OF WALKING IN PEOPLE WITH AN INCOMPLETE SPINAL CORD INJURY : A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, Monique; Lucas, Cees; Eriks, Inge; de Groot, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of body weight-supported gait training on restoration of walking, activities of daily living, and quality of life in persons with an incomplete spinal cord injury by a systematic review of the literature. Methods: Cochrane, MEDLINE, EM BASE, CINAHL, PEDro, DocOnline

  17. Obesity Increases the Risk of Chest Wall Pain From Thoracic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly being used to treat thoracic tumors. We attempted here to identify dose-volume parameters that predict chest wall toxicity (pain and skin reactions) in patients receiving thoracic SBRT. Patients and Methods: We screened a database of patients treated with SBRT between August 2004 and August 2008 to find patients with pulmonary tumors within 2.5 cm of the chest wall. All patients received a total dose of 50 Gy in four daily 12.5-Gy fractions. Toxicity was scored according to the NCI-CTCAE V3.0. Results: Of 360 patients in the database, 265 (268 tumors) had tumors within 30, or volume of the chest wall receiving 30 Gy. Body mass index (BMI) was also strongly associated with the development of chest pain: patients with BMI ≥29 had almost twice the risk of chronic pain (p = 0.03). Among patients with BMI >29, diabetes mellitus was a significant contributing factor to the development of chest pain. Conclusion: Safe use of SBRT with 50 Gy in four fractions for lesions close to the chest wall requires consideration of the chest wall volume receiving 30 Gy and the patient's BMI and diabetic state.

  18. Injury to the blood-testis barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to ionising radiation induces male infertility, accompanied by increasing permeability of the blood-testis barrier. However, the effect on male fertility by low-dose-rate chronic radiation has not been investigated. In this study, the effects of low-dose-rate chronic radiation on male mice were investigated by measuring the levels of tight-junction-associated proteins (ZO-1 and occludin-1), Niemann-Pick disease type 2 protein (NPC-2) and anti-sperm antibody (AsAb) in serum. BALB/c mice were exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (3.49 mGy h-1) for total exposures of 0.02 (6 h), 0.17 (2 d) and 1.7 Gy (21 d). Based on histological examination, the diameter and epithelial depth of seminiferous tubules were significantly decreased in 1.7-Gy-irradiated mice. Compared with those of the non-irradiated group, 1.7-Gy-irradiated mice showed significantly decreased ZO-1, occludin-1 and NPC-2 protein levels, accompanied with increased serum AsAb levels. These results suggest potential blood-testis barrier injury and immune infertility in male mice exposed to low-dose-rate chronic radiation. (authors)

  19. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for melanoma and renal cell carcinoma: impact of single fraction equivalent dose on local control

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson William; Lewis Karl; Flaig Thomas; Gonzalez Rene; Schefter Tracey E; Kavanagh Brian D; Stinauer Michelle A; Chidel Mark; Glode Michael; Raben David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are traditionally considered less radioresponsive than other histologies. Whereas stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) involves radiation dose intensification via escalation, we hypothesize SBRT might result in similar high local control rates as previously published on metastases of varying histologies. Methods The records of patients with metastatic melanoma (n = 17 patients, 28 lesions) or RCC (n = 13 patients, 25 lesions) t...

  20. Bone scan findings of chest wall pain syndrome after stereotactic body radiation therapy: implications for the pathophysiology of the syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Shane; Decker, Roy H.; Evans, Suzanne B.

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 72-year-old woman treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for peripherally located stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). After treatment she developed ipsilateral grade II chest wall pain. A bone scan showed nonspecific and heterogeneous increased radiotracer uptake in the volume of ribs receiving 30% of the prescription dose of radiation (V30). We present a color wash image demonstrating excellent concordance between the V30 and the area of scinti...

  1. The statistical distributed source boundary point method to calculate the acoustic radiation from the random vibrating body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXiufeng; CHENXinzhao; LIUZhao

    2003-01-01

    The statistical distributed source boundary point method (SDSBPM) put forward is applied to calculate the acoustic radiation from the random vibrating body. A detailed description of this method is presented. A test for the SDSBPM is carried out through the random vibrating sphere and the random vibrating cuboid. An experiment on the exterior acoustic radiation of a random vibrating simulation axial box of the lathe tool is performed in a semi-anechoic chamber.

  2. Chondrosarcoma arising within a radiation-induced osteochondroma several years following childhood total body irradiation: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Shuji [Kurume University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Fukuoka (Japan); Shen, Robert K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States); Laack, Nadia N. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rochester, MN (United States); Inwards, Carrie Y. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Pathology, Rochester, MN (United States); Wenger, Doris E.; Amrami, Kimberly K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Malignant degeneration arising in radiation-induced osteochondromas is extremely rare. We report a case of a 34-year-old man with a chondrosarcoma arising from an osteochondroma of the left posterior eighth rib that developed following total body irradiation received as part of the conditioning regimen prior to bone marrow transplantation at age 8. To our knowledge, this is only the fourth reported case of a chondrosarcoma arising within a radiation-induced osteochondroma and the first case occurring following childhood total body irradiation. (orig.)

  3. An Appreciation for the Rabbit Ladderlike Modeling of Radiation-induced Lung Injury with High-energy X-Ray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Ming Fang; Chun-Hong Hu; Xiao-Yun Hu; Xuan-Jun Yao; Ping-Yan Qian; Ju-Ying Zhou; Jian Guo

    2015-01-01

    Background:To evaluate the utility of rabbit ladderlike model of radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) for the future investigation of computed tomography perfusion.Methods:A total of 72 New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into two groups:36 rabbits in the test group were administered 25 Gy of single fractionated radiation to the whole lung of unilateral lung;36 rabbits in the control group were sham-radiated.All rabbits were subsequently sacrificed at 1,6,12,24,48,72 h,and 1,2,4,8,1 6,24 weeks after radiation,and then six specimens were extracted from the upper,middle and lower fields of the bilateral lungs.The pathological changes in these specimens were observed with light and electron microscopy;the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-a) and transforming growth factor-βl (TGF-β1) in local lung tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry.Results:(1) Radiation-induced lung injury occurred in all rabbits in the test group.(2) Expression of TNF-a and TGF-β1 at 1 h and 48 h after radiation,demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the test and control groups (each P < 0.05).(3) Evaluation by light microscopy demonstrated statistically significant differences between the two groups in the following parameters (each P < 0.05):thickness of alveolar wall,density of pulmonary interstitium area (1 h after radiation),number offibroblasts and fibrocytes in interstitium (24 h after radiation).The test group metrics also correlated well with the time ofpostradiation.(4) Evaluation by electron microscopy demonstrated statistically significant differences in the relative amounts of collagen fibers at various time points postradiation in the test group (P < 0.005),with no significant differences in the control group (P > 0.05).At greater than 48 h postradiation the relative amount of collagen fibers in the test groups significantly differ from the control groups (each P < 0.05),correlating well with the time postradiation (r =0

  4. Genetic variants in inducible nitric oxide synthase gene are associated with the risk of radiation-induced lung injury in lung cancer patients receiving definitive thoracic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Nitric oxide (NO), mainly synthesized by inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) in pathological conditions, plays an important role in cytotoxicity, inflammation and fibrosis. Elevations in exhaled NO after thoracic radiation have been reported to predict radiation-induced lung injury (RILI). This study examined whether genetic variations in NOS2 gene is associated with the risk of RILI. Material and methods: A cohort of 301 patients between 2009 and 2011 were genotyped for 21 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NOS2 gene by the Sequenom MassArray system. Kaplan–Meier cumulative probability was used to assess RILI risk and Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed to evaluate the effect of NOS2 genotypes on RILI. Results: Multivariate analysis found that three SNPs (rs2297518, rs1137933 and rs16949) in NOS2 were significantly associated with risk of RILI ⩾ 2 (P value = 0.001, 0.000092, 0.001, respectively) after adjusting for other covariates. Their associations were independent of radiation dose and mean lung dose. Further haplotype analysis indicated that the ATC haplotype of three SNPs is associated with reducing the risk of developing RILI. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that genetic variants of NOS2 may serve as a reliable predictor of RILI in lung cancer patients treated with thoracic radiation

  5. Sports injuries, drowning and exposure to radiation concern Canada Safety Council meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazards associated with surface sports, aquatic sports and exposure to radiation were considered at a meeting of the Canada Safety Council in late 1979. The session on radiation noted that 6 of 20000 radiation workers wearing dosimeters were exposed to a dose in excess of 5 rem, the annual limit set by the Atomic Energy Control Board. Radiographers were in the job classification receiving the highest doses of ionizing radiation. Concern was expressed for the emission of damaging radiation from broken mercury vapour lamps. Increased regulation rather than training was seen as the most effective solution. (T.I.)

  6. Body radioactivity and radiation dose from 40K in Bangladeshi subjects measured with a whole-body counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A group of subjects of Bangladeshi adults from both sexes were studied for internal radioactivity and effective dose by measuring the whole-body activity of naturally occurring 40K using a whole-body counter. The mean activity concentration in the whole body and effective dose due to naturally occurring 40K for the average male were found to be 2.0 ± 0.4 Bq.g-1 and 100 ± 26 μSv.y-1, respectively and those for the average female were 1.7 ± 0.3 Bq.g-1 and 100 ± 20 μSv.y-1, respectively. The mean activity concentration in the whole body and effective dose for both sexes were 1.9 ± 0.4 Bq.g-1 and 100 ± 25 μSv.y 1, respectively. The effective dose from 40K for subjects is below the value reported by the UNSCEAR. (authors)

  7. Evaluation of manual test for anterior cruciate ligament injury using a body-mounted sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, R.; Sagawa, K.; Tsukamoto, T.; Ishibashi, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Diagnosis method of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using body-mounted sensor is discussed. A wide variety of diagnosis method such as Pivot Shift Test (PST), Lachman Test and monitoring of jump motion (JT) are applied to examine the injured ACL. These methods, however, depend on the ability and the experience of examiner. The proposed method numerically provides three dimensional translation and rotation of the knee by using a newly developed 3D sensor. The 3D sensor is composed of three accelerometers and three gyroscopes. Measured acceleration of the knee during the examination is converted to the fixed system of coordinate according the acceleration of gravity and 3D rotation of the sensor, and is numerically integrated to derive 3D trajectory and rotation angle around the tibia. The experimental results of JT suggest that unsymmetrical movement of rotation angle of the tibia and sudden movement of estimated 3D trajectory show instability of knee joint. From the results of PST analysis, it is observed that the tibial angular velocity around the flexed position changes 41.6 [deg/s] at the injured side and 21.7 [deg/s] at the intact side. This result suggests the reposition of injured knee from subluxation.

  8. Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract; Syndrome aigu d'irradiation: les atteintes du systeme gastro-intestinal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, N.M.; Dublineau, I.; Lebrun, F.; Linard, C.; Monti, P.; Picard, C.; Scanff, P.; Aigueperse, J. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire

    2002-06-01

    Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract. Exposure to ionising radiation at medium to high doses results in the manifestation of mixed pathologies. Following the analysis of several radiation accidents it is clear that intestinal injury influences patient survival. However the appearance of the classically defined gastrointestinal syndrome is not always evident. Nevertheless injury to the gastrointestinal tract, in particular loss of barrier function, seems to play an important role in the development of Multiple Organ Failure such as reported in the recent accident at Tokai Mura. Ionising radiation overexposure results in changes in intestinal motility and nutrient, fluid and electrolyte absorption and secretion all which may contribute to the genesis of diarrhea. In addition to modified cellular transport properties for nutrients or electrolytes, important loss of epithelial cells is also a major contributing factor. Intestinal functions are controlled by many factors such as neurotransmitters, locally released mediators from endocrine cells or immunocompetent cells in addition to luminal agents. To date, treatment of radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury is mainly symptomatic. However treatments such as growth factors, anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as cellular transplantation remain to be validated in the radiation accident situation. (author)

  9. Biochemical metabolic changes assessed by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy after radiation-induced hepatic injury in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ri-Sheng Yu; Liang Hao; Fei Dong; Jian-Shan Mao; Jian-Zhong Sun; Ying Chen; Min Lin; Zhi-Kang Wang; Wen-Hong Ding

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To compare the features of biochemical metabolic changes detected by hepatic phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) with the liver damage score (LDS) and pathologic changes in rabbits and to investigate the diagnostic value of 31P MRS in acute hepatic radiation injury.METHODS:A total of 30 rabbits received different radiation doses (ranging 5-20 Gy) to establish acute hepatic injury models.Blood biochemical tests,31P MRS and pathological examinations were carried out 24 h after irradiation.The degree of injury was evaluated according to LDS and pathology.Ten healthy rabbits served as controls.The MR examination was performed on a 1.5 T imager using a 1H/31P surface coil by the 2D chemical shift imaging technique.The relative quantities of phosphomonoesters (PME),phosphodiesters (PDE),inorganic phosphate (Pi) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were measured.The data were statistically analyzed.RESULTS:(1) Relative quantification of phosphorus metabolites:(a) ATP:there were significant differences (P<0.05) (LDS-groups:control group vs mild group vs moderate group vs severe group,1.83±0.33 vs 1.55±0.24 vs 1.27±0.09 vs 0.98±0.18;pathological groups:control group vs mild group vs moderate group vs severe group,1.83±0.33 vs 1.58±0.25 vs 1.32±0.07 vs 1.02 ± 0.18) of ATP relative quantification among control group,mild injured group,moderate injured group,and severe injured group according to both LDS grading and pathological grading,respectively,and it decreased progressively with the increased degree of injury (r=-0.723,P=0.000).(b) PME and Pi;the relative quantification of PME and Pi decreased significantly in the severe injured group,and the difference between the control group and severe injured group was significant (P<0.05) (PME:LDScontrol group vs LDS-severe group,0.86±0.23 vs 0.58±0.22,P=0.031;pathological control group vs pathological severe group,0.86±0.23 vs 0.60±0.21,P=0.037;Pi:LDS-control group vs LDS-severe group,0.74±0.18 vs

  10. Spine stereotactic body radiation therapy plans: Achieving dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report our experience of establishing planning objectives to achieve dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plans. Patients with spine lesions were treated using SBRT in our institution since September 2009. Since September 2011, we established the following planning objectives for our SBRT spine plans in addition to the cord dose constraints: (1) dose coverage—prescription dose (PD) to cover at least 95% planning target volume (PTV) and 90% PD to cover at least 99% PTV; (2) conformity index (CI)—ratio of prescription isodose volume (PIV) to the PTV < 1.2; (3) dose falloff—ratio of 50% PIV to the PTV (R50%); (4) and maximum dose in percentage of PD at 2 cm from PTV in any direction (D2cm) to follow Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915. We have retrospectively reviewed 66 separate spine lesions treated between September 2009 and December 2012 (31 treated before September 2011 [group 1] and 35 treated after [group 2]). The χ2 test was used to examine the difference in parameters between groups. The PTV V100% PD ≥ 95% objective was met in 29.0% of group 1 vs 91.4% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. The PTV V90% PD ≥ 99% objective was met in 38.7% of group 1 vs 88.6% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. Overall, 4 plans in group 1 had CI > 1.2 vs none in group 2 (p = 0.04). For D2cm, 48.3% plans yielded a minor violation of the objectives and 16.1% a major violation for group 1, whereas 17.1% exhibited a minor violation and 2.9% a major violation for group 2 (p < 0.01). Spine SBRT plans can be improved on dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff employing a combination of RTOG spine and lung SBRT protocol planning objectives

  11. Acceptable Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Tumors Adjacent to the Central Biliary System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriguchi, Takahisa; Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Oku, Yohei; Aoki, Yousuke [Radiation Oncology Center, Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Shigematsu, Naoyuki [Department of Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kunieda, Etsuo, E-mail: kunieda-mi@umin.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokai University, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate biliary toxicity after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver tumors. Methods and Materials: Among 297 consecutive patients with liver tumors treated with SBRT of 35 to 50 Gy in 5 fractions, patients who were irradiated with >20 Gy to the central biliary system (CBS), including the gallbladder, and had follow-up times >6 months were retrospectively analyzed. Toxicity profiles, such as clinical symptoms and laboratory and radiologic data especially for obstructive jaundice and biliary infection, were investigated in relation to the dose volume and length relationship for each biliary organ. Results: Fifty patients with 55 tumors were irradiated with >20 Gy to the CBS. The median follow-up period was 18.2 months (range, 6.0-80.5 months). In the dose length analysis, 39, 34, 14, and 2 patients were irradiated with >20 Gy, >30 Gy, >40 Gy, and >50 Gy, respectively, to >1 cm of the biliary tract. Seven patients were irradiated with >20 Gy to >20% of the gallbladder. Only 2 patients experienced asymptomatic bile duct stenosis. One patient, metachronously treated twice with SBRT for tumors adjacent to each other, had a transient increase in hepatic and biliary enzymes 12 months after the second treatment. The high-dose area >80 Gy corresponded to the biliary stenosis region. The other patient experienced biliary stenosis 5 months after SBRT and had no laboratory changes. The biliary tract irradiated with >20 Gy was 7 mm and did not correspond to the bile duct stenosis region. No obstructive jaundice or biliary infection was found in any patient. Conclusions: SBRT for liver tumors adjacent to the CBS was feasible with minimal biliary toxicity. Only 1 patient had exceptional radiation-induced bile duct stenosis. For liver tumors adjacent to the CBS without other effective treatment options, SBRT at a dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions is a safe treatment with regard to biliary toxicity.

  12. Ionizing radiation and lipid peroxidation in human body; Radiazioni ionizzanti e perossidazione lipidica nell`organismo umano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giubileo, Gianfranco [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Roma (Italy)

    1997-07-01

    Lipids are organic compounds constituting the living cells. Lipid molecules can be disassembled through peroxidative pathways and hydrocarbons can be bred as end-product of lipid peroxidation in vivo. Lipid peroxidation can be started by an indirect effect of ionizing radiation. So a radioinduced cellular damage in human body can be detected by monitoring the production of specific hydrocarbons.

  13. Raw data-based iterative reconstruction in body CTA: evaluation of radiation dose saving potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winklehner, Anna; Karlo, Christoph; Puippe, Gilbert; Goetti, Robert; Pfammatter, Thomas; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    To evaluate prospectively, in patients undergoing body CTA, the radiation dose saving potential of raw data-based iterative reconstruction as compared to filtered back projection (FBP). Twenty-five patients underwent thoraco-abdominal CTA with 128-slice dual-source CT, operating both tubes at 120 kV. Full-dose (FD) images were reconstructed with FBP and were compared to half-dose (HD) images with FBP and HD-images with sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE), both reconstructed using data from only one tube-detector-system. Image quality and sharpness of the aortic contour were assessed. Vessel attenuation and noise were measured, contrast-to-noise-ratio was calculated. Noise as image quality deteriorating artefact occurred in 24/25 (96%) HD-FBP but not in FD-FBP and HD-raw data-based iterative reconstruction datasets (p < 0.001). Other artefacts occurred with similar prevalence among the datasets. Sharpness of the aortic contour was higher for FD-FBP and HD-raw data-based iterative reconstruction as compared to HD-FBP (p < 0.001). Aortoiliac attenuation was similar among all datasets (p > 0.05). Lowest noise was found for HD-raw data-based iterative reconstruction (7.23HU), being 9.4% lower than that in FD-FBP (7.98HU, p < 0.05) and 30.8% lower than in HD-FBP images (10.44HU, p < 0.001). Contrast-to-noise-ratio was lower in HD-FBP (p < 0.001) and higher in HD-raw data-based iterative reconstruction (p < 0.001) as compared to FD-FBP. Intra-individual comparisons of image quality of body CTA suggest that raw data-based iterative reconstruction allows for dose reduction >50% while maintaining image quality. (orig.)

  14. Delta-tocotrienol suppresses radiation-induced microRNA-30 and protects mice and human CD34+ cells from radiation injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Hong Li

    Full Text Available We reported that microRNA-30c (miR-30c plays a key role in radiation-induced human cell damage through an apoptotic pathway. Herein we further evaluated radiation-induced miR-30 expression and mechanisms of delta-tocotrienol (DT3, a radiation countermeasure candidate, for regulating miR-30 in a mouse model and human hematopoietic CD34+ cells. CD2F1 mice were exposed to 0 (control or 7-12.5 Gy total-body gamma-radiation, and CD34+ cells were irradiated with 0, 2 or 4 Gy of radiation. Single doses of DT3 (75 mg/kg, subcutaneous injection for mice or 2 μM for CD34+ cell culture were administrated 24 h before irradiation and animal survival was monitored for 30 days. Mouse bone marrow (BM, jejunum, kidney, liver and serum as well as CD34+ cells were collected at 1, 4, 8, 24, 48 or 72 h after irradiation to determine apoptotic markers, pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL-1β and IL-6, miR-30, and stress response protein expression. Our results showed that radiation-induced IL-1β release and cell damage are pathological states that lead to an early expression and secretion of miR-30b and miR-30c in mouse tissues and serum and in human CD34+ cells. DT3 suppressed IL-1β and miR-30 expression, protected against radiation-induced apoptosis in mouse and human cells, and increased survival of irradiated mice. Furthermore, an anti-IL-1β antibody downregulated radiation-induced NFκBp65 phosphorylation, inhibited miR-30 expression and protected CD34+ cells from radiation exposure. Knockdown of NFκBp65 by small interfering RNA (siRNA significantly suppressed radiation-induced miR-30 expression in CD34+ cells. Our data suggest that DT3 protects human and mouse cells from radiation damage may through suppression of IL-1β-induced NFκB/miR-30 signaling.

  15. Modeling of Radiation Pneumonitis after Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: A Bayesian Network Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sangkyu; Jeyaseelan, Krishinima; Faria, Sergio; Kopek, Neil; Brisebois, Pascale; Vu, Toni; Filion, Edith; Campeau, Marie-Pierre; Lambert, Louise; Del Vecchio, Pierre; Trudel, Diane; El-Sokhn, Nidale; Roach, Michael; Robinson, Clifford; Naqa, Issam El

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer accompanies a non-negligible risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP). This study presents a Bayesian network (BN) model that connects biological, dosimetric, and clinical RP risk factors. Material and Methods: 43 non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with SBRT with 5 fractions or less were studied. Candidate RP risk factors included dose-volume parameters, previously reported clinical RP factors, 6 protein biomarkers at baseline and 6 weeks post-treatment. A BN ensemble model was built from a subset of the variables in a training cohort (N=32), and further tested in an independent validation cohort (N=11). Results: Key factors identified in the BN ensemble for predicting RP risk were ipsilateral V5, lung volume receiving more than 105% of prescription, and decrease in angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) from baseline to 6 weeks. External validation of the BN ensemble model yielded an area under the curve of 0.8. Conclusions: The BN...

  16. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis for Delivery of Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To improve the quality and safety of our practice of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), we analyzed the process following the failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) method. Methods: The FMEA was performed by a multidisciplinary team. For each step in the SBRT delivery process, a potential failure occurrence was derived and three factors were assessed: the probability of each occurrence, the severity if the event occurs, and the probability of detection by the treatment team. A rank of 1 to 10 was assigned to each factor, and then the multiplied ranks yielded the relative risks (risk priority numbers). The failure modes with the highest risk priority numbers were then considered to implement process improvement measures. Results: A total of 28 occurrences were derived, of which nine events scored with significantly high risk priority numbers. The risk priority numbers of the highest ranked events ranged from 20 to 80. These included transcription errors of the stereotactic coordinates and machine failures. Conclusion: Several areas of our SBRT delivery were reconsidered in terms of process improvement, and safety measures, including treatment checklists and a surgical time-out, were added for our practice of gantry-based image-guided SBRT. This study serves as a guide for other users of SBRT to perform FMEA of their own practice.

  17. Radiative characteristics of ice-covered fresh- and brackish-water bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leppäranta, Matti

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The structure and optics of ice and snow overlying bodies of water were studied in the years 2000–2003. The data were collected in the northern temperate region (nine Estonian and Finnish lakes and one brackish water site, Santala Bay, in the Gulf of Finland. In the present paper we describe the results concerning the radiative characteristics of the system “snow + ice cover on the water”: albedo, attenuation of light, and planar and scalar irradiances through the ice. The basic data consist of irradiance measurements above and below ice cover for the PAR band of the solar spectrum (400–700 nm. Albedo varied across wide limits (0.20–0.70 for ice, 0.63–0.94 for snow, depending on the optical and physical properties of ice/snow and weather conditions. The vertically averaged light attenuation coefficient of the ice layer in the brackish waters of Santala Bay was higher than that in the lakes. The ratio of irradiance beneath the ice to incident irradiance increased 2.5–20 times after removing the snow, depending on the albedo and the thickness of ice and snow as well as on their optical properties. In the upper layer of water beneath the ice the ratio of planar to scalar quantum irradiances increased with depth (according to our earlier results obtained in summer this ratio decreased with increasing depth.

  18. Radiation doses to lungs and whole body from use of tritium in luminous paint industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudran, K.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation dose to persons exposed to tritium in the luminous paint industry is reported. The biological half-life of labile tritium is observed to be 7 to 10 days. There is evidence of exposure of lung tissue from tritium labelled polystyrene deposited in the pulmonary region and of soft tissue from organically bound tritium. Delayed excretion of labile tritium in urine following removal of the individuals from tritium handling, presence of tritium in organic constituents of blood and urine, and presence of non-volatile tritium in faecal excretion have been verified. From in vitro studies using fresh bovine serum, solubilisation half-life of tritium from the labelled paint is estimated to be 35 to 70 days after the initial fast clearance. Probable annual doses to the whole body, soft tissue and lungs under the prevailing working conditions have been estimated from the urinary and faecal excretion data. It is revealed that the actual values thus estimated are likely to exceed the values estimated by the conventional technique based on urine analysis for tritiated water.

  19. The Evolving Mcart Multimodal Imaging Core: Establishing a Protocol for Computed Tomography and Echocardiography in the Rhesus Macaque to Perform Longitudinal Analysis of Radiation-Induced Organ Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria, Eduardo B; Barrow, Kory R; Ruehle, Bradley T; Parker, Jordan T; Swartz, Elisa; Taylor-Howell, Cheryl; Kieta, Kaitlyn M; Lees, Cynthia J; Sleeper, Meg M; Dobbin, Travis; Baron, Adam D; Mohindra, Pranshu; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) and Echocardiography (EC) are two imaging modalities that produce critical longitudinal data that can be analyzed for radiation-induced organ-specific injury to the lung and heart. The Medical Countermeasures Against Radiological Threats (MCART) consortium has a well established animal model research platform that includes nonhuman primate (NHP) models of the acute radiation syndrome and the delayed effects of acute radiation exposure. These models call for a definition of the latency, incidence, severity, duration, and resolution of different organ-specific radiation-induced subsyndromes. The pulmonary subsyndromes and cardiac effects are a pair of interdependent syndromes impacted by exposure to potentially lethal doses of radiation. Establishing a connection between these will reveal important information about their interaction and progression of injury and recovery. Herein, the authors demonstrate the use of CT and EC data in the rhesus macaque models to define delayed organ injury, thereby establishing: a) consistent and reliable methodology to assess radiation-induced damage to the lung and heart; b) an extensive database in normal age-matched NHP for key primary and secondary endpoints; c) identified problematic variables in imaging techniques and proposed solutions to maintain data integrity; and d) initiated longitudinal analysis of potentially lethal radiation-induced damage to the lung and heart.

  20. Whole-body MSCT of patients after polytrauma: abdominal injuries; Ganzkoerper-MSCT beim Polytrauma: Abdominelle Verletzungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehrl, B.; Sadick, M.; Diehl, S.; Dueber, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie (Germany); Obertacke, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Zentrum fuer Orthopaedie und Traumatologie (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Purpose: The goal of this retrospective study was to evaluate the spectrum of abdominal injuries and the reliability of computed tomography-based diagnosis in patients after polytrauma. Material and methods: CT findings and clinical reports for 177 patients after polytrauma were evaluated with regard to abdominal injuries. Clinical patient reports at the time of discharge from the hospital were utilized as the standard of reference. Abdominal injuries resulting from an accident, frequent additional traumas and following therapeutic procedures were recorded. In the case of discrepancies in the reports, the CT scans were viewed retrospectively. Results: In 30 out of 177 patients, 42 abdominal injuries were detected. 69% of the injuries were caused by traffic accidents while 31% resulted from falls. Liver and spleen injuries were the most common. 50% of the cases were treated surgically, and the other half of the cases underwent non-surgical conservative therapy. Massive chest traumas, pelvic injuries, cerebral traumas and injuries to extremities were commonly associated with abdominal injuries. Evaluation of the discrepancies in the clinical reports showed that injury to the pancreas and the small intestine were not successfully detected on CT, thus resulting in a false negative diagnosis. Early stages of organ parenchyma laceration were also initially misdiagnosed on CT. (orig.)

  1. ENSURING RADIATION SAFETY AT THE XXVII WORLD SUMMER UNIVERSIADE IN KAZAN BY ROSPOTREBNADZOR BODIES AND ORGANIZATIONS Communication 1. Ensuring radiation safety at the preparatory phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Onischenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available After the terrorist attack at theBostonMarathon, Federal and Republican executive bodies took increased security measures during the XXVII World Summer Universiade inKazan. Bodies and Organizations of the Federal Service for Surveillance on Consumer Rights Protection and Human Well-being (Rospotrebnadzor were participants of all preparatory activities and directly provided security of the Student Games inKazan. This report analyzes the experience of providing radiation safety by Rospotrebnadzor experts at the stage of preparation for the Universiade. So far, Rospotrebnadzor organizations had no experience of providing radiation safety of such large-scale events. Analysis of the performed work with account for both positive and negative experiences is especially important in the context of preparations for the safety providing of the Olympic Winter Games inSochiin 2014. 

  2. Medical management and planning for radiation emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation Emergencies which result as a consequence of nuclear or radiological accidents can produce a spectrum of different types of radiation injuries which could include cases of whole body irradiation causing Acute Radiation Syndrome, partial body irradiation, radiation burns (localized irradiation), radioactive contamination and combined injuries having component of conventional injuries. General principles of managing these cases entail doing triage, offering immediate emergency care and instituting definitive treatment. Infra-structural facilities which are required to facilitate their management include first aid post at plant site, personnel decontamination centre, site clinic and specialized hospital which can offer comprehensive investigational and treatment modalities. Training of medical and paramedical personnel is crucial as part of emergency preparedness programme and if needed, help can be sought from WHO's Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network Centres. (author)

  3. WE-D-BRE-01: A Sr-90 Irradiation Device for the Study of Cutaneous Radiation Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine dosimetric character for a custom-built Sr-90 beta irradiator designed for the study of Cutaneous Radiation Injury (CRI) in a porcine animal model. In the event of a radiological accident or terrorist event, Sr-90, a fission by-product, will likely be produced. CRI is a main concern due to the low energy and superficial penetration in tissue of beta particles from Sr-90. Seven 100 mCi plaque Sr-90 radiation sources within a custom-built irradiation device create a 40 mm diameter region of radiation-induced skin injury as part of a larger project to study the efficacy of a topical keratin-based product in CRI healing. Methods: A custom-built mobile irradiation device was designed and implemented for in vivo irradiations. Gafchromic™ EBT3 radiochromic film and a PTW Markus chamber type 23343 were utilized for dosimetric characterization of the beta fluence at the surface produced by this device. Films were used to assess 2-dimensional dose distribution and percent depth dose characteristics of the radiation field. Ion chamber measurements provided dose rate data within the field. Results: The radiation field produced by the irradiation device is homogeneous with high uniformity (∼5%) and symmetry (∼3%) with a steep dose fall-off with depth from the surface. Dose rates were determined to be 3.8 Gy/min and 3.3 Gy/min for film and ion chamber measurements, respectively. A dose rate of 3.4 Gy/min was used to calculate irradiation times for in vivo irradiations. Conclusion: The custom-built irradiation device enables the use of seven Sr-90 beta sources in an array to deliver a 40 mm diameter area of homogeneous skin dose with a dose rate that is useful for research purposes and clinically relevant for the induction of CRI. Doses of 36 and 42 Gy successfully produce Grade III CRI and are used in the study of the efficacy of KeraStat™. This project has been funded in whole or in part with Federal funds from the Biomedical Advanced Research and

  4. WE-D-BRE-01: A Sr-90 Irradiation Device for the Study of Cutaneous Radiation Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorand, JE; Bourland, JD [Department of Radiation Oncology and Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Burnett, LR [KeraNetics, LLC, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Tytell, M [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine dosimetric character for a custom-built Sr-90 beta irradiator designed for the study of Cutaneous Radiation Injury (CRI) in a porcine animal model. In the event of a radiological accident or terrorist event, Sr-90, a fission by-product, will likely be produced. CRI is a main concern due to the low energy and superficial penetration in tissue of beta particles from Sr-90. Seven 100 mCi plaque Sr-90 radiation sources within a custom-built irradiation device create a 40 mm diameter region of radiation-induced skin injury as part of a larger project to study the efficacy of a topical keratin-based product in CRI healing. Methods: A custom-built mobile irradiation device was designed and implemented for in vivo irradiations. Gafchromic™ EBT3 radiochromic film and a PTW Markus chamber type 23343 were utilized for dosimetric characterization of the beta fluence at the surface produced by this device. Films were used to assess 2-dimensional dose distribution and percent depth dose characteristics of the radiation field. Ion chamber measurements provided dose rate data within the field. Results: The radiation field produced by the irradiation device is homogeneous with high uniformity (∼5%) and symmetry (∼3%) with a steep dose fall-off with depth from the surface. Dose rates were determined to be 3.8 Gy/min and 3.3 Gy/min for film and ion chamber measurements, respectively. A dose rate of 3.4 Gy/min was used to calculate irradiation times for in vivo irradiations. Conclusion: The custom-built irradiation device enables the use of seven Sr-90 beta sources in an array to deliver a 40 mm diameter area of homogeneous skin dose with a dose rate that is useful for research purposes and clinically relevant for the induction of CRI. Doses of 36 and 42 Gy successfully produce Grade III CRI and are used in the study of the efficacy of KeraStat™. This project has been funded in whole or in part with Federal funds from the Biomedical Advanced Research and

  5. Spine stereotactic body radiation therapy plans: Achieving dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Linda X., E-mail: lhong0812@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Shankar, Viswanathan [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Shen, Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Kuo, Hsiang-Chi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Mynampati, Dinesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Yaparpalvi, Ravindra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Goddard, Lee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Basavatia, Amar; Fox, Jana; Garg, Madhur; Kalnicki, Shalom; Tomé, Wolfgang A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2015-10-01

    We report our experience of establishing planning objectives to achieve dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plans. Patients with spine lesions were treated using SBRT in our institution since September 2009. Since September 2011, we established the following planning objectives for our SBRT spine plans in addition to the cord dose constraints: (1) dose coverage—prescription dose (PD) to cover at least 95% planning target volume (PTV) and 90% PD to cover at least 99% PTV; (2) conformity index (CI)—ratio of prescription isodose volume (PIV) to the PTV < 1.2; (3) dose falloff—ratio of 50% PIV to the PTV (R{sub 50%}); (4) and maximum dose in percentage of PD at 2 cm from PTV in any direction (D{sub 2cm}) to follow Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915. We have retrospectively reviewed 66 separate spine lesions treated between September 2009 and December 2012 (31 treated before September 2011 [group 1] and 35 treated after [group 2]). The χ{sup 2} test was used to examine the difference in parameters between groups. The PTV V{sub 100%} {sub PD} ≥ 95% objective was met in 29.0% of group 1 vs 91.4% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. The PTV V{sub 90%} {sub PD} ≥ 99% objective was met in 38.7% of group 1 vs 88.6% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. Overall, 4 plans in group 1 had CI > 1.2 vs none in group 2 (p = 0.04). For D{sub 2cm}, 48.3% plans yielded a minor violation of the objectives and 16.1% a major violation for group 1, whereas 17.1% exhibited a minor violation and 2.9% a major violation for group 2 (p < 0.01). Spine SBRT plans can be improved on dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff employing a combination of RTOG spine and lung SBRT protocol planning objectives.

  6. Esophageal Dose Tolerance to Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Risk Factors for Late Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephans, Kevin L., E-mail: stephak@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Djemil, Toufik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Diaconu, Claudiu [Cleveland Clinic Learner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Reddy, Chandana A.; Xia, Ping; Woody, Neil M.; Greskovich, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Makkar, Vinit [Department of Medical Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To identify factors associated with grade ≥3 treatment related late esophageal toxicity after lung or liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review of 52 patients with a planning target volume within 2 cm of the esophagus from a prospective registry of 607 lung and liver SBRT patients treated between 2005 and 2011. Patients were treated using a risk-adapted dose regimen to a median dose of 50 Gy in 5 fractions (range, 37.5-60 Gy in 3-10 fractions). Normal structures were contoured using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) defined criteria. Results: The median esophageal point dose and 1-cc dose were 32.3 Gy (range, 8.9-55.4 Gy) and 24.0 Gy (range, 7.8-50.9 Gy), respectively. Two patients had an esophageal fistula at a median of 8.4 months after SBRT, with maximum esophageal point doses of 51.5 and 52 Gy, and 1-cc doses of 48.1 and 50 Gy, respectively. These point and 1-cc doses were exceeded by 9 and 2 patients, respectively, without a fistula. The risk of a fistula for point doses exceeding 40, 45, and 50 Gy was 9.5% (n=2/21), 10.5% (n=2/19), and 12.5% (n=2/16), respectively. The risk of fistula for 1-cc doses exceeding 40, 45, and 50 Gy was 25% (n=2/9), 50% (n=2/4), and 50% (n=2/4), respectively. Eighteen patients received systemic therapy after SBRT (11 systemic chemotherapy, and 6 biologic agents, and 1 both). Both patients with fistulas had received adjuvant anti-angiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor) agents within 2 months of completing SBRT. No patient had a fistula in the absence of adjuvant VEGF-modulating agents. Conclusions: Esophageal fistula is a rare complication of SBRT. In this series, fistula was seen with esophageal point doses exceeding 51 Gy and 1-cc doses greater than 48 Gy. Notably, however, fistula was seen only in those patients who also received adjuvant VEGF-modulating agents after SBRT. The potential interaction of dose and adjuvant therapy

  7. Combined effects of radiation and trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerschmidt, Otfried

    Injuries, caused by both whole-body irradiation and wounds or burns, have been relatively little studied. Possibly because many investigators think that these injuries are just modified radiation-induced diseases for which the same treatment principles are valid. Other authors had the impression that, for instance, the radiation burn trauma is a new kind of disease which differs significantly from either radiation syndrome alone or from burn disease. There are many experimental data on animals which suggest that the pathology of combined injuries differs significantly from that of radiation-induced disease or of thermal or mechanical traumas. Wounds or burns which, in general, do not cause septicaemia could become entrance ports for bacteria when animals are exposed to whole-body irradiation. Thrombocytopenia is the reason for hemorrhages in wounds. The susceptibility to shock is increased considerably in combined injuries and the formation of callus in the bone fractures is significantly delayed. The healing of wounds and burns in the initial phase of the radiation syndrome does not always differ from healing in the non-irradiated organism. However, a few days or weeks later very serious wound infections and hemorrhages can occur. The additional injuries almost always worsen the development and prognosis of radiation-induced disease. The recommended treatment for combined injuries will differ in many respects from the treatment of wounds and burns or the radiation syndrome.

  8. Study of the effects of mild hypothermia on cerebral PO2, PCO2 and pH and body temperature in patients with acute severe head injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Jun; LIN Yuan-quan; LIU Wen-feng; ZHONG Tian-an; ZHANG Jun; YE Yu; XU Yi-qun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of mild hypothermia on cerebral oxygen partial pressure, carbon dioxide partial pressure, pH and body temperature (PbrO2, PbrCO2, pHbr and BT) in patients with acute severe head injury.Methods: Thirty-eight patients with acute severe head injury were treated with mild hypothermia, meantime PbrO2, PbrCO2, pHbr and BT were monitored in order to study the changes of PbrO2, PbrCO2, pHbr and BT.Results: In patients with acute head injury, mild hypothermia obviously increased PbrO2, decreased PbrCO2 and CO2 accumulation and acidosis in brain tissue. BT was 1℃-1.5℃ higher than rectal temperature(RT) after injury. The BT and RT were decreased when the patients were treated with mild hypothermia, but at the same time the difference between BT and RT was increased.Conclusions: In patients with acute severe head injury the direct monitoring of PbrO2, PbrCO2, pHbr and BT was safe and reliable, and is helpful in estimating prognosis and mild hypothermia therapy.

  9. Added diagnostic benefit of 16-row whole-body spiral CT in patients with multiple trauma differentiated by region and injury severity according to the ATLS registered concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to determine the added diagnostic benefit of using MS-CT in multiple trauma patients differentiated by severity of injury and affected body region. Materials and methods: a retrospective analysis was performed of the 16-row whole-body spiral CT findings in 275 multiple trauma patients (73% men, 27% women; age 39.6 ± 18.9 years) with regard to additional findings and new findings obtained with CT compared to the findings obtained by conventional projection radiography and abdominal ultrasound in the emergency room. The additional and new findings were differentiated by body region (head, face, chest, pelvis, abdomen, spine) and the degree of severity according to the three classes of injuries distinguished by the ATLS registered concept (class 1: simple injury, class 2: potentially life threatening, class 3: immediately life threatening). Results: a total of 921 additional findings (findings potentially relevant for further diagnosis and therapy in addition to the findings obtained by conventional radiography or ultrasound) were obtained by MS-CT in all patients. The distribution by number of patients and body region was as follows: 22 neck, 76 face, 125 chest, 112 abdomen, 50 pelvis, and 91 spine. Most additional findings were categorized as potentially life threatening (ATLS class 2). In addition, there were 439 completely new findings, involving the head in 128 patients (mostly ATLS class 3), the face in 18, the chest in 47, the abdomen in 26, and the spine in 9 patients. Most new findings involving the face, abdomen, and spine were ATLS class 2 injuries. (orig.)

  10. Studies on chemical protectors against radiation, 27; Survival effects of methanol extracts of various Chinese traditional medicines on radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Cheng-Ming; Ohta, Setsuko; Shinoda, Masato (Hoshi Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science)

    1989-12-01

    The survival effect of mice irradiated with a lethal dose of X-ray was studied by use of 60 kinds of Chinese traditional medicines. Methanol extracts of these medicines were prepared, and then each extract injected intraperitoneally into male mice before or after whole-body irradiation. As a result of these studies, the survival effects with Ogi-kentyu-to, Simotu-to, Sessyo-in, Zokumei-to and Boi-ogi-to were observed by intraperitoneal injection before irradiation. Of these effective methanol extracts, only Zokumei-to was shown to have a significant survival effect by intraperitoneal injection after irradiation. (author).

  11. Long-term safety and efficacy of fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantel, Frederick; Glatz, Stefan; Toussaint, Andre; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Patients with long life expectancy despite metastatic status might benefit from long-term local control of spinal metastases. Dose-intensified radiotherapy (RT) is believed to control tumor growth better and thus offers longer pain relief. This single-institution study reports on fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases in patients with good life expectancy based on performance status, extent of metastases, histology, and time to metastasis. Between 2004 and 2010, 36 treatment sites in 32 patients (median age 55 years; male 61 %; median Karnofsky performance score 85) were treated with fractionated SBRT. The median treatment dose was 60 Gy (range, 48.5-65 Gy) given in a median of 20 fractions (range, 17-33); the median maximum dose to the planning risk volume for the spinal cord (PRV-SC) was 46.6 Gy. All patients suffering from pain prior to RT reported pain relief after treatment; after a median follow-up of 20.3 months, 61 % of treatment sites were pain-free, another 25 % associated with mild pain. In 86 % of treatments, patients were free from neurological symptoms at the time of the last clinical follow-up. Acute grade 1 toxicities (CTCAE 3.0) were observed in 11 patients. Myelopathy did not occur in any patient. Radiologically controlled freedom from local progression was 92 and 84 % after 12 and 24 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 19.6 months. Patient selection resulted in long OS despite metastatic disease, and dose-intensified fractionated SBRT for spinal metastases was safe and achieved long-term local tumor control and palliation of pain. (orig.) [German] Patienten mit guter Lebenserwartung trotz metastasierter Erkrankung koennten von einer lang andauernden lokalen Kontrolle von Wirbelsaeulenmetastasen profitieren. Eine dosisintensivierte Radiotherapie (RT) kann vermutlich eine bessere Tumorkontrolle und daher eine laengere Schmerzpalliation erreichen. Ausgewertet wurden die monozentrischen

  12. Grey-body surface radiation coupled with conduction and convection for general geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Michael; Jamnia, Mohammad-Ali

    1991-11-01

    This paper presents a numerical technique for the simulation of the effects of grey-diffuse surface radiation on the temperature field of fluid flows using FIDAP, a general purpose incompressible, viscous fluid code. The radiating surface relationships assume a non-participating medium, constant surface temperature and heat fluxes at the discretized elemental level. The technique involves the decoupling of energy and radiation exchange equations. A concept of macrosurfaces, each containing a number of radiating boundary surfaces, is introduced. These boundary macroelements then carry the information from the radiating boundary into the fluid regime. A number of simulations illustrating the algorithm are presented.

  13. Dosimetric comparison of patient setup strategies in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Jianzhou; He, Tongming T. [Radiation Oncology, Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, Washington 98104 (United States); Betzing, Christopher; Fuss, Martin [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon 97239 (United States); D' Souza, Warren D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21044 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors retrospectively compared the accumulated dose over the treatment course for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer for three patient setup strategies. Methods: Ten patients who underwent lung SBRT were selected for this study. At each fraction, patients were immobilized using a vacuum cushion and were CT scanned. Treatment plans were performed on the simulation CT. The planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding a 5-mm uniform margin to the internal target volume derived from the 4DCT. All plans were normalized such that 99% of the PTV received 60 Gy. The plan parameters were copied onto the daily CT images for dose recalculation under three setup scenarios: skin marker, bony structure, and soft tissue based alignments. The accumulated dose was calculated by summing the dose at each fraction along the trajectory of a voxel over the treatment course through deformable image registration of each CT with the planning CT. The accumulated doses were analyzed for the comparison of setup accuracy. Results: The tumor volume receiving 60 Gy was 91.7 {+-} 17.9%, 74.1 {+-} 39.1%, and 99.6 {+-} 1.3% for setup using skin marks, bony structures, and soft tissue, respectively. The isodose line covering 100% of the GTV was 55.5 {+-} 7.1, 42.1 {+-} 16.0, and 64.3 {+-} 7.1 Gy, respectively. The corresponding average biologically effective dose of the tumor was 237.3 {+-} 29.4, 207.4 {+-} 61.2, and 258.3 {+-} 17.7 Gy, respectively. The differences in lung biologically effective dose, mean dose, and V20 between the setup scenarios were insignificant. Conclusions: The authors' results suggest that skin marks and bony structure are insufficient for aligning patients in lung SBRT. Soft tissue based alignment is needed to match the prescribed dose delivered to the tumors.

  14. Prostate-specific antigen bounce following stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C. Vu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA bounce after brachytherapy has been well-documented. This phenomenon has also been identified in patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT. While the parameters that predict PSA bounce have been extensively studied in prostate brachytherapy patients, this study is the first to analyze the clinical and pathologic predictors of PSA bounce in prostate SBRT patients. Materials and Methods: Our institution has maintained a prospective database of patients undergoing SBRT for prostate cancer since 2006. Our study population includes patients between May 2006 and November 2011 who have at least 18 months of follow-up. All patients were treated using the CyberKnife treatment system. The prescription dose was 3500-3625cGy in 5 fractions.Results: 120 patients were included in our study. Median PSA follow-up was 24 months (range 18-78 months. 34 (28% patients had a PSA bounce. The median time to PSA bounce was 9 months, and the median bounce size was 0.50ng/mL. On univariate analysis, only younger age (p = .011 was shown to be associated with an increased incidence of PSA bounce. Other patient factors, including race, prostate size, prior treatment by hormones, and family history of prostate cancer, did not predict PSA bounces. None of the tumor characteristics studied, including Gleason score, pre-treatment PSA, T-stage, or risk classification by NCCN guidelines, was associated with increased incidence of PSA bounces. Younger age was the only statistically significant predictor of PSA bounce on multivariate analysis (OR = 0.937, p = 0.009.Conclusion: PSA bounce, which has been reported after prostate brachytherapy, is also seen in a significant percentage of patients after CyberKnife SBRT. Close observation rather than biopsy can be considered for these patients. Younger age was the only factor that predicted PSA bounce.

  15. Dosimetric evaluation of simultaneous integrated boost during stereotactic body radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wensha, E-mail: wensha.yang@cshs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Reznik, Robert; Fraass, Benedick A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Nissen, Nicholas [Department of Surgery, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hendifar, Andrew [Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wachsman, Ashley [Department of Cross-Sectional Imaging Interventional Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Sandler, Howard; Tuli, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a promising way to treat locally advanced pancreatic cancer and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. A simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the region of vessel abutment or encasement during SBRT has the potential to downstage otherwise likely positive surgical margins. Despite the potential benefit of using SIB-SBRT, the ability to boost is limited by the local geometry of the organs at risk (OARs), such as stomach, duodenum, and bowel (SDB), relative to tumor. In this study, we have retrospectively replanned 20 patients with 25 Gy prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) and 33~80 Gy to the boost target volume (BTV) using an SIB technique for all patients. The number of plans and patients able to satisfy a set of clinically established constraints is analyzed. The ability to boost vessels (within the gross target volume [GTV]) is shown to correlate with the overlap volume (OLV), defined to be the overlap between the GTV + a 1(OLV1)- or 2(OLV2)-cm margin with the union of SDB. Integral dose, boost dose contrast (BDC), biologically effective BDC, tumor control probability for BTV, and normal tissue complication probabilities are used to analyze the dosimetric results. More than 65% of the cases can deliver a boost to 40 Gy while satisfying all OAR constraints. An OLV2 of 100 cm{sup 3} is identified as the cutoff volume: for cases with OLV2 larger than 100 cm{sup 3}, it is very unlikely the case could achieve 25 Gy to the PTV while successfully meeting all the OAR constraints.

  16. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Concomitant With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors. It may have a real impact on patients who may not otherwise qualify for breast-conserving surgery. We conducted a phase 1 trial that tested 5 dose levels of SBRT concomitant with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) before to surgery. The purpose of the current dose escalation study was to determine the maximum tolerable dose of SBRT in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: To define toxicity, we performed dermatologic examinations that included clinical examinations by 2 separate physicians and technical evaluations using colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasonography. Dermatologic examinations were performed before NACT, 36 and 56 days after the beginning of NACT, and before surgery. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. Efficacy, the primary endpoint, was determined by the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. Only 1 case of dose-limiting toxicity was reported (grade 3 dermatologic toxicity), and SBRT was overall well tolerated. The pCR rate was 36%, with none being observed at the first 2 dose levels, and the highest rate being obtained at dose level 3 (25.5 Gy delivered in 3 fractions). Furthermore, the breast-conserving surgery rate was up to 92% compared with an 8% total mastectomy rate. No surgical complications were reported. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that SBRT can be safely combined with NACT. Regarding the efficacy endpoints, this trial showed promising results in terms of pCR rate (36%) and breast-conserving rate (92%). The findings provide a strong rationale for extending the study into a phase 2 trial. In view of the absence of correlation between dose and pCR, and given that the data from dose level 3 met the statistical requirements, a dose of 25.5 Gy in 3 fractions should be used for the phase 2 trial

  17. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Concomitant With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves, E-mail: pierre-yves.bondiau@nice.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Courdi, Adel [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Bahadoran, Phillipe [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Nice, Nice (France); Chamorey, Emmanuel [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Queille-Roussel, Catherine [Centre de Pharmacologie Clinique Appliquée à la Dermatologie, Nice (France); Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Pacquelet-Cheli, Sandrine; Ferrero, Jean-Marc [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors. It may have a real impact on patients who may not otherwise qualify for breast-conserving surgery. We conducted a phase 1 trial that tested 5 dose levels of SBRT concomitant with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) before to surgery. The purpose of the current dose escalation study was to determine the maximum tolerable dose of SBRT in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: To define toxicity, we performed dermatologic examinations that included clinical examinations by 2 separate physicians and technical evaluations using colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasonography. Dermatologic examinations were performed before NACT, 36 and 56 days after the beginning of NACT, and before surgery. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. Efficacy, the primary endpoint, was determined by the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. Only 1 case of dose-limiting toxicity was reported (grade 3 dermatologic toxicity), and SBRT was overall well tolerated. The pCR rate was 36%, with none being observed at the first 2 dose levels, and the highest rate being obtained at dose level 3 (25.5 Gy delivered in 3 fractions). Furthermore, the breast-conserving surgery rate was up to 92% compared with an 8% total mastectomy rate. No surgical complications were reported. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that SBRT can be safely combined with NACT. Regarding the efficacy endpoints, this trial showed promising results in terms of pCR rate (36%) and breast-conserving rate (92%). The findings provide a strong rationale for extending the study into a phase 2 trial. In view of the absence of correlation between dose and pCR, and given that the data from dose level 3 met the statistical requirements, a dose of 25.5 Gy in 3 fractions should be used for the phase 2 trial.

  18. Fatal complications after stereotactic body radiation therapy for central lung tumors abutting the proximal bronchial tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseltine, Justin M.; Rimner, Andreas; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Modh, Ankit; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Jackson, Andrew; Yorke, Ellen D.; Wu, Abraham J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is associated with excess toxicity following treatment of central lung tumors. Risk-adapted fractionation appears to have mitigated this risk, but it remains unclear whether SBRT is safe for all tumors within the central lung zone, especially those abutting the proximal bronchial tree (PBT). We investigated the dependence of toxicity on tumor proximity to PBT and whether tumors abutting the PBT had greater toxicity than other central lung tumors after SBRT. Materials and methods A total of 108 patients receiving SBRT for central lung tumors were reviewed. Patients were classified based on closest distance from tumor to PBT. Primary endpoint was SBRT-related death. Secondary endpoints were overall survival, local control, and grade 3+ pulmonary adverse events. We compared tumors abutting the PBT to nonabutting and those ≤1 cm and >1 cm from PBT. Results Median follow-up was 22.7 months. Median distance from tumor to PBT was 1.78 cm. Eighty-eight tumors were primary lung and 20 were recurrent or metastatic; 23% of tumors were adenocarcinoma and 71% squamous cell. Median age was 77.5 years. Median dose was 4500 cGy in 5 fractions prescribed to the 100% isodose line. Eighteen patients had tumors abutting the PBT, 4 of whom experienced SBRT-related death. No other patients experienced death attributed to SBRT. Risk of SBRT-related death was significantly higher for tumors abutting the PBT compared with nonabutting tumors (P 1cm from PBT (P = .014). Conclusions Even with risk-adapted fractionation, tumors abutting PBT are associated with a significant and differential risk of SBRT-related toxicity and death. SBRT should be used with particular caution in central-abutting tumors, especially in the context of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. PMID:26577006

  19. Novel Technique for Hepatic Fiducial Marker Placement for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report experience with fiducial marker insertion and describe an advantageous, novel technique for fiducial placement in the liver for stereotactic body radiation therapy with respiratory tracking. Methods and Materials: We implanted 1444 fiducials (single: 834; linked: 610) in 328 patients with 424 hepatic lesions. Two methods of implantation were compared: the standard method (631 single fiducials) performed on 153 patients from May 2007 to May 2010, and the cube method (813 fiducials: 610 linked/203 single) applied to 175 patients from April 2010 to March 2013. The standard method involved implanting a single marker at a time. The novel technique entailed implanting 2 pairs of linked markers when possible in a way to occupy the perpendicular edges of a cube containing the tumor inside. Results: Mean duration of the cube method was shorter than the standard method (46 vs 61 minutes; P<.0001). Median numbers of skin and subcapsular entries were significantly smaller with the cube method (2 vs 4, P<.0001, and 2 vs 4, P<.0001, respectively). The rate of overall complications (total, major, and minor) was significantly lower in the cube method group compared with the standard method group (5.7% vs 13.7%; P=.013). Major complications occurred while using single markers only. The success rate was 98.9% for the cube method and 99.3% for the standard method. Conclusions: We propose a new technique of hepatic fiducial implantation that makes use of linked fiducials and involves fewer skin entries and shorter time of implantation. The technique is less complication-prone and is migration-resistant

  20. Dosimetric comparison of patient setup strategies in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In this work, the authors retrospectively compared the accumulated dose over the treatment course for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer for three patient setup strategies. Methods: Ten patients who underwent lung SBRT were selected for this study. At each fraction, patients were immobilized using a vacuum cushion and were CT scanned. Treatment plans were performed on the simulation CT. The planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding a 5-mm uniform margin to the internal target volume derived from the 4DCT. All plans were normalized such that 99% of the PTV received 60 Gy. The plan parameters were copied onto the daily CT images for dose recalculation under three setup scenarios: skin marker, bony structure, and soft tissue based alignments. The accumulated dose was calculated by summing the dose at each fraction along the trajectory of a voxel over the treatment course through deformable image registration of each CT with the planning CT. The accumulated doses were analyzed for the comparison of setup accuracy. Results: The tumor volume receiving 60 Gy was 91.7 ± 17.9%, 74.1 ± 39.1%, and 99.6 ± 1.3% for setup using skin marks, bony structures, and soft tissue, respectively. The isodose line covering 100% of the GTV was 55.5 ± 7.1, 42.1 ± 16.0, and 64.3 ± 7.1 Gy, respectively. The corresponding average biologically effective dose of the tumor was 237.3 ± 29.4, 207.4 ± 61.2, and 258.3 ± 17.7 Gy, respectively. The differences in lung biologically effective dose, mean dose, and V20 between the setup scenarios were insignificant. Conclusions: The authors’ results suggest that skin marks and bony structure are insufficient for aligning patients in lung SBRT. Soft tissue based alignment is needed to match the prescribed dose delivered to the tumors.

  1. Multiphoton Microscopy in the Study of Morphological Characteristics of Radiation-Induced Injuries of the Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Kuznetsov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to assess the feasibility of multiphoton microscopy (MPM for studying dynamics of bladder structural changes following a single exposure to gamma-radiation at various doses (2, 10, and 40 Gy in experiment. Materials and Methods. Specimens of rat bladders after a single local radiation at the dose of 2, 10, and 40 Gy were the objects of investigation (9 groups with two rats for each dose and term, and two intact rats — 20 observations in all. The study was carried out 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month after radiation exposure. Part of the histological bladder preparations was stained with picrofuchsin according to Van Gieson method. The other part of the sections, obtained from the same blocks, was investigated using MPM without additional staining. For this purpose a laser scanning microscope LSM Axiovert 510 Meta (Carl Zeiss, Germany was used. Excitation was generated with a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser (MAI TAI HP, Spectra Physics, USA at the wavelength of 800 nm, registration was performed in the range of 362–415 nm (second harmonic signal from collagen and 512–576 nm (signal of two-photon excited elastin autofluorescence. Results. Application of MPM method allowed us to find out, that in early terms (1 day and 1 week after radiation exposure the process of alteration of collagen-containing structures of bladder walls was a leading one at all selected doses. A month after 2 and 10 Gy radiation increase in collagen structures was registered, speaking of the onset of radiation fibrosis formation. At a dose of 40 Gy decrease of second harmonic signal retained in the extracellular matrix of the bladder wall. It allowed us to draw a conclusion on a long-term disorganization of collagen at high radiation doses. Conclusion. MPM method makes it possible to estimate, that structural destruction of extracellular tissue matrix occurs even after low radiation doses and in early terms after radiation exposure, which is not

  2. Role of p53 in Anticancer Drug Treatment- and Radiation-Induced Injury in Normal Small Intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the human gastrointestinal tract, the functional mucosa of the small intestine has the highest capacity for absorption of nutrients and rapid proliferation rates, making it vulnerable to chemoradiotherapy. Recent understanding of the protective role of p53-mediated cell cycle arrest in the small intestinal mucosa has led researchers to explore new avenues to mitigate mucosal injury during cancer treatment. A traditional p53 inhibitor and two other molecules that exhibit strong protective effects on normal small intestinal epithelium during anticancer drug treatment and radiation therapy are introduced in this work. The objective of this review was to update current knowledge regarding potential mechanisms and targets that inhibit the side effects induced by chemoradiotherapy

  3. Potential protection of green tea polyphenols against 1800 MHz electromagnetic radiation-induced injury on rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-Li; Wen, Jian-Qiang; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2011-10-01

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) are harmful to public health, but the certain anti-irradiation mechanism is not clear yet. The present study was performed to investigate the possible protective effects of green tea polyphenols against electromagnetic radiation-induced injury in the cultured rat cortical neurons. In this study, green tea polyphenols were used in the cultured cortical neurons exposed to 1800 MHz EMFs by the mobile phone. We found that the mobile phone irradiation for 24 h induced marked neuronal cell death in the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) and TUNEL (TdT mediated biotin-dUTP nicked-end labeling) assay, and protective effects of green tea polyphenols on the injured cortical neurons were demonstrated by testing the content of Bcl-2 Assaciated X protein (Bax) in the immunoprecipitation assay and Western blot assay. In our study results, the mobile phone irradiation-induced increases in the content of active Bax were inhibited significantly by green tea polyphenols, while the contents of total Bax had no marked changes after the treatment of green tea polyphenols. Our results suggested a neuroprotective effect of green tea polyphenols against the mobile phone irradiation-induced injury on the cultured rat cortical neurons.

  4. Study on the protective effect of MgSO4 on the radiation-induced neural stem cell injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the neuroprotective effect of magnesium sulfate on radiation induced neural stem cell injury. Methods: Brain tissue was obtained from new-born sprague-dawley rats within 24 hours, and the cerebral hemisphere was dissociated to culture the neural stem cells. After being identified by immunofluorescence method, the neural stem cells were randomly divided into 3 groups as blank control group, experimental control group and experimental group. The neural stem cells of experimental control group and experimental group were irradiated with 2 or 4 Gy of gamma rays. The proliferation and the cell cycle of neural stem cells were detected at different time-points ranging from 24 h,48 h, 72 h after irradiation with CCK-8 and FCM. Results: Compared with the blank control group, the proliferation rate of experimental control group was significantly reduced (t=5.33-8.44, P<0.05 ), and the G1 phase arrest of experimental control group was significantly enhanced (t=30.60-71.22, P<0.05).Compared with the experimental control group, the proliferation of experimental group significantly increased excluding that of 24 h (t=2.45-4.71, P<0.05), the apoptosis rate of experimental group significantly decreased (t=6.73-41.12, P<0.05), which was closer to the blank control group.Conclusion: Magnesium sulfate can alleviate the injury of proliferation and decrease the cell apoptosis in the early stage after irradiation. (authors)

  5. Protective effect of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) on radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Joong Sun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Jong Choon; Park, Hae-Ran; Jung, Uhee; Jang, Jong Sik; Jo, Sung Kee

    2009-12-01

    The protective properties of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) against intestinal damage were examined by evaluating its effects on jejunal crypt survival, morphological changes, and apoptosis in gamma-irradiated mice. The mice were whole-body irradiated with 12 Gy for the examination of jejunal crypt survival and any morphological changes and with 2 Gy for the detection of apoptosis and Ki-67 labeling. Irradiation was conducted using (60)Co gamma-rays. HemoHIM treatment was administered intraperitonially at a dosage of 50 mg/kg of body weight at 36 and 12 hours pre-irradiation and 30 minutes post-irradiation or orally at a dosage of 250 mg/kg of body weight/day for 7 or 11 days before necropsy. The HemoHIM-treated group displayed a significant increase in survival of jejunal crypts, when compared to the irradiation controls. HemoHIM treatment decreased intestinal morphological changes such as crypt depth, villus height, mucosal length, and basal lamina length of 10 enterocytes after irradiation. Furthermore, the administration of HemoHIM protected intestinal cells from irradiation-induced apoptosis. These results suggested that HemoHIM may be therapeutically useful to reduce intestinal injury following irradiation. PMID:20041793

  6. Protective effect of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) on radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Joong Sun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Jong Choon; Park, Hae-Ran; Jung, Uhee; Jang, Jong Sik; Jo, Sung Kee

    2009-12-01

    The protective properties of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) against intestinal damage were examined by evaluating its effects on jejunal crypt survival, morphological changes, and apoptosis in gamma-irradiated mice. The mice were whole-body irradiated with 12 Gy for the examination of jejunal crypt survival and any morphological changes and with 2 Gy for the detection of apoptosis and Ki-67 labeling. Irradiation was conducted using (60)Co gamma-rays. HemoHIM treatment was administered intraperitonially at a dosage of 50 mg/kg of body weight at 36 and 12 hours pre-irradiation and 30 minutes post-irradiation or orally at a dosage of 250 mg/kg of body weight/day for 7 or 11 days before necropsy. The HemoHIM-treated group displayed a significant increase in survival of jejunal crypts, when compared to the irradiation controls. HemoHIM treatment decreased intestinal morphological changes such as crypt depth, villus height, mucosal length, and basal lamina length of 10 enterocytes after irradiation. Furthermore, the administration of HemoHIM protected intestinal cells from irradiation-induced apoptosis. These results suggested that HemoHIM may be therapeutically useful to reduce intestinal injury following irradiation.

  7. The outcome of local radiation injuries: 14 years of follow-up after the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlöber, P; Steinert, M; Weiss, M; Bebeshko, V; Belyi, D; Nadejina, N; Stefani, F H; Wagemaker, G; Fliedner, T M; Peter, R U

    2001-03-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident on April 26, 1986 was the largest in the history of the peaceful use of nuclear energy. Of the 237 individuals initially suspected to have been significantly exposed to radiation during or in the immediate aftermath of the accident, the diagnosis of acute radiation sickness (ARS) could be confirmed in 134 cases on the basis of clinical symptoms. Of these, 54 patients suffered from cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) to varying degrees. Among the 28 patients who died from the immediate consequences of accidental radiation exposure, acute hemopoietic syndrome due to bone marrow failure was the primary cause of death only in a minority. In 16 of these 28 deaths, the primary cause was attributed to CRS. This report describes the characteristic cutaneous sequelae as well as associated clinical symptoms and diseases of 15 survivors of the Chernobyl accident with severe localized exposure who were systematically followed up by our groups between 1991 and 2000. All patients presented with CRS of varying severity, showing xerosis, cutaneous telangiectasias and subungual splinter hemorrhages, hemangiomas and lymphangiomas, epidermal atrophy, disseminated keratoses, extensive dermal and subcutaneous fibrosis with partial ulcerations, and pigmentary changes including radiation lentigo. Surprisingly, no cutaneous malignancies have been detected so far in those areas that received large radiation exposures and that developed keratoses; however, two patients first presented in 1999 with basal cell carcinomas on the nape of the neck and the right lower eyelid, areas that received lower exposures. During the follow-up period, two patients were lost due to death from myelodysplastic syndrome in 1995 and acute myelogenous leukemia in 1998, respectively. Other radiation-induced diseases such as dry eye syndrome (3/15), radiation cataract (5/15), xerostomia (4/15) and increased FSH levels (7/15) indicating impaired fertility were also

  8. Unveiling the influence of the radiation pressure in nature of orbits in the photogravitational restricted three-body problem

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2015-01-01

    The case of the planar circular photogravitational restricted three-body problem where the more massive primary is an emitter of radiation is numerically investigated. A thorough numerical analysis takes place in the configuration $(x,y)$ and the $(x,C)$ space in which we classify initial conditions of orbits into three main categories: (i) bounded, (ii) escaping and (iii) collisional. Our results reveal that the radiation pressure factor has a huge impact on the character of orbits. Interpreting the collisional motion as leaking in the phase space we related our results to both chaotic scattering and the theory of leaking Hamiltonian systems. We successfully located the escape as well as the collisional basins and we managed to correlate them with the corresponding escape and collision times. We hope our contribution to be useful for a further understanding of the escape and collision properties of motion in this interesting version of the restricted three-body problem.

  9. Clinical Characteristics and Management of Late Urinary Symptom Flare Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Jennifer A; Leonard N Chen; Bhagat, Aditi; Oermann, Eric K; Kim, Joy S; Moures, Rudy; Yung, Thomas; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T.; Kumar, Deepak; Suy, Simeng; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H.; Sean P Collins

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly utilized as primary treatment for clinically localized prostate cancer. While acute post-SBRT urinary symptoms are well recognized, the late genitourinary toxicity of SBRT has not been fully described. Here, we characterize the clinical features of late urinary symptom flare and recommend conservative symptom management approaches that may alleviate the associated bother. Methods: Between February 2008 and August 2011, 216...

  10. Equilibrium Points and Related Periodic Motions in the Restricted Three-Body Problem with Angular Velocity and Radiation Effects

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Perdios; Kalantonis, V. S.; Perdiou, A. E.; Nikaki, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with a modification of the restricted three-body problem in which the angular velocity variation is considered in the case where the primaries are sources of radiation. In particular, the existence and stability of its equilibrium points in the plane of motion of the primaries are studied. We find that this problem admits the well-known five planar equilibria of the classical problem with the difference that the corresponding collinear points may be stable depending on the par...

  11. Mathematical model of biological order state or syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine: based on electromagnetic radiation within the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jinxiang; Huang, Jinzhao

    2012-03-01

    In this study, based on the resonator model and exciplex model of electromagnetic radiation within the human body, mathematical model of biological order state, also referred to as syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine, was established and expressed as: "Sy = v/ 1n(6I + 1)". This model provides the theoretical foundation for experimental research addressing the order state of living system, especially the quantitative research syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine.

  12. Survival Outcomes of Patients Treated with Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Parotid Gland Tumors: a Retrospective Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Karam, Sana D; Snider, James W.; Hongkun eWang; Margaux eWooster; Christopher eLominska; Deeken, John F.; Kenneth eNewkirk; Bruce eDavidson; K.William eHarter

    2012-01-01

    Background: to review a single-institution experience with the management of parotid malignancies treated by fractionated stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT). Findings: Between 2003 and 2011, 13 patients diagnosed with parotid malignancies were treated with adjuvant or definitive SBRT to a median dose of 33 Gy (range 25–40 Gy). There were 11 male and two female patients with a median age of 80. Ten patients declined conventional radiation treatment and three patients had received prior unre...

  13. Radiation-Induced Testicular Injury and Its Amelioration by Tinospora cordifolia (An Indian Medicinal Plant) Extract

    OpenAIRE

    Goyal, P. K.; Preeti Verma; Jyoti Parmar; Priyanka Sharma

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is to determine the deleterious effects of sub lethal gamma radiation on testes and their possible inhibition by Tinospora cordifolia extract (TCE). For this purpose, one group of male Swiss albino mice was exposed to 7.5 Gy gamma radiation to serve as the irradiated control, while the other group received TCE (75 mg/kg b. wt./day) orally for 5 consecutive days half an hr before irradiation to serve as experimental. Exposure of animals to 7.5 Gy gam...

  14. Studies on chemical protectors against radiation, 34; Survival effects of aqueous extracts of various Chinese traditional medicines on radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Cheng-Ming; Ohta, Setsuko; Shinoda, Masato (Hoshi Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-06-01

    In order to develop a nontoxic radioprotector, 60 kinds of Chinese traditional medicines were chosen, and their aqueous extracts tested for their survival effects against the lethal effect of X-irradiation in mice. Radiation factors used were as follows: soft X-rays, 2100 R (5.418x10{sup -1}Ckg{sup -1}), 70 kVp, 10 mA, 10 mm acrylic filter, 70 R (1.806x10{sup -2} Ckg{sup -1})/min. Among 60 medicines tested by intraperitoneal injection immediately before the irradiation, 15 are shown to have the significant survival effect. These 15 effective medicines were also tested by intraperitoneal injection after the irradiation, and the survival effect was recognized in Keisi-syakuyaku-chimo-to, Keigai-rengyo-to, Shimotu-to, Syakuyaku-kanzo-to and Hange-syasin-to. On the other hand, the survival effects of 25 medicines including the above-mentioned 15 medicines were investigated by the oral administration at various times before or after the irradiation. As the results of these studies, only Keigai-rengyo-to and Bukuryo-in are shown to have the significant survival effect when administered 2 h before the irradiation. (author).

  15. EURADOS INTERCOMPARISONS IN EXTERNAL RADIATION DOSIMETRY: SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES AMONG EXERCISES FOR WHOLE-BODY PHOTON, WHOLE-BODY NEUTRON, EXTREMITY, EYE-LENS AND PASSIVE AREA DOSEMETERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Ana M; Grimbergen, Tom; McWhan, Andrew; Stadtmann, Hannes; Fantuzzi, Elena; Clairand, Isabelle; Neumaier, Stefan; Figel, Markus; Dombrowski, Harald

    2016-09-01

    The European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) has been organising dosimetry intercomparisons for many years in response to an identified requirement from individual monitoring services (IMS) for independent performance tests for dosimetry systems. The participation in intercomparisons gives IMS the opportunity to show compliance with their own quality management system, compare results with other participants and develop plans for improving their dosimetry systems. In response to growing demand, EURADOS has increased the number of intercomparisons for external radiation dosimetry. Most of these fit into the programme of self-financing intercomparisons for dosemeters routinely used by IMS. This programme is being coordinated by EURADOS working group 2 (WG2). Up to now, this programme has included four intercomparisons for whole-body dosemeters in photon fields, one for extremity dosemeters in photon and beta fields, and one for whole-body dosemeters in neutron fields. Other EURADOS working groups have organised additional intercomparisons including events in 2014 for eye-lens dosemeters and passive area dosemeters for environmental monitoring. In this paper, the organisation and achievements of these intercomparisons are compared in detail focusing on the similarities and differences in their execution. PMID:26759475

  16. Dried Fruit Extract of Sumac (Rhus coriaria L) Protects Albino Rats from Adverse Effects of Whole Body gamma-Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Antioxidant effect of Sumac; Rhus coriaria L. against whole body gamma-irradiation-induced oxidative damage in lung and liver tissues was investigated in albino rats. To achieve the ultimate goal of this study, 48 adult rats were randomly divided into 4 groups of 12 animals each. Group I: Control group. Group II: Irradiated with a single dose of 5Gy gamma-rays. Group III: Fed with sumac orally (300 mg/ kg body wt/ day) for 10 days. Group IV: Fed sumac (300 mg/ kg body wt) for 3 days pre-irradiation and 7 days after-radiation (5 Gy). The rats were sacrificed 1 and 7 days after a single exposure to ?-rays. The animals exposed to gamma radiation recorded significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) and total nitrate oxide (NO) levels in both lung and liver tissues. Also the results revealed, significant decrease in the activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) and the level of reduced glutathione (GSH), in lung and liver tissues. Moreover, a significant increase in plasma glucose accompanied with a significant decrease in insulin level was observed in irradiated rats. Administration of sumac for 10 days to rats prior and post gamma irradiation improved the tested parameters except glucose. In conclusion, data obtained from this study indicated that sumac could increase the antioxidant defence mechanism in rat and there by protects the animals from radiation-induced organs toxicity but it may increase the blood sugar, therefore in diabetic patient be considered

  17. Hematologycal disorders in mice of C57BL family exposed to full body radiation by Radioactive Cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven groups of 5C57B1 mice were submitted to full body radiation ina a single dose of 1.000 r (258m C/Kg). Each group was sacrified respectively on the 5th, 7th, 8th, and 10th day after exposition to radiation. Another group (8th) of 5 animals was used as control group, and was to submitted to radiation. Before sacrificing the animals, peripheral blood was collected to prepare extensions which