WorldWideScience

Sample records for body irradiation evolution

  1. Influence of radioprotectors on total body weight evolution and on oxygen consumption in lethal dose irradiated animals. (Preliminary study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparison of total body weight evolution and oxygen consumption in lethal dose irradiated animals, protected by various well known radioprotective substances, isolated or in mixture, with evolution and consumption of non protected animals irradiated at the same dose and with these of check animals

  2. Modelling microstructural evolution under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microstructural evolution of materials under irradiation is characterised by some unique features that are not typically present in other application environments. While much understanding has been achieved by experimental studies, the ability to model this microstructural evolution for complex materials states and environmental conditions not only enhances understanding, it also enables prediction of materials behaviour under conditions that are difficult to duplicate experimentally. Furthermore, reliable models enable designing materials for improved engineering performance for their respective applications. Thus, development and application of mesoscale microstructural model are important for advancing nuclear materials technologies. In this chapter, the application of the Potts model to nuclear materials will be reviewed and demonstrated, as an example of microstructural evolution processes. (author)

  3. Dosimetry of total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the treatment of disseminated malignancies an improvement in the curability and reduction of complication rates require high precision total body irradiation (TBI) and correct reporting of relevant treatment parameters. Optimal TBI dosimetry is the basis. Radiooncological and radiobiological requirements as well as the special physical situation have to be considered. To review the efforts of medical physicists, highlights from TBI workshops and publications are summarized. Additionally, dosimetric data from 34 European radiooncological centres contributing to the recent ESTRO inquiry on TBI are analysed. The topics are: absorbed dose and dose monitor calibration, determination of absolute and relative doses, dose ratios, attenuation data and heterogeneity corrections; TBI dose calculation methods regarding patient position, beam incidence, body shape and thickness, lung size and density; methods of TBI treatment planning including calculated dose modification and of TBI quality assurance. In conclusion, the following recommendations can be given: TBI dosimetry shall be performed under TBI conditions, close to the real treatment situation. The absorbed dose to water must be determined. The dose monitor should be calibrated against dose measurements at the centre of a water equivalent phantom of TBI equivalent size and typical thickness. Photon fluence profiles have to be measured with small phantoms. Influences on the local dose must be investigated systematically. A reproducible AP/PA TBI technique should be used. The TBI dose shall be specified to mid-abdomen and reported in units of gray. The single and total dose and the dose rate to the lungs, the number of fractions and the treatment time schedule must be stated. In vivo dosimetry is required if non-reliable TBI techniques are used. An international TBI dosimetry intercomparison could assist these efforts to improve the treatment of acute leukaemia. (author). 89 refs, 3 figs, 13 tabs

  4. Cataractogenesis after total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic factors and the ophthalmologic follow-up on cataract formation following total body irradiation (TBI) prior to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Methods and Materials: Between 1980 and 1992, 494 patients were referred to our department for TBI prior to BMT. The mean age was 32 ± 11 (median: 32, range: 2-63) years and the male to female ratio was 1.6 (304:190). The majority of patients were treated for acute leukemia (lymphoblastic, n = 177, 36%; or nonlymphoblastic, n = 139, 28%); 80 (16%) for chronic myeloid leukemia, 60 (12%) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 23 (5%) for multiple myeloma, and 15 (3%) for other malignancies. Two hundred and fifty-four (51%) patients were grafted in the first complete remission (CR), 118 (24%) in second CR. Allogeneic BMT was performed in 210 (43%) patients, and autologous BMT in 284 (57%). Methotrexate combined to steroids (n = 47, 22%) or to cyclosporine (n = 163, 78%) was administered for graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) prophylaxis. In 188 patients (38%), heparin was used in the prevention of veno-occlusive disease (VOD) of the liver. Furthermore, steroid administration was registered in 223 patients (45%). The conditioning chemotherapy consisted of cyclophosphamide (Cy) alone in 332 (67%) patients. Total-body irradiation was administered either in single dose (STBI; 10 Gy in 1 day, n = 291) or in six fractions (FTBI; 12 Gy over 3 consecutive days, n = 203) before BMT. The mean instantaneous dose rate was 0.0574 ± 0.0289 Gy/min (0.024-0.1783). It was < 0.048 Gy/min in 157 patients (LOW group), ≥ 0.048 Gy/min and < 0.09 Gy/min in 301 patients (MEDIUM group), and ≥ 0.09 Gy/min in 36 patients (HIGH group). Results: When considering all patients, 42 (8.5%) patients developed cataracts after 13 to 72 months (median: 42 months) with a 5-year estimated cataract incidence (ECI) of 23%. Thirty-three (11.3%) out of 291 patients in the STBI group, and 9 (4.4%) out of 203 patients in the FTBI group

  5. Cataract incidence after total-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate cataract incidence in a homogeneous group of patients after total-body irradiation followed by autologous bone marrow transplantation or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Method and Materials: Between 11/1982 and 6/1994 in total 260 patients received in our hospital total-body irradiation for treatment of haematological malignancy. In 1996-96 patients out of these 260 patients were still alive. 85 from these still living patients (52 men, 33 women) answered evaluable on a questionnaire and could be examined ophthalmologically. Median age of these patients was 38,5 years (15 - 59 years) at time of total-body irradiation. Radiotherapy was applied as hyperfractionated total-body irradiation with a median dose of 14,4 Gy in 12 fractions over 4 days. Minimum time between fractions was 4 hours, photons with a energy of 23 MeV were used, and the dose rate was 7 - 18 cGy/min. Results: Median follow-up is now 5,8 years (1,7 - 13 years). Cataract occurred in (28(85)) patients after a median time of 47 months (1 - 104 months). In 6 out of these 28 patients who developed a cataract, surgery of the cataract was performed. Whole-brain irradiation prior to total-body irradiation was more often in the group of patients developing a cataract (14,3%) vs. 10,7% in the group of patients without cataract. Conclusion: Cataract is a common side effect of total-body irradiation. Cataract incidence found in our patients is comparable to results of other centres using a fractionated regimen for total-body irradiation. The hyperfractionated regimen used in our hospital does obviously not result in a even lower cataract incidence. In contrast to acute and late toxicity in other organ/organsystems, hyperfractionation of total-body irradiation does not further reduce toxicity for the eye-lens. Dose rate may have more influence on cataract incidence

  6. Device for the irradiation of living bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In attempting to protect as far as possible the surrounding healthy tissue in radiation exposure of living bodies, it is suggested to include part of an ellipsoid mirror in the casing of the irradiation device in which the exit opening of the radiation source is arranged under the focal point, and whose second focal point is on the outer side of the radiation penetration opening of the casing and fixes the irradiation spot. A locally sharply limited area is thus irradiated. Further advantageous improvements of the apparatus are described. (UWI)

  7. Implantation of total body irradiation in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before implementing a treatment technique, the characteristics of the beam under irradiation conditions must be well acknowledged and studied. Each one of the parameters used to calculate the dose has to be measured and validated before its utilization in clinical practice. This is particularly necessary when dealing with special techniques. In this work, all necessary parameters and measurements are described for the total body irradiation implementation in facilities designed for conventional treatments that make use of unconventional geometries to generate desired enlarged field sizes. Furthermore, this work presents commissioning data of this modality at Hospital das Clinicas of Sao Paulo using comparison of three detectors types for measurements of entrance dose during total body irradiation treatment. (author)

  8. A review of total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review of total body irradiation discusses the optimization of the prescription, relevant radiobiological research, cytotoxic drugs and TBI, and the delivery of TBI and its complications, with particular reference to acute effects, neurological sequelae, endocrine effects, cataracts, and secondary malignancies. (U.K.)

  9. Whole-body irradiation technique: physical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work has been to implement a Total body irradiation technique that fulfill the following conditions: simplicity, repeatability, fast and comfortable positioning for the patient, homogeneity of the dose between 10-15 %, short times of treatments and In vivo dosimetric verifications. (Author)

  10. Tissue air ratio in total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of dose readings in 102 patients treated with total body irradiation (TBI), a 'tissue air ratio (TAR) curve' has been produced. It could be useful to precalculate treatment time in TBI, for dose prescription to a specific point, provided the same source (60Co) and treatment setting (lateral irradiation; 3 m source-axis distance; reference point at thighs bifurcation, neat the perineum) is used. The TAR curve produced, and the formula relating tissue depth to TAR value, are presented, and compared to preexisting data for 'magna fields' treatments. This curve is exponential, and in semilog representation becomes straight, as every classic TAR curve; it is lower than others, reflecting non full-scatter situation in patient irradiation. (orig.)

  11. The evolution of irradiated stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stars less than a few pc from a quasar or an active galactic nucleus will be subjected to an intense radiation flux. The effects on the structure and evolution of such stars are investigated by evolving models in isotropic radiation baths at constant temperatures ranging from 103.75 to 104. The effects on stars with radiative envelopes are found to be small, while stars with convective envelopes generally increase in size. Consequently, the main sequence evolution of stars of mass ≥ 1 solar mass is little affected, but as red giants, they are 10-100 times larger than normal. Lower-mass stars do grow significantly while still on the main sequence. Redistribution of energy is found to prolong Hertzsprung-gap evolution of all stars and to shorten the main sequence lifetimes of very-low-mass stars. It is found that the bloated giants are likely to undergo extensive mass loss soon after they begin to expand. (author)

  12. Evolution of glycaemia during irradiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of glycaemia following irradiation has been followed in the rat and pig. The results concerning a case of human accidental exposure have also been included. The author has tried to see whether the observed variations are reproducible and have a prognostic value. (author)

  13. Biological basis of total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive understanding of the radiobiological bases of total body irradiation (TBI) is made difficult by the large number of normal and malignant tissues that must be taken into account. In addition, tissue responses to irradiation are also sensitive to associated treatments, type of graft and a number of patient characteristics. Experimental studies have yielded a large body of data, the clinical relevance of which still requires definite validation through randomized trials. Fractionated TBI schemes are able to reduce late normal tissue toxicity, but the ultimate consequences of the fractional dose reduction do not appear to be equivocal. Thus, leukemia and lymphoma cells are probably more radio-biologically heterogeneous than previously thought, with several cell lines displaying relatively high radioresistance and repair capability patterns. The most primitive host-type hematopoietic stem cells are likely to be at least partly protected by TBI fractionation and may hamper late engraftment. Similarly, but with possibly conflicting consequences on the probability of engraftment, the persistence of a functional marrow stroma may also be fractionation-sensitive, while higher rejection rates have been reported after T-depletion grafts and fractionated TBI. in clinical practice (as for performance of relevant clinical trials), the influence of these results are rather limited by the heavy logistic constraints created by a sophisticated and time-consuming procedure. Lastly, clinicians are now facing an increasing incidence of second cancers, at least partly induced by irradiation, which jeopardize the long-term prospects of otherwise cured patients. (authors)

  14. The evolution of whole-body imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Deirdre E

    2012-02-01

    This article reviews the evolution of whole-body imaging, discussing the history and development of radiography, nuclear medicine, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), combined PET-CT, and magnetic resonance imaging. The obstacles hindering progress toward whole-body imaging using each of these modalities, and the technical advances that were developed to overcome them, are reviewed. The effectiveness and the limitations of whole-body imaging with each of these techniques are also briefly discussed.

  15. Biological problems of total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have considered the dose required for meeting the aims of total body irradiation as well as its significance in terms of cell survival for bone marrow stem cells leukaemia, intestinal mucosa and lung. The necessity of a relative protection of the critical tissues with respect to the target populations the irradiation is aiming at, is emphasized. Localized shielding of the lung results in a reduction of the dose to a part of the target population; its biological consequence is discussed. Fractionation and protraction of the irradiation can achieve a significant protection of the critical tissues. Radiobiological data allow estimating the benefit of reducing the fraction size to 1.25 Gy or the dose rate to 0.05 Gy/mn. The benefit of smaller fraction size or dose rate is probably small. Fractionation or low dose rate appear equivalent for the protection of the critical tissues. A larger clinical experience is necessary for a definite comparison of their biological and practical advantages

  16. Total body irradiation for children with malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanuki, Eiichi; Maeno, Toshio; Kamata, Rikisaburo; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Mugishima, Hideo [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-12-01

    Total body irradiation combined with high dose chemotherapy has been performed just before bone marrow transplantation in 35 children with advanced malignancies, with the object of achieving successful transplantation and improving the prognosis. Simulation was performed as follows: back scatter, flatness, dose accumulation using randophantom and dose distribution using a thermo-luminescence dosimeter and linac-graphy. The standard error of dose distribution was within 10%. In neuroblastoma, of which there were 14 cases in stage IV and one case in stage III, the 5-year survival rate was 55%. In leukemia, of which all cases were in the high-risk group (7 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 2 of acute myeloblastic leukemia) the 5-year survival rate was 55%. The 5 cases having first remission survived disease-free while the 4 cases having non-first remission died. In malignant lymphoma (6 cases in stage IV and one case in stage III, with bulky mass) the 5-year survival rate was 67%. Four cases with other diagnoses (severe aplastic anemia, and others) all survived. As yet no side effects resulting from total body irradiation have been recognized in our cases, but a longer follow-up period is necessary to observe possible late side effects. (author).

  17. Modeling of microstructural evolution under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microstructural evolution under irradiation is an extremely complex phenomenon involving numerous interacting mechanisms which alter both the microstructure and microchemistry of structural alloys. Predictive procedures which correlate primary irradiation and material variables to microstructural response are needed to extrapolate from the imperfect data base, which will be available, to fusion reactor conditions. Clearly, a marriage between models and experiments is needed. Specific steps to achieving such a marriage in the form of composite correlation model analysis are outlined and some preliminary results presented. The strongly correlated nature of microstructural evolution is emphasized and it is suggested that rate theory models, resting on the principle of material balances and focusing on coupled point defect-microchemical segregation processes, may be a practical approach to correlation model development. (orig.)

  18. Network evolution of body plans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Fujimoto

    Full Text Available One of the major goals in evolutionary developmental biology is to understand the relationship between gene regulatory networks and the diverse morphologies and their functionalities. Are the diversities solely triggered by random events, or are they inevitable outcomes of an interplay between evolving gene networks and natural selection? Segmentation in arthropod embryogenesis represents a well-known example of body plan diversity. Striped patterns of gene expression that lead to the future body segments appear simultaneously or sequentially in long and short germ-band development, respectively. Moreover, a combination of both is found in intermediate germ-band development. Regulatory genes relevant for stripe formation are evolutionarily conserved among arthropods, therefore the differences in the observed traits are thought to have originated from how the genes are wired. To reveal the basic differences in the network structure, we have numerically evolved hundreds of gene regulatory networks that produce striped patterns of gene expression. By analyzing the topologies of the generated networks, we show that the characteristics of stripe formation in long and short germ-band development are determined by Feed-Forward Loops (FFLs and negative Feed-Back Loops (FBLs respectively, and those of intermediate germ-band development are determined by the interconnections between FFL and negative FBL. Network architectures, gene expression patterns and knockout responses exhibited by the artificially evolved networks agree with those reported in the fly Drosophila melanogaster and the beetle Tribolium castaneum. For other arthropod species, principal network architectures that remain largely unknown are predicted. Our results suggest that the emergence of the three modes of body segmentation in arthropods is an inherent property of the evolving networks.

  19. Bone-marrow alterations after half-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mouse bone marrow was investigated after upper half-body, upper and lower half-body and whole-body irradiation, resp., with regard to the development of an animal model for half-body treatment of tumor patients. As a result of the studies the practicability of bilateral half-body irradiation can be assumed as to the regeneration of the bone marrow and the survival of the whole organism based on a kind of 'endogeneous transplantation' of bone marrow cells from the unirradiated area into the irradiated one. Resulting from the single irradiations distinct reductive cellular effects followed by exceeding regeneration in the irradiated parts of the bone marrow as well as compensatory proliferations in the unirradiated parts could be revealed. The dynamics of the number of cells essentially turned out on account of leukopoiesis. The results presented are a guideline for the interpretation of clinical processes following upper and lower adjuvant half-body irradiation

  20. Cataract incidence after total-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate cataract incidence in a homogeneously-treated group of patients after total-body irradiation (TBI) followed by autologous bone marrow transplantation or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 1994, a total of 260 patients received either autologous bone marrow or blood stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancy at the University of Heidelberg. Two hundred nine of these patients received TBI in our hospital. Radiotherapy was applied as hyperfractionated TBI, with a median dose of 14.4 Gy in 12 fractions over 4 days. Minimum time between fractions was 4 h. Photons with an energy of 23 MeV were used with a dose rate of 7-18 cGy/min. Ninety-six of the 209 irradiated patients were still alive in 1996; 86 of these patients (52 men, 33 women) answered a questionnaire and could be examined ophthalmologically. The median age at time of TBI was 38.5 years, with a range of 15-59 years. Results: The median follow-up is now 5.8 years, with a range of 1.7-13 years. Cataract occurred in 28/85 patients (32.9%) after a median of 47 months (1-104 months). In 6 of 28 patients who developed a cataract, surgery of the cataract was performed. Whole-brain irradiation prior to TBI had been performed more often in the group of patients developing cataract (14.3%) versus 10.7% in the group of patients without cataract. However, there was no statistical difference (Chi-square, p > 0.05). Conclusion: Cataract is a common side effect of TBI. Cataract incidence found in our patients is comparable to results of other centers using a fractionated regimen for TBI. To assess the incidence of cataract after TBI, a long-term follow-up is required

  1. Total body irradiation in bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total body irradiation was used in 22 patients as part of their conditioning regimen for bone marrow transplantation. Nine patients with acute leukemia received 1000 cGy TBI in addition with chemotherapy. None of them survived and the main cause of death was interstitial pneumonitis (50%). 4 patients received 1000 cGy with a lung shielding of 500 cGy. Two patients with acute leukemia died of leukemia and sepsis, two patients had aplastic anemia, one is surviving, the other died of severe GVHD and infectious complications. Nine patients with severe aplastic anemia strongly immunized by previous blood transfusions received 800 cGy TBI with a lung shielding of 400 cGy. No rejection was observed and 7 patients (63%) are currently alive. One patient died of interstitial pneumonitis probably related to CMV infection, one of subacute necrotizing hepatitis, two of severe acute GVHD. It is concluded from this study that TBI remains the best immunosuppressive conditioning regimen even in strongly immunized patients. It may be a contributing factor of the incidence and severity of interstitial pneumonitis. A reduction of the dose of the lung to 400-500 cGy seems to decrease the severity of this complication

  2. Total body irradiation: technical and clinical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total-body irradiation (TBI) has an established role in many preparative regimens used before marrow transplantation (BMT) in the treatment of hematological malignancies in children and adults. Better choice in TBI techniques and dosimetry have permitted better homogeneity of dose, and therefore a significant sparing of critical tissues. Advances in treatments over the past 20 years have greatly improved survival; therefore, the evaluation of early and late complications with a sufficient follow-up, according to different conditioning regimens is important. In this article, we review and compare different TBI techniques and dosimetry, and their influence on the distribution and homogeneity of dose, and the possible relationship to the risk of complications. We also describe the acute and late effects of TBI in children and adults appearing in the first month post-BMT as veno-occlusive disease, interstitial pneumonitis, or after 3 months, i.e., endocrinal late effects and growth in children, cataracts, neurological and bone or other complications, secondary tumors and alteration in the quality of life. The responsibility of TBI in the increased rate of certain complications is difficult to assess from chemotherapy or allograft side effects (chronic graft vs. host disease) or from other associated medical treatments, such as long term steroid therapy. (authors)

  3. Radiobiological speculations on therapeutic total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unexpected total body irradiation (TBI) of human beings, involved in nuclear warfare or in accidents in nuclear reactors can be lethal. In the 1950s, bone marrow transplantation was discovered as a potentially life saving procedure after TBI in the dose range of 5.0 to 12.0 Gy. Since that time, deliberate or therapeutic TBI has been used to condition patients with a lethal bone marrow disorder for bone marrow replacement. The therapeutic ratio of TBI followed by bone marrow transplantation is small. Many potentially lethal complications can occur, such as acute TBI side effects, late TBI side effects or immunological complications of bone marrow transplantation such as graft versus host disease or graft rejection. The benefits of TBI and bone marrow transplantation are that they offer a chance for cure of previously lethal bone marrow disorders. The optimal parameters for TBI remain to be defined. The review discusses the current clinical and experimental animal data, as they relate to the future definition of less toxic TBI procedures with a better therapeutic ratio. Different TBI procedures are required for patients with malignant vs. non-malignant disorders or for patients with histoincompatible vs. histocompatible bone marrow donors.77 references

  4. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper was to develop a thermoluminescent dosimetry method for the absorbed dose determination of 6 MeV high-energy electron beams by thermoluminescent dosimetry. Total body irradiation (TBI) was performed using four dual fields angled at 252° and 285° in high-dose rate (HDR) mode. TBI measurements were investigated to estimate the absorbed dose in different anatomical parts of the patient. Experimental results were obtained using thermoluminescent detectors and solid water phantoms. The TL response of the dosimeters, as a function of the high-energy electron beam (HEEB) absorbed dose, was linear, from 0.1 to 500 cGy. The entrance skin dose (ESD) and isodose distribution on the surface of the treatment were investigated graphically. - Highlights: ► The total patient skin electron dose was determined. ► The patient skin dose distribution was measured by TL. ► TBID in treatment planning and QA for radiation therapy are suggested. ► TLD system is a good candidate for TBI dosimetry.

  5. Total body irradiation for bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: The primary goal of this course is to develop an understanding of the rationale for the use of total body irradiation (TBI) as a component of cytoreduction for bone marrow transplantation, the techniques used, and the results of changing important parameters, such as dose, dose rate, and fractionation. Materials and Methods: Basic radiobiological principles relevant to TBI are reviewed; in particular, emphasis is placed on cell and animal studies which suggest means of optimizing TBI delivery to achieve maximum tumor cell kill and immunosuppression along with minimal normal tissue damage. Techniques utilized at various centers are described, with some discussion of achieving homogeneity, as well as inhomogeneity when desired with partial shielding or 'boosting'. A review of clinical studies, both randomized and non-randomized, is done; these are then interpreted in terms of potential optimization of the TBI parameters. Finally, comparison of TBI-containing regimens with chemotherapy-only regimens is done. Results: Radiobiological studies suggest a potential advantage for fractionated TBI over single dose TBI. Clinical studies support this view: highly fractionated regimens have allowed higher total doses to be used to increase malignant cell kill and immunosuppression without increasing toxicity. Randomized studies of TBI combined with VP-16 or cyclophosphamide versus busulfan combined with cyclophosphamide have either shown an advantage with TBI (in acute myelocytic leukemia in first remission) or no difference (in chronic myelogenous leukemia, chronic phase). Conclusion: TBI has been an effective component of cytoreductive regimens for marrow transplantation in patients with malignant disease, especially leukemias, which constitute 73% of all marrow transplants worldwide. Evidence supports fractionated TBI, to doses ≥ 13 Gy, when compared with single dose TBI. Randomized studies support the continued use of TBI in AML, and suggest that

  6. Total body irradiation: current indications; L`irradiation corporelle totale: les indications actuelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraud, P.; Danhier, S.; Dubray, B.; Cosset, J.M. [Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France)

    1998-05-01

    The choice of dose and fractionation for total body irradiation is made difficult by the large number of considerations to be taken into account. The outcome of bone marrow transplantation after total body irradiation can be understood in terms of tumor cell killing, engraftment, and normal tissue damage, each of these endpoints being influenced by irradiation-, disease-, transplant-, and patient- related factors. Interpretation of clinical data is further hampered by the overwhelming influence of logistic constraints, the small numbers of randomized studies, and the concomitant variations in total dose and fraction size or dose rate. So far, three cautious conclusions can be drawn in order to tentatively adapt the total body irradiation schedule to clinically-relevant situations. Firstly, the organs at risk for normal tissue damage (lung, liver, lens, kidney) are protected by delivering small doses per fraction at low dose rate. This suggests that, when toxicity is at stake (e.g. in children), fractionated irradiation should be preferred, provided that inter-fraction intervals are long enough. Secondly, fractionated irradiation should be avoided in case of T-cell depleted transplant, given the high risk of graft rejection in this setting. An alternative would be to increase total (or fractional) dose of fractionated total body irradiation, but this approach is likely to induce more normal tissue toxicity. Thirdly, clinical data have shown higher relapse rates in chronic myeloid leukemia after fractionated or low dose rate total body irradiation, suggesting that fractionated irradiation should not be recommended, unless total (or fractional) dose is increased. Total body irradiation-containing regimens, primarily cyclophosphamide / total body irradiation, are either equivalent to or better than the chemotherapy-only regimens, primarily busulfan / cyclophosphamide. Busulfan / cyclophosphamide certainly represents a reasonable alternative, especially in patients who

  7. Development of a new method of whole body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method of whole body irradiation was developed using a linear accelerator linked to microprocessor. By this modified arc technique, a total body photon irradiation and a total skin electron irradiation were practical for narrow room. Approximative calculations were deviced for dose distribution. Dosimetric results were consistent with those previosly calculated. Local doses in lungs, neck and other areas were easily adjustable with arrangements of pre-set dose rate. In total skin electron irradation, six predeterminated postures and 'make up' irradiation were necessary to dose homogeneity over 'shady area' such as axillae. Clinically, a large arteriovenous malformation in an arm decreased with normalization of plethysmogram after treatment, and remarkable reductions of mycosis fungoides tumor were observed. This new method of total skin electron irradiation and total body photon therapy will clinically expand with the progress of bone marrow transplantation. (author)

  8. Comparative studies in the cellular immunostimulation by whole body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the cellular immune response by total body irradiation was investigated. The transplant survival (skin grafts) was determined as immune parameter. Donors were colony bred Wistar rats and recipients were colony bred Sprague Dawley rats. The investigations were carried out with irradiated rats and with rats irradiated after thymectomy and/or adrenalectomy as well as with animals without irradiation. A single total-body irradiation (1 and 2 Gy) was administered. The skin graft survival in irradiated rats was significant shorter (radiogenic immunostimulation) than in unirradiated rats; there were no significant differences between the operated (thymectomy and/or adrenalectomy) and not operated animals. Including precedent examinations this radiogenic immunostimulation is caused by relativly selective inactivation of T-suppressor cells. (orig.)

  9. Chemical evolution of primitive solar system bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oro, J.; Mills, T.

    1989-01-01

    Observations on organic molecules and compounds containing biogenic elements in the interstellar medium and in the primitive bodies of the solar system are reviewed. The discovery of phosphorus molecular species in dense interstellar clouds, the existence of organic ions in the dust and gas phase of the comas of Comet Halley, and the presence of presolar, deuterium-hydrogen ratios in the amino acids of carbonaceous chondrites are discussed. The relationships between comets, dark asteroids, and carbonaceous chondrites are examined. Also, consideration is given to the chemical evolution of Titan, the primitive earth, and early Mars.

  10. The Evolution of Trilobite Body Patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Nigel C.

    2007-05-01

    The good fossil record of trilobite exoskeletal anatomy and ontogeny, coupled with information on their nonbiomineralized tissues, permits analysis of how the trilobite body was organized and developed, and the various evolutionary modifications of such patterning within the group. In several respects trilobite development and form appears comparable with that which may have characterized the ancestor of most or all euarthropods, giving studies of trilobite body organization special relevance in the light of recent advances in the understanding of arthropod evolution and development. The Cambrian diversification of trilobites displayed modifications in the patterning of the trunk region comparable with those seen among the closest relatives of Trilobita. In contrast, the Ordovician diversification of trilobites, although contributing greatly to the overall diversity within the clade, did so within a narrower range of trunk conditions. Trilobite evolution is consistent with an increased premium on effective enrollment and protective strategies, and with an evolutionary trade-off between the flexibility to vary the number of trunk segments and the ability to regionalize portions of the trunk.

  11. Evolution of body size in Galapagos marine iguanas

    OpenAIRE

    Wikelski, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Body size is one of the most important traits of organisms and allows predictions of an individual's morphology, physiology, behaviour and life history. However, explaining the evolution of complex traits such as body size is difficult because a plethora of other traits influence body size. Here I review what we know about the evolution of body size in a group of island reptiles and try to generalize about the mechanisms that shape body size. Galapagos marine iguanas occupy all 13 larger isla...

  12. Biochemical and hematological indicators in model of total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the purpose of evaluating the applicability of several biological indicators in accidental overexposures a study was carried out in 20 patients undergoing therapeutical total body irradiation (TBI). The following parameters were evaluated: a) Oxidative stress indicators: erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activity (CAT), lipo peroxyde levels (TBARS) and total plasma antioxidant activity (TAA). b) Haematological indicators: reticulocyte maturity index (RMI) and charges in lymphocyte subpopulations. Non significant changes in SOD and CAT activity were observed. Significant higher TBARS levels were found in patients with unfavorable post-BTM course without any significant correlation with TAA. RMI decreased early and dropped to zero in most of the patients and rose several days prior to reticulocyte, neutrophils and platelets counts. A significant decrease in absolute counts of all lymphocyte subpopulations was observed during TBI, particularly for B lymphocytes. A subpopulation of natural killer (NK) cells (CD16+/ CD 56 +) showed a relative higher radioresistance. Cytotoxic activity was significantly decreased after TBI. These data suggest that TBARS could provide an useful evolutive indicator in accidental over exposure d patients and RMI is an early indicator of bone marrow recovery after radioinduced aplasia. The implications of the different radiosensitivities within the NK subsets remains unanswered. (author)

  13. Response of irradiated diet fed rats to whole body X irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response to whole body X irradiation has been studied in the brain of rats fed both on a normal diet (consisting of equal parts of wheat and gram flour) and on a low protein irradiated diet (consisting of a part of normal diet and three parts of wheat). The activity of enzymes related to the glucose metabolism (glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and fructose diphosphate aldolase) is reduced, while that of peroxidant enzymes (catalase and lipid peroxidase) increased in the brain of rats that received a diet poor in proteins and irradiated diets (normal or hypoproteic). DNA and RNA levels and protein content show a significant reduction in the brain of rats with hypoproteic and irradiated diets. The total body irradiation causes serious alterations in the brain in animals with a hypoproteic malnutritions due both to a low protein and an irradiated diet. The brain of rats fed on a low protein and irradiated diet exhibits after whole body irradiation damages more severe than those in rats fed on a normal irradiated diet

  14. Irradiation Induced Microstructure Evolution in Nanostructured Materials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured (NS materials may have different irradiation resistance from their coarse-grained (CG counterparts. In this review, we focus on the effect of grain boundaries (GBs/interfaces on irradiation induced microstructure evolution and the irradiation tolerance of NS materials under irradiation. The features of void denuded zones (VDZs and the unusual behavior of void formation near GBs/interfaces in metals due to the interactions between GBs/interfaces and irradiation-produced point defects are systematically reviewed. Some experimental results and calculation results show that NS materials have enhanced irradiation resistance, due to their extremely small grain sizes and large volume fractions of GBs/interfaces, which could absorb and annihilate the mobile defects produced during irradiation. However, there is also literature reporting reduced irradiation resistance or even amorphization of NS materials at a lower irradiation dose compared with their bulk counterparts, since the GBs are also characterized by excess energy (compared to that of single crystal materials which could provide a shift in the total free energy that will lead to the amorphization process. The competition of these two effects leads to the different irradiation tolerance of NS materials. The irradiation-induced grain growth is dominated by irradiation temperature, dose, ion flux, character of GBs/interface and nanoprecipitates, although the decrease of grain sizes under irradiation is also observed in some experiments.

  15. Acute and delayed toxicities of total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeg, H.J.

    1983-12-01

    Total body irradiation is being used with increasing frequency for the treatment of lymphopoietic malignancies and in preparation for marrow transplantation. Acute toxicities include reversible gastroeneritis, mucositis, myelosuppression alopecia. As the success of treatment improves and more patients become long-term survivors, manifestations of delayed and chronic toxicity become evident. These include impairment of growth and development, gonadal failure and sterility, cataract formation and possibly secondary malignancies. The contribution of total body irradiation to the development of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis is still poorly understood. Some of these changes are reversible or correctable, whereas others are permanent. Nevertheless, until equally effective but less toxic regimens become available, total body irradiation appears to be the treatment of choice to prepare patients with leukemia for marrow transplantation.

  16. Acute and delayed toxicities of total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total body irradiation is being used with increasing frequency for the treatment of lymphopoietic malignancies and in preparation for marrow transplantation. Acute toxicities include reversible gastroeneritis, mucositis, myelosuppression alopecia. As the success of treatment improves and more patients become long-term survivors, manifestations of delayed and chronic toxicity become evident. These include impairment of growth and development, gonadal failure and sterility, cataract formation and possibly secondary malignancies. The contribution of total body irradiation to the development of pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis is still poorly understood. Some of these changes are reversible or correctable, whereas others are permanent. Nevertheless, until equally effective but less toxic regimens become available, total body irradiation appears to be the treatment of choice to prepare patients with leukemia for marrow transplantation

  17. Evolution of glycaemia during irradiation syndrome; Evolution de la glycemie au cours du syndrome d'irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisonnier, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay aux Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-03-15

    The evolution of glycaemia following irradiation has been followed in the rat and pig. The results concerning a case of human accidental exposure have also been included. The author has tried to see whether the observed variations are reproducible and have a prognostic value. (author) [French] L'evolution de la glycemie a ete suivie, chez le rat et le porc, apres irradiation. Les resultats relatifs a une irradiation accidentelle humaine sont egalement rapportes. L'auteur cherche a definir si les variations observees sont reproductibles et ont une valeur pronostique. (auteur)

  18. Evolution of Body Elongation in Gymnophthalmid Lizards: Relationships with Climate

    OpenAIRE

    Grizante, Mariana B.; Brandt, Renata; Kohlsdorf, Tiana

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of elongated body shapes in vertebrates has intrigued biologists for decades and is particularly recurrent among squamates. Several aspects might explain how the environment influences the evolution of body elongation, but climate needs to be incorporated in this scenario to evaluate how it contributes to morphological evolution. Climatic parameters include temperature and precipitation, two variables that likely influence environmental characteristics, including soil texture an...

  19. Microstructural evolution under high temperature irradiation: fundamental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the impossibility to propose theoretically established scaling laws for extrapolating microstructural evolutions to unknown irradiation conditions, a full modelization of microstructural evolution at the atomistic level cannot be avoided. We briefly review the main models available for describing: defect balance under irradiation, the nucleation of clusters of various types, the development of each of the components of the microstructure, synergistic effects among the latter. Attention is called on the problems which remain to be solved at each step. In particular, the swelling incubation phenomenon is just being studied from the fundamental viewpoint. A table of available relevant observations thereof is given. The existence of dose-rate thresholds accross which microstructural evolution undergoes a qualitative change is stressed. Such thresholds call for a detailed modelization of microstructural evolution in order to propose safe extrapolation techniques

  20. Total body irradiation in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Fundagul Andic

    2014-01-01

    Total body irradiation is used in conjunction with chemotherapy as a conditioning regimen in the treatment of many disease such as leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, aplastic anemia, multiple myeloma and lymphoma prior to the hematopoetic stem cell transplantation. The main purposes of the hematopoetic stem cell transplantation are eradication of the recipient bone marrow and any residual cancer cells, creation of space in the receipient bone marrow for donor hematopoetic stem cells, and imm...

  1. Left-half-body-irradiation induced mouse bone marrow hematopoietic cells DNA damage in non-irradiation area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the DNA damage of mouse bone marrow hematopoietic cells in-non-irradiation area after being irradiated by way of left-half-body. Methods: 6-8 weeks male Kunming strain mice were randomly divided into 4 groups i.e. normal control (NC), total-body-irradiated (TBI), left-half-body-irradiated (LHBI), and total -body-shield-irradiated (TBSI). Half-body-irradiated model were made with two pieces of 5 cm x 8 cm x 16 cm over- lapped lead bricks shielding right-side body and irradiated with 8.0 Gy 60Co γ-ray. The TNF-α, SOD, MDA in mouse serum were measured and the DNA damages of bone marrow hematopoietic cells were observed by comet assay and the frequency of polychromatic erythrocytes micronucleated(fMPCE). Results: In the left-half-body-irradiated condition, The TNF-α and MDA were increased and the SOD was decreased in serum remarkably(compared with NC, P<0.01); In non-irradiation area, the fMPCE and the percentage of bone marrow hematopoietic cells with comet-like tail, were aggravated significantly. Conclusions: Our study suggest that the local irradiation result in the DNA damage of bone marrow hematopoietic cells in non- irradiation area, and the increasing of TNF-α and reactive oxygen or free radicals may play an important role in the damages. (authors)

  2. A modified 60C teletherapy unit for total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A modified teletherapy unit to achieve total body irradiation with a vertical beam in a conventional treatment room. Methods and Materials: A standard 60C teletherapy unit has been modified to achieve total body irradiation with a vertical beam in a conventional treatment room. Patients are treated in prone and supine positions. Removal of the adjustable collimator assembly of this standard machine provides a circular field of 196 cm in diameter at 167 cm from the source. Second, the machine has been elevated by about 50 cm on a metallic base to enlarge irradiation field to obtain 248 cm in diameter at 210 cm from the source, and to encompass tall patients under better conditions. A special lead conical beam flattening filter, 10-mm thick at the center, was designed to compensate the spatial inhomogeneity of the beam. An instantaneous dose rate of 6.10-2 Gy/min is attained at the L4 level (midplane) in an average 20-cm thick patient with a source activity of 5099 RHM (air kerma rate of 44.8 Gy·h-1·m2). Between February 2, 1984 and December 27, 1990, 244 total body irradiations were performed either by single dose (n = 69, 10 Gy were given to midplane at L4 level in about 6 to 8 h, 8 Gy to the lungs), or by fractionated dose (n = 175, 12 Gy were given in 6 fractions over 3 consecutive days to midplane at L4 level, 9 Gy to the lungs). Results: The dose distribution is similar than the ones obtained by a linear accelerator with patients lying on their sides. Conclusion: Patients were treated in a comfortable and highly reproductible position. Organ shielding was easily achievable. This could be a less expensive and reasonable alternative to linear accelerator

  3. Dissipative N - body code for galaxy evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kravchuk, S

    2000-01-01

    The evolving galaxy is considered as a system of baryonic fragments embedded into the static dark nonbaryonic (DH) and baryonic (BH) halo and subjected to gravitational and viscous interactions. Although the chemical evolution of each separate fragment is treated in the frame of one -- zone close box model with instantaneous recycling, its star formation (SF) activity is a function of mean local gas density and, therefore, is strongly influenced by other interacting fragments. In spite of its simplicity this model provides a realistic description of the process of galaxy formation and evolution over the Hubble timescale.

  4. Total body irradiation and allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study is to present the first case in the Bulgarian oncological practice of total-body irradiation (TBI) followed by allogeneic transplantation of hemopoietic peripheral steam cells from a haploidentical family donor to a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient was a 10-year old boy with a verified non-Hodgkin lymphoma - IV clinical stage (leukemia-lymphoma syndrome) with initial mediastinal and bone-marrow engagement. After the disease recurrence the patient was hospitalized in the Transplantation Department of the Specialized Pediatric Hospital for Active Treatment of Oncological Diseases for realizing allogeneic transplantation. The application of the conditioning regime includes Melphalan, Fludarabine, ATG and TBI with 5x2 Gy. The patient was discharged on the 30th day in a good general condition with compensated haematological parameters and stable function of the transplant, and with instructions for the control check-ups and examinations each 14 days till the day + 100. The TBI method applied by the team was simple for realization and did not require special equipment. The patient received irradiation by a vertical radiation beam in a small procedure room in a comfortable spinal and prone position, which allowed the realization of sufficiently homogeneous dose in the body and effective lung protection. The irradiation time was acceptable, compared with the time for the application of horizontal radiation beams at large distances. (authors)

  5. Evolution of the solar irradiance during the Holocene

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira\\inst, Luis Eduardo A; Krivova, Natalie A; Usoskin, Ilya

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We present a physically consistent reconstruction of the total solar irradiance for the Holocene. Methods. We extend the SATIRE models to estimate the evolution of the total (and partly spectral) solar irradiance over the Holocene. The basic assumption is that the variations of the solar irradiance are due to the evolution of the dark and bright magnetic features on the solar surface. The evolution of the decadally averaged magnetic flux is computed from decadal values of cosmogenic isotope concentrations recorded in natural archives employing a series of physics-based models connecting the processes from the modulation of the cosmic ray flux in the heliosphere to their record in natural archives. We then compute the total solar irradiance (TSI) as a linear combination of the jth and jth + 1 decadal values of the open magnetic flux. Results. Reconstructions of the TSI over the Holocene, each valid for a di_erent paleomagnetic time series, are presented. Our analysis suggests that major sources of uncert...

  6. Evolution of body elongation in gymnophthalmid lizards: relationships with climate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana B Grizante

    Full Text Available The evolution of elongated body shapes in vertebrates has intrigued biologists for decades and is particularly recurrent among squamates. Several aspects might explain how the environment influences the evolution of body elongation, but climate needs to be incorporated in this scenario to evaluate how it contributes to morphological evolution. Climatic parameters include temperature and precipitation, two variables that likely influence environmental characteristics, including soil texture and substrate coverage, which may define the selective pressures acting during the evolution of morphology. Due to development of geographic information system (GIS techniques, these variables can now be included in evolutionary biology studies and were used in the present study to test for associations between variation in body shape and climate in the tropical lizard family Gymnophthalmidae. We first investigated how the morphological traits that define body shape are correlated in these lizards and then tested for associations between a descriptor of body elongation and climate. Our analyses revealed that the evolution of body elongation in Gymnophthalmidae involved concomitant changes in different morphological traits: trunk elongation was coupled with limb shortening and a reduction in body diameter, and the gradual variation along this axis was illustrated by less-elongated morphologies exhibiting shorter trunks and longer limbs. The variation identified in Gymnophthalmidae body shape was associated with climate, with the species from more arid environments usually being more elongated. Aridity is associated with high temperatures and low precipitation, which affect additional environmental features, including the habitat structure. This feature may influence the evolution of body shape because contrasting environments likely impose distinct demands for organismal performance in several activities, such as locomotion and thermoregulation. The present

  7. Total body irradiation in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fundagul Andic

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Total body irradiation is used in conjunction with chemotherapy as a conditioning regimen in the treatment of many disease such as leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, aplastic anemia, multiple myeloma and lymphoma prior to the hematopoetic stem cell transplantation. The main purposes of the hematopoetic stem cell transplantation are eradication of the recipient bone marrow and any residual cancer cells, creation of space in the receipient bone marrow for donor hematopoetic stem cells, and immunosuppression to prevent rejection of donor stem cells in the case of an allotransplant. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(3.000: 398-410

  8. Post-irradiation changes in acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activity in blood platelets of whole-body irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After 24, 96 and 144 hours following whole-body irradiation of rats with 8 Gy an increased acetylcholinesterase activity was found in platelets. The activity of butyrylcholinesterase in platelets increased in all investigated intervals after whole-body irradiation of rats with 8 Gy. The highest values were recorded after 144, 192 and 264 hours. (author)

  9. Study of boron carbide evolution under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to its high neutron efficiency, boron carbide (B4C) is used as a neutron absorber in control rods of nuclear plants. Its behaviour under irradiation has been extensively studied for many years. It now seems clear that brittleness of the material induced by the 10B(n,α)7Li capture reaction is due to penny shaped helium bubbles associated to a high strain field around them. However, no model explains the behaviour of the material under neutron irradiation. In order to build such a model, this work uses different techniques: nuclear microprobe X-ray diffraction profile analysis and Raman and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to present an evolution model of B4C under neutron irradiation. The use of nuclear reactions produced by a nuclear microprobe such as the 7Li(p,p'γ)7Li reaction, allows to measure lithium profile in B4C pellets irradiated either in Pressurised Water Reactors or in Fast Breeder Reactors. Examining such profiles enables us to describe the migration of lithium atoms out of B4C materials under neutron irradiation. The analysis of X-ray diffraction profiles of irradiated B4C samples allows us to quantify the concentrations of helium bubbles as well as the strain fields around such bubbles.Furthermore Raman spectroscopy studies of different B4C samples lead us to propose that under neutron irradiation. the CBC linear chain disappears. Such a vanishing of this CBC chain. validated by NMR analysis, may explain the penny shaped of helium bubbles inside irradiated B4C. (author)

  10. Secondary radiation dose during high-energy total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this work was to assess the additional dose from secondary neutrons and γ-rays generated during total body irradiation (TBI) using a medical linac X-ray beam. Nuclear reactions that occur in the accelerator construction during emission of high-energy beams in teleradiotherapy are the source of secondary radiation. Induced activity is dependent on the half-lives of the generated radionuclides, whereas neutron flux accompanies the treatment process only. The TBI procedure using a 18 MV beam (Clinac 2100) was considered. Lateral and anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior fractions were investigated during delivery of 2 Gy of therapeutic dose. Neutron and photon flux densities were measured using neutron activation analysis (NAA) and semiconductor spectrometry. The secondary dose was estimated applying the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. The main contribution to the secondary dose is associated with fast neutrons. The main sources of γ-radiation are the following: 56Mn in the stainless steel and 187W of the collimation system as well as positron emitters, activated via (n,γ) and (γ,n) processes, respectively. In addition to 12 Gy of therapeutic dose, the patient could receive 57.43 mSv in the studied conditions, including 4.63 μSv from activated radionuclides. Neutron dose is mainly influenced by the time of beam emission. However, it is moderated by long source-surface distances (SSD) and application of plexiglass plates covering the patient body during treatment. Secondary radiation gives the whole body a dose, which should be taken into consideration especially when one fraction of irradiation does not cover the whole body at once. (orig.)

  11. Myeloproliferative disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were treated with total body irradiation administered in two sittings, 300 to 400 rads to each half of the body. All four patients had taken antimetabolites prior to receiving total body irradiation, and two continued to use them after total body irradiation. Two patients had taken alkylating agents before, and one had used them after total body irradiation. All patients showed clinical improvement. However, in two patients myeloproliferative disorders developed: a myelodysplastic preleukemia at 40 months after total body irradiation in one and acute myelogenous leukemia at 25 months in the other. Total body irradiation differs from total nodal irradiation in the total dose of irradiation (300 to 400 rads versus 2,000 to 3,000), and in the duration of the therapy (two sittings versus treatment over several weeks to months). Furthermore, the patients in the total body irradiation study frequently used cytotoxic drugs before and/or after irradiation, whereas in one total nodal irradiation study, azathioprine (2 mg/kg per day or less) was permitted, but no other cytotoxic agents were allowed. Rheumatologists may therefore face a binding decision when deciding to treat a patient with rheumatoid arthritis with either a cytotoxic drug or irradiation

  12. Myeloproliferative disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urowitz, M.B.; Rider, W.D.

    1985-01-21

    Four patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were treated with total body irradiation administered in two sittings, 300 to 400 rads to each half of the body. All four patients had taken antimetabolites prior to receiving total body irradiation, and two continued to use them after total body irradiation. Two patients had taken alkylating agents before, and one had used them after total body irradiation. All patients showed clinical improvement. However, in two patients myeloproliferative disorders developed: a myelodysplastic preleukemia at 40 months after total body irradiation in one and acute myelogenous leukemia at 25 months in the other. Total body irradiation differs from total nodal irradiation in the total dose of irradiation (300 to 400 rads versus 2,000 to 3,000), and in the duration of the therapy (two sittings versus treatment over several weeks to months). Furthermore, the patients in the total body irradiation study frequently used cytotoxic drugs before and/or after irradiation, whereas in one total nodal irradiation study, azathioprine (2 mg/kg per day or less) was permitted, but no other cytotoxic agents were allowed. Rheumatologists may therefore face a binding decision when deciding to treat a patient with rheumatoid arthritis with either a cytotoxic drug or irradiation.

  13. Response of adrenal gland to whole body 60Co irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole body of the adult albino rates was exposed to 60Co radiation in a single dose of 600 R. Following irradiation the adrenal serotonin level was found higher till the end of 8th week except a fall on 14th day, whereas the blood 5HT level remained lower than the normal except a slight rise at the end of 1st week and dropped down at 14 days followed by a further rise. The blood catecholamine level was found increased at the end of 14th day followed by a fall at 4th and 8th weeks, but the levels were moving round the normal value. The histological studies of adrenal gland showed degranulation and hypertrophy of adrenal cortex and medullary cells at various intervals of post-irradiation. On the whole it is observed that maximum changes in the level of biogenic amines take place within 14 days after irradiation, and maximum rate of mortality also coincide with this period. Thus bringing out the fact that adrenal bioamines play an important role in the vital activities of the animals. (author)

  14. Total body irradiation in France in the past twenty years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the activity and techniques of total body irradiation (TBI) in France in the last 20 years is presented. In order to have on overall view of the activity and techniques of total body irradiation in France, the group of cancer centre radiation oncologists sent a questionnaire to all the cancer centres or public hospitals radiotherapy departments dealing with this treatment. Thirty-six questionnaires were sent and thirty-one departments answered. Three departments do not offer this treatment. Five departments did not answer. Results, therefore, concern the activity of the 28 departments that agreed to give detailed and clear answers. A total of 10 630 TBIs have been documented, 850 to 900 TBI have been done each year since 1995. Single fraction TBIs are used in only five centres and are being progressively abandoned. For Multiple-fraction TBIs, the techniques described here are the ones used in 1999, at the time the questionnaires were sent. A majority (98%) of the teams used linear accelerators. The collected data are synthesised in tables. Nowadays, single fraction TBIs are only indicated in exceptional cases, Most of the TBIs are fractionated in six twice-daily fractions with pulmonary shielding to limit the dose between 6 and 11 Gy depending on departments' protocols and pathologies. (author)

  15. Cooperative effects in microstructural evolutions under irradiation: fundamental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a novel technique for studying the coupling of the evolution of the various components of the microstructure. The state of the microstructure is represented by a point in an appropriate state space; a microstructural evolution corresponds to a trajectory in this space. Standard technique are used for studying the topology of all a priori possible trajectories. The practical use of this technique is exemplified by the study of the evolution of dislocation lines or dislocation interstitial loops in the presence of cavities. The state of the microstructure is represented by the curvature radii of these two classes of sinks. The model reveals the following possible behaviours, some of which have been experimentally observed but not properly accounted for by existing theories: - existence of an incubation dose for swelling. The amplitude of the incubation dose depends on the dislocation density and on the irradiation flux and temperature; - possibility of transient swelling (cavity growth followed by decay); - large dose divergence of evolution which are very similar at lower doses (swelling heterogeneities); - irradiation induced enhancement of the rate of sintering: a new mechanism has been revealed by the model. Preliminary results obtained for precipitates-containing microstructures are briefly discussed

  16. A Solvable Model of Species Body Mass Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Clauset, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    We present a quantitative model for the biological evolution of species body masses within large groups of related species, e.g., terrestrial mammals, in which body mass M evolves according to branching (speciating) multiplicative diffusion and an extinction probability that increases logarithmically with mass. We describe this evolution in terms of a convection-diffusion-reaction equation for ln M. The steady-state behavior is in good agreement with empirical data on recent terrestrial mammals, and the time-dependent behavior also agrees with data on extinct mammal species between 95 - 50 million years ago.

  17. Evolution of normal vertebral body marrow enhancement in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes and determines the pattern, intensity, and evolution of normal marrow enhancement of the vertebral bodies in children. Thirty patients (1-10 years of age) without known pathology of the vertebral body marrow were imaged with a 1.5-T magnet before and after administration of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). Short TR(600/30) sequences were performed. Sagittal images were evaluated by inspection and by intensity measurements of regions of interest. Striking enhancement of normal vertebral body marrow was seen in young children. The pattern of enhancement was homogeneous and resembled marrow enhancement seen with diffuse infiltrative processes, such as tumor

  18. Whole Body Microwave Irradiation for Improved Dacarbazine Therapeutical Action in Cutaneous Melanoma Mouse Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cutaneous melanoma mouse model was used to test the efficacy of a new therapeutical approach that uses low doses of cytostatics in conjunction with mild whole body microwave exposure of 2.45 GHz in order to enhance cytostatics anti tumoral effect. Materials and Methods. A microwave exposure system for C57BL/6 mouse whole body microwave irradiation was designed; groups of 40 mice (males and females) bearing experimental tumours were subjected to a combined therapy comprising low doses of dacarbazine in combination with mild whole body irradiation. Clinical parameters and serum cytokine testing using xMAP technology were performed. Results. The group that was subjected to combined therapy, microwave and cytostatic, had the best clinical evolution in terms of overall survival, tumour volume, and metastatic potential. At day 14 the untreated group had 100% mortality, while in the combined therapy group 40% of mice were surviving. Quantifying serum IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 (p70), IFN-γ, GM-CSF, TNF-α, MIP-1α, MCP-1, and KC during tumorigenesis and therapy found that the combined experimental therapy decreases all the inflammatory cytokines, except chemokine MCP-1 that was found increased, suggesting an increase of the anti-tumoral immune response triggered by the combined therapy. The overall metastatic process is decreased in the combined therapy group.

  19. A new Bayesian model applied to cytogenetic partial body irradiation estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new zero-inflated Poisson model is introduced for the estimation of partial body irradiation dose and fraction of body irradiated. The Bayes factors are introduced as tools to help determine whether a data set of chromosomal aberrations obtained from a blood sample reflects partial or whole body irradiation. Two examples of simulated cytogenetic radiation exposure data are presented to demonstrate the usefulness of this methodology in cytogenetic biological dosimetry. (authors)

  20. Microstructural evolution in fast-neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work has focused on the specific problem of fast-neutron-induced radiation damage to austenitic stainless steels. These steels are used as structural materials in current fast fission reactors and are proposed for use in future fusion reactors. Two primary components of the radiation damage are atomic displacements (in units of displacements per atom, or dpa) and the generation of helium by nuclear transmutation reactions. The radiation environment can be characterized by the ratio of helium to displacement production, the so-called He/dpa ratio. Radiation damage is evidenced microscopically by a complex microstructural evolution and macroscopically by density changes and altered mechanical properties. The purpose of this work was to provide additional understanding about mechanisms that determine microstructural evolution in current fast reactor environments and to identify the sensitivity of this evolution to changes in the He/dpa ratio. This latter sensitivity is of interest because the He/dpa ratio in a fusion reactor first wall will be about 30 times that in fast reactor fuel cladding. The approach followed in the present work was to use a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis. The experimental component of the work primarily involved the examination by transmission electron microscopy of specimens of a model austenitic alloy that had been irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A major aspect of the theoretical work was the development of a comprehensive model of microstructural evolution. This included explicit models for the evolution of the major extended defects observed in neutron irradiated steels: cavities, Frank faulted loops and the dislocation network. 340 refs., 95 figs., 18 tabs

  1. Environmental influences on the evolution of body size in Ammonoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, S.; Khong, C.; Pelagio, M.; Seixas, G.; Payne, J.

    2012-12-01

    A major debate in evolutionary biology and paleobiology focuses on the relative importance of ecological interactions between species versus changes in the physical environment in governing large-scale evolutionary patterns. Body size is among the most important traits of any organism, and so identifying the factors that influence size evolution can shed light on both the causes and consequences of many major evolutionary trends. However, the extent to which body size evolution over time can be explained by changes in the physical versus ecological context remains unknown. In this study, we examined body size evolution in ammonoids, an extinct group of marine cephalopods. We collected a representative body size for each genus from illustrated specimens in the Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology. We then examined relative statistical support for six models of size evolution: random walk, directional trend, stasis, and environmental control by oxygen availability, temperature, and global sea level. No model is unambiguously supported over all others. Unbiased random walk was the best supported model (34%) and environmental control by atmospheric pO2 was the second best supported model (22%). Stasis received the least support (extinction events.

  2. Cyclic, low-dose total body irradiation for metastatic neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total body irradiation (TBI) can be thought of as a systemic anticancer agent. It therefore might best be given like an adjuvant drug, i.e., in tolerable doses, cyclically. The therapeutic ratio between normal bone marrow stem cells and suitably sensitive cancer cells should be widened by these means. Fourteen children with advanced (Stage IV) neuroblastomas were given 100-150 rad TBI in 50 rad daily fractions along with each three-week cycle of standard triple-agent chemotherapy (vincristine, DTIC, cyclophosphamide). Two patients died of toxicity and one is still undergoing therapy. Four of the remaining 12 survive free of disease for 12+ to 31+ months. The regimen is well tolerated, but prolonged, pronounced bone marrow depression, especially thrombocytopenia, commonly occurs after doses of 300-450 rad

  3. Multiple osteochondromata after total body irradiation. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a rare case of multiple osteochondromata after total body irradiation (TBI) in a bone marrow recipient. The patient was a 9-year-old boy. He had been given 13.2 Gy of TBI before allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) at the age of one because of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). He did not have a family history of hereditary multiple osteochondromatosis. Osteochondromata presented at the left clavicle, bilateral scapulae, right distal femur, and right proximal tibia. The lesions of the left clavicle and bilateral scapulae were excised. Histological features of resected specimens were those of osteochondroma, showing no evidence of malignant transformation. Although radiation is recognized to be a cause of osteochondroma, reports of TBI are rare. TBI should be considered as one of the causes of multiple osteochondromata. (author)

  4. Evolution of graphene nanoribbons under low-voltage electron irradiation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Wenpeng

    2012-01-01

    Though the all-semiconducting nature of ultrathin graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) has been demonstrated in field-effect transistors operated at room temperature with ∼105 on-off current ratios, the borderline for the potential of GNRs is still untouched. There remains a great challenge in fabricating even thinner GNRs with precise width, known edge configurations and specified crystallographic orientations. Unparalleled to other methods, low-voltage electron irradiation leads to a continuous reduction in width to a sub-nanometer range until the occurrence of structural instability. The underlying mechanisms have been investigated by the molecular dynamics method herein, combined with in situ aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory calculations. The structural evolution reveals that the zigzag edges are dynamically more stable than the chiral ones. Preferential bond breaking induces atomic rings and dangling bonds as the initial defects. The defects grow, combine and reconstruct to complex edge structures. Dynamic recovery is enhanced by thermal activation, especially in cooperation with electron irradiation. Roughness develops under irradiation and reaches a plateau less than 1 nm for all edge configurations after longtime exposure. These features render low-voltage electron irradiation an attractive technique in the fabrication of ultrathin GNRs for exploring the ultimate electronic properties. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  5. Total body irradiation in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between October 1972 and August 1977, low-dose fractionated total body irradiation (TBI), 150 to 300 rad,, was selected for 48 patients with previously untreated non-Hodgkin's lumphoma staged II, III, and IV. In 63% of the patients the disease had a nodular pattern; there were no patients with diffuse histiocytic lymphoma. All but 2 patients responded to TBI. The 4-year acutarial survival was 71% for the nodular group and 57% for the diffuse group. There were no acute symptoms during the course of treatment and no mortality associated with the treatment. Seventeen per cent of the patients developed transient platelet counts less than 30,000/mm3. Four required hospitilization for correction of thrombocytopenia and/or infection. The majority of patients who failed more than 3 months after initial complete remission were placed back in remission with either chemotherapy, TBI, or local irradiation. Patients with persistent disease after TBI showed a less favorable response with chemotherapy. A selected group of 15 patients in relapse after chemotherapy or localized radiotherapy were treated with TBI. Eleven responded to treatment, while 4 showed no useful response. The median survival for this group was slightly over 2 years. Twenty percent developed transient platelet counts less than 30,000/mm3

  6. Response of hepatic hematopoiesis to whole body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive hepatic erythropoiesis, granulocytopoiesis and megakaryocytopoiesis occur in adult mice given methylcellulose (MC). This appears to be a compensatory response to MC induced hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of whole body irradiation (WBI) upon established hepatic hematopoiesis (HH) as well as its effect when given before the induction of HH. Established hepatic erythroid and granulocytic foci were significantly decreased 24 hours after 100 or 300 rads. The D0 for erythroid and granulocytic foci was 107+-10 rads and 95+-20 rads respectively, similar to those reported for murine marrow and spleen cell CFUsub(s). Megakaryocytes were more radioresistant, gradually declining over 7 days to 50% of control values following 100 rads and with a D0 of 347+-7 rads; suggesting a differential radiation sensitivity compared to erythroid and granulocytic foci. WBI, 100 and 300 rads, given before MC failed to prevent subsequent development of HH although both marrow and spleen responses were reduced. Hepatic granulocytic foci and marrow peroxidase positive cells were reduced by such treatment while erythroid and megakaryocytic foci were similar to controls. This suggests that irradiation damaged stem cells responded to MC with increased erythropoiesis and megakaryocytopoiesis at the expense of granulopoiesis. (author)

  7. Morphological studies on the healing process of tooth extraction wounds in whole body irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present studies were performed to investigate the healing process of the tooth extraction wound in whole body irradiated rats and to clarify the effect of irradiation on bone metabolism. One hundred and seven Wistar rats of about 100 g body weight were used and divided into 3 groups. Whole body irradiated rats were given single exposure with a dose of 8 Gy. The region of the left upper molars of local irradiated rats as controls, was exposed to 8 Gy. On the 7th day after irradiation, the left upper first molar of each rat was extracted. The rats were sacrificed at intervals of 1 to 14 days after extraction. Non-irradiated rats were sacrificed at the same intervals after extraction. The maxillary bone including the extraction wound was evaluated, histologically, histometrically and ultrastructurally. From the histological and histometrical findings, the difference of the healing process between non-irradiated rats and locally irradiated rats is not significant. In whole body irradiated rats, the healing process especially in the socket was disturbed. The osteoblastic new bone formation following production of granulation tissue was interfered with. Ultrastructurally, the cytoplasmic organellae were poorly developed in the osteoblast and osteoid formation was reduced in the socket. But periosteal new bone formation was the same as that of the locally irradiated rats. In whole body irradiated rats, the osteoclasts in the interradicular alveolar bone were decreased and have smaller nuclei, compared with non-irradiated and locally irradiated rats. Histometrically, the amount of bone loss was decreased in whole body irradiated rats. Ultrastructurally, the cyoplasmic organellae and ruffled border were poorly developed in the osteoclasts of whole body irradiated rats. The findings suggested that irradiation induced cytological changes not only in osteoblasts but in osteoclasts and these changes resulted in the delayed healing of extraction wound. (author) 106 refs

  8. In vivo dosimetry with silicon diodes in total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is the characterization and application of silicon diode detectors for in vivo dosimetry in total body irradiation (TBI) treatments. It was evaluated the diode response with temperature, dose rate, gantry angulations and field size. A maximum response variation of 2.2% was obtained for temperature dependence. The response variation for dose rate and angular was within 1.2%. For field size dependence, the detector response increased with field until reach a saturation region, where no more primary radiation beam contributes for dose. The calibration was performed in a TBI setup. Different lateral thicknesses from one patient were simulated and then the calibration factors were determined by means of maximum depth dose readings. Subsequent to calibration, in vivo dosimetry measurements were performed. The response difference between diode readings and the prescribed dose for all treatments was below 4%. This difference is in agreement as recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), which is ±5%. The present work to test the applicability of a silicon diode dosimetry system for performing in vivo dose measurements in TBI techniques presented good results. These measurements demonstrated the value of diode dosimetry as a treatment verification method and its applicability as a part of a quality assurance program in TBI treatments. - Highlights: ► Characterization of a silicon diode dosimetry system. ► Application of the diodes for in vivo dosimetry in total body irradiation treatments. ► Implementation of in vivo dosimetry as a part of a quality assurance program in radiotherapy

  9. Osteochondroma after total body irradiation in bone marrow transplant recipients. Report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present two cases of osteochondroma after total body irradiation in bone marrow recipients, the first in a 6-year-old boy with juvenile chronic myelogenous leukemia and the second in a 13-year-old boy with acute myelogenous leukemia. The patients developed multiple osteochondromas three years and seven years, respectively, after 12 Gy of total body irradiation. Neither had a family history of hereditary multiple osteochondromatosis. A review of the English literature revealed only one report describing five cases of osteochondroma after 12 Gy of total body irradiation in bone marrow transplant recipients. Osteochondroma should be considered as an additional adverse effect of total body irradiation. (author)

  10. Chromosome damage evolution after low and high LET irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Sergey; Eidelman, Yuri

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA and chromatin lesions which are converted to chromosome lesions detected in the first post-irradiation mitosis by classic cytogenetic techniques as chromosomal aberrations (CAs). These techniques allow to monitor also delayed aberrations observed after many cell generations post-irradiation - the manifestation of chromosomal instability phenotype (CIN). The problem discussed is how to predict time evolution from initial to delayed DNA/chromosome damage. To address this question, in the present work a mechanistic model of CIN is elaborated which integrates pathways of (*) DNA damage induction and its conversion to chromosome lesions (aberrations), (**) lesion transmission and generation through cell cycles. Delayed aberrations in subsequent cycles are formed in the model owing to two pathways, DNA damage generation de novo as well as CA transmission from previous cycles. DNA damage generation rate is assumed to consist of bystander and non-bystander components. Bystander signals impact all cells roughly equally, whereas non-bystander DSB generation rate differs for the descendants of unirradiated and irradiated cells. Monte Carlo simulation of processes underlying CIN allows to predict the time evolution of initial radiation-induced damage - kinetics curve for delayed unstable aberrations (dicentrics) together with dose response and RBE as a function of time after high vs low LET irradiation. The experimental data for radiation-induced CIN in TK6 lymphoblastoid cells and human lymphocytes irradiated with low (gamma) and high (Fe, C) LET radiation are analyzed on the basis of the proposed model. One of the conclusions is that without bystander signaling, just taking into account the initial DNA damage and non-bystander DSB generation, it is impossible to describe the available experimental data for high-LET-induced CIN. The exact contribution of bystander effects for high vs low LET remains unknown, but the relative contribution may be

  11. Evolution of brain-body allometry in Lake Tanganyika cichlids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Masahito; Kotrschal, Alexander; Hayward, Alexander; Buechel, Severine Denise; Zidar, Josefina; Løvlie, Hanne; Kolm, Niclas

    2016-07-01

    Brain size is strongly associated with body size in all vertebrates. This relationship has been hypothesized to be an important constraint on adaptive brain size evolution. The essential assumption behind this idea is that static (i.e., within species) brain-body allometry has low ability to evolve. However, recent studies have reported mixed support for this view. Here, we examine brain-body static allometry in Lake Tanganyika cichlids using a phylogenetic comparative framework. We found considerable variation in the static allometric intercept, which explained the majority of variation in absolute and relative brain size. In contrast, the slope of the brain-body static allometry had relatively low variation, which explained less variation in absolute and relative brain size compared to the intercept and body size. Further examination of the tempo and mode of evolution of static allometric parameters confirmed these observations. Moreover, the estimated evolutionary parameters indicate that the limited observed variation in the static allometric slope could be a result of strong stabilizing selection. Overall, our findings suggest that the brain-body static allometric slope may represent an evolutionary constraint in Lake Tanganyika cichlids. PMID:27241216

  12. Total lymphoid irradiation and total body irradiation for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between April 1980 and June 1989, 15 patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) were treated at Hyogo College of Medicine with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) after preparation consisting of cyclophosphamide (CY) and total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) or total body irradiation (TBI) for the purpose of reducing the incidence of graft rejection. All patients had initial evidence of engraftment after the first transplantation except for one patient who died of heart failure due to CY on the third day after transplantation and could not be evaluated for engraftment. Rejection later occurred in four of these 14 patients, who then underwent successful regrafting. One of these four patients, who was conditioned with CY alone at the first grafting, underwent successful regrafting after a conditioning regimen of CY and TBI. In the other three patients, irradiation was performed twice as the conditioning regimen. Thus, 14 of 15 patients underwent successful BMT and are alive with restored hematopoietic function. From the above results, the combination of TLI or TBI and CY was considered to be very useful as a conditioning regimen for BMT in patients with SAA. (author)

  13. Patterns of patient specific dosimetry in total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akino, Yuichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); McMullen, Kevin P.; Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) has been used for bone marrow transplant for hematologic and immune deficiency conditions. The goal of TBI is to deliver a homogeneous dose to the entire body, with a generally accepted range of dose uniformity being within {+-}10% of the prescribed dose. The moving table technique for TBI could make dose uniform in whole body by adjusting couch speed. However, it is difficult to accurately estimate the actual dose by calculation and hence in vivo dosimetry (IVD) is routinely performed. Here, the authors present patterns of patient-specific IVD in 161 TBI patients treated at our institution. Methods: Cobalt-60 teletherapy unit (Model C9 Cobalt-60 teletherapy unit, Picker X-ray Corporation) with customized moving bed (SITI Industrial Products, Inc., Fishers, IN) were used for TBI treatment. During treatment, OneDose{sup TM} (Sicel Technology, NC) Metal Oxide-silicon Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor detectors were placed at patient body surface; both entrance and exit side of the beam at patient head, neck, mediastinum, umbilicus, and knee to estimate midplane dose. When large differences (>10%) between the prescribed and measured dose were observed, dose delivery was corrected for subsequent fractions by the adjustment of couch speed and/or bolus placement. Under IRB exempt status, the authors retrospectively analyzed the treatment records of 161 patients who received TBI treatment between 2006 and 2011. Results: Across the entire cohort, the median {+-} SD (range) percent variance between calculated and measured dose for head, neck, mediastinum, umbilicus, and knee was -2.3 {+-} 10.2% (-66.2 to +35.3), 1.1 {+-} 11.5% (-62.2 to +40.3), -1.9 {+-} 9.5% (-66.4 to +46.6), -1.1 {+-} 7.2% (-35.2 to +42.9), and 3.4 {+-} 12.2% (-47.9 to +108.5), respectively. More than half of treatments were within {+-}10% of the prescribed dose for all anatomical regions. For 80% of treatments (10%-90%), dose at the umbilicus was within {+-}10

  14. Immunosuppression by whole-body irradiation and its effect on oedema in experimental cerebral ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of global immunosuppression by sublethal whole body X-irradiation on the development of cerebral oedema was assessed 24 h after right middle cerebral artery occulustion in the rat. Irradiation produced a significant leucopaenia and thrombocytopaenia, and significantly reduced cortical oedema when compared to non-irradiated control animals. (au)

  15. Immunosuppression by whole-body irradiation and its effect on oedema in experimental cerebral ischaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, R.D.; Kane, P.J.; Mendelow, A.D. (Department of Surgery, Neurosurgery, University of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne (United Kingdom)); Cook, S.; Chambers, I.R.; Clayton, C.B. (Department of Medical Physics, University of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne (United Kingdom))

    1992-01-01

    The effect of global immunosuppression by sublethal whole body X-irradiation on the development of cerebral oedema was assessed 24 h after right middle cerebral artery occulustion in the rat. Irradiation produced a significant leucopaenia and thrombocytopaenia, and significantly reduced cortical oedema when compared to non-irradiated control animals. (au).

  16. Modeling body size evolution in Felidae under alternative phylogenetic hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alexandre Felizola Diniz-Filho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of phylogenetic comparative methods in ecological research has advanced during the last twenty years, mainly due to accurate phylogenetic reconstructions based on molecular data and computational and statistical advances. We used phylogenetic correlograms and phylogenetic eigenvector regression (PVR to model body size evolution in 35 worldwide Felidae (Mammalia, Carnivora species using two alternative phylogenies and published body size data. The purpose was not to contrast the phylogenetic hypotheses but to evaluate how analyses of body size evolution patterns can be affected by the phylogeny used for comparative analyses (CA. Both phylogenies produced a strong phylogenetic pattern, with closely related species having similar body sizes and the similarity decreasing with increasing distances in time. The PVR explained 65% to 67% of body size variation and all Moran's I values for the PVR residuals were non-significant, indicating that both these models explained phylogenetic structures in trait variation. Even though our results did not suggest that any phylogeny can be used for CA with the same power, or that “good” phylogenies are unnecessary for the correct interpretation of the evolutionary dynamics of ecological, biogeographical, physiological or behavioral patterns, it does suggest that developments in CA can, and indeed should, proceed without waiting for perfect and fully resolved phylogenies.

  17. Whole-body. gamma. -irradiation in the treatment of hemoblastoses in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishkova, T.V.; Danilova, N.B.; Khrushchev, V.G.; Grammatikati, V.S.

    1982-11-01

    An analysis of foreign literature on treatment acute leukoses with irradiation and transplantation of allogenic bone marrow is given. It is shown that whole-body irradiation used to increase treatment efficiency of man hemoblastosis are widely applied nowadays abroad. Bone marrow transplantation including compulsory whole-body irradiation with 10 Gy is the only practicable attempt to eradicate leukosis. Whole-body irradiation unlike chemotherapy provides more durable survival rate without recurrence; it doesn't require hospitalization and continuity of treatment following the general course; it doesn't produce toxic complications.

  18. Whole-body ν-irradiation in the treatment of hemoblastoses in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of foreign literature on treatment acute leukoses with irradiation and transplantation of allogenic bone marrow is given. It is shown that whole-body irradiation used to increase treatment efficiency of man hemoblastosis are widely applied nowadays abroad. Bone marrow transplantation including compulsory whole-body irradiation with 10 Gy is the only practicable attempt to eradicate leukosis. Whole-body irradiation unlike chemotherapy provides more durable survival rate without recurrence; it doesn't require hospitalization and continuity of treatment following the general course; it doesn't produce toxic complications

  19. Total body irradiation - review of treatment techniques in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In treatment of acute leukaemia and other disseminated diseases, high dose total body irradiation (TBI) combined with intensive chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is use more and more successfully. Reflecting the complex clinical, biological, physical and technical situation of TBI, a large variety of TBI treatment techniques has been developed. In order to review the techniques applied in Europe and to report about common methods as well as about new ideas in TBI, a questionnaire was prepared and mailed to medical physicists in Europe responsible for TBI. The topics of this questionnaire are general information: TBI technique (beams, fields, treatment conditions); basic TBI dosimetry; physical treatment planning (patient dosimetry, heterogeneity correction, dose modification, dose homogeneity, dose precision, confirmation measurements); TBI treatment planning (dose prescription, localization, documentation, verification, in vivo dosimetry); requirements (additional staff, time, equipment) and recommendations for improvement of TBI. Most questionnaires (34/45) were returned in time with detailed information from TBI centres in 15 European countries. These data as well as results of the 'Meeting of Leiden, 1982' of the 'Meeting of Essen, 1985' and of the 'Meeting of Toulouse, 1986' are summarized and discussed. There are many interesting methods to plan and perform exact TBI. However, anterior-posterior TBI is preferred to achieve sufficient homogeneity of dose and effective lung shielding. While the development of TBI has reached a high level of exactness, further improvement will require a better knowledge of the dose-effect relationships. (Auth.)

  20. Total body irradiation for myasthenia gravis with thymoma: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ki Mun; Choi, Ihl Bohng; Kim, In Ah [College of Medicine, Catholic Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-01

    Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is relatively rare occuring as one of important autoimmune disease to affect neuromuscular junction. This study was clinically to evaluate total body irradiation (TBI) against two patients including 33-year and 39-year females for chronic MG with thymoma who hospitalized in the St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University since 1994 as well as who showed no response by thymectomy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy. TBI designed by the dose of 150-180 cGy consisting of 10 cGy per fraction, three times a week, for 5-6 weeks using linear accelerator of 6 MV. During the treatment of TBI, they did complain acute side effect such as vomiting and also appear improved physical condition from 4-6 weeks after TBI. Through the follow-up period of 18 or 42 months after TBI, they did not have any symptomatic recurrence. Consequently, the results suggest that TBI can be used as an alternative tool for the patients concurrently for MG with thymoma who had been refractory to various conventional therapies like thymectomy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy.

  1. Total body irradiation for myasthenia gravis with thymoma: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is relatively rare occuring as one of important autoimmune disease to affect neuromuscular junction. This study was clinically to evaluate total body irradiation (TBI) against two patients including 33-year and 39-year females for chronic MG with thymoma who hospitalized in the St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University since 1994 as well as who showed no response by thymectomy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy. TBI designed by the dose of 150-180 cGy consisting of 10 cGy per fraction, three times a week, for 5-6 weeks using linear accelerator of 6 MV. During the treatment of TBI, they did complain acute side effect such as vomiting and also appear improved physical condition from 4-6 weeks after TBI. Through the follow-up period of 18 or 42 months after TBI, they did not have any symptomatic recurrence. Consequently, the results suggest that TBI can be used as an alternative tool for the patients concurrently for MG with thymoma who had been refractory to various conventional therapies like thymectomy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy

  2. Rheological properties of blood after whole body gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims to investigate the influence of whole body gamma irradiation on the rheological properties of rat's blood . The applied shear rate was from 12 to 375 s-1. low shear viscosity (up to 100 s-1) depends mainly on the erythrocytes aggregation while the high shear viscosity depends on the erythrocytes deformability. Adult male rats were exposed to 1, 2.5, 3.5,5,7 and 9 Gy single doses. The consistency index, apparent viscosity, yield stress and aggregation index were increased after exposure to gamma radiation . The dielectric properties of the erythrocytes, in the low frequency range (60 hz to 40 khz), were measured in order to investigate the changes in the membrane surface charge . The relative permittivity and relaxation time showed significant decrease after exposure to the lowest dose and continue to decrease as the dose increased. The obtained results showed that increase in the blood viscosity and aggregation index can be attributed to the decrease in the erythrocyte surface charges

  3. Rheological properties of blood after whole body gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of rheological properties of blood has special interest; since it is a circulating fluid exposed to shear rates during its life time. This work aims to investigate the influence of whole body gamma irradiation on the rheological properties of rat's blood. The applied shear rate was from 12 to 375 s-1. Low shear viscosity (up to 100 s-1) depends mainly on the erythrocytes aggregation while the high shear viscosity depends on the erythrocytes deformability. Materials and Methods: Adult male rats were exposed to 1, 2.5, 3.5, 5, 7 and 9 Gy single doses. The consistency index, apparent viscosity, yield stress and aggregation index were increased after exposure to gamma radiation. The dielectric properties of the erythrocytes, in the low frequency range (60 Hz to 40 k Hz), were measured in order to investigate the changes in the membrane surface charge. Results: The results obtained indicate that the viscosity, consistency index and yield stress increased after the exposure to the lowest dose taken; 1 Gy, and continued to increase as the exposure dose increased up to dose 7 Gy and then decrease after exposure to 9 Gy. The relative permittivity and relaxation time showed significant decrease after exposure to the lowest dose and continue to decrease as the dose increased. Conclusion: The obtained results can be attributed to the decrease of membrane surface charge after exposure to gamma radiation. The decrease in the membrane surface charge is known to decrease the repulsion between the cells and increase blood viscosity.

  4. Total body irradiation for treatment of haematological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of total body irradiation (TBI) as a part of the treatment of haematological diseases was discussed during a separate symposium at the 5th Annual ESTRO meeting at Baden-Baden. The experimental techniques applied in Europe, the dosimetry for TBI, the radiobiological aspects and the late effects after TBI have been reviewed. For specific geometries, precautions have to be taken to avoid increased dose contributions at the skin due to electrons scattered from the wall behind the patient. CT data can be useful for the individualisation of the exposure regimen of patients with extreme variations in lung anatomy or lung density. An appreciable number of centres apply in vivo dosimetry, however, special care is needed for the correct interpretation of the dosimeter readings. A number of late effects, including induction of cataract and secondary tumours has been observed after TBI. The techniques applied for TBI at the various centres and the temporal administration of the dose show wide variations. At present, the patient material is too heterogeneous to draw any conclusion about an optimum schedule for a TBI regimen. Further cooperation between clinicians, radiobiologists and radiation physicists has to be established to achieve consistency and further improvement of the results after TBI. (Auth.)

  5. Total body irradiation: present and future; Irradiation corporelle totale: present et avenir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilli, T.; Miralbell, R.; Ozsahin, M. [Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Service de Radio-Oncologie (Switzerland); Ozsahin, M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Service de Radio-Oncologie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2009-09-15

    Total body irradiation (T.B.I.) has an established role as preparative regimen for bone-marrow transplantation in the treatment of hematological malignancies. Many randomized trials demonstrated that the clinical outcomes obtained from the association of T.B.I. and cyclophosphamide are equivalent, or, sometimes, better than those based on chemotherapeutic agents. Despite the therapeutic progress of the last years, and the consequent improvement in the overall survival, this preparative regimen remains always associated with a relatively high rate of acute and late toxicity. In this article, we review the actual indications of T.B.I. in clinical practice, and analyze the technological progress in this domain. We focus on the hypothesis that a selective irradiation of the hematopoietic or lymphoid organs is actually possible with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Technical limits and preliminary results in terms of acute and late toxicities of intensity-modulated T.B.I. are analyzed. With these new technologies, treatment-related toxicity is not anymore a major limiting factor in the preparative regimens for bone-marrow transplantation, allowing for a larger spectrum of T.B.I. indications, a possible extension to patients older than 50 years, or a dose escalation. Preliminary results warrant, however, further evaluation in clinical trials to better assess the impact of this new approach on disease control and the long-term toxicity. (authors)

  6. Thermal Evolution of Solid Targets Irradiated by Pulsed Plasma Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal evolution of various targets irradiated with high intensity pulsed ion or plasma beams was determined by computer simulation i.e. by solving numerically one dimensional heat flow equation. The calculations were carried out using computer code ETLIT based on finite difference method, elaborated specially for this purpose. The surface temperature, melt depth and liquid duration were computed as functions of pulse energy density, pulse duration, melting temperature and thermal diffusivity of a given material. In particular the examples are shown for such materials as: Cu, Al, Zn, Fe, Ti, Mo, W, and Al2O3. Various practical aspects of the obtained results arc discussed, with a special attention given to less or no intuitively predictable dependencies. (author)

  7. A dislocation dynamics study of the transition from homogeneous to heterogeneous deformation in irradiated body-centered cubic iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low temperature irradiation of crystalline materials is known to result in hardening and loss of ductility, which limits the usefulness of candidate materials in harsh nuclear environments. In body-centered cubic (bcc) metals, this mechanical property degradation is caused by the interaction of in-grown dislocations with irradiation defects, particularly small dislocation loops resulting from the microstructural evolution of displacement cascades. In this paper, we perform dislocation dynamics simulations of bcc Fe containing various concentrations of dislocation loops produced by irradiation in an attempt to gain insight into the processes that lead to hardening and embrittlement. We find that a transition from homogenous to highly localized deformation occurs at a critical loop density. Above it, plastic flow proceeds heterogeneously, creating defect-free channels in its wake. We find that channel initiation and size are mediated by loop coalescence resulting from elastic interactions with moving dislocations.

  8. Study on Dosimetry Used TLD Dosimeter and Body Mass Index at Total Body Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of study is to expose a more uniform dose depending on the relationship between a body mass index in patients who underwent radiation therapy and an acquired dosimetric information by using a thermoluminescent dosimeter. Since 2006 to August 2011 we investigated 28 people who underwent radiation therapy were enrolled in AMC. Each patient was measured on the head, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, thigh, knee joint, and ankle joint using the thermoluminescent dosimeter. The measurement value of each points compared with the prescribed center point, abdominal point, and dose measurements of points on which to base the abdomen and the patient's body mass index (BMI) were compared with reference point, abdomen dose. 28 patients on prescribed dose in the abdomen by which the center point, an average dose was 100.6±5.5, and the other seven measuring points with the average maximum difference among the head, neck, chest, pelvic, thigh, knee, and ankle were 92.8±4.2%, 97.6±6.2%, 96.4±5.5%, 102.6±5.3%, 103.4±7.9%, 95.8±5.9%, 96.1±5.5%. The relationship of abdominal point dose and the patient's body mass index (BMI) was analyzed a scatter plot, and the result of linear relationship analysis by regression method, the regression of the dose (y) was -1.009 BMI (x) plus 123.3 and coefficient of determination (R2) was represented 0.697. The total body irradiation treatment process was evaluated the dose deviation and then the prescribed dose by which the average abdominal dose was satisfied with 100.6±5.5%. Results of the relationship analysis between BMI and dose, if we apply the correction value for each patients, it can be achieved more uniform dose delivery.

  9. Body size evolution of ammonoids shows limited correlation with diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelagio, M.; Khong, C.; Heines, S.; Seixas, G.; Payne, J.

    2012-12-01

    Although many studies have been conducted on patterns of size evolution in marine and terrestrial species, there is not a concrete answer as to what are the most important controlling factors are in different taxa. In this study, we collected body size data from the Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology volumes on ammonoids. Ammonoids are an extinct group of marine mollusks that lived from the Devonian to the late Cretaceous periods. In this study, we tested three models for size evolution: general random walk, unbiased random walk and forcing by diversity. The mean size of the ammonoids increased from a 4.60 to a 5.07 log10 mm3 from the time they appeared to their extinction. At the same time, the maximum size increased gradually with the biggest number in late Cretaceous, just before the last species disappeared. The results were more favorable to diversity forcing followed by unbiased random walk leaving general random walk last. Based on these results, we conclude that the evolution in size depends on the diversity of a species. However, because of the great possibility of an unbiased random walk for the data, further research should be done to find the interplay between different models of size evolution of the ammonoids.

  10. Some biochemical effects of partial body irradiation in case of combined radiation action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ATPase and creatinkinase activity of water extracts from the brain, liver and spleen of rats has been studied 5, 12, 19 and 26 days after X-irradiation (50 R) of the whole body, anterior one-third and hind two-thirds of the body, and external β-irradiation (Kr85, 3.05 krads) delivered separately and in a combination. It has been shown that under conditions, partial exposures are comparable by their biochemical effectiveness to the action of the whole-body irradiation. The combined exposure was, on the whole, less effective than separate ones

  11. Modeling of microstructure evolution in austenitic stainless steels irradiated under light water reactor condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, J.; Was, G. S.; Stoller, R. E.

    2001-10-01

    A model for microstructure development in austenitic alloys under light water reactor irradiation conditions is described. The model is derived from the model developed by Stoller and Odette to describe microstructural evolution under fast neutron or fusion reactor irradiation conditions. The model is benchmarked against microstructure measurements in 304 and 316 SS irradiated in a boiling water reactor core using one material-dependent and three irradiation-based parameters. The model is also adapted for proton irradiation at higher dose rate and higher temperature and is calibrated against microstructure measurements for proton irradiation. The model calculations show that for both neutron and proton irradiations, in-cascade interstitial clustering is the driving mechanism for loop nucleation. The loss of interstitial clusters to sinks by interstitial cluster diffusion was found to be an important factor in determining the loop density. The model also explains how proton irradiation can produce an irradiated dislocation microstructure similar to that in neutron irradiation.

  12. Influence of whole-body irradiation on calcium and phosphate homeostasis in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous irradiation studies have revealed marked alterations in calcium metabolism. Moreover, the maintenance of calcium homeostasis with parathyroid hormone or calcium salts has been reported to reduce radiation lethality. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the influence of irradiation on calcium homeostasis in the rat. Nine hundred rad of whole-body irradiation produced a significant depression of both plasma calcium and phosphate at 4 days postirradiation. This effect of irradiation was observed to be dose-dependent over a range of 600 to 1200 rad, and possibly related to irradiation-induced anorexia. The physiological significance of these observations is discussed

  13. Immunologic changes after loco-regional radiotherapy and fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The immunologic effects of fractionated irradiation to both hind limbs and the tail of adult mice were investigated. A dose of 34 Gy given in 17 fractions of 2 Gy, 1 fraction per day, 5 days per week, was delivered with a 60Co source. A significant decrease of the total splenocyte count and of the PHA(phytohemagglutinin)-induced proliferation of T cells was found immediately after irradiation. Both parameters normalized within 30 days after irradiation. Immediately after irradiation, the MLC (mixed lymphocyte culture) was supranormal, dropped to 45% 1 week later, and normalized within 1 month after radiotherapy. The NK (natural killer) activity was significantly decreased only the first week after loco-regional irradiation, while the LAK (lymphokine activated killer) activity was not altered at all. The percentage of goat-anti-mouse+ cells (mainly B lymphocytes) was not changed immediately after loco-regional irradiation, but rose to supranormal values (175% of control level) 3 months after irradiation. A persistent decrease of the percentage and the absolute numbers of the Lyt2+ cells (= CD8+ cells, suppressor/cytotoxic phenotype) was observed up to 3 months after irradiation, while the percentage of L3T4+ cells (= CD4+ cells, helper phenotype) remained normal for the total follow-up. No differences in allogeneic skin graft survival could be demonstrated between irradiated and control animals. The observed immunological effects could not be explained by the scatter irradiation to the whole body as total body irradiation (TBI) administered in a dose and dose rate similar to the scatter dose did not result in persistent immunologic changes. No dose-rate effect could be demonstrated in a low dose fractionated total body irradiation schedule. A total body irradiation similar to the scatter dose in humans did not result in significant immunologic changes

  14. Effects of local and whole body irradiation on appearance of osteoclasts during wound healing of tooth extraction sockets in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined effects of local and whole body irradiation before tooth extraction on appearance and differentiation of osteoclasts in the alveolar bone of rat maxillary first molars. Wistar rats weighting 100 g were divided into three groups: non-irradiation group, local irradiation group, and whole body irradiation group. In the local irradiation group, a field made with lead blocks was placed over the maxillary left first molar tooth. In the whole body irradiation group, the animals were irradiated in cages. Both groups were irradiated at 8 Gy. The number of osteoclasts around the interradicular alveolar bone showed chronological changes common to non-irradiated and irradiated animals. Several osteoclasts appeared one day after tooth extraction, and the maximal peak was observed 3 days after extraction. Local irradiation had no difference from non-irradiated controls. In animals receiving whole body irradiation, tooth extraction one day after irradiation caused smaller number of osteoclasts than that 7 day after irradiation during the experimental period. Whole body-irradiated rats had small osteoclasts with only a few nuclei and narrow resorption lacunae, indicating deficiency of radioresistant osteoclast precursor cells. Injection of intact bone marrow cells to whole body-irradiated animals immediately after tooth extraction recovered to some content the number of osteoclasts. These findings suggest that bone resorption in the wound healing of alveolar socket requires radioresistant, postmitotic osteoclast precursor cells from hematopoietic organs, but not from local sources around the alveolar socket, at the initial phase of wound healing. (author)

  15. Local proliferation and extrahepatic recruitment of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) in partial-body irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative significance of local proliferation and extrahepatic recruitment of Kupffer cells was investigated by partial-body irradiation before the induction of macrophage hyperplasia by zymosan. There was no difference in growth of the Kupffer cells population between nonirradiated rats and rats irradiated with the liver shielded, whereas irradiation of the liver with the rest of the body (bone marrow) shielded resulted in strong inhibition of growth (-61%). Splenectomy combined with bone marrow irradiation inhibited growth to a lesser extent as compared to liver irradiation (-38%). Monocyte and other leukocyte numbers were strongly reduced in peripheral blood and their accumulation in the liver was completely prevented by bone marrow irradiation. Our results demonstrate that local proliferation of resident Kupffer cells represents the predominant source for their increased number during hyperplasia

  16. Hematological Effects of Total or Partial Irradiation of the Human Body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many studies have been devoted to hematological effects of total body irradiation in various animal species, but there are few human data. In addition, the origin of these documents limited value. It is indeed, sometimes accidentally irradiated subjects, including irradiation was not uniform and that the dosimetry performed a posteriori, is random, sometimes irradiated patients or for the treatment of cancer or to suppress immunological reactions so that a transplant of tissue or an organ transplant, and one may wonder if the reactions such subjects are similar to those of normal subjects. Documents valid for partial irradiation of a human body by a single session even fewer and almost all relate to accidental irradiation

  17. Characteristics of a Teflon rod antenna for millimeter and submillimeter wave irradiation on living bodies

    OpenAIRE

    TATSUKAWA, Toshiaki; Doi, Akitaka; TERANAKA, Masato; Takashima, Hitoshi; Goda, Fuminori; Idehara, Toshitaka; Ogawa, Isamu; KANEMAKI, Tomohiro; NISHIZAWA, Seiji; NAMBA, Tunetoyo

    2003-01-01

    The development of a millimeter and submillimeter wave catheter for irradiation on living bodies using a Teflon rod dielectric antenna is described. The power sources of electromagnetic wave are an Impatt oscillator (90 GHz, 0.3 W) and gyrotron (302 GHz, 30 W). Irradiation tests using various Teflon rod dielectric antennas were performed on beef livers. Irradiation results were considered by microwave theory and ray optics.

  18. Total body irradiation as a form of preparation for bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history of total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation is surprisingly old. Following the success of Thomas et al. in the 1970s, bone marrow transplantation appeared to be the sole curative treatment modality for high-risk leukemia. A supralethal dose of total body irradiation was widely accepted as a form of preparation for bone marrow transplantation. In this paper, I described the present status of bone marrow transplantation for leukemia patients in Japan based on the IVth national survey. Since interstitial pneumonitis was one of the most life threatening complications after bone marrow transplantation, I mentioned the dose, dose-rate and fraction of total body irradiation in more detail. In addition, I dealt with some problems of the total body irradiation, such as dose prescription, compensating contour as well as inhomogeneity, and shielding for the highrisk organs. (author) 82 refs

  19. Changes in plasma (hydrocortisone) levels after whole-body irradiation with ultraviolet rays of defined wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hour after whole-body irradiation with a radiation source having its maximum of emission in the UVB range, at a radiation dose of 0.44 J/cm2, a significant fall in the mean values of the blood plasma hydrocortisone level (p<0.05) was seen which exceeded the normal daytime variation. This effect could not be elicited by UVA whole-body irradiation. The ACTH concentrations in the blood plasma remained unchanged. Upon daily repetition of the UVB radiation exposure at increasing doses over a period of 12 days, the reaction of the fall in hydrocortisone repeatedly occurred again attaining the same value. The hydrocortisone concentrations of the suction blister liquid were unaltered after the UVB whole-body irradiation. The phenomenon of the fall in plasma hydrocortisone observed shortly after UVB whole-body irradiation is claimed by the author to be due to UVB-radiation-induced epidermal glucocorticoid consumption. (orig./MG)

  20. Change in the mineralization of the healing bone callus after whole-body irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The delayed consolidation of diaphysial long-bone fractures in mice subjected to whole-body X-irradiation is expressed biochemically by a faulty mineralization of the repair callus. This deficiency is proportional to the irradiation intensity and is not corrected by previous administration of cycteamine

  1. Report of the work party: comparison of total body irradiation techniques for bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents a survey of total body irradiation techniques for bone marrow transplantation in nine institutions in North America and England. The survey compares their nominal dose, dose rate, point of dose prescription, type of machine used, patient's position during treatment, and use of compensators. This experience has emphasized the need for a system of uniform dose reporting and for uniform dose prescription in total body irradiation

  2. Whole-body irradiation transiently diminishes the adrenocorticotropin response to recombinant human interleukin-1α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombinant human interleukin-1α (rhIL-1α) has significant potential as a radioprotector and/or treatment for radiation-induced hematopoietic injury. Both IL-1 and whole-body ionizing irradiation acutely stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. We therefore assessed the interaction of whole-body irradiation and rhIL-1α in altering the functioning of the axis in mice. Specifically, we determined the adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone responses to rhIL-1α administered just before and hours to days after whole-body or sham irradiation. Our results indicate that whole-body irradiation does not potentiate the rhIL-1α-induced increase in ACTH levels at the doses used. In fact, the rhIL-1α-induced increase in plasma ACTH is transiently impaired when the cytokine is administered 5 h after, but not 1 h before, exposure to whole-body irradiation. The ACTH response may be inhibited by elevated corticosterone levels after whole-body irradiation, or by other radiation-induced effects on the pituitary gland and hypothalamus. 36 refs., 3 figs

  3. Microstructural and microchemical evolution in vanadium alloys by heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimura, Naoto; Kakiuchi, Hironori; Shirao, Yasuyuki; Iwai, Takeo [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Microstructural and microchemical evolution in vanadium alloys were investigated using heavy ion irradiation. No cavities were observed in V-5Cr-5Ti alloys irradiated to 30 dpa at 520 and 600degC. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses showed that Ti peaks around grain boundaries. Segregation of Cr atoms was not clearly detected. Co-implanted helium was also found to enhance dislocation evolution in V-5Cr-5Ti. High density of matrix cavities were observed in V-5Fe alloys irradiated with dual ions, whereas cavities were formed only around grain boundaries in single ion irradiated V-5Fe. (author)

  4. Microstructural evolutions of zirconium alloys under irradiation. Link with the irradiation growth phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with the irradiation-induced growth and microstructural evolutions of Zircaloy-4 type materials (ZrSn1.2-1.7 Fe0.18-0.24 Cr0.07-0.13 O0.09-0.15), used as cladding and guide-tubes in PWR's fuel assemblies. The main objective was to obtain a better understanding of the growth acceleration which may occur at high doses for the recrystallized metallurgical state. The elongation values of stress-free tubes irradiated at 400 deg in experimental reactors give clear indication of accelerated growth after a critical dose. Microstructural investigations reveal some large basal plane dislocation loops with vacancy character, which is an unexpected defect configuration for an hexagonal material with a c/a ratio less than the ideal value. In addition, a significant redistribution of iron and chromium solute elements comes from the dissolution of the initial Zr(Fe,Cr)2 phases. In a guide-tube irradiated to high dose at 320 deg in a power reactor, a large density of these c-component loops was also observed in coincidence with a large iron re-solution due to the progressive partial amorphization of Laves phases. By contrast, as long as a negligible amount of iron is available in the matrix (start of progressive amorphization at 350 deg or complete amorphization without any chemical change at 280 deg, only prism plane loops with interstitial and vacancy character are observed and the steady-state growth rate is low. A mechanism taking into account the Diffusional Anisotropy Difference of the radiation induced point defects seems to be the most suitable to explain the correlations between microstructural evolutions and growth rates. However it does not allow to predict the dose necessary for the formation of the basal plane loops responsible for the growth acceleration. Several factors (dose, temperature, metallurgical state) are required and the iron re-solution is likely to play a major role to stabilize such defects, by a decrease in stacking fault energy

  5. Dose Calculation Evolution for Internal Organ Irradiation in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez V., Reina A.

    2007-10-01

    The International Commission of Radiation Units (ICRU) has established through the years, a discrimination system regarding the security levels on the prescription and administration of doses in radiation treatments (Radiotherapy, Brach therapy, Nuclear Medicine). The first level is concerned with the prescription and posterior assurance of dose administration to a point of interest (POI), commonly located at the geometrical center of the region to be treated. In this, the effects of radiation around that POI, is not a priority. The second level refers to the dose specifications in a particular plane inside the patient, mostly the middle plane of the lesion. The dose is calculated to all the structures in that plane regardless if they are tumor or healthy tissue. In this case, the dose is not represented by a point value, but by level curves called "isodoses" as in a topographic map, so you can assure the level of doses to this particular plane, but it also leave with no information about how this values go thru adjacent planes. This is why the third level is referred to the volumetrical description of doses so these isodoses construct now a volume (named "cloud") that give us better assurance about tissue irradiation around the volume of the lesion and its margin (sub clinical spread or microscopic illness). This work shows how this evolution has resulted, not only in healthy tissue protection improvement but in a rise of tumor control, quality of life, better treatment tolerance and minimum permanent secuelae.

  6. Dose Calculation Evolution for Internal Organ Irradiation in Humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Commission of Radiation Units (ICRU) has established through the years, a discrimination system regarding the security levels on the prescription and administration of doses in radiation treatments (Radiotherapy, Brach therapy, Nuclear Medicine). The first level is concerned with the prescription and posterior assurance of dose administration to a point of interest (POI), commonly located at the geometrical center of the region to be treated. In this, the effects of radiation around that POI, is not a priority. The second level refers to the dose specifications in a particular plane inside the patient, mostly the middle plane of the lesion. The dose is calculated to all the structures in that plane regardless if they are tumor or healthy tissue. In this case, the dose is not represented by a point value, but by level curves called 'isodoses' as in a topographic map, so you can assure the level of doses to this particular plane, but it also leave with no information about how this values go thru adjacent planes. This is why the third level is referred to the volumetrical description of doses so these isodoses construct now a volume (named 'cloud') that give us better assurance about tissue irradiation around the volume of the lesion and its margin (sub clinical spread or microscopic illness). This work shows how this evolution has resulted, not only in healthy tissue protection improvement but in a rise of tumor control, quality of life, better treatment tolerance and minimum permanent secuelae

  7. Microstructural evolutions of zirconium alloys under irradiation. Link with the irradiation growth phenomenon; Evolutions microstructurales des alliages de zirconium sous irradiation. Liens avec le phenomene de croissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonot, C.

    1995-07-18

    This study deals with the irradiation-induced growth and microstructural evolutions of Zircaloy-4 type materials (ZrSn{sub 1.2-1.7} Fe{sub 0.18-0.24} Cr{sub 0.07-0.13} O{sub 0.09-0.15}), used as cladding and guide-tubes in PWR`s fuel assemblies. The main objective was to obtain a better understanding of the growth acceleration which may occur at high doses for the recrystallized metallurgical state. The elongation values of stress-free tubes irradiated at 400 deg in experimental reactors give clear indication of accelerated growth after a critical dose. Microstructural investigations reveal some large basal plane dislocation loops with vacancy character, which is an unexpected defect configuration for an hexagonal material with a c/a ratio less than the ideal value. In addition, a significant redistribution of iron and chromium solute elements comes from the dissolution of the initial Zr(Fe,Cr){sub 2} phases. In a guide-tube irradiated to high dose at 320 deg in a power reactor, a large density of these c-component loops was also observed in coincidence with a large iron re-solution due to the progressive partial amorphization of Laves phases. By contrast, as long as a negligible amount of iron is available in the matrix (start of progressive) amorphization at 350 deg or complete amorphization without any chemical change at 280 deg, only prism plane loops with interstitial and vacancy character are observed and the steady-state growth rate is low. A mechanism taking into account the Diffusional Anisotropy Difference of the radiation induced point defects seems to be the most suitable to explain the correlations between microstructural evolutions and growth rates. However it does not allow to predict the dose necessary for the formation of the basal plane loops responsible for the growth acceleration. (Abstract Truncated)

  8. Physical exercise tolerance in patients with chronic lymphoproliferative diseases after whole-body therapeutic gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is stated that physical workability remains practically at the initial level after a course of fractionated whole-body therapeutic gamma irradiation at the integral doze of 1 Gy obtained during two weeks and at the integral dose of 2 Gy obtained during 4 weeks. Tendency to decrease of systolic arterial pressure (AP) is noted under fractionated whole-body therapeutic gamma irradiation at the integral dose of 1 Gy that should be necessarily taken into account under irradiation of patients with reduced AP and patients receiving hypotensive preparations for accompanying arterial hypertension

  9. Perturbations in phosphoinositide metabolism and protein kinase C activity in mouse liver following whole body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The involvement of the signal transduction pathway in mouse liver following whole body irradiation was investigated. Mice were exposed to 60Co gamma rays (3 Gy) and sacrificed after different time intervals. Various elements of phosphatidyl inositol signal transduction pathway were investigated. Alterations could be seen as early as 15 min of irradiation. These changes are reflected in elevation in DAG levels and increased activation of PKC, an enzyme which is involved in tumorigenesis. The chronological appearance of various transducers following whole body irradiation is of significance since these early effects may set the stage for radiation-induced tumorigenesis and hence may be used to manipulate tumor response to radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Employment of whole-body ν-irradiation in chronic lymphoid leukemia and malignant lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are presented data showing that whole-body therapeutic ν-irradiation is an effective method of treatment of chronic lymphoid leukosis and lymphomas. Rapid lymphopenic effect, satisfactory diminution of lymph nodes and spleen sizes testify to the effect. The necessity of further investigation of the treatment method is underlined. It is of interest to trace the fate of lymphocyte subpopulations in the course and after treatment. The urgency of working out a most rational scheme for whole-body therapeutic irradiation and for investigating indications for local irradiation of various groups of lymphatic nodes is indicated

  11. Employment of whole-body. gamma. -irradiation in chronic lymphoid leukemia and malignant lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilova, N.B.; Baranov, A.E.; Khrushchev, V.G.; Grammatikati, V.S.; Murav' eva, L.I.; Strashnenko, E.S.

    1982-11-01

    There are presented data showing that whole-body therapeutic ..gamma..-irradiation is an effective method of treatment of chronic lymphoid leukosis and lymphomas. Rapid lymphopenic effect, satisfactory diminution of lymph nodes and spleen sizes testify to the effect. The necessity of further investigation of the treatment method is underlined. It is of interest to trace the fate of lymphocyte subpopulations in the course and after treatment. The urgency of working out a most rational scheme for whole-body therapeutic irradiation and for investigating indications for local irradiation of various groups of lymphatic nodes is indicated.

  12. The effect of whole body irradiation on the action of strong analgesics of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of whole body irradiation of male mice with single doses of 3 and 7 Gy (60Co source) on analgesic action of three morphine-like drugs was studied. Over the first 6 days after irradiation, the analgesic effect of alfentanil and fentanyl was significantly less pronounced in irradiated animals than in control ones. During the subsequent period of 24 days till the end of experiment, the analgesic effect in irradiated animals gradually increased reaching and exceeding the control values. On the contrary, the analgesic effect of butorphanole was less pronounced in irradiated animals than in control ones, although the difference was not significantly. The difference between butorphanole and other two drugs are probably due to chemical structure and the metabolic fate in the body. (author) 8 refs.; 2 figs

  13. The pupal body temperature and inner space temperature of cocoon under microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature of pupal surface,body and inner space of cocoon on cocoon drying of microwave irradiation was investigated to make clear the effect of temperature with pupa and cocoon shell. After pupal surface temperature and body temperature were risen rapidly in early irradiation and slowly thereafter, these were done fast again. Then these rising degrees fell. The variation of inner space temperature consists three terms: as the first stage of rapidly rising on early irradiation, the second stage of slowly doing and the third stage of fast doing again in temperature. In the first stage and the second stage, the higher the temperature of sending air during irradiation was, the shorter the term was and the higher the reached temperature was. The surface, pupal body and inner space have reached higher temperature than the sending air before cocoon drying was over

  14. Change in the Casimir force between semiconductive bodies by irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inui, Norio [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167, Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo, 671-2280 (Japan)

    2007-11-15

    Two topics relevant to the Casimir force (retarded van der Waals force), which is exerted between neutral objects due to the quantum vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field are discussed- First, the enhancement of the Casimir between silicon plates by irradiation is considered. Irradiation generates free carriers inside silicon and it can cause enhancement of the Casimir force between silicon membranes. The temporal behavior of the Casimir force between two parallel silicon membranes after irradiating the surface with UV pulse laser is numerically studied. Based on the Lifshitz theory accounting for thickness of the slabs, the Casimir force as a function of time and the finite size effect of the thickness is calculated. The our experiment in progress to demonstrate the enhancement of the Casimir force by irradiation is also refer. Second, the influence of optical adsorption on the Casimir force acting between a metallic sphere and a semiconductive plate illuminated with Gaussian light beam is considered. The Casimir torque and the lateral Casimir force result form the inhomogeneous photonionization. Taking into account the spatial inhomogeneousness of the plasma frequency in the semiconductive plate, the dependence of the Casimir force on the distance between the optical axis and the center of the sphere is computed within the proximity force approximation.

  15. Change in the Casimir force between semiconductive bodies by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two topics relevant to the Casimir force (retarded van der Waals force), which is exerted between neutral objects due to the quantum vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field are discussed- First, the enhancement of the Casimir between silicon plates by irradiation is considered. Irradiation generates free carriers inside silicon and it can cause enhancement of the Casimir force between silicon membranes. The temporal behavior of the Casimir force between two parallel silicon membranes after irradiating the surface with UV pulse laser is numerically studied. Based on the Lifshitz theory accounting for thickness of the slabs, the Casimir force as a function of time and the finite size effect of the thickness is calculated. The our experiment in progress to demonstrate the enhancement of the Casimir force by irradiation is also refer. Second, the influence of optical adsorption on the Casimir force acting between a metallic sphere and a semiconductive plate illuminated with Gaussian light beam is considered. The Casimir torque and the lateral Casimir force result form the inhomogeneous photonionization. Taking into account the spatial inhomogeneousness of the plasma frequency in the semiconductive plate, the dependence of the Casimir force on the distance between the optical axis and the center of the sphere is computed within the proximity force approximation

  16. Radioprotective effects of dipyridamole. Effect on lipid peroxidation in mouse spleen after whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the effects of dipyridamole, which has radioprotective effects in mice, on radiation damage in the mouse spleen. The level of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) in the spleen, a measure of free radical initiated lipid peroxidation, increased significantly between 6 and 10 Gy 4 days after whole-body irradiation (p<0.05). Also, the TBARS in the spleen increased linearly between days 2 and 10 after 9 Gy whole-body irradiation. The TBARS concentration in the spleen 4 days after irradiation was reduced significantly from 5.15±0.97 nmole/mg protein to 3.76±0.35 nmole/mg protein by dipyridamole treatment (1hr before irradiation, 2 mg i.p.) (p<0.01), but no effects were observed with 2 mg i.p. dipyridamole treatment after irradiation. The weight of the spleen decreased significantly between 6 (31%) to 10 Gy (21%) 4 days after whole-body irradiation (p<0.05). The spleen weight 2 day after 9 Gy whole-body irradiation (40.2±1.8 mg) decreased significantly as compared with the control group (125.8±16.8 mg, p< O.01), and the decrease in spleen weight was related to the time lapse (after irradiation from 2 to 10 days). The slight inhibition effect on the decrease of spleen weight was observed by dipyridamole treatment 2 days after 9 Gy whole-body irradiation. These results suggest that the radioprotective effects of dipyridamole are related to the inhibition of lipid peroxidation and to participation in the early phase of apoptosis in spleen cells. (author)

  17. Protection from radiation induced changes in liver and serum transaminase of whole body gamma irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole body gamma irradiation of rats with a dose of 5.5 Gy induced significant changes in the activity of liver and serum transaminase. The results indicated that this radiation dose caused a significant increase in the activity of serum Got and GPT on the third and seventh days after irradiation. This was followed by significant decreases on the fourteenth post-irradiation day. The activity of Got returned to is control activity, while the activity of GPT was significantly above the control on the twenty ones post-irradiation day. The activity of Got, in the liver of irradiated rats was elevated during the post-irradiation days, but on the twenty one day activity was about the normal value. The activity of liver GPT firstly decreased and then increased very much but attained the control level on the fourteenth after irradiation. The intraperitoneal injection of testosterone-vitamin E mixture 10 days before whole body gamma irradiation caused complete recovery for the activity of liver and serum Got. No indication of remarkable recovery in the case of GPT activity was recorded either in liver or in serum of irradiated rats. The applied mixture could protect against radiation induced changes in Got activity of liver and serum but could not protect or ameliorate the changes which occurred in the activity of GPT of the two tissues. 2 tab

  18. Evolution of the organizer and the chordate body plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart, J.

    2001-01-01

    the dorsoventral dimension. This addition to the organizer is seen as a major event in chordate evolution, bringing body organization beyond that achieved by oocyte organization and meso-endoderm induction in other groups.

  19. Physical model of evolution of oxygen subsystem of PLZT-ceramics at neutron irradiation and annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikov, D V; Trushin, Y V; Veber, K V; Khumer, K; Bitner, R; Shternberg, A R

    2001-01-01

    The physical model of evolution of the oxygen subsystem defects of the ferroelectric PLZT-ceramics by the neutron irradiation and isochrone annealing is proposed. The model accounts for the effect the lanthanum content on the material properties. The changes in the oxygen vacancies concentration, calculated by the proposed model, agree well with the polarization experimental behavior by the irradiated material annealing

  20. Physical aspects of total body irradiation as practised at Tuebingen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the outset it has been our overriding aim: administer the medically prescribed dose as correctly as possible to the patient. Both method and dosages we have taken over from the so-called Seattle technique. Only in the single fraction-irradiation (E) the dose rate of the linac (Philips SL 75/20 or SL 75/10) was reduced to 0.07 Gy/min. The report describes how the TBI was realized. (orig./HP)

  1. Dynamics of Delayed p53 Mutations in Mice Given Whole-Body Irradiation at 8 Weeks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Ionizing irradiation might induce delayed genotoxic effects in a p53-dependent manner. However, a few reports have shown a p53 mutation as a delayed effect of radiation. In this study, we investigated the p53 gene mutation by the translocation frequency in chromosome 11, loss of p53 alleles, p53 gene methylation, p53 nucleotide sequence, and p53 protein expression/phosphorylation in p53+/+ and p53+/- mice after irradiation at a young age. Methods and Materials: p53+/+ and p53+/- mice were exposed to 3 Gy of whole-body irradiation at 8 weeks of age. Chromosome instability was evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. p53 allele loss was evaluated by polymerase chain reaction, and p53 methylation was evaluated by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. p53 sequence analysis was performed. p53 protein expression was evaluated by Western blotting. Results: The translocation frequency in chromosome 11 showed a delayed increase after irradiation. In old irradiated mice, the number of mice that showed p53 allele loss and p53 methylation increased compared to these numbers in old non-irradiated mice. In two old irradiated p53+/- mice, the p53 sequence showed heteromutation. In old irradiated mice, the p53 and phospho-p53 protein expressions decreased compared to old non-irradiated mice. Conclusion: We concluded that irradiation at a young age induced delayed p53 mutations and p53 protein suppression.

  2. Type 2 Diabetes is a Delayed Late Effect of Whole-Body Irradiation in Nonhuman Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Kylie; Dendinger, Michael D.; Davis, Ashley T.; Register, Thomas C.; DeBo, Ryne; Dugan, Greg; Cline, J. Mark

    2015-01-01

    One newly recognized consequence of radiation exposure may be the delayed development of diabetes and metabolic disease. We document the development of type 2 diabetes in a unique nonhuman primate cohort of monkeys that were whole-body irradiated with high doses (6.5–8.4 Gy) 5–9 years earlier. We report here a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes in irradiated monkeys compared to age-matched nonirradiated monkeys. These irradiated diabetic primates demonstrate insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia, however, they lack the typical obese presentation of primate midlife diabetogenesis. Surprisingly, body composition analyses by computed tomography indicated that prior irradiation led to a specific loss of visceral fat mass. Prior irradiation led to reductions in insulin signaling effectiveness in skeletal muscle and higher monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 levels, indicative of increased inflammation. However, there was an absence of large defects in pancreatic function with radiation exposure, which has been documented previously in animal and human studies. Monkeys that remained healthy and did not become diabetic in the years after irradiation were significantly leaner and smaller, and were generally smaller and younger at the time of exposure. Irradiation also resulted in smaller stature in both diabetic and nondiabetic monkeys, compared to nonirradiated age-matched controls. Our study demonstrates that diabetogenesis postirradiation is not a consequence of disrupted adipose accumulation (generalized or in ectopic depots), nor generalized pancreatic failure, but suggests that peripheral tissues such as the musculature are impaired in their response to insulin exposure. Ongoing inflammation in these animals appears to be a consequence of radiation exposure and can interfere with insulin signaling. The reasons that some animals remain protected from diabetes as a late effect of irradiation are not clear, but may be related to body size. The translational

  3. Effects of total body irradiation on functions of small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the characteristics of intestinal mucosal immunity after gamma irradiation. Methods: The number, proliferation activity, cytotoxic activity of small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs), and the TNF-α and TGF-β concentrations in supernatant of cultured IELs were studied using IELs freshly isolated from whole small intestine of Kunming strain mice after 3,8 and 12 Gy total body 60Co γ-irradiation. Results: (1) The number of IELs in small intestinal mucosa of all irradiated mice significantly decreased at 8 h, reaching the lowest level at 48-72 h post-irradiation, then began to rise, but it still did not return to its normal level on day 15. (2) The proliferation activity and cytotoxic activity of IELs isolated from irradiated mice were reduced sharply. They followed the same pattern of decreasing at 8h, reaching the lowest level at 48-72 h post-irradiation, then began to rise, but it did not return to their normal levels on day 15. (3) The TNF-α and TGF-β concentrations in supernatant of cultured IELs isolated from irradiated mice were elevated at 8h, reaching their peak at 48-72 h. Conclusion: The decrease in number and important functions of IELs is one of the factors damaging the intestinal mucosal immunity barrier after total body irradiation

  4. Water Transport and the Evolution of CM Parent Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, R.; Cohen, B.

    2014-01-01

    Extraterrestrial water-bearing minerals are of great importance both for understanding the formation and evolution of the solar system and for supporting future human activities in space. Asteroids are the primary source of meteorites, many of which show evidence of an early heating episode and varying degrees of aqueous alteration. The origin and characterization of hydrated minerals (minerals containing H2O or OH) among both the main-belt and near-earth asteroids is important for understanding a wide range of solar system formation and evolutionary processes, as well as for planning for human exploration. Current hypotheses postulate asteroids began as mixtures of water ice and anhydrous silicates. A heating event early in solar system history was then responsible for melting the ice and driving aqueous alteration. The link between asteroids and meteorites is forged by reflectance spectra, which show 3-µm bands indicative of bound OH or H2O on the C-class asteroids, which are believed to be the parent bodies of the carbonaceous chondrites in our collections. The conditions at which aqueous alteration occurred in the parent bodies of carbonaceous chondrites are thought to be well-constrained: at 0-25 C for less than 15 Myr after asteroid formation. In previous models, many scenarios exhibit peak temperatures of the rock and co-existing liquid water in more than 75 percent of the asteroid's volume rising to 150 C and higher, due to the exothermic hydration reactions triggering a thermal runaway effect. However, even in a high porosity, water-saturated asteroid very limited liquid water flow is predicted (distances of 100's nm at most). This contradiction has yet to be resolved. Still, it may be possible for water to become liquid even in the near-surface environment, for a long enough time to drive aqueous alteration before vaporizing or freezing then subliming. Thus, we are using physics- and chemistry-based models that include thermal and fluid transport as well

  5. Changes in Serum Zinc, Copper and Ceruloplasmin Levels of Whole Body Gamma Irradiated Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rats are whole body irradiated with different Gamma radiation doses. Zinc and Copper, two important trace elements in the biological processes and Ceruloplasmin, a protein which carries more than 95% of serum Cu and has important roles in many vital processes are followed up in the irradiated rat sera. This work aimed to determine the changes in the serum levels of the three parameters (Zinc, Copper and Ceruloplasmin) through eight weeks follow up period (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th, and 8th week) post whole body gamma irradiation with three sub-lethal doses (2, 3.5 and 5 Gy) of rats. All the experimental animals did not receive any medical treatment. Zinc and Copper were measured using discrete nebulization flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Ceruloplasmin was measured using a colorimetric method. The statistical analyses of the results show that the Zinc levels of the irradiated groups decreased significantly post irradiation and then were recovered at the 6th week post irradiation. The Copper levels of the irradiated groups increased significantly and then were recovered at 6th week post irradiation. The levels of Ceruloplasmin in the same groups increased significantly throughout the whole follow up period. The conclusion is that, Zinc, Copper and Ceruloplasmin levels changed significantly in the irradiated groups compared to the control group with a maximum effect noted in the groups irradiated with the higher doses and that the lower dose irradiated groups recover earlier than the higher ones. Also the correlation between Copper and Zinc is reversible at different doses and that between Copper and Ceruloplasmin is direct

  6. Total body irradiation (sweeping beam technique) prior bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are given the principle and basic informations about Sweeping beam technique with gantry rotation on LINAC ORION 6. The whole process of treatment is presented here: CT - determination of reference points and reference slices (AP, PA) Simulator - localization of lung shielding (AP, PA) Linac - determination of some physical parameters - simulation of radiation technique Treatment planning - calculation of treatment time and number of sweeps - determination of lung shielding Model laboratory - preparation of lung shielding blocks - blocks position and fixation Radiation therapy - verification of shielding blocks - patient irradiation (AP, PA) Dosimetry in-vivo - determination of patient's doses At the end the presentation of physical results with group of 55 patients is reported

  7. Evolution and plasticity of body size of Drosophila in response to temperature.

    OpenAIRE

    Calboli, F. C. F.

    2004-01-01

    Ectotherm body size is positively correlated with latitude, giving rise to body size clines, found in different continents. Ectotherm body size also shows a developmental response to temperature, increasing at lower developmental temperatures. To investigate the effects of temperature in the evolution and plasticity of body size dines, I used two species of the genus Drosophila as model organisms. To investigate the cellular mechanism underlying the evolution of wing size clines the two newly...

  8. The effects of 3Gy total body irradiation on mouse intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes' number and functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore the characteristics of intestinal mucosal immunity after radiation injury, IEL number, proliferation activity, cytotoxic activity as well as the TNF-α and TGF-β concentrations of supernatant of cultured IEL were studied using IEL freshly isolated from whole small intestine of Kunming strain mice received 3Gy total body 60Co γ-ray irradiation. The proliferation activity, cytotoxic activity as well as the number of IEL in small intestinal mucosa were significantly decreased at 8h post-irradiation, reaching lowest level at 72h. The TNF-α and TGF-β concentrations of supernatant of cultured IEL isolated from irradiated mice were elevated at 8h, reaching peak at 72h. The decrease in number and functions of IEL may play an important role in the damage intestinal mucosal immunity barrier after total body irradiation

  9. Time course of lipolytic activity and lipid peroxidation after whole-body gamma irradiation of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rejholcova, M.; Wilhelm, J.

    1989-01-01

    The content of fluorescing products of lipid peroxidation (LFP) and hormone-stimulated lipolytic activity were determined in rat epididymal adipose tissue during a 29-day interval after whole-body gamma irradiation. An increase in LFP was accompanied by a decrease in lipolytic activity. It is suggested that these effects are interrelated and that the decrease in lipolysis in irradiated, semi fasting rats is an additional deteriorating factor leading to death in some animals.

  10. The clinical experience and results of total body irradiation for the cases of refractory leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five patients suffering from refractory leukemia were treated by Cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation followed by bone marrow transplantation. Total body irradiation with 10 MV Linac x-ray (1000 - 1280 rad, peak absorbed dose) followed by bone marrow transplantation is considered to be a relatively safe procedure. The dose distribution of the total body irradiation shows clinically suitable homogeniety. Although there is no long-term survivor in this study, no relapse sign of leukemia was found at autopsy. Therefore, some possibility of cure can be expected from this experience. There are many problems such as Graft-versus-host disease, susceptability to infection, etc., but this combination therapy will be able to contribute to improve the clinical course of refractory leukemia. (author)

  11. Dislocation loop evolution under ion irradiation in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etienne, A., E-mail: auriane.etienne@etu.univ-rouen.f [Groupe de Physique des Materiaux, Universite et INSA de Rouen, UMR CNRS 6634, BP 12, 76 801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray Cedex (France); Hernandez-Mayoral, M. [Division of Materials, CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Genevois, C.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P. [Groupe de Physique des Materiaux, Universite et INSA de Rouen, UMR CNRS 6634, BP 12, 76 801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray Cedex (France)

    2010-05-01

    A solution annealed 304 and a cold worked 316 austenitic stainless steels were irradiated from 0.36 to 5 dpa at 350 deg. C using 160 keV Fe ions. Irradiated microstructures were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Observations after irradiation revealed the presence of a high number density of Frank loops. Size and number density of Frank loops have been measured. Results are in good agreement with those observed in the literature and show that ion irradiation is able to simulate dislocation loop microstructure obtained after neutron irradiation. Experimental results and data from literature were compared with predictions from the cluster dynamic model, MFVIC (Mean Field Vacancy and Interstitial Clustering). It is able to reproduce dislocation loop population for neutron irradiation. Effects of dose rate and temperature on the loop number density are simulated by the model. Calculations for ion irradiations show that simulation results are consistent with experimental observations. However, results also show the model limitations due to the lack of accurate parameters.

  12. Dislocation loop evolution under ion irradiation in austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, A.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Genevois, C.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.

    2010-05-01

    A solution annealed 304 and a cold worked 316 austenitic stainless steels were irradiated from 0.36 to 5 dpa at 350 °C using 160 keV Fe ions. Irradiated microstructures were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Observations after irradiation revealed the presence of a high number density of Frank loops. Size and number density of Frank loops have been measured. Results are in good agreement with those observed in the literature and show that ion irradiation is able to simulate dislocation loop microstructure obtained after neutron irradiation. Experimental results and data from literature were compared with predictions from the cluster dynamic model, MFVIC (Mean Field Vacancy and Interstitial Clustering). It is able to reproduce dislocation loop population for neutron irradiation. Effects of dose rate and temperature on the loop number density are simulated by the model. Calculations for ion irradiations show that simulation results are consistent with experimental observations. However, results also show the model limitations due to the lack of accurate parameters.

  13. Dislocation loop evolution under ion irradiation in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solution annealed 304 and a cold worked 316 austenitic stainless steels were irradiated from 0.36 to 5 dpa at 350 deg. C using 160 keV Fe ions. Irradiated microstructures were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Observations after irradiation revealed the presence of a high number density of Frank loops. Size and number density of Frank loops have been measured. Results are in good agreement with those observed in the literature and show that ion irradiation is able to simulate dislocation loop microstructure obtained after neutron irradiation. Experimental results and data from literature were compared with predictions from the cluster dynamic model, MFVIC (Mean Field Vacancy and Interstitial Clustering). It is able to reproduce dislocation loop population for neutron irradiation. Effects of dose rate and temperature on the loop number density are simulated by the model. Calculations for ion irradiations show that simulation results are consistent with experimental observations. However, results also show the model limitations due to the lack of accurate parameters.

  14. Type 2 Diabetes is a Delayed Late Effect of Whole-Body Irradiation in Nonhuman Primates

    OpenAIRE

    Kavanagh, Kylie; Dendinger, Michael D.; Davis, Ashley T.; Register, Thomas C.; DeBo, Ryne; Dugan, Greg; Cline, J. Mark

    2015-01-01

    One newly recognized consequence of radiation exposure may be the delayed development of diabetes and metabolic disease. We document the development of type 2 diabetes in a unique nonhuman primate cohort of monkeys that were whole-body irradiated with high doses (6.5–8.4 Gy) 5–9 years earlier. We report here a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes in irradiated monkeys compared to age-matched nonirradiated monkeys. These irradiated diabetic primates demonstrate insulin resistance and hypertrig...

  15. Behavior of peripheral reticulocytes following whole-body irradiation and stimulation of the bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative reticulocyte content and the average Fe uptake of peripheral reticulocytes were investigated in rats after blood loss and whole-body irradiation as well as after a combined treatment for a time of 15 days. The acute loss of blood caused a rapid increase of cellular uptake within 24 hours, whereas after irradiation a considerable diminution could be observed. In addition to a direct stimulation or inhibition of bone marrow activity a direct influence of blood loss and irradiation on reticulocytes is discussed. (author)

  16. Mitochondrial DNA alterations of peripheral lymphocytes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients undergoing total body irradiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations, including mtDNA copy number and mtDNA 4977 bp common deletion (CD), are key indicators of irradiation-induced damage. The relationship between total body irradiation (TBI) treatment and mtDNA alterations in vivo, however, has not been postulated yet. The aim of this study is to analyze mtDNA alterations in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients as well as to take them as predictors for radiatio...

  17. Four cases of protracted whole body irradiation (Algerian accident 1978)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 25 Ci iridium-192 source accidentally lost was introduced in a room where among others four young female patients (14 - 20 years old) one of them pregnant were irradiated during 4/5 weeks, 6/8 hours daily, cumulating skin doses in the range of 2500r and mean medullary doses in the range of 1250r. They developed a very protracted infections and haemorragic syndrome during which they were treated successfully by haematologic compensatory therapy with enormous quantities of packed isolated blood cells (R.B.C., W.B.C., platelets) and massive antibiotic, antimycotic and hydro-electrolytic therapy. The dosimetric (physical and biological) problems are discussed and the clinical and biological data are given in detail

  18. Long-term evolution of isolated N-body sytems

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgardt, H; Hut, P; Baumgardt, Holger; Heggie, Douglas C.; Hut, Piet

    2002-01-01

    We report results of N-body simulations of isolated star clusters, performed up to the point where the clusters are nearly completely dissolved. Our main focus is on the post-collapse evolution of these clusters. We find that after core collapse, isolated clusters evolve along nearly a single sequence of models whose properties are independent of the initial density profile and particle number. Due to the slower expansion of high-N clusters, relaxation times become almost independent of the particle number after several core collapse times, at least for the particle range of our study. As a result, the dissolution times of isolated clusters exhibit a surprisingly weak dependence on N. We find that most stars escape due to encounters between single stars inside the half-mass radius of the cluster. Encounters with binaries take place mostly in the cluster core and account for roughly 15% of all escapers. Encounters between single stars at intermediate radii are also responsible for the build up of a radial anis...

  19. Clinical aspects of accidents resulting in acute total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    That the management of whole body radiation injury involves: (1) watchful waiting, (2) observation of the hematologic parameters, (3) use of antibiotics, platelet red cell and possibly granulocyte transfusions, (4) administration of hemopoietic molecular regulators of granulopoiesis, and (5) bone marrow transplantation as the last line of defense. The clinical indication for the preceding will not be discussed, since this will be a subject of later speakers in this conference. Certainly, if a radiation casualty is fortunate enough to have an identical twin, a marrow transplant may be lifesaving and certainly can do no harm to the patient, and there is little risk to the donor

  20. Entire litters developed from transferred eggs in whole body x-irradiated female mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitivity of mouse eggs to sublethal x-irradiation was determined in vitro and in vivo with regard to the development of donor litters in foster mothers. One thousand seven hundred fifty-eight unfertilized eggs of agouti dark-eyed donor mice were transferred into 293 unirradiated or x-irradiated, mated female pink-eyed mice. Two hundred thirty-nine recipients became pregnant; of these 35 produced litters containing solely dark-eyed fetuses. Sublethal doses of x-radiation administered to donor eggs in vitro before transferring into unirradiated recipients did not influence significantly the number of litters of exclusively dark-eyed fetuses produced. However, recipients irradiated by 250 roentgens (r) produced more solely dark-eyed litters than did those irradiated with 100 r. In 21 pregnant females irradiated by 100 r, only 3 (14%) developed solely dark-eyed fetuses as compared to 22 pregnant females irradiated by 250 r, of which 13 (59%) developed solely dark-eyed fetuses, all from unirradiated, transferred eggs. Of another group of 22 pregnant females which received 250 r body irradiation and subsequently received eggs also irradiated by 250 r, only 7 (32%) produced litters of dark-eyed fetuses. No one female of these three groups carried native fetuses. Such radiation-induced infertility resulting from damage of native eggs rather than loss of mother's ability to carry a pregnancy, is frequently remedied by egg transfer

  1. Patient dose analysis in total body irradiation through in vivo dosimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Ganapathy, K.; Kurup, P. G. G.; Murali, V.; M. Muthukumaran; Bhuvaneshwari, N.; Velmurugan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) is a special radiotherapy technique, administered prior to bone marrow transplantation. Due to the complex nature of the treatment setup, in vivo dosimetry for TBI is mandatory to ensure proper delivery of the intended radiation dose throughout the body. Lithium fluoride (LiF) TLD-100 chips are used for the TBI in vivo dosimetry. Results obtained from the in vivo dosimetry of 20 patients are analyzed. Results obtained from forehead, abdomen, pelvis, and mediastinu...

  2. Effects of low dose half-body irradiation on immune function in patients with malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the effects on the immune function by low dose half-body irradiation. Methods: Twenty patients, 13 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 7 small cell lung cancer, were randomly divided into two groups: HBR and RR. 10 patients of HBR were administrated with routine radiotherapy and low dose of half-body irradiation with 10 cGy once, twice every week. The routine radiotherapy was performed 6-8 h after low dose half-body irradiation and the total dose is 100 cGy. The other 10 patients of RR were given with routine radiotherapy alone. The changes in CD4, CD8, CD25 and CD56 of the peripheral blood lymphocyte between HBR and RR were measured by flow cytometry pro-, midst- and post-radiotherapy. Results: The CD4+/CD8+ for RR patients was decreased after irradiation (P4+, as well as the expression of CD25+ and CD56+ molecule were significantly increased (P8+ was decreased pro-, post- radiotherapy (P4+/CD8+ was increased midst- (P<0.05) and post-radiotherapy (P<0.01). Conclusions: Low dose half-irradiation could enhance the immune function. (authors)

  3. Acute effects of whole body gamma irradiation on exocrine pancreatic secretion in the pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reports on radiation damage to the pancreas deal essentially with long-term morphological changes with few data on pancreatic exocrine function. The aim of this work was to study the acute effects of whole body irradiation on volume and enzyme activities in the pancreatic juice. A whole body gamma irradiation (6 Gy) was investigated in pigs with continuous sampling of pancreatic juice before and after exposure via an indwelling catheter in the pancreatic duct. For each sample collected, total protein concentration and enzyme activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, lipase and amylase were determined. Pancreatic juice volume was monitored during all periods of collection. The volume of pancreatic juice secreted daily decreased one day after irradiation and remained lower than the control values over the experimental period. Total proteins secreted in the pancreatic juice and total activities of pancreatic enzymes were reduced similarly. On the other hand, only specific activities of elastase and lipase were affected by irradiation. Whole body gamma irradiation resulted in a rapid and marked decrease of exocrine pancreatic secretion, in terms of volume as well as secreted enzymes. This may contribute in part to the intestinal manifestations of the acute and/or late radiation syndrome. (author)

  4. Evolution of microstructure in zirconium alloys during irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, M; Winegar, J E

    1997-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used to characterize microstructural and microchemical changes produced by neutron irradiation in zirconium and zirconium alloys. Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and Zr-2.5Nb alloys with differing metallurgical states have been analyzed after irradiation for neutron fluences up to 25 x 10 sup 2 sup 5 n.m sup - sup 2 (E > I MeV) for a range of temperatures between 330 and 580 K. Irradiation modifies the dislocation structure through nucleation and growth of dislocation loops and, for cold-worked materials in particular, climb of existing network dislocations. In general, the a-type dislocation structure tends to saturate at low fluences (10 x l0 sup 2 sup 5 n.m sup - sup 2 - in some cases). The phase structure is also modified by irradiation. The common alloying/impurity elements, Fe, Cr, and Ni, are relatively insoluble in the alpha-phase but are dispersed into the alpha-phase during irradiation irrespective of the state of the phase initial...

  5. Changes in serum amylase and its isoenzymes after whole body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was carried out to assess the effect of total body irradiation on pancreatic and parotid isoenzymes of amylase in patients about to undergo bone-marrow transplantation who had received high-dose cyclophosphamide. Twelve patients were studied, enzyme activity being measured before and at various times after total body irradiation. Serum total amylase activity rose rapidly within 12 hours of irradiation to a maximum at 36 hours, returning to normal by six days; most of the increase was derived from salivary damage, with a much smaller pancreatic component. These results confirm that radiation produces acute changes in amylase activity, which may be of use in assessing radiation-induced damage. (author)

  6. The influence of hypoxia on the hematological radiation response following whole-body irradiation of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the protective effect of hypoxia in the hematopoietic radiation response 9 beagles were exposed to whole body X irradiation with 3.0 Gy medium line dosis (MLD) and after 10 weeks to a second 60Co-gamma whole-body irradiation with 6.5 Gy MLD, 5 animals being exposed under respiratory hypoxia of 7.5% O2 and 4 under normal oxygen conditions. 4 animals were sham-irradiated under 7.5% hypoxia. The effect of hypoxia found expression in a distinct decrease of neutropenia and a lesser extent of lymphopenia after 3.0 Gy MLD. The highest effect was obtained with respect to a significant increase of the effectiveness of the regenerative events. After 6.5 Gy MLD and the subsequent peracute course of the radiation syndrome the protective effect could be observed less clearly

  7. Bone Marrow Transplantation, 20 years of experience with total body irradiation in the 'Hermanos Ameijeiras' hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using Total Body Irradiation (ICT) for bone marrow transplants is indicated in several hematological malignancies such as Acute and Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphoma and Myelodysplastic Syndrome. The odds of survival with this procedure than those obtained with standard treatments in this type of condition, ensuring a better life expectancy for these patients. (Author)

  8. A SIMPLIFIED IN VIVO DOSLMETRY FOR TOTAL BODY IRRADIATION PRIOR TO BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖泽久

    1994-01-01

    For TBI (total body irradiation) prior to BMT (bone marrow transplantation) and in order to guarantee exact treatment, it is necessary to perfect is vivo dosimetry to detect any deviation of the treatment and to verify the dose dis-tribution. A simplified and convenient transmission type in vivo dosimetry and problems are introduced and discussed.

  9. Subtotal body irradiation with linear accelerator as preparation for marrow engraftment in aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of multitransfused severe aplastic anemia were retransplanted with bone marrow from the same HLA compatible sibling donors after subtotal body irradiation (800 r). Only minor non hematologic toxicity was observed. No permanent take was seen in relation to this procedure. During the survival time of the patients (78-120 days) no signs of interstitial pneumonia were observed

  10. Caffeine protects mice against whole-body lethal dose of γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Administration of caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine), a major component of coffee, to Swiss mice at doses of 80 or 100 mg/kg body weight 60 min prior to whole-body lethal dose of γ-irradiation (7.5 Gy) resulted in the survival of 70 and 63% of animals, respectively, at the above doses in contrast to absolutely no survivors (LD-100/25 days) in the group exposed to radiation alone. Pre-treatment with a lower concentration of caffeine (50 mg/kg) did not confer any radioprotection. The protection exerted by caffeine (80 mg/kg), however, was reduced from 70 to 50% if administered 30 min prior to irradiation. The trend statistics reveal that a dose of 80 mg/kg administered 60 min before whole-body exposure to 7.5 Gy is optimal for maximal radioprotection. However, caffeine (80 mg/kg) administered within 3 min after irradiation offered no protection. While there is documentation in the literature that caffeine is an antioxidant and radioprotector against the toxic pathway of radiation damage in a wide range of cells and organisms, this is the first report demonstrating unequivocally its potent radioprotective action in terms of survival of lethally whole-body irradiated mice. (author)

  11. Mitochondrial monoaminoxidase activity and serotonin content in rat brain after whole-body γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that γ-irradiation of albino rats with a dose of 30 Gy leads to pronounced phase changes in monoaminoxidase activity and serotonin content in rat brain at early times after whole-body exposure. These is a similar direction of changes in the activity of the enzyme and in the content of the substrate adequate to the latter

  12. Total body irradiation with a 10 MV linear accelerator in conjunction with bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total body irradiation (1000 rad, single dose) in conjunction with chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation is a therapy for acute leukemia. We show that a 10 MV linear accelerator is a suitable source of radiation for these procedures. Dosimetric and clinical results are presented for 25 patients who were treated between 5/76 and 12/78

  13. Modelling and validation for total body irradiation using a 3D planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinnacle treatment planning system has been successfully commissioned for total body irradiation and will be used for patient treatments in near future. The actual dose delivered to patients will be monitored with TLDs and diode array and the agreement with the prescribed dose will be further investigated

  14. Whole-body irradiation technique: physical aspects; Tecnica de irradiacion corporal total: aspectos fisicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venencia, D.; Bustos, S.; Zunino, S. [Instituto Privado de Radioterapia. Obispo Oro 425. Cordoba 5000 (Argentina)

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this work has been to implement a Total body irradiation technique that fulfill the following conditions: simplicity, repeatability, fast and comfortable positioning for the patient, homogeneity of the dose between 10-15 %, short times of treatments and In vivo dosimetric verifications. (Author)

  15. H2 evolution in hexadecane irradiated at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H2 yields of n-hexadecane irradiated at 330-400 deg. C were determined and compared with that at room temperature. The temperature dependence of G(H2) was found to be insignificant up to 330 deg. C. High G(H2) values above 330 deg. C indicated the enhanced dehydrogenation of hydrocarbons. Compared to alkane, irradiation of alkene at high temperature produces higher H2 yields as shown from the correlation between G(H2) and the fraction of alkene. (author)

  16. Comparison of irradiation hardening and microstructure evolution in ion-irradiated delta and epsilon hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oono, Naoko, E-mail: n-oono@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Higuchi, Toru; Sakamoto, Kan; Nakatsuka, Masafumi [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163 Naritacho Oarai, Higashi-Ibaraki, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Hasegawa, Akiko; Kondo, Sosuke; Iwata, Noriyuki Y.; Matsui, Hideki; Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    A δ-Zr-hydride was irradiated with 6.4 MeV Fe{sup 3+} ions to clarify the relationship between hardening and microstructural changes of bulk Zr-hydrides under neutron irradiation. Irradiation hardening was measured by nanoindentation tests. Transmission electron microscope cross-sectional observations showed that the deformation mechanism of the δ-Zr-hydride was both slip and twinning. Dislocation loops were observed in the irradiated hydride matrix. These irradiation-induced defects make slip deformation difficult and consequently promote the twin deformation of δ-Zr-hydride. This work is a continuation of the previous our work (J. Nucl. Mater. 419 (2011) 366–370) focused upon ε-Zr-hydride and we discuss a comparison between the two Zr-hydrides.

  17. Effect of Hippophae leaves on neurotransmitters and hematological parameters in whole body irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till date no approved radio-protective agent is available world over. WR-2721 had severe side effects and was behaviourally toxic even at sub-lethal doses of ionizing radiation. Seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) is known for its nutraceutical and therapeutic values. Our studies demonstrated that treatment with leaves of H. rhamnoides rendered > 90% whole body radioprotection in 60Co-g-irradiated (10 Gy) mice population in comparison to 100% death in non-Hippophae treated irradiated (10 Gy) mice population. Our studies also demonstrated that treatment with leaves of H. rhamnoides prevented conditioned taste aversion (CTA) in irradiated (2 Gy) Sprague-Dawley rats. The present study was planned to evaluate the effects of aqueous extract of Hippophae leaves on changes in levels of neurotransmitters ((acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and dopamine (DA)) in plasma and brain, haematological parameters in blood/plasma; and brain histology in Sprague-Dawley rats showing CTA after 60Co-g-irradiation (2 Gy). The results showed that whole body 60Co-g-irradiation (2 Gy) (i) increased the levels of Ach, Eepinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE); oxidative stress (MDA and NO), and (ii) decreased the levels of DA; WBC counts and RBC counts and antioxidants (GSH), in comparison to untreated control. Treatment with 12 mg/kg b.w. drug concentration, prior to irradiation significantly (p<0.05) (i) decreased the levels of AChE, E and NE, and MDA and NO levels in plasma and brain, and (ii) increased the WBC counts; RBC counts and levels of antioxidants (GSH), in comparison to radiation control group. Histological changes in brain were also recorded. The results demonstrated that Hippophae leaves extract had neuro-protective and reduced oxidative stress in brain of whole body irradiated mice and could be, thereby contributing to behavioural protection. (author)

  18. Effects of whole-body x irradiation on the biogenesis of creatine in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influences of whole-body x irradiation on various aspects of creatine metabolism have been studied. Exposures to sublethal or lethal doses of x radiation results in excessive urinary excretion as well as higher accumulation of creatine in the skeletal muscle of x-irradiated rats. A sudden fall in CPK activity in muscle with a concomitant rise in serum suggests that changes in serum and tissue CPK activity are of an adaptive nature in rats exposed to sublethal doses of x radiation. In vitro studies on creatine synthesis shows that transaminidase and methyl transferase activities in kidneys and liver, respectively, are decreased on the 5th day in the x-irradiated, are decreased on the 5th day in the x-irradiated rat. However, on the 8th day, the enzyme activities are restored to normal

  19. The effect of total-body γ-irradiation on pigeons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the effects of total-body 60Coγ radiation (200 to 2000 rad) on the common pigeon (Columba livia) has indicated a LD 50/30 of 950 +- 50 rad. There were no deaths before 6 days and the peak frequency in average deaths occurred 9 days after irradiation. Most of the birds showed small changes in activity or behaviour in the first five days. A histopathological study was made of femoral bone marrow from irradiated (1000 rad) pigeons sacrificed 1 to 18 days post-irradiation. Slight aplasia was observed on the first day after irradiation, moderately marked on the third day and extensive on the fourth and fifth days. At the end of the second week regeneration was observed as the primitive lymphocyte-like cells were differentiating into granulocytes and erythrocytes. (UK)

  20. Volatile evolution from polymer materials induced by irradiation with He++ ions and comparative pyrolysis experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of polymer samples using an accelerated beam of He++ ions passed through a 10 μm thick window of Havar foil has been performed. Such an irradiation simulates the effects of large α radiation doses on a vastly reduced time-scale. The experimental set up was designed so that the irradiated materials were contained within a small sample chamber. This chamber was isolated from the main vacuum chamber of the ion beam by means of the Havar foil window. A mass spectrometer linked directly to the sample chamber was used to analyse gaseous products evolved from the materials under irradiation. Samples of a material in which the polymer phase was an ethylenevinylacetate/polyvinylalcohol composite material indicated increased CO2 and CO evolution upon irradiation. This material, however, evolved a considerable amount of volatiles even without irradiation and so a detailed mechanistic interpretation of the results is not possible. A foamed poly(siloxane) material evolved a number of volatile species upon irradiation and possible chemical degradation mechanisms are commented upon. The sample was extremely resistant to radiation induced degradation as measured by volatile evolution though, so again a detailed mechanistic analysis is not possible. Samples of a polyester based polyurethane evolved CO2, CO and a number of high mass volatile species. Assignment of chemical structures to the main molecular ions allows deductions about the chemistry underlying radiation induced change to be made. Furthermore, identification of trends in volatile production allows information about potential degradation mechanisms to be deduced. To assess the contribution of sample heating on volatile evolution a series of pyrolysis experiments were performed. These indicate no evolution of volatiles below 100 deg. C and evolution of volatiles possessing masses of greater than 50 amu only at temperature of above 300 deg. C

  1. Microstructural evolution during dual-ion irradiation of candidate fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single- and dual-ion (heavy ions + 3He) irradiations of Fe-20wt.%Ni-15wt.%Cr, V-15wt.%Cr and Ti-6wt.%Al-4wt.%V alloys have been performed over a range of temperatures and doses. Various features of microstructural evolution during irradiation are reported as determined by transmission electron microscopy and Auger spectroscopy investigations

  2. Measurement of volatile evolution from polyurethane induced by accelerated ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of polymer samples using an accelerated beam of He2+ ions passed through a 10μm thick window of havar foil has been performed. Such irradiation simulates the effects of large α radiation doses, on a vastly reduced time-scale. Analysis of volatiles evolved during irradiation is performed by a residual gas analyser (RGA), which is located close to the sample chamber. Presented in this paper are the results obtained during a radiation study on polyester/MDI based polyurethane materials. During high dose rate irradiation a number of high mass species were observed. A comparison between two similar polyurethanes formulated with slightly different polyesters indicated some differences. They were, however, too minor to link to specific degradation mechanisms. The dominant degradation products evident to the RGA at low dose rates were H2 , CO and CO2 . A series of polyurethane samples previously conditioned by γ irradiation at doses between 0 and 5MGy were irradiated in the ion beam. Identification of differences in trends in the rates of volatile evolution between these samples indicated the precise vacuum conditions at the time of irradiation had a major influence. There was also an indication that the surface of the sample had a small effect on rates of volatile evolution. Comparative plots of CO and CO2 evolution for a series of 1MGy irradiations indicated variations in behaviour between samples with different γ doses. Evolution during the first 1MGy was inhibited for the unirradiated sample, the extent of inhibition diminished with increasing γ dose and was no longer evident in a sample with 1.5MGy γ dose. H2 does not show an equivalent inhibition. Evidence for a low dose crosslinking reaction is put forward as a reason for the inhibition. Chemical reaction mechanisms are postulated and used to explain differences in the behaviour observed

  3. Study of boron carbide evolution under neutron irradiation; Contribution a l'etude de l'evolution du carbure de bore sous irradiation neutronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeone, D. [CEA/Saclay, Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie (DMT), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[Universite Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand II, (CNRS), 63 - Aubiere (France)

    1999-07-01

    Owing to its high neutron efficiency, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) is used as a neutron absorber in control rods of nuclear plants. Its behaviour under irradiation has been extensively studied for many years. It now seems clear that brittleness of the material induced by the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li capture reaction is due to penny shaped helium bubbles associated to a high strain field around them. However, no model explains the behaviour of the material under neutron irradiation. In order to build such a model, this work uses different techniques: nuclear microprobe X-ray diffraction profile analysis and Raman and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to present an evolution model of B{sub 4}C under neutron irradiation. The use of nuclear reactions produced by a nuclear microprobe such as the {sup 7}Li(p,p'{gamma}){sup 7}Li reaction, allows to measure lithium profile in B{sub 4}C pellets irradiated either in Pressurised Water Reactors or in Fast Breeder Reactors. Examining such profiles enables us to describe the migration of lithium atoms out of B{sub 4}C materials under neutron irradiation. The analysis of X-ray diffraction profiles of irradiated B{sub 4}C samples allows us to quantify the concentrations of helium bubbles as well as the strain fields around such bubbles.Furthermore Raman spectroscopy studies of different B{sub 4}C samples lead us to propose that under neutron irradiation. the CBC linear chain disappears. Such a vanishing of this CBC chain. validated by NMR analysis, may explain the penny shaped of helium bubbles inside irradiated B{sub 4}C. (author)

  4. Total body irradiation with a four-field technique using a 10 MV linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, total body irradiation (TBI) is being used as a method of preparation for bone marrow transplantation (BMT). However, many variations exist in the TBI procedure, such as the irradiation technique, total dose, dose rate and dose fractionation. In TBI treatment, it is important to apply a homogeneous dose to the total body, and avoid interstitial pneumonitis and cataracta. Therefore, we applied a four-field technique using 10 MV X-rays with a shield for lungs and eyeballs, and employed tissue compensators and bolus to obtain a homogeneous dose distribution. The midpoint doses in 12 positions of the total body have been achieved within ±10% of that of the pelvis with the use of this technique. Also, this TBI technique is capable of accurately controlling absorbed doses to the lungs and eyes. (author)

  5. Evolution of dislocation loops in iron under irradiation: The impact of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of carbon content on the evolution of dislocation loops in iron–carbon was studied by object kinetic Monte Carlo, explicitly introducing carbon atoms and their atomic features for the first time. We demonstrate that the saturated loop density strongly depends on carbon content and temperature, in good agreement with in situ irradiation microscopy studies. The physical processes responsible for the accumulation and long-range migration of the loops are rationalized with implications for nanostructural evolution in commercial steels upon low-dose-rate neutron irradiation

  6. Multiscale modeling and experiment validation of microstructure evolution induced by Ar+ irradiation in hastelloy C276

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microstructure evolution induced by Ar+ irradiation (room temperature, about 10 dpa) in nickel based alloy Hastelloy C276 was studied using molecular dynamics and cluster dynamics, and a multiscale modeling code Radieff was constructed based on rate theory. The nucleation and growth of interstitial dislocation loops and void were studied by Radieff code. C276 was irradiated by 115 keV Ar+ at room temperature as validation experiment using transmission electron microscope (TEM)-implanter/accelerator interface facility at Wuhan University, and the microstructure evolution was observed by TEM. The size of dislocation loops simulated by Radieff is in good agreement with experiment. (authors)

  7. Revisiting Biomarkers of Total-Body and Partial-Body Exposure in a Baboon Model of Irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Valente

    Full Text Available In case of a mass casualty radiation event, there is a need to distinguish total-body irradiation (TBI and partial-body irradiation (PBI to concentrate overwhelmed medical resources to the individuals that would develop an acute radiation syndrome (ARS and need hematologic support (i.e., mostly TBI victims. To improve the identification and medical care of TBI versus PBI individuals, reliable biomarkers of exposure could be very useful. To investigate this issue, pairs of baboons (n = 18 were exposed to different situations of TBI and PBI corresponding to an equivalent of either 5 Gy 60Co gamma irradiation (5 Gy TBI; 7.5 Gy left hemibody/2.5 right hemibody TBI; 5.55 Gy 90% PBI; 6.25 Gy 80% PBI; 10 Gy 50% PBI, 15 Gy 30% PBI or 2.5 Gy (2.5 Gy TBI; 5 Gy 50% PBI. More than fifty parameters were evaluated before and after irradiation at several time points up to 200 days. A partial least square discriminant analysis showed a good distinction of TBI from PBI situations that were equivalent to 5 Gy. Furthermore, all the animals were pooled in two groups, TBI (n = 6 and PBI (n = 12, for comparison using a logistic regression and a non parametric statistical test. Nine plasmatic biochemical markers and most of hematological parameters turned out to discriminate between TBI and PBI animals during the prodromal phase and the manifest illness phase. The most significant biomarkers were aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, lactico dehydrogenase, urea, Flt3-ligand, iron, C-reactive protein, absolute neutrophil count and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio for the early period, and Flt3-ligand, iron, platelet count, hemoglobin, monocyte count, absolute neutrophil count and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio for the ARS phase. These results suggest that heterogeneity could be distinguished within a range of 2.5 to 5 Gy TBI.

  8. Microstructural evolution in nickel alloy C-276 after Ar-ion irradiation at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Shuoxue [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); He, Xinfu [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Li, Tiecheng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Ma, Shuli; Tang, Rui [Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu 610041 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2012-10-15

    In present work, the irradiation damage in nickel-base alloy C-276 irradiated with Ar-ions was studied. Specimens of C-276 alloy were subjected to an irradiation of Ar-ions (with 120 keV) to dose levels of 6 and 10 dpa at 300 and 550 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The size distributions and densities of dislocation loops caused by irradiation were investigated with transmission electron microscopy. Irradiation hardening due to the formation of the loops was calculated using the dispersed barrier-hardening model, showing that irradiation hardening was greatest at 300 Degree-Sign C/6 dpa. The microstructure evolution induced by Ar-ion irradiation (0-10 dpa) in nickel-base alloy C-276 has been studied using a multi-scale modeling code Radieff constructed based on rate theory, and the size of dislocation loops simulated by Radieff was in good agreement with the experiment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High density of dislocation loops appeared after Ar ions irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Irradiation hardening due to the formation of loops was calculated by the DBH model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Size of loops simulated by Radieff was in good agreement with the experiment.

  9. Phase structure and surface morphology evolution of Al–Ti–O films irradiated by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al–Ti–O films were prepared on Si substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering technology. Then the as-deposited and annealed films were treated by electron beam irradiation. The phase structure and surface morphology of the films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Especially, height–height correlation function measurement was introduced to quantitatively characterize the film surface evolution. The results show that both electron irradiation and annealing induce well-crystallization of as-deposited films, while the irradiation leads to the phase change of annealed films. In contrast to those of as-deposited films, the surface morphologies of annealed films exhibits roughening characteristic and steep local surface slope due to the formation of new phases and the preferred grain growth. The electron irradiation can result in a rougher surface due to the irradiation-induced structural damage

  10. Microstructural Evolution of Type 304 and 316 Stainless Steels Under Neutron Irradiation at LWR Relevant Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L.; Stoller, R. E.; Field, K. G.; Yang, Y.; Nam, H.; Morgan, D.; Wirth, B. D.; Gussev, M. N.; Busby, J. T.

    2016-02-01

    Life extension of light water reactors will expose austenitic internal core components to irradiation damage levels beyond 100 displacements per atom (dpa), leading to profound microstructural evolution and consequent degradation of macroscopic properties. Microstructural evolution, including Frank loops, cavities, precipitates, and segregation at boundaries and the resultant radiation hardening in type 304 and 316 stainless steel (SS) variants were studied in this work via experimental characterization and multiple simulation methods. Experimental data for up to 40 heats of type 304SS and 316SS variants irradiated in different reactors to 0.6-120 dpa at 275-375°C were generated from this work or collected from literature reports. These experimental data were then combined with models of Frank loop and cavity evolution, computational thermodynamics and precipitation, and ab initio and rate theory integrated radiation-induced segregation models to provide insights into microstructural evolution and degradation at higher doses.

  11. Behavioural consequences of an 8 Gy total body irradiation in mice: Regulation by interleukin-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of an 8 Gy γ total body irradiation (TBI) on exploration and locomotion activities as well as temperature were studied in C57BL6/J mice. Survival, body weight, and blood cell counts were also assessed in irradiated mice treated with placebo or interleukin (IL)-4. The efficacy of IL-4 treatment on improvement in exploration activity was evaluated. The study was carried out from 3 h to 30 days following exposure. Our results showed a biphasic response to irradiation concerning the exploration activity of mice. Irradiated mice had reduced activity as early as 3 h after exposure, with recovery of activity within 24 h. The exploration activity again decreased 4 days after irradiation and the recovery occurred slowly after day 17. IL-4 ameliorated the exploration status in mice in both phases. The locomotion activity was studied using a telemetry apparatus. A similar pattern to that of the exploration data was observed, with a minimal activity observed between days 13 and 17. A radiation-induced hypothermia was also noticed over the same time period. (author)

  12. Behavioural consequences of an 8 Gy total body irradiation in mice: Regulation by interleukin-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Meeren, A.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L. [Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Protection de la sante de l' Homme et de Dosimetrie, Section Autonome de Radiobiologie Appliquee a la Medecine, IPSN, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2001-02-01

    The effects of an 8 Gy {gamma} total body irradiation (TBI) on exploration and locomotion activities as well as temperature were studied in C57BL6/J mice. Survival, body weight, and blood cell counts were also assessed in irradiated mice treated with placebo or interleukin (IL)-4. The efficacy of IL-4 treatment on improvement in exploration activity was evaluated. The study was carried out from 3 h to 30 days following exposure. Our results showed a biphasic response to irradiation concerning the exploration activity of mice. Irradiated mice had reduced activity as early as 3 h after exposure, with recovery of activity within 24 h. The exploration activity again decreased 4 days after irradiation and the recovery occurred slowly after day 17. IL-4 ameliorated the exploration status in mice in both phases. The locomotion activity was studied using a telemetry apparatus. A similar pattern to that of the exploration data was observed, with a minimal activity observed between days 13 and 17. A radiation-induced hypothermia was also noticed over the same time period. (author)

  13. The distribution of mesenchymal stem cells after total-body irradiation in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To detect the distribution of mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) after total-body irradiation in rats. Methods: MSCs were cultured and labeled with green fluorescent protein(GFP). Rats were exposed to total-body irradiation(TBI) or TBI plus total brain irradiation, and then MSCs were injected through the tail vein. The Fluorescent MSCs were observed by fluorescence microscope. The MSCs numbers in different organs were determined by quantitative RT-PCR method. Results: GFP-labeled MSCs were obtained. After MSCs were infused to the rats, few of them were observed in the organs of nonirradiated group except for a very low number in the lungs ,bone marrow(BM) and spleen. TBI of 6 Gy increased the engraftment of MSCs in almost all the organs, especially in early response tissues such as the small intestine and BM. TBI of 7 Gy further increased the number of MSCs. The MSCs numbers in the brain and other organs were significantly increased after 20 Gy total brain irradiation in addition to 6 Gy TBI. Conclusions: Radiation injury can induce the aggregation of MSCs. With the increase of radiation dose and severity of radiation injury, a significant increase of MSCs in different organs were observed. Local irradiation can increase the MSCs distribution in the radiation field as well as other organs. (authors)

  14. Protective Role Of Fresh Pomegranate Against Oxidative Damage In Whole Body Gamma Irradiated Male Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty four male albino rats, body weight 100-130 g, were used to evaluate the protective role of fresh pomegranate fruit intake for 30 days on the damage induced by single dose of 6 Gy whole body gamma irradiation. The rats were randomly and equally divided into four groups: group (1): control, group (2): irradiated with 6 Gy, group (3): pomegranate for 30 days and group (4): pomegranate for 30 days followed by 6 Gy whole body irradiation. At the end of the experiment, all rats were sacrificed after 12 hours fasting then sera were separated for the determination of sugar, total antioxidant, lipid profile and liver and kidney functions. Results showed that gamma radiation caused significant decline (P<0.05) in serum total antioxidant, total protein, albumin, HDL-C and blood glucose with significant elevation (P<0.05) in other hepato-renal markers in addition to serum total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL-C. These changes were significantly attenuated in irradiated animals pre-treated with whole fresh pomegranate fruit leading to the conclusion that pre-intake of pomegranate fruit had a radio- protective effect. This protection of this whole fruit may be due to the increased total antioxidant level leading to free radical scavenging

  15. Study on Fractionated Total Body Irradiation before Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Fang; Bo Liu; Hong Gao

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To observe the dose and the complications from total body irradiation before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.METHODS This study involved 312 patients with total body irradiation before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. They were entered into the treated research from May 1999 to October 2005. All patients had Received the irradiation from 60Co of an absorbed dose rate of (5.2 ± 1.13) cGy/min. The total dose of TBI was 7~12 Gy, 1 f/d × 2 d. A high-dose rate group (≥ 10 Gy) included 139 cases and a low-dose rate group (< 10 Gy) included 173 cases.RESULTS The probability of acute gastrointestinal reactions in the high-dose rate group was more compared with that in the low-dose rate group. The differences for other reactions, such as hematopoietic reconstitution and graft survival rate, between the two groups were insignificant.CONCLUSION Using fractional total body irradiation at a dose rate of 5 cGy/min, with a total dose of 7~12 Gy, 1 f/d x 2 d, with the lung receiving under 7.5 Gy is a safe and effective pretreatment for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  16. Low Dietary Protein Status Potentiating Risk of Health Hazard in Whole Body Gamma Irradiated Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations were planned to assess the changes in certain biochemical parameters as affected by the synergistic effect of exposure to fractionated doses of rays and / or feeding on different protein levels. The date showed that animals kept on normal or low protein diet exhibited a significant decrease in serum total protein and glucose. Also , a significant increase was recorded in insulin level in rats exposed at the radiation dose level of 20 Gy. Exposure to cumulative doses of irradiation has aggrevated the hyperglycemic effect of high protein diet with a significant and marked increase of insulin at all the applied doses. Animals fed normal high or low protein diet were found to exert significant decreases in T3, T4 while a significant increase in TSH of high protein group occurred as a result of exposure to cumulative doses of gamma-irradiation. Rats kept on low protein diet exhibited losses in body weight, hypercholesterolemia, low levels of phospholipids and triglycerides as compared with the normal protein diet group. In contrast high protein diet group showed no serious effects. Irradiation has potentiated body weight losses, hypotriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia in animal group fed low protein diet with a significant increase in serum phospholipids due to the higher radiation dose of 20 Gy. Protein deficiency acted synergistically with gamma irradiation and increased the susceptibility of body organs to radiation damage. Such findings contributed to the knowledge which stimulated the decrease of the internationally recognized occupational dose limits from 50 down to 20 m Sv (ICRP 1991)

  17. Fractionated homogenous total-body irradiation prior to bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the University of Kiel, myeloid and acute lymphatic leukemia is treated since 1983 by total-body irradiation applied prior to bone marrow transplantation. Dose deviations in the midplane caused by the irregular surface and tissue inhomogeneities of the patient are reduced down to +- 3.5% compared to the central ray, with the help of CT-based individual compensators. This method prevents above all an excessive dose to the lungs. The radiobiologic advantages of fractionated irradiation have been employed for all patients treated hitherto (n = 9). At present, a total body dose of 12 Gy in six fractions is applied within three days. There were no undesired acute radiogenic reactions except a mild acute mucositis found in all patients. Chronic side effects, especially in the lungs, were not demonstrated, too. However, the average follow-up time of 149 days has been rather short. One patient died from relapse of leukemia after a total dose of 10 Gy, another patient died because the transplanted bone marrow was rejected, and a third died from catheter sepsis. Six out of nine patients are in complete remission with a maximum index of Karnofsky. The limited experiences gained hitherto show that the homogeneous accelerated-fractionated total-body irradiation offers essential advantages compared to non-compensated single dose irradiation with respect to the prevention of undesired radiogenic effects in sound tissues and that its therapeutic efficacy is at least the same. (orig.)

  18. The Irradiation Performance and Microstructural Evolution in 9Cr-2W Steel Under Ion Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsagabi, Sultan; Charit, Indrajit; Pasebani, Somayeh

    2016-02-01

    Grade 92 steel (9Cr-2W) is a ferritic-martensitic steel with good mechanical and thermal properties. It is being considered for structural applications in Generation IV reactors. Still, the irradiation performance of this alloy needs more investigation as a result of the limited available data. The irradiation performance investigation of Grade 92 steel would contribute to the understanding of engineering aspects including feasibility of application, economy, and maintenance. In this study, Grade 92 steel was irradiated by iron ion beam to 10, 50, and 100 dpa at 30 and 500 °C. In general, the samples exhibited good radiation damage resistance at these testing parameters. The radiation-induced hardening was higher at 30 °C with higher dislocation density; however, the dislocation density was less pronounced at higher temperature. Moreover, the irradiated samples at 30 °C had defect clusters and their density increased at higher doses. On the other hand, dislocation loops were found in the irradiated sample at 50 dpa and 500 °C. Further, the irradiated samples did not show any bubble or void.

  19. He-Ne Laser Auricular Irradiation Plus Body Acupuncture for Treatment of Acne Vulgaris in 36 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Lihong

    2006-01-01

    In order to observe the therapeutic effects of He-Ne laser auricular irradiation plus body acupuncture for acne vulgaris, 68 cases of acne vulgaris were randomly divided into a treatment group of 36 cases treated with He-Ne laser auricular irradiation plus body acupuncture, and a control group of 32 cases treated with body acupuncture only. The results showed that the cure rate was 77.8% in the treatment group and 46.9% in the control group (P<0.05), indicating that He-Ne laser auricular irradiation plus body acupuncture may exhibit better effects for acne vulgaris.

  20. The nanostructure evolution in Fe–C systems under irradiation at 560 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •We developed a model that describes well the defects produced in Fe–C under irradiation. •The effect of carbon is effectively described in terms of traps for radiation defects. •The model is based on physical considerations and uses only a couple of calibration parameters. •Two types of interstitial clusters are simulated using an effective migration energy. -- Abstract: This work extends our Object Kinetic Monte Carlo model for neutron irradiation-induced nanostructure evolution in Fe–C alloys to consider higher irradiation temperatures. The previous study concentrated on irradiation temperatures <370 K. Here we study the evolution of vacancy and self-interstitial atom (SIA) cluster populations at the operational temperature of light water reactors, by simulating specific reference irradiation experiments. Following our previous study, the effect of carbon on radiation defect evolution can be described in terms of formation of immobile complexes with vacancies, that in turn act as traps for SIA clusters. This dynamics is simulated using generic traps for SIA and vacancy clusters. The traps have a binding energy that depends on the size and type of the clusters and is also chosen on the basis of previously performed atomistic studies. The model had to be adapted to account for the existence of two kinds of SIA clusters, 〈1 1 1〉 and 〈1 0 0〉, as observed in electron microscopy examinations of Fe alloys neutron irradiated at the temperatures of technological interest. The model, which is fully based on physical considerations and only uses a few parameters for calibration, is found to be capable of reproducing the experimental trends, thereby providing insight into the physical mechanisms of importance to determine the type of nanostructural evolution undergone by the material during irradiation

  1. Effect of total body irradiation on skeletal growth and cataract formation in rhesus monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of total body irradiation in single doses of 400-950 rad on skeletal growth and the development of lens cataract was investigated in 21 rhesus monkeys. The results suggest that exposure to irradiation before or during adolescent growth in children may lead to bone shortening when doses of 750 rad or higher are concerned, and that treatment of children with TBI in excess of 750 rad - as is sometimes employed in conjunction with bone marrow transplantation for the treatment of leukemia - may carry a strong risk for the subsequent development of cataract formation. (C.F.)

  2. Suppression of spontaneous and artificial metastasis by low dose total body irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated whether low dose total body irradiation (TBI) suppresses metastasis using both artificial and spontaneous lung metastasis in WHT/Ht mice. When mice were irradiated with 15-60 cGy immediately before tumor cell injection into a tail vein in artificial lung metastasis, lung colony formation was suppressed significantly by the TBI, and 20 cGy was the most effective dose. The suppressive effect of 20 cGy TBI lasted for 6 hours. TBI with 15-20 cGy suppressed spontaneous lung metastasis significantly, and 15 cGy was the most effective dose. (author)

  3. Response of peripheral leucocytes to whole body irradiation and vitamin E treatment in white leghorn chick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced changes in peripheral blood leucocytes in 1 day old male white leghorn chicks were studied after whole body exposure to 2.25 Gy dose of gamma radiation at the rate of 0.50 Gy/sec with and without vitamin E. The changes in total leucocyte counts, lymphocytes and heterophils were observed at 1,3,5,7,14 and 28 days postirradiation. A pronounced leucocytopenia was noted in the initial post-irradiation period. The lymphocytes and heterophils showed a reciprocal relationship after radiation. With vitamin E treatment, considerable and faster recovery was noticed in the leucocytes after irradiation. (author). 16 refs., 3 figs

  4. Recombinant human thrombopoietin promotes hematopoietic reconstruction after severe whole body irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Wang; Bowen Zhang; Sihan Wang; Jing Zhang; Yiming Liu; Jingxue Wang; Zeng Fan; Yang Lv; Xiuyuan Zhang; Lijuan He; Lin Chen; Huanzhang Xia; Yanhua Li; Xuetao Pei

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human thrombopoietin (rHuTPO) is a drug that is used clinically to promote megakaryocyte and platelet generation. Here, we report the mitigative effect of rHuTPO (administered after exposure) against severe whole body irradiation in mice. Injection of rHuTPO for 14 consecutive days following exposure significantly improved the survival rate of lethally irradiated mice. RHuTPO treatment notably increased bone marrow cell density and LSK cell numbers in the mice after sub-lethal irr...

  5. Study of boron carbide evolution under neutron irradiation by Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide, B12C3, is an absorbing material used to control the reactivity of nuclear reactors by taking advantage of nuclear reactions (e.g. 10B(n,α)7Li), where neutrons are absorbed. During such reactions, radiation damages originating both from these nuclear reactions and from elastic collisions between neutrons and atoms lead to a partial destruction of this material, which gives the main limitation of its lifetime in nuclear reactors. In order to understand the evolution of B12C3 in nuclear plants, the effect of neutron irradiation in B12C3 has been investigated by Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. Comparisons of B12C3 samples irradiated by 1 MeV electrons, 180 keV helium ions and neutrons are used to study the microstructure evolution of this material by Raman scattering. The analysis of Raman spectra of different B12C3 samples irradiated by neutrons clearly shows that during the cascade displacements, the 485 and 527 cm-1 modes disappear. These characteristic features of Raman spectra of the neutron irradiated samples are interpreted by a microscopic model. This model assumes that the CBC linear chain is destroyed whereas icosahedra are self-healed. 10B atoms destroyed during the neutron irradiation are replaced in icosahedra by other boron and carbon atoms coming from the linear CBC chain. The 11B NMR analysis performed on unirradiated and irradiated B4C samples shows the vanishing of a strong quadrupolar interaction associated to the CBC chain during the high neutron irradiation. The 11B NMR spectroscopy confirms the previous Raman spectroscopy and the proposed microscopic model of B12C3 evolution under neutron irradiation

  6. Loss of Ia-bearing splenic adherent cells after whole body ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daily uv irradiation of mice results in a marked decrease in the antigen-presenting capability of SAC from these mice after 1 wk of uv exposure. To directly examine this cell population, we developed a technique for purifying SAC that involves passing mouse splenocytes through two cycles of glass adherence with an intervening incubation on rabbit anti-mouse Ig-coated dishes. SAC from externally uv irradiated mice prepared by this method, when pulsed with antigen, activate primed T cells to proliferate much less efficiently than SAC from normal mice. Both the proportion and absolute number of Ia-bearing cells in this purified SAC population from uv irradiated mice are considerably smaller than that seen in similarly prepared populations from normal mice. Previous adjuvant immunization was shown to override functional defects elicited by external uv irradiation. This demonstration of a uv irradiation induced selective loss of Ia bearing splenic adherent cells and the functional consequences of this loss provide further evidence for the importance of Ia-bearing accessory cells in antigen presentation of T dependent antigens, and provides insight into the origin of the immunologic defects induced by whole body uv irradiation

  7. Effect of whole body gamma irradiation on delayed hypersensitivity to dinitrofluorobenzene in CBA mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of whole body γ-irradiation of CBA mice on the subsequent development of delayed hypersensitivity (DH) response to 2,4 dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) was studied. Mice were irradiated with 60Co-γrays 24 hr prior to the first epicutaneous sensitization with DNFB. Mice irradiated at doses up to 1.08 Gy showed unaltered DH response. Increasing doses resulted in progressive suppression of DH response and the D50 was 3.86 Gy. Marked reduction in the number of lymph node cells was observed in irradiated, sensitized as well as unsensitized mice. This could be due to interphase death of precursor cells (antigen-sensitive cells), resulting in lower number of effector lymphocytes for DH(Tsub(DH)). Furthermore, the maximum DH response in irradiated, sensitized mice was obtained later on in comparison with the controls. The effector lymphocytes from irradiated sensitized mice were, however, functionally unimpaired. It was observed that the radiation-induced suppression of DH to DNFB in these mice could be partly due to the damage to antigen sensitive cells and also to the cells other than effector lymphocytes which participated in the inflammatory reaction. (author)

  8. Booster irradiation to the spleen following total body irradiation. A new immunosuppressive approach for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graft rejection presents a major obstacle for transplantation of T cell-depleted bone marrow in HLA-mismatched patients. In a primate model, after conditioning exactly as for leukemia patients, it was shown that over 99% of the residual host clonable T cells are concentrated in the spleen on day 5 after completion of cytoreduction. We have now corroborated these findings in a mouse model. After 9-Gy total body irradiation (TBI), the total number of Thy-1.2+ cells in the spleen reaches a peak between days 3 and 4 after TBI. The T cell population is composed of both L3T4 (helper) and Lyt-2 (suppressor) T cells, the former being the major subpopulation. Specific booster irradiation to the spleen (5 Gy twice) on days 2 and 4 after TBI greatly enhances production of donor-type chimera after transplantation of T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow. Similar enhancement can be achieved by splenectomy on day 3 or 4 after TBI but not if splenectomy is performed 1 day before TBI or 1 day after TBI, strengthening the hypothesis that, after lethal TBI in mice, the remaining host T cells migrate from the periphery to the spleen. These results suggest that a delayed booster irradiation to the spleen may be beneficial as an additional immunosuppressive agent in the conditioning of leukemia patients, in order to reduce the incidence of bone marrow allograft rejection

  9. Optimum combination of targeted 131I and total body irradiation for treatment of disseminated cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiobiological modeling was used to explore optimum combination strategies for treatment of disseminated malignancies of differing radiosensitivity and differing patterns of metastatic spread. The purpose of the study was to derive robust conclusions about the design of combination strategies that incorporate a targeting component. Preliminary clinical experience of a neuroblastoma treatment strategy, which is based upon general principles obtained from modelling, is briefly described. Methods and Materials: The radiobiological analysis was based on an extended (dose-rate dependent) formulation of the linear quadratic model. Radiation dose and dose rate for targeted irradiation of tumors of differing size was in part based on microdosimetric considerations. The analysis was applied to several tumor types with postulated differences in the pattern of metastatic spread, represented by the steepness of the slope of the relationship between numbers of tumors present and tumor diameter. The clinical pilot study entailed the treatment of five children with advanced neuroblastoma using a combination of 131I metaiodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) and total body irradiation followed by bone marrow rescue. Results: The theoretical analysis shows that both intrinsic radiosensitivity and pattern of metastatic spread can influence the composition of the ideal optimum combination strategy. High intrinsic radiosensitivity generally favors a high proportion of targeting component in the combination treatment, while a strong tendency to micrometastatic spread favors a major contribution by total body irradiation. The neuroblastoma patients were treated using a combination regimen with an initially low targeting component (2 Gy whole body dose from targeting component plus 12 Gy from total body irradiation). The treatment was tolerable and resulted in remissions in excess of 9 months in each of these advanced neuroblastoma patients. Conclusions: Radiobiological analysis, which

  10. The carcinogenic risk of high dose total body irradiation in non-human primates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High dose total body irradiation (TBI) in combination with chemotherapy, followed by rescue with bone marrow transplantation (BMT), is increasingly used for the treatment of haematological malignancies. With the increasing success of this treatment and its current introduction for treating refractory autoimmune diseases the risk of radiation carcinogenesis is of growing concern. Studies on turnout induction in non-human primates are of relevance in this context since the response of this species to radiation does not differ much from that in man. Since the early sixties, studies have been performed on acute effects in Rhesus monkeys and the protective action of bone marrow transplantation after irradiation with X-rays (average total body dose 6.8 Gy) and fission neutrons (average dose 3.4 Gy). Of those monkeys, which were irradiated and reconstituted with autologous bone marrow, 20 animals in the X-irradiated group and nine animals in the neutron group survived more than 3 years. A group of 21 non-irradiated Rhesus monkeys of a comparable age distribution served as controls. All animals were regularly screened for the occurrence of neoplasms. Complete necropsies were performed after natural death or euthanasia. At post-irradiation intervals of 4-21 years an appreciable number of tumours was observed. In the neutron irradiated group eight out of nine animals died with one or more malignant tumours. In the X-irradiated group this fraction was 10 out of 20. The tumours in the control group, in seven out of the 21 animals, appeared at much older a-e compared with those in the irradiated cohorts. The histogenesis of the tumours was diverse with a preponderance of renal carcinoma, sarcomas among which osteosarcormas, and malignant glomus tumours in the irradiated groups. When corrected for competing risks, the carcinogenic risk of TBI in the Rhesus monkeys is similar to that derived from the studies of the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. The increase of the risk by a

  11. High Temperature Ion-Irradiation Effects on Microstructural Evolution in β-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High temperature and high dose irradiation effects on microstructural evolution in high purity β-SiC was studied by Single- and dual-ion irradiation, where 5.1 MeV Si2+ ions for displacement damage and 1 MeV He+ ions for (n, α) simulation were implanted at 1673 K. From a cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) study of the β-SiC irradiated with single-ion up to a dose of 100 dpa, high density dislocation loops were observed. Sizes and concentrations of the loops are dependant on displacement damage level. In the dual-ion irradiated specimen, dislocation network was observed through the dual-ion irradiated region. At the same time, cavities were formed in both the grain and grain boundary. In front of the irradiated surface, localized growth of the cavities was observed. TEM micrographs demonstrate that the helium had a large mobility on grain boundary and dislocation network under high temperature irradiation. It is clarified that helium largely contributes to the development of irradiation-induced microstructural defects. The formation mechanisms of microstructural defects were also discussed

  12. Processes influencing the evolution of irradiated wheat populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of wheat irradiation has been studied through 20 generations in order to follow some of the micro-evolutionary processes. The main processes that contributed to the recovery of the treated wheat population were: elimination of unconditionally harmful mutations by self pollination and natural selection; maintenance of genetic polymorphism in three types of spikes, through the deficiency-duplication mechanism, which correlated closely with plant height; alteration of the mating system by increasing the frequency of open pollination; open pollination to maintain variability within the treated population; natural selection through 20 generations favoured superior genotypes, which contributed to the recovery process. (author)

  13. Structural Evolution of Human Recombinant alfaB-Crystallin under UV Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiyama, Masaaki; Fujii, Noriko; Morimoto, Yukio;

    2008-01-01

    External stresses cause certain proteins to lose their regular structure and aggregate. In order to clarify this abnormal aggregation process, a structural evolution of human recombinant aB-crystallin under UV irradiation was observed with in situ small-angle neutron scattering. The abnormal...

  14. Swelling and Gas Evolution in Irradiated Organic Matrix COMPOSITES—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D.

    2010-04-01

    When irradiated with high energy particles, all organic materials produce gas as a result of bond scission or nuclear displacement reactions that may occur and the rate of gas evolution can be related to the chemical structure of the material. The relationship between rate of gas evolution and temperature of irradiation is complex, but it is believed that providing the material is irradiated at a temperature below its Tg, there is little influence of temperature on the total gas evolved. A number of investigators have considered the possibility that radiolytic gases, if not lost by normal diffusion processes, will be trapped within the material and so causes the resin to `swell'. There is a particular concern that when materials are irradiated at low temperatures, gases may be released suddenly as the material is warmed, minimising the possibility of loss by diffusion and so leading to an increase in dimensions. This paper reviews the literature on gas evolution and any associated swelling that may occur and for epoxies, correlates gas evolution rates with chemical structure.

  15. Monitoring microstructural evolution in irradiated steel with second harmonic generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Material damage in structural components is driven by microstructural evolution that occurs at low length scales and begins early in component life. In metals, these microstructural features are known to cause measurable changes in the acoustic nonlinearity parameter. Physically, the interaction of a monochromatic ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and vacancies, generates a second harmonic wave that is proportional to the acoustic nonlinearity parameter. These nonlinear ultrasonic techniques thus have the capability to evaluate initial material damage, particularly before crack initiation and propagation occur. This paper discusses how the nonlinear ultrasonic technique of second harmonic generation can be used as a nondestructive evaluation tool to monitor microstructural changes in steel, focusing on characterizing neutron radiation embrittlement in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels. Current experimental evidence and analytical models linking microstructural evolution with changes in the acoustic nonlinearity parameter are summarized

  16. The effect of gamma-rays on the hemoglobin of whole-body irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in the UV-visible absorption spectrum of mouse hemoglobin as a result of whole body irradiation were studied. White albino adult mice were exposed to a Cs-137 γ-source at a dose rate of 47.5 Gy/h to different absorbed dose values ranging from 1 to 8 Gy. Blood specimens were taken 24 h after irradiation. The UV-visible absorption spectra of hemoglobin of irradiated and control mice were measured in the wavelength range from 200 to 700 nm. The obtained results showed significant changes in the bands measured at 340 nm, in the Soret band measured at 410 nm, also, the α- and β-bands measured at 537 and 572 nm showed significant decrease in intensity with the absorbed dose increase. The absorbance measured at 630 nm showed no significant changes. The radiation effect on the animal hemoglobin was discussed on the basis of the obtained results. (Author)

  17. Radiation effects of some enzymatic activities in tissues of rats subjected to whole body gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study deals with the changes produced in the activity of transaminases and cholinesterase in the tissues of male rats exposed to 6 Gy whole body-irradiation. The activity of these enzymes was estimated at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days following irradiation. The results indicated that radiation induced changes in the activity of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic pyrovic transaminase (GPT) in liver brain and serum of white rats; as well as in the activity of liver and brain cholinesterase. Changes in the enzymatic activities are dependent on the time after irradiation and the tissue containing the enzyme. It could be concluded that each enzyme has a range of sensitivity to ionizing radiation according to its presence in the animal organ. This must serve cancer radiotherapy for patients

  18. Tissue air ratio in total body irradiation. An in vivo evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpati, D.; Mancini, G.; Corvo, R.; Franzone, P.

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of dose readings in 102 patients treated with total body irradiation (TBI), a 'tissue air ratio (TAR) curve' has been produced. It could be useful to precalculate treatment time in TBI, for dose prescription to a specific point, provided the same source (/sup 60/Co) and treatment setting (lateral irradiation; 3 m source-axis distance; reference point at thighs bifurcation, neat the perineum) is used. The TAR curve produced, and the formula relating tissue depth to TAR value, are presented, and compared to preexisting data for 'magna fields' treatments. This curve is exponential, and in semilog representation becomes straight, as every classic TAR curve; it is lower than others, reflecting non full-scatter situation in patient irradiation. (orig.).

  19. Effect of ultra-low dose whole-body-irradiation on severe patients with myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultra-low dose whole body irradiation therapy was given to 5 patients with intractable bulbar syndrome, in a dose of 10 rad/fraction, 2 times a week for 5 weeks, with a total of 100 rad; and effects of this therapy on their clinical symptoms and immunological ability were discussed. In 3 of them, bulbar syndrome was improved, and the other one, the first irradiation was effective. The peripheral leukocyte count and lymphocyte count became lowest immediately after completion of the irradiation, and returned to the normal level within 1 to 2 months. The function of T-cells, especially suppressive T-cells, was recovered; and decrease in B-cells, resulted in a decrease in the AChR antibody titer. (Ueda, J.)

  20. Effect of ultra-low dose whole-body-irradiation on patients with severe myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimori, Shigeru; Koriyama, Kenji (Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-12-01

    An ultra-low dose whole body irradiation therapy was given to 5 patients with intractable bulbar syndrome, in a dose of 10 rad/fraction, 2 times a week for 5 weeks, with a total of 100 rad; and effects of this therapy on their clinical symptoms and immunological ability were discussed. In 3 of them, bulbar syndrome was improved, and the other one, the first irradiation was effective. The peripheral leukocyte count and lymphocyte count became lowest immediately after completion of the irradiation, and returned to the normal level within 1 to 2 months. The function of T-cells, especially suppressive T-cells, was recovered; and decrease in B-cells, resulted in a decrease in the AChR antibody titer.

  1. Rheological, structural and chemical evolution of bitumen under gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitumen derived from crude oil by fractional distillation has been used in the nuclear industry as a radioactive waste encapsulation matrix. When subjected to α, β and γ self-irradiation, this organic matrix undergoes radiolysis, generating hydrogen bubbles and modifying the physical and chemical properties of the material. In this paper, the effects of irradiation on bitumen materials, especially in terms of its physical, chemical, structural and rheological properties, were characterized at radiation doses ranging from 1 to 7 MGy. An increase in the shear viscosity and melt yield stress was observed with increasing doses. Similarly, the elastic and viscous moduli (G' and G'') increase with the dose, with a more pronounced increase for G' that reflects enhanced elasticity arising from radiation-induced cross-linking. In addition, a low-frequency plateau is observed for G', reflecting pseudo-solid behavior and leading to an increase of the complex viscosity. This behavior is due to increased interactions between asphaltene particles, and to aromatization of the bitumen by γ-radiations. Cross-linking of bitumen enhances its strength, as confirmed by various techniques (modulated DSC, DTA/TGA, SEC, FTIR and XRD). (authors)

  2. Sesamol attenuates cytogenetic damages in bone marrow cells of whole body gamma irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole body radiation exposure cause damages to all vital organs and bone marrow is the most sensitive. Pre-treatment with antioxidant as single prophylactic dose is expected to lower induction of damages in bone marrow. In the present study we have focused on sesamol, a dietary antioxidant mediated radioprotection in bone marrow cells of gamma irradiated mice and compared with melatonin. Male C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally administered with sesamol (10 and 20 mg/kg body) and after 30 minutes exposed to whole body gamma radiation using 60Co Teletherapy unit. Mice were injected with 0.2 ml of a metaphase arresting agent (0.05% colchicine) intra-peritoneally 3 hours prior to sacrifice (24 hrs. post-irradiation). Bone marrow cells were flushed out from femurs of each animal and processed for chromosomal aberration assay. Another set of experiment without colchicine injection was performed to access the DNA damage in bone marrow using alkaline comet assay. At least 100 metaphases per animal were scored under light microscope to record various aberrations and total chromosomal aberrations (TCA) was calculated. Similar measurements were performed with melatonin for comparing the efficacy of sesamol. Gamma irradiation has increased the chromatid type aberrations (break formation, fragment) and chromosomal type aberrations (ring formation, acentric) in bone marrow cells. The results have shown significant (p< 0.001) increase in TCA of irradiated mice than control. While pre-treatment of sesamol and melatonin 10 mg/kg significantly (p<0.05) reduced the TCA. The extend of protection has increased at 20 mg/kg significantly (p<0.001) as evident from the reduced TCA compared to irradiated group. Interestingly, sesamol and melatonin have shown similar extent of reduction of TCA. Thus sesamol has demonstrated strong ability to protect bone marrow at low dosage. These investigations on sesamol mediated protection in bone marrow are likely to benefit development of

  3. Dose-effect relationships in total body irradiation on the healing of cutaneous wounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冉新泽; 程天民; 林远; 屈纪富; 刘都户; 艾国平; 阎国和; 王文昌; 许汝福

    2003-01-01

    ObjectiveTo study the effects of dosages of total body irradiation on the healing process of cutaneous wounds and to observe the changes of wound area at different periods after injury.star rats. The single dosage varied from 1 to 8 Gy. Within 1 h after irradiation, two whole thickness circular cutaneduced on the back of the animals (combined injury groups). Same wounds were produced on rats with no irradiation (single wound group). Wound healing was observed at different points after injury. ResultsAfter total body irradiation with the dose of 1,2,3,4,5,6, 7 or 8 Gy, the wound healing was obviously retarded as the dosages increased. The wound area remained was larger in the large dosage groups than in the small dosage groups. Seven days after injury, there was 33.5% wound surface left unhealed in the single wound group, whereas in the combined injury groups, 35.4%, 38.1%, 41.6%, 48.8%, 53.9%, 63.7%, 69.2% and 73.9% of the wound surfaces remained unhealed, respectively. Statistical analysis showed marked correlations between the varioustimes after total body irradiation and various dosages to the percentage of unhealed wound surface. Nine dose-effect relation formulae were deduced according to the statistical results.ConclusionsIn soft tissue trauma combined with radiation injury, the delay of wound healingis related to the dose of radiation inflicted. It is also related to the time between injury and time of observation.

  4. DNA damage focus analysis in blood samples of minipigs reveals acute partial body irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lamkowski

    Full Text Available Radiation accidents frequently involve acute high dose partial body irradiation leading to victims with radiation sickness and cutaneous radiation syndrome that implements radiation-induced cell death. Cells that are not lethally hit seek to repair ionizing radiation (IR induced damage, albeit at the expense of an increased risk of mutation and tumor formation due to misrepair of IR-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs. The response to DNA damage includes phosphorylation of histone H2AX in the vicinity of DSBs, creating foci in the nucleus whose enumeration can serve as a radiation biodosimeter. Here, we investigated γH2AX and DNA repair foci in peripheral blood lymphocytes of Göttingen minipigs that experienced acute partial body irradiation (PBI with 49 Gy (± 6% Co-60 γ-rays of the upper lumbar region. Blood samples taken 4, 24 and 168 hours post PBI were subjected to γ-H2AX, 53BP1 and MRE11 focus enumeration. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL of 49 Gy partial body irradiated minipigs were found to display 1-8 DNA damage foci/cell. These PBL values significantly deceed the high foci numbers observed in keratinocyte nuclei of the directly γ-irradiated minipig skin regions, indicating a limited resident time of PBL in the exposed tissue volume. Nonetheless, PBL samples obtained 4 h post IR in average contained 2.2% of cells displaying a pan-γH2AX signal, suggesting that these received a higher IR dose. Moreover, dispersion analysis indicated partial body irradiation for all 13 minipigs at 4 h post IR. While dose reconstruction using γH2AX DNA repair foci in lymphocytes after in vivo PBI represents a challenge, the DNA damage focus assay may serve as a rapid, first line indicator of radiation exposure. The occurrence of PBLs with pan-γH2AX staining and of cells with relatively high foci numbers that skew a Poisson distribution may be taken as indicator of acute high dose partial body irradiation, particularly when samples are available

  5. Modulator Effect of Turmeric on Oxidative Damage in Whole Body Gamma Irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of its penetrating power and its ability to travel great distances, gamma rays are considered the primary hazard to the population during most radiological emergencies. So, there is a need to develop medical countermeasures to protect the first responders and remediation workers from biomedical effect of ionizing radiation. Turmeric has been reported to have many beneficial health effects, including a strong anti-oxidant effect, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties. In the present study, turmeric was investigated as a therapeutic agent against hazards induced by ionizing radiation on kidney, liver, urinary and serum calcium levels and blood counts. A daily dose of 0.5 g/kg body weight was used in whole body gamma irradiated female rats with 3 Gy. Radiation effects were followed up for four weeks post irradiation. The results revealed that the administration of turmeric post-irradiation resulted in a significant inhibition in the frequency of radiation induced oxidative damage. It could be concluded that definite turmeric dose exerts a vital modulator role against gamma irradiation hazard

  6. Enhancement of committed hematopoietic stem cell colony formation by nandrolone decanoate after sublethal whole body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of an anabolic steroid, nandrolone decanoate, to increase committed topoietic stem cell (CFU-gm, CFU-e, and BFU-e) colony formation after sublethal irradiation was evaluated. Immediately after receiving whole body irradiation and on the next two days, each mouse was injected intraperitoneally with nandrolone decanoate (1.25 mg) in propylene glycol. Irradiated control mice received only propylene glycol. Compared to controls, drug-treated mice showed marked peripheral blood leukocytosis and more stable packed red cell volume. Drug-treated mice also demonstrated increased erythropoiesis, as CFU-e/BFU-e concentrations from both marrow (9% to 581%) and spleen (15% to 797%) were elevated. Granulopoiesis was increased similarly, as CFU-gm concentrations from marrow (38% to 685%) and spleen (9% to 373%) were elevated. These results demonstrate that nandrolone decanoate enhances hematopoietic stem cell recovery after sublethal whole body irradiation. This suggests that following hematopoietic suppression, nandrolone decanoate may stimulate the recovery of hematopoiesis at the stem cell level and in peripheral blood

  7. Effect of whole-body irradiation on wound macrophages and role of phenytoin sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macrophages play an important role in wound healing. The effect of 6 Gy whole-body irradiation on wound macrophages and the role of phenytoin sodium were studied by making an incision on rat dorsum, into which polyvinyl alcohol sponges were implanted. It was found that after irradiation the phagocytic function of wound macrophages, the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) from wound macrophages, as well as the number of macrophages in wound were significantly decreased on days 3, 5 and 8 after wounding. Phenytoin sodium significantly increased the number of wound macrophages, improved the phagocytic function of macrophages and promoted release of TNFα and IL-1 from wound macrophages on days 3, 5 and 8 after wounding, no matter whether rats were irradiated or not. The results indicated that the important mechanism of impairing wound healing by whole-body irradiation was that the number and function of wound macrophages were decreased in early stage of wound healing. The role of phenytoin sodium in wound healing was increasing the number of wound macrophages and improving their function

  8. Total body irradiation and syngeneic marrow transplantation in an inbred rat model of acute myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) occurs rarely in laboratory animals, over 20 model systems have been reported. One of these, AML of the inbred Wistar/Furth rat, has been shown to be pathophysiologically similar to human AML. Ten days after intravenous inoculation of 1.0 x 106 cells of a tissue culture grown clonal line, rats demonstrated peripheral blood leukemia, replacement of greater than 90% of the bone marrow with distinctive malignant myeloblasts and a syndrome of hypermuramidase (lysozyme) emia and muramidasuria. Total body irradiation (TBI) at 10 days after leukemia cell passage with a marrow lethal dose (950 rad, 140 rad/min, 137Cs source, 663 kV) followed by intravenous inoculation of 5.0 x 108/kg viable syngeneic bone marrow cells produced transient complete remissions. Repopulation with transplanted marrow was detected along with increasing numbers of recognizable W/Fu AML cells in peripheral blood, marrow, and central nervous system. The delayed leukemia relapse in irradiated transplanted rats compared to irradiated non-transplanted controls suggests an interaction between surviving W/Fu AML cells and transplanted marrow. This model may be of value in studies designing a therapeutic interaction against AML by donor marrow in the chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and total body irradiated patient

  9. Enhancement of committed hematopoietic stem cell colony formation by nandrolone decanoate after sublethal whole body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallicchio, V.S.; Chen, M.G.; Watts, T.D.

    1984-11-01

    The ability of an anabolic steroid, nandrolone decanoate, to increase committed topoietic stem cell (CFU-gm, CFU-e, and BFU-e) colony formation after sublethal irradiation was evaluated. Immediately after receiving whole body irradiation and on the next two days, each mouse was injected intraperitoneally with nandrolone decanoate (1.25 mg) in propylene glycol. Irradiated control mice received only propylene glycol. Compared to controls, drug-treated mice showed marked peripheral blood leukocytosis and more stable packed red cell volume. Drug-treated mice also demonstrated increased erythropoiesis, as CFU-e/BFU-e concentrations from both marrow (9% to 581%) and spleen (15% to 797%) were elevated. Granulopoiesis was increased similarly, as CFU-gm concentrations from marrow (38% to 685%) and spleen (9% to 373%) were elevated. These results demonstrate that nandrolone decanoate enhances hematopoietic stem cell recovery after sublethal whole body irradiation. This suggests that following hematopoietic suppression, nandrolone decanoate may stimulate the recovery of hematopoiesis at the stem cell level and in peripheral blood.

  10. The evolution of recrystallization textures in body centered cubic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model of the evolution of recrystallization textures for b.c.c. metals was suggested based on the ODF and EBSD analysis of the texture change during annealing of cold rolled steel. The model is composed of two principles: first, the maximum principal stress direction in the deformed grain becomes the minimum Young's modulus direction in the recrystallized grain; second, a {110} plane, parallel to the maximum principal stress direction (hence, minimum Young's modulus direction), is taken for variant selection. The current model is successfully applied to describe the evolution of recrystallization textures in various b.c.c. transition metals such as tantalum, molybdenum and tungsten

  11. Protection of hemopoietic tissue in whole-body gamma-irradiated mice by intramuscular cystamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intramuscular administration of cystamine (150 mg/kg) prior to whole-body gamma irradiation with a dose of 8 Gy gave the same or better radioprotection of spleen hemopoiesis in mice as cystamine applied in the same amount intraperitoneally. Therefore the number of endogenous spleen colonies, as well as the incorporation of 59Fe and 125I-iodouridine into the spleen served as criteria of radiation injury. (author)

  12. Technical modifications in hyperfractionated total body irradiation for T-lymphocyte deplete bone marrow transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Medical College of Wisconsin implemented a major bone marrow transplant (BMT) program in July 1985. The type of transplants to be focused on were allogeneic T-lymphocyte deplete. Total body irradiation (TBI) was initially patterned after the Memorial method. Patients received total body irradiation in a sitting position at a dose rate of 20-25 cGy/minute with 50% attenuation lung blocks used both anterior/posterior and posterior/anterior. Electron boosting was utilized for the ribs beneath the lung blocks. Occasionally, lower extremity boosting was required because of the sitting position. A dose of 14 Gy was chosen since T-lymphocyte deplete bone marrow transplant data suggest the need for higher total doses to consistently obtain engraftment. This dose was given in 3 equal daily fractions over 3 days following conditioning chemotherapy. Six of 11 patients treated in this manner developed lethal pulmonary events. In response to the pulmonary toxicity, partial lung shielding was increased to 60% attenuation. In the next 107 patients receiving this program of total body irradiation there was a reduced incidence of fatal pulmonary events (10 cases of fatal idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis and 12 cases of fatal pulmonary infections) after a median follow-up of 9 months. This was an obvious improvement over the initial group. A significant level of hepato-renal toxicity was also observed with 14 Gy total body irradiation when no liver or kidney blocking was used. Of the first 20 patients treated, three cases of fatal veno-occlusive disease resulted. Subsequently, a 10% attenuation right sided liver block was added. Five of 98 patients treated with this block have developed fatal hepatic dysfunction, (median follow-up of 7.2 months)

  13. Total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation in some malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Available data and proper results of high-dose total body irradiation combined with chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation in patients with leukemia and other disseminated malignant diseases are analyzed. It is shown that the therapeutic effect is determined by the total dose, dose per fraction, dose rate, and disease stage. Moderate fractionation is preferable; its efficacy is no leas than that of hyperfractionation, it is convenient for patients, and causes less complications than a single exposure

  14. Half body irradiation of patients with multiple bone metastases: a phase II trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Randi S; Yilmaz, Mette K; Høyer, Morten;

    2009-01-01

    AIM OF STUDY: The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of half-body irradiation (HBI) on pain and quality of life in cancer patients with multiple bone metastases. The secondary aim was to evaluate side effects of the treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 44 patients received...... patients' global quality of life. CONCLUSION: Single fraction HBI is safe and effective providing long lasting pain reduction in 76% of patients with multiple bone metastases....

  15. Mechanisms of taurine hyperexcretion after whole-body irradiation of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanisms of postirradiation hyperexcretion of taurine with urine have been investigated. In the course of three days after a whole-body exposure of rats (700 rads), the excretion of taurine increases. The experiments in vitro have demonstrated that taurine synthesis decreases in the thymus and liver of irradiated animals. The experiments conducted have shown that the postirradiation hyperexcretion of taurine is partly due to its release from the lymohoid tissue (thymus)

  16. An Acute Transverse Myelitis Attack after Total Body Irradiation: A Rare Case

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Unal; Bulent Eser; Mustafa Cetin; Cigdem Pala; Serife Cingoz; Celalettin Eroglu; Serdar Sivgin; Leylagul Kaynar; Afra Yildirim; Muzaffer Keklik

    2013-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) combined with chemotherapy is widely used as a pretreatment regimen of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in hematologic disorders. Late complications related to TBI as part of the conditioning regimen for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have been revealed. Acute transverse myelitis (ATM) is a neurological syndrome characterized by disorder of motor, sensorial, and autonomic nerves, and tracts at medulla spinalis, which is resulted from involvement of spina...

  17. Ordered compounds under irradiation: dynamical equilibrium phase diagrams and microstructural evolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffusion in an ordered alloy under irradiation is modelled on a rigid lattice with two atomic exchange mechanisms acting in parallel: thermally activated and forced jumps. Two descriptions are proposed and applied to the A2-B2 disorder-order transition in bcc compounds: a deterministic kinetic method in the Bragg-Williams approximation and Monte Carlo simulations. Dynamical equilibrium phase diagrams under irradiation are built; microstructural evolutions are studied: a new mechanism for irradiation induced elimination of antiphase boundaries is identified as well as the various dissolution modes of ordered precipitates. The shift from second to first order of the A2-B2 transition, predicted by the model, has been experimentally checked by 1 MeV electron irradiations of a FeAl alloy. 60 figs., 135 refs

  18. A multiscale approach to defect evolution in tungsten under helium irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles, G.; Cazalilla, A. L.; Gonzalez, C.; Martin-Bragado, I.; Prada, A.; Iglesias, R.; Perlado, J. M.; Rivera, A.

    2015-06-01

    We have studied He irradiation in tungsten from a multiscale point of view: Density Functional Theory (DFT) to obtain the binding energies of He to vacancy clusters, Binary Collision Approximation (BCA) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) to produce defect cascades and Object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) to study their evolution in larger temporal and spatial scales. A comparison between BCA and MD cascades produced by PKA at different energies has been done at different temperatures: at high temperature and at high PKA energies the OKMC results clearly depend on the defect cascades. 625 keV pulsed He ion irradiation has been simulated with cascades obtained by means of BCA and MD. The results show that in the case of ion irradiation, BCA results can provide good OKMC results. However, in the case of neutron irradiation producing high energy PKAs, BCA cascades clearly overestimate the number of FPs, which may have a strong influence on the OKMC results.

  19. Body size evolution in insular speckled rattlesnakes (Viperidae: Crotalus mitchellii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse M Meik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Speckled rattlesnakes (Crotalus mitchellii inhabit multiple islands off the coast of Baja California, Mexico. Two of the 14 known insular populations have been recognized as subspecies based primarily on body size divergence from putative mainland ancestral populations; however, a survey of body size variation from other islands occupied by these snakes has not been previously reported. We examined body size variation between island and mainland speckled rattlesnakes, and the relationship between body size and various island physical variables among 12 island populations. We also examined relative head size among giant, dwarfed, and mainland speckled rattlesnakes to determine whether allometric differences conformed to predictions of gape size (and indirectly body size evolving in response to shifts in prey size. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Insular speckled rattlesnakes show considerable variation in body size when compared to mainland source subspecies. In addition to previously known instances of gigantism on Angel de la Guarda and dwarfism on El Muerto, various degrees of body size decrease have occurred frequently in this taxon, with dwarfed rattlesnakes occurring mostly on small, recently isolated, land-bridge islands. Regression models using the Akaike information criterion (AIC showed that mean SVL of insular populations was most strongly correlated with island area, suggesting the influence of selection for different body size optima for islands of different size. Allometric differences in head size of giant and dwarf rattlesnakes revealed patterns consistent with shifts to larger and smaller prey, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provide the first example of a clear relationship between body size and island area in a squamate reptile species; among vertebrates this pattern has been previously documented in few insular mammals. This finding suggests that selection for body size is influenced by changes in

  20. Eight years of whole body irradiation at Verone: clinical and physical experience in 115 patients (june 2000-december 2008); Huit ans d'irradiation corporelle totale a verone: experience clinique et physique chez 115 patients (juin 2000-decembre 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palazzi, M.; Benedetti, F.; Romano, M.; Maluta, S.; Compri, C.; Giri, M.G.; Meliado, G. [Azienda Ospedaliera, Verona (Italy)

    2009-10-15

    The multi fractionated whole-body irradiation has today replaced the technique of whole-body irradiation in single dose, that was at the origin of acute and delayed effects, especially pneumonia and cataract. The results and the tolerance of our whole-body irradiation pattern are similar to these ones mentioned in the national register of allogeneic marrow transplants. (N.C.)

  1. Late effects on gonadal function of cyclophosphamide, total-body irradiation, and marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred thirty-seven patients had gonadal function evaluated 1-11 years after marrow transplantation. All 15 women less than age 26 and three of nine older than age 26 who were treated with 200 mg/kg cyclophosphamide recovered normal gonadotropin levels and menstruation. Five have had five pregnancies resulting in three live births, one spontaneous abortion, and one elective abortion. Three of 38 women who were prepared with 120 mg/kg cyclophosphamide and 920-1200 rad total-body irradiation had normal gonadotropin levels and menstruation. Two had pregnancies resulting in one spontaneous and one elective abortion. Of 31 men prepared with 200 mg/kg cyclophosphamide, 30 had normal luteinizing hormone levels, 20 had normal follicle-stimulating hormone levels, and 10 of 15 had spermatogenesis. Four have fathered five normal children. Thirty-six of 41 men prepared with 120 mg/kg cyclophosphamide and 920-1750 rad total-body irradiation had normal luteinizing hormone levels, ten had normal follicle-stimulating hormone levels, and 2 of 32 studied had spermatogenesis. One has fathered two normal children. It was concluded that cyclophosphamide does not prevent return of normal gonadal function in younger women and in most men. Total-body irradiation prevents return of normal gonadal function in the majority of patients

  2. Design considerations for a neutron generator-based total-body irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prompt- and delayed-gamma neutron activation techniques have been used for the non-invasive measurement of human body composition. In recent years, neutron irradiators have used only transuranic isotopic sources (238PuBe, 241AmBe, 252Cf). However, in today's security-minded environment, the use of alternate neutron sources may provide some advantages. Several designs for an irradiator that would use a high-output, miniature D-T neutron generator (MF Physics) have been examined. The use of this type of neutron source will lessen the storage, security, and transport issues associated with continuous-output isotopic neutron sources. To determine the scientific impact of this decision, Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP-4B2; Los Alamos National Laboratory) has been performed to aid in the design of the irradiator system, evaluating shielding materials, collimation, and source-to-subject distance, for the measurement of total body nitrogen (TBN). Based on internal flux distributions within the simulated body region of a subject, several design options were identified. The final design will be selected based on the optimization of precision, dose, and exposure time. (author)

  3. Anorexia in rats after protracted whole-body irradiation with low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our experiments, carried out hitherto, concerning the effect of incorporated and radioactive substances, weight behaviour and food uptake have proved to be a sensitive test. With regard to these experiments and the half-life of the radionuclides used, it is reported about trial series in Wistar rats. These rats were applied, with Co-60 gamma irradiation, different whole-body doses protracted over 48 hours. A total of 32 groups of experimental animals (20 animals each) was exposed to irradiation doses of lethal, medium lethal, and sublethal ranges, control and pseudo-irradiation series included. The experiments were carried out under observance of constant irradiation and attitude conditions, night and day changes, as conditioned by the season, included. Even in the inferior sublethal range (12 to 24 R), a significant trend of decreased food uptake is registered. This trend remains for a short period after the end of irradiation, but then it returns to normal conditions. Furthermore, a new decrease with subsequent increase seems to become evident - about ten days after termination of the radiotherapy (especially after several hundred R); report about these items will be made later on. (orig.)

  4. Therapeutic application of IL-4 on total body irradiated mice with lethal doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, we determined the consequences of IL-4 treatment on survival hematopoietic recovery as well as acute inflammatory response of irradiated mice. Mice were total body irradiated with lethal doses of γ-rays and treated with IL-4 30 min or 2 h after exposure. Our data show an enhancement of the 30-day survival after 8 Gy irradiation, from 20% for placebo-treated mice to 75% with IL-4. It is generally admitted that the death of animals occurring in this dose range is due to hematopoietic syndrome. Therefore, we determined the efficacy of IL-4 on promoting the recovery of blood cell counts and progenitors in bone marrow. The hematopoietic status of animals is the same whether or not treated with IL-4. Given the anti-inflammatory properties of IL-4, we studied the consequences of IL-4 treatment on the inflammatory response within 24 h after 8 Gy exposure. We have shown that IL-4 treatment led to a limitation of the release of inflammatory mediators, such as IL-1β or KC, in the plasma or tissues of irradiated mice. On the other hand, IL-4 improved the ratio-induced metabolic and functional damages in the central nervous system. In conclusion, our results have shown an enhanced survival of IL-4 treated irradiated mice without improvement of hematopoietic reconstitution. Therapeutic potential of IL-4 could result, at least in part, from the limitation of the radio-induced inflammatory response. (author)

  5. Survival of mice and hematopoietic stem cells in bone marrow after intermittent total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a preparative procedure for bone marrow transplantation, intermittent total body irradiation (TBI) has been used in our hospital. The biological significance of this method, in which the instantaneous dose rate is high but the average dose rate is low, has not been evaluated to date. The hematopoietic responses caused by both intermittent and continuous TBI were compared. In the intermittent irradiation, mice in a moving irradiation chamber were exposed under a small field (2 x 35 cm2), and the instantaneous and average dose rates were 1 Gy/min and 0.25 - 0.12 Gy/min, respectively. The average dose rate was adjusted to the same level in both irradiation methods. LD50/30 and survival of colony-forming units (CFU) in culture and survival of endogenuous CFU in the spleen from female BDF1 mice were the same with the two methods. These results show that the response of hematopoietic stem cells depends on the average dose rate, not on the instantaneous dose rate. Our findings suggest that intermittent irradiation, as well as the continuous method, would be useful for preparing patients before bone marrow transplantation. (author)

  6. Kidney and lung injury in irradiated rats protected from acute death by partial-body shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninety-six CD-1 male rats were exposed to gamma-ray doses (0-25 Gy) in increments of 5 Gy. One femur, the surgically exteriorized GI tract, and the oral cavity were shielded during irradiation to protect against acute mortality from injury to the hematopoietic system, small intestine, and oral cavity. In addition, the thoraxes of half of the animals from each dose group were shielded. At approximately monthly intervals from 2 to 10 months after irradiation the hematocrit, plasma urea nitrogen (PUN), and 51Cr-EDTA clearance were measured. During the study 20 thorax-shielded and 19 thorax-irradiated animals died. All rats whose thoraxes received 25 Gy irradiation and three out of seven rats whose thoraxes received 20 Gy died 1 to 3 months postirradiation with massive pleural fluid accumulation. Shielding the thoraxes prevented this mode of death at these doses. Kidney injury was judged to be the primary cause of death of all thorax-shielded animals and 15- and 20-Gy thorax-irradiated animals. Animals with kidney damage had elevated PUN and reduced 51Cr-EDTA clearance and hematocrits. The relative merits of each of these end points in assessing radiation-induced kidney injury after total-body exposure are discussed

  7. Effects of supralethal total body irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution upon immunologic memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transplantation of bone marrow from prospectively selected genotypically and pedigree DLA-identical donors into supralethally irradiated littermate and nonlittermate recipients within the Copperstown beagle colony has regularly resulted in the establishment of long-term chimerism, with no evidence of graft-versus-host disease in the recipients. It has been demonstrated that irradiated recipients exhibit significant decreases in their ability to muster primary immunological responses during the first months after reconstitution with bone marrow. Beyond the documented capacity of preirradiation blood transfusions to interfere with subsequent engraftment of allogeneic marrow, however, there have been no systematic studies of the possible effects of irradiation and bone marrow transplantation upon immunologic memory. The present study was designed in order to assess this question in greater detail, with particular regard to the effects of irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution upon host sensitization to skin allografts. The results indicate that, within the experimental limitations described, the state of sensitivity produced by first set skin allograft rejection is not affected significantly by supralethal total body irradiation and reconstitution of the recipient with allogeneic bone marrow

  8. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity After Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, Zhiguo [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chao, Nelson J. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Benny J., E-mail: chen0032@mc.duke.edu [Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for 5 consecutive days starting within 1 hour after exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied by use of an in vitro culture system. Results: IGF-1 protected 8 of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation, whereas only 2 of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for 5 days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed as long as 6 hours after irradiation. In comparison with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red blood cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 after irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of nonirradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conclusions: IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  9. Microstructural evolution of P92 ferritic/martensitic steel under argon ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microstructural evolution of P92 ferritic/martensitic steel irradiated by Ar+ ion beams at doses from 0.6 to 230 displacements per atom (dpa) at room temperature was investigated with conventional transmission electron microscope technique. Selected-area electron diffraction combined with bright-field and dark-field contrast image indicated that carbide/matrix interfaces were more easily damaged. The carbide peripheries became partly amorphous at irradiation dose of 2.3 dpa and were almost complete amorphous at the dose of 11.5 dpa. The small carbides would re-precipitate in matrices at 34.5 dpa. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis revealed that segregation of Cr and W and depletion of Fe in carbides occurred under irradiation. With the irradiation dose increasing, the irradiation induced segregation and depletion became more severe, which would influence mechanical properties of the steel. - Research Highlights: → Carbide/matrix interfaces in P92 ferritic/martensitic steel were easily damaged. → Small carbides re-precipitated in matrices after higher dose irradiation. → Segregation of Cr and W and depletion of Fe in carbides occurred after irradiation.

  10. The evolution of island gigantism and body size variation in tortoises and turtles

    OpenAIRE

    Jaffe, Alexander L.; Slater, Graham J.; Alfaro, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Extant chelonians (turtles and tortoises) span almost four orders of magnitude of body size, including the startling examples of gigantism seen in the tortoises of the Galapagos and Seychelles islands. However, the evolutionary determinants of size diversity in chelonians are poorly understood. We present a comparative analysis of body size evolution in turtles and tortoises within a phylogenetic framework. Our results reveal a pronounced relationship between habitat and optimal body size in ...

  11. Effective evolution equations from many-body quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systems of interest in physics often consist of a very large number of interacting particles. In certain physical regimes, effective non-linear evolution equations are commonly used as an approximation for making predictions about the time-evolution of such systems. Important examples are Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute Bose gases and degenerate Fermi gases. While the effective equations are well-known in physics, a rigorous justification is very difficult. However, a rigorous derivation is essential to precisely understand the range and the limits of validity and the quality of the approximation. In this thesis, we prove that the time evolution of Bose-Einstein condensates in the Gross-Pitaevskii regime can be approximated by the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation, a cubic non-linear Schroedinger equation. We then turn to fermionic systems and prove that the evolution of a degenerate Fermi gas can be approximated by the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation (TDHF) under certain assumptions on the semiclassical structure of the initial data. Finally, we extend the latter result to fermions with relativistic kinetic energy. All our results provide explicit bounds on the error as the number of particles becomes large. A crucial methodical insight on bosonic systems is that correlations can be modeled by Bogolyubov transformations. We construct initial data appropriate for the Gross-Pitaevskii regime using a Bogolyubov transformation acting on a coherent state, which amounts to studying squeezed coherent states. As a crucial insight for fermionic systems, we point out a semiclassical structure in states close to the ground state of fermions in a trap. As a convenient language for studying the dynamics of fermionic systems, we use particle-hole transformations.

  12. On the evolution of the steady state in gold-silica nanocomposites under sustained irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, T. H. Y.; Ramjauny, Y.; Hayoun, M.; Rizza, G.; Perruchas, S.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the kinetic evolution of a nanocomposite submitted to sustained irradiation. The study focuses on gold nanoparticles embedded within a silica host matrix. Irradiations with 4 MeV Au ++ ions are performed in the temperature range from 300 K to 1100 K and for fluences up to 8 × 1016 cm-2. The experimental results are combined with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to fully characterize the kinetic evolution of the nanoparticles under irradiation. In particular, the change of the steady state with the temperature is investigated in details. First, we demonstrate the existence of a direct-coarsening regime at high temperature, e.g., above 900 K, and of a coarsening-resistant regime at low temperature, e.g., below 700 K. Second, we show that the transition between these two regimes takes place in a temperature region, where the nucleation of new nanoparticles is hindered, and the mass is redistributed among the existing nanoparticles. We also use our experimental results to critically analyze the existing theoretical models. As it has recently been pointed out that the physical principles underlying precipitation under irradiation are similar to those that govern the behavior of driven alloys, this work can be considered as an attempt to bridge the gap between two fields of experimental and theoretical studies, viz., those on driven alloys and those on metal-glass nanocomposites submitted to a sustained irradiation.

  13. Study of the lattice parameter evolution of PWR irradiated MOX fuel by X-Ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel irradiation leads to a swelling resulting from the formation of gaseous (Kr, Xe) or solid fission products which are found either in solution or as solid inclusions in the matrix. This phenomena has to be evaluated to be taken into account in fuel cladding Interaction. Fuel swelling was studied as a function of burn up by measuring the corresponding cell constant evolution by X-Ray diffraction. This study was realized on Mixed Oxide Fuels (MOX) irradiated in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) at different burn-up for 3 initial Pu contents. Lattice parameter evolutions were followed as a function of burn-up for the irradiated fuel with and without an annealing thermal treatment. These experimental evolutions are compared to the theoretical evolutions calculated from the hard sphere model, using the fission product concentrations determined by the APPOLO computer code. Contribution of varying parameters influencing the unit cell value is discussed. Thermal treatment effects were checked by metallography, X-Ray diffraction and microprobe analysis. After thermal treatment, no structural change was observed but a decrease of the lattice parameter was measured. This modification results essentially from self-irradiation defect annealing and not from stoichiometry variations. Microprobe analysis showed that about 15% of the formed Molybdenum is in solid solution In the oxide matrix. Micrographs showed the existence of Pu packs in the oxide matrix which induces a broadening of diffraction lines. The RIETVELD method used to analyze the X-Ray patterns did not allow to characterize independently the Pu packs and the oxide matrix lattice parameters. Nevertheless, with this method, the presence of micro-strains in the irradiated nuclear fuel could be confirmed. (author)

  14. Dietary protein content affects evolution for body size, body fat and viability in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Torsten N; Overgaard, Johannes; Loeschcke, Volker;

    2011-01-01

    The ability to use different food sources is likely to be under strong selection if organisms are faced with natural variation in macro-nutrient (protein, carbohydrate and lipid) availabilities. Here, we use experimental evolution to study how variable dietary protein content affects adult body...... composition and developmental success in Drosophila melanogaster. We reared flies on either a standard diet or a protein-enriched diet for 17 generations before testing them on both diet types. Flies from lines selected on protein-rich diet produced phenotypes with higher total body mass and relative lipid...

  15. Layered Model for Radiation-Induced Chemical Evolution of Icy Surface Composition on Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Hill, Matthew E.; Richardson, John D.; Sturner, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    The diversity of albedos and surface colors on observed Kuiper Belt and Inner Oort Cloud objects remains to be explained in terms of competition between primordial intrinsic versus exogenic drivers of surface and near-surface evolution. Earlier models have attempted without success to attribute this diversity to the relations between surface radiolysis from cosmic ray irradiation and gardening by meteoritic impacts. A more flexible approach considers the different depth-dependent radiation profiles produced by low-energy plasma, suprathermal, and maximally penetrating charged particles of the heliospheric and local interstellar radiation environments. Generally red objects of the dynamically cold (low inclination, circular orbit) Classical Kuiper Belt might be accounted for from erosive effects of plasma ions and reddening effects of high energy cosmic ray ions, while suprathermal keV-MeV ions could alternatively produce more color neutral surfaces. The deepest layer of more pristine ice can be brought to the surface from meter to kilometer depths by larger impact events and potentially by cryovolcanic activity. The bright surfaces of some larger objects, e.g. Eris, suggest ongoing resurfacing activity. Interactions of surface irradiation, resultant chemical oxidation, and near-surface cryogenic fluid reservoirs have been proposed to account for Enceladus cryovolcanism and may have further applications to other icy irradiated bodies. The diversity of causative processes must be understood to account for observationally apparent diversities of the object surfaces.

  16. Short-term endocrine consequences of total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation in children treated for leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied 24-h hormone profiles and hormonal responses to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia prospectively in 23 children of similar age and pubertal stage, nine of whom had received prior cranial irradiation and fourteen of whom had not before and 6-12 months after total body irradiation (TBI) for bone marrow transportation in leukaemia. (Author)

  17. Effect of whole-body irradiation on Michaelis-Menten constants of microsomal enzyme systems of rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of whole-body irradiation on Michaelis-Menten constants of the NADPH cytochrome P-450 reductase (EC1.6.2.3.), the oxidative demethylation of ethylmorphine and glucose 6-phosphatase (EC3.1.3.9.), have been studied at 1, 4 and 7 days after irradiation. (Auth.)

  18. Big cat, small cat: reconstructing body size evolution in living and extinct Felidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, A R; Randau, M; Head, J; Hutchinson, J R; Pierce, S E; Goswami, A

    2015-08-01

    The evolution of body mass is a fundamental topic in evolutionary biology, because it is closely linked to manifold life history and ecological traits and is readily estimable for many extinct taxa. In this study, we examine patterns of body mass evolution in Felidae (Placentalia, Carnivora) to assess the effects of phylogeny, mode of evolution, and the relationship between body mass and prey choice in this charismatic mammalian clade. Our data set includes 39 extant and 26 extinct taxa, with published body mass data supplemented by estimates based on condylobasal length. These data were run through 'SURFACE' and 'bayou' to test for patterns of body mass evolution and convergence between taxa. Body masses of felids are significantly different among prey choice groupings (small, mixed and large). We find that body mass evolution in cats is strongly influenced by phylogeny, but different patterns emerged depending on inclusion of extinct taxa and assumptions about branch lengths. A single Ornstein-Uhlenbeck optimum best explains the distribution of body masses when first-occurrence data were used for the fossil taxa. However, when mean occurrence dates or last known occurrence dates were used, two selective optima for felid body mass were recovered in most analyses: a small optimum around 5 kg and a large one around 100 kg. Across living and extinct cats, we infer repeated evolutionary convergences towards both of these optima, but, likely due to biased extinction of large taxa, our results shift to supporting a Brownian motion model when only extant taxa are included in analyses. PMID:26075837

  19. Microstructural evolution of RPV steels under proton and ion irradiation studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J.; Wu, Y. C.; Liu, X. B.; Wang, R. S.; Nagai, Y.; Inoue, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Toyama, T.

    2015-03-01

    The microstructural evolution of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels induced by proton and heavy ion irradiation at low temperature (∼373 K) has been investigated using positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), atom probe tomography (APT), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nanoindentation. The PAS results indicated that both proton and heavy ion irradiation produce a large number of matrix defects, which contain small-size defects such as vacancies, vacancy-solute complexes, dislocation loops, and large-size vacancy clusters. In proton irradiated RPV steels, the size and number density of vacancy cluster defects increased rapidly with increasing dose due to the migration and agglomeration of vacancies. In contrast, for Fe ion irradiated steels, high density, larger size vacancy clusters can be easily induced at low dose, showing saturation in PAS response with increasing dose. No clear precipitates, solute-enriched clusters or other forms of solute segregation were observed by APT. Furthermore, dislocation loops were observed by TEM after 1.0 dpa, 240 keV proton irradiation, and an increase of the average nanoindentation hardness was found. It is suggested that ion irradiation produces many point defects and vacancy cluster defects, which induce the formation of dislocation loops and the increase of nanoindentation hardness.

  20. The content of mouse bone marrow and hepatic metallothioneins and human lymphocyte metallothioneins after whole-body γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increase in the content of bone marrow and hepatic metallothioneins (MT) in mice with the maximum at 30 hr after whole-body γ-irradiation was shown. The MT level in that tissues at that time correlated with the exposure dose. The MT content in lymphocytes of patient with acute lympholeucosis was increased after fractionated whole-body irradiation, that index also correlated with accumulated exposure dose

  1. Mitochondrial DNA alterations of peripheral lymphocytes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients undergoing total body irradiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations, including mtDNA copy number and mtDNA 4977 bp common deletion (CD), are key indicators of irradiation-induced damage. The relationship between total body irradiation (TBI) treatment and mtDNA alterations in vivo, however, has not been postulated yet. The aim of this study is to analyze mtDNA alterations in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients as well as to take them as predictors for radiation toxicity. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated from 26 ALL patients 24 hours after TBI preconditioning (4.5 and 9 Gy, respectively). Extracted DNA was analyzed by real-time PCR method. Average 2.31 times mtDNA and 0.53 fold CD levels were observed after 4.5 Gy exposure compared to their basal levels. 9 Gy TBI produced a greater response of both mtDNA and CD levels than 4.5 Gy. Significant inverse correlation was found between mtDNA content and CD level at 4.5 and 9 Gy (P = 0.037 and 0.048). Moreover, mtDNA content of lymphocytes without irradiation was found to be correlated to age. mtDNA and CD content may be considered as predictive factors to radiation toxicity

  2. Mitochondrial DNA alterations of peripheral lymphocytes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients undergoing total body irradiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Fuyun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA alterations, including mtDNA copy number and mtDNA 4977 bp common deletion (CD, are key indicators of irradiation-induced damage. The relationship between total body irradiation (TBI treatment and mtDNA alterations in vivo, however, has not been postulated yet. The aim of this study is to analyze mtDNA alterations in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients as well as to take them as predictors for radiation toxicity. Methods Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated from 26 ALL patients 24 hours after TBI preconditioning (4.5 and 9 Gy, respectively. Extracted DNA was analyzed by real-time PCR method. Results Average 2.31 times mtDNA and 0.53 fold CD levels were observed after 4.5 Gy exposure compared to their basal levels. 9 Gy TBI produced a greater response of both mtDNA and CD levels than 4.5 Gy. Significant inverse correlation was found between mtDNA content and CD level at 4.5 and 9 Gy (P = 0.037 and 0.048. Moreover, mtDNA content of lymphocytes without irradiation was found to be correlated to age. Conclusions mtDNA and CD content may be considered as predictive factors to radiation toxicity.

  3. Alterations in tissue lipids of rats subjected to whole-body X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole-body irradiation of rats at sublethal doses leads to hepatic lipid accumulation which reaches a maximum by the sixth day; this effect on lipid metabolism does not appear to be due to accompanying inanition but due to irradiation per se. The female rats show a greater and more consistent increase in liver lipids than males and this better response of the females is not abolished by prolonged administration of testosterone to these animals. An accumulation of triglycerides accounts for almost all the increases in total liver lipids, although smaller elevations in the levels of free fatty acids and cholesterol are also seen. Free fatty acids of liver show a marked decrease on the second day following irradiation. Serum lipids do not show any appreciable changes while adipose lipids progressively decrease reaching a minimum by the sixth day. Although an insufficiency of ATP may be responsible for lipid accumulation in the irradiated rat as in the case in rats treated with ethionine or orotic acid, adenine administration, which prevents fatty infiltration due to these chemical agents, does not protect against the radiation-induced increase in liver triglycerides. (orig.)

  4. Ciliary body and choroidal melanomas treated by proton beam irradiation. Histopathologic study of eyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton beam irradiation resulted in clinical and/or histopathological regression of large ciliary body and choroidal melanomas in three eyes. Enucleations were performed 6 1/2 weeks, five months, and 11 months after irradiation for angle-closure glaucoma from total retinal detachment, increase in retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma, respectively. A direct relationship was found between the length of the interval from irradiation to enucleation and the degree of histologic changes. Vascular changes in the tumors included endothelial cell swelling and decreased lumen size, basement membrane thickening, collapse of sinusoidal vessels, and thrombosis of vessels. Although apparently unaltered tumor cells remained, degenerative changes occurred in some melanoma cells, including lipid vacuoles in cytoplasm, pyknotic nuclei, and balloon cell formation. Patchy areas of necrosis and proteinaceous exudate were present. Pigment-laden macrophages were found near tumor vessels and all had a substantial chronic inflammatory infiltrate. The effect of proton beam irradiation on tumor vessels probably plays an important role in uveal melanoma regression

  5. Inferences from other bodies for the earth's composition and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaula, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    Properties of the earth are considered in the light of the earth's presumed status as an end member of the class of predominantly silicate solar system bodies. Bulk composition data for the inner planets are presented and processes which may account for compositional variations are discussed. Problems posed by Viking findings on Mars and Pioneer findings on Venus are mentioned. Prominent evolutionary patterns of the inner planets are discussed, including the inverse correlation of lithospheric and crustal thickness with planetary size, and the thermotectonics of Venus, Mars, and earth are compared.

  6. Early biochemical changes in rat lungs following whole-body exposure to external ionizing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some biochemical and cytological parameters were followed up in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and in lung homogenate from albino rats, exposed to single whole-body ionizing irradiation with 4, 8, and 15 Gy. Infectious complications were ruled out by addition of 2 g/l tetracycline in the drinking water before and after irradiation. Dose-dependent increase in the number of cells and lactatedehydrogenase and acid phosphate activities in the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid was observed on the first day and a tendency toward decrease in the period between the 5th and 15th day. These parameters are of the definite value as early diagnostic tests in radiation lung injury. These is evidence of inhibition of the antioxidative protective system in this organ - a dose-dependent decrease in the enzymatic activities of superoxyde dismutase and glucose-6-phosphatedehydrogenase and in the content of nonprotein sulfhydryl groups in the pulmonary homogenate

  7. Craniomandibular dysfunction in children treated with total-body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlloef, G.; Krekmanova, L.; Kopp, S.; Borgstroem, B.; Forsberg, C.M.; Ringden, O. (Huddinge Univ. Hospital (Sweden))

    1994-01-01

    The prevalence of pain and dysfunction in the stomatognathic system was studied in a group of 19 long-term survivors after pediatric bone marrow transplantation (BMT), conditioned with total-body irradiation (TBI). Compared with the control group, the children and adolescents in the BMT group had a significantly reduced mouth opening capacity. A reduced translation movement of the condyles was diagnosed in 53% of children treated with TBI, compared with 5% in the control group. Signs of craniomandibular dysfunction were found in 84% of children in the BMT group, compared with 58% in the control group. Both irradiation and chemotherapy induce long-term alterations in connective and muscle tissues resulting in inflammation and eventually fibrosis. These changes in tissue homeostasis and concomitant growth retardation may lead to the observed malocclusion and reduced mobility of the temporomandibular joint, with subsequent muscle pain and headaches, which were found in this study. 29 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  8. Studies on the effects of whole-body gamma irradiation on chickens infected with Eimeria tenella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole-body exposure of one- and three-week-old White Leghorn cockerels to 600 R gamma radiation (Cesium-137) 24 hours before oral inoculation with 500, 2500, 5000, or 50,000 Eimeria tenella oocysts produced a pattern of mortality differing markedly from nonirradiated, infected (NRI) control birds. When oocyst dosage was held constant (2500) and radiation exposure increased (250, 450, 600, 800, or 1000 R) a gradual increase in mortality rate with higher radiation dosages was observed among both one- and three-week-old birds. Birds irradiated 24 hours or more before inoculation were less able to survive infection than were those irradiated one hour before and one, two, three, or four days after inoculation. (U.S.)

  9. Effect of whole-body irradiation by fast neutrons on mouse tissues. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Male Swiss albino mice were exposed to whole-body irradiation by fast neutrons of 14 MeV average energy. Two single doses of 7 or 14 rem were used, corresponding to a fluence of 1.27x108 and 2.54x108 n/cm2, respectively. Two enzymes were assessed in testicular tissue, acid phosphatase activity to measure the changes in lysosomal function and succinic dehydrogenase activity to test mitochondrial functions and energy production. Lysosomal affection was revealed by statistically significant increase of ACP activity in all cell types of testicular tissue with either of the two doses used. Although SDH was characterised by relatively low activity in most of the testicular tissues, decrease in enzyme activity was clear. Complete absence of activity was sometimes noted. The magnitude of response was dose dependent and there was a tendency to return to pre-irradiation levels of both enzymes with time. (orig.)

  10. Elucidation of aspects of murine skeletal muscle regeneration using local and whole body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the role of proliferating local and emigrating circulatory leucocytes in skeletal muscle regeneration in mice, their bone marrow was ablated with whole body irradiation and compared with the effects of local irradiation. Results indicate that (1) the sealing of damaged myofibres is a function of local cells and not dependent on the presence of infiltrating leucocytes; (2) the formation of sarcoplasmic projections at the ends of damaged myofibres is dependent on leucocyte infiltration; (3) nuclei in the sarcoplasmic projections are probably derived from fusion of muscle precursor cells; (4) most muscle precursor cells in vivo replicate at least once before fusion; and (5) both replication and fusion of muscle precursors can occur in the absence of infiltrating leucocytes. (author)

  11. The influence on rabbit platelet aggregation following γ ray whole-body-irradiation with 400 rads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, using the method of turbidmetric technique, changes of rabbit platelet aggregation are observed following γ ray whole-body irradiation with 400 rads. The results indicated that the function of blood platelet aggregation was risen from the first to the fifth day after irradiation, but reduced at the seventh day and markedly at the tenth. It is believed that the early elevation of platelet aggregation may result in increase of adherence and coagulation, and enhance microcirculation disturbances. In addition, a large number of platelets and coagulation factors were consumed, and it might be one of the causes of hemorrhage syndrome after exposure. Dueing early therapy of radiation injury, therefore, it is of benefit for improving the repair of radiation injury to inhibit platelet aggregation

  12. Evolution of the macroscopic properties of two epoxy resins during ageing under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the thermomechanical properties of two epoxy resins (DGEBA/TETA and DGEBA/DDM systems) are analysed as a function of the irradiation dose. The maximum conversion and reticulation is obtained by post-curing treatment. Irradiation by electrons results in a decrease of the glass transition temperature and of the elastic modulus in the rubbery region. These results can be interpreted invoking a destruction of the crosslinks and chains breaks within the resin. The Arrhenius diagrams obtained for the various doses shows that the cooperative mobility associated with the α relaxation becomes faster after the irradiation. On the contrary, more local mobility corresponding to the γ relaxation is also modified, but in a lesser extent. The stress-strain curves are also discussed. In uniaxial compression test, the plastic flow stress σp decreases when the irradiation dose increases and this effect can largely be accounted for by a variation of Tg. Post-irradiative effects are studied in inert atmosphere. Reticulation increases when the material is heated to a higher temperature than its Tg. This effect suggest the presence of radical formed during irradiation. For DGEBA/TETA system, glass transition temperature Tg shifts towards lowest temperatures. This shift increases the molecular mobility and enhances the physical ageing process at the ambient temperature. The results are well described by the quasi point defects theory. Direct effect of irradiation and physical ageing evolve with the scale parameter t0. This parameter characterizes the gap (in time and/or temperature) between the principal relaxation and simplest ones. By connecting t0 to the amount of irradiation, it is possible to predict the modifications of the behaviour and to predict these evolutions for various amounts. (author)

  13. In-situ investigation of graphene oxide under UV irradiation: Evolution of work function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Using in-situ Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM to measure surface potential, we investigated the time-dependent work function evolution of solution-processed graphene oxide (GO under ultraviolet (UV irradiation. We found that the work function of GO exposed in UV shows a notable decrease with increasing irradiation time, which is proposed to be attributed to the gradual disappearance of oxygen-containing functional groups in GO during the UV-induced reduction reaction process. Fourier transform infrared spectrum and Raman spectrum were used to confirm the reduction of GO under UV irradiation. Our study would give an insight into understanding the transformation of GO’s electronic structures during the reduction process.

  14. In-situ investigation of graphene oxide under UV irradiation: Evolution of work function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jun; Qi, Xiang; Hao, Guolin; Ren, Long; Zhong, Jianxin, E-mail: jxzhong@xtu.edu.cn [Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Energy Materials and Devices and School of Physics and Optoelectronics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Laboratory for Quantum Engineering and Micro-Nano Energy Technology, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Using in-situ Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) to measure surface potential, we investigated the time-dependent work function evolution of solution-processed graphene oxide (GO) under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. We found that the work function of GO exposed in UV shows a notable decrease with increasing irradiation time, which is proposed to be attributed to the gradual disappearance of oxygen-containing functional groups in GO during the UV-induced reduction reaction process. Fourier transform infrared spectrum and Raman spectrum were used to confirm the reduction of GO under UV irradiation. Our study would give an insight into understanding the transformation of GO’s electronic structures during the reduction process.

  15. In-situ investigation of graphene oxide under UV irradiation: Evolution of work function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using in-situ Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) to measure surface potential, we investigated the time-dependent work function evolution of solution-processed graphene oxide (GO) under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. We found that the work function of GO exposed in UV shows a notable decrease with increasing irradiation time, which is proposed to be attributed to the gradual disappearance of oxygen-containing functional groups in GO during the UV-induced reduction reaction process. Fourier transform infrared spectrum and Raman spectrum were used to confirm the reduction of GO under UV irradiation. Our study would give an insight into understanding the transformation of GO’s electronic structures during the reduction process

  16. The influence of x-ray energy on lung dose uniformity in total-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In this study we examine the influence of x-ray energy on the uniformity of the dose within the lung in total-body irradiation treatments in which partial transmission blocks are used to control the lung dose. Methods and Materials: A solid water phantom with a cork insert to simulate a lung was irradiated by x-rays with energies of either 6, 10, or 18 MV. The source to phantom distance was 3.9 meters. The cork insert was either 10 cm wide or 6 cm wide. Partial transmission blocks with transmission factors of 50% were placed anterior to the cork insert. The blocks were either 8 or 4 cm in width. Kodak XV-2 film was placed in the midline of the phantom to record the dose. Midplane dose profiles were measured with a densitometer. Results: For the 10 cm wide cork insert the uniformity of the dose over 80% of the block width varied from 6.6% for the 6 MV x-rays to 12.2% for the 18 MV x-rays. For the 6 cm wide cork insert the uniformity was comparable for all three x-ray energies, but for 18 MV the central dose increased by 9.4% compared to the 10 cm wide insert. Conclusion: Many factors must be considered in optimizing the dose for total-body irradiation. This study suggests that for AP/PA techniques lung dose uniformity is superior with 6 MV irradiation. The blanket recommendation that the highest x-ray energy be used in TBI is not valid for all situations

  17. Partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals with an industrial X-ray tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenzel, Thorsten; Kruell, Andreas [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Bereich Strahlentherapie; Grohmann, Carsten; Schumacher, Udo [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie und Experimentelle Morphologie

    2014-07-01

    Dedicated precise small laboratory animal irradiation sources are needed for basic cancer research and to meet this need expensive high precision radiation devices have been developed. To avoid such expenses a cost efficient way is presented to construct a device for partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals by adding specific components to an industrial X-ray tube. A custom made radiation field tube was added to an industrial 200 kV X-ray tube. A light field display as well as a monitor ionization chamber were implemented. The field size can rapidly be changed by individual inserts of MCP96 that are used for secondary collimation of the beam. Depth dose curves and cross sectional profiles were determined with the use of a custom made water phantom. More components like positioning lasers, a custom made treatment couch, and a commercial isoflurane anesthesia unit were added to complete the system. With the accessories described secondary small field sizes down to 10 by 10 mm{sup 2} (secondary collimator size) could be achieved. The dosimetry of the beam was constructed like those for conventional stereotactical clinical linear accelerators. The water phantom created showed an accuracy of 1 mm and was well suited for all measurements. With the anesthesia unit attached to the custom made treatment couch the system is ideal for the radiation treatment of small laboratory animals like mice. It was feasible to shrink the field size of an industrial X-ray tube from whole animal irradiation to precise partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals. Even smaller secondary collimator sizes than 10 by 10 mm{sup 2} are feasible with adequate secondary collimator inserts. Our custom made water phantom was well suited for the basic dosimetry of the X-ray tube.

  18. Partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals with an industrial X-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedicated precise small laboratory animal irradiation sources are needed for basic cancer research and to meet this need expensive high precision radiation devices have been developed. To avoid such expenses a cost efficient way is presented to construct a device for partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals by adding specific components to an industrial X-ray tube. A custom made radiation field tube was added to an industrial 200 kV X-ray tube. A light field display as well as a monitor ionization chamber were implemented. The field size can rapidly be changed by individual inserts of MCP96 that are used for secondary collimation of the beam. Depth dose curves and cross sectional profiles were determined with the use of a custom made water phantom. More components like positioning lasers, a custom made treatment couch, and a commercial isoflurane anesthesia unit were added to complete the system. With the accessories described secondary small field sizes down to 10 by 10 mm2 (secondary collimator size) could be achieved. The dosimetry of the beam was constructed like those for conventional stereotactical clinical linear accelerators. The water phantom created showed an accuracy of 1 mm and was well suited for all measurements. With the anesthesia unit attached to the custom made treatment couch the system is ideal for the radiation treatment of small laboratory animals like mice. It was feasible to shrink the field size of an industrial X-ray tube from whole animal irradiation to precise partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals. Even smaller secondary collimator sizes than 10 by 10 mm2 are feasible with adequate secondary collimator inserts. Our custom made water phantom was well suited for the basic dosimetry of the X-ray tube.

  19. Antimutagenic and redox regulatory activities of curcumin in whole body γ - irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the aim of the current study is understanding the redox regulatory activity ( pro- and anti-oxidant properties) and mutagenic burden following whole body -irradiation with special reference to its control by curcumin in mice. the antimutagenic effects of curcumin; diferuloylmethane ( C21 H20 O6) were evaluated in vitro using chromosomal aberration assay in male mice,induced after-exposure to 3 Gy γ-rays that is a known mutagenic and carcinogenic agent, when curcumin was given at a dose of 400 mmol/kg body wt through gastric intubation for 5 following days either before-, after-or both before and after-exposure, the incidence of aberrant cells and aberration types (mostly chromatids, breaks and fragments) reduced with curcumin dosage as compared to irradiated group. the cellular biochemical changes were estimated using liver tissue damage marker enzymes: alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and γ -glutamyl transferase (GGT), pro-oxidant: xanthine oxidase (XO), lipid per oxidative indices: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and hydroperoxide (HP. the non-enzymatic antioxidant : glutathione (GSH) and the enzymatic antioxidants: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). TBARS ,HP,XO and liver marker enzymes were increased significantly , whereas the levels of GSH and the enzymatic antioxidants were significantly depleted in -irradiated groups. curcumin-treatment either before-, after-or both before and after -irradiation has attenuated the liver toxic effects of radiation obvious by reducing the levels of tbars and HP and diminished the increases of the activity of XO and liver marker enzymes. it has also re sued the depletion of the non enzymatic -and the enzymatic-antioxidant status.conclusion:curcumin has anti-oxidant potential against -rays-induced chromosomal mutations and redox imbalance regulatory status

  20. Enhancement of survival and limitation of inflammatory response in total body irradiated mice treated with cytokines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Inflammatory reaction is a classical feature of radiation exposure and radiation pneumonitis is a dose-limiting complication in the treatment of haematological disorders treated with total body irradiation. Vascular injury is often considered to be a primary determinant of tissue dysfunction and is likely responsible for the chronic and progressive nature of delayed radiation injury. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-11) in association with thrombopoietin (TPO) on the 30-day mouse survival as well as on systemic and lung inflammatory response and on microvascular permeability. Mice were total body irradiated with the supra lethal dose of 10 Gy (137Cs). TPO alone allowed the survival of 45% of the mice although 90% of mice treated with IL-4/TPO or IL-11/TPO survived. TPO, alone or in association, significantly decreased the over-production of the chemokine KC observed in the plasma of irradiated mice 10 to 18 days following exposure, with a higher efficacy for TPO when associated with IL-4 or IL-11. No major effect of treatments was seen on the radiation-induced lung endothelial cell activation, as illustrated by the lack of efficacy of the treatment on PECAM-1 and P-Selectin over-expression with immunohistochemistry. However, both combined-cytokine treatment limited the radiation-induced vascular leakage for 70 kD-Dextran across the mesenteric venules measured in irradiated mice four days after exposure. The efficacy of treatment with cytokines on the 30-day survival of mice might result from limitation of endothelial cell damage. In addition cytokine treatment reduced the radiation-induced vascular hyperpermeability which could result in limitation of systemic inflammatory reaction

  1. Defect evolution in single crystalline tungsten following low temperature and low dose neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-03-01

    The tungsten plasma-facing components of fusion reactors will experience an extreme environment including high temperature, intense particle fluxes of gas atoms, high-energy neutron irradiation, and significant cyclic stress loading. Irradiation-induced defect accumulation resulting in severe thermo-mechanical property degradation is expected. For this reason, and because of the lack of relevant fusion neutron sources, the fundamentals of tungsten radiation damage must be understood through coordinated mixed-spectrum fission reactor irradiation experiments and modeling. In this study, high-purity (110) single-crystal tungsten was examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy following low-temperature (∼90 °C) and low-dose (0.006 and 0.03 dpa) mixed-spectrum neutron irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing at 400, 500, 650, 800, 1000, 1150, and 1300 °C. The results provide insights into microstructural and defect evolution, thus identifying the mechanisms of different annealing behavior. Following 1 h annealing, ex situ characterization of vacancy defects using positron lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening was performed. The vacancy cluster size distributions indicated intense vacancy clustering at 400 °C with significant damage recovery around 1000 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening measurements confirm the trend of the vacancy defect evolution, and the S-W plots indicate that only a single type of vacancy cluster is present. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy observations at selected annealing conditions provide supplemental information on dislocation loop populations and visible void formation. This microstructural information is consistent with the measured irradiation-induced hardening at each annealing stage, providing insight into tungsten hardening and embrittlement due to irradiation-induced matrix defects.

  2. Effect of heavy ion irradiation on microstructural evolution in CF8 cast austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Ying; Li, Meimei; Kirk, Marquis A.; Baldo, Peter M.; Lian, Tiangan

    2016-04-01

    The microstructural evolution in ferrite and austenitic in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) CF8, as received or thermally aged at 400 °C for 10,000 h, was followed under TEM with in situ irradiation of 1 MeV Kr ions at 300 and 350 °C to a fluence of 1.9 × 1015 ions/cm2 (∼3 dpa) at the IVEM-Tandem Facility. For the unaged CF8, the irradiation-induced dislocation loops appeared at a much lower dose in the austenite than in the ferrite. At the end dose, the austenite formed a well-developed dislocation network microstructure, while the ferrite exhibited an extended dislocation structure as line segments. Compared to the unaged CF8, the aged specimen appeared to have lower rate of damage accumulation. The rate of microstructural evolution under irradiation in the ferrite was significantly lower in the aged specimen than in the unaged. This difference is attributed to the different initial microstructures in the unaged and aged specimens, which implies that thermal aging and irradiation are not independent but interconnected damage processes.

  3. Dose dependence of the microstructural evolution in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microstructural data on the evolution of the dislocation loop, cavity, and precipitate populations in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels are reviewed in order to estimate the displacement damage levels needed to achieve the 'steady state' condition. The microstructural data can be conveniently divided into two temperature regimes. In the low temperature regime (below about 200 degrees C) the microstructure of austenitic stainless steel is dominated by 'black spot' defect clusters and faulted interstitial dislocation loops. The dose needed to approach saturation of the loop and defect cluster densities is generally on the order of 1 displacement per atom (dpa) in this regime. In the high temperature regime (∼300 to 700 degrees C), cavities, precipitates, loops and network dislocations are all produced during irradiation; doses in excess of 10 dpa are generally required to approach a 'steady state' microstructural condition. Due to complex interactions between the various microstructural components that form during irradiation, a secondary transient regime is typically observed in commercial stainless steels during irradiation at elevated temperatures. This slowly evolving secondary transient may extend to damage levels in excess of 50 dpa in typical 300-series stainless steels, and to >100 dpa in radiation-resistant developmental steels. The detailed evolution of any given microstructural component in the high-temperature regime is sensitive to slight variations in numerous experimental variables, including heat-to-heat composition changes and neutron spectrum

  4. Catecholamine levels in sheep hypothalamus, hypophysis and adrenals following whole-body gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes were studied in the levels of catecholamines and L-DOPA in the control system of the reproduction cycle (hypothalamus, hypophysis) and in the adrenal glands of sheep after whole-body irradiation with 60Co at a total dose of 6.7 Gy for seven days. The output of the radiation source was 0.039 Gy/h. The catecholamines (noradrenaline, dopamine and adrenaline) and L-DOPA were determined after separation from the tissues by the method of spectral fluorometry. After whole-body exposure to gamma radiation, noradrenaline dropped in the hypothalamus in comparison with the control group, most significantly in the rostral (by 74.2%) and caudal (by 40%) parts. A similar drop was also observed in dopamine, the concentrations of which decreased in the rostral hypothalamus by 60%. Adrenaline showed a drop in the hypothalamus, most significant in the caudal region (by 62%). Consequently, the level of the precursor of the synthesis of catecholamines and L-DOPA changed and showed in the studied regions of the hypothalamus significantly lower levels than in the control group. As regards the hypophysis, after irradiation no significant changes in the levels of noradrenaline and adrenaline were recorded, however, dopamine and L-DOPA dropped significantly (P<0.01). The exposure to gamma radiation also causes a decrease in the concentrations of catecholamines and L-DOPA in the adrenal glands of sheep, most significantly in noradrenaline (by 61%). It was thus found that whole-body irradiation of sheep with a dose of 6.7 Gy results in a significant decrease in the level of catecholamines in the hypothalamus, hypophysis and adrenal glands, which is probably in relation to the failure of synthesis and degradation of catecholamines and to the total organism injury

  5. Biological dosimetry after total body irradiation (TBI) for hematologic malignancy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Biological dosimetry based on scoring chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes was compared to physical dosimetry done for total body irradiation (TBI) before bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in patients with hematologic malignancies. Patients and Methods: Fifteen patients undergoing TBI were included in the study. A total dose of 12 Gy in 2.5 days was fractionated into 2 or 3 daily doses of 1.8 Gy delivered by a 18 MV linear accelerator (dose rate: 15.8 cGy · min-1). Blood samples were obtained from patients before irradiation and after the first fraction of 1.8 Gy. A standard dose-effect curve was established by in vitro irradiation of healthy volunteer lymphocytes. Chromosomal aberrations were scored by the conventional cytogenetics (CCG) method for unstable anomalies and by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for stable anomalies. Results: Healthy donor lymphocytes before irradiation yielded 0.1% dicentrics and 0.3% translocations of chromosome 4 (Chr. 4), that is 2.5% for the whole genome. Patients before irradiation had 2% of dicentrics and 1.1% of chromosome 4 translocations. The biologically estimated dose of the 15 patients after exposure to 1.8 Gy was 1.93 Gy (95% CI: 1.85-2.05) according to CCG, and 2.06 Gy (95% CI: 1.75-2.15) by FISH. Conclusion: The dose estimated by biological dosimetry, in this case of homogeneously distributed radiation of TBI, agrees well with the absorbed radiation dose calculated by physical dosimetry

  6. Changes in plasma apolipoproteins following whole-body irradiation in rabbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feliste, R. (INSERM, Toulouse, France); Dousset, N.; Carton, M.; Douste-Blazy, L.

    1981-09-01

    Male New Zealand white rabbits were whole-body-irradiated with a linear electron accelerator at 800 rad (LD/sub 50/ in 30 days). This treatment induced a pronounced hypertriglyceridemia. The apoprotein composition of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL, d < 1.006 g/ml) and high-density lipoproteins (HDL, d = 1.063 - 1.21 g/ml) from irradiated rabbits was studied and compared to those of normal rabbits. Significant changes were observed in both very low density apolipoproteins and high-density apolipoproteins. (1) In the VLDL fraction from irradiated rabbits, there appeared in high proportion two apolipoproteins with electrophoretic mobility in urea/polyacrylamide gels similar to apoA-I and A-II but which were distinctly different in their apparent molecular weights, their isoelectric points, and their amino acid composition from these latter proteins. These proteins had apparent molecular weights of about 10,000. They focused into three bands with pI values of 6.1, 6.4, and 6.6. Their amino acid composition was characterized by a very low content of threonine and serine and a high content of aspartic acid, glycine, alanine, and arginine. In addition, a marked increase of an apolipoprotein with an apparent molecular weight of about 43,000 and with an amino acid composition similar to rat apoA-IV was also observed in rabbit VLDL after irradiation. Apolipoprotein C constituents with slowmobility decreased significantly. (2) The irradiated rabbit HDL apolipoproteins showed an important increase of the proteins with molecular weight 10,000 and isoelectric points 6.1, 6.4, and 6.6. Compared to normal rabbit HDL apolipoproteins, a significant decrease of apoA-IV occurred. These modifications were also observed with lower radiation doses (200 and 400 rad).

  7. Clinical analysis of patients with acute radiation syndrome due to total body irradiation or total lymphatic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the severity of iatrogenic acute radiation syndrome, treatment, hematopoietic recovery and related complications in patients subjected to total body irradiation (TBI) or total lymphatic irradiation (TLI) prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Methods: 100 tumor patients (91 with leukemia and 9 with other tumors), after receiving 500∼1000 cGy (in an average of 738.6 cGy) of TBI or TLI with super high dose chemotherapy as conditioning regimen during the process of hemopoietic stem cell transplantation, developed severe or even extremely severe, mainly bone marrow form acute radiation syndrome. Results: The patients' white blood cell count once dropped to (0∼0.15) x 109/L, platelet count fell to (1∼17) x 109/L, bone marrow was depleted with only a few non-hemopoietic cells and rare hemopoietic cells, and a high risk of complicating with infection and hemorrhage was observed. Treated with a variety of measures including protective isolation, supportive care, administration of growth factors such as GM-CSF or G-CSF, blood component transfusion and effective antibiotics, 92 cases restored their normal hemopoiesis, while 8 cases died of infection or hemorrhage. The clinical course of these patients indicated that a majority of the patients with severe and extremely severe, iatrogenic acute radiation syndrome involving bone marrow could restore their normal hemopoiesis, and hemopoietic stem cell transplantation played an important role in the treatment. Conclusion: Hemopoietic stem cell transplantation and administration of growth factors are very useful for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome

  8. Human evolution in Siberia: from frozen bodies to ancient DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouakaze Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Yakuts contrast strikingly with other populations from Siberia due to their cattle- and horse-breeding economy as well as their Turkic language. On the basis of ethnological and linguistic criteria as well as population genetic studies, it has been assumed that they originated from South Siberian populations. However, many questions regarding the origins of this intriguing population still need to be clarified (e.g. the precise origin of paternal lineages and the admixture rate with indigenous populations. This study attempts to better understand the origins of the Yakuts by performing genetic analyses on 58 mummified frozen bodies dated from the 15th to the 19th century, excavated from Yakutia (Eastern Siberia. Results High quality data were obtained for the autosomal STRs, Y-chromosomal STRs and SNPs and mtDNA due to exceptional sample preservation. A comparison with the same markers on seven museum specimens excavated 3 to 15 years ago showed significant differences in DNA quantity and quality. Direct access to ancient genetic data from these molecular markers combined with the archaeological evidence, demographical studies and comparisons with 166 contemporary individuals from the same location as the frozen bodies helped us to clarify the microevolution of this intriguing population. Conclusion We were able to trace the origins of the male lineages to a small group of horse-riders from the Cis-Baïkal area. Furthermore, mtDNA data showed that intermarriages between the first settlers with Evenks women led to the establishment of genetic characteristics during the 15th century that are still observed today.

  9. An Acute Transverse Myelitis Attack after Total Body Irradiation: A Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Keklik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Total body irradiation (TBI combined with chemotherapy is widely used as a pretreatment regimen of bone marrow transplantation (BMT in hematologic disorders. Late complications related to TBI as part of the conditioning regimen for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have been revealed. Acute transverse myelitis (ATM is a neurological syndrome characterized by disorder of motor, sensorial, and autonomic nerves, and tracts at medulla spinalis, which is resulted from involvement of spinal cord. In this paper, we presented an ATM attack developed after TBI in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL as it is a rarely seen case.

  10. Idiopathic interstitial pneumonia following bone marrow transplantation: the relationship with total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interstitial pneumonia is a frequent and often fatal complication of allogenic bone marrow transplantation. Thirty to 40 percent of such cases are of unknown etiology and have been labelled as cases of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia. Idiopathic cases are more commonly associated with the use of total body irradiation; their occurrence appears to be independent of immunosupression or graft versus host disease. Evidence is presented from the literature suggesting that the development of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia is related to the absolute absorbed dose of radiation to lung. The similarity of idiopathic pneumonia to radiation pneumonitis seen in a different clinical setting is described

  11. Comparison between combination chemotherapy and total body irradiation plus combination chemotherapy in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-nine untreated patients with either lymphocytic or nodular mixed/nodular histiocytic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, stage II-IV, were randomized to treatment with total body irradiation (TBI), 100 rads in 10 fractions over 12 days, plus combination chemotherapy with either cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisone (CVP) or cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine and prednisone (C-MOPP) or to treatment with combination chemotherapy (CVP or C-MOPP) alone. Remission rate and duration were comparable for both treatment groups; thus the use of both treatment modalities ab initio provides no therapeutic advantage

  12. Basal Cell Skin Cancer after Total-Body Irradiation and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Robert W. Mathes; Leisenring, Wendy M; Friedman, Debra L.; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies identified radiation therapy as a key modifier of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) risk in survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In the present analysis, risk of BCC was analyzed in relation to age at transplant, attained age, race, total-body irradiation (TBI), and radiation fractionation in 6,306 patients who received HCT at ages 0–65 years after conditioning regimens with (n = 3870) or without (n = 2436) TBI, and who were followed from 100 days to 36.2 years aft...

  13. Total body irradiation with volumetric modulated arc therapy: Dosimetric data and first clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To implement total body irradiation (TBI) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). We applied the Varian RapidArc™ software to calculate and optimize the dose distribution. Emphasis was placed on applying a homogenous dose to the PTV and on reducing the dose to the lungs. From July 2013 to July 2014 seven patients with leukaemia were planned and treated with a VMAT-based TBI-technique with photon energy of 6 MV. The overall planning target volume (PTV), comprising the whole body, had to be split into 8 segments with a subsequent multi-isocentric planning. In a first step a dose optimization of each single segment was performed. In a second step all these elements were calculated in one overall dose-plan, considering particular constraints and weighting factors, to achieve the final total body dose distribution. The quality assurance comprised the verification of the irradiation plans via ArcCheck™ (Sun Nuclear), followed by in vivo dosimetry via dosimeters (MOSFETs) on the patient. The time requirements for treatment planning were high: contouring took 5–6 h, optimization and dose calculation 25–30 h and quality assurance 6–8 h. The couch-time per fraction was 2 h on day one, decreasing to around 1.5 h for the following fractions, including patient information, time for arc positioning, patient positioning verification, mounting of the MOSFETs and irradiation. The mean lung dose was decreased to at least 80 % of the planned total body dose and in the central parts to 50 %. In two cases we additionally pursued a dose reduction of 30 to 50 % in a pre-irradiated brain and in renal insufficiency. All high dose areas were outside the lungs and other OARs. The planned dose was in line with the measured dose via MOSFETs: in the axilla the mean difference between calculated and measured dose was 3.6 % (range 1.1–6.8 %), and for the wrist/hip-inguinal region it was 4.3 % (range 1.1–8.1 %). TBI with VMAT provides the benefit of satisfactory dose

  14. Irradiation induced growth and microstructure evolution of Zr-1.2Sn-1Nb-0.4Fe under neutron irradiation to high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconium alloy components subjected to long-term operation and high doses in thermal reactors need to be highly irradiation resistant to provide integrity of components, primarily, their geometrical sizes. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis used to investigate thin foils and extraction replicas of irradiated zirconium, Zr-1Nb (E110) and Zr-1.2Sn-1Nb-0.4Fe (E635) alloys allowed one to analyze the evolution of their microstructure under neutron irradiation. The experimental irradiations that were conducted at 350 C to 1027 n/m2 (E ≥ 0.1 MeV) show that the most irradiation resistant alloy proved to be a multicomponent E635 alloy. It is not essentially subject to growth. Dislocation structure and phase composition were studied as interrelated to different stages of irradiation induced growth. The accelerated growth correlates with a high density of basal-plane -component dislocations

  15. Linking the evolution of body shape and locomotor biomechanics in bird-line archosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Vivian; Bates, Karl T; Li, Zhiheng; Hutchinson, John R

    2013-05-01

    Locomotion in living birds (Neornithes) has two remarkable features: feather-assisted flight, and the use of unusually crouched hindlimbs for bipedal support and movement. When and how these defining functional traits evolved remains controversial. However, the advent of computer modelling approaches and the discoveries of exceptionally preserved key specimens now make it possible to use quantitative data on whole-body morphology to address the biomechanics underlying this issue. Here we use digital body reconstructions to quantify evolutionary trends in locomotor biomechanics (whole-body proportions and centre-of-mass position) across the clade Archosauria. We use three-dimensional digital reconstruction to estimate body shape from skeletal dimensions for 17 archosaurs along the ancestral bird line, including the exceptionally preserved, feathered taxa Microraptor, Archaeopteryx, Pengornis and Yixianornis, which represent key stages in the evolution of the avian body plan. Rather than a discrete transition from more-upright postures in the basal-most birds (Avialae) and their immediate outgroup deinonychosauria, our results support hypotheses of a gradual, stepwise acquisition of more-crouched limb postures across much of theropod evolution, although we find evidence of an accelerated change within the clade Maniraptora (birds and their closest relatives, such as deinonychosaurs). In addition, whereas reduction of the tail is widely accepted to be the primary morphological factor correlated with centre-of-mass position and, hence, evolution of hindlimb posture, we instead find that enlargement of the pectoral limb and several associated trends have a much stronger influence. Intriguingly, our support for the onset of accelerated morpho-functional trends within Maniraptora is closely correlated with the evolution of flight. Because we find that the evolution of enlarged forelimbs is strongly linked, via whole-body centre of mass, to hindlimb function during

  16. Parallel evolution in Ugandan crater lakes: repeated evolution of limnetic body shapes in haplochromine cichlid fish

    OpenAIRE

    Machado-Schiaffino, Gonzalo; Kautt, Andreas F; Kusche, Henrik; Meyer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Background The enormous diversity found in East African cichlid fishes in terms of morphology, coloration, and behavior have made them a model for the study of speciation and adaptive evolution. In particular, haplochromine cichlids, by far the most species-rich lineage of cichlids, are a well-known textbook example for parallel evolution. Southwestern Uganda is an area of high tectonic activity, and is home to numerous crater lakes. Many Ugandan crater lakes were colonized, apparently indepe...

  17. An experimental model of acute encephalopathy after total body irradiation in the rat: effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To define the therapeutic effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761) in an experimental model of acute encephalopathy following total body irradiation in rats. Ninety four-month-old rats received 4.5 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) at day 1 while 15 rats received sham irradiation. A behavioural study based on a conditioning test of negative reinforcement, the one-way avoidance test, was performed test, was performed after irradiation. Orally treatment was started one day (study A) or twenty two days (study B) after irradiation and repeated daily for twelve days. In the irradiated group, three subgroups were defined according to the treatment received: EGb 761 (50 mg/kg), EGb 761 (100 mg/kg), water. This work comprised two consecutive studies. In study A (45 rats) the one-way avoidance test was administered daily from day 7 to day 14. In study B (45 rats) the behavioural test was performed from day 28 to day 35. Study A (three groups of 15 rats): following TBI, irradiated rats treated with water demonstrated a significant delay in a learning the one-way avoidance test in comparison with sham-irradiated rats (P < 0.0002) or irradiated rats treated with EGb 761 (50 mg/kg; P < 0.007) or EGb 761 (100 mg/kg; P < 0.0002). The irradiated rats, treated with EGb 761 (50 or 100 mg/kg) did not differ from the sham-irradiated controls. Study B (three groups of 15 rats): the irradiated rats, treated with water of EGb 761 (50 or 100 mg/kg) did not differ from the sham-irradiated controls. (authors)

  18. Interaction of whole-body hyperthermia and irradiation in the treatment of AKR mouse leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole-body hyperthermia (WBH) to 41-420C combined with fractionated total-body irradiation (TBI) was studied in mice with transplanted AKR leukemia. Mice treated with both TBI and WBH survived longer than mice treated with either modality alone. From other groups of similarly treated mice the spleens were removed, weighed, and assayed for their content of leukemic colony-forming units (CFU) by injecting single-cell suspensions into normal syngeneic recipients. Using this methodology it was determined that the thermal enhancement ratio for WBH combined with TBI was 1.6, and that enhanced killing of leukemia cells occurred irrespective of the sequence of WBH and TBI. Data are presented which relate variables, such as duration of WBH or heating time to target temperature, to the response of neoplastic disease. The implications of these preclinical findings to clinical trials are discussed. (author)

  19. Numerical simulation of tidal evolution of a viscoelastic body modelled with a mass-spring network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouard, Julien; Quillen, Alice C.; Efroimsky, Michael; Giannella, David

    2016-05-01

    We use a damped mass-spring model within an N-body code to simulate the tidal evolution of the spin and orbit of a self-gravitating viscoelastic spherical body moving around a point-mass perturber. The damped mass-spring model represents a Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic solid. We measure the tidal quality function (the dynamical Love number k2 divided by the tidal quality factor Q) from the numerically computed tidal drift of the semimajor axis of the binary. The shape of k2/Q, as a function of the principal tidal frequency, reproduces the kink shape predicted by Efroimsky for the tidal response of near-spherical homogeneous viscoelastic rotators. We demonstrate that we can directly simulate the tidal evolution of spinning viscoelastic objects. In future, the mass-spring N-body model can be generalized to inhomogeneous and/or non-spherical bodies.

  20. Feasibility study of helical tomotherapy for total body or total marrow irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total body radiation (TBI) has been used for many years as a preconditioning agent before bone marrow transplantation. Many side effects still plague its use. We investigated the planning and delivery of total body irradiation (TBI) and selective total marrow irradiation (TMI) and a reduced radiation dose to sensitive structures using image-guided helical tomotherapy. To assess the feasibility of using helical tomotherapy (A) we studied variations in pitch, field width, and modulation factor on total body and total marrow helical tomotherapy treatments. We varied these parameters to provide a uniform dose along with a treatment times similar to conventional TBI (15-30 min). (B) We also investigated limited (head, chest, and pelvis) megavoltage CT (MVCT) scanning for the dimensional pretreatment setup verification rather than total body MVCT scanning to shorten the overall treatment time per treatment fraction. (C) We placed thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) inside a Rando phantom to measure the dose at seven anatomical sites, including the lungs. A simulated TBI treatment showed homogeneous dose coverage (±10%) to the whole body. Doses to the sensitive organs were reduced by 35%-70% of the target dose. TLD measurements on Rando showed an accurate dose delivery (±7%) to the target and critical organs. In the TMI study, the dose was delivered conformally to the bone marrow only. The TBI and TMI treatment delivery time was reduced (by 50%) by increasing the field width from 2.5 to 5.0 cm in the inferior-superior direction. A limited MVCT reduced the target localization time 60% compared to whole body MVCT. MVCT image-guided helical tomotherapy offers a novel method to deliver a precise, homogeneous radiation dose to the whole body target while reducing the dose significantly to all critical organs. A judicious selection of pitch, modulation factor, and field size is required to produce a homogeneous dose distribution along with an acceptable treatment time. In

  1. Factors influencing the rate of gas evolution from epoxide resins during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work examined the influence of resin and hardener structure, together with the associated processing variables, on the rate of radiation induced gas evolution. Glycidyl ether and glycidyl amine resins are considered, together with aromatic amine and acid anhydride hardeners and such processing variables as cure schedule, accelerator content and amount of anhydride hardener. The effect of specimen geometry on the total gas evolved for unit radiation dose is also examined. A range of open-quote radical scavengers close-quote has been investigated, in relation to the structure of the resin and hardener components, to investigate the possibility of reducing the total radiolytic gas evolution. A nuclear reactor was used for the irradiation studies - and a system of dosimetry based on the well characterized gas evolution from polyethylene provided comprehensive information relating to dose distribution within the reactor

  2. The influence of whole body 60Co-irradiation on distribution of 67Ga in tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the initial findings that 67Ga has a preferential affinity for soft tissue tumors, in humans numerous suggestions have been advanced for the basic mechanism involved. The effects produced by whole-body X-irradiation on the excretion and tissue distribution of 67Ga have been reported by Swartzendruber and others. Bradley and coworkers have shown that these irradiation effects were associated with an increase in serum iron. The present investigation was undertaken in order to study the relationships between the change in the serum iron concentration and 67Ga accumulation in the tumor and soft tissues in mice bearing Ehrlich's ascites tumor. The following results were obtained. (1) The serum iron concentration was significantly decreased between 3 and 6 hours after 10 Gy (1,000 rad) dose of whole-body 60Co-irradiation. Subsequently, the serum iron levels were slowly elevated. (2) The uptake of 67Ga in the tumor and soft tissues was increased if the serum iron concentration was decreased by whole-body 60Co-irradiation during the early phase. On the contrary, if the serum iron concentration was high, the uptake of 67Ga in the tumor was decreased. (3) The excretion of 67Ga from the body was delayed if the serum iron concentration was decreased by whole-body 60Co-irradiation. However, if the serum iron concentration was high, the excretion of 67Ga from the body significantly increased. (author)

  3. Effects of body size and lifestyle on evolution of mammal life histories

    OpenAIRE

    Sibly, Richard M; Brown, James H

    2007-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that life-history evolution is subject to a fundamental size-dependent constraint. This constraint limits the rate at which biomass can be produced so that production per unit of body mass is inevitably slower in larger organisms than in smaller ones. Here we derive predictions for how changes in body size and production rates evolve in different lifestyles subject to this constraint. Predictions are tested by using data on the mass of neonate tissue produced per...

  4. HOX genes in the sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes: Implications for the evolution of complex body plans

    OpenAIRE

    Callaerts, Patrick; Lee, Patricia N.; Hartmann, Britta; Farfan, Claudia; Choy, Darrett W. Y.; Ikeo, Kazuho; Fischbach, Karl-Friedrich; Gehring, Walter J.; de Couet, H. Gert

    2002-01-01

    Molluscs display a rich diversity of body plans ranging from the wormlike appearance of aplacophorans to the complex body plan of the cephalopods with highly developed sensory organs, a complex central nervous system, and cognitive abilities unrivaled among the invertebrates. The aim of the current study is to define molecular parameters relevant to the developmental evolution of cephalopods by using the sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes as a model system. Using PCR-based approaches, we identi...

  5. Apriori Estimates for Many-Body Hamiltonian Evolution of Interacting Boson System

    OpenAIRE

    Grillakis, Manoussos G.; Margetis, Dionisios

    2008-01-01

    We study the evolution of a many-particle system whose wave function obeys the N-body Schroedinger equation under Bose symmetry. The system Hamiltonian describes pairwise particle interactions in the absence of an external potential. We derive apriori dispersive estimates that express the overall repulsive nature of the particle interactions. These estimates hold for a wide class of two-body interaction potentials which are independent of the particle number, N. We discuss applications of the...

  6. Optimization of monoclonal antibody production in mouse ascites by single whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybridoma cells injected intraperitoneally into mice induce formation of ascites tumors producing ascites fluid with high levels of monoclonal antibodies. Several parameters affect the growth of the immunoglobulin-producing tumors in vivo. In 10 different hybridomas the average ascites tumor formation rate could be increased from 32% (n = 338 mice) to 77% (n = 112 mice) by only one whole-body irradiation of paraffin-pretreated Balb/c mice. Production of monoclonal antibodies was better in males because of the significantly (p < 0.01) increased volume of ascites fluid. From the increased tumor formation rate in irradiated mice it is suggested that in non-irradiated recipients the tumor growth rate was lowered by immunological reactions against hybridoma cells provoked by cell surface neoantigens revealed by cell fusion and/or tumor-associated antigens of the myeloma parent cells as well as by altered antigen pattern caused by possible mutations in the myeloma cell line and/or Balb/c/K strain. (author)

  7. The behaviour of the endocrinological parameters cortisol, testosterone, growth hormone and prolactin after UVA and UVB whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With two groups, each with 8 healthy subjects UV whole-body irradiation was carried out with uniformly 30 J/cm2 UVA or respectively UVB at the level of the individual minimal erythema dose. Every subject received serial irradiations once a day for four days. The determination of the serum hormone level was accomplished by means of radioimmunoassays. The results show a weakly significant decline of cortisol 4 and 24 hours after 2 serial UVB irradiations. 3,5 and 7 days after the end of the irradiation series the cortisol values have increased, but by the seventh day statistically only weakly significant. With UVA irradiation there was also a weakly significant increase in cortisol levels three days after the end of the irradiation series. The serum levels of the other hormones showed no statistically significant changes. (orig./MG)

  8. Midplane dose determination and verification of calculated doses in total body irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem ÖZDEMİR

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES To compare calculated and measured doses for different regions of anthropomorphic phantom and patients using ion chamber and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD for total body irradiation. METHODS Measurements were done for lateral fields with 6 MV, gantry 82º, 40x40 cm2 field and 400 cm source-axis distance (SAD. Entrance-exit and midline doses were measured on anthropomorphic phantom by TLD and entrance-exit doses were measured by TLD and ion chamber on patients. RESULTS For anthropomorphic phantom measurements differences between calculated and measured entrance-exit doses of head, neck, shoulder, lung and thick pelvis were 0.8%, 2.7%, 26.4%, 4.4% and 4.9% and for midline doses were 1.6%, 1.6%, 6.3%, -1.4% and 7.4% respectively. For patients; TLD differences were within -4.13% ile 6.7%, -3.3% ile 3.9%, 5.1% ile 16.6%, -7.8% ile 2.4%, and 3.6% ile 7.1% respectively. For thick pelvis measurements with ion chamber differences were within %0.1-1.9. CONCLUSION Total body irradiation is being applied in limit values in our clinic.

  9. Dose calculation method with 60-cobalt gamma rays in total body irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Scaff, L A M

    2001-01-01

    Physical factors associated to total body irradiation using sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma rays beams, were studied in order to develop a calculation method of the dose distribution that could be reproduced in any radiotherapy center with good precision. The method is based on considering total body irradiation as a large and irregular field with heterogeneities. To calculate doses, or doses rates, of each area of interest (head, thorax, thigh, etc.), scattered radiation is determined. It was observed that if dismagnified fields were considered to calculate the scattered radiation, the resulting values could be applied on a projection to the real size to obtain the values for dose rate calculations. In a parallel work it was determined the variation of the dose rate in the air, for the distance of treatment, and for points out of the central axis. This confirm that the use of the inverse square law is not valid. An attenuation curve for a broad beam was also determined in order to allow the use of absorbers. In this wo...

  10. Establishment of Early Endpoints in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Amory; Gulani, Jatinder; King, Gregory; Hieber, Kevin; Chappell, Mark; Ossetrova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation sickness (ARS) following exposure to ionizing irradiation is characterized by radiation-induced multiorgan dysfunction/failure that refers to progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems, the etiological agent being radiation damage to cells and tissues over time. Radiation sensitivity data on humans and animals has made it possible to describe the signs associated with ARS. A mouse model of total-body irradiation (TBI) has previously been developed that represents the likely scenario of exposure in the human population. Herein, we present the Mouse Intervention Scoring System (MISS) developed at the Veterinary Sciences Department (VSD) of the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) to identify moribund mice and decrease the numbers of mice found dead, which is therefore a more humane refinement to death as the endpoint. Survival rates were compared to changes in body weights and temperatures in the mouse (CD2F1 male) TBI model (6-14 Gy, 60Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min-1), which informed improvements to the Scoring System. Individual tracking of animals via implanted microchips allowed for assessment of criteria based on individuals rather than by group averages. From a total of 132 mice (92 irradiated), 51 mice were euthanized versus only four mice that were found dead (7% of non-survivors). In this case, all four mice were found dead after overnight periods between observations. Weight loss alone was indicative of imminent succumbing to radiation injury, however mice did not always become moribund within 24 hours while having weight loss >30%. Only one survivor had a weight loss of greater than 30%. Temperature significantly dropped only 2-4 days before death/euthanasia in 10 and 14 Gy animals. The score system demonstrates a significant refinement as compared to using subjective assessment of morbidity or death as the endpoint for these survival studies. PMID:27579862

  11. Protective Effect Of Avocado Oil Against Biochemical And Histological Changes In Whole Body Gamma Irradiation In Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avocado oil, extracted from the pulp of the fruit, is rich in poly-unsaturated fatty acids, linoleic, linolenic, oleic acids and the monounsaturated fatty acid. It also contains B-sitosterol, B-carotene, lecithin, minerals and vitamins A, C, D and E. Avocado oil lowers the blood levels of serum lipids and has antioxidant properties as a free radical scavenger. Male albino rats were divided into 5 groups. 1- Control group: rats not subjected to any treatment, 2- Avocado treated group: rats received avocado oil (0.1 ml/kg/day) via intraperitoneal injection during 21 days, 3- Irradiated group: rats were whole body gamma irradiated with 7 Gy, 4- Avocado + irradiated group: rats received avocado oil for 21 days then exposed to whole body gamma irradiation with 7 Gy and 5- Radiation + avocado group: rats were exposed to 7 Gy whole body gamma irradiation then received avocado oil for 21 days. Avocado oil (0.1 ml/kg/day) was given to rats, receiving a standard diet, for 21 days before exposure to 7 Gy whole body gamma irradiation then the treatment was continued for 10 days after irradiation. Several investigations were carried out such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), lipid profile and blood sugar. High significant increase in MDA was observed and treatment with avocado before irradiation caused significant increase in GSH, CAT and SOD and significant decrease in MDA as compared to the irradiated groups. The results also showed that treatment with avocado oil significantly diminished the radiation-induced alterations observed in the levels of lipid profile and glucose. The results demonstrated that whole body gamma irradiated rats showed significant increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate amino-transferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and glucose. By studying the lipid profile, significant increases in cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL-C levels were recorded while significant decrease was

  12. Changes of pulmonary function in patients treated with bone marrow transplantation after total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes of pulmonary functions were studied with time in 10 patients who underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT) after total body irradiation (TBI, total lung dose, 3 to 12 Gy; dose rate, 5.3 to 10.0 cGy/min). Regardless of the total lung dose and the dose rate of irradiation or the period after BMT, the percent vital capacity (%VC) and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1.0%) were kept within normal limits, whereas the diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide (%DLco) tended to decrease within 100 days after BMT in all of our patients. From the possibility that respiratory insufficiency will rapidly occur due to infection, it seems unfavorable for the patients to return to routine life during this period after BMT, even if in states without any clinical manifestations. It was found that the %DLco began to decrease prior to the onset of interstitial pneumonia (IP) and that the degree was more marked in patients who progressed to IP than in those who did not. Therefore, it is possible to predict the occurrence of IP by frequently measuring pulmonary function. In patients with IP, the %DLco rapidly improved with steroid administration, and it tended to improve gradually even after discontinuing the administration of the drug. But regardless of the total lung dose and dose rate of irradiation, the %DLco in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) did not recover completely when compared with that in patients without chronic GVHD. Thus, it is considered that this persistant pulmonary dysfunction is caused mainly by chronic GVHD rather than by irradiation. (author)

  13. Late ophthalmological complications after total body irradiation in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemer-Tucker, M. M.; Sterk, C. C.; de Wolff-Rouendaal, D.; Lee, A. C.; Lett, J. T.; Cox, A.; Emmanouilidis-van der Spek, K.; Davelaar, J.; Lambooy, A. C.; Mooy, C. M.; Broerse, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the long-term effects of total body irradiation (TBI) on the incidence and time course of ocular complications. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rhesus monkeys treated with TBI photon doses up to 8.5 Gy and proton doses up to 7.5 Gy were studied at intervals up to 25 years post-irradiation. They were compared with control groups with a similar age distribution. Cataract formation and ocular fundus lesions were scored according to a standardized protocol. Fluorescein angiography and histopathology was performed in selected animals. RESULTS: Cataract formation occurred after a latent period of 3-5 years. Significant cataract induction was observed for photon-doses of 8 and 8.5 Gy and beyond 20 years after proton irradiation. The severity of the lesions represents significant impairment of vision and would require cataract surgery if similar results occurred in human bone marrow transplant patients. Fluorescein angiography demonstrated a normal pattern of retinal vessels in 13 out of 14 animals (93%) from the irradiated group and in eight out of nine animals (89%) from the control group. No additional lesions apart from age-related degenerative changes could be demonstrated. Histological evaluation revealed no radiation-associated vasculopathy. CONCLUSIONS: Radiation alone for doses up to 8.5 Gy of photons does not carry a potential risk for fundus pathology, whereas clinically important cataract induction should be anticipated within 5 years after photon doses of 8.0 and 8.5 Gy and proton doses in excess of 2.5 Gy.

  14. Thrombopoietin promotes hematopoietic recovery and survival after high-dose whole body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The therapeutic potential of thrombopoietin (TPO), the major regulator of platelet production, was evaluated for hematopoietic recovery and survival in mice following lethal and supralethal total body irradiation (TBI). Methods and Materials: Hematopoietic recovery was studied in C57BL6/J mice after 8 Gy TBI (gamma-rays). Survival experiments were performed with C57BL6/J and BCBA F1 mice. Two protocols of TPO administration were evaluated: treatment for 7 consecutive days (7 x 0.3 μg/mice) beginning 2 h after exposure, or a single dose (0.3 μg/mice) administered 2 h after irradiation. Results: TPO improved the platelet nadir and accelerated the platelet reconstitution of irradiated mice in comparison to placebo-treated mice. Recovery of neutrophils and erythrocytes was stimulated as well. TPO induced an accelerated recovery of hematopoietic progenitors and immature multilineage progenitors in bone marrow and spleen. In addition, TPO administration induced approximately 90% survival of 8 Gy irradiated C57BL6/J mice, a TBI dose which resulted in 100% mortality within 30 days for placebo-treated mice. Single TPO administration was as effective as repeated injections for hematopoietic recovery and prevention of mortality. Dose-effect survival experiments were performed in BCBA F1 mice and demonstrated that TPO shifted the LD50/30 from approximately 9.5 Gy to 10.5 Gy TBI given as a single dose, and from 14 Gy to as high as 17 Gy when TBI was given in three equal doses, each separated by 24 h. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that the multilineage hematopoietic effects of TPO may be advantageously used to protect against lethal bone marrow failure following high dose TBI

  15. Lung autophagic response following exposure of mice to whole body irradiation, with and without amifostine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zois, Christos E. [Department of Radiotherapy - Oncology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis 68100 (Greece); Giatromanolaki, Alexandra [Department of Pathology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Kainulainen, Heikki [Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Botaitis, Sotirios [Department of Experimental Surgery, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Torvinen, Sira [Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Simopoulos, Constantinos [Department of Experimental Surgery, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Kortsaris, Alexandros [Department of Biochemistry, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Sivridis, Efthimios [Department of Pathology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Koukourakis, Michael I., E-mail: targ@her.forthnet.gr [Department of Radiotherapy - Oncology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis 68100 (Greece)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} We investigated the effect 6 Gy of WBI on the autophagic machinery of normal mouse lung. {yields} Irradiation induces dysfunction of the autophagic machinery in normal lung, characterized by decreased transcription of the LC3A/Beclin-1 mRNA and accumulation of the LC3A, and p62 proteins. {yields} The membrane bound LC3A-II protein levels increased in the cytosolic fraction (not in the pellet), contrasting the patterns noted after starvation-induced autophagy. {yields} Administration of amifostine, reversed all the LC3A and p62 findings, suggesting protection of the normal autophagic function. -- Abstract: Purpose: The effect of ionizing irradiation on the autophagic response of normal tissues is largely unexplored. Abnormal autophagic function may interfere the protein quality control leading to cell degeneration and dysfunction. This study investigates its effect on the autophagic machinery of normal mouse lung. Methods and materials: Mice were exposed to 6 Gy of whole body {gamma}-radiation and sacrificed at various time points. The expression of MAP1LC3A/LC3A/Atg8, beclin-1, p62/sequestosome-1 and of the Bnip3 proteins was analyzed. Results: Following irradiation, the LC3A-I and LC3A-II protein levels increased significantly at 72 h and 7 days. Strikingly, LC3A-II protein was increased (5.6-fold at 7 days; p < 0.001) only in the cytosolic fraction, but remained unchanged in the membrane fraction. The p62 protein, was significantly increased in both supernatant and pellet fraction (p < 0.001), suggesting an autophagosome turnover deregulation. These findings contrast the patterns of starvation-induced autophagy up-regulation. Beclin-1 levels remained unchanged. The Bnip3 protein was significantly increased at 8 h, but it sharply decreased at 72 h (p < 0.05). Administration of amifostine (200 mg/kg), 30 min before irradiation, reversed all the LC3A and p62 findings on blots, suggesting restoration of the normal autophagic function

  16. Lung autophagic response following exposure of mice to whole body irradiation, with and without amifostine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → We investigated the effect 6 Gy of WBI on the autophagic machinery of normal mouse lung. → Irradiation induces dysfunction of the autophagic machinery in normal lung, characterized by decreased transcription of the LC3A/Beclin-1 mRNA and accumulation of the LC3A, and p62 proteins. → The membrane bound LC3A-II protein levels increased in the cytosolic fraction (not in the pellet), contrasting the patterns noted after starvation-induced autophagy. → Administration of amifostine, reversed all the LC3A and p62 findings, suggesting protection of the normal autophagic function. -- Abstract: Purpose: The effect of ionizing irradiation on the autophagic response of normal tissues is largely unexplored. Abnormal autophagic function may interfere the protein quality control leading to cell degeneration and dysfunction. This study investigates its effect on the autophagic machinery of normal mouse lung. Methods and materials: Mice were exposed to 6 Gy of whole body γ-radiation and sacrificed at various time points. The expression of MAP1LC3A/LC3A/Atg8, beclin-1, p62/sequestosome-1 and of the Bnip3 proteins was analyzed. Results: Following irradiation, the LC3A-I and LC3A-II protein levels increased significantly at 72 h and 7 days. Strikingly, LC3A-II protein was increased (5.6-fold at 7 days; p < 0.001) only in the cytosolic fraction, but remained unchanged in the membrane fraction. The p62 protein, was significantly increased in both supernatant and pellet fraction (p < 0.001), suggesting an autophagosome turnover deregulation. These findings contrast the patterns of starvation-induced autophagy up-regulation. Beclin-1 levels remained unchanged. The Bnip3 protein was significantly increased at 8 h, but it sharply decreased at 72 h (p < 0.05). Administration of amifostine (200 mg/kg), 30 min before irradiation, reversed all the LC3A and p62 findings on blots, suggesting restoration of the normal autophagic function. The LC3A and Beclin1 m

  17. Anti-tumor immunological mechanisms of low dose whole-body irradiation in the protocol of tumor generadiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the immunologic enhancement of low dose whole-body irradiation in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) under recombinant plasmid pEgr-IL18-B7.1 gene-radiotherapy. Methods: LLC cells were implanted subcutaneously in the right-hind leg of C57BL/6J mice. The pEgr-IL18- B7.1 recombinant plasmids mediated by polyethylenimine were injected locally into tumors of the mice with gene- radiotherapy, and then the tumors received different therapeutic regimens containing local irradiation with 2 Gy and whole-body irradiation with 0.075 Gy, respectively. Cytotoxic activity of CTL and NK were detected with isotope labeling of 3H-TdR. The secretion activities of TNF-α and IFN-γ were detected with ELISA. The anti-tumor immunological effects of low dose whole-body irradiation in protocol of gene-radiotherapy on the tumor-bearing mice were observed. Results: Compared with conventional repeated high dose local irradiation, single high dose local irradiation in combination with repeated low dose whole-body irradiation could enhance the cytotoxic activity of CTL and NK, and increase the secretion of TNF-α and IFN-γ under pEgr-IL18-B7.1 gene-radiotherapy. Conclusions: Low dose whole-body irradiation superimposed upon a local high dose could significantly enhance the anti-tumor effect in the protocol of gene-radiotherapy through promoting the cytotoxic activity of CTL and NK, and up-regulating the expression of TNF-α and IFN-γ. (authors)

  18. On showy dwarfs and sober giants: body size as a constraint for the evolution of bird plumage colouration

    OpenAIRE

    Galván, Ismael; Negro, Juan J.; Rodríguez, Airam; Carrascal de la Puente, Luis María

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of bird plumage colouration may be explained by a wide range of selective pressures, includ- ing both defensive and advertising needs. However, the relationship between plumage colouration and body size has never been investigated in detail. Here we hypothesize that body size represents a constraint for the evolution of plumage colour heterogeneity because the relative number of body feathers was suggested to increase as body size decreases, and in the case of carote...

  19. Hydrogen gas evolution from water-dispersed titania and alumina nanoparticles by γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen gas evolution induced by 60Co gamma-ray irradiation of nanoparticles dispersed in water was investigated. Nanoparticles of TiO2 and Al2O3, whose average sizes were within the range of 14-33 nm, were employed. Hydrogen-gas yield from a sample dispersion in a closed vial was measured by gas chromatography after the irradiation. The sample exhibited much larger hydrogen yields than that in the pure water radiolysis. The hydrogen yield increased with the absorbed dose and the amount of particles dispersed in water. These results support the fact that the reaction is activated by both the γ-ray irradiation and the dispersed particles. In conjunction with results of TEM observation, it was implied that these enhancement effects should depend on the size and/or shape of the particles rather than their chemical species. We calculated the G-values for the hydrogen-gas evolution. They will be useful for the discussion about the reaction. (author)

  20. Microstructural evolution and Am migration behaviour in Am-containing fuels at the initial stage of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the effect of americium addition to MOX fuels on the irradiation behaviour, the 'Am-1' programme is being conducted in JAEA. The Am-1 programme consists of two short-term irradiation tests of 10-minute and 24-hour irradiations and a steady-state irradiation test. The short-term irradiation tests were successfully completed and the post-irradiation examinations (PIE) are in progress. The PIE for Am-containing MOX fuels focused on the microstructural evolution and redistribution behaviour of Am at the initial stage of irradiation and the results to date are reported. The successful development of fabrication technology with remote handling and the evaluation of thermo-chemical properties based on the out-of-pile experiments are described with an emphasis on the effects of Am addition on the MOX fuel properties. (authors)

  1. Highly efficient photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from nickel quinolinethiolate complexes under visible light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Heng; Yu, Wen-Qian; Zheng, Hui-Qin; Bonin, Julien; Fan, Yao-Ting; Hou, Hong-Wei

    2016-08-01

    Earth-abundant metal complexes have emerged as promising surrogates of platinum for catalyzing the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this study, we report the design and synthesis of two novel nickel quinolinethiolate complexes, namely [Ni(Hqt)2(4, 4‧-Z-2, 2‧-bpy)] (Hqt = 8-quinolinethiol, Z = sbnd H [1] or sbnd CH3 [2], bpy = bipyridine). An efficient three-component photocatalytic homogeneous system for hydrogen generation working under visible light irradiation was constructed by using the target complexes as catalysts, triethylamine (TEA) as sacrificial electron donor and xanthene dyes as photosensitizer. We obtain turnover numbers (TON, vs. catalyst) for H2 evolution of 5923/7634 under the optimal conditions with 5.0 × 10-6 M complex 1/2 respectively, 1.0 × 10-3 M fluorescein and 5% (v/v) TEA at pH 12.3 in EtOH/H2O (1:1, v/v) mixture after 8 h irradiation (λ > 420 nm). We discuss the mechanism of H2 evolution in the homogeneous photocatalytic system based on fluorescence spectrum and cyclic voltammetry data.

  2. Structure evolution of carbon black under ionic-liquid-assisted microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interactions between the carbon black (CB) and the ionic liquid (IL), 1-butyl-3-methyl-imiazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM+][PF6-]), are firstly examined. The CB, mixed with the IL via simple blending, is then subjected to microwave (MW) irradiation to prepare the modified CB. The structure evolutions of the modified CB such as the microcrystalline structure and surface chemistry are revealed by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and pore analysis. After mixing but before MW irradiation, the microcrystalline arrangement of CB turns to be more ordering and microcrystalline size (La) to be a little bigger but with a limited degree. Under MW irradiation, the IL undergoes severe decomposition. The combination of localized high temperature (proposed to be higher than 425 deg. C) and the decomposition of the IL leads to substantial structure changes of the CB. The graphitization of the CB surface, the disordering of the microcrystalline and the decrease in La are disclosed. In addition, compared with the untreated CB, the CB treated with IL-assisted MW irradiation is found to have much higher volume of the smaller mesopore.

  3. Bronchial neuroendocrine elements in late post-radiation stage in humans after total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is not known how long-term total body irradiation affects the neuroendocrine cells (Nc) and peptidergic innervation in the bronchial wall. This study examined, by immunohistochemical and radioimmunoassay (RIA) techniques, the distribution of NC and neuropeptide-containing nerve fibres in the large bronchi of Chernobyl nuclear accident cleanup workers displaying pulmonary fibrosis and metaplastic epithelium. Bronchial mucous and submucous layers from 16 Chernobyl patients and 6 control subjects were examined by conventional light microscopy and immunohistochemical techniques for determination of protein gene product 9.5 (PGP), chromogranin A, chromogranin A and B (CAB), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), calcitonin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), helospectin I, neuropeptide Y (NPY), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP), serotonin (5-hydroxyltryptamine, 5-HT), and substance P (SP). Additionally, bronchial biopsies from 6 Chernobyl cleanup workers and 3 control patients were examined by RIA for VIP and NPY/peptideYY-Ievels. The Chernobyl patients were examined 10 years after exposure during the cleanup works in the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station. PGP immunoreactive nerve fibres appeared to be more frequent in the bronchial wall after long term irradiation as compared with controls. However, no specific alterations in the amounts of NPY-, PACAP-, helospectin-, SP- and CGRP-immunoreactive nerve fibres were seen in bronchi of control and Chernobyl patients. 5-HT -immunoreactive NC appeared to be more numerous in normal bronchial epithelium adjacent to metaplastic epithelium, in which numerous CAB- immunoreactive NC were seen in Chernobyl patients. RIA for VIP and NPY/PYY showed individual variations in the levels of these peptides in the bronchial tissue. In two cases (one Chernobyl patient and one control patient) there was a high concentration of VIP in parallel with a high concentration of NPY

  4. Effect of black pepper (piper nigrum) on body weight and some serum lipid fractions in whole body gamma irradiated albino rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine effect of sublethal body gamma irradiation (6.0 Gy as a single dose) on body weight and some serum lipid fractions in female and male rats. The beneficial efficacy of intragastric administration of black pepper (in two doses of 160 and 320 mg/kg bw) was also investigated. The results obtained revealed that the sublethal irradiated rats showed a drastic loss in body weight reached 39.5% less than the normal males and significant alterations in serum triglycerides, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol) and low density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol) levels, 5 weeks post exposure to gamma irradiation in female and male rats. Black pepper showed a beneficial effect on these significant changes in lipid fractions in irradiated female and male rats. Treatment with the two doses of black pepper up to 14 weeks, 5 days/week, showed a slight effect on body gain and fluctuations in the lipid fractions at 5.10 and 14 weeks for both sexes

  5. Effects of 8 Gy whole body irradiation on number and functions of small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the characteristics of intestinal mucosal immunity after radiation injury. Methods: Number, proliferation activity, cytotoxicity of IEL as well as the TNF-α and TGF-β concentrations in supernatant of cultured IELs were studied using freshly isolated IELs from whole small intestine of Kunming strain mice whole-body irradiated with 8 Gy 60Co rays. Results: The proliferation activity, cytotoxicity as well as the number of IELs in small intestinal mucosa were significantly decreased from 8h and reached the lowest level at 72 h post-irradiation. The TNF-α and TGF-β concentrations in supernatant of cultured IELs isolated from irradiated mice elevated at 8h and reached the peak values at 72h. Conclusion: The decrease in number and important factions of IELs might be one of the reasons which damage the intestinal mucosal immunity barrier after whole body irradiation

  6. Soft X-ray Irradiation of Silicates: Implications on Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Ciaravella, A; Chen, Y -J; Caro, G M Muñoz; Huang, C -H; Jiménez-Escobar, A; Venezia, A M

    2016-01-01

    The processing of energetic photons on bare silicate grains was simulated experimentally on silicate ?lms submitted to soft X-rays of energies up to 1.25 keV. The silicate material was prepared by means of a microwave assisted solgel technique. Its chemical composition reflects the Mg2SiO4 stoichiometry with residual impurities due to the synthesis method. The experiments were performed using the spherical grating monochromator beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Taiwan. We found that soft X-ray irradiation induces structural changes that can be interpreted as an amorphization of the processed silicate material. The present results may have relevant implications in the evolution of silicate materials in X-ray irradiated protoplanetary disks.

  7. Microstructural evolution of V-4Cr-4Ti during ion irradiation at 200{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazda, J.; Meshii, M.; Loomis, B.A. Chung, H.M.

    1996-04-01

    The results of a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of the microstructural evolution of V-4Cr-4Ti (Heat no. 832665) that was irradiated with 4.5 MeV {sup 58}Ni{sup ++} ions at 200 {degrees}C are presented. Dose effects were investigated for fluences ranging from 0.5 to 5 dpa. When the irradiation dose was increased, the relative number density of black dots and dislocation loops was nearly constant and accompanied by an increase in the size of the defects. Cavity formation was not observed in any of the specimens, indicating high resistance of the alloy to void swelling at the lower temperature of the experiments.

  8. Total Body Irradiation (TBI) using Helical Tomotherapy in children and young adults undergoing stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Establishing Total Body Irradiation (TBI) using Helical Tomotherapy (HT) to gain better control over dose distribution and homogeneity and to individually spare organs at risk. Because of their limited body length the technique seems especially eligible in juvenile patients. The cohort consisted of 10 patients, 6 female and 4 male, aged 4 - 22 y with acute lymphoblastic- (ALL) or acute myeloic leukemia (AML). All patients presented with high risk disease features. Body length in treatment position ranged from 110–180 cm. Two Gy single dose was applied BID to a total dose of 12 Gy. Dose volume constraint for the PTV was 95% dose coverage for 95% of the volume. The lungs were spared to a mean dose of [less than or equal to] 10 Gy. Patients were positioned in a vac-loc bag in supine position with a 3-point head mask. Average D95 to the PTV was 11.7 Gy corresponding to a mean coverage of the PTV of 97.5%. Dmean for the lungs was 9.14 Gy. Grade 3–4 side effects were not observed. TBI using HT is feasible and well tolerated. A benefit could be demonstrated with regard to dose distribution and homogeneity and the selective dose-reduction to organs at risk

  9. In pediatric leukemia, dose evaluation according to the type of compensators in total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Yeon [Dongnam Inst. of Radiological and Medical science, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Catholic University of Busan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Total body irradiation (TBI) and chemotherapy are the pre-treatment method of a stem cell transplantations of the childhood leukemia. in this study, we evaluate the Quantitative human body dose prior to the treatment. The MCNPX simulation program evaluated by changing the material of the tissue compensators with imitation material of pediatric exposure in a virtual space. As a result, first, the average skin dose with the material of the tissue compensators of Plexiglass tissue compensators is 74.60 mGy/min, Al is 73.96 mGy/min, Cu is 72.26 mGy/min and Pb 67.90 mGy/min respectively. Second, regardless of the tissue compensators material that organ dose were thyroid, gentile, digestive system, brain, lungs, kidneys higher in order. Finally, the ideal distance between body compensator and the patient were 50 cm aparting each other. In conclusion, tissue compensators Al, Cu, Pb are able to replace of the currently used in Plexiglass materials.

  10. Patient dose analysis in total body irradiation through in vivo dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ganapathy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Total body irradiation (TBI is a special radiotherapy technique, administered prior to bone marrow transplantation. Due to the complex nature of the treatment setup, in vivo dosimetry for TBI is mandatory to ensure proper delivery of the intended radiation dose throughout the body. Lithium fluoride (LiF TLD-100 chips are used for the TBI in vivo dosimetry. Results obtained from the in vivo dosimetry of 20 patients are analyzed. Results obtained from forehead, abdomen, pelvis, and mediastinum showed a similar pattern with the average measured dose from 96 to 97% of the prescription dose. Extremities and chest received a dose greater than the prescription dose in many instances (more than 20% of measurements. Homogeneous dose delivery to the whole body is checked by calculating the mean dose with standard deviation for each fraction. Reasons for the difference between prescription dose and measured dose for each site are discussed. Dose homogeneity within ±10% is achieved using our in-house TBI protocol.

  11. A technique for delivery of total body irradiation for bone marrow transplantation in adults and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the increasing use of bone marrow transplantation for cancer, total body irradiation is becoming a more commonplace procedure in many of the larger centers across the country. The technical difficulties in delivering homogenous doses of radiation to the whole body are significant and involve many factors such as creation of a homogeneous, flat beam of radiation, and dealing with variations in patient thickness and tissue homogeneity, particularly in the lung. In addition, techniques must be used to safely and efficiently deal with patients who are usually very ill and require long treatment times. Although there is often an advantage in terms of dosimetry to using an AP/PA treatment technique, many institutions use parallel opposed lateral beams because of equipment and facility limitations. A technique has been devised that enables total body irradation to be given by an AP/PA technique using equipment available in many radiotherapy departments. Patients are supported in an upright position during treatment by means of a modified harness attached to the ceiling of the treatment room. Lung compensators are fixed to individually fitted vests, allowing the patient moderate amounts of movement during treatment while maintaining the position of the compensator relative to the lungs. Thermoluminiscent dosimeter (TLD) dose measurements in a phantom indicate that this system can deliver accurate and homogeneous doses to lung tissue, while allowing a good degree of patient comfort and safety during the long treatment times that are required

  12. Microstructural evolution of ferritic-martensitic steels under heavy ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topbasi, Cem

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are primary candidate materials for fuel cladding and internal applications in the Sodium Fast Reactor, as well as first-wall and blanket materials in future fusion concepts because of their favorable mechanical properties and resistance to radiation damage. Since microstructure evolution under irradiation is amongst the key issues for these materials in these applications, developing a fundamental understanding of the irradiation-induced microstructure in these alloys is crucial in modeling and designing new alloys with improved properties. The goal of this project was to investigate the evolution of microstructure of two commercial ferritic-martensitic steels, NF616 and HCM12A, under heavy ion irradiation at a broad temperature range. An in situ heavy ion irradiation technique was used to create irradiation damage in the alloy; while it was being examined in a transmission electron microscope. Electron-transparent samples of NF616 and HCM12A were irradiated in situ at the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory with 1 MeV Kr ions to ˜10 dpa at temperatures ranging from 20 to 773 K. The microstructure evolution of NF616 and HCM12A was followed in situ by systematically recording micrographs and diffraction patterns as well as capturing videos during irradiation. In these irradiations, there was a period during which no changes are visible in the microstructure. After a threshold dose (˜0.1 dpa between 20 and 573 K, and ˜2.5 dpa at 673 K) black dots started to become visible under the ion beam. These black dots appeared suddenly (from one frame to the next) and are thought to be small defect clusters (2-5 nm in diameter), possibly small dislocation loops with Burgers vectors of either ½ or . The overall density of these defect clusters increased with dose and saturated around 6 dpa. At saturation, a steady-state is reached in which defects are eliminated and created at the same rates so that the

  13. Total-body irradiation and cataract incidence: A randomized comparison of two instantaneous dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the influence of instantaneous total-body irradiation dose rate in hematological malignancies, the authors randomized 157 patients according to different instantaneous dose rates. Patients have undergone a total-body irradiation before bone-marrow transplantation according to two different techniques: Either in one fraction (1000 cGy given to the midplane at the level of L4, and 800 cGy to the lungs) or in six fractions (1200 cGy over 3 consecutive days to the midplane at the level of L4, and 900 cGy to the lungs). Patients were randomized according to two instantaneous dose rates, called LOW and HIGH, in single-dose (6 vs. 15 cGy/min) and fractionated (3 vs. 6 cGy/min) TBI groups; there were 77 cases for the LOW and 80 for the HIGH groups, with 57 patients receiving single-dose (28 LOW, 29 HIGH) and 100 patients receiving fractionated total-body irradiation (49 LOW, 51 HIGH). As of July 1992, 16 of 157 patients developed cataracts after 17 to 46 months, with an estimated incidence of 23% at 5 years. Four of 77 patients in the LOW group, 12 of 80 patients in the HIGH group developed cataracts, with 5-year estimated incidences of 12% and 34%, respectively. Ten of 57 patients in the single-dose group, and 6 of 100 patients in the fractionated group developed cataracts, with 5-year estimated incidences of 39% and 13%, respectively. When the subgroups were considered, in the single-dose group, 3 of 28 LOW patients, and 7 of 29 HIGH patients developed cataracts, with 5-year estimated incidences of 24% and 53%, respectively; in the fractionated group, 1 of 49 LOW patients, and 5 of 51 HIGH patients developed cataracts, with 5-year estimated incidences of 4% and 22%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in terms of 5-year estimated cataract incidence between the patients receiving steroids and those not. The instantaneous dose rate was the only independent factor influencing the cataractogenesis. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  14. Effect of liposome entrapped Cu/Zn bovine superoxide dismutase in rat after total body (neutron-gamma) irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose was, to study in rat the effects of (neutron-gamma) exposure and of LIPSOD treatment (liposomal Cu/Zn super-oxide dismutase) on cognitive functions. Our data demonstrate that whole-body irradiation induces in Sprague-Dawley rats some cognitive dysfunction. Treatment using LIPSOD corrects in a significantly way this trend. Moreover, in sham-irradiated rats, this treatment shows an inhibitory effect. (authors)

  15. Whole body UVA irradiation lowers systemic blood pressure by release of nitric oxide from intracutaneous photolabile nitric oxide derivates

    OpenAIRE

    Opländer, C.; Volkmar, C.M.; Paunel-Görgülü, A; van Faassen, E.E.H.; Heiss, C

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Human skin contains photolabile nitric oxide derivates like nitrite and S-nitroso thiols, which after UVA irradiation, decompose and lead to the formation of vasoactive NO. Objective: Here, we investigated whether whole body UVA irradiation influences the blood pressure of healthy volunteers because of cutaneous nonenzymatic NO formation. Methods and Results: As detected by chemoluminescence detection or by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in vitro with human skin speci...

  16. Influence of immunization on serum γ-globulin levels of calves following whole-body X irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calves aged 2.5 to 4 months were whole-body X irradiated with mean lethal doses between 1.2 and 1.7 Gy. The effect of different immunization procedures on the irradiation-induced reaction of the serum gamma globulin levels was studied. Immunization 14 and 21 days before irradiation resulted in obvious stimulation gamma globulin production. After parenteral antigen administration the nearly 2 weeks lasting increase of the gamma globulin level rose in the irradiated animals but declined in the sham-irradiated calves. After a lethal dosis of 1.7 Gy there was a decrease of the gamma globulins 3 weeks post irradiation, at the climax of the radiation syndrome. When 1.5 Gy were used the increase of the gamma globulin concentration was observed also after oral administration of the antigen. The response of the irradiated animals in the secondary reaction of the antibody production was most lear after boosting with homologous bacteria. The stimulating effect of the irradiation on the serum globulin levels after immunization prior to irradiation has been attributed to the reaction of the immunoglobulin-producing system to the release of tissue proteins and antigens, respectively

  17. Influence of whole body irradiation on BCG contact suppression of a rat sarcoma and tumour-specific immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment has been made of the influence of host immunosuppression on Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) contact suppression of a syngenetically transplanted, highly immunogenic, 3-methylcholanthrene-induced rat sarcoma. Experiments have been carried out with transplanted cells derived from solid tissue and from an in vitro culture line, the latter excluding the possibility of transfer to immunosuppressed rats of lymphoid cells present in preparations from solid tissue. Normal or whole-body γ-irradiated (450 rad 24 hours before injection) rats were injected s.c. with mixtures of tumour cells and BCG organisms, and some of the animals received a simultaneous challenge of tumour cells alone at a contralateral subcutaneous site. Whole-body irradiation did not abrogate the local suppressive effect of BCG injected in admixture with sarcoma cells, whereas in contrast the development of tumour-specific host immunity, normally occurring concomitantly with rejection of mixed inocula, was totally abrogated by whole-body irradiation. (U.K.)

  18. The evolution of micro defects in He+ irradiated FeCrNi alloy during isochronal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the microstructural evolution of the He+ irradiated FeCrNi model alloy, 140 keV He+ ions were implanted into the specimen with the fluence of 1 × 1015 ions/cm2 at room temperature. Positron annihilation spectroscopy was used to characterize the evolution of micro defects during isochronal annealing between 423 and 873 K. The decrease of the S parameter between 573 and 623 K has been associated to the annihilation of vacancy clusters, which were not trapped by helium atom. While the decline of the S parameter between 773 and 823 K in the damage region might be caused by the dissociation of HenVm clusters. The dissociated vacancy clusters were unstable and annihilated rapidly, which decreases the concentration of vacancy defects

  19. Spontaneous radiopathological evolution and after medical treatment in two models of localized irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathophysiological evolution of a 192Ir γ-rays radio-induced muscular lesion was studied in experimental models developed in pigs and rabbits to simulate accidents which occurred among humans. Cutaneous and muscular radionecrosts started from early epithelial, microvascular and vascular lesions and late muscular and connective tissue lesions. Our therapeutic studies in pigs showed the interest of an early surgical treatment a minima. In rabbits, the association of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (flurbiprofene) and haemorrheological agent (trimetazidine) among 10 other medical treatments, given for 8 weeks after an irradiation of a 80 Gy dose at the skin surface, involved a dose reduction factor of 2, with regards to the evolution of the skin injuries and the deep muscular fibronecrotic process. Tabs

  20. Neuro-immune response and sleep studies after whole body irradiation with high-LET particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquette, C.; Bertho, J.M.; Wysoki, J.; Maubert, C.; Gerbin, R.; Aigueperse, J. [IRSN, F-92260 Fontenay Aux Roses, (France); Mathieu, J.; Galonnier, M.; Clarencon, D. [CRSSA, Dept Radiobiol and Radiopathol, F-38700 La Tronche, (France); Balanzat, E. [CEA, DSM, CIRIL, Ganil, Caen, (France)

    2009-07-01

    In order to investigate the biological effects of galactic rays on astronaut cerebral functions after space flight, mice were exposed to different heavy ions (HZE) in whole-body conditions at doses comparable to the galactic flux: {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 20}Ne (95 MeV/u, at 42-76 mGy). Animals were also exposed to 42 mGy of {sup 60}Co radiation for comparison with HZE. The neuro-immune response, evaluated by interleukin-I (IL-1) measurement, showed that this cytokine was produced 3 h after irradiation by {sup 16}O or {sup 60}Co. In contrast, neither {sup 12}C (56.7 mGy) nor {sup 20}Ne (76 mGy) induced IL-1 production. However, immunohistochemical staining of {sup 12}C-irradiated mouse brain tissue showed 2 months later a marked inflammatory reaction in the hippocampus and a diffuse response in parenchyma. Sleep studies were realized before and after exposure to 42 mGy of {sup 16}O and 76 mGy of {sup 20}Ne: only the {sup 20}Ne radiation displayed a small effect. A slight decrease in paradoxical sleep, corresponding to a reduction in the number of episodes of paradoxical sleep, was manifested between 8 and 22 days after exposure. Exposure to {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O induced no changes either in cellularity of spleen or thymus, or in caspase 3 activity (as much as four months after irradiation). Taken together, these data indicate that the CNS could be sensitive to heavy ions and that responses to HZE impact depend on the nature of the particle, the dose threshold and the time delay to develop biological processes. Differences in responses to different HZE highlight the complex biological phenomena to which astronauts are submitted during space flight. (authors)

  1. Neuro-immune response and sleep studies after whole body irradiation with high-LET particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the biological effects of galactic rays on astronaut cerebral functions after space flight, mice were exposed to different heavy ions (HZE) in whole-body conditions at doses comparable to the galactic flux: 12C, 16O and 20Ne (95 MeV/u, at 42-76 mGy). Animals were also exposed to 42 mGy of 60Co radiation for comparison with HZE. The neuro-immune response, evaluated by interleukin-I (IL-1) measurement, showed that this cytokine was produced 3 h after irradiation by 16O or 60Co. In contrast, neither 12C (56.7 mGy) nor 20Ne (76 mGy) induced IL-1 production. However, immunohistochemical staining of 12C-irradiated mouse brain tissue showed 2 months later a marked inflammatory reaction in the hippocampus and a diffuse response in parenchyma. Sleep studies were realized before and after exposure to 42 mGy of 16O and 76 mGy of 20Ne: only the 20Ne radiation displayed a small effect. A slight decrease in paradoxical sleep, corresponding to a reduction in the number of episodes of paradoxical sleep, was manifested between 8 and 22 days after exposure. Exposure to 12C and 16O induced no changes either in cellularity of spleen or thymus, or in caspase 3 activity (as much as four months after irradiation). Taken together, these data indicate that the CNS could be sensitive to heavy ions and that responses to HZE impact depend on the nature of the particle, the dose threshold and the time delay to develop biological processes. Differences in responses to different HZE highlight the complex biological phenomena to which astronauts are submitted during space flight. (authors)

  2. Stimulation of hematopoietic stem cells by interferon inducer in nonhuman primates receiving fractionated total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interferon response and hematopoietic stem cells (spleen colony forming units-CFU-S) were studied in rhesus monkeys subjected to fractionated total body irradiation (FTBI). An interferon inducer, a nuclease resistant complex of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid with poly-L-lysine and carboxmethylcellulose[-poly(ICLC)] was used. Poly(ICLC) at 3.75 mg/m2 was given I.V. to 7 monkeys, 5 of which, starting 24 hours later, received 50 rad of 4 MV X rays twice a week for 2.5 weeks (total of 250 rad). Another group of 4 monkeys received FTBI only. Although the initial interferon response was similar in both groups treated with poly(ICLC)-800 international units (IU), the animals receiving FTBI showed reduced interferon levels after 100 rad. These animals, however, did not develop the hyporesponsiveness to subsequent poly(ICLC) injections that was observed in non-irradiated monkeys. Stabile interferon response (30-100 IU) in the FTBI group paralleled the prolonged persistence of the drug in their serum. Bone marrow (BM) aspirates from animals receiving FTBI and poly(ICLC) contained more CFU-S per 106 nucleated cells than those treated with poly(ICLC) alone or FTBI alone. FTBI with and without poly(ICLC) led to thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Lower white blood cell (WBC) count was found in irradiated animals treated with poly(ICLC). Partial alopecia was observed in animals receiving poly(ICLC). Two animals--one in the poly(ICLC) and FTBI group and the other receiving FTBI alone, died with thrombocytopenia and leukopenia

  3. Stimulation of hematopoietic stem cells by interferon inducer in nonhuman primates receiving fractionated total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lvovsky, E.A. (George Washington Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC); Levine, P.H.; Bengali, Z.; Leiseca, S.A.; Cicmanec, J.L.; Robinson, J.E.; Bautro, N.; Levy, H.B.; Scott, R.M.

    1982-10-01

    Interferon response and hematopoietic stem cells (spleen colony forming units--CFU-S) were studied in rhesus monkeys subjected to fractionated total body irradiation (FTBI). An interferon inducer, a nuclease resistant complex of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid with poly-L-lysine and carboxmethylcellulose(-poly(ICLC)) was used. Poly(ICLC) at 3.75 mg/m/sup 2/ was given I.V. to 7 monkeys, 5 of which, starting 24 hours later, received 50 rad of 4 MV X rays twice a week at 2.5 weeks (total of 250 rad). Another group of 4 monkeys received FTBI only. Although the initial interferon response was similar in both groups treated wih poly(ICLC)--800 international units (IU), the animals that receiving FTBI showed reduced interferon levels after 100 rad. These animals, however, did not develop the hyporesponsiveness to subsequent poly(ICLC) injections that was observed in non-irradiated monkeys. Stabile interferon response (30-100 IU) in the FTBI group paralleled the prolonged persistence of the drug in their serum. Bone marrow (BM) aspirates from animals receiving FTBI and poly(ICLC) contained more CFU-S per 10/sup 6/ nucleated cells than those treated with poly(ICLC) along or FTBI with and without poly(ICLC) lead to thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Lower white blood cell (WBC) count was found in irradiated animals treated with poly(ICLC). Partial alopecia was observed in animals receiving poly(ICLC). Two animals--one in the poly(ICLC) and FTBI group and the other receiving FTBI along, died with thrombocytopenia and leukopenia.

  4. Catecholamines levels in hypothalamus, pineal and adrenal glands after whole body irradiation and hormone stimulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of the exposure of the whole body to continuous radiation and of the administration of serum gonadotropin (SG) and Folistiman (FSH) was studied as exerted on the concentration of catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine (NE)) in the hypothalamus, epiphysis and adrenal glands of ewes during the aneostric period with synchronized oestrus. The ewes were were exposed to continuous radiation of 60Co (on a total dose 2.48 Gy) for five days. The radiation was provided at the rate 0.020 Gy per hour. Protracted exposure to gamma radiation and hormonal stimulation with SG reduces the concentration of NE in whole hypothalamus of sheep. A decrease of norepinephrine concentrations, statistically significant in the caudal (p < 0.01) and medial hypothalamus were recorded in the ewes after hormonal stimulation with SG without irradiation. (authors)

  5. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in adults after fractionated body irradiation and high dose cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present short and long-term results of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation after hyper-fractionated total body irradiation and high dose cyclophosphamide in ten patients treated for leukaemia during th period 1985-89. Three patients died from complications connected to the transplantation, while seven are living free from leukaemia 18 to 59 months after transplantation. Two patients need treatment for chronic graft versus host disease. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is expensive and risky. Close cooperation between clinicians and laboratory specialists is essential. The treatment increases long term survival and probably cures certain patients with leukaemia. Some of the patients will need treatment for chronic graft versus host disease and other late sequelae. 19 refs., 2 tabs

  6. Incidence of cataracts in rhesus monkeys treated with whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of cataract formation was investigated in rhesus monkeys exposed to different doses of whole-body irradiation. Application of 850 to 900 rad (8.5 to 9 Gy) caused cataracts in 17% of the monkeys within 3 years after treatment; after 10 to 15 years, incidence increased to 100%. Young lenses showed a significantly lower incidence than adult lenses, although no differences in the stage of cataractogenesis could be demonstrated. Sex differences did not play a role in incidence and severity of cataracts. Lower doses (400 rad or 4 Gy) did not cause cataracts. In view of the close similarity between monkeys and humans, these results indicate that a single dose of 850 to 900 rad, sometimes employed in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia in children, carries a strong risk of cataract development

  7. Simple technique for fabrication of shielding blocks for total body irradiation at extended treatment distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandran R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Techniques are being standardized in our department for total body irradiation (TBI with six MV photons in linear accelerator for preconditioning to bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Individualized shields with low melting point alloy are to be fabricated for shielding critical organs such as lungs, kidneys etc. A method to mount diminished dimension of shields in a tray at 3.75m is designed in the department for a teletreatment distance of four meters with magna field with A simulator image taken with the patient′s midplane (MP at one meter distance is used to mark the dimensions of lung, scaled down by a factor of 3.75/4.0. These lung dimensions are reprinted from the digital simulator image for making the shield. The methodology of the technique using digitized minification in radiography is the first of its kind to be used for shield cutting in magna field radiotherapy.

  8. Disturbances in dental development after total body irradiation in bone marrow transplant recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dental status of 16 children who had been treated with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for serious bone marrow diseases was followed for up to 6 years. Several types of disturbances in dental development were observed in children who had been conditioned with total body irradiation (TBI) at 10 Gy before BMT. Thus, impaired root development that caused short V-shaped roots was found in all patients, a complete failure of root development and premature apical closure were found in five patients, enamel hypoplasia was observed in four patients, and microdontia was observed in three patients conditioned with TBI. Patients younger than 6 years of age at BMT exhibited the most severe and extensive dental aberrations. The TBI at 10 Gy appeared to be the major cause of the disturbances found

  9. Proton-beam irradiated epithelioid cell melanoma of the ciliary body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A malignant ciliary body melanoma received proton-beam irradiation. After an apparent failure of the tumor to respond, the eye was enucleated. A predominantly epithelioid cell tumor appeared viable by light microscopy, and a low degree of mitotic activity persisted, despite therapy. The tumor cells, however, displayed degenerative changes ultrastructurally, presumably results of the radiotherapy. These consisted of numerous cytoskeletal filaments, lipid vacuoles, prominent phagolysosomes, and nuclear convolutions and fragmentations. The mitochondria were fewer in number in the present tumor than typically encountered in epithelioid cells. A rare leptomeric structure was discovered, probably an organizational modification of the cytoplasmic filaments. The tumor's capillaries showed radiation-induced changes in terms of thickened basement membranes and perivascular fibrin deposition. The foregoing features are indicative of cellular and metabolic injury from the radiotherapy, but these were evidently not sufficiently injurious to sterilize the tumor

  10. Interstitial pneumonitis after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation following total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The records of 40 patients who received allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) at Hyogo College of Medicine under the same conditioning regimen using cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (TBI) from January 1984 to August 1989 were analyzed. The dose rate of TBI was 10 cGy per minute, and the total dose was 10 Gy (2.5 Gy daily for 4 days). Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) occurred in 13 of 40 patients, and was fatal in five patients. The probability of developing IP during the first year was 31%. We performed univariate analysis on the following factors but did not find any significant risk factors for IP: age and sex of patient, sex mismatch, ABO mismatch, grade of acute graft-versus-host disease, post immunosuppression regimen, and number of marrow cells transfused. (author)

  11. Cytogenetic studies on recipients of allogeneic bone marrow transplants after fractionated total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytogenetic findings from the bone marrow (BM) and the peripheral blood (PB) of nine consecutive patients after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for acute or chronic myelogenous leukaemia are reported. After a conditioning regimen consisting of cyclophosphamide and fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) given in five or six fractions of 2 Gy, persistence of host cells was detected in four out of seven cases with permanent engraftment. While one of these patients relapsed 4 months after host cells had been found in BM and PB, the other patients stayed relapse-free 124, 257 and 347 d after grafting. Before transplantation, the leukaemic cells in all three cases carried unique cytogenetic abnormalities giving the opportunity to distinguish the leukaemic population from chromosomally non-aberrant cells thought to represent residual normal host cells. As the persisting host cells after BMT lacked any cytogenetic abnormalities, it is suggested that they were members of residual normal clones not involved in the leukaemic process. (author)

  12. Cobalt-60 total body irradiation dosimetry at 220 cm source-axis distance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adults with acute leukemia are treated with cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (TBI) followed by autologous marrow transplants. For TBI, patients seated in a stand angled 450 above the floor are treated for about 2 hours at 220 cm source-axis distance (SAD) with sequential right and left lateral 87 cm x 87 cm fields to a 900 rad mid-pelvic dose at about 8 rad/min using a 5000 Ci cobalt unit. Maximum (lateral) to minimum (mid-plane) dose ratios are: hips--1.15, shoulders--1.30, and head--1.05, which is shielded by a compensator filter. Organ doses are small intestine, liver and kidneys--1100 rad, lung--1100 to 1200 rad, and heart--1300 rad. Verification dosimetry reveals the prescribed dose is delivered to within +-5%. Details of the dosimetry of this treatment are presented

  13. Effects of chronic whole-body gamma irradiation on cell mediated immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test has been used to estimate the effects of chronic, whole-body, gamma irradiation in the dog. At lower dose levels, 0.07 and 0.33 R/day to cumulative dose of about 50 and 250 R, there was no change in cell mediated immunity. Dogs at high dose levels were affected. Dogs which succumbed to aplastic anemia at high doses had reduced immunological responses. Dogs which survived these high doses showed a temporary depression. When aplastic anemia was initially noted, there was a differential response to PHA and Con-A stimulation. The response to the former mitogen was profoundly reduced, but Con-A stimulated cells were unaffected, indicative of the development of radioresistant cell lines. As the dogs progressed toward aplastic anemia, all T lympocytes were negatively affected

  14. Changes in rat plasma fibrinolytic factors during long term follow up after whole body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rats were whole body irradiated with a dose of 7.0 Gy and then bled at different times after exposure, from 1 day to 12 months; in their plasma the activity of plasmin, the level of plasminogen, the activity of plasminogen activator as well as α2-antiplasmin and α2-macroglobulin were determined. In comparison to control values obtained in parallel determinations it was found that during the acute phase of radiation disease (up to 30 days after irradiation) the activity of plasmin and the level of plasminogen underwent fluctuation: at the beginning there was an increase, followed by a decrease at later time intervals. There was also a distinct decrease (over 50%) in the activity of plasminogen activator. During the 2 to 4 weeks after exposure the activity of inhibitors was somewhat decreased, especially that of α2-macroglobulin. At later periods the level of plasminogen and the activity of plasminogen activator returned to normal but that of plasmin underwent fluctuation again, reaching a significant decrease in activity 6 and 12 months after exposure. At these time points also some decrease in activity of inhibitors was observed, especially in that of α2-macroglobulin. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs. (author)

  15. Stability of the translocation frequency following whole-body irradiation measured in rhesus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, J. N.; Hill, F. S.; Burk, C. E.; Cox, A. B.; Straume, T.

    1996-01-01

    Chromosome translocations are persistent indicators of prior exposure to ionizing radiation and the development of 'chromosome painting' to efficiently detect translocations has resulted in a powerful biological dosimetry tool for radiation dose reconstruction. However, the actual stability of the translocation frequency with time after exposure must be measured before it can be used reliably to obtain doses for individuals exposed years or decades previously. Human chromosome painting probes were used here to measure reciprocal translocation frequencies in cells from two tissues of 8 rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) irradiated almost three decades previously. Six of the monkeys were exposed in 1965 to whole-body (fully penetrating) radiation and two were unexposed controls. The primates were irradiated as juveniles to single doses of 0.56, 1.13, 2.00, or 2.25 Gy. Blood lymphocytes (and skin fibroblasts from one individual) were obtained for cytogenetic analysis in 1993, near the end of the animals' lifespans. Results show identical dose-response relationships 28 y after exposure in vivo and immediately after exposure in vitro. Because chromosome aberrations are induced with identical frequencies in vivo and in vitro, these results demonstrate that the translocation frequencies induced in 1965 have not changed significantly during the almost three decades since exposure. Finally, our emerging biodosimetry data for individual radiation workers are now confirming the utility of reciprocal translocations measured by FISH in radiation dose reconstruction.

  16. Total Body Irradiation for Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between July 1987 and December 1992, we treated 22 patients with chromic myelogenous leukemia; 14 in the chronic phase and 8 with more advanced disease. All were received with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from HLA-identical sibling donors after a total body irradiation (TBI) cyclophosphamide conditioning regimen. Patients were non-randomly assigned to either 1200 cGy/6 fractions/3 days (6 patients) or 1320 cGy/8 fractions/4 days (16 patients) by dose of TBI. Of the 22 patients, 8 were prepared with cyclophosphamide alone, 14 were conditioned with additional adriamycin or daunorubicin. To prevent graft versus host disease, cyclosporine was given either alone or in conjunction with methotrexate. The actuarial survival and leukemic-free survival at four years were 58.5% and 41.2%, respectively, and the relapse rate was 36% among 22 patients. There was a statistically significant difference in survival between the patients in chronic phase and more advanced phase (76% vs 33%, p=0.05). The relapse rate of patients receiving splenectomy was higher than that of patients receiving splenic irradiation (50% vs 0%, p=0.04). We conclude that the probability of cure is highest if transplantation is performed while the patient remains in the chronic phase

  17. Effect of whole body neutron irradiation on certain enzyme activities in different brain areas in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Male swiss albino mice were exposed to whole-body irradiation by fast neutrons of 14 MeV average energy. Two single doses of 0.08 sievert and 0.16 sievert were used, corresponding to fluences of 1.27 X 108 and 2.54 X 108 n/cm2 respectively. Two enzymes were assessed in different layers of the cerebrum and cerebellum of mouse brain. Changes in the activities of acid phosphatase (ACP) and succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) were taken to measure alterations in lysosomal and mitochondrial functions respectively. The degrees of lysosomal affection in different layers of the cerebrum were not uniform, while changes in A activity were very prominent in certain layers (e.g. external pyramidal layer, polymorphous cells layer and white matter), they were practically absent in others (e.g. internal pyramidal layer). Stronger effect was noted in the tissue layers of the cerebellum. The activity of SDH decreased as result of fast neutron irradiation. The response was more apparent for this enzyme than for ACP. This indicates more liability for a decrease in energy metabolism with consequent effect on behavioural and physiological functions under central nervous system control. 4 figs., 4 tabs

  18. The influences of a whole body irradiation on the host immune system in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of a whole body irradiation in mice was studied. Marked depression of the absolute lymphocyte count in the spleen and the peripheral blood was observed within 24 hour, with 300 rad. The count began to recover on day 4 in the spleen and completely recovered in about 4 weeks in the spleen and the peripheral blood. Incorporation of [3H]-TdR in the splenolymphocytes was reduced on day 1 postirradiation, however, the rate of [3H]-TdR-labeled cells per number of splenolymphocytes increased temporarily on day 1 and 4 postirradiation and, later, recovered quickly. Labeling index was enhanced only on day 4 postirradiation. In the case of the relative radiosensitivity of B lymphocytes, measured by antibody formation against SRBC, plaque-forming capacities were observed when antigens were injected into mice before or after irradiation. The capacities were extremely suppressed in each experimental groups. Cytotoxic activities against VX2-carcinoma cells were examined by microcytotoxicity assay. The activities increased more than 3 fold, both before immunization and on day 15 postirradiation, suggesting that B lymphocytes in antibody formation against SRBC were more radiosensitive than cytotoxic T lymphocytes against xenogeneic cells. Transfusion of splenolymphocyted labeled with [3H]-TdR was observed on day 4, which appeared to compensate for that of [51Cr]-labeled one. When [51Cr] labeled T lymphocytes were transfused intravenously, trapping and negative trapping of the lymphocytes were observed in spleen and in peripheral blood, respectively. (Ueda, J.)

  19. Total Body Irradiation for Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Su Mi; Choi, Ihl Bohng; Kang, Ki Mun; Kim, In Ah; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Kim, Choon Choo; Kim, Dong Jip [Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-06-15

    Between July 1987 and December 1992, we treated 22 patients with chromic myelogenous leukemia; 14 in the chronic phase and 8 with more advanced disease. All were received with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from HLA-identical sibling donors after a total body irradiation (TBI) cyclophosphamide conditioning regimen. Patients were non-randomly assigned to either 1200 cGy/6 fractions/3 days (6 patients) or 1320 cGy/8 fractions/4 days (16 patients) by dose of TBI. Of the 22 patients, 8 were prepared with cyclophosphamide alone, 14 were conditioned with additional adriamycin or daunorubicin. To prevent graft versus host disease, cyclosporine was given either alone or in conjunction with methotrexate. The actuarial survival and leukemic-free survival at four years were 58.5% and 41.2%, respectively, and the relapse rate was 36% among 22 patients. There was a statistically significant difference in survival between the patients in chronic phase and more advanced phase (76% vs 33%, p=0.05). The relapse rate of patients receiving splenectomy was higher than that of patients receiving splenic irradiation (50% vs 0%, p=0.04). We conclude that the probability of cure is highest if transplantation is performed while the patient remains in the chronic phase.

  20. Dosimetric aspects of inverse-planned modulated-arc total-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop optimal beam parameters and to verify the dosimetric aspects of the recently developed modulated-arc total-body irradiation (MATBI) technique, which delivers an inverse-planned dose to the entire body using gantry rotation. Methods: The patient is positioned prone and supine underneath the gantry at about 2 m source-to-surface distance (SSD). Then, up to 28 beams irradiate the patient from different gantry angles. Based on full-body computed-tomography (CT) images of the patient, the weight of each beam is optimized, using inverse planning, to create a uniform body dose. This study investigates how to best simulate patients and the ideal beam setup parameters, such as field size, number of beams, and beam geometry, for treatment time and dose homogeneity. In addition, three anthropomorphic water phantoms were constructed and utilized to verify the accuracy of dose delivery, with both diode array and ion chamber measurements. Furthermore, to improve the accuracy of the new technique, a beam model is created specifically for the extended-SSD positioning for MATBI. Results: Low dose CT scans can be utilized for dose calculations without affecting the accuracy. The largest field size of 40 × 40 cm2 was found to deliver the most uniform dose in the least amount of time. Moreover, a higher number of beams improves dose homogeneity. The average dose discrepancy between ion chamber measurements and extended-SSD beam model calculations was 1.2%, with the largest discrepancy being 3.2%. This average dose discrepancy was 1.4% with the standard beam model for delivery at isocenter. Conclusions: The optimum beam setup parameters, regarding dose uniformity and treatment duration, are laid out for modulated-arc TBI. In addition, the presented dose measurements show that these treatments can be delivered accurately. These measurements also indicated that a new beam model did not significantly improve the accuracy of dose calculations. The optimum beam setup

  1. Formation and evolution of point defects created in alkali halogen compounds irradiated by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to achieve a better understanding of the heavy-ion material interaction. Alkali halogen crystals were chosen since the color centers produced by heavy ions can be distinguished easier from those generated by X rays. Measurements on KI irradiated at low temperature showed that the usual process of non radiative de-excitation of self-captured exciton is not prevailing. As the main objective of this work was the exact determination of the defects created by accelerated heavy ions, an important effort was dedicated to the spectrum deconvolution. Due to the high quality of the obtained spectra the V band analyse was possible. The defect stability was found to have the same nature in all the cubical alkali halogens and depend essentially on the crystal type. The defect evolution after irradiation is related to the diffusion coefficients corresponding to each mobile species and to the crystal lattice in which they move. Based on measurements made at different temperatures a simple modeling of the recombination kinetics was proposed. This effect was found to be specific to irradiation by heavy ions. It is difficult to determine the initial processes from the fossil defects, so, the defect history must be known as the described investigation methods do not permit to establish the transient aspect of defect creation. The important role of impurities should be stressed as the third intruder in the ion/crystal configuration; it can modify significantly the final state of the irradiated crystal, as it was found in KI, for instance. The open problems underlined in this study will probably be solved by using the atomic force microscopy and diffraction or on-line Raman measurements in ISOC chamber to avoid the passage to ambient conditions of the crystals irradiated at low temperatures

  2. Sesamol attenuates genotoxicity in bone marrow cells of whole-body γ-irradiated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Selvan, Tamizh G; Tripathi, Akanchha M; Choudhary, Sandeep; Khan, Shahanshah; Adhikari, Jawahar S; Chaudhury, Nabo K

    2015-09-01

    Ionising radiation causes free radical-mediated damage in cellular DNA. This damage is manifested as chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei (MN) in proliferating cells. Sesamol, present in sesame seeds, has the potential to scavenge free radicals; therefore, it can reduce radiation-induced cytogenetic damage in cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the radioprotective potential of sesamol in bone marrow cells of mice and related haematopoietic system against radiation-induced genotoxicity. A comparative study with melatonin was designed for assessing the radioprotective potential of sesamol. C57BL/6 mice were administered intraperitoneally with either sesamol or melatonin (10 and 20mg/kg body weight) 30 min prior to 2-Gy whole-body irradiation (WBI) and sacrificed after 24h. Total chromosomal aberrations (TCA), MN and cell cycle analyses were performed using bone marrow cells. The comet assay was performed on bone marrow cells, splenocytes and lymphocytes. Blood was drawn to study haematological parameters. Prophylactic doses of sesamol (10 and 20mg/kg) in irradiated mice reduced TCA and micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte frequency in bone marrow cells by 57% and 50%, respectively, in comparison with radiation-only groups. Sesamol-reduced radiation-induced apoptosis and facilitated cell proliferation. In the comet assay, sesamol (20mg/kg) treatment reduced radiation-induced comets (% DNA in tail) compared with radiation only (P < 0.05). Sesamol also increased granulocyte populations in peripheral blood similar to melatonin. Overall, the radioprotective efficacy of sesamol was found to be similar to that of melatonin. Sesamol treatment also showed recovery of relative spleen weight at 24h of WBI. The results strongly suggest the radioprotective efficacy of sesamol in the haematopoietic system of mice. PMID:25863274

  3. Chondrosarcoma arising within a radiation-induced osteochondroma several years following childhood total body irradiation: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant degeneration arising in radiation-induced osteochondromas is extremely rare. We report a case of a 34-year-old man with a chondrosarcoma arising from an osteochondroma of the left posterior eighth rib that developed following total body irradiation received as part of the conditioning regimen prior to bone marrow transplantation at age 8. To our knowledge, this is only the fourth reported case of a chondrosarcoma arising within a radiation-induced osteochondroma and the first case occurring following childhood total body irradiation. (orig.)

  4. Effects of body size and lifestyle on evolution of mammal life histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibly, Richard M; Brown, James H

    2007-11-01

    It has recently been proposed that life-history evolution is subject to a fundamental size-dependent constraint. This constraint limits the rate at which biomass can be produced so that production per unit of body mass is inevitably slower in larger organisms than in smaller ones. Here we derive predictions for how changes in body size and production rates evolve in different lifestyles subject to this constraint. Predictions are tested by using data on the mass of neonate tissue produced per adult per year in 637 placental mammal species and are generally supported. Compared with terrestrial insectivores with generalized primitive traits, mammals that have evolved more specialized lifestyles have divergent mass-specific production rates: (i) increased in groups that specialize on abundant and reliable foods: grazing and browsing herbivores (artiodactyls, lagomorphs, perissodactyls, and folivorous rodents) and flesh-eating marine mammals (pinnipeds, cetaceans); and (ii) decreased in groups that have lifestyles with reduced death rates: bats, primates, arboreal, fossorial, and desert rodents, bears, elephants, and rhinos. Convergent evolution of groups with similar lifestyles is common, so patterns of productivity across mammalian taxa reflect both ecology and phylogeny. The overall result is that groups with different lifestyles have parallel but offset relationships between production rate and body size. These results shed light on the evolution of the fast-slow life-history continuum, suggesting that variation occurs along two axes corresponding to body size and lifestyle. PMID:17940028

  5. Evolution of ensemble of second phase particles under cascade-producing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of size distribution function of second phase precipitates in a binary substitutional alloy under cascade-producing irradiation was studied. The main mechanisms affecting phase stability, namely, radiation-enhanced diffusion, nonequilibrium segregation and cascade mixing were taken into account. The radiation-modified phase diagram - an analog of the equilibrium Gibbs diagram was constructed. The evolution of alloy phase microstructure was shown to depend both on the type of interphase boundaries and temperature range. It is shown that evolution of small precipitates (as compared to cascade size) and large precipitates differs. Small precipitates nucleate continuously and grow until destruction by a few cascades. Large precipitates can survive cascade mixing and grow. The equations describing evolution of both small and large precipitates were formulated. The asymptotic behavior of solutions of these equations was investigated. It was shown that the nucleation of small precipitates can reduce substantially the stability of large precipitates. The theoretical predictions were compared with experimental data for Ni-based alloy.37 refs., 9 figs

  6. Total-body irradiation and bone-marrow transplantation - first observations on clinical tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 50 000 bone-marrow transplantations (BMT) are performed annually at the present stage in numerous clinical centers all over the world. The Bulgarian experience in total-body irradiation (TBI) with following BMT is rather scarce. The routine TBI procedures in the oncological practice in the country date back just to 2001. The aim of the present publication is to describe the Bulgarian experience and the first impressions from the clinical tolerance of the total-body irradiation (TBI) with subsequent allogeneic peripheral stem cell transplantation (PSCT). Patient characteristics are presented in detail, including their distribution with respect to sex, age, primary diagnose, recurrence number till BMT, patient status during BMT performance (clinical hematological remission or relapse), as well as the basic parameters of the conditioning regime including TBI with subsequent allogeneic PSCT. The position of the patient and the applied radiotherapeutic equipment are described as well as the TBI schemes, respectively 5 fractions of 2 Gy per day for two patients and 3-day irradiation with 6 fractions (two fractions with a 6-hour interval between them) for the rest of the patients. The total dose (TD) of 10 Gy is realized for all patients. The clinical tolerance of 7 patients subjected to TBI and allogeneic PSCT is discussed. All patients were tolerable to the TBI treatment and had no serious problems. The radiotherapy was interrupted only in the case of the first two patients due to slight gastro-intestinal reactions. The first days of radiation were accompanied with a light degree of headache, nausea and vomiting, which were successfully overcome by granisetron. Diarrhea syndrome and mucositis to the II-III degree were developed subsequently without parotitis development. On the days 0 and +1 of the clinical protocol transplantation was realized of non- T-cell-depleted grafts (in 5 patients) and T-cell-depleted grafts (in 2 patients), which had no serious

  7. Spatially dependent cluster dynamics modeling of microstructure evolution in low energy helium irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In fusion reactors, plasma facing components (PFC) and in particular the divertor will be irradiated with high fluxes of low energy (∼100 eV) helium and hydrogen ions. Tungsten is one of the leading candidate divertor materials for ITER and DEMO fusion reactors. However, the behavior of tungsten under high dose, coupled helium/hydrogen exposure remains to be fully understood. The PFC response and performance changes are intimately related to microstructural changes, such as the formation of point defect clusters, helium and hydrogen bubbles or dislocation loops. Computational materials modeling has been used to investigate the mechanisms controlling microstructural evolution in tungsten following high dose, high temperature helium exposure. The aim of this study is to understand and predict helium implantation, primary defect production and defect diffusion, helium-defect clustering and interactions below a tungsten surface exposed to low energy helium irradiation. The important defects include interstitial clusters, vacancy clusters, helium interstitials and helium-vacancy clusters. We report results from a one-dimensional, spatially dependent cluster dynamics model based on the continuum reaction–diffusion rate theory to describe the evolution in space and time of all these defects. The key parameter inputs to the model (diffusion coefficients, migration and binding energies, initial defect production) are determined from a combination of atomistic materials modeling and available experimental data. (paper)

  8. The Primary Origin of Dose Rate Effects on Microstructural Evolution of Austenitic Alloys During Neutron Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of dose rate on neutron-induced microstructural evolution was experimentally estimated. Solution-annealed austenitic model alloys were irradiated at approximately 400 degrees C with fast neutrons at seven different dose rates that vary more than two orders difference in magnitude, and two different doses were achieved at each dose rate. Both cavity nucleation and growth were found to be enhanced at lower dose rate. The net vacancy flux is calculated from the growth rate of cavities that had already nucleated during the first cycle of irradiation and grown during the second cycle. The net vacancy flux was found to be proportional to (dpa/sec) exp (1/2) up to 28.8 dpa and 8.4 x 10 exp (-7) dpa/sec. This implies that mutual recombination dominates point defect annihilation, in this experiment even though point defect sinks such as cavities and dislocations were well developed. Thus, mutual recombination is thought to be the primary origin of the effect of dose rate on microstructural evolution

  9. Caffeine and Aspirin Protecting Albino Rats A gainst Biochemical and Histological Disorders Induced by Whole Body Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine is an alkaloid (purine derivative) that contains flavonoids, where as aspirin, natural component of mammalian tissue ( acetylsalicylic acid) is one of the most commonly used non steroidal anti - inflammatory , and it is a necessary factor in the utilization of long - chain fatty acids to produce energy. Furthermore, it has been shown to protect cells from per oxidative stress. Th e objective of the present study is to evaluate the efficacy of caffeine (1,3,7 - trimethyl xanthine) 80 mg/kg b.wt. a nd aspirin ( acetylsalicylic acid) in the amelioration of the physiological and histological changes in stomach and intestine of rats exposed to gamma irradiation . Male albino rats were divided into 8 groups. 1 - Control group: rats not subject to any treatment, 2 - Caffeine group: rats received caffeine ( 80 ml/Kg body weight )via intraperitoneal injection for 21 days, 3 - Aspirin group: rats received aspirin (150 mg / kg body) via intraperitoneal injection for 21 days , 4 - Caffeine + Aspirin group: rats received caffeine a nd aspirin treatment, 5 - Radiation groups: rats were whole body gamma irradiated at 8 Gy , 6 - Caffeine + Radiation group: rats received caffeine for 21 days before whole body gamma irradiation at 8 Gy, 7 - Aspirin + Radiation group: rats received aspirin during 21 days before w hole body gamma irradiation , 8 - Caffeine + Aspirin + Radiation group: rats received caffeine parallel to aspirin for 21 days before whole body gamma irradiation. Animals were sacrificed 24 hrs post irradiation. The results demonstrated that rats exposed to whole body gamma irradiation showed a significant increase in alanine amino transferase (AL ) , aspartate amino transferase ( AST), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities, and a significant decrease in total protein indicating liver injury. A significant increase in urea, creatinine, Na+,and K+ were recorded indicating kidney damage. Alteration of liver and kidney functions was accompanied by a significant

  10. Body composition in Pan paniscus compared with Homo sapiens has implications for changes during human evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Zihlman, AL; Bolter, DR

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. The human body has been shaped by natural selection during the past 4-5 million years. Fossils preserve bones and teeth but lack muscle, skin, fat, and organs. To understand the evolution of the human form, information about both soft and hard tissues of our ancestors is needed. Our closest living relatives of the genus Pan provide the best comparative model to those ancestors. Here, we present data on the body composition of 13 bonob...

  11. Total body irradiation in intensive treatment necessitating bone marrow graft, of malignant hematological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1980 to 1988, 65 consecutive patients were treated with a program of intensive chemotherapy and total body irradiation (TBI) for malignant hematological diseases at the Institut Jules-Bordet. Results were analyzed according to different prognostic factors as well as to the radiation technique; 3 different schedules were used: 3 fractions of 2.66 Gy given in one day at 3-h intervals, 6 daily fractions of 2 Gy in 6 days and 7 fractions of 2.25 Gy in 8 days. The second radiation schedule appears to give the best results as relapses were higher with the 1-day program and there was an increase in later effects and early deaths with 7 fractions of 2.25 Gy. Nevertheless, the results indicate that after administration of 5 or 6 times 2 Gy TBI, there might be possible benefit in treating certain parts of the body by radiation, those in particular that could be sanctuary sites for malignant cells from chemotherapy. The authors propose a simple and easy way of uniformizing the radiation schedule to carry out a multicentric trial

  12. Stellar growth by disk accretion: the effect of disk irradiation on the protostellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Rafikov, Roman R

    2007-01-01

    Young stars are expected to gain most of their mass by accretion from a disk that forms around them as a result of angular momentum conservation in the collapsing protostellar cloud. Accretion initially proceeds at high rates of 10^{-6}-10^{-5} M_Sun/yr resulting in strong irradiation of the stellar surface by the hot inner portion of the disk and leading to the suppression of the intrinsic stellar luminosity. Here we investigate how this luminosity suppression affects evolution of the protostellar properties. Using simple model based on the energy balance of accreting star we demonstrate that disk irradiation causes only a slight increase of the protostellar radius, at the level of several per cent. Such a weak effect is explained by a minor role played by the intrinsic stellar luminosity (at the time when it is significantly altered by irradiation) in the protostellar energy budget compared to the stellar deuterium burning luminosity and the inflow of the gravitational potential energy brought in by the fre...

  13. Numerical atomic scale simulations of the microstructural evolution of ferritic alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we have developed a model of point defect (vacancies and interstitials) diffusion whose aim is to simulate by kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) the formation of solute rich clusters observed experimentally in irradiated FeCuNiMnSi model alloys and in pressure vessel steels. Electronic structure calculations have been used to characterize the interactions between point defects and the different solute atoms. Each of these solute atoms establishes an attractive bond with the vacancy. As for Mn, which is the element which has the weakest bond with the vacancy, it establishes more favourable bonds with interstitials. Binding energies, migration energies as well as other atomic scale properties, determined by ab initio calculations, have led to a parameter set for the KMC code. Firstly, these parameters have been optimised on thermal ageing experiments realised on the FeCu binary alloy and on complex alloys, described in the literature. The vacancy diffusion thermal annealing simulations show that when a vacancy is available, all the solutes migrate and form clusters, in agreement with the observed experimental tendencies. Secondly, to simulate the microstructural evolution under irradiation, we have introduced interstitials in the KMC code. Their presence leads to a more efficient transport of Mn. The first simulations of electron and neutron irradiations show that the model results are globally qualitatively coherent with the experimentally observed tendencies. (author)

  14. Thermophysical property and pore structure evolution in stressed and non-stressed neutron irradiated IG-110 nuclear graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, L. L.; Contescu, C. I.; Byun, T. S.; Porter, W.

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear graphite, IG-110, was irradiated with and without a compressive load of 5 MPa at ∼400 °C up to 9.3 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Following irradiation physical properties were studied to compare the effect of graphite irradiation on microstructure developed under compression and in stress-free conditions. Properties included: dimensional change, thermal conductivity, dynamic modulus, and CTE. The effect of stress on open internal porosity was determined through nitrogen adsorption. The IG-110 graphite experienced irradiation-induced creep that is differentiated from irradiation-induced swelling. Irradiation under stress resulted in somewhat greater thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion. While a significant increase in dynamic modulus occurs, no differentiation between materials irradiated with and without compressive stress was observed. Nitrogen adsorption analysis suggests a difference in pore evolution in the 0.3-40 nm range for graphite irradiated with and without stress, but this evolution is seen to be a small contributor to the overall dimensional change.

  15. Thermophysical property and pore structure evolution in stressed and non-stressed neutron irradiated IG-110 nuclear graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Lance; Contescu, Christian I.; Byun, Thak Sang; Porter, Wallace D.

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear graphite, IG-110, was irradiated with and without a compressive load of 5 MPa at ~400 *C up to 9.3E25 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Following irradiation physical properties were studied to compare the effect of graphite irradiation on microstructure developed under compression and in stress-free conditions. Properties included: dimensional change, thermal conductivity, dynamic modulus, and CTE. The effect of stress on open internal porosity was determined through nitrogen adsorption. The IG-110 graphite experienced irradiation-induced creep that is differentiated from irradiation-induced swelling. Irradiation under stress resulted in somewhat greater thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion. While a significant increase in dynamic modulus occurs, no differentiation between materials irradiated with and without compressive stress was observed. Nitrogen adsorption analysis suggests a difference in pore evolution in the 0.3e40 nm range for graphite irradiated with and without stress, but this evolution is seen to be a small contributor to the overall dimensional change.

  16. Gene Expression Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue Following Whole-Body Proton or Gamma-Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purgason, Ashley; Zhang, Ye; Mangala, Lingegowda; Nie, Ying; Gridley, Daila; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Seidel, Derek V.; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Crew members face potential consequences following exposure to the space radiation environment including acute radiation syndrome and cancer. The space radiation environment is ample with protons, and numerous studies have been devoted to the understanding of the health consequences of proton exposures. In this project, C57BL/6 mice underwent whole-body exposure to 250 MeV of protons at doses of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 2 and 6 Gy and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation. Standard H&E staining methods to screen for morphologic changes in the tissue showed an increase in apoptotic lesions for even the lowest dose of 0.1 Gy, and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased with increasing dose. Results of gene expression changes showed consistent up- or down- regulation, up to 10 fold, of a number of genes across exposure doses that may play a role in proton-induced oxidative stress including Gpx2. A separate study in C57BL/6 mice using the same four hour time point but whole-body gamma-irradiation showed damage to the small intestine with lesions appearing at the smallest dose of 0.05 Gy and increasing with increasing absorbed dose. Expressions of genes associated with oxidative stress processes were analyzed at four hours and twenty-four hours after exposure to gamma rays. We saw a much greater number of genes with significant up- or down-regulation twenty-four hours post-exposure as compared to the four hour time point. At both four hours and twenty-four hours post-exposure, Duox1 and Mpo underwent up-regulation for the highest dose of 6 Gy. Both protons and gamma rays lead to significant variation in gene expressions and these changes may provide insight into the mechanism of injury seen in the GI tract following radiation exposure. We have also completed experiments using a BALB/c mouse model undergoing whole-body exposure to protons. Doses of 0, 0.1, 1 and 2 Gy were used and results will be compared to the work mentioned

  17. Previsions of the microstructural evolution of ferritic alloys under irradiation by numerical atomic scale simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we have improved a diffusion model for point defects (vacancies and self-interstitials) by introducing hetero-interstitials. The model has been used to simulate by Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) the formation of solute rich clusters that are observed experimentally in irradiated ferritic model alloys of type Fe - CuMnNiSiP - C.Electronic structure calculations have been used to characterize the interactions between self-interstitials and all solute atoms, and also carbon. P interacts with vacancies and strongly with self-interstitials. Mn also interacts with self-interstitials to form mixed dumbbells. C, with occupies octahedral sites, interacts strongly with vacancies and less with self-interstitials. Binding and migration energies, as well as others atomic scale properties, obtained by ab initio calculations, have been used as parameters for the KMC code. Firstly, these parameters have been optimized over isochronal annealing experiments, in the literature, of binary alloys that have been electron-irradiated. Isochronal annealing simulations, by reproducing experimental results, have allowed us to link each mechanism to a single evolution of the resistivity during annealing. Moreover, solubility limits of all the elements have been determined by Metropolis Monte Carlo. Secondly, we have simulated the evolution at 300 C of the microstructure under irradiation of different alloys of increasing complexity: pure Fe, binary alloys, ternaries, quaternaries, and finally complex alloys which compositions are close to those of pressure vessel steels. The results show that the model globally reproduces all the experimental tendencies, what has led us to propose mechanisms to explain the behaviours observed. (author)

  18. Origin and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance: The Common Mechanisms of Emergence and Spread in Water Bodies

    OpenAIRE

    ThomasUlrichBerendonk; SebastienCoyne

    2012-01-01

    The environment, and especially freshwater, constitutes a reactor where the evolution and the rise of new resistances occur. In water bodies such as waste water effluents, lakes, and rivers or streams, bacteria from different sources, e.g., urban, industrial, and agricultural waste, probably selected by intensive antibiotic usage, are collected and mixed with environmental species. This may cause two effects on the development of antibiotic resistances: first, the contamination of water by an...

  19. Nonlinear evolution of tidally forced inertial waves in rotating fluid bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Favier, B.; Barker, A.J.; Baruteau, C.; Ogilvie, G. I.

    2014-01-01

    We perform one of the first studies into the nonlinear evolution of tidally excited inertial waves in a uniformly rotating fluid body, exploring a simplified model of the fluid envelope of a planet (or the convective envelope of a solar-type star) subject to the gravitational tidal perturbations of an orbiting companion. Our model contains a perfectly rigid spherical core, which is surrounded by an envelope of incompressible uniform density fluid. The corresponding linear problem was studied ...

  20. Biochemical and histological changes in whole body gamma-irradiated rats feed on wheat, barely and corn bran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work aims to study the effect of adding 3 different of dietary fibers (wheat, barley or corn bran) to normal balanced diet on liver function, blood, cholesterol, triglycerides and blood glucose level to counteract their elevation in whole body gamma irradiation rats. The experimental diets (balanced diet + fibre additive) were fed for 4 weeks. Samples (blood and tissue) were collected at intervals of times 7, 14 and 28 days post exposure to single dose (7 Gy) gamma irradiation. The control group consumed a fibre diet for 4 weeks, but not irradiated. The minimum aspartate amino-transferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities and the lowest blood total cholestrol, triglycerides and blood glucose were observed in rats (irradiated and non-irradiated rats) fed on wheat bran experimental diet (barley or corn bran). It could be concluded that wheat fibers were more effective, as compared with other fibers contained in balanced diet, in improving the investigated parameters observed after whole body gamma irradiation exposure

  1. Protective Effects of Ibuprofen and L-Carnitine Against Whole Body Gamma Irradiation-Induced Duodenal Mucosal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meryem Akpolat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ibuprofen and L-carnitine have been demonstrated to provide radioprotective activity to the hamster against whole body sublethal irradiation. The purpose of this study is to test those antioxidant drugs, each of which has the capacity of inhibiting mucosal injury, as topical radioprotectants for the intestine. Material and Methods: The male hamsters were divided into the following four groups (n=6: group 1: control group, received saline, 1 ml/100 g by gavage, as placebo. Group 2: irradiated-control group, received whole body irradiation of 8 Gy as a single dose plus physiological saline. The animals in groups 3 and 4 were given a daily dose of 10 mg/kg of ibuprofen and 50 mg/kg of L-carnitine for 15 days respectively, before irradiation with a single dose of 8 Gy. Twenty-four hours after radiation exposure, the hamsters were sacrificed and samples were taken from the duodenum, and the histopatological determinations were carried out. Results: Morphologically, examination of the gamma irradiated duodenum revealed the presence of shortening and thickening of villi and flattening of enterocytes, massive subepithelial lifting. Pretreatment of ibuprofen and L-carnitine with irradiation reduced these histopathological changes. Conclusion: Ibuprofen and L-carnitine administrated by the oral route may be a good radioprotector against small intestinal damage in patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  2. Comparison of /sup 32/P therapy and sequential hemibody irradiation (HBI) for bony metastases as methods of whole body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, H.; Choi, K.; Sohn, C.; Yaes, R.; Rotman, M.

    1986-06-01

    We report a retrospective study of 15 patients with prostate carcinoma and diffuse bone metastases treated with sodium /sup 32/P for palliation of pain at Downstate Medical Center and Kings County Hospital from 1973 to 1978. The response rates, duration of response, and toxicities are compared with those of other series of patients treated with /sup 32/P and with sequential hemibody irradiation. The response rates and duration of response are similar with both modalities ranging from 58 to 95% with a duration of 3.3 to 6 months with /sup 32/P and from 75 to 86% with a median duration of 5.5 months with hemibody irradiation. There are significant differences in the patterns of response and in the toxicities of the two treatment methods. Both methods cause significant bone marrow depression. Acute radiation syndrome, radiation pneumonitis, and alopecia are seen with sequential hemibody irradiation and not with /sup 32/P, but their incidence can be reduced by careful treatment planning. Hemibody irradiation can provide pain relief within 24 to 48 h, while /sup 32/P may produce an initial exacerbation of pain. Lower hemibody irradiation alone is less toxic than either upper hemibody irradiation or /sup 32/P treatment.

  3. Comparison of 32P therapy and sequential hemibody irradiation (HBI) for bony metastases as methods of whole body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a retrospective study of 15 patients with prostate carcinoma and diffuse bone metastases treated with sodium 32P for palliation of pain at Downstate Medical Center and Kings County Hospital from 1973 to 1978. The response rates, duration of response, and toxicities are compared with those of other series of patients treated with 32P and with sequential hemibody irradiation. The response rates and duration of response are similar with both modalities ranging from 58 to 95% with a duration of 3.3 to 6 months with 32P and from 75 to 86% with a median duration of 5.5 months with hemibody irradiation. There are significant differences in the patterns of response and in the toxicities of the two treatment methods. Both methods cause significant bone marrow depression. Acute radiation syndrome, radiation pneumonitis, and alopecia are seen with sequential hemibody irradiation and not with 32P, but their incidence can be reduced by careful treatment planning. Hemibody irradiation can provide pain relief within 24 to 48 h, while 32P may produce an initial exacerbation of pain. Lower hemibody irradiation alone is less toxic than either upper hemibody irradiation or 32P treatment

  4. Hydrogen gas evolution from water included in a silica gel cavity and on metal oxides with γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen gas evolution from water induced with γ-ray irradiation of silica gels and metal oxides dispersed in water is studied by examining the hydrogen gas evolved. Hydrogen gas is detected by gas chromatography after 60Co γ-ray irradiation of the sample solution in a closed vial at room temperature. Water adsorbed on the surface of metal oxides shows more evolution of hydrogen gas than pure water. Hydrogen gas evolution is maximized in the silica gels when the size of a silica gel cavity is about 2 nm, being on the order of spur size. The most active surface toward the decomposition of water upon γ-ray irradiation is that of SiO2 dried at 100degC after sample preparation. (author)

  5. Can foraging ecology drive the evolution of body size in a diving endotherm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothée R Cook

    Full Text Available Within a single animal species, different morphs can allow for differential exploitation of foraging niches between populations, while sexual size dimorphism can provide each sex with access to different resources. Despite being potentially important agents of evolution, resource polymorphisms, and the way they operate in wild populations, remain poorly understood. In this study, we examine how trophic factors can select for different body sizes between populations and sexes in a diving endotherm. Dive depth and duration are positively related to body size in diving birds and mammals, a relationship explained by a lower mass-specific metabolic rate and greater oxygen stores in larger individuals. Based on this allometry, we predict that selection for exploiting resources situated at different depths can drive the evolution of body size in species of diving endotherms at the population and sexual level. To test this prediction, we studied the foraging ecology of Blue-eyed Shags, a group of cormorants with male-biased sexual size dimorphism from across the Southern Ocean. We found that mean body mass and relative difference in body mass between sexes varied by up to 77% and 107% between neighbouring colonies, respectively. Birds from colonies with larger individuals dived deeper than birds from colonies with smaller individuals, when accounting for sex. In parallel, males dived further offshore and deeper than females and the sexual difference in dive depth reflected the level of sexual size dimorphism at each colony. We argue that body size in this group of birds is under intense selection for diving to depths of profitable benthic prey patches and that, locally, sexual niche divergence selection can exaggerate the sexual size dimorphism of Blue-eyed Shags initially set up by sexual selection. Our findings suggest that trophic resources can select for important geographic micro-variability in body size between populations and sexes.

  6. The effects of whole-body irradiation on the serum levels and kinetics of thyroid hormones in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of a single whole-body dose of X-rays on the serum levels and kinetics of thyroid hormones in rats were studied. The influence of radiation-induced anorexia was monitored by using pair fed control groups. A dose of 800 rad caused a reduction in T4 levels and 750 rad had a similar effect on T3; in each case the control group showed a smaller reduction. The kinetic results indicated that, in the control groups, the early reduction in hormone concentrations was caused by decreased production, whereas, in the irradiated groups, it was caused by a change in the distribution of the hormone; however the continuing reduction in hormone levels in the irradiated rats appeared to result from decreased production. The results suggest that the thyroid system may play an active part in the early metabolic changes which follow whole-body irradiation. (author)

  7. Impairment of adrenal Gland in albino rat embryo in response to polytrin contamination and/or whole body gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, investigations have been carried out in view of evaluation of the biological hazard exerted on adrenal gland of albino rat embryos subjected to the pesticide polytrin and whole body gamma irradiation either individually or in succession. Histological and histochemical studies showed in general, vacuolation, karyolysis, pyknotic nuclei and increased signs of necrosis in adrenal tissue exposed to irradiation. Pesticide treatment resulted in severe degeneration in between zona glomerulosa and fasciculata accompanied by intercellular degeneration. Combined effect of polytrin together with gamma irradiation showed to exert more intensive degeneration in tissue cells with affected chromatin material as compared with the effect of either polytrin or irradiation when applied individually. The histochemical investigations revealed decreased alkaline phosphatase activity in all treated groups. 14 figs

  8. Suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity to oxazolone in whole-body-irradiated mice and protection by WR-2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of whole-body irradiation on cellular immunity, as measured in vivo by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to oxazolone, was determined in CD2F1 mice. DTH, determined by changes in ear swelling after challenge with oxazolone, was significantly depressed in irradiated mice (500-900 rad of 60Co) in a dose-dependent fashion when animals were irradiated after sensitization and before challenge with oxazolone. Administration of WR-2721 30 min before irradiation (2 days after sensitization) resulted in protection against suppression of DTH, which was dependent on drug and radiation dose. An effective dose of WR-2721 provided an approximate dose-modifying factor of 1.3. The data suggest that WR-2721 interacts with cells involved in that DTH response and that WR-2721 may be useful in protecting against radiation-induced decrements in cell-mediated immunity

  9. Acute Radiation Syndrome Severity Score System in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossetrova, Natalia I; Ney, Patrick H; Condliffe, Donald P; Krasnopolsky, Katya; Hieber, Kevin P

    2016-08-01

    Radiation accidents or terrorist attacks can result in serious consequences for the civilian population and for military personnel responding to such emergencies. The early medical management situation requires quantitative indications for early initiation of cytokine therapy in individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and effective triage tools for first responders in mass-casualty radiological incidents. Previously established animal (Mus musculus, Macaca mulatta) total-body irradiation (γ-exposure) models have evaluated a panel of radiation-responsive proteins that, together with peripheral blood cell counts, create a multiparametic dose-predictive algorithm with a threshold for detection of ~1 Gy from 1 to 7 d after exposure as well as demonstrate the acute radiation syndrome severity score systems created similar to the Medical Treatment Protocols for Radiation Accident Victims developed by Fliedner and colleagues. The authors present a further demonstration of the acute radiation sickness severity score system in a mouse (CD2F1, males) TBI model (1-14 Gy, Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min) based on multiple biodosimetric endpoints. This includes the acute radiation sickness severity Observational Grading System, survival rate, weight changes, temperature, peripheral blood cell counts and radiation-responsive protein expression profile: Flt-3 ligand, interleukin 6, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, thrombopoietin, erythropoietin, and serum amyloid A. Results show that use of the multiple-parameter severity score system facilitates identification of animals requiring enhanced monitoring after irradiation and that proteomics are a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposure, enhancing accuracy and discrimination index for acute radiation sickness response categories and early prediction of outcome. PMID:27356057

  10. Neurobehavioral toxicity of total body irradiation: a follow-up in long-term survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) in preparation for bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is a routine treatment of hematological malignancy. A retrospective and a prospective group study of long-term cerebral side effects was performed, with a special emphasis on neurobehavioral toxicity effects. Methods and Materials: Twenty disease-free patients treated with hyperfractionated TBI (14.4 Gy, 12 x 1.2 Gy, 4 days), 50 mg/kg cyclophosphamide, and autologous BMT (mean age 38 years, range 17-52 years; age at TBI 35 years, 16-50 years; follow-up time 32 months, 9-65 months) participated in a neuropsychological, neuroradiological, and neurological examination. Data were compared to 14 patients who were investigated prior to TBI. Eleven patients with renal insufficiencies matched for sex and age (38 years, 20-52 years) served as controls. In a longitudinal approach, neuropsychological follow-up data were assessed in 12 long-term survivors (45 years, 23-59 years; follow-up time 8.8 years, 7-10.8 years; time since diagnosis 10.1 years, 7.5-14.2 years). Results: No evidence of neurological deficits was found in post-TBI patients except one case of peripheral movement disorder of unknown origin. Some patients showed moderate brain atrophy. Neuropsychological assessment showed a subtle reduction of memory performance of about one standard deviation. Cognitive decline in individual patients appeared to be associated with pretreatment (brain irradiation, intrathecal methotrexate). Ten-years post disease onset, survivors without pretreatment showed behavioral improvement up to the premorbid level. Conclusion: The incidence of long-term neurobehavioral toxicity was very low for the present TBI/BMT regimen

  11. No evidence for directional evolution of body mass in herbivorous theropod dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanno, Lindsay E; Makovicky, Peter J

    2013-01-22

    The correlation between large body size and digestive efficiency has been hypothesized to have driven trends of increasing mass in herbivorous clades by means of directional selection. Yet, to date, few studies have investigated this relationship from a phylogenetic perspective, and none, to our knowledge, with regard to trophic shifts. Here, we reconstruct body mass in the three major subclades of non-avian theropod dinosaurs whose ecomorphology is correlated with extrinsic evidence of at least facultative herbivory in the fossil record--all of which also achieve relative gigantism (more than 3000 kg). Ordinary least-squares regressions on natural log-transformed mean mass recover significant correlations between increasing mass and geological time. However, tests for directional evolution in body mass find no support for a phylogenetic trend, instead favouring passive models of trait evolution. Cross-correlation of sympatric taxa from five localities in Asia reveals that environmental influences such as differential habitat sampling and/or taphonomic filtering affect the preserved record of dinosaurian body mass in the Cretaceous. Our results are congruent with studies documenting that behavioural and/or ecological factors may mitigate the benefit of increasing mass in extant taxa, and suggest that the hypothesis can be extrapolated to herbivorous lineages across geological time scales. PMID:23193135

  12. Zinc cystein as an enhancer to natural antioxidant defense mechanism (s) in whole body gamma irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malonaldehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in liver and blood, were measured in whole body gamma irradiated rats with a dose of 6.5 Gy before and after administration of zinc cystein. Zinc cystein (Zn/cyst) was administrated intraperitoneally at a concentration of 30 mg/kg, b.w. 30 min pre-irradiation and measurements were done at 24 and 72 hr after irradiation. These results were compared with non-irradiated. These results were compared with non-irradiated, non Zn/cyst treated group (control group). After irradiation, the activity of SOD and the level of GSH in both liver and blood were decreased, while in Zn/cyst protected groups this decrease was less but did not reach to that of control group level till the end of the experimental period. On the other hand, MDA markedly increased after irradiation. Nevertheless, and in protected group with Z0/cyst reveled less increase. It can be concluded that pre-treatment with Zn/cyst protects rats against sublethal effect of radiation, by improving the natural antioxidant mechanism (s)

  13. Deformation Failure Characteristics of Coal Body and Mining Induced Stress Evolution Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijie Wen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the interaction between coal failure and mining pressure field evolution during mining are presented. Not only the mechanical model of stope and its relative structure division, but also the failure and behavior characteristic of coal body under different mining stages are built and demonstrated. Namely, the breaking arch and stress arch which influence the mining area are quantified calculated. A systematic method of stress field distribution is worked out. All this indicates that the pore distribution of coal body with different compressed volume has fractal character; it appears to be the linear relationship between propagation range of internal stress field and compressed volume of coal body and nonlinear relationship between the range of outburst coal mass and the number of pores which is influenced by mining pressure. The results provide theory reference for the research on the range of mining-induced stress and broken coal wall.

  14. Composition and evolution of the eucrite parent body - Evidence from rare earth elements. [extraterrestrial basaltic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolmagno, G. J.; Drake, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative modeling of the evolution of rare earth element (REE) abundances in the eucrites, which are plagioclase-pigeonite basalt achondrites, indicates that the main group of eucrites (e.g., Juvinas) might have been produced by approximately 10% equilibrium partial melting of a single type of source region with initial REE abundances which were chondritic relative and absolute. Since the age of the eucrites is about equal to that of the solar system, extensive chemical differentiation of the eucrite parent body prior to the formation of eucrites seems unlikely. If homogeneous accretion is assumed, the bulk composition of the eucrite parent body can be estimated; two estimates are provided, representing different hypotheses as to the ratio of metal to olivine in the parent body. Since a large number of differentiated olivine meteorites, which would represent material from the interior of the parent body, have not been detected, the eucrite parent body is thought to be intact. It is suggested that the asteroid 4 Vesta is the eucrite parent body.

  15. Total Body Irradiation using VMAT (RapidArc): A Planning Study of a novel treatment delivery method

    OpenAIRE

    Santam Chakraborty; Suja Cheruliyil; Resmi Bharathan; Geetha Muttath

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using RapidArc to deliver total body irradiation (TBI) treatment. Methods: VMAT planning was performed a whole body computed tomography (CT) data set using Rapid Arc. The planning target volumes included entire body trimmed to 3 mm below the skin. The organs at risk included the lungs and kidneys. A dose of 12 Gy in 10 fractions was prescribed to the target volume. The VMAT-TBI technique consisted of three i...

  16. Dosimetric analysis for photon and electron beams in Whole body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To initiate the Whole body irradiation as an alternative for the treatment of the hematological diseases, leukemia and assistant for the osseous marrow transplantation, it may be taken account the application of International Protocols about control and quality assurance. It is established the intercomparison by the different dosimetric methods: cylindrical ionization chambers and parallel plane, radiographic emulsion film, semiconductor diodes (Mosfet transistors) and TLD-100 thermoluminescent crystals, obtained measurements for 140 x 140 cm2 fields and large distances 340 cm respect conventional fields in Radiotherapy. The in vitro dosimetry was realized at the Universal Anthropomorphic puppet Alderson Rando basically with the cylindrical crystals (1 mm diameter) of TLD-100 lithium fluoride. It was obtained the dose value with a 0.6 cm3 cylindrical ionization chamber and the Farmer electrometer for Whole body irradiation (ICT) with photons for electrons and were obtained values with the Markus plane parallel camera. Knowing the dose rate value to the source-surface distance DFS= 80 cm, it was calibrated the crystals with the reference radiation beam of 60 Co for obtaining the response curve: Dose vs. Tl lecture. It was characterized the 10 % of the total population for 300 crystals for applying the statistics corresponding. The luminescence curve obtained of Gaussian form was considered satisfactory by its stability during the pre-anneal lecture and anneal process, getting the main peak lecture at 300 Centigrade according to assigned parameters at lecture equipment TLD Harshaw model 4500. The results indicate the functional dependence with the distance DFS= 340 cm for the following depth PPD, the relations TMR and TPR, the TAR is not calculated by the increment of the dispersion in air. The penumbra increment indicates an increase of the radiation field respect of luminous field. The dispersion angle q1 respect at the field central axis was determined and was

  17. Total-body irradiation in the beginning of the 21 century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total-body irradiation (TBI), in combination with intensive chemotherapy, plays an important role in the preparation of patients with hematological diseases for bone-marrow transplantation (BMT). Depending of the total dose applied low- and high-dose TBI is distinguished. The present review is aimed at presenting the accumulated experience so far in the field of the high-dose total-body irradiation with an emphasis on the effect of total dose, dose rate and fractionation on the therapeutic results, the host versus graft reactions as well as some reactions and complications during TBI performance. The indications, aims and priorities of TBI over chemotherapy as a conditioning regime are discussed in detail. The radiobiological bases and the technical and dosimetric requirements for TBI realization are presented. An attempt is made for systematizing the accumulated knowledge so far with respect to effects of total dose, dose rate and fractionation on the therapeutic results, host versus graft reactions, post TBI reactions and complications. High-dose TBI, in combination with chemotherapy, has been acknowledged and widely applied conditioning regime prior to allogeneic BMT in a number of hematological diseases. During the last three decades the performance of TBI treatment varies with respect to the realized total dose (10-16 Gy) as well as to the used radiotherapeutic sources (telegamma therapeutic devices or linear accelerators), the applied techniques (latero-lateral), prone-supine or combinations of both patient positions), the radiation beam modifiers, the lung compensators used, dose rate (2.5-15 cGy/min). Heterogeneous and difficult for systematization data are available at the present stage, which concern the effect of some parameters as realized total dose, dose rate and fractionation on the prognosis for patients with serious hematological diseases subjected to BMT. There are numerous questions concerning their effect on the therapeutic results, host versus

  18. Oxygen no longer plays a major role in Body Size Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, H.; Sachson, W.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    When observing the long-term relationship between atmospheric oxygen and the maximum size in organisms across the Geozoic (~3.8 Ga - present), it appears that as oxygen increases, organism size grows. However, during the Phanerozoic (541 Ma - Present) oxygen levels varied, so we set out to test the hypothesis that oxygen levels drive patterns marine animal body size evolution. Expected decreases in maximum size due to a lack of oxygen do not occur, and instead, body size continues to increase regardless. In the oxygen data, a relatively low atmospheric oxygen percentage can support increasing body size, so our research tries to determine whether lifestyle affects body size in marine organisms. The genera in the data set were organized based on their tiering, motility, and feeding, such as a pelagic, fully-motile, predator. When organisms fill a certain ecological niche to take advantage of resources, they will have certain life modes, rather than randomly selected traits. For example, even in terrestrial environments, large animals have to constantly feed themselves to support their expensive terrestrial lifestyle which involves fairly consistent movement, and the structural support necessary for that movement. Only organisms with access to high energy food sources or large amounts of food can support themselves, and that is before they expend energy elsewhere. Organisms that expend energy frugally when active or have slower metabolisms in comparison to body size have a more efficient lifestyle and are generally able to grow larger, while those who have higher energy demands like predators are limited to comparatively smaller sizes. Therefore, in respect to the fossil record and modern measurements of animals, the metabolism and lifestyle of an organism dictate its body size in general. With this further clarification on the patterns of evolution, it will be easier to observe and understand the reasons for the ecological traits of organisms today.

  19. Translating bed total body irradiation lung shielding and dose optimization using asymmetric MLC apertures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shahbaz; Brown, Derek; Ahmed, Saad B S; Kakakhel, Muhammad B; Muhammad, Wazir; Hussain, Amjad

    2016-01-01

    A revised translating bed total body irradiation (TBI) technique is developed for shielding organs at risk (lungs) to tolerance dose limits, and optimizing dose distribution in three dimensions (3D) using an asymmetrically-adjusted, dynamic multileaf collimator. We present a dosimetric comparison of this technique with a previously developed symmetric MLC-based TBI technique. An anthropomor-phic RANDO phantom is CT scanned with 3 mm slice thickness. Radiological depths (RD) are calculated on individual CT slices along the divergent ray lines. Asymmetric MLC apertures are defined every 9 mm over the phantom length in the craniocaudal direction. Individual asymmetric MLC leaf positions are optimized based on RD values of all slices for uniform dose distributions. Dose calculations are performed in the Eclipse treatment planning system over these optimized MLC apertures. Dose uniformity along midline of the RANDO phantom is within the confidence limit (CL) of 2.1% (with a confidence probability p = 0.065). The issue of over- and underdose at the interfaces that is observed when symmetric MLC apertures are used is reduced from more than ± 4% to less than ± 1.5% with asymmetric MLC apertures. Lungs are shielded by 20%, 30%, and 40% of the prescribed dose by adjusting the MLC apertures. Dose-volume histogram analysis confirms that the revised technique provides effective lung shielding, as well as a homogeneous dose coverage to the whole body. The asymmetric technique also reduces hot and cold spots at lung-tissue interfaces compared to previous symmetric MLC-based TBI technique. MLC-based shielding of OARs eliminates the need to fabricate and setup cumbersome patient-specific physical blocks. PMID:27074477

  20. Effect of a whole-body gamma irradiation on glycemia and ATP blood level in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt was made to establish possible correlations, during gamma irradiation, between glucose and ATP. The variations in their blood levels were studied, using specific enzymatic methods. The results obtained after a low dose irradiation (150 roentgens) demonstrated an increase of glycemia during the hours following the irradiation and a parallel decrease of ATP blood level

  1. Influence of whole-body irradiation on immune reactions after antitetanus vaccination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of gamma irradiation (450, 550 and 650 rads) on the circulating antibodies resulting from the injection of antitetanus vaccine in rabbits, were studied for different time interval between irradiation and antigen injection. An analysis of the results obtained exhibited that the increase in antibodies formation appeared only one weak after the beginning of irradiation and for a dose of 650 rads

  2. Microstructure evolution in austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated with rotons: comparison with neutron-irradiated microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, J.; Was, G. S.

    2001-08-01

    Irradiation-induced microstructures of high purity and commercial purity austenitic stainless steels were investigated using proton-irradiation. For high purity alloys, Fe-20Cr-9Ni (HP 304 SS), Fe-20Cr-24Ni and Ni-18Cr-9Fe were irradiated using 3.2 MeV protons between 300°C and 600°C at a dose rate of 7×10 -6 dpa/ s to doses up to 3.0 dpa. The commercial purity alloys, CP 304 SS and CP 316 SS were irradiated at 360°C to doses between 0.3 and 5.0 dpa. The dose, temperature and composition dependence of the number density and size of dislocation loops and voids were characterized. The changes in yield strength due to irradiation were estimated from Vickers hardness measurements and compared to calculations using a dispersed-barrier-hardening (DBH) model. The dose and temperature dependence of proton-irradiated microstructure (loops, voids) and the irradiation hardening are consistent with the neutron-data trend. Results indicate that proton-irradiation can accurately reproduce the microstructure of austenitic alloys irradiated in LWR cores.

  3. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Shuman, Anne L.; Diener, Antonia K.; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-04-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for loss of white blood cells (WBCs), which are the body's main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved WBC loss, specifically neutrophils, in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated, irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well as internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses.

  4. Evolution of InP surfaces under low fluence pulsed UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musaev, O.R. [Department of Physics, University of Missouri Kansas City, Rockhill Road 5100, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)], E-mail: musaevo@umkc.edu; Kwon, O.S.; Wrobel, J.M.; Zhu, D.-M.; Kruger, M.B. [Department of Physics, University of Missouri Kansas City, Rockhill Road 5100, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    An InP wafer was irradiated in air by a series of UV pulses from a nitrogen laser with fluences of 120 mJ/cm{sup 2} and 80 mJ/cm{sup 2}. These fluences are below the single-pulse ablation threshold of InP. Over the studied region the distribution of the radiation intensity was uniform. The number of pulses varied from 50 to 6000. The evolution of the surface morphology and structure was characterized by atomic force microscopy, optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The relationship between mound size and the number of pulses starts out following a power law, but saturates for a sufficiently high number of pulses. The crossover point is a function of fluence. A similar relation exists for the surface roughness. Raman spectroscopic investigations showed little change in local crystalline structure of the processed surface layer.

  5. Ion beam induced luminescence analysis of defect evolution in lithium fluoride under proton irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, A.; Valotto, G.; Piccinini, M.; Montereali, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) spectra of pure LiF under irradiation by a 2 MeV proton beam were analyzed as a function of the dose in order to deepen the kinetic mechanisms underlying the formation of luminescent point defects. The intensity evolution with dose at several emission wavelengths has been studied within a wide spectral interval, from ultraviolet (UV) to near infrared (NIR), and their different change rates have been correlated to the electronic defect formation processes. The intensity at few selected wavelengths was analyzed with a multiple linear regression (MLR) method in order to demonstrate that a linear calibration curve can be obtained and that an on-line optical dose monitor for ion beams can be realized.

  6. Severe Pulmonary Toxicity After Myeloablative Conditioning Using Total Body Irradiation: An Assessment of Risk Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess factors associated with severe pulmonary toxicity after myeloablative conditioning using total body irradiation (TBI) followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: A total of 101 adult patients who underwent TBI-based myeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies at Duke University between 1998 and 2008 were reviewed. TBI was combined with high-dose cyclophosphamide, melphalan, fludarabine, or etoposide, depending on the underlying disease. Acute pulmonary toxicity, occurring within 90 days of transplantation, was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Actuarial overall survival and the cumulative incidence of acute pulmonary toxicity were calculated via the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using a log-rank test. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed to assess factors independently associated with acute severe pulmonary toxicity. Results: The 90-day actuarial risk of developing severe (Grade 3-5) pulmonary toxicity was 33%. Actuarial survival at 90 days was 49% in patients with severe pulmonary toxicity vs. 94% in patients without (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, the number of prior chemotherapy regimens was the only factor independently associated with development of severe pulmonary toxicity (odds ratio, 2.7 per regimen). Conclusions: Severe acute pulmonary toxicity is prevalent after TBI-based myeloablative conditioning regimens, occurring in approximately 33% of patients. The number of prior chemotherapy regimens appears to be an important risk factor.

  7. Conditioning with total body irradiation for autologous bone marrow transplantation in patients with advanced neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We administered a combination of chemotherapy, autologous bone marrow purged with magnet immunobeads and total body irradiation (TBI) for advanced neuroblastoma (NB). The effect of TBI was retrospectively studied with regard to hematological recovery and complications after autologous bone marrow transplantation (A-BMT). The bone marrow was engrafted in all patients, both recipients and non-recipients of TBI. In patients receiving TBI, the average number or days after A-BMT required for the white blood cell count to exceed 1,000/μl, the neutrophile count to exceed 500/μl and the platelet count to exceed 5.0 x 104/μl was 15.0±6.5, 16.0±6.4 and 59.7±24.4, respectively. In patients not receiving TBI, the corresponding figures were 12.2±6.2, 12.9±6.9 and 43.2±17.8 days, respectively. During hematological recovery after A-BMT, there was no statistical difference between patients having received TBI and those who did not receive TBI. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) was observed in four patients while receiving TBI, but no HUS developed after shielding the kidney from TBI. In terms or engraftment and complications, A-BMT can be performed on patients receiving TBI as safely as on those patients not receiving TBI. (author)

  8. Marrow transplantation for leukemia following fractionated total body irradiation. A comparative trial of methotrexate and cyclosporine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-six patients, 30-47 yr of age, with leukemia in relapse received allogeneic marrow transplants from HLA-identical siblings. All patients were treated with cyclophosphamide (120 mg/kg) and 7 daily fractions of 2.25 Gy of total body irradiation (TBI) for seven consecutive days. Nine patients (16%) are currently alive, free of disease, 324-845 days from transplantation. Actuarial relapse and survival rates at 2 yr were 56% and 9.5% respectively. These data were not remarkably different from those in previous studies using 10 Gy of TBI administered as a single dose. Thirty patients were randomized to receive methotrexate (MTX) and 26 to receive cyclosporine (CSP) as postgrafting prophylaxis for acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Probability of developing significant acute GVHD by day 100 post-transplant was 71% for patients in the MTX group and 45% for patients in the CSP group (p<0.05). Probability of relapse was 37% for patients in the MTX group and 70% for patients in the CSP group (p<0.05). Transplant-related deaths were more frequent in the MTX group and leukemic deaths more frequent in the CSP group although this may have been related to an uneven distribution of high-risk patients. Long term disease-free survival was comparable. (author)

  9. Treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia by total body irradiation alone and combined with chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total body irradiation (TBI) offers a new dimension in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a disease heretofore refractory to effective management. Excellent responses were observed in 50/57 (88%) consecutive patients with active CLL treated since 1964, and complete remissions were achieved in 22/57 (39%). Toxicity was acceptable and was minimized by combining TBI and chemotherapy in attenuated doses of each modality. The responders had a modified natural history of disease as evidenced by prolonged survival, improved quality of life, and even restoration of immunologic competence in some cases. Benefit was particularly evident for patients with a poor prognosis, i.e., those with anemia and/or thrombocytopenia prior to treatment. A median survival of 55 months for the 40 Stage III-IV patients is 2-3 times longer than described for comparable patients in other series. This experience indicates TBI may be the most effective single agent available for the treatment of CLL and warrants consideration in primary therapy

  10. Arc therapy for total body irradiation – A robust novel treatment technique for standard treatment rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: We developed a simple and robust total body irradiation (TBI) method for standard treatment rooms that obviates the need for patient translation devices. Methods and materials: Two generic arcs with rectangular segments for a patient thickness of 16 and 20 cm (arc16/arc20) were generated. An analytical fit was performed to determine the weights of the arc segments depending on patient thickness and gantry angle. Stability and absolute dose for both arcs were measured using EBT3 films in a range of solid water slab phantom thicknesses. Additionally ionization chamber measurements were performed every 10 cm at a source surface distance (SSD) of ∼200 cm. Results: The measured standard deviation for arc16 is ±3% with a flatness ⩽9.0%. Arc20 had a standard deviation of ±3% with a flatness ⩽7.3% for all measured thicknesses. The theoretical curves proved to be accurate for the prediction of the segment weightings for the two arcs. In vivo measurements for the first 22 clinical patients showed a dose deviation of less than 3%. Conclusions: Arc therapy is a convenient and stable method for TBI. This cost-effective approach has been introduced clinically, obviating the need for field patches and to physically move the patient

  11. Cataracts after total body irradiation and marrow transplantation: a sparing effect of dose fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two hundred seventy-seven patients, who have been followed for 1 to 12 years after marrow transplantation, have been examined for cataract development. In preparation for transplantation, 96 patients with aplastic anemia were conditioned with chemotherapy only, while 181 patients (two with aplastic anemia and 179 with a hematologic malignancy) were conditioned with a regimen of total body irradiation (TBI) and chemotherapy. TBI was delivered from two opposing 60Co sources at an exposure rate of 4 to 8 cGy/min, either as a single dose of 10 Gy (105 patients) or in fractions (76 patients). To date, 86 patients have developed cataracts. Kaplan-Meier product limit estimates of the incidence of cataracts for patients given chemotherapy only and no TBI, single-dose TBI, and fractionated TBI are 19, 80, 18%, respectively. On the basis of proportional hazards regression analyses, patients given single-dose TBI had a relative risk of developing cataracts that was 4.7-fold higher than in patients given fractionated TBI or chemotherapy only, suggesting a significant sparing effect with use of TBI dose fractionation

  12. Use of WR-2721 with total body irradiation in treatment of mouse lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficacy of total body irradiation (TBI) in treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is limited by bone marrow radiosensitivity. WR-2721 has been shown to be an effective chemical protector of the hemotopoietic system. In this study, a spontaneous T-cell lymphoma implanted in BALB/c mice was used to determine the effect of WR-2721 on TBI of lymphoma. Mice were randomly assigned to 5 radiation dose groups (0-200 rad TBI) when the tumors reached the desired size. The experimental group received the half-maximum tolerated dose (365 mg/kg) of WR-2721/IP 30 min. before 150 rad TBI. Using tumor regrowth delay as an endpoint, WR-2721 was seen not to lessen the delay as would a tumor protector but rather to slightly increase the delay to 216 +- 9 hrs as compared with an expected value of 188 +- 20 hrs based on controls. In a subsequent experiment to determine the effect of WR-2721 alone, the experimental mice received 3 IP injections of WR-2721 (400 mg/kg/day) while the control group received saline. The geometric mean tumor regrowth delay times were 47 +- 3 hrs for the control group compared to 112 +- 10 hrs for the WR-2721 group ( p <.001). The authors conclude that WR-2721 does not give net radiation protection of this lymphoma at the doses studied and has an apparent cytotoxic effect on lymphoma that has not been previously reported

  13. Benefits of online in vivo dosimetry for single-fraction total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, David J., E-mail: davideaton@nhs.net [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Warry, Alison J. [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Trimble, Rachel E.; Vilarino-Varela, Maria J.; Collis, Christopher H. [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-01

    Use of a patient test dose before single-fraction total body irradiation (TBI) allows review of in vivo dosimetry and modification of the main treatment setup. However, use of computed tomography (CT) planning and online in vivo dosimetry may reduce the need for this additional step. Patients were treated using a supine CT-planned extended source-to-surface distance (SSD) technique with lead compensators and bolus. In vivo dosimetry was performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and diodes at 10 representative anatomical locations, for both a 0.1-Gy test dose and the treatment dose. In total, 28 patients were treated between April 2007 and July 2013, with changes made in 10 cases (36%) following test dose results. Overall, 98.1% of measured in vivo treatment doses were within 10% of the prescribed dose, compared with 97.0% of test dose readings. Changes made following the test dose could have been applied during the single-fraction treatment itself, assuming that the dose was delivered in subportions and online in vivo dosimetry was available for all clinically important anatomical sites. This alleviates the need for a test dose, saving considerable time and resources.

  14. Radiation damage in patients treated by total-body irradiation, bone marrow grafting, and cyclosporin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) from 63 patients were assessed for the presence of chromosomal aberrations after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) following total body irradiation (TBI) for leukemia. Forty-one patients showed no abnormalities in either BM or PB, and 22 had aberrations in either BM or PB or both. Only stable aberrations were found in the BM, but both stable and unstable abnormalities were present in the PB, the majority showing only unstable aberrations. Among the 25 patients who had a leukemic relapse, clonal chromosomal abnormalities were found in the BM of 12 out of the 16 cases for whom marrow was studied at the time of the relapse. A statistically significant negative correlation between leukemic relapse and graft versus host disease (GvHD) was found, but the relationships between chromosome damage and leukemic relapse, GvHD, and the pretransplant radiation dose and between the radiation dose and both leukemic relapse and GvHD were not significant

  15. Anticarcinogenic effect of tetrachlorodecaoxide after total-body gamma irradiation in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetrachlorodecaoxygen (TCDO) therapy of acute radiation syndrome was tested for a possible influence on the development of X-ray-induced malignancies. BD IX rats were exposed to total-body irradiation (TBI, γ rays, 9 or 11 Gy) and received daily intravenous injections of either TCDO or physiological saline solution from days 4 through 11 after TBI. The short-term TCDO therapy reduced the acute death rate markedly, but survival rates after 4 months were similar with and without TCDO. The first malignancy after TBI occurred on day 103, and over the lifetime of the animals the tumor incidence in the group given TBI (11 Gy) without TCDO treatment was 73% vs 20% in animals with short-term TCDO therapy after TBI. In particular, there was a highly significant prevention of radiation-induced leukemia [P (one-sided) < 0.001] by TCDO, and a significantly reduced incidence of malignant epithelial tumors [P (one-sided) < 0.05]. The development of sarcomas was not affected by TCDO. Long-term survival was not enhanced by TCDO due to the occurrence of bronchopneumonial infections about 1 year after TBI. In conclusion, TCDO is not only a potent therapeutic agent in acute radiation syndrome, but it also significantly reduced the carcinogenic risk in rats after exposure to ionizing radiation. 18 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Interstitial pneumonitis following total body irradiation for bone marrow transplantation using two different dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 22 patients with leukemia have undergone allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) by the Quebec Co-operative Group for Marrow Transplantation from 1980 to 1982. All patients received 900 cGy total body irradiation (TBI), in a single fraction, on the day preceding BMT. The first 11 patients were treated on a cobalt unit at a constant dose rate of 4.7 to 6.3 cGy/min. Six of these patients developed interstitial pneumonitis (IP). The clinical course of three patients, two with idiopathic and one with drug-induced pneumonitis, was mild and recovery was complete in all. The other three patients developed severe infectious IP and two died. The next 11 patients were treated with a sweeping beam technique on a 4 MV linear accelerator delivering a total tumor dose of 900 cGy at an average dose rate of 6.0 to 6.5 cGy/min but an instantaneous dose rate of 21.0 to 23.5 cGy/min. Eight patients developed severe IP. Five of these were idiopathic and four died. Three were infectious and all died. The fatality of interstitial pneumonitis appeared to be greater in the group treated with the sweeping beam technique

  17. Induction of systemic bone changes by preconditioning total body irradiation for bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preconditioning total body irradiation (TBI) prior to bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has been believed to be a safe procedure that does not cause late morbidity; yet, a recent report raises the suspicion that TBI-induced chondroosseous abnormalities do occur. To evaluate the radiological manifestations of TBI-induced skeletal alterations and their orthopaedic morbidity. Subjects included 11 children with TBI-induced skeletal changes, including 9 in our hospital and 2 in other hospitals. The former were selected from 53 children who had undergone TBI with BMT. Radiographic examinations (n=11), MRI (n=3), CT (n=2), and medical records in the 11 children were retrospectively reviewed. The skeletal alterations included abnormal epiphyseal ossification and metaphyseal fraying (8/11), longitudinal metaphyseal striations (8/11), irregular metaphyseal sclerosis (6/11), osteochondromas (4/11), slipped capital femoral epiphysis (2/10), genu valgum (3/10), and platyspondyly (2/3). MRI demonstrated immature primary spongiosa in the metaphysis. Of the 11 children, 9 had clinical symptoms. TBI can induce polyostotic and/or generalized bone changes, mainly affecting the epiphyseal/metaphyseal regions and occasionally the spine. The epi-/metaphyseal abnormalities represent impaired chondrogenesis in the epiphysis and growth plate and abnormal remodelling in the metaphysis. Generalized spine changes may lead to misdiagnosis of a skeletal dysplasia. (orig.)

  18. Effects of low dose total body irradiation (LDTBI) and recombinant human interleukin-2 in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    10-16-week-old female BALB/c mice received low dose total body irradiation (LDTBI) in one fraction immediately before the beginning of treatment with recombinant human interleukin-2 (rIL-2). LDTBI prevented in a dose-dependent manner the weight increase of the spleen, liver and lungs induced by fluid extravasation provoked by rIL-2 injections. It also limited the increase of the number of mononuclear cells in the spleen induced after in vivo treatment with rIL-2. Immunofluorescence analysis of spleen cells revealed that LDTBI decreased the relative sIgM+ cell number in spleen, while the relative numbers of Lyt-1+, Thy-1+ and L3T4+ cells were increased, indicating that a T and/or NK population, radioresistant to LDTBI, could still proliferate under rIL-2 stimulation in vivo. Such lymphocytes were capable of in vitro lysis of YAC cells in a 4-hour 51Cr release assay, as well as lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells obtained in mice treated with rIL-2 alone. Thus, LDTBI given prior to rIL-2, yet preserving the cytotoxic capacity of the LAK cells activated by rIL-2, could prevent the vascular leak syndrome toxicity induced by rIL-2 injection. (author). tabs., figs

  19. Total body irradiation therapy for thymectomized myasthenic patients and immunological evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, Nobukazu; Tanaka, Masayuki; Kurihara, Teruyuki (Miyazaki Medical College (Japan))

    1983-06-01

    Three patients with intractable myasthenia gravis (MG) were treated with total body irradiation (TBI). All the three patients had been unstable after extended thymectomy and poorly responding to prednisolone therapy. Radiation therapy consisted of 10 doses of 10 rads/day given over five weeks. After the radiation therapy the three patients improved clinically, and an objective parameter, area of M-waves also improved. No significant side effects were noted. TBI therapy can be considered as a safe method to induce selective reduction of circulating lymphocytes. This was indeed achieved, as evidenced by a drop of the lymphocyte counts to the levels of 20-40 % of the pretreatment level. The effects were persistent over twelve weeks. Early radiosensitivity of B lymphocytes were recognized. The levels of T..gamma.. cells were low before TBI therapy, increasing gradually during TBI therapy and returned to normal range after twelve weeks. Serum anti-AChR antibody titers decreased in all the cases, but it was impossible to determine whether the decrement was due to the therapy or natural course after thymectomy. Two of our three cases had a significant percentage decrement of the titers after TBI therapy. We suggest that TBI therapy is a safe method of immunosupperssive treatment for the myasthenic patients after thymectomy.

  20. Acute effects of whole-body proton irradiation on the immune system of the mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajioka, E. H.; Andres, M. L.; Li, J.; Mao, X. W.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Slater, J. M.; Gridley, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    The acute effects of proton whole-body irradiation on the distribution and function of leukocyte populations in the spleen and blood were examined and compared to the effects of photons derived from a (60)Co gamma-ray source. Adult female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a single dose (3 Gy at 0.4 Gy/min) of protons at spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), protons at the distal entry (E) region, or gamma rays and killed humanely at six different times thereafter. Specific differences were noted in the results, thereby suggesting that the kinetics of the response may be variable. However, the lack of significant differences in most assays at most times suggests that the RBE for both entry and peak regions of the Bragg curve was essentially 1.0 under the conditions of this study. The greatest immunodepression was observed at 4 days postexposure. Flow cytometry and mitogenic stimulation analyses of the spleen and peripheral blood demonstrated that lymphocyte populations differ in radiosensitivity, with B (CD19(+)) cells being most sensitive, T (CD3(+)) cells being moderately sensitive, and natural killer (NK1.1(+)) cells being most resistant. B lymphocytes showed the most rapid recovery. Comparison of the T-lymphocyte subsets showed that CD4(+) T helper/inducer cells were more radiosensitive than the CD8(+) T cytotoxic/suppressor cells. These findings should have an impact on future studies designed to maximize protection of normal tissue during and after proton-radiation exposure.

  1. Prospective evaluation of delayed central nervous system (CNS) toxicity of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Prospective evaluation of chronic radiation effects on the healthy adult brain using neuropsychological testing of intelligence, attention, and memory. Methods and Materials: 58 patients (43 ± 10 yr) undergoing hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) (TBI, 14.4 Gy, 12 x 1.2 Gy in 4 days) before bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation were prospectively included. Twenty-one recurrence-free long-term survivors were re-examined 6-36 months (median 27 months) after completion of TBI. Neuropsychological testing included assessment of general intelligence, attention, and memory using normative, standardized psychometric tests. Mood status was controlled, as well. Test results are given as IQ scores (population mean 100) or percentiles for attention and memory (population mean 50). Results: The 21 patients showed normal baseline test results of IQ (101 ± 13) and attention (53 ± 28), with memory test scores below average (35 ± 21). Test results of IQ (98 ± 17), attention (58 ± 27), and memory (43 ± 28) showed no signs of clinically measurable radiation damage to higher CNS (central nervous system) functions during the follow-up. The mood status was improved. Conclusion: The investigation of CNS toxicity after hyperfractionated TBI showed no deterioration of test results in adult recurrence-free patients with tumor-free CNS. The median follow-up of 27 months will be extended.

  2. Fractionated half body irradiation for palliation of multiple symptomatic bone metastases from solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This was a phase I-II nonrandomized study that explored the toxicity and response of fractionated half-body irradiation (F-HBI) in patients with multiple symptomatic osseous metastases. The patients had no premedication and received 10 Gy in 5 fractions with a dose rate of 15 cGy/min. At the Cancer Institute Hospital, 9 patients were treated by this technique (1 upper and lower F-HBI, 6 upper F-HBI, 2 lower F-HBI). All patients were female and had adenocarcinomas (8 breast and 1 lung). Adverse effects were myelosuppression, vomiting and partial alopecia. But hematologic toxicity was treated with blood transfusion or G-CSF. All toxicity was transient, and no pneumonitis nor radiation-related deaths occurred. When given as palliation, F-HBI was found to relieve pain in 80% of the patients. In 10% of the patients the pain relief was complete. The mean time to achieve pain relief in responders after F-HBI was 9 days. The pain relief was long-lasting and continued without need of reirradiation for 40% of the remaining patient's life. This treatment modality appears to be well tolerated and effective in patients with multiple symptomatic osseous metastases. The optimal indications, dose and fractionation for F-HBI should be further explored in randomized trials. (author)

  3. Fractionated half body irradiation for palliation of multiple symptomatic bone metastases from solid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiguchi, Kenji; Hayashi, Shinya; Sunagawa, Yoshimitsu; Sougawa, Mitsuharu; Nakazawa, Masanori; Yamashita, Takashi (Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital)

    1992-06-01

    This was a phase I-II nonrandomized study that explored the toxicity and response of fractionated half-body irradiation (F-HBI) in patients with multiple symptomatic osseous metastases. The patients had no premedication and received 10 Gy in 5 fractions with a dose rate of 15 cGy/min. At the Cancer Institute Hospital, 9 patients were treated by this technique (1 upper and lower F-HBI, 6 upper F-HBI, 2 lower F-HBI). All patients were female and had adenocarcinomas (8 breast and 1 lung). Adverse effects were myelosuppression, vomiting and partial alopecia. But hematologic toxicity was treated with blood transfusion or G-CSF. All toxicity was transient, and no pneumonitis nor radiation-related deaths occurred. When given as palliation, F-HBI was found to relieve pain in 80% of the patients. In 10% of the patients the pain relief was complete. The mean time to achieve pain relief in responders after F-HBI was 9 days. The pain relief was long-lasting and continued without need of reirradiation for 40% of the remaining patient's life. This treatment modality appears to be well tolerated and effective in patients with multiple symptomatic osseous metastases. The optimal indications, dose and fractionation for F-HBI should be further explored in randomized trials. (author).

  4. Calculation of midplane dose for total body irradiation from entrance and exit dose MOSFET measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satory, P R

    2012-03-01

    This work is the development of a MOSFET based surface in vivo dosimetry system for total body irradiation patients treated with bilateral extended SSD beams using PMMA missing tissue compensators adjacent to the patient. An empirical formula to calculate midplane dose from MOSFET measured entrance and exit doses has been derived. The dependency of surface dose on the air-gap between the spoiler and the surface was investigated by suspending a spoiler above a water phantom, and taking percentage depth dose measurements (PDD). Exit and entrances doses were measured with MOSFETs in conjunction with midplane doses measured with an ion chamber. The entrance and exit doses were combined using an exponential attenuation formula to give an estimate of midplane dose and were compared to the midplane ion chamber measurement for a range of phantom thicknesses. Having a maximum PDD at the surface simplifies the prediction of midplane dose, which is achieved by ensuring that the air gap between the compensator and the surface is less than 10 cm. The comparison of estimated midplane dose and measured midplane dose showed no dependence on phantom thickness and an average correction factor of 0.88 was found. If the missing tissue compensators are kept within 10 cm of the patient then MOSFET measurements of entrance and exit dose can predict the midplane dose for the patient. PMID:22298238

  5. Hippophae leaf extract (SBL-1) countered radiation induced dysbiosis in jejunum of total body 60Cobalt gamma - irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single dose of SBL-1 administered at the rate 30 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) 30 min prior to whole body 60Co-gamma-irradiation at lethal dose (10 Gy), rendered >90% survival in comparison to zero survival in the non-SBL-1 treated 60Co-gamma-irradiated (10 Gy) mice population (J Herbs Spices Med Plants, 2009; 15(2): 203-215). Present study investigated the effect of SBL-1 on jejunal microbiota in lethally irradiated mice. Study was performed with inbred Swiss albino Strain 'A' male mice (age 9 weeks) weighing 28±2 g. The animals were maintained under controlled environment at 26±2℃; 12 h light/dark cycle and offered standard animal food (Golden feed, Delhi) as well as tap water ad libitum. Metagenomic DNA was extracted, purified and quantified from jejunum of the mice. Universal primers (27f and 1492r) were used to amplify the 16S rRNA DNA from the metagenomic DNA. Amplicons were sequenced, vector contamination and chimeras were removed. The sequences (GenBank Accession No: KF681283 to KF681351) were taxonomically classified by using Sequence Match program, Ribosomal Database Project as well as by nucleotide-BLAST (E-value: 10, database: 16S rRNA gene sequences, Bacteria and Archea). Phylogenetic Tree was prepared using MEGA 5.2 package, using maximum likelihood algorithm after sequence alignment by MUSCLE. Thermus aquaticus was used as out-group to construct rooted tree. Branch stability was assessed by bootstrap analysis. Untreated animals and the animals treated with SBL-1 had 100% Lactobacillus; 60Co gamma-irradiated animals had 55% Cohaesibacter (Alphaproteobacteria); 27% Mycoplasma (Tenericutes) and only 18% Lactobacillus; animals treated with SBL-1 prior to irradiation had 89% Lactobacillus and 11% Clostridium. This study demonstrated that treatment with SBL-1 at radioprotective doses before total body irradiation with lethal dose (10 Gy) countered the jejunal dysbiosis. (author)

  6. Phase transformation and microstructural evolution of nanostructured oxides and nitrides under ion irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fengyuan

    Material design at the nanometer scale is an effective strategy for developing advanced materails with enhanced radiation tolerance for advanced nuclear energy systems as high densities of surfaces and interfaces of the nanostructured materials may behave as effective sinks for defect recovery. However, nanostructured materials may not be intrinsically radiation tolerant, and the interplay among the factors of crystal size, temperature, chemical composition, surface energy and radiation conditions may eventually determine material radiation behaviors. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the radiation effects of nanostructured materials and the underlying physics for the design of advanced nanostructured nuclear materials. The main objective of this doctoral thesis is to study the behavior of nanostructured oxides and nitrides used as fuel matrix and waste forms under extreme radiation conditions with the focus of phase transformation, microstructural evolution and damage mechanisms. Radiation experiments were performed using energetic ion beam techniques to simulate radiation damage resulting from energetic neutrons, alpha-decay events and fission fragments, and various experimental approaches were employed to characterize materials’ microstructural evolution and phase stability upon intense radiation environments including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Thermal annealing experiments indicated that nanostructured ZrO2 phase stability is strongly affected by the grain size. Radiation results on nanostructured ZrO2 indicated that thermodynamically unstable or metastable high temperature phases can be induced by energetic beam irradiation at room temperature. Various phase transformation among different polymorphs of monoclinic, tetragonal and amorphous states can be induced, and different mechanisms are responsible for structural transformations including oxygen vacancies accumulation upon displacive

  7. Tailoring molybdenum nanostructure evolution by low-energy He+ ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-10-01

    Mirror-finished polished molybdenum (Mo) samples were irradiated with 100 eV He+ ions as a function of ion fluence (using a constant flux of 7.2 × 1020 ions m-2 s-1) at normal incidence and at 923 K. Mo surface deterioration and nanoscopic fiber-form filament ("Mo fuzz") growth evolution were monitored by using field emission (FE) scanning electron (SEM) and atomic force (AFM) microscopy studies. Those studies confirm a reasonably clean and flat surface, up to several micrometer scales along with a few mechanical-polishing-induced scratches. However, He+ ion irradiation deteriorates the surface significantly even at 2.1 × 1023 ions m-2 fluence (about 5 min. irradiation time) and leads to evolution of homogeneously populated ∼75-nm-long Mo nanograins having ∼8 nm intergrain width. The primary stages of Mo fuzz growth, i.e., elongated half-cylindrical ∼70 nm nanoplatelets, and encapsulated bubbles of 20-45 nm in diameter and preferably within the grain boundaries of sub-micron-sized grains, were observed after 1.3 × 1024 ions m-2 fluence irradiation. Additionally, a sequential enhancement in the sharpness, density, and protrusions of Mo fuzz at the surface with ion fluence was also observed. Fluence- and flux-dependent studies have also been performed at 1223 K target temperature (beyond the temperature window for Mo fuzz formation). At a constant fluence of 2.6 × 1024 ions m-2, 7.2 × 1020 ions m-2 s-1 flux generates a homogeneous layered and stacked nanodiscs of ∼70 nm diameter. On the other hand, 1.2 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1 flux generates a combination of randomly patched netlike nanomatrix networked structure, mostly with ∼105 nm nanostructure wall width, various-shaped pores, and self-organized nano arrays. While the observed netlike nanomatrix network structures for 8.6 × 1024 ions m-2 fluence (at a constant flux of 1.2 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1) is quite similar to those for 2.6 × 1024 ions m-2 fluence, the nanostructure wall width extends up to ∼45

  8. Evolution of star cluster systems in isolated galaxies: first results from direct $N$-body simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L J; Hurley, J R

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of star clusters is largely affected by the tidal field generated by the host galaxy. It is thus in principle expected that under the assumption of an "universal" initial cluster mass function the properties of the evolved present-day mass function of star cluster systems should show a dependency on the properties of the galactic environment in which they evolve. To explore this expectation a sophisticated model of the tidal field is required in order to study the evolution of star cluster systems in realistic galaxies. Along these lines, in the present work we first describe a method developed for coupling $N$-body simulations of galaxies and star clusters. We then generate a database of galaxy models along the Hubble sequence and calibrate evolutionary equations to the results of direct $N$-body simulations of star clusters in order to predict the clusters' mass evolution as function of the galactic environment. We finally apply our methods to explore the properties of evolved "universal" init...

  9. The nucleic acids as early indicators of the recovery of patients subjected to total body irradiation for bone marrow transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility to use the concentration of nucleic acids as an early indicator for the recovery of individuals exposed to high radiation was valued in 30 patients subjected to a dose of 10 Gy (cobalt 60) in two or three sessions of total body irradiation for bone marrow transplants. The determination of the concentration of the nucleic acids was carried out prior to the irradiation, and later in different periods until the patients discharge. The behaviour of indicate such as alpha amylase serics transaminases, glicemics, alkaline phosphatase and others was also studied

  10. Arginine-esterase activity of kallikrein in the sera of whole-body irradiated rats and guinea-pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In whole-body irradiated rats (800 R=LDsub(50/30)) and guinea pigs (300 R=LDsub(50/30)) changes were investigated in the arginine esterase activity of kallikrein in native serum as well as in serum exposed to contact with a clay suspension. From the values obtained the activity of prekallikrein was calculated. While in the rat serum significant changes in the arginine esterase activity of kallikrein were found, in the guinea pig serum the kallikrein activity did not change markedly. The activity of prekallikrein immediately after irradiation assumes a similar course in both types of laboratory animals while during later intervals a reverse pattern was observed. (author)

  11. Rates and modes of body size evolution in early carnivores and herbivores: a case study from Captorhinidae

    OpenAIRE

    Brocklehurst, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Body size is an extremely important characteristic, impacting on a variety of ecological and life-history traits. It is therefore important to understand the factors which may affect its evolution, and diet has attracted much interest in this context. A recent study which examined the evolution of the earliest terrestrial herbivores in the Late Carboniferous and Early Permian concluded that in the four herbivorous clades examined there was a trend towards increased body size, and that this in...

  12. Gas Evolution Measurements on Reactor Irradiated Advanced Fusion Magnet Insulation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humer, K.; Seidl, E.; Weber, H. W.; Fabian, P. E.; Feucht, S. W.; Munshi, N. A.

    2006-03-01

    Glass-fiber reinforced plastics (GFRPs) are used as insulation materials for the superconducting magnet coils of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The radiation environment present at the magnet location will lead to gas production, swelling and weight loss of the laminate, which may result in a pressure rise combined with undefined stresses on the magnet coil casing. Consequently, these effects are important parameters for the engineering and design criteria of superconducting magnet coil structures. In this study, newly developed epoxy and cyanate-ester (CE) based S2-glass fiber reinforced insulation systems were irradiated at ambient temperature in the TRIGA-Mark II reactor (Vienna) to a fast neutron fluence of 1 and 5×1021 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV) prior to measurements of gas evolution, swelling and weight loss. The CE based laminates show increased radiation resistance, i.e. less gas evolution. The highest radiation hardness up to the highest dose was observed in a pure CE system. In addition, the effects of swelling and weight loss are either negligible or less pronounced for all systems. The results prove that the newly developed CE based composites are serious candidate insulation systems for ITER.

  13. Acute whole body UVA irradiation combined with nitrate ingestion enhances time trial performance in trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggeridge, David J; Sculthorpe, Nicholas; Grace, Fergal M; Willis, Gareth; Thornhill, Laurence; Weller, Richard B; James, Philip E; Easton, Chris

    2015-08-01

    Dietary nitrate supplementation has been shown to increase nitric oxide (NO) metabolites, reduce blood pressure (BP) and enhance exercise performance. Acute exposure to ultraviolet (UV)-A light also increases NO bioavailability and reduces BP. We conducted a randomized, counterbalanced placebo-controlled trial to determine the effects of UV-A light alone and in combination with nitrate on the responses to sub-maximal steady-state exercise and time trial (TT) performance. Nine cyclists (VO2max 53.1 ± 4.4 ml/kg/min) completed five performance trials comprising 10 min submaximal steady-state cycling followed by a 16.1 km TT. Following a familiarization the final four trials were preceded, in random order, by either (1) Nitrate gels (NIT) + UV-A, (2) Placebo (PLA) + UV-A, (3) NIT + Sham light (SHAM) and (4) PLA + SHAM (control). The NIT gels (2 × 60 ml gels, ~8.1 mmol nitrate) or a low-nitrate PLA were ingested 2.5 h prior to the trial. The light exposure consisted of 20 J/cm(2) whole body irradiation with either UV-A or SHAM light. Plasma nitrite was measured pre- and post-irradiation and VO2 was measured continuously during steady-state exercise. Plasma nitrite was higher for NIT + SHAM (geometric mean (95% CI), 332 (292-377) nM; P = 0.029) and NIT + UV-A (456 (312-666) nM; P = 0.014) compared to PLA + SHAM (215 (167-277) nM). Differences between PLA + SHAM and PLA + UV-A (282 (248-356) nM) were small and non-significant. During steady-state exercise VO2 was reduced following NIT + UVA (P = 0.034) and tended to be lower in NIT + SHAM (P = 0.086) but not PLA + UV-A (P = 0.381) compared to PLA + SHAM. Performance in the TT was significantly faster following NIT + UV-A (mean ± SD 1447 ± 41 s P = 0.005; d = 0.47), but not PLA + UV-A (1450 ± 40 s; d = 0.41) or NIT + SHAM (1455 ± 47 s; d = 0.28) compared to PLA + SHAM (1469 ± 52 s). These findings demonstrate that exposure to UV-A light alone does not alter the physiological responses to exercise or improve

  14. Highly efficient photocatalytic hydrogen evolution of graphene/YInO3 nanocomposites under visible light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jianjun; Yan, Wenhao; Xie, Wei; Sun, Song; Bao, Jun; Gao, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Visible-light-driven hydrogen evolution with high efficiency is important in the current photocatalysis research. Here we report for the first time the design and synthesis of a new graphene-semiconductor nanocomposite consisting of YInO3 nanoparticles and two-dimensional graphene sheets as efficient photocatalysts for hydrogen evolution under visible light irradiation. The graphene/YInO3 nanocomposites were synthesized using a facile solvothermal method in which the formation of graphene and the deposition of YInO3 nanoparticles on the graphene sheets can be achieved simultaneously. The addition of graphene as a cocatalyst can narrow the band gap of YInO3 to visible photon energy and prolong the separation and lifetime of electron-hole pairs by the chemical bonding between YInO3 and graphene. The photocatalytic reaction with this nanocomposite reaches a high H2 evolution rate of 400.4 μmol h-1 g-1 when the content of graphene is 0.5 wt%, over 127 and 3.7 times higher than that of pure YInO3 and Pt/YInO3, respectively. This work can provide an effective approach to the fabrication of graphene-based photocatalysts with high performance in the field of energy conversion.Visible-light-driven hydrogen evolution with high efficiency is important in the current photocatalysis research. Here we report for the first time the design and synthesis of a new graphene-semiconductor nanocomposite consisting of YInO3 nanoparticles and two-dimensional graphene sheets as efficient photocatalysts for hydrogen evolution under visible light irradiation. The graphene/YInO3 nanocomposites were synthesized using a facile solvothermal method in which the formation of graphene and the deposition of YInO3 nanoparticles on the graphene sheets can be achieved simultaneously. The addition of graphene as a cocatalyst can narrow the band gap of YInO3 to visible photon energy and prolong the separation and lifetime of electron-hole pairs by the chemical bonding between YInO3 and graphene. The

  15. Hard X-ray irradiation of cosmic silicate analogs: structural evolution and astrophysical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilan, L.; Jäger, C.; Simionovici, A.; Lemaire, J. L.; Sabri, T.; Foy, E.; Yagoubi, S.; Henning, T.; Salomon, D.; Martinez-Criado, G.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Protoplanetary disks, interstellar clouds, and active galactic nuclei contain X-ray-dominated regions. X-rays interact with the dust and gas present in such environments. While a few laboratory X-ray irradiation experiments have been performed on ices, X-ray irradiation experiments on bare cosmic dust analogs have been scarce up to now. Aims: Our goal is to study the effects of hard X-rays on cosmic dust analogs via in situ X-ray diffraction. By using a hard X-ray synchrotron nanobeam, we seek to simulate cumulative X-ray exposure on dust grains during their lifetime in these astrophysical environments and provide an upper limit on the effect of hard X-rays on dust grain structure. Methods: We prepared enstatite (MgSiO3) nanograins, which are analogs to cosmic silicates, via the melting-quenching technique. These amorphous grains were then annealed to obtain polycrystalline grains. These were characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) before irradiation. Powder samples were prepared in X-ray transparent substrates and were irradiated with hard X-rays nanobeams (29.4 keV) provided by beamline ID16B of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble). X-ray diffraction images were recorded in transmission mode, and the ensuing diffractograms were analyzed as a function of the total X-ray exposure time. Results: We detected the amorphization of polycrystalline silicates embedded in an organic matrix after an accumulated X-ray exposure of 6.4 × 1027 eV cm-2. Pure crystalline silicate grains (without resin) do not exhibit amorphization. None of the amorphous silicate samples (pure and embedded in resin) underwent crystallization. We analyze the evolution of the polycrystalline sample embedded in an organic matrix as a function of X-ray exposure. Conclusions: Loss of diffraction peak intensity, peak broadening, and the disappearance of discrete spots and arcs reveal the amorphization

  16. Environmental Evolution of the Water Body of Qinghai Lake since the Postglacial Age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彭熹; 张保珍; 等

    1989-01-01

    Based on the data developed from various s natural waters in the Qinghai Lake area and ostracode shells present in drill core QH-16A of recent lake-floor sediments ,this paper discusses the distribution of stable isotopes in the modern water body of Qinghai Lake,and the initial isotopic composition of the lake water has been deduced ,Studies of δ18O,δ13C,Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca in ostracode shells provide the basis for the establishment of the model of climatic fluctuation in the Qinghai Lake area since the postaglacial age,as well as for the elucidation of the environmental evolution of the water body of Qinghai Lake since the postglacial age.

  17. Biochemical changes in mice brain synaptosomes after whole body, low dose gamma-irradiation of various intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some characteristics of mice brain nerve-endings' lipid phase were studied (total lipids, total and individual phospholipids and cholesterol contents, their ratios, lipid peroxidation level, rigidity index) after single low dose, whole body gamma-irradiation (15 cGy) with dose intensities of 0.01, 0.25, 9.0 cGy/min. Some markedly expressed alterations were found out in those parameters. Brain membranes functioning also changed significantly as it was judged by membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase activity. All the changes revealed complicated dependence both on dose intensity and on time period after irradiation. The ranges of the observed changes suppose CNS state to have been modified by low dose irradiation including CNS sensibility to external psycho-and neurotropic factors. 25 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  18. Multicolor flow cytometry analysis of blood cell subsets in patients given total body irradiation before bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone marrow transplantation has often been closely linked with accidental or intentional therapeutical irradiation. In both situations, study of the radiosensitivity of human blood cell subsets is of interest. Using one-color flow cytometry analysis of B lymphocytes, T cell subsets, and natural killer cells, we previously reported that lymphocyte subsets exhibit equal radiosensitivity. Taking advantage of recent developments in the knowledge of leukocyte differentiation antigens and flow cytometry technology we undertook a study of blood cell subsets to search for rare populations exhibiting different radiosensitivity. Thirty patients, who were delivered a 12 Gy fractionated total body irradiation as part of their conditioning regimen before transplantation for malignant disorders, were studied using multicolor flow cytometry. T and B lymphocytes showed a sharp, radiation-induced decrease, with the B lymphocytes (cluster of differentiation (CD) 19+) being the most sensitive. When analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry all major lymphocyte subsets appeared equally sensitive to the in vivo irradiation. Therefore, all major lymphocyte subsets sharing the helper phenotype (naive or memory) and the cytotoxic phenotype appeared equally sensitive to in vivo whole body irradiation. In parallel, the CD34+ cell subset remained basically unchanged after whole body irradiation. Finally, the CD3-, 56+, 16+ natural killer cell subset was relatively radioresistant (91 and 74% of its initial value, after 2 and 4 Gy, respectively) as compared to other lymphocyte subsets. Our study provides evidence that T and B cell subsets seem to be highly radiosensitive in vivo. The CD34+ progenitor/stem cells and NK cells seem to be more radioresistant. This latter result might provide clues to the understanding of the pathophysiogeny of radiation-induced aplasia and of the engrafment/rejection process following bone marrow transplantation. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  19. Multicolor flow cytometry analysis of blood cell subsets in patients given total body irradiation before bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Bone marrow transplantation has often been closely linked with accidental or intentional therapeutical irradiation. In both situations, study of the radiosensitivity of human blood cell subsets is of interest. Using one-color flow cytometry analysis of B lymphocytes, T cell subsets, and natural killer cells, we previously reported that lymphocyte subsets exhibit equal radiosensitivity. Taking advantage of recent developments in the knowledge of leukocyte differentiation antigens and flow cytometry technology we undertook a study of blood cell subsets to search for rare populations exhibiting different radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients, who were delivered a 12 Gy fractionated total body irradiation as part of their conditioning regimen before transplantation for malignant disorders, were studied using multicolor flow cytometry. Results: T and B lymphocytes showed a sharp, radiation-induced decrease, with the B lymphocytes (cluster of differentiation (CD) 19+) being the most sensitive. When analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry, all major lymphocyte subsets appeared equally sensitive to the in vivo irradiation; that is, CD3+4+45RO+, CD3+4+45RA+, CD3+4+8-, CD3+4-8+. Therefore, all major lymphocyte subsets sharing the helper phenotype (naive or memory) and the cytotoxic phenotype appeared equally sensitive to in vivo whole body irradiation. In parallel, the CD34+ cell subset remained basically unchanged after whole body irradiation. Finally, the CD3-, 56+, 16+ natural killer cell subset was relatively radioresistant (91 and 74% of its initial value, after 2 and 4 Gy, respectively) as compared to other lymphocyte subsets. Conclusion: Our study provides evidence that T and B cell subsets seem to be highly radiosensitive in vivo. The CD34+ progenitor/stem cells and NK cells seem to be more radioresistant. This latter result might provide clues to the understanding of the pathophysiogeny of radiation-induced aplasia and of the engrafment

  20. Nonchaotic evolution of triangular configuration due to gravitational radiation reaction in the three-body problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kei; Asada, Hideki

    2016-04-01

    Continuing work initiated in an earlier publication [H. Asada, Phys. Rev. D 80, 064021 (2009)], the gravitational radiation reaction to Lagrange's equilateral triangular solution of the three-body problem is investigated in an analytic method. The previous work is based on the energy balance argument, which is sufficient for a two-body system because the number of degrees of freedom (the semimajor axis and the eccentricity in quasi-Keplerian cases, for instance) equals that of the constants of motion such as the total energy and the orbital angular momentum. In a system with three (or more) bodies, however, the number of degrees of freedom is more than that of the constants of motion. Therefore, the present paper discusses the evolution of the triangular system by directly treating the gravitational radiation reaction force to each body. The perturbed equations of motion are solved by using the Laplace transform technique. It is found that the triangular configuration is adiabatically shrinking and is kept in equilibrium by increasing the orbital frequency due to the radiation reaction if the mass ratios satisfy the Newtonian stability condition. Long-term stability involving the first post-Newtonian corrections is also discussed.

  1. The role of total body irradiation in preparation for bone marrow transplantation in acute leukaemia. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From extrapolation obtained from animal studies and radiation accidents, it is assumed that for man the LD 50 (30) will be between 300-500 rads total body irradiation (TBI) and the LD 100 at least 600 rads TBI. A dose of 1000 rads TBI is generally used in man for conditioning for bone marrow transplantation. In acute leukemia, total body irradiation is usually associated with cytoreductive chemotherapy. In Seattle 110 patients underwent bone marrow transplantation for acute leukemia in relapse. 15 patients became long term survivors. The main cause of failure were GVH, interstitial pneumonitis and leukemic relapse. New attempts are being made to improve the results: (1) better cytoreductive therapy preceding transplantation, (2) bone marrow transplantation during remission of the disease, (3) prevention of interstitial pneumonitis by modifications of the TBI technique

  2. Impact of Whole Body Irradiation on the Intestinal Microbiome- Considerations for Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karouia, Fathi; Santos, Orlando; Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Jones, Jeffrey; Greenberger, Joel S.; Epperly, Michael W.

    Human space travelers experience a unique environment that affects homeostasis and physiologic adaptation. Spaceflight-related changes have been reported in the musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular, neurovestibular, endocrine, and immune systems to just name a few. However, to date, radiation exposure is one of the main limiting factors for long duration space exploration missions and especially a mission to Mars. Over the past few years through advances in technology, the characterization of the microbiome has revealed a large and complex community of microorganisms living in symbiosis with the human host. However, heterogeneity of the intestinal microbial spectrum in humans has been associated with a variety of diseases and susceptibility to infectious and toxic agents. Limited information is known about the influence of space environment in general and radiation in particular on the microbiome. Furthermore, multiple spaceflight and simulated microgravity experiments have shown changes in phenotypic microbial characteristics such as microbial growth, morphology, metabolism, genetic transfer, antibiotic and stress susceptibility, and an increase in virulence factors. We now report a study of the bacterial composition of the intestine in C57BL/6NTAC mice and the types of microbes entering the body at two time points after the LD 50/30 dose of total body irradiation using microarray-based assay, G3 PhyloChip 16S rRNA, and bioinformatics methods. Bacteria and archaea taxon richness was determined at the genus level and ranged from 2 to 107 and 0 to 3 respectively. As expected, pre-exposure blood samples exhibited less bacterial and archaeal genus richness compared to all other samples. However, the study shows a significant shift in the mouse gut microbial speciation in several bacterial families, with increases in the Turicibacteraceae and Enterobacteriaceae and decreases in the Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae families. The findings most relevant to occupational

  3. The effect of carbon impurities on molybdenum surface morphology evolution under high-flux low-energy helium ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Gonderman, S.; Bharadwaj, N.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the role of carbon (C) impurities, in molybdenum (Mo) fuzz evolutions on Mo surface during 100 eV He+ ion irradiations. In this study we considered 0.01, 0.05, and 0.5% C+ ion impurities in He+ ion irradiations. For introducing such tiny C+ ion impurities, gas mixtures of He and CH4 have been chosen in following ratios; 99.95: 0.05, 99.75: 0.25, and 97.5: 2.5. Apart from these three cases, two additional cases, 100% He+ ion (for Mo fuzz growth due to only He+ ions) and 100% H+ ion (for confirming the significance of tiny 0.04-2.0% H+ ions in terms of Mo fuzz evolutions on Mo surface, if any), have also been considered. Ion energy (100 eV), ion fluence (2.6 × 1024 ions m-2), and target temperature (923 K) were kept constant for each experiment and their selections were based on our previous studies [1,2]. Our study shows homogeneously populated and highly dense Mo fuzz evolutions on entire Mo surface for 100% He+ ion irradiation case. Enhancement of C+ ion impurities in He+ ions causes a sequential reduction in Mo fuzz evolutions, leading to almost complete prevention of Mo fuzz evolutions for 0.5% C+ ion impurity concentrations. Additionally, no fuzz formation for 100% H+ ion irradiation at all, were seen (apart from some tiny nano-structuring, in very limited regions). This indicates that there is no significant role of H+ ions in Mo fuzz evolutions (at least for such tiny amount, 0.04-2.0% H+ ions). The study is significant to understand the behavior of potential high-Z plasma facing components (PFCs), in the, presence of tiny amount of C impurities, for nuclear fusion relevant applications.

  4. Neoplasia in beagles that received whole-body irradiation during prenatal or postnatal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitivity to radiation carcinogenesis is being studied in 1680 beagle dogs that received whole-body 60Co gamma radiation exposures during development. Eight treatment groups of 120 dogs each received 0.16 or 0.83 Gy at one of three prenatal (8, 28, or 55 days postcoitus) ages or at one postnatal (2 days postpartum) age. One treatment group of 120 dogs received 0.83 Gy as juveniles at 70 days postpartum, and one treatment group of 240 young adult dogs received 0.83 Gy at 365 days postpartum. Three-hundred-sixty control dogs were sham irradiated. Of the 1680 dogs, 1058 are dead. Approximately 25% of these deaths were related to malignant neoplasia. The age-related incidence of neoplasia is being evaluated. While the incidence of all neoplasms is being studied, particular emphasis is being placed on types of cancer with known susceptibility to induction by radiation such as those of breast, thyroid, and hematopoietic tissues. Neoplasms are classed as (1) incidental, i.e., those found at necropsy in dogs that died of an unrelated cause; (2) mortality independent, i.e., those seen in live dogs and removed surgically, or (3) fatal, i.e., those directly or indirectly responsible for death. Analyses of incidental tumors are done by a prevalence method, whereas analyses of mortality-independent and fatal tumors use an onset-rate or death-rate method. The results of these methods are then combined to give a composite age-related incidence of specific neoplasms. Analyses also are done on disease subgroups to attempt to delineate the effect of intercurrent disease on tumor incidence. The results of such analyses support the concept that age at exposure is an important factor in radiation carcinogenesis. 28 refs., 7 tabs

  5. Cataract after total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation degree of visual impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the degree of visual impairment as a result of cataract formation after total body irradiation (TBI) for bone marrow transplantation. Methods and Materials: The data from 93 patients who received TBI in 1 or 2 fractions as a part of their conditioning regimen for bone marrow transplantation were analyzed with respect to the degree of visual impairment as a result of cataract formation. The probability to develop severe visual impairment (SVI) was determined for all patients, and the degree of visual impairment was assessed for 56 patients with stabilized cataract, using three categories: no, mild, or severe. Results: For all 93 patients, the probability of developing a cataract causing SVI was 0.44. For allogeneic patients, it was 0.33 without and 0.71 with steroid treatment (p<0.001). All SVI-free probability curves reached a plateau distinct from the cataract-free curves. Apparently, cataracts developing late in the follow-up period rarely cause SVI. Of the patients with stabilized cataract, 32% had no visual impairment, 16% had mild, and 52% severe impairment. No or mild visual impairment was present in 61% of all patients with stable cataract and no steroid treatment compared with only 13% of the patients treated with steroids (p=0.035). Conclusion: SVI occurs in only some of the patients (52%) with stable cataract after TBI for bone marrow transplantation in 1 or 2 fractions. Steroid treatment markedly increases the probability of developing visual problems as result of a cataract after TBI

  6. Clinical tolerance of total body irradiation and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total body irradiation (TBI) followed by bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is well established as a part of the conditioning regimen in high dose therapy. The objective is to report the organ toxicity investigated prospectively in patients who had conditioning regimes including fractionated TBI (FTBI) and chemotherapy. From October 2002 to December 2007 18 patients received FTBI in our institution. There were 11 males and; 7 females with median age of 20 years (range 8-50). The present study includes 11 patients with initial diagnoses; acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), 4 - acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 3 - chronic myeloid leukemia (GML). At the time of BMT 11 patients were in complete response, 4 in progression and 3 in chronic phase. TBI was performed on a 60Co unit in alternate prone and supine position. Three patients received nonmyeloablative regimen including 'mini' TBI of 2 Gy followed by allogeneic BMT and 15 received myeloablative regimen of 10-12 Gy FTBI. The dose rate requirement was met for TBI 5-10 cGy/min. A standardized supportive therapy was administered. During the transplantation period on day 0 and +1 of the clinical protocol the realized transplantation of the donor cells pool passed without complications in 16 of the patients and was accompanied by allergic reactions in 2 patients. Induced bone-marrow aplasia was observed in all patients during the post-transplantation period. On day +14 to +24 'entgraftment' was established in 16 patients. In 2 patients till the 35th day after the transplantation no symptoms of the grafting were observed, which imposed reinfusion of donor cells pool. Seven patients developed acute GvHD, 2 patients developed idiopathic pneumonia syndrome, 1 patient developed liver toxicity, 1 - neurological and 1 - cardiovascular toxicity. FTBI is a well tolerated therapeutic regimen in high dose therapy. The observed organ toxicity in the 18 patients in similar to that cited in reference literature. (authors)

  7. Long-term results of total body irradiation in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this chart review of adult patients treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with total body irradiation (TBI) was to evaluate early and late toxicity and long-term outcome. A total of 110 adult patients (34 ± 12 years) with ALL underwent TBI (6 fractions of 2 Gy for a total of 12 Gy) as a part of the treatment regimen before transplantation. Treatment-related toxicity, mortality, and hematologic outcome are reported. Mean follow-up was 70 months. The 2- and 5-year leukemia-free survival rates were 78 and 72 %, respectively. In all, 29 % (32/110) patients suffered from medullary recurrence after a median time of 7 months. Gender was the only statistically significant prognostic factor in terms of overall survival in favor of female patients. Treatment-related mortality and overall survival after 2 and 5 years were 16 and 22 %, and 60 and 52.7 %, respectively. The most frequent late reaction wascGVHD of the skin (n = 33, 30 %). In addition, 15.5 % (17/110 patients) suffered pulmonary symptoms, and 6 patients developed lung fibrosis. Eyes were frequently affected by the radiation (31/110 = 28 %); 12 of 110 patients (11 %) presented with symptoms from osteoporosis, 5 of 110 patients (4.5 %) developed hypothyreosis and 2 patients diabetes mellitus. Of the male patients, 11 % reported erectile dysfunction or loss of libido, while 2 of 36 women reported menopausal syndrome at the mean time of 28 months after treatment with requirement for substitution. No women became pregnant after treatment. No acute or late cardiac toxicities were documented in our patients. No secondary malignancies were documented. Although hematologic outcome was in the upper range of that reported in the literature, treatment-related mortality (TRM) and medullary recurrences remain a challenge. Sophisticated radiation techniques allow for decreasing toxicity to certain organs and/or dose escalation to the bone marrow in highly selected patients in order to improve therapeutic

  8. Retrospective, monocentric analysis of late effects after total body irradiation (TBI) in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boelling, Tobias [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Paracelsus Clinic Osnabrueck (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Kreuziger, David Christoph; Ernst, Iris; Elsayed, Hassan; Willich, Normann [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) is a standard treatment modality within the multidisciplinary approach for allogeneous stem cell or bone marrow transplantation. However, surviving patients are at risk for developing a variety of late sequelae. This analysis aimed to retrospectively characterize late effects after TBI in adults treated in a single center. Patients and Methods: Patients {>=} 18 years treated with fractionated TBI (4-12 Gy) between 1996 and 2008 were included in this study. Treatment data were collected retrospectively from the treating departments. Late effects were evaluated using the clinic charts and/or were obtained from the general practitioners using a standardized questionnaire. Analyses were performed by calculation of the cumulative incidences using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log rank test. Results: A total of 308 patients {>=} 18 years were treated including a TBI of whom 78 patients were excluded from further analysis due to death within less than 1 year after TBI. Patients suffered from leukemia in most cases. Late toxicity follow-up was available in 120 patients (mean age 46.1 years; range, 18-70 years) after a mean follow-up of 23 months (range, 12-96 months). The cumulative incidences (CI) at 3 years were 28% for pulmonary event, 8% for pulmonary toxicity, 25% for kidney toxicity, 8% for cataract, 17% for bone toxicity, and 10% for secondary malignancy. The CI of bone toxicity was higher in female than in male patients (p = 0.019). Conclusion: Late effects after TBI in the context of allogeneous stem cell or bone marrow transplantation can frequently be observed. Regular follow-up examinations are advised for the early registration and treatment of adverse effects. (orig.)

  9. Attenuator design for organs at risk in total body irradiation using a translation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total body irradiation (TBI) is an efficient part of the treatment for malignant hematological diseases. Dynamic TBI techniques provide great advantages (e.g., dose homogeneity, patient comfort) while overcoming treatment room space restrictions. However, with dynamic techniques come additional organs at risk (OAR) protection challenges. In most dynamic TBI techniques, lead attenuators are used to diminish the dose received by the OARs. The purpose of this study was to characterize the dose deposition under various shapes of attenuators in static and dynamic treatments. This characterization allows for the development of a correction method to improve attenuator design in dynamic treatments. The dose deposition under attenuators at different depths in dynamic treatment was compared with the static situation based on two definitions: the coverage areas and the penumbra regions. The coverage area decreases with depth in dynamic treatment while it is stable for the static situation. The penumbra increases with depth in both treatment modes, but the increasing rate is higher in the dynamic situation. Since the attenuator coverage is deficient in the dynamic treatment mode, a correction method was developed to modify the attenuator design in order to improve the OAR protection. The correction method is divided in two steps. The first step is based on the use of elongation charts, which provide appropriate attenuator coverage and acceptable penumbra for a specific depth. The second point is a correction method for the thoracic inclination, which can introduce an orientation problem in both static and dynamic treatments. This two steps correction method is simple to use and personalized to each patient's anatomy. It can easily be adapted to any dynamic TBI techniques

  10. Patient dosimetry for total body irradiation using single-use MOSFET detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, Tina Marie; Tailor, Ramesh; Tolani, Naresh; Prado, Karl; Lane, Richard; Woo, Shiao; Ha, Chul; Gillin, Michael T; Beddar, A Sam

    2008-01-01

    We studied the usefulness of a new type of solid-state detector, the OneDose single-use MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) dosimeter, for entrance dose measurements for total body irradiation (TBI). The factory calibration factors supplied by the manufacturer are applicable to conventional radiotherapy beam arrangements and therefore may not be expected to be valid for TBI dosimetry because of the large field sizes and extended source-to-axis distances used. OneDose detectors were placed under a 1-cm thick bolus at the head, neck, and umbilicus of 9 patients undergoing TBI procedures. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed beside the detectors. We found that the OneDose readings differed from the TLD readings by 4.6% at the head, 1.7% at the neck, and 3.9% at the umbilicus, with corresponding standard deviations of 3.9%, 2.2%, and 2.7%. For all patient measurements, 95% of the OneDose readings fell within 3.3% +/- 6.0% of the TLD readings. Anthropomorphic phantom measurements showed differences of -0.1% at the neck and -1.2% midway between the phantom's carina and umbilicus. Our results suggest that these detectors could be used for TBI quality assurance monitoring, although TLDs should remain the standard when critical dose measurements are performed. If OneDose detectors are to be used for TBI, the use of more than one at each location is strongly recommended. Because the detectors are designed for single use, they cannot be individually calibrated. However, to obtain institution-specific correction factors for better applicability to TBI dosimetry, measurements of several detectors taken from a particular lot could also be obtained in phantom with the TBI geometry configurations used for patient treatment. PMID:19020482

  11. Retrospective, monocentric analysis of late effects after total body irradiation (TBI) in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) is a standard treatment modality within the multidisciplinary approach for allogeneous stem cell or bone marrow transplantation. However, surviving patients are at risk for developing a variety of late sequelae. This analysis aimed to retrospectively characterize late effects after TBI in adults treated in a single center. Patients and Methods: Patients ≥ 18 years treated with fractionated TBI (4-12 Gy) between 1996 and 2008 were included in this study. Treatment data were collected retrospectively from the treating departments. Late effects were evaluated using the clinic charts and/or were obtained from the general practitioners using a standardized questionnaire. Analyses were performed by calculation of the cumulative incidences using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log rank test. Results: A total of 308 patients ≥ 18 years were treated including a TBI of whom 78 patients were excluded from further analysis due to death within less than 1 year after TBI. Patients suffered from leukemia in most cases. Late toxicity follow-up was available in 120 patients (mean age 46.1 years; range, 18-70 years) after a mean follow-up of 23 months (range, 12-96 months). The cumulative incidences (CI) at 3 years were 28% for pulmonary event, 8% for pulmonary toxicity, 25% for kidney toxicity, 8% for cataract, 17% for bone toxicity, and 10% for secondary malignancy. The CI of bone toxicity was higher in female than in male patients (p = 0.019). Conclusion: Late effects after TBI in the context of allogeneous stem cell or bone marrow transplantation can frequently be observed. Regular follow-up examinations are advised for the early registration and treatment of adverse effects. (orig.)

  12. Modelling the thermal evolution and differentiation of the parent body of acapulcoites and lodranites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Wladimir; Breuer, Doris; Spohn, Tilman; Henke, Stephan; Gail, Hans-Peter; Schwarz, Winfried; Trieloff, Mario; Hopp, Jens

    2015-04-01

    The acapulcoites and lodranites are rare groups of achondritic meteorites. Several characteristics such as unique oxygen isotope composition and similar cosmic ray exposure ages indicate that these meteorites originate from a common parent body (Weigel et al. 1999). By contrast to both undifferentiated and differentiated meteorites, acapulcoites and lodranites are especially interesting because they experienced melting that was, however, not complete (McCoy et al. 2006). Thus, unravelling their origin contributes directly to the understanding of the initial differentiation stage of planetary objects in the Solar system. The information preserved in the structure and composition of meteorites can be recovered by modelling the evolution of their parent bodies and comparing the results with the laboratory investigations. Model calculations for the thermal evolution of the parent body of the Acapulco and Lodran-like meteorite clan were performed using two numerical models. Both models (from [3] and [4], termed (a) and (b), respectively) solve a 1D heat conduction equation in spherical symmetry considering heating by short- and long-lived radioactive isotopes, temperature- and porosity-dependent parameters, compaction of initially porous material, and melting. The calculations with (a) were compared to the maximum metamorphic temperatures and thermo-chronological data available for acapulcoites and lodranites. Applying a genetic algorithm, an optimised set of parameters of a common parent body was determined, which fits to the data for the cooling histories of these meteorites. The optimum fit corresponds to a body with the radius of 270 km and a formation time of 1.66 Ma after the CAIs. Using the model by (b) that considers differentiation by porous flow and magmatic heat transport, the differentiation of the optimum fit body was calculated. The resulting structure consists of a metallic core, a silicate mantle, a partially differentiated layer, an undifferentiated

  13. Total Body Irradiation using VMAT (RapidArc: A Planning Study of a novel treatment delivery method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santam Chakraborty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT using RapidArc to deliver total body irradiation (TBI treatment. Methods: VMAT planning was performed a whole body computed tomography (CT data set using Rapid Arc. The planning target volumes included entire body trimmed to 3 mm below the skin. The organs at risk included the lungs and kidneys. A dose of 12 Gy in 10 fractions was prescribed to the target volume. The VMAT-TBI technique consisted of three isocentres and three overlapping arcs: the head and neck, the chest, and the pelvis. The plans were prescribed to ensure, at a minimum, 95% planning target volume dose coverage with the prescription dose (percentage of volume receiving dose of 12 Gy was 95% and maximum dose of 109.8%. Mean dose to lung was restricted at 8.6Gy. Results: The total body volume in the study was 15469cm3 and the PTV volume was 11322cm3. The mean dose to PTV was 104%. The homogeneity index was 0.09. Sparing of normal tissues with adequate coverage of skeletal bones was shown to be feasible with Rapid Arc. The study demonstrates that VMAT is feasible for TBI treatment. Unlike conventional TBI chest wall boost with electrons was not required. Conclusion: The technique for total body irradiation using RapidArc VMAT was found feasible and is undergoing further studies prior to clinical use.

  14. Total-body irradiation with 25-MV photons in advanced non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were treated with total-body irradiation (TBI). One group was treated after chemotherapy failed, while the other group received TBI initially. TBI was ineffective against CLL after chemotherapy failed. All patients with lymphocytic lymphoma who initially responded to chemotherapy but later relapsed were helped by TBI, as were 88 percent of patients with previously untreated lymphocytic lymphomas

  15. Prospective neurodevelopmental studies of two children treated with total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation for acute leukemia in infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five-year neurodevelopmental studies of two infants with acute leukemia are presented. Both patients underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT) after conditioning with cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (TBI). Neither patient was treated with intrathecal chemotherapy. Their outcome is remarkable for normal development of intelligence, language, perception, and motor coordination. These results suggest that TBI and BMT should be considered in future therapeutic studies of infants with acute leukemia, who are at great risk for failure of conventional therapy

  16. In situ observation of microstructure evolution in tungsten under 400 keV Kr{sup +} irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran, Guang, E-mail: gran@xmu.edu.cn [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Huang, Shilin; Huang, Zijing [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Yan, Qingzhi [Institute of Nuclear Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Xu, Jiangkun [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Taishan Nuclear Power Joint Venture Co., Ltd., Taishan City, Guangdong 529228 (China); Li, Ning [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Wang, Lumin, E-mail: lmwang@umich.edu [College of Energy, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Tungsten was irradiated with 400 keV Kr{sup +} ions using the IVEM-Tandem Facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The evolution of microstructure and gas bubbles during the irradiation was observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy. Under irradiation, dislocation loops were created and grew into an increased density of network dislocations with increasing Kr{sup +} ion fluence. The irradiation induced final microstructure consists of dislocation cells ∼50 nm in diameter separated by dislocation walls. The irradiation also induced formation of Kr gas bubbles with an average diameter of 1.4 nm after 3.0 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} at 525 K. The gas bubbles were observed to grow to 2.6 nm diameter after additional Kr-irradiation of 5.0 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} at 815 K. The relationship between bubble size and irradiation time was obtained from experimental data obtained at 815 K and an empirical formula for calculating Kr bubble size was developed by fitting bubble growth equations with experiment data. The growth mechanisms of Kr gas bubbles in tungsten are discussed.

  17. Microstructural evolution of Fesbnd 22%Cr model alloy under thermal ageing and ion irradiation conditions studied by atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchuganova, Olesya A.; Thuvander, Mattias; Aleev, Andrey A.; Rogozhkin, Sergey V.; Boll, Torben; Kulevoy, Timur V.

    2016-08-01

    Nanostructure evolution during ion irradiation of two thermally aged binary Fee22Cr alloys has been investigated using atom probe tomography. Specimens aged at 500 °C for 50 and 200 h were irradiated by 5.6 MeV Fe ions at room temperature up to fluences of 0.3 × 1015 ions/cm2 and 1 × 1015 ions/cm2. The effect of irradiation on the material nanostructure was examined at a depth of 1 μm from the irradiated surface. The analysis of Cr radial concentration functions reveals that dense α‧-phase precipitates in the 200 h aged alloy become diffuse and thereby larger when subjected to irradiation. On the other hand, less Cr-enriched precipitates in the alloy aged for 50 h are less affected. The CreCr pair correlation function analysis shows that matrix inhomogeneity decreases under irradiation. Irradiation leads to a decrease in the number density of diffuse clusters, whereas in the case of well-developed precipitates it remains unchanged.

  18. Treatment verification and in vivo dosimetry for total body irradiation using thermoluminescent and semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is the characterization of thermoluminescent and semiconductor detectors and their applications in treatment verification and in vivo dosimetry for total body irradiation (TBI) technique. Dose measurements of TBI treatment simulation performed with thermoluminescent detectors inserted in the holes of a “Rando anthropomorphic phantom” showed agreement with the prescribed dose. For regions of the upper and lower chest where thermoluminescent detectors received higher doses it was recommended the use of compensating dose in clinic. The results of in vivo entrance dose measurements for three patients are presented. The maximum percentual deviation between the measurements and the prescribed dose was 3.6%, which is consistent with the action level recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), i.e., ±5%. The present work to test the applicability of a thermoluminescent dosimetric system and of a semiconductor dosimetric system for performing treatment verification and in vivo dose measurements in TBI techniques demonstrated the value of these methods and the applicability as a part of a quality assurance program in TBI treatments. - Highlights: • Characterization of a semiconductor dosimetric system. • Characterization of a thermoluminescent dosimetric system. • Application of the TLDs for treatment verification in total body irradiation treatments. • Application of semiconductor detectors for in vivo dosimetry in total body irradiation treatments. • Implementation of in vivo dosimetry as a part of a quality assurance program in radiotherapy

  19. Changes in levels of tissue-specific aldolases following whole-body x-irradiation of rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of whole-body X-irradiation (600 R) of rat on the levels of tissue-specific forms of fructose-1, 6-biphosphate (FDP) aldolase have been investigated. Aldolase activities of type A from muscle, heart and spleen were relatively more susceptible than those from brain (A-C), liver (B) and kidney (A-B). While aldolase activities from brain and kidney showed losses after exposure of rat to 1000 R, that from liver remained unaffected. Effects on muscle aldolase were most pronounced. In muscle, though aldolase showed reduction in activity with FDP as substrate, no change was observed towards fructose-1-phosphate (F-1-P); consequently FDP/F-1-P activity ratio was reduced. Post-irradiation structural changes in muscle aldolase were suggested by the appearance of an extra band with aldolase activity in the gel electrophoresis pattern of muscle extract of irradiated rat. Incubation of muscle extract of control rat with that from irradiated animal at pH 6.0 resulted in loss of aldolase activity, and the presence of EDTA and -SH agents enhanced the loss. A similar loss of crystalline rabbit muscle aldolase was also seen upon incubation with muscle extract from irradiated rat and iodoacetamide protected against such loss. The results indicated involvement of catheptic enzymes of lysosomal origin in the inactivation of aldolase in rat muscle. Incorporation of DL-[1-14C] leucine into the muscle proteins of rat was inhibited by 80-90% upon administration of cycloheximide or puromycin. (author)

  20. An explanation for the ability of cytotoxic drug pretreatment to reduce bone marrow related lethality of total body irradiation (TBI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mice given 9 to 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) die a hematological death 10 to 14 days after exposure. This lethality can be avoided by pretreatment with a cytotoxic drug two days before irradiation. The best example of this is seen when 200 mg/Kg cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) is given two days before TIB. Improved survival results from an earlier onset in the recovery of marrow stem cells (CFU-s) in animals given ara-C before irradiation as compared to controls. In animals given radiation alone there is a lag phase in the recovery of CFU-s; drug pretreatment before irradiation abolishes this delay. We postulate that the cells that repopulate the CFU-s compartment after irradiation are a sub-population of the DFU-s with higher self-renewal capability, lower proliferative activity and higher radiosensitivity (D0 = .8 Gy) than the overall population D0 = 1.1 Gy). Further, we suggest that drug pretreatment alters the radiosensitivity of the first population, increasing it temporarily to that of the overall population. This may come about by ara-C triggering these CFU-s into a relatively radioresistant phase of the cell cycle. In the Lewis lung tumor ara-C pretreatment does not affect the response to radiation, even at times when the drug promotes the early recovery of the CFU-s. It would therefore seem that a potentially useful gain in the therapeutic index may result from these findings

  1. Accelerated recovery of hematopoiesis following sub-lethal whole body irradiation with recombinant murine interleukin-1 (IL-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This communication reports the results of studies designed to investigate the ability of recombinant murine interleukin-1 (rIL-1) to enhance the recovery of hematopoiesis following administration of sub-lethal whole body irradiation (2 Gy). Mice were administered rIL-1 (100 and 500 units) i.p. Twenty-four hours later these mice were administered 2 Gy radiation. Irradiated control mice were given only phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Animals were then serially sacrificed (on days 1, 2, 4, 7, 9, and 12 following irradiation) and their peripheral blood was analyzed for indices (packed red cell volume, WBC, platelets, and differential). Femoral bone marrow was harvested and assayed for their stem cell content--erythroid (CFU-E, BFU-E), granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM), and megakaryocyte (CFU-MEG). Irradiated mice pretreated with rIL-1 demonstrated accelerated hematopoietic recovery as measured by higher WBC, platelets and femoral stem cell content than PBS-treated irradiated controls. These results indicate IL-1 may be an effective radioprotective agent against the hematotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation

  2. Body Size Evolution in Conodonts from the Cambrian through the Triassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, E. K.; Morgan, D. J.; Payne, J.

    2013-12-01

    The size of an organism exercises tremendous control over its physiology, life history, and ecology, yet the factors that influence body size evolution remain poorly understood. One major limitation is the lack of appropriate datasets spanning long intervals of evolutionary time. Here, we document size trends in conodonts (tooth-like microfossils from marine chordates) because they evolved rapidly and are known to change size during intervals of environmental change. By measuring photographs from the Catalogue of Conodonts (Ziegler 1982), we compiled a database of conodont P1 element measurements for 575 species and subspecies from the Cambrian through Triassic periods. Because tooth size correlates with body size in conodont animals and their extant relatives, conodont element length can serve as a proxy for the size of the conodont animal. We find that mean and maximum size across species increased during the early Paleozoic, peaked during the Devonian-Mississippian, and then generally decreased until conodonts went extinct at the end of the Triassic. We used regression analyses to compare conodont mean size trends to potential environmental predictors, such as changing atmospheric pO2, atmospheric pCO2, and sea level. Conodont size exhibited poor correlation with these environmental factors, suggesting that conodont evolution may have been more strongly influenced by other environmental covariates or ecological variables such as predation and competition.

  3. In-situ observation of damage evolution in TiC crystals during helium ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-situ observations were performed on bubble formation and growth in TiC during 20 keV helium ion irradiation over the wide range of irradiation temperatures from 12 to 1523 K. No amorphization occurred over this temperature range. The bubble densities and sizes were almost independent of irradiation temperatures from 12 to 1273 K. Remarkable growth and coalescence occurred during irradiation at high temperature above 1423 K and during annealing above 1373 K after irradiation. ((orig.))

  4. Ultraviolet irradiation of bacteria under anaerobic conditions: implications for Prephanerozoic evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history of the rise of atmospheric oxygen and subsequent time of development of an ultraviolet light screening ozone layer has far reaching consequences in interpreting Prephanerozoic (4.5 to 0.6 billion years ago) evolution and ecology. A special anaerobic glove box was constructed to study the relative sensitivities of different groups of bacteria to uv light under varying conditions. Although there is no concensus concerning the oxygen concentration in the early atmosphere, total anoxic conditions were assumed in these studies. The flux of the uv radiation at 253.7 nm within the chamber is slightly higher than calculated from estimates of the present solar luminosity constant at this wavelength. Strict anaerobes, possibly direct decendants from early reducing conditions on Earth (e.g. Clostridium), facultative anaerobes (e.g. Escherichia, Enterobacter), and aerobes (e.g. Pseudomonas) were irradiated and examined for survival as a function of uv dosage. In these studies, photoreactivation, the amelioration of uv damage by visible light, was demonstrated for the first time to exist in an obligate anaerobe. The number of cells in unprotected cultures, exposed to 20 minutes of uv radiation is generally reduced by 99.9%. However, several mechanisms of protection were found: (1) photoreactivation, (2) absorption of uv by nitrates in aqueous irradiation media, (3) intertwiningof growing filaments into cohesive structures called mats, e.g. the matting habit, (4) dark enzymatic repair of photodamage; and (5) inherent radiation resistance. These experimental results coupled with a literature review of uv effects strongly suggests that the Berkner-Marshall hypothesis is no longer tenable

  5. Activity of kallikrein and kininases in lung tissue and serum of whole-body irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity of kallikrein, kininase 1 and kininase 2 (Angiotensin converting enzyme, ACE) was assayed using chromogenic substrates in lung tissue preparation (microsomal fraction) and in serum of rats irradiated with a dose of 7.0 Gy of X-rays. Kallikrein and ACE in lung were decreased on the 1, 6 and 28 day while kininase 1 was increased from the 6 day on after irradiation. In serum no significant changes were observed in kallikrein and kininase 1. Significant decrease in ACE activity during two weeks after exposure was noticed. Three weeks after irradiation the activity of all three enzymes was significantly lower than in controls. The changes observed are interpreted as contributing to a diminished removal of kinins from irradiated animals and thus favouring vasodilating effect of irradiation. 22 refs. (author)

  6. Effect of environmental variables on body size evolution of crinoids between periods of mass extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, T.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2013-12-01

    Body size plays a major role in determining whether or not an organism can sustain in its local environment. The ecosystem of an animal has a major effect on the fitness of organisms, and it would be interesting to note the degree to which various environmental factors alter body size. In my project, I identify three environmental factors that seem to affect body size of crinoids, marine invertebrates from phylum Echinodermata, and explore how these variables play out in the intervals between the five mass extinctions. The particular factors I study include atmospheric CO2 concentration (proxy for temperature), O2 concentration, and sea level. Although the r and p values for all of these factors were statistically insignificant to definitively make any correlation, there was a visual correlation. For O2, I noted a generally positive correlation with body size over time. CO2 trends suggested a negative correlation until the K-T boundary, but a positive correlation afterwards. Correlation with sea level was a little more complicated: correlation was positive from the start of the Phanerozoic to the Permian extinction; it turned negative until the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary; afterwards, it again became positive. However, for all three variables, statistical values are too low to say definitively mark any correlation. Out of all three factors, CO2 levels had the highest correlation and lowest p-values in the most time intervals: from the start of the Phanerozoic to Ordovician-Silurian Extinction, from the Late Devonian to the Permian Extinction, and from the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary to the present. When considering first differences, CO2 levels also had the highest correlation from the Permian Extinction to Triassic-Jurassic Extinction and from the Triassic-Jurassic Extinction to Cretaceous-Tertiary Extinction. Using PaleoTS, I found that body size evolution patterns either seemed to follow either an unbiased random walk (URW) or stasis in the intervals between

  7. Effects of local and whole body irradiation on the appearance of osteoblasts during wound healing in tooth extraction sockets in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation before tooth extraction delays wound healing in the alveolar socket. This study examined the influences of local and whole body irradiation before tooth extraction on appearance of osteoblasts in the alveolar bone of rat maxillary first molars because bone formation is observed at the initial phase of wound healing. Several osteoblasts were generated 3 days after tooth extraction, and the number of cells increased day by day. Morphological studies showed there were little differences between local irradiation and non-irradiated controls. In contrast, the extraction wound in the whole body irradiation group showed delayed healing, and there was poor granulation tissue and very few osteoblasts at the bottom of the socket. An ultrastructural study showed that the osteoblasts in the extraction socket of whole body irradiation rats were smaller, and had poorly developed organelles. Injection of bone marrow cells to whole body-irradiated animals immediately after tooth extraction partially restored the number of osteoblasts. New periosteal bone formations outside of sockets showed little delay in the whole body irradiation group. These findings suggest that bone formation in the wound healing of extraction socket requires bone marrow cells from hematopoietic organs such as the bone marrow as well as local sources around the alveolar socket, during the initial phase of wound healing. (author)

  8. Nanostructure evolution under irradiation in FeMnNi alloys: A “grey alloy” object kinetic Monte Carlo model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiapetto, M., E-mail: mchiapet@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Malerba, L. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Becquart, C.S. [Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France)

    2015-07-15

    This work extends the object kinetic Monte Carlo model for neutron irradiation-induced nanostructure evolution in Fe–C binary alloys developed in [1], introducing the effects of substitutional solutes like Mn and Ni. The objective is to develop a model able to describe the nanostructural evolution of both vacancy and self-interstitial atom (SIA) defect cluster populations in Fe(C)MnNi neutron-irradiated model alloys at the operational temperature of light water reactors (∼300 °C), by simulating specific reference irradiation experiments. To do this, the effects of the substitutional solutes of interest are introduced, under simplifying assumptions, using a “grey alloy” scheme. Mn and Ni solute atoms are not explicitly introduced in the model, which therefore cannot describe their redistribution under irradiation, but their effect is introduced by modifying the parameters that govern the mobility of both SIA and vacancy clusters. In particular, the reduction of the mobility of point-defect clusters as a consequence of the presence of solutes proved to be key to explain the experimentally observed disappearance of detectable defect clusters with increasing solute content. Solute concentration is explicitly taken into account in the model as a variable determining the slowing down of self-interstitial clusters; small vacancy clusters, on the other hand, are assumed to be significantly slowed down by the presence of solutes, while for clusters bigger than 10 vacancies their complete immobility is postulated. The model, which is fully based on physical considerations and only uses a few parameters for calibration, is found to be capable of reproducing the experimental trends in terms of density and size distribution of the irradiation-induced defect populations with dose, as compared to the reference experiment, thereby providing insight into the physical mechanisms that influence the nanostructural evolution undergone by this material during irradiation.

  9. Nanostructure evolution under irradiation in FeMnNi alloys: A “grey alloy” object kinetic Monte Carlo model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work extends the object kinetic Monte Carlo model for neutron irradiation-induced nanostructure evolution in Fe–C binary alloys developed in [1], introducing the effects of substitutional solutes like Mn and Ni. The objective is to develop a model able to describe the nanostructural evolution of both vacancy and self-interstitial atom (SIA) defect cluster populations in Fe(C)MnNi neutron-irradiated model alloys at the operational temperature of light water reactors (∼300 °C), by simulating specific reference irradiation experiments. To do this, the effects of the substitutional solutes of interest are introduced, under simplifying assumptions, using a “grey alloy” scheme. Mn and Ni solute atoms are not explicitly introduced in the model, which therefore cannot describe their redistribution under irradiation, but their effect is introduced by modifying the parameters that govern the mobility of both SIA and vacancy clusters. In particular, the reduction of the mobility of point-defect clusters as a consequence of the presence of solutes proved to be key to explain the experimentally observed disappearance of detectable defect clusters with increasing solute content. Solute concentration is explicitly taken into account in the model as a variable determining the slowing down of self-interstitial clusters; small vacancy clusters, on the other hand, are assumed to be significantly slowed down by the presence of solutes, while for clusters bigger than 10 vacancies their complete immobility is postulated. The model, which is fully based on physical considerations and only uses a few parameters for calibration, is found to be capable of reproducing the experimental trends in terms of density and size distribution of the irradiation-induced defect populations with dose, as compared to the reference experiment, thereby providing insight into the physical mechanisms that influence the nanostructural evolution undergone by this material during irradiation

  10. The role of load-carrying in the evolution of modern body proportions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W-J; Crompton, R H

    2004-05-01

    The first unquestionably bipedal early human ancestors, the species Australopithecus afarensis, were markedly different to ourselves in body proportions, having a long trunk and short legs. Some have argued that 'chimpanzee-like' features such as these suggest a 'bent-hip, bent-knee' (BHBK) posture would have been adopted during gait. Computer modelling studies, however, indicate that this early human ancestor could have walked in a reasonably efficient upright posture, whereas BHBK posture would have nearly doubled the mechanical energy cost of locomotion, as it does the physiological cost of locomotion in ourselves. More modern body proportions first appear at around 1.8-1.5 Ma, with Homo ergaster (early African Homo erectus), represented by the Nariokotome skeleton KNM-WT 15000, in which the legs were considerably longer in relation to the trunk than they are in human adults, although this skeleton represents an adolescent. Several authors have suggested that this morphology would have allowed faster, more endurant walking. But during the same period, the archaeological record indicates a sharp rise in distances over which stone tools or raw materials are transported. Is this coincidental, or can load-carrying also be implicated in selection for a more modern morphology? Computer simulations of loaded walking, verified against kinetic data for humans, show that BHBK gait is even more ineffective while load-carrying. However, walking erect, the Nariokotome individual could have carried loads of 10-15% body mass for less cost, relative to body size, than AL 288-1 walking erect but unloaded. In fact, to the extent that our sample of humans is typical, KNM-WT 15000 would have had better mechanical effectiveness in bearing light loads on the back than modern human adults. Thus, selection for effectiveness in load-carrying, as well as in endurant walking, is indeed likely to have been implicated in the evolution of modern body proportions. PMID:15198704

  11. Study of Martian Organic Molecules Irradiation and Evolution: The Momie Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Patrice; Stalport, F.; Szopa, C.; Cottin, H.

    2007-12-01

    The life on Mars remains an open question despite the Viking landers results and the ALH84001 possible terrestrial contamination. However recent data of Mars Express orbiter and the twin rovers Spirit and Opportunity seem show different proofs of a past environment with liquid water and mild temperatures favorable for life. Among the biomarkers we seek, the organic molecules are primordial because they are necessary to the origin of life as we know it. However, these molecules (except methane recently discovered) have never been detected on Mars by the in situ analyzes of the Viking landers. A key question is to know if organic molecules are indeed present, in which concentration and under which form. Indeed, even if endogenous organic molecules were never synthesized, those brought by exogenous sources, like interplanetary dust, should be present in detectable amount. Moreover, the track of the endogenous organic molecules should not be dropped out because these molecules are able to resist over periods of several billion years without being degraded. It thus appears that organic molecules could be present at the surface of Mars, even if they have significant chances to undergo a partial or total chemical evolution. Within the framework of a search for organic molecules by present or future space experiments , we are developing the MOMIE project (Martian Organic Material Irradiation and Evolution) in order to determine how the organic species evolve on the Martian surface. We thus propose to implement this type of research with the assistance of an experimental setup designed for the study of the behavior of organic molecules under conditions simulating as close as possible conditions of Mars surface, and plan to present at 39th DPS our first results.

  12. Deuterium Retention and Microstructural Evolution of D2+ -Irradiated Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: A variety of important characteristics associated with the interaction of hydrogen plasma with the metallic walls of fusion devices are either entirely due to, or at least strongly influenced by surface impurities and chemical composition. Understanding of the roles of additional elements in defect structure evolution and deuterium uptake is important for the design of fusion reactor materials. The influence of deuterium on material microstructure, deuterium trapping and release was investigated using transmission electron microscopy, thermal desorption spectrometry and the nuclear reactions D(3He,p)4He. Reemission, retention and evolution of depth distribution profiles of deuterium in stainless steels (06Kh18Ni10, 08Kh18Ni10Ti, 12Kh18Ni10Ti, the commercially available and modified 316L and Cr12Mn20W2V) were studied for 12 keV D2+ implantation up to 1.1019- 1.1022 D/m2 at room and 600 K temperatures followed by annealing from 290 to 1500 K. Changes in hardness were measured using Vickers hardness indentation. Total amount of retained deuterium in Kh18-Ni10 SS saturated for ion fluencies above 4.0.1021 D/m2 and maximum saturation level was 2.1021 D/m2. The radiation-induced dislocation microstructure had no well-defined influence on the deuterium trapping. The results of performed experiments provide evidence of hydrogen trapping at irradiation vacancies end their complexes. A behavior of the deuterium retention is influenced by the manufacturing process and the sample history of stainless steels. Certain thermo-mechanical treatments stimulate the nucleation of martensitic phase acting as an anomalous strong gas trap, so the retained deuterium desorbs mainly at around 1200 K. (authors)

  13. Hemi body irradiation: An economical way of palliation of pain in bone metastasis in advanced cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Pal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The primary aim of this prospective non-randomized study was to evaluate the effect of hemi-body irradiation (HBI on pain and quality of life in cancer patients with extensive bone metastases. The secondary aim was to evaluate side-effects and cost-effectiveness of the treatment. Materials and Methods: Between March 2008 and December 2010, a total of 23 (male = 14, female = 9, median age = 60 years diagnosed cases of metastatic cancer patients (prostate = 11, breast = 6, and lung = 6 received HBI, which was delivered as lower (n = 7 (dose = 8 Gy, upper (n = 8 (dose = 6 Gy, or sequential HBI (n = 8 with a Telecobalt unit (Theratron 780C. Among them, one lung cancer patient died at 2 months and one prostate cancer patient defaulted after the second follow-up. Thus, 21 patients (male = 13, female = 8, median age = 65 years (prostatic cancer = 10, breast cancer = 6, and lung cancer = 5 were followed up for a minimum of 6 months. Evaluations were performed before and at 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 weeks after treatment. Pain evaluation was done by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, Verbal Rating Scale (VRS, Percentage of Pain Relief (PRR, and Global Pain Score (GPS. Toxicity was assessed by CTC v-3 toxicity scores in the medical record. Assessment of oral morphine consumption was done before and after radiation using paired t-test, and correlation analysis was also done with decrease of morphine consumption and reduction of pain score using statistical analysis. Results: Response (control of pain was partial (PR in 67% and complete (CR in 22% of patients. For most patients, the pain control lasted throughout the follow-up period (6 months. From 66.66% patients requiring 13 or more Morphine (10 mg tablets per day prior to HBI, none of the patients required to consume 13 or more Morphine (10 mg tablets per day following HBI, which was correlated with significant reduction in various pain scores (P < 0.05. One way ANOVA with Dunnett′s Multiple Comparison

  14. Late Effects of Total-Body Gamma Irradiation on Cardiac Structure and Function in Male Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBo, Ryne J; Lees, Cynthia J; Dugan, Greg O; Caudell, David L; Michalson, Kris T; Hanbury, David B; Kavanagh, Kylie; Cline, J Mark; Register, Thomas C

    2016-07-01

    Heart disease is an increasingly recognized, serious late effect of radiation exposure, most notably among breast cancer and Hodgkin's disease survivors, as well as the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the late effects of total-body irradiation (TBI) on cardiac morphology, function and selected circulating biomarkers in a well-established nonhuman primate model. For this study we used male rhesus macaques that were exposed to a single total-body dose of ionizing gamma radiation (6.5-8.4 Gy) 5.6-9.7 years earlier at ages ranging from ∼3-10 years old and a cohort of nonirradiated controls. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed annually for 3 years on 20 irradiated and 11 control animals. Myocardium was examined grossly and histologically, and myocardial fibrosis/collagen was assessed microscopically and by morphometric analysis of Masson's trichrome-stained sections. Serum/plasma from 27 irradiated and 13 control animals was evaluated for circulating biomarkers of cardiac damage [N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic protein (nt-proBNP) and troponin-I], inflammation (CRP, IL-6, MCP-1, sICAM) and microbial translocation [LPS-binding protein (LBP) and sCD14]. A higher prevalence of histological myocardial fibrosis was observed in the hearts obtained from the irradiated animals (9/14) relative to controls (0/3) (P = 0.04, χ(2)). Echocardiographically determined left ventricular end diastolic and systolic diameters were significantly smaller in irradiated animals (repeated measures ANOVA, P effects including a high incidence of myocardial fibrosis, reduced left ventricular diameter and elevated systemic inflammation. Additional prospective studies are required to define the time course and mechanisms underlying radiation-induced heart disease in this model. PMID:27333082

  15. Biochemical estimation of ovaries after whole body irradiation with low doses of gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Public concern is being expressed over the effects on men and his environment of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation from the increasing use of atomic energy in medicine industry and power generation. An evaluation of the toxic effects of gamma radiation on female reproduction was made by biochemical estimations of cytoplasmic and membrane bound, Glycogen, Acid and Alkaline phosphatases and cholesterol in the rat varies after whole body irradiation with the low doses of gamma rays. Female Sprague Dawley rats of 12 weeks were divided randomly into four groups Two groups were exposed to 60Co gamma rays of 0.10 Gy and 0.40 Gy respectively at the dose rate 0.0589 Gy/min. These groups were further exposed to the same respective doses and dose rates each month for two consecutive months i .e. when the animals were 16 and 20 weeks old. Total doses delivered in three fractionated doses to the two groups were therefore 0.30 Gy and 1.20 Gy respectively. The remaining two groups were exposed as above but at the dose rate of 0.00368 Gy/min. This would mean that these animals received the same respective doses i.e 0.30 Gy and 1.20 Gy but at the dose rate 1/16th of the above. A day after the last dose the animals were sacrificed by decapitation, ovaries were extirpated put in normal saline and freed from fat and adhering connective tissues. The cleared ovaries were soaked on a piece of filter paper, weighed, minced and homogenized in known volume ice-cold phosphate - buffer saline (PBS, pH 7.4) and the ovarian homogenate was centrifuged for biochemical estimation. Radiation caused degenerative changes in the ovaries as evidenced by a significant decrease in the concentration of cytoplasmic as well as membrane bound glycogen and cholesterol. AKP activity is associated with follicular atrophy. The growing follicles had less AKP activity than antral follicle. The high concentration of ACP in small antral follicles might limit their ability to respond radiation stimulation

  16. Toxicities of total-body irradiation for pediatric bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the acute and late effects, including cognitive function, of total body irradiation (TBI) and chemotherapy for bone marrow transplant (BMT) in children with immunodeficiency or hematologic disorders. Methods and Materials: At UCSF, 15 children with immunodeficiency disorders and 58 children with leukemia received chemoradiotherapy between July 1982 and November 1993 and were evaluated for toxicity. Patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disorder (SCID) received 7 Gy TBI while leukemia patients received 12 Gy TBI. Results: Eight immunodeficient patients (53%) are alive at 4 months to 11 years posttransplant. Acute toxicity was limited and treatment well tolerated. Most patients developed mild nausea and vomiting, skin rash, or erythema. Transient fever/chills, oral mucositis, and alopecia were noted in approximately 50% of patients. Seventy-three percent of patients demonstrated acute liver dysfunction, but only four (27%) developed veno-occlusive disease. All children had decreased growth velocity but normal growth hormone levels. Other endocrinologic evaluations including adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, and thyroid hormones were normal. Only one evaluable girl had delayed puberty with late onset of secondary sexual characteristics. Neuropsychological testing demonstrated an intelligence quotient (IQ) reduction between the baseline and 1 year post-BMT, with some recovery at 3 years. Only one patient developed a clinically significant cataract. Thirteen percent of patients had chronic interstitial lung disease. Four children developed exostosis. Only 1 of the 15 children developed a second malignancy (acute myelogenous leukemia) at age 5, 51 months posttransplant for SCID. For patients with leukemia, similar toxicities were observed. Twenty-nine percent disease-free survival was noted with a mean follow-up of 4.7 years. Twenty-two percent had chronic interstitial lung disease and two patients were diagnosed with cataracts

  17. Rates of ecological divergence and body size evolution are correlated with species diversification in scaly tree ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Barahona, Santiago; Barrera-Redondo, Josué; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2016-07-13

    Variation in species richness across regions and between different groups of organisms is a major feature of evolution. Several factors have been proposed to explain these differences, including heterogeneity in the rates of species diversification and the age of clades. It has been frequently assumed that rapid rates of diversification are coupled to high rates of ecological and morphological evolution, leading to a prediction that remains poorly explored for most species: the positive association between ecological niche divergence, morphological evolution and species diversification. We combined a time-calibrated phylogeny with distribution, ecological and body size data for scaly tree ferns (Cyatheaceae) to test whether rates of species diversification are predicted by the rates at which clades have evolved distinct ecological niches and body sizes. We found that rates of species diversification are positively correlated with rates of ecological and morphological evolution, with rapidly diversifying clades also showing rapidly evolving ecological niches and body sizes. Our results show that rapid diversification of scaly tree ferns is associated with the evolution of species with comparable morphologies that diversified into similar, yet distinct, environments. This suggests parallel evolutionary pathways opening in different tropical regions whenever ecological and geographical opportunities arise. Accordingly, rates of ecological niche and body size evolution are relevant to explain the current patterns of species richness in this 'ancient' fern lineage across the tropics. PMID:27412279

  18. Effect of 60Co-gamma whole-body irradiation on serum amylase level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes of serum amylase activity in rats, after several doses of acut 60Co-gamma irradiation as a function of time were investigated. These changes proved to be of no diagnostic value in early radiation damage. (author)

  19. Hepatic catalase activity after whole-body irradiation of the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using biochemical techniques, the effect of irradiation on catalase rate of different tissues is studied. With cytochemistry, the decrease of catalase activity is studied in situ, after exposure to great ionizing radiation doses

  20. Repopulation of murine alveolar macrophage colony-forming cells after whole body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of the repopulation of alveolar macrophage colony-forming cells (AL-CFC) after a supra lethal irradiation and bone marrow transplantation in mice. The repopulation of both CFU-S (hemopoietic stem cells) and the committed stem cells for both granulocytes and monocytes (GM-CFC) in the femoral bone marrow occurred within 2 weeks. In sharp contrast, the repopulation of AL-CFC in the lung was a very slow process. The number of AL-CFC, which are more resistant to irradiation than both CFU-S and GM-CFC, was reduced to 1% of control values one day after the irradiation and recovered slowly with time. It took almost nine weeks for the number of AL-CFC per mouse to reach normal levels. The number of recoverable alveolar cells in these mice never dropped below 70% of control values and reached the nadir about two weeks after the irradiation. (UK)

  1. Effect of whole-body irradiation by fast neutrons on mouse tissues. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groups of male Swiss albino mice were irradiated by single doses of either 7 rem or 14 rem of fast neutrons with 14 MeV average energy, corresponding to fluences of 1.27x108 n/cm2 and 2.54x108 n/cm2, respectively. The activities of acid phosphatase (ACP) and succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) in kidney, lung and liver were determined at different time point up to seven days after irradiation. Lysosomal affection was represented by statistically significant increase of ACP activity in all cell types of the three tested organs immediately after irradiation with either of the doses used. The effect of SDH was represented by reduction in activity in all three organs. The activities of both enzymes showed tendencies to return to pre-irradiation levels with time in most cell types especially after the 7 rem dose. (orig.)

  2. Busulfan and total body irradiation as antihematopoietic stem cell agents in the preparation of patients with congenital bone marrow disorders for allogenic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capacity of busulfan and total body irradiation to ablate hematopoietic stem cells as preparation for the allogeneic bone marrow transplantation of patients with congenital bone marrow disorders was studied. Fourteen patients received 18 transplants; busulfan was used in the preparatory regimen of eight transplants and total body irradiation in the regimens of six transplants. Sustained hematopoietic ablation was achieved in six of eight patients prepared with busulfan and in all six patients prepared with total body irradiation. Three patients prepared with total body irradiation died with idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis, whereas no patients receiving busulfan developed interstitial pneumonitis. The optimal antihematopoietic stem cell agent to be used for the preparation of patients with congenital bone marrow disorder for bone marrow transplantation is not certain

  3. Temporal evolution of the environmental doce remaining in a clinical irradiation bunker after the cessation of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we try to quantify tite doce emitted by different radioactive processes that occur in the head of a clinica. Linear accelerator and the patient is irradiated, or wallc of the bunker, converted into tertiary sources of radiation trying to ectablish tite origin of the came in different parts of the bunker.

  4. Long-term results of total body irradiation in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnitz, Simone; Zich, Alexander; Budach, Volker; Jahn, Ulrich; Neumann, Oliver [Charite University Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Martus, Peter [University Tuebingen, Institute of Clinical Epidemiology and Applied Biostatistics, Tuebingen (Germany); Arnold, Renate [Charite University Medicine, Campus CVK, Department of Hematology and Oncology, Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this chart review of adult patients treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with total body irradiation (TBI) was to evaluate early and late toxicity and long-term outcome. A total of 110 adult patients (34 ± 12 years) with ALL underwent TBI (6 fractions of 2 Gy for a total of 12 Gy) as a part of the treatment regimen before transplantation. Treatment-related toxicity, mortality, and hematologic outcome are reported. Mean follow-up was 70 months. The 2- and 5-year leukemia-free survival rates were 78 and 72 %, respectively. In all, 29 % (32/110) patients suffered from medullary recurrence after a median time of 7 months. Gender was the only statistically significant prognostic factor in terms of overall survival in favor of female patients. Treatment-related mortality and overall survival after 2 and 5 years were 16 and 22 %, and 60 and 52.7 %, respectively. The most frequent late reaction wascGVHD of the skin (n = 33, 30 %). In addition, 15.5 % (17/110 patients) suffered pulmonary symptoms, and 6 patients developed lung fibrosis. Eyes were frequently affected by the radiation (31/110 = 28 %); 12 of 110 patients (11 %) presented with symptoms from osteoporosis, 5 of 110 patients (4.5 %) developed hypothyreosis and 2 patients diabetes mellitus. Of the male patients, 11 % reported erectile dysfunction or loss of libido, while 2 of 36 women reported menopausal syndrome at the mean time of 28 months after treatment with requirement for substitution. No women became pregnant after treatment. No acute or late cardiac toxicities were documented in our patients. No secondary malignancies were documented. Although hematologic outcome was in the upper range of that reported in the literature, treatment-related mortality (TRM) and medullary recurrences remain a challenge. Sophisticated radiation techniques allow for decreasing toxicity to certain organs and/or dose escalation to the bone marrow in highly selected patients in order to improve therapeutic

  5. Microstructure evolution in proton-irradiated austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys under LWR core conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jian

    1999-11-01

    Irradiation-induced microstructure of austenitic stainless steel was investigated using proton irradiation. High-purity alloys of Fe-20Cr-9Ni (UHP 304 SS), Fe-20Cr-24Ni and Ni-18Cr-9Fe were irradiated using 3.2 MeV protons at a dose rate of 7 × 10-6 dpa/s between 300°C and 600°C. The irradiation produced a microstructure consisting of dislocation loops and voids. The dose and temperature dependence of the number density and size of dislocation loops and voids were investigated. The changes in yield strength due to irradiation were estimated from Vickers hardness measurements and compared to calculations using a dispersed-barrier hardening model. The dose and temperature dependence of microstructure and hardness change for proton irradiation follows the same trend as that for neutron irradiation at comparable irradiation conditions. Commercial purity alloys of CP 304 SS and CP 316 SS were irradiated at 360°C to doses between 0.3 and 3.0 dpa. The irradiated microstructure consists of dislocation loops. No voids were detected at doses up to 3.0 dpa. Loop size distributions are in close agreement with that in the same alloys neutron-irradiated in a LWR core. The loop density also agrees with neutron irradiation data. The yield strength as a function of dose in proton irradiated commercial purity alloys is consistent with the neutron- data trend. A fast-reactor microstructure model was adapted for light water reactor (LWR) irradiation conditions (275°C, 7 × 10 -8 dpa/s) and then applied to proton irradiation under conditions (360°C, 7 × 10-6 dpa/s) relevant to LWRs. The original model was modified by including in-cascade interstitial clustering and the loss of interstitial clusters to sinks by cluster diffusion. It was demonstrated that loop nucleation for both LWR irradiation condition and proton irradiation are driven by in-cascade interstitial clustering. One important result from this modeling work is that the difference in displacement cascade between

  6. Effects of whole-body x-irradiation on some aspects of collagen metabolism in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole-body exposure of adult rats to x rays at sublethal or lethal doses causes a decrease in hydroxyproline levels in urine and skeletal muscle. Similarly, reduction in the excretion of labeled hydroxyproline in urine following intraperitoneal injection of 14C-proline may be attributed to impaired in vivo hydroxylation of proline. Incorporation of administered 14C-proline into 14C-hydroxyproline and its distribution in different metabolic forms of collagen in skeletal muscle and skin are markedly reduced in x-irradiated rats. These suggest impaired hydroxylation of proline. However, in vitro proline hydroxylase activity in liver is not affected by radiation treatment. Decreased endogenous oxygen consumption, as observed in liver homogenates of x-irradiated rats, may be one of the factors which affect in vivo proline hydroxylation

  7. Experimental model of a combined lung lesion by selinon herbicide and external whole-body ionizing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wistar rats have been treated as follows: acute gamma irradiated with 4 Gy; per os poisoned with selinon 5 times weekly during 4 months at dose 2.2 mg/kg (1/20 LD50) exposed to combined treatment with both factors. The following indices of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and supernatant from lung homogenate (LH) were determined in dynamics till day 60: in BALF - total cell count; activity of the lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, protein content; in LH - activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, amounts of malonic aldehyde and protein. The results show that chronic oral introduction of selinon at small doses causes toxic lung damage. Whole-body irradiation with 4 Gy ionizing radiation fails to potentiate the biological effects recorded. 2 figs., 4 refs

  8. Effect of whole-body irradiation of mice on the number of background plaque-forming cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R.E.; Lefkovits, I.; Soeederberg, A.

    1983-08-01

    Mice were exposed in whole-body fashion to several doses of radiation and killed at various times thereafter for a determination of the number of background plaque-forming cells (PFCs) as assayed on either sheep erythrocytes or bromelain-treated autologous mouse erythrocytes. Increased numbers of both types of PFC were found in the irradiated groups. These increases were dependent on radiation dose and time after exposure. They did not appear to be caused by a disruption of normal lymphocyte traffic or a switch in immunoglobulin isotype. An increased number of PFCs on bromelain-treated mouse RBCs but not on sheep RBCs were found in irradiated congenitally athymic nude mice. On the basis of this and related observations, background PFCs on bromelain-treated mouse RBCs and on sheep RBCs appear to fall under different forms of homeostatic control.

  9. DNA base damage generated in vivo in hepatic chromatin of mice upon whole body γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA base lesions in hepatic chromatin formed upon whole-body irradiation of mice were studied. After γ-irradiating (20-470 Gy) and killing animals, chromatin was isolated from their livers and analysed by GC-MS. Five pyrimidine- and five purine-derived DNA lesions were identified and quantified: 5-hydroxy-5-methylhydantoin, 5-hydroxycytosine, 5-(hydroxymethyl) uracil, 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoadenine, 2-hydroxyadenine, 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine, thymine glycol and 5,6-dihydroxy-uracil. Except for the latter two, amounts of these compounds were increased significantly over control levels in the dose range of 100-470 Gy. Above 200 Gy, a deviation from linearity was observed, although yields were increased in most cases up to 470 Gy. (Author)

  10. Constraining the redshift evolution of the Cosmic Microwave Background black-body temperature with PLANCK data

    CERN Document Server

    de Martino, I; Atrio-Barandela, F; Ebeling, H; Kashlinsky, A; Kocevski, D; Martins, C J A P

    2015-01-01

    We constrain the deviation of adiabatic evolution of the Universe using the data on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature anisotropies measured by the {\\it Planck} satellite and a sample of 481 X-ray selected clusters with spectroscopically measured redshifts. To avoid antenna beam effects, we bring all the maps to the same resolution. We use a CMB template to subtract the cosmological signal while preserving the Thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (TSZ) anisotropies; next, we remove galactic foreground emissions around each cluster and we mask out all known point sources. If the CMB black-body temperature scales with redshift as $T(z)=T_0(1+z)^{1-\\alpha}$, we constrain deviations of adiabatic evolution to be $\\alpha=-0.007\\pm 0.013$, consistent with the temperature-redshift relation of the standard cosmological model. This result could suffer from a potential bias associated with the CMB template, that we quantify it to be less than $-0.02$, but is free from those biases associated with using TSZ selected ...

  11. Interest of the grazing X ray diffraction to study the evolution of materials under irradiation: behaviour of zirconia under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document was written to show that grazing X ray diffraction may be a powerful tool to study irradiation damages induced by ion beams in materials. Taking advantage of an asymmetric geometry and a curved detector, it is possible to analyse accurately diffraction diagrams at low angles by taking into account the specific effects induced by the grazing incidence. The interest of grazing incidence is to control the penetration depth of X rays. Such possibility allows to separate effects induced by damages (displacement cascades) and the implantation peak (elastic deformation of the lattice due to the insertion of projectile ions in the matrix). A Rietveld analysis on grazing X ray diagrams shows clearly that displacement cascades induce a phase transition on irradiated zirconia. (authors)

  12. The process of adaptation and evolution in irradiated synthetic populations of Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of synthetic populations of A. thaliana caused an intense process of directed natural selection. As a result, six to eight generations after irradiation, the arithmetic mean of a number of parameters (plant height, stem length, number of internodes) exceeded the arithmetic average for plants in a non-irradiated population. The process of directed selection proceeded more intensely after the plants were irradiated repeatedly than after a single irradiation. The intensity of directed selection when the plants were irradiated with a 104rad dose of fast neutrons was definitely greater than for a dose of 103rad. An intermediate intensity of selection was observed when the plants were irradiated with a 3x104rad dose of gamma radiation. When the plants were subjected to single and repeated 104rad doses of fast neutron radiation, the arithmetic mean of certain features of the best component of the initial population (Enkheim) was exceeded in M8 and R6. (author)

  13. On the Evolution of Pulsatile Flow Subject to a Transverse Impulse Body Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Labbio, Giuseppe; Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Kadem, Lyes

    2014-11-01

    In the event of an unexpected abrupt traffic stop or car accident, automotive passengers will experience an abrupt body deceleration. This may lead to tearing or dissection of the aortic wall known as Blunt Traumatic Aortic Rupture (BTAR). BTAR is the second leading cause of death in automotive accidents and, although quite frequent, the mechanisms leading to BTAR are still not clearly identified, particularly the contribution of the flow field. As such, this work is intended to provide a fundamental framework for the investigation of the flow contribution to BTAR. In this fundamental study, pulsatile flow in a three-dimensional, straight pipe of circular cross-section is subjected to a unidirectional, transverse, impulse body force applied on a strictly bounded volume of fluid. These models were simulated using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT. The evolution of fluid field characteristics was investigated during and after the application of the force. The application of the force significantly modified the flow field. The force induces a transverse pressure gradient causing the development of secondary flow structures that dissipate the energy added by the acceleration. Once the force ceases to act, these structures are carried downstream and gradually dissipate their excess energy.

  14. The Bar-Halo Interaction - II. Secular evolution and the religion of N-body simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, M D; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, Martin D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores resonance-driven secular evolution between a bar and dark-matter halo using N-body simulations. We make direct comparisons to our analytic theory (Weinberg & Katz 2005) to demonstrate the great difficulty that an N-body simulation has representing these dynamics for realistic astronomical interactions. In a dark-matter halo, the bar's angular momentum is coupled to the central density cusp (if present) by the Inner Lindblad Resonance. Owing to this angular momentum transfer and self-consistent re-equilibration, strong realistic bars WILL modify the cusp profile, lowering the central densities within about 30% of the bar radius in a few bar orbits. Past results to the contrary (Sellwood 2006, McMillan & Dehnen 2005) may be the result of weak bars or numerical artifacts. The magnitude depends on many factors and we illustrate the sensitivity of the response to the dark-matter profile, the bar shape and mass, and the galaxy's evolutionary history. For example, if the bar length is com...

  15. Reorganisation of Hoxd regulatory landscapes during the evolution of a snake-like body plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Isabel; Gitto, Sandra; Novoa, Ana; Codourey, Julien; Nguyen Huynh, Thi Hanh; Gonzalez, Federico; Milinkovitch, Michel C; Mallo, Moises; Duboule, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Within land vertebrate species, snakes display extreme variations in their body plan, characterized by the absence of limbs and an elongated morphology. Such a particular interpretation of the basic vertebrate body architecture has often been associated with changes in the function or regulation of Hox genes. Here, we use an interspecies comparative approach to investigate different regulatory aspects at the snake HoxD locus. We report that, unlike in other vertebrates, snake mesoderm-specific enhancers are mostly located within the HoxD cluster itself rather than outside. In addition, despite both the absence of limbs and an altered Hoxd gene regulation in external genitalia, the limb-associated bimodal HoxD chromatin structure is maintained at the snake locus. Finally, we show that snake and mouse orthologous enhancer sequences can display distinct expression specificities. These results show that vertebrate morphological evolution likely involved extensive reorganisation at Hox loci, yet within a generally conserved regulatory framework. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16087.001 PMID:27476854

  16. Genome evolution and the emergence of fruiting body development in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Goldman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lateral gene transfer (LGT is thought to promote speciation in bacteria, though well-defined examples have not been put forward. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: We examined the evolutionary history of the genes essential for a trait that defines a phylogenetic order, namely fruiting body development of the Myxococcales. Seventy-eight genes that are essential for Myxococcus xanthus development were examined for LGT. About 73% of the genes exhibit a phylogeny similar to that of the 16S rDNA gene and a codon bias consistent with other M. xanthus genes suggesting vertical transmission. About 22% have an altered codon bias and/or phylogeny suggestive of LGT. The remaining 5% are unique. Genes encoding signal production and sensory transduction were more likely to be transmitted vertically with clear examples of duplication and divergence into multigene families. Genes encoding metabolic enzymes were frequently acquired by LGT. Myxobacteria exhibit aerobic respiration unlike most of the delta Proteobacteria. M. xanthus contains a unique electron transport pathway shaped by LGT of genes for succinate dehydrogenase and three cytochrome oxidase complexes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Fruiting body development depends on genes acquired by LGT, particularly those involved in polysaccharide production. We suggest that aerobic growth fostered innovation necessary for development by allowing myxobacteria access to a different gene pool from anaerobic members of the delta Proteobacteria. Habitat destruction and loss of species diversity could restrict the evolution of new bacterial groups by limiting the size of the prospective gene pool.

  17. Radioprotective efficacy of melatonin and sesamol in hematopoietic system of whole body irradiated mice at 2 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hematopoietic system is most sensitive to radiation exposure, its protection and recovery is very critical for survival and quality of life after radiation exposure. Antioxidants have strong capacity to reduce free radicals and have multiple roles in recovery of radiation induced damages in different organs. The objective of the present study was to investigate radioprotective effects of melatonin and sesamol in hematopoietic system of whole body irradiated C57BL/6 mice at therapeutic dose of 2 Gy. Male 7-8 week old C57BL/6 mice were administered intra-peritoneal with melatonin/sesamol (10 and 20 mg/kg body weight) 30 minutes prior to whole body γ-irradiation (2 Gy at dose rate 1 Gy/min) using Cobalt Teletherapy Unit Bhabhatron-II (Panacea Biotech Pvt. Ltd, India). Control (untreated mice), radiation, melatonin alone, sesamol alone and melatonin/sesamol plus radiation groups were sacrificed 24 hours post irradiation. The spleen and bone marrow were extracted and processed for relative organ weight, smears preparation (for micronuclei analysis). The relative spleen weight was observed and expressed in the ratio of weight of spleen (mg) and body weight of mice (gms). Relative spleen weight of radiation groups decreased significantly to control group (p<0.01); melatonin/sesamol (20 mg/kg body weight) plus radiation groups recovered the relative spleen weight (p<0.05). The micro-nucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (mnPCE) were scored in minimum 1000 polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) under 100X objective for micronuclei assay in bone marrow cells. Normochromatic erythrocytes (NCE) were also scored along with PCE to calculate the PCE/NCE ratio. The results have shown significant increase in frequency of mnPCE (p<0.05) in radiation alone group compared to control; whereas melatonin (20 mg/kg body weight) plus radiation decreased the mnPCE frequency (p<0.05). Further studies for MnPCE in bone marrow of sesamol groups are in progress. The results will have strong

  18. Changes in some sex hormones in the pigs after whole body gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigs aged 2 months were gamma irradiated at doses of 1.5-3.0 Gy. The control sex markers LH, FSH, PG, 17-estradiol and testosterone were measured by radioimmunoassay. Hormonal analysis of blood is performed on the 30th day after irradiation and continued at fixed intervals until sexual maturity. A histological study of the ovaries was carried out and the quality of ova was examined. During the same terms the development of the testes and the quality of the spermatogenesis of the males were also examined. Results indicate that irradiation up to 1.5 Gy cause short life hormonal changes in both sexes and insignificant changes in the histological structure of the ovary and testis. Doses above 1.5 Gy cause changes in both hormonal and germinative function of the ovary and testis leading up to proved changes in the reproductive ability of the male and female animals. (author)

  19. Pulmonary complications of bone marrow transplantation: a comparison of total body irradiation and cyclophosphamide to busulfan and cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the acute and long-term pulmonary toxicities of total body irradiation and busulfan in bone marrow transplantation. Methods and Materials: From March 1984 through February 1991, 144 patients received high-dose therapy with cyclophosphamide plus either total body irradiation (TBI-CY) or busulfan (BU-CY) followed by bone marrow rescue. Treatment protocols were based on disease type. Cyclophosphamide dose was 120-200 mg/kg, given in 2-4 days. Total body irradiation was given as 12 Gy in four fractions over 4 days, or 14.4 Gy in eight fractions over 4 days. Busulfan dose was 16 mg/kg given over 4 days. Results: Seventy-nine patients were treated with TBI-CY and 65 patients with BU-CY. More patients in the TBI group had allogeneic transplants (40 vs. 18). Pulmonary events occurred in 48 patients, 19 in BU-CY and 29 in TBI-CY. Of the 58 patients with allogeneic transplants, 21 (36%) developed chronic graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD), and 10 of those patients developed pulmonary complications (including 2 with obliterative bronchitis and 1 with asthma). Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) occurred in 14 patients, 12 in the TBI-CY group and 2 in the BU-CY group. Cytomegalovirus and pneumocystis infections were associated with IP in 11 of those patients. Fatal idiopathic IP occurred in one patient in each of the TBI-CY and BU-CY groups. Multivariate analysis showed that only chronic GVHD and prior bleomycin use were significant predictors of interstitial pneumonitis; no difference was seen between TBI-CY and BU-CY. Conclusions: Pulmonary complications were most commonly associated with GVHD and prior bleomycin use. The incidence of cytomegalovirus or pneumocystis carinii pneumonitis was greater in the patients receiving the TBI regimen; fatal pulmonary complications were not significantly different between TBI and nonTBI regimens

  20. Combined total body X-ray irradiation and total skin electron beam radiotherapy with an improved technique for mycosis fungoides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twelve consecutive patients with advanced stage mycosis fungoides (MF) were treated with combined total body X ray irradiation (TBI) and total skin electron beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Six had generalized plaque disease and dermatopathic nodes, three had tumor stage disease and node biopsy positive for mycosis fungoides, and three had erythroderma/Sezary syndrome. The treatment regimen consisted of split course total body X ray irradiation, given in twice weekly 15 cGy fractions to 75 cGy, then total skin electron beam radiation therapy given in once weekly 400 cGy fractions to a total dose of 2400 cGy. Underdosed areas and areas of greatest initial involvement were boosted 400 cGy twice weekly for an additional 1200 cGy. This was followed by a second course of total body X ray irradiation, to a total dose of 150 cGy. The total skin electron beam radiotherapy technique is a modification of an established six position EBRT technique for mycosis fungoides. Measurements to characterize the beam with and without a lexan scattering plate, demonstrated that the combination of no-plate beams produced better dose uniformity with a much higher dose rate. This improved technique is particularly advantageous for elderly and/or frail patients. Nine (75%) of the 12 patients achieved complete response (CR). The other three had significant improvement with greater than 80% clearing of their disease and resolution of symptoms. All six patients with generalized plaque disease achieved complete response and remained free of disease from 2 to 16 months. Two of three node positive patients also achieved complete response; one, with massive biopsy-documented mycosis fungoides nodal disease and deep open tumors, remained relapse-free over 2 years. Only one of the three patients with erythroderma/Sezary syndrome achieved a complete response, which was short lived

  1. Protective Effect of Exogenous Dehydro-epiandrosterone Sulfate (DHEAS) on Liver Cell Organs of Whole Body y-Irradiated Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate (DHES) are adrenal hormones. They are powerful endogenous antioxidants and are important in protecting the cells from damage. The present work aimed to evaluate the exogenous DHEAS as a protector against the whole body exposure to gamma radiation damages on DNA and RNA content of the nuclear fraction, calcium and acid phosphatase in the mitochondria fraction and glutathione (GSH) and malonaldehyde (MDA) in the cytosol fraction in the liver of male rats. Fifty male albino rats weighing 130-150 g were categorized into the following groups: 1-Control untreated. 2-Exposed to whole body gamma irradiation (6.5 Gy). 3-Received a single oral administration of DHEAS at a dose level of 200 mg/kg b.wt. 4-Administered with DHEAS (200 mg/kg) two h pre-exposure to whole body gamma irradiation (6.5 Gy). Three time intervals were determined for tissue sampling: after one day, one week and two weeks post irradiation (groups 2 and 4) and post administration of DHEAS (group 3). The results showed that: 1- DHEAS has a radioprotective effect on DNA and RNA content decreases in the liver nuclear fraction. 2- It significantly ameliorated the changes in mitochondria Ca21 content and acid phosphatase activity. 3- It improved both GSH and MDA contents in the cytosolic fraction. It could be concluded that, DHEAS showed an obvious protective role against the hazard of gamma radiation on liver cells. Several mechanisms were discussed about its effects. Therefore, more investigations are needed to understand well the role of DHEAS in protecting the animal tissues against ionizing radiation hazard

  2. Total body irradiation and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation - Sofia University Hospital experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim of the study: To report the long-term outcome in patients with leukaemias, who had conditioning regimens including total body irradiation (TBI) prior to bone marrow transplantation (BMT), and to establish independent factors correlated with treatment outcome. Material and methods: Between January 2002 and December 2007, 18 patients, 11 males and 7 females with median age of 12 years (range 8-50), received TBI. Initial diagnoses were acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) 11 (61%), acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) 4 (22%), and chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) 3 (17%). Pre-transplantation disease status was defined as remission 11 (61%), progression 4 (22%), and chronic phase 3 (17%). All the patients were conditioned with a high-dose chemoradiotherapy regimen including fractionated TBI delivering 10 to 12 Gy in 15 (73%) and a single fraction of 2 Gy in 3 (17%) of the cases. TBI was performed in alternate prone and supine positions with a 60 Co machine. In 13 (72%) patients transplantation was carried out from an HLA-identical related donor and in 5 (28%) from an unrelated donor. Seventeen allogeneic transplantations were of peripheral blood stem cells and 1 was of bone marrow stem cells. Post- transplantation clinical, biological, and functional evaluations were performed on days 30, 100, 180, at 1 year, and annually thereafter. Each evaluation included an assessment of the study end points: marrow chimerism, disease status (complete remission or relapse), survival status (alive or dead), treatment-related toxicity (TRT), treatment-related mortality (TRM) and graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD). Results: Median follow-up from BMT was 27 months (range 3-52). Sixteen patients achieved engraftment, 2 patients had primary graft failure. Seven of 18 (39%) evaluable patients developed acute GvHD, 6 (35%) patients developed chronic GvHD. At the time of reporting 9 of 18 patients remain alive and in remission. Nine patients died, 4 (22%) because of relapse and 5 (28%) because of

  3. Effect of whole-body irradiation on the level of blood clotting factors in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rats were irradiated with 6.0, 7.0 or 9.5 Gy of X-rays. Blood was collected on the 1,3,7,14 or 30th day after exposure. Fibrinogen, thrombin, prothrombin, factor X and antithrombin 3 levels were determined in blood plasma. In irradiated rats the level of these factors underwent a change which depended to some extent on the radiation dose absorbed. In general, there was a temporary elevation of all factors, lasting longer when the dose applied was higher. 24 refs., 6 tabs. (author)

  4. Enhancement of hemopoietic recovery by indomethacin after sublethal whole-body gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug, indomethacin, a potent prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor, on the recovery of hemopoiesis was investigated in sublethally gamma irradiated mice. Treatment with indomethacin after irradiation was found to increase the granulocyte and lymphocyte counts in peripheral blood. Furthermore, an increased rate of the restitution of bone marrow cellularity and of the spleen weight was observed. Using the method of 125iodo-deoxyuridine uptake in the spleen, the ability of indomethacin to potentiate cell proliferation was demonstrated. (orig.)

  5. Evolution of microbial activity in a mediterranean ecosystem submitted to chronic gamma irradiation. Investigation of nitrogen transfer with isotopic tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mediterranean ecosystem located on the site of Cadarache (France) has been experimentally by irradiated over the past fifteen years. The potential effects of ionizing radiations for different doses of its ecological system has been studied. The objective of the work was to demonstrate the level of soil microbial population and its activity. Chronic exposures reduced the biomass and the dehydrogenase activity by a factor of 50% and increased the amount of nitrate in the soil. To measure the direct impact of irradiations on soil microorganisms, we have irradiated soil sample in laboratory at 0.1; 0.5; 1 kGy, and observed its evolution during a period of six weeks thereafter. We have a reduction of the dehydrogenase activity and an increase of nitrate being proportionaly to the dose delivered. Using nitrogen labelled, we state that this high rate of nitrate production is due to an inhibition of the organization of this form of nitrogen. Conversely, the ammonification and the nitrification are not affected. Also, for anaerobic conditions created by glucose, the nitrate labelled (15N) permitted us to show that in untreated soil, 45% of nitrate was reduced to nitrogen gas by denitrification and 24% of nitrate was reduced to ammonium by dissimilation in the irradiated soil. These experiments show that gamma irradiations are of great interest for studying soil microorganisms. As of now, very little is known on the effects of this kind of stress for attention and need to be pursued on such ecosystems. Further investigations call

  6. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of nanostructural evolution under post-irradiation annealing in dilute FeMnNi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiapetto, M. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Mol (Belgium); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Universite de Lille 1, ENSCL, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Becquart, C.S. [Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Universite de Lille 1, ENSCL, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS, Etude et Modelisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Materiaux (EM2VM) (France); Domain, C. [EDF R and D, Departement Materiaux et Mecanique des Composants, Les Renardieres, Moret sur Loing (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS, Etude et Modelisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Materiaux (EM2VM) (France); Malerba, L. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Mol (Belgium)

    2015-01-01

    Post-irradiation annealing experiments are often used to obtain clearer information on the nature of defects produced by irradiation. However, their interpretation is not always straightforward without the support of physical models. We apply here a physically-based set of parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations of the nanostructural evolution of FeMnNi alloys under irradiation to the simulation of their post-irradiation isochronal annealing, from 290 to 600 C. The model adopts a ''grey alloy'' scheme, i.e. the solute atoms are not introduced explicitly, only their effect on the properties of point-defect clusters is. Namely, it is assumed that both vacancy and SIA clusters are significantly slowed down by the solutes. The slowing down increases with size until the clusters become immobile. Specifically, the slowing down of SIA clusters by Mn and Ni can be justified in terms of the interaction between these atoms and crowdions in Fe. The results of the model compare quantitatively well with post-irradiation isochronal annealing experimental data, providing clear insight into the mechanisms that determine the disappearance or re-arrangement of defects as functions of annealing time and temperature. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of nanostructural evolution under post-irradiation annealing in dilute FeMnNi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post-irradiation annealing experiments are often used to obtain clearer information on the nature of defects produced by irradiation. However, their interpretation is not always straightforward without the support of physical models. We apply here a physically-based set of parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations of the nanostructural evolution of FeMnNi alloys under irradiation to the simulation of their post-irradiation isochronal annealing, from 290 to 600 C. The model adopts a ''grey alloy'' scheme, i.e. the solute atoms are not introduced explicitly, only their effect on the properties of point-defect clusters is. Namely, it is assumed that both vacancy and SIA clusters are significantly slowed down by the solutes. The slowing down increases with size until the clusters become immobile. Specifically, the slowing down of SIA clusters by Mn and Ni can be justified in terms of the interaction between these atoms and crowdions in Fe. The results of the model compare quantitatively well with post-irradiation isochronal annealing experimental data, providing clear insight into the mechanisms that determine the disappearance or re-arrangement of defects as functions of annealing time and temperature. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Influence of L-dopa and of thymus fraction on the survival rate of whole-body irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busse, E.; Helmholz, M. (Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (German Democratic Republic). Bereich Medizin (Charite))

    1982-06-01

    The survival rate of mice with exposure of the whole body (7 Gy) was hardly changed by one dose as well as several doses of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor amantadine and the interferon inductor measles vaccine. However, the survival rates were increased by one administration of L-dopa or by the long-term therapy using L-dopa at 7 and 9 Gy, resp. The survival rates were also increased at 7 and 9 Gy, resp. if the thymus factor was three times applied to the animals after irradiation. The increased survival rates gained by using L-dopa and thymus factor are correlated with the leukocyte values determined.

  9. The influence of L-dopa and of thymus fraction on the survival rate of whole-body irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival rate of mice with exposure of the whole body (7 Gy) was hardly changed by one dose as well as several doses of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor amantadine and the interferon inductor measles vaccine. However, the survival rates were increased by one administration of L-dopa or by the long-term therapy using L-dopa at 7 and 9 Gy, resp. The survival rates were also increased at 7 and 9 Gy, resp. if the thymus factor was three times applied to the animals after irradiation. The increased survival rates gained by using L-dopa and thymus factor are correlated with the leukocyte values determined. (author)

  10. Effect of low dose whole-body X-irradiation on the efficacy of pEgr-IL18-B7.1 gene-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of whole-body irradiation with low dose X-rays in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma under recombinant plasmid pEgr-IL18-B7.1 gene-radiotherapy. Methods: The pEgr-IL18-B7.1 recombinant plasmids mediated by polyethylenimine were injected locally into tumors of the mice with gene-radiotherapy, and then the tumors received different therapeutic regimens containing local X-irradiation with 2 Gy and whole-body X-irradiation with 0.075 Gy, respectively. The anti-tumor effects of low dose X-rays in optimizing the protocol of pEgr-IL18-B7.1 gene-radiotherapy on the tumor-bearing mice were observed. Results: As compared with repeated high dose local X-irradiation alone, single high dose local X-irradiation in combination with repeated low dose of whole-body X-irradiation showed more significant inhibition of tumor growth under pEgr-IL18-B7.1 gene-radiotherapy. Conclusions: Low dose whole-body X-irradiation superimposed upon a local high dose could significantly enhance the anti-tumor effect in the protocol of pEgr-IL18-B7.1 gene-radiotherapy. (authors)

  11. Precipitate evolution in low-nickel austenitic stainless steels during neutron irradiation at very low dose rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isobe, Y.; Sagisaka, M. [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Osaka (Japan); Garner, F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA, AK (United States); Okita, T. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Not all components of a fusion reactor will be subjected to high atomic displacement rates. Some components outside the plasma containment may experience relatively low displacement rates but data generated under long-term irradiation at low dpa rates is hard to obtain. In another study the neutron-induced microstructural evolution in response to long term irradiation at very low dose rates was studied for a Russian low-nickel austenitic stainless steel that is analogous to AISI 304. The irradiated samples were obtained from an out-of-core anti-crush support column for the BN-600 fast reactor with doses ranging from 1.5 to 22 dpa generated at 3x10{sup -9} to 4x10{sup -8} dpa/s. The irradiation temperatures were in a very narrow range of 370-375 deg. C. Microstructural observation showed that in addition to voids and dislocations, an unexpectedly high density of small carbide precipitates was formed that are not usually observed at higher dpa rates in this temperature range. These results required us to ask if such unexpected precipitation was anomalous or was a general feature of low-flux, long-term irradiation. It is shown in this paper that a similar behavior was observed in a western stainless steel, namely AISI 304 stainless steel, irradiated at similar temperatures and dpa rates in the EBR-II fast reactor, indicating that irradiation at low dpa rates for many years leads to a different precipitate microstructure and therefore different associated changes in matrix composition than are generated at higher dpa rates. One consequence of this precipitation is a reduced lattice parameter of the alloy matrix, leading to densification that increases in strength with increasing temperature and dose. A. non-destructive method to evaluate these precipitates is under development and is also discussed in this paper. (authors)

  12. The comparison of microstructure and nanocluster evolution in proton and neutron irradiated Fe-9%Cr ODS steel to 3 dpa at 500 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, M. J.; Wharry, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    A model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel was irradiated with protons or neutrons to a dose of 3 displacements per atom (dpa) at a temperature of 500 °C, enabling a direct comparison of ion to neutron irradiation effects at otherwise fixed irradiation conditions. The irradiated microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography including cluster analysis. Both proton and neutron irradiations produced a comparable void and dislocation loop microstructure. However, the irradiation response of the Ti-Y-O oxide nanoclusters varied. Oxides remained stable under proton irradiation, but exhibited dissolution and an increase in Y:Ti composition ratio under neutron irradiation. Both proton and neutron irradiation also induced varying extents of Si, Ni, and Mn clustering at existing oxide nanoclusters. Protons are able to reproduce the void and loop microstructure of neutron irradiation carried out to the same dose and temperature. However, since nanocluster evolution is controlled by both diffusion and ballistic impacts, protons are rendered unable to reproduce the nanocluster evolution of neutron irradiation at the same dose and temperature.

  13. Effect of PdS on Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution of Nanostructured CdS under Visible Light Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingyun Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of PdS as a cocatalyst for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution, nanostructured PdS/CdS were prepared by an in situ coprecipitation and hydrothermal method, respectively. The as-prepared photocatalysts were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, UV-visible absorption spectra, and photoluminescence spectra (PL. With PdS highly dispersed in the CdS nanostructures, the photoactivity was evaluated by hydrogen evolution from aqueous solution containing Na2S/Na2SO3 as sacrificial reagents under visible light irradiation. When the concentration of PdS was 1% by weight, PdS/CdS, prepared by the in situ coprecipitation, showed the highest photocatalytic activity, while that prepared by hydrothermal method showed the most stability for hydrogen evolution. The effect of highly dispersed PdS on the photoactivity was discussed.

  14. Acute whole-body irradiation, even at moderate dose, induces alterations in blood-brain-barrier permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A radiation-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown has been evoked, but clearly demonstrated only at high doses of ionizing radiations. By using two protocols, we have searched an impairment in BBB integrity induced by moderate doses. First, the effects of irradiation on the permeability of striatal BBB to [3H]AIBA and [14C]sucrose were investigated in rats by using brain microdialysis. 32 rats, irradiated at 4.5Gy were serially experimented from 0 to 24 hours, from 24 to 48 hours and at later delays after exposure. 32 sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Second, the entry of pyridostigmine (PYR would not be expected to cross the BBB) into the brain was investigated in mice subjected to (neutron-g) exposure at 0.7Gy or 4Gy. For each dose 120 animals were irradiated and 120 sham-irradiated mice were included. At different delays after exposure, 10 mice were injected with 0.9% NaCl (control) or PYR bromide (0.1 mg/kg). Mice were killed 10min after injection and striatum, cortex and hippocampus were quickly dissected. Penetration of the drug into the brain was examined by measurement of AChE activity. Concerning microdialysis protocol, no late modification of the permeability of BBB was observed. But, in the course of the initial syndrome, we observed a transient increase of the permeability to the two markers, between the third and the 17th hour after exposure. A secondary transient 'opening' of the BBB to [14C] sucrose was noticed about 28 hours following irradiation with no modification of the permeability to [3H]AIBA. Concerning the BBB permeability to PYR, by comparing irradiated-PYR mice to sham-PYR mice, a decrease of AChE activity in the three cerebral areas was noted 48 hours after exposure at 4 Gy ; at 0.7 Gy this decrease is noted in the striatum only. In conclusion, our experiments by using two animal models, two types of radiations, and different tracers show modifications of the BBB permeability after moderate doses whole-body

  15. Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term Irradiation at Elevated Temperature: Critical Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, Gary; Jiao, Zhijie; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2013-12-20

    The in-service degradation of reactor core materials is related to underlying changes in the irradiated microstructure. During reactor operation, structural components and cladding experience displacement of atoms by collisions with neutrons at temperatures at which the radiation-induced defects are mobile, leading to microstructure evolution under irradiation that can degrade material properties. At the doses and temperatures relevant to fast reactor operation, the microstructure evolves by microchemistry changes due to radiation-induced segregation, dislocation loop formation and growth, radiation induced precipitation, destabilization of the existing precipitate structure, as well as the possibility for void formation and growth. These processes do not occur independently; rather, their evolution is highly interlinked. Radiation-induced segregation of Cr and existing chromium carbide coverage in irradiated alloy T91 track each other closely. The radiation-induced precipitation of Ni-Si precipitates and RIS of Ni and Si in alloys T91 and HCM12A are likely related. Neither the evolution of these processes nor their coupling is understood under the conditions required for materials performance in fast reactors (temperature range 300-600°C and doses to 200 dpa and beyond). Further, predictive modeling is not yet possible, as models for microstructure evolution must be developed along with experiments to characterize these key processes and provide tools for extrapolation. To extend the range of operation of nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials in advanced nuclear energy and transmutation systems to that required for the fast reactor, the irradiation-induced evolution of the microstructure, microchemistry, and the associated mechanical properties at relevant temperatures and doses must be understood. This project builds upon joint work at the proposing institutions, under a NERI-C program that is scheduled to end in September, to understand the effects of

  16. The influence of whole-body irradiation with combined ultraviolet/infrared light on the spermiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We irradiated for six weeks two times a week 10 volunteer subjects with a UV/IR-radiation source and evaluated the spermiogram every week. The subjects were divided in 3 groups with various light sensitivities (high, medium, low), in order to achieve a similar erythematous intensity. No relation to the irradiation could be found in any of the spermiogram parameters (sperm density, total sperm number, motility, vitality, ejaculation quantity, fructose, pH value). A direct effect as a result of photochemical changes of the cells of spermatogenesis is not possible because of the limited penetration ability of the used radiation. The temperature increase as a result of the UV/IR irradiation was too small to result in a decrease of spermatozoan concentration, as can be expected by stronger warming of the testicles. An indirect effect of the UV/IR irradiation in the sense of an influence on spermatogenesis via the involuntary nervous system → hypophysis → sexual hormone could not be determined by us. (orig.)

  17. Histostructural changes in pig testes after total-body gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiments were carried out with male pigs from Cembarow breed. Animals aged 60 days were exposed to 1.5 - 2.5 Gy gamma rays. Samples for histological study were taken after castration 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 months after irradiation. The testes samples were fixed and prepared by routine histological methods. The following control markers were used to examine the histostructural changes of testes in post-irradiation period: total number of germ cells, diameter of seminiferous tubule, relative number of seminiferous tubules with impaired and normal spermatogenesis and sterile seminiferous tubule. The changes were compared in relation to age and dose. Data obtained from serial cross sections of the seminiferous tubules indicated that in earlier periods after exposure (1-2 months) the number of germ cells decreased in part of the seminiferous tubules, but later some violation of spermatogenesis was observed. The analysis of these changes in relation to the dose indicated that the 2.5 Gy irradiation caused a permanent cytopathogenetic effect on germ cells in pig seminiferous tubules. The results from histological studies of the 2-8 months aged pig testes irradiated at 2.5 Gy indicated depressed spermatogenesis in its morphological state. (author)

  18. Monte Carlo efficiency calibration of a neutron generator-based total-body irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many body composition measurement systems are calibrated against a single-sized reference phantom. Prompt-gamma neutron activation (PGNA) provides the only direct measure of total body nitrogen (TBN), an index of the body's lean tissue mass. In PGNA systems, body size influences neutron flux attenuation, induced gamma signal distribution, and counting efficiency. Thus, calibration based on a single-sized phantom could result in inaccurate TBN values. We used Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP-5; Los Alamos National Laboratory) in order to map a system's response to the range of body weights (65-160 kg) and body fat distributions (25-60%) in obese humans. Calibration curves were constructed to derive body-size correction factors relative to a standard reference phantom, providing customized adjustments to account for differences in body habitus of obese adults. The use of MCNP-generated calibration curves should allow for a better estimate of the true changes in lean tissue mass that many occur during intervention programs focused only on weight loss. (author)

  19. The contribution of atom probe tomography to the understanding of nuclear material evolution under thermal or irradiation ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of materials are strongly linked to their structure at nanometer scale. In order to optimize material properties or to anticipate the evolution of these properties during ageing in given conditions, the first step is to characterize their microstructure at this very fine scale and to understand the mechanisms governing its long term evolution. This is particularly the case for nuclear materials which are submitted to severe conditions such as corrosive environment, mechanical stress, high temperature and neutron irradiation. In order to ensure nuclear plant long term operation (up to 60 years) with reliable and safe conditions and to develop materials for next generations of reactors, the mechanisms occurring at the atomic scale during thermal or irradiation ageing have to be understood. Atom probe Tomography (APT) is one of the suitable tools to study these phenomena (phase transformations, segregations...). The Groupe de Physique des Matériaux (GPM) works on the ageing of nuclear materials since more than 20 years. A combination of characterization tools (APT, scanning and transmission electron microscopies - SEM and TEM) and modeling tools (Monte Carlo, Phase field ..) is generally used. The interest of APT, coupled with other experimental or theoretical tools, (i) to identify the microstructural features responsible of the degradation of the properties of nuclear materials in service conditions, (ii) to understand basic mechanisms at the formation and evolution of these features and (iii) to develop new materials will be shown through several examples (irradiation ageing of pressurized water reactor pressure vessel and internal structures steels, ferritic-martensitic steels for future reactors...). One of the challenges for the investigation of irradiation effects in nuclear materials is to be able to characterize the nanostructure of radioactive samples. The project GENESIS, led by the GPM, aims to develop and experimental platform (APT, TEM

  20. Structure and evolution of irradiated accretion disks. I - Static thermal equilibrium structure. II - Dynamical evolution of a thermally unstable torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchman, Y.; Mineshige, S.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal equilibrum structure and dynamical behavior of externally irradiated accretion disks are investigated. For radiative disks only the surface layer is heated, while for convective disks the heat penetrates deeply into the disk. For sufficiently strong radiation and given irradiation flux F(irr), the disk is completely stabilized against thermal instabilities of the sort invoked to explain dwarf novae. For moderately strong irradiation there is still an unstable branch in the thermal equilibrium curve. In typical soft X-ray transients, the disk is unstable against the dwarf-nova type instability. Fixed F(irr) on accretion disk annuli reduces the amplitude and the quiescent times and increases the outburst duration of the resultant light curves. Varying F(irr) in proportion to the mass accretion rate at the disks's inner edge results in light curves with a plateau in the decay from outbursts. In the case when irradiation is suddenly switched on, a temperature inversion results which leads to the formation of an accretion corona.