WorldWideScience

Sample records for board task force

  1. Core 24 Implementation Task Force Final Report to the Washington State Board of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington State Board of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The State Board of Education (SBE) created the Core 24 Implementation Task Force (ITF) to examine the implementation issues associated with the Core 24 high school graduation requirements framework, passed by the State Board of Education (SBE) in July 2008. The SBE chartered the ITF to advise the SBE on strategies needed to implement the…

  2. Natural Gas Market Design Task Force : report to the Ontario Energy Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a summary of the Natural Gas Market Design Task Force's recommendations concerning issues relating to capacity entitlement, customer mobility, access to service, title transfer, consolidation of direct purchase contracts, conversion issues, emergency planning, load balancing services, pricing of unbundled components, unbundling timetable, load profiling issues, consumer education, information systems issues and licence processing. Outlines of an immediate agenda of ongoing technical work is also provided. Fundamental policy issues in respect of which resolution was not achieved by the Task Force and where some Board direction may be required, and a detailed review of the Task Force's deliberations, which formed the basis for the recommendations, constitute the bulk of the report

  3. 75 FR 43943 - Defense Science Board; Task Force on Counter Insurgency (COIN) Intelligence, Surveillance and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... of the Secretary Defense Science Board; Task Force on Counter Insurgency (COIN) Intelligence...) Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) Operations will meet in closed session on August 24-26, and... Defense for Acquisition, Technology & Logistics on scientific and technical matters as they affect...

  4. 75 FR 4051 - Defense Health Board; DoD Task Force on the Prevention of Suicide by Members of the Armed Forces...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... of the Secretary Defense Health Board; DoD Task Force on the Prevention of Suicide by Members of the...)(2) of Public Law, the DoD Task Force on the Prevention of Suicide by Members of the Armed Forces (hereafter, Task Force) will meet on February 11, 2010, to gather information pertaining to suicide...

  5. Compilation of reports prepared for the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This report contains reports prepared for the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management, from experts in the United States. The contents of the report focus mainly on public opinion, and government policies as perceived by the public.

  6. Compilation of reports prepared for the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains reports prepared for the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management, from experts in the United States. The contents of the report focus mainly on public opinion, and government policies as perceived by the public

  7. Findings of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secretary of Energy James D. Watkins created the Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management in April 1991. He asked the group then to recommend measures the Dept. might take to strengthen public trust and confidence in its diverse radioactive waste management programs. The group was composed of 14 individuals representing a broad range of experience and background. It conducted seven public meetings, at which nearly one hundred government officials, representatives of non-governmental organizations, and members of the general public appeared. It undertook an extensive program of independent research and analysis including surveys of DOE stakeholders

  8. Gap Task Force

    CERN Multimedia

    Lissuaer, D

    One of the more congested areas in the ATLAS detector is the GAP region (the area between the Barrel Calorimeter and the End Cap calorimeter) where Inner Detector services, LAr Services and some Tile services all must co-habitat in a very limited area. It has been clear for some time that the space in the GAP region is not sufficient to accommodate all that is needed. In the last few month additional problems of routing all the services to Z=0 have been encountered due to the very limited space between the Tile Calorimeter and the first layer of Muon chambers. The Technical Management Board (TMB) and the Executive Board (EB) decided in the middle of March to establish a Task Force to look at this problem and come up with a solution within well-specified guidelines. The task force consisted of experts from the ID, Muon, Liquid Argon and Tile systems in addition to experts from the Technical Coordination team and the Physics coordinator. The task force held many meetings and in general there were some very l...

  9. The task force process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on the unique aspects of the Fernald Citizens Task Force process that have contributed to a largely successful public participation effort at Fernald. The Fernald Citizens Task Force passed quickly by many procedural issues. Instead, the Task Force concentrated on (a) educating itself about the site, its problems, and possible solutions, and (b) choosing a directed way to approach its mandate: To make recommendations on several open-quotes big pictureclose quotes issues, including future use of the site, cleanup levels, waste disposition, and cleanup priorities. This paper presents the approach used at Fernald for establishing and running a focused site-specific advisory board, the key issues that have been faced, and how these issues were resolved. The success of Fernald in establishing a strong and functioning site-specific advisory board serves as a useful model for other DOE facilities, although the Fernald model is just one of many approaches that can be taken. However, the approach presented here has worked extremely well for Fernald

  10. 75 FR 34439 - Defense Science Board Task Force on Nuclear Treaty Monitoring and Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... anticipated directions in nonproliferation and arms control agreements and the environments in which they... Designated Federal Official will review all timely submissions with the Defense Science Board...

  11. 75 FR 43943 - Defense Science Board; Task Force on Nuclear Treaty Monitoring and Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... anticipated directions in nonproliferation and arms control agreements and the environments in which they... Official will review all timely submissions with the Defense Science Board Chairperson, and ensure they...

  12. 75 FR 55577 - Office of the Secretary: Defense Science Board (DSB) Task Force on the Survivability of DoD...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... Assets to Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) and Other Nuclear Weapons Effects AGENCY: Defense Threat Reduction... Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) and other Nuclear Weapons Effects (hereafter referred to as the Task Force) will...

  13. Responses to comments received on the draft final report of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    The Task Force solicited comments on its Draft Final Report from a variety of sources. Letters were sent to over 400 individuals who had expressed interest in the interest in the Department`s radioactive waste, management programs, a notice was placed in the Federal Register, the morning session of the January 1993 meeting of the full Secretary of Energy Advisory Board was given over to discussion of the draft, and Task Force members and staff presented the effort at several professional meetings. Altogether 32 written comments were received. They are reproduced here, followed in each case by the Task Force`s response to specific suggestions made to improve the draft. (The panel did not respond to comments that simply reflected policy preferences or that praised the group`s effort.) With one exception, those specific suggestions are highlighted and given a letter designation from {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} to {open_quotes}Z{close_quotes}. The Task Force`s responses, written in the Fall 1993, are labeled in a like manner. For the one exception, a comments submitted by Judy Treichel, the Task Force`s response is printed on copies of her annotated pages.

  14. Board Task Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minichilli, Alessandro; Zattoni, Alessandro; Nielsen, Sabina;

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses recent calls to narrow the micro–macro gap in management research (Bamberger, 2008), by incorporating a macro-level context variable (country) in exploring micro-level determinants of board effectiveness. Following the integrated model proposed by Forbes and Milliken (1999), ...

  15. Responses to comments received on the draft final report of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Task Force solicited comments on its Draft Final Report from a variety of sources. Letters were sent to over 400 individuals who had expressed interest in the interest in the Department's radioactive waste, management programs, a notice was placed in the Federal Register, the morning session of the January 1993 meeting of the full Secretary of Energy Advisory Board was given over to discussion of the draft, and Task Force members and staff presented the effort at several professional meetings. Altogether 32 written comments were received. They are reproduced here, followed in each case by the Task Force's response to specific suggestions made to improve the draft. (The panel did not respond to comments that simply reflected policy preferences or that praised the group's effort.) With one exception, those specific suggestions are highlighted and given a letter designation from open-quotes Aclose quotes to open-quotes Zclose quotes. The Task Force's responses, written in the Fall 1993, are labeled in a like manner. For the one exception, a comments submitted by Judy Treichel, the Task Force's response is printed on copies of her annotated pages

  16. Urban task force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grubović Ljiljana V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Urban Task Force Report has brought to our attention, that English towns and cities today require a new renaissance. The comprehensive planning has retarded urban living (Urban Renaissance, Sharing the Vision 01.99, 1999. Forty percent of inner-urban housing stock is subsidized 'social' housing. A review of the demographic and development trends have lead to the UK Government’s new urban policy that prioritizes the regeneration of towns and cities by building on recycled urban land and protecting the countryside. As result, Urban Task Force (UTF was founded the with the following aims To identify causes of urban decline in England; To recommend practical solutions how to bring people back into cities; To establish a new vision for urban regeneration based on the principles of design excellence, social well being and environmental responsibility within a viable economic and legislative framework (Urban Task Force, 1999:1. This paper represents the analysis of the economic and political effects of the program and its viability.

  17. Comparison of a laboratory grade force platform with a Nintendo Wii Balance Board on measurement of postural control in single-leg stance balance tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huurnink, Arnold; Fransz, Duncan P; Kingma, Idsart; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2013-04-26

    Training and testing of balance have potential applications in sports and medicine. Laboratory grade force plates (FP) are considered the gold standard for the measurement of balance performance. Measurements in these systems are based on the parameterization of center of pressure (CoP) trajectories. Previous research validated the inexpensive, widely available and portable Nintendo Wii Balance Board (WBB). The novelty of the present study is that FP and WBB are compared on CoP data that was collected simultaneously, by placing the WBB on the FP. Fourteen healthy participants performed ten sequences of single-leg stance tasks with eyes open (EO), eyes closed (EC) and after a sideways hop (HOP). Within trial comparison of the two systems showed small root-mean-square differences for the CoP trajectories in the x and y direction during the three tasks (mean±SD; EO: 0.33±0.10 and 0.31±0.16 mm; EC: 0.58±0.17 and 0.63±0.19 mm; HOP: 0.74±0.34 and 0.74±0.27 mm, respectively). Additionally, during all 420 trials, comparison of FP and WBB revealed very high Pearson's correlation coefficients (r) of the CoP trajectories (x: 0.999±0.002; y: 0.998±0.003). A general overestimation was found on the WBB compared to the FP for 'CoP path velocity' (EO: 5.3±1.9%; EC: 4.0±1.4%; HOP: 4.6±1.6%) and 'mean absolute CoP sway' (EO: 3.5±0.7%; EC: 3.7±0.5%; HOP: 3.6±1.0%). This overestimation was highly consistent over the 140 trials per task (r>0.996). The present findings demonstrate that WBB is sufficiently accurate in quantifying CoP trajectory, and overall amplitude and velocity during single-leg stance balance tasks. PMID:23528845

  18. Transport Task Force Leadership, Task 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Transport Task Force (TTF) was initiated as a broad-based US magnetic fusion community activity during the fall of 1988 to focus attention on and encourage development of an increased understanding of anomalous transport in tokamaks. The overall TTF goal is to make progress on Characterizing, Understanding and Identifying how to Reduce plasma transport in tokamaks -- to CUIR transport

  19. Inter-Association Task Force Report on Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Special Libraries Association, Washington, DC.

    In 1988, the Board of Directors of the Special Libraries Association provided funding to a task force to gather data which would determine how certain segments of society perceive librarians, how librarians view themselves and their colleagues, and to provide recommendations for addressing the issue of image. The task force project consisted of…

  20. Fuel oil quality task force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laisy, J.; Turk, V. [R.W. Beckett Corp., Elyria, OH (United States)

    1997-09-01

    In April, 1996, the R.W. Beckett Corporation became aware of a series of apparently unrelated symptoms that made the leadership of the company concerned that there could be a fuel oil quality problem. A task force of company employees and industry consultants was convened to address the topic of current No. 2 heating oil quality and its effect on burner performance. The task force studied changes in fuel oil specifications and trends in properties that have occurred over the past few years. Experiments were performed at Beckett and Brookhaven National Laboratory to understand the effect of changes in some fuel oil properties. Studies by other groups were reviewed, and field installations were inspected to gain information about the performance of fuel oil that is currently being used in the U.S. and Canada. There was a special concern about the use of red dye in heating oils and the impact of sulfur levels due to the October, 1993 requirement of low sulfur (<0.05%) for on-highway diesel fuel. The results of the task force`s efforts were published in July, 1996. The primary conclusion of the task force was that there is not a crisis or widespread general problem with fuel oil quality. Localized problems that were seen may have been related to refinery practices and/or non-traditional fuel sources. System cleanliness is very important and the cause of many oil burner system problems. Finally, heating oil quality should get ongoing careful attention by Beckett engineering personnel and heating oil industry groups.

  1. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public Comment In an effort to make the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations clearer and ... Current as of: May 2016 Internet Citation: Home . U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. June 2016. http://www. ...

  2. 78 FR 63208 - UPDATE-Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... Epidemiology, Analysis, and Library Services; Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services... Services Task Force (Task Force) AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of... Force (Task Force). The in-person Task Force meeting is being replaced by an abbreviated conference...

  3. 78 FR 27969 - Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Program Office, Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers for Disease Control... Task Force (Task Force) AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health... Prevention (CDC) announces the next meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)....

  4. 77 FR 56845 - Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... and Analysis Program Office, Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers... Task Force (Task Force) AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health... Prevention (CDC) announces the next meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)....

  5. 78 FR 2996 - Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... and Analysis Program Office, Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers... Task Force (Task Force) AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health... Prevention (CDC) announces the next meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)....

  6. Response to the Task Force on School Governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoyer, Richard A.

    Although the Task Force on School Governance report claims that restructuring of school boards is essential to save the nation's failing schools, the real failure is society itself. Societal problems such as the nation's $4 trillion debt, air and water pollution, crime, drug abuse, and special interest lobbies abound, and legislators'…

  7. Public venture capital in Germany: task force or forced task?

    OpenAIRE

    Schilder, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the question of whether public venture capital (VC) is performing its task properly, taking a look at how public VC companies' selection process, investment behavior, and consulting services reflect goals that differ from those of private VC firms. The results present evidence that public VC firms deliver a different market segment than their private counterparts; for example, their selection process and syndication behavior reveal their predominant goal of promoting the...

  8. Forced board changes: Evidence from Norway.

    OpenAIRE

    Nygaard, Knut

    2011-01-01

    The recently introduced gender quota on Norwegian corporate boards dramatically increased the share of female directors. This reform offers a natural experiment to investigate changes in corporate governance from forced increases in gender diver- sity, and whether these changes in turn impact firm performance. I find that investors anticipate the new directors to be more effective in firms with less information asymmetry between insiders of the firm and outsiders. Firms with low information a...

  9. Pyramid Lake Task Force : Final report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Pyramid Lake Task Force was created to address Pyramid Lake’s recession and recommend possible solutions that would consider both the needs for preserving the...

  10. Task force report on computerized tomographic scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-10-01

    Computerized axial tomography (CAT) scanning was the focus of a task force established by the Bergen-Passaic Health Systems Agency in New Jersey. The task force reviewed the literature on CAT technology and its applications, surveyed four northeastern hospitals with operating CAT scanning installations, and created three working subcommittees which produced written reports. It was agreed by task force members that certain criteria should be used when evaluating applications for CAT scanners, e.g., service area, staff resources, emergency room activity, radiotherapy, 24-hour scanner coverage, the medically indigent, and cost. Overall, it was determined that CAT is a proven diagnostic tool of significant value and that it should be available to residents of the Bergen-Passaic health service area. Since the CAT field is rapidly evolving and changing, however, it was not possible to define quantitatively the long-term need for and supply of CAT scanners in the region. Appendixes present supporting data on the task force findings.

  11. Drug and alcohol task force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordey, T. [ConocoPhillips Canada Resources Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada); Sunstrum, M. [Enform, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Worker absenteeism due to substance abuse costs the Alberta economy approximately $720 million a year. It is estimated that 20 per cent of all drivers in fatal crashes were using alcohol, and the use of cannabis and cocaine in Alberta has more than doubled over the last 15 years. In addition, 1 in 10 Alberta workers have reported using alcohol while at work and 4 per cent have reported using alcohol 4 hours prior to coming to work during the previous 12 months. In an effort to ensure appropriate health and safety for workers in the Canadian petroleum industry, 6 trade associations in the sector have joined together as the Enform Alcohol and Drug Initiative and are now working to develop a common approach to drug and alcohol guidelines and workplace rules. The task group will determine if existing policies and guidelines are sufficient to ensure a safe workplace and will consider standardizing the testing, application and rehabilitation of workers with respect to the use of drugs and alcohol. In the past, disciplinary actions have often been reversed because employers have not been consistent or did not follow established alcohol and drug policies or test to specific standards. Various work rules for inappropriate alcohol and drug use were reviewed, as well as education and communication strategies regarding policy content. Standards for testing criteria were discussed, as well as issues concerning duty-to-accommodate circumstances. An excerpt of concentration standards was presented. It was concluded that a matrix for companies to assess and determine safety sensitive positions is needed. refs., tabs., figs.

  12. Drug and alcohol task force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worker absenteeism due to substance abuse costs the Alberta economy approximately $720 million a year. It is estimated that 20 per cent of all drivers in fatal crashes were using alcohol, and the use of cannabis and cocaine in Alberta has more than doubled over the last 15 years. In addition, 1 in 10 Alberta workers have reported using alcohol while at work and 4 per cent have reported using alcohol 4 hours prior to coming to work during the previous 12 months. In an effort to ensure appropriate health and safety for workers in the Canadian petroleum industry, 6 trade associations in the sector have joined together as the Enform Alcohol and Drug Initiative and are now working to develop a common approach to drug and alcohol guidelines and workplace rules. The task group will determine if existing policies and guidelines are sufficient to ensure a safe workplace and will consider standardizing the testing, application and rehabilitation of workers with respect to the use of drugs and alcohol. In the past, disciplinary actions have often been reversed because employers have not been consistent or did not follow established alcohol and drug policies or test to specific standards. Various work rules for inappropriate alcohol and drug use were reviewed, as well as education and communication strategies regarding policy content. Standards for testing criteria were discussed, as well as issues concerning duty-to-accommodate circumstances. An excerpt of concentration standards was presented. It was concluded that a matrix for companies to assess and determine safety sensitive positions is needed. refs., tabs., figs

  13. Task Force '74: Recommendations for Better Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, John W.

    1975-01-01

    Four areas of concern need to be developed as quickly as possible if significant changes are to be achieved at the secondary school level, believe members of Task Force '74. They are: citizen involvement, educating for student responsibility, alternative programs, and teacher negotiations. (Editor)

  14. 75 FR 45606 - Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force-Final Recommendations of the Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... QUALITY Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force--Final Recommendations of the Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force AGENCY: Council on Environmental Quality. ACTION: Notice of Availability, Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force's ] ``Final Recommendations of the Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force''. SUMMARY: On...

  15. 76 FR 35191 - Reserve Forces Policy Board (RFPB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... Meeting: An open meeting of the Reserve Forces Policy Board. Agenda: Total Force Readiness, Care for Our... no later than five business days prior to the meeting in question. The Designated Federal...

  16. Illinois task force on global climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, B.S. [Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources, Springfield, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document progress in the areas of national policy development, emissions reduction, research and education, and adaptation, and to identify specific actions that will be undertaken to implement the Illinois state action plan. The task force has been tracking national and international climate change policy, and helping shape national policy agenda. Identification and implementation of cost-effective mitigation measures has been performed for emissions reduction. In the area of research and education, the task force is developing the capacity to measure climate change indicators, maintaining and enhancing Illinois relevant research, and strengthening climate change education. Activities relevant to adaptation to new policy include strengthening water laws and planning for adaptation. 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Report of the Task Force on radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procedures for evaluation of IND and NDA applications were reviewed by FDA and the state members of the Task Force believe that there is significant progress being made toward expeditious handling of these items. Progress toward publication of the final rule on radiopharmaceuticals has reduced the need for state regulatory activity in investigational aspects of radiopharmaceutical research to the point that the original concept for the training is no longer valid

  18. 32 CFR 700.1053 - Commander of a task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commander of a task force. 700.1053 Section 700... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1053 Commander of a task force. (a) A geographic fleet commander, and any other naval commander, may detail in command of a task force, or other task command, any...

  19. Final Technical Report Transport Task Force Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Transport Task Force has functioned as the primary scientific organization in the area of magnetic-fusion confinement and transport since its inception in 1988. It has defined and set research directions, coordinated broad research efforts, advocated new funding initiatives, and created a highly successful and widely admired interactive culture between experiment, theory and modeling. The Transport Task Force carries out its activities under the direction of its chair and the Executive Committee. The Executive Committee is comprised of the leaders and deputy leaders of the scientific working groups. The working groups are structured and organized according to research needs and priorities and have been organized around the areas of Core Transport, H Mode and Pedestal, Fast Particle Transport, Transient Transport Phenomena, and Modeling and Simulation. A steering committee provides advise on TTF activities. Further information on the working groups and the structure and management of the TTF can be found at http://psfcwww2.psfc.mit.edu/ttf/index.html. The TTF holds an annual workshop. A summary of the workshops held during the period of this report is given in Appendix I. During the period of this report the Transport Task Force was involved in several significant activities. Foremost of these was a sweeping review of the status of transport science, the key research tasks for progress during the next 5-10 years, and a proposal for a funding initiative to ensure application of adequate resources to these problems. The conclusions of this study were incorporated into a white paper, which is copied below in Appendix II. Other significant activities have included the introduction of an extended, ongoing discussion on verification and validation as a requisite for defining and codifying the path toward predictive capability, the orchestration of a gradual shift of focus from ion thermal confinement to electron thermal confinement, and a joining of efforts on edge

  20. Final Technical Report Transport Task Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.W. Terry

    2006-08-22

    The Transport Task Force has functioned as the primary scientific organization in the area of magnetic-fusion confinement and transport since its inception in 1988. It has defined and set research directions, coordinated broad research efforts, advocated new funding initiatives, and created a highly successful and widely admired interactive culture between experiment, theory and modeling. The Transport Task Force carries out its activities under the direction of its chair and the Executive Committee. The Executive Committee is comprised of the leaders and deputy leaders of the scientific working groups. The working groups are structured and organized according to research needs and priorities and have been organized around the areas of Core Transport, H Mode and Pedestal, Fast Particle Transport, Transient Transport Phenomena, and Modeling and Simulation. A steering committee provides advise on TTF activities. Further information on the working groups and the structure and management of the TTF can be found at http://psfcwww2.psfc.mit.edu/ttf/index.html. The TTF holds an annual workshop. A summary of the workshops held during the period of this report is given in Appendix I. During the period of this report the Transport Task Force was involved in several significant activities. Foremost of these was a sweeping review of the status of transport science, the key research tasks for progress during the next 5-10 years, and a proposal for a funding initiative to ensure application of adequate resources to these problems. The conclusions of this study were incorporated into a white paper, which is copied below in Appendix II. Other significant activities have included the introduction of an extended, ongoing discussion on verification and validation as a requisite for defining and codifying the path toward predictive capability, the orchestration of a gradual shift of focus from ion thermal confinement to electron thermal confinement, and a joining of efforts on edge

  1. International Task Force on Volunteer Cleft Missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeow, Vincent K L; Lee, Seng-Teik T; Lambrecht, Thomas J; Barnett, John; Gorney, Mark; Hardjowasito, Widanto; Lemperle, Gottfried; McComb, Harold; Natsume, Nagato; Stranc, Mirek; Wilson, Libby

    2002-01-01

    The International Task Force on Volunteer Cleft Missions was set up to provide a report to be presented at the Eighth International Congress of Cleft Palate and Associated Craniofacial Anomalies on September 12, 1997, in Singapore. The aim of the report was to provide data from a wide range of different international teams performing volunteer cleft missions and, thereafter, based on the collected data, to identify common goals and aims of such missions. Thirteen different groups actively participating in volunteer cleft missions worldwide were selected from the International Confederation of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery's list of teams actively participating in volunteer cleft missions. Because of the time frame within which the committee had to work, three groups that did not respond by the stipulated deadline were omitted from the committee. The represented members and their respective institutions have undertaken more than 50 volunteer cleft missions to underdeveloped nations worldwide within the last 3 years. They have visited over 20 different countries, treating more than 3,500 patients worldwide. Based on the data collected and by consensus, the committee outlined recommendations for future volunteer cleft missions based on 1) mission objectives, 2) organization, 3) personal health and liability, 4) funding, 5) trainees in volunteer cleft missions, and 6) public relations. The task force believed that all volunteer cleft missions should have well-defined objectives, preferably with long-term plans. The task force also decided that it was impossible to achieve a successful mission without good organization and close coordination. All efforts should be made, and care taken, to ensure that there is minimal morbidity and no mortality. Finally, as ambassadors of goodwill and humanitarian aid, the participants must make every effort to understand and respect local customs and protocol. The main aims are to provide top-quality surgical service, train local

  2. A Task Force to Address Bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Ronald; Budin, Wendy C; Allie, Tammy

    2016-02-01

    Bullying in the workplace can create a dysfunctional environment that is associated with serious physical and psychological harm to the person being bullied. Nurses' experience with bullying has gained considerable attention in recent years, and warrants further discussion. Nurse leaders need to develop and implement effective bullying prevention initiatives that will foster the functioning of a professional and productive staff in a healthy work environment. The aim of this article is to review workplace bullying as experienced by nurses, and describe how nurses at a Magnet-designated academic medical center developed and implemented a bullying task force to address the problem. PMID:26817556

  3. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen; Penderis, Jacques; Stein, Veronika; Tipold, Andrea; Berendt, Mette; Farqhuar, Robyn; Fischer, Andrea; Long, Sam; Mandigers, Paul J J; Matiasek, Kaspar; Packer, Rowena M A; Pakozdy, Akos; Patterson, Ned; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Batlle, Martí Pumarola; Rusbridge, Clare; Volk, Holger A

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient...... on the factors listed in tier I and II and identification of electroencephalographic abnormalities characteristic for seizure disorders. The authors recommend performing MRI of the brain and routine CSF analysis, after exclusion of reactive seizures, in dogs with age at epileptic seizure onset <6...

  4. 75 FR 15457 - Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... Task Force Web site at: http://anstaskforce.gov/meetings.php . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Susan... on the ANS Task Force Web site at: http://anstaskforce.gov/meetings.php . Dated: March 19,...

  5. 76 FR 60863 - Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    .... You may also view the minutes on the ANS Task Force Web site at http://anstaskforce.gov/meetings.php... Task Force Web site at http://anstaskforce.gov/meetings.php . Accessibility Information The...

  6. 76 FR 15334 - Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... minutes on the ANS Task Force Web site at: http://anstaskforce.gov/meetings.php . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... on the ANS Task Force Web site at: http://anstaskforce.gov/meetings.php . Dated: March 14,...

  7. Offshore petroleum engineering task force report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Offshore Petroleum Engineering Task Force was established in July 1998 in response to concerns about Newfoundland and Labrador's share of offshore petroleum engineering activity, with the aim of determining the current capability of the local sector, the demand for such companies and individuals until the year 2010, their capability to grow over that time-frame, and requirements in order to achieve that growth. The report summarizes the analysis undertaken by the Task Force as well as the conclusions it reached and associated recommendations. Section two provides an overview of the offshore engineering activity, including its origins, structure, and key success factors, and its also provides a profile of the industry, internationally, in Canada and in Newfoundland. Section three presents an analysis of the future demand for offshore engineering in Newfoundland until 2010, based on three development scenarios. Section four based on a Consulting Engineers of Newfoundland and Labrador (CENL) survey, establishes the present offshore engineering capacity and capabilities within the province. Section five examines current education and training programs and their ability to respond to future demands. Section six summarizes the conclusions of the analysis and presents recommendations designed to facilitate and promote the development of the local offshore engineering industry. 6 figs

  8. 75 FR 16577 - Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). ACTION... the Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force (GWVI-TF) in August 2009 to conduct a comprehensive review... Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Draft Written Report is now complete. The VA is inviting public comments...

  9. 75 FR 76744 - National Disaster Housing Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency National Disaster Housing Task Force AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: The National Disaster Housing Task Force (NDHTF... INFORMATION CONTACT: Mitchell Wyllins, National Disaster Housing Task Force, 500 C Street, SW., (Room...

  10. 75 FR 77934 - Small Business Information Security Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Information Security Task Force AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION... Small Business Information Security Task Force Meeting. DATES: 1 p.m., Wednesday, November 10, 2010... meeting minutes for the second meeting of the Small Business Information Security Task Force....

  11. 76 FR 11307 - Small Business Information Security Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Information Security Task Force AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION... Small Business Information Security Task Force Meeting. DATES: 1 p.m., Wednesday, January 12, 2011... meeting minutes for the third meeting of the Small Business Information Security Task Force. Chairman,...

  12. 76 FR 5232 - Small Business Information Security Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Information Security Task Force AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION... Small Business Information Security Task Force Meeting. DATES: 1 p.m., Wednesday, December 8, 2010... meeting minutes for the third meeting of the Small Business Information Security Task Force....

  13. 75 FR 4402 - Task Force on Community Preventive Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Task Force on Community Preventive Services Name: Task Force on Community Preventive Services meeting. Times and Dates: 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. EST... available. Purpose: The mission of the Task Force is to develop and publish the Guide to...

  14. 75 FR 32186 - Task Force on Community Preventive Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Task Force on Community Preventive Services Name: Task Force on Community Preventive Services meeting. Times and Dates: 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. EST, June...: The mission of the Task Force is to develop and publish the Guide to Community Preventive...

  15. ESPR postmortem imaging task force: where we begin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthurs, Owen J; van Rijn, Rick R; Whitby, Elspeth H; Johnson, Karl; Miller, Elka; Stenzel, Martin; Watt, Andrew; Taranath, Ajay; Perry, David H

    2016-08-01

    A new task force on postmortem imaging was established at the annual meeting of the European Society of Paediatric Radiology (ESPR) in Graz, Austria, in 2015. The postmortem task force is separate from the child abuse task force as it covers all aspects of fetal, neonatal and non-forensic postmortem imaging. The main focus of the task force is the guidance and standardization of non-radiographic postmortem imaging, particularly postmortem CT and postmortem MRI. This manuscript outlines the starting point of the task force, with a mission statement, outline of current experience, and short- and long-term goals. PMID:27412272

  16. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen;

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient...... paroxysmal events can be challenging. Criteria that can be used to make this differentiation are presented in detail and discussed. Criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy (IE) are described in a three-tier system. Tier I confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on a history of two or more...... diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and unremarkable fasting and post-prandial bile acids, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain (based on an epilepsy-specific brain MRI protocol) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. Tier III confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based...

  17. In vacuum undulator task force report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastings, J.B.; Kao, C.C.; Stefan, P. [and others

    1998-06-01

    Historically the NSLS has been active in R&D for state-of-the-art electron beams, photon beams and x-ray optics. One of the available straight sections has therefore been dedicated to insertion device R&D. Over the past five to seven years a program aimed at exploiting the very small vertical {beta} function in the straight sections has yielded first a prototype small gap undulator (PSGU) and then an in-vacuum undulator (IVUN). The IVUN sources attain a brightness similar to the existing hybrid wigglers in X21 and X25. They radiate significantly lower total power than the wigglers but produce higher power densities. They provide undulator rather than wiggler spectra. Because of the small gaps and small periods there is not much tunability in these devices and they will have to be purpose-built for a specific scientific program. The original IVUN parameters were chosen for in-elastic x-ray scattering, similar to the scientific program on X21. This put the fundamental at 4.6 keV and the third harmonic at 13.8 keV. The question that this new possible insertion device poses is what science programs can best take advantage of this new insertion device source? To answer this, a task force was formed by M. Hart, NSLS Department Chair and charged with identifying viable scientific programs that could seek outside funding to construct IVUN beamlines. The task force concentrated on experimental programs that are presently being pursued on new insertion devices worldwide. For example, x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, which takes advantage of the large coherent flux from undulator sources, was considered. However, this program was not considered as the highest priority. The general area of protein crystallography, however, is ideal for the IVUN source. The unique electron beam optics that makes the IVUN possible in the first place also makes the IVUN ideal as a source for microdiffraction.

  18. Effects of force reflection on servomanipulator task performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports results of a testing program that assessed the impact of force reflection on servomanipulator task performance. The testing program compared three force-reflection levels: 4 to 1 (four units of force on the slave produce one unit of force at the master controller), 1 to 1, and infinity to 1 (no force reflection). Time required to complete tasks, rate of occurrence of errors, the maximum force applied to task components, and variability in forces during completion of representative remote handling tasks were used as dependent variables. Operators exhibited lower error rates, lower peak forces, and more consistent application of forces using force reflection than they did without it. These data support the hypothesis that force reflection provides useful information for servomanipulator operators

  19. Mixing Board Versus Mouse Interaction In Value Adjustment Tasks

    CERN Document Server

    Bergner, Steven; Kirkpatrick, Arthur E; Möller, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    We present a controlled, quantitative study with 12 participants comparing interaction with a haptically enhanced mixing board against interaction with a mouse in an abstract task that is motivated by several practical parameter space exploration settings. The study participants received 24 sets of one to eight integer values between 0 and 127, which they had to match by making adjustments with physical or graphical sliders. Based on recorded slider motion path data, we developed an analysis algorithm that identifies and measures different types of activity intervals, including error time moving irrelevant sliders and end time in breaks after completing each trial item. Our results showed a significant increase in speed of the mixing board interaction accompanied by reduced perceived cognitive load when compared with the traditional mouse-based GUI interaction. The gains in speed are largely due to the improved times required for the hand to reach for the first slider (acquisition time) and also when moving b...

  20. 77 FR 61019 - Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ....php . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Susan Mangin, Executive Secretary, ANS Task Force, at (703) 358... site at: http://anstaskforce.gov/meetings.php . Accessibility Information The meeting location...

  1. Report of the Siting Policy Task Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In August 1978, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission directed the staff to develop a general policy statement on nuclear power reactor siting. A Task Force was formed for that purpose and has prepared a statement of current NRC policy and practice and has recommended a number of changes to current policy. Recommendations were made to accomplish the following goals: (1) To strengthen siting as a factor in defense in depth by establishing requirements for site approval that are independent of plant design consideration. The present policy of permitting plant design features to compensate for unfavorable site characteristics has resulted in improved designs but has tended to deemphasize site isolation. (2) To take into consideration in siting the risk associated with accidents beyond the design basis (Class 9) by establishing population density and distribution criteria. Plant design improvements have reduced the probability and consequences of design basis accidents, but there remains the residual risk from accidents not considered in the design basis. Although this risk cannot be completely reduced to zero, it can be significantly reduced by selective siting. (3) To require that sites selected will minimize the risk from energy generation. The selected sites should be among the best available in the region where new generating capacity is needed. Siting requirements should be stringent enough to limit the residual risk of reactor operation but not so stringent as to eliminate the nuclear option from large regions of the country. This is because energy generation from any source has its associated risk, with risks from some energy sources being greater than that of the nuclear option

  2. Report of the Task Force on Community College Finance Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Joseph M.

    In response to legislative mandate, the Office of the Chancellor for California Community Colleges convened a Task Force on Community College Finance to examine and recommend funding alternatives, focusing on general apportionments. This report provides background on: (1) the formation and work of the task force; (2) the conceptual structure…

  3. Task force for integral test of High Energy nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    According to completion of the JENDL-High Energy file for neutron nuclear cross sections up to 50 MeV, a task force for integral test of high energy nuclear data was organized to discuss a guide line for integral test activities. A status of existing differential and integral experiments and how to perform such a test were discussed in the task force. Here the purpose and outline of the task force is explained with some future problems raised in discussion among the task member. (author)

  4. Effects of experimental muscle pain on force variability during task-related and three directional isometric force task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mista, Christian Ariel; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    of parameters from the 1D task showed a significant interaction between level of contraction, pain/control, and time (P<0.05). Post-hoc analysis of the interaction showed that the total excursion of the center of pressure for the 1D task was higher during pain compared with the control session (P<0.......05). In the task-related force, no significant effects were found for the CV during the three-dimensional task or for the task-related task. Finally, the ANOVA analysis of sample entropy showed a significant interaction between pain/control and time (P<0.05) in the main direction of the contraction......Experimentally muscle pain induces changes in the distribution of muscle activity and affects the muscle coordination. The force steadiness is impaired during muscle pain in the task-related force direction as well as in the tangential directions. In addition, pain lead to a mismatch between the...

  5. Proceedings of the IRI task force activity 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This internal report of the International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) contains presentations delivered during the International Reference Ionosphere Task Force Activity 2000 which took place at the Abdus Salam ICTP during July 2000. The 2000 Task Force Activity is the seventh successful encounter of specialists organized by the URSI-COSPAR IRI Working Group and the Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory of the ICTP of Trieste, Italy. The main topic of this task force activity was the modeling of the topside ionosphere and the development of strategies for modeling of ionospheric variability

  6. Report of NASA Lunar Energy Enterprise Case Study Task Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lunar Energy Enterprise Case Study Task Force was asked to determine the economic viability and commercial potential of mining and extracting He-3 from the lunar soil, and transporting the material to Earth for use in a power-generating fusion reactor. Two other space energy projects, the Space Power Station (SPS) and the Lunar Power Station (LPS), were also reviewed because of several interrelated aspects of these projects. The specific findings of the Task Force are presented. Appendices contain related papers generated by individual Task Force Members

  7. Force-Field Compensation in a Manual Tracking Task

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina Squeri; Lorenzo Masia; Maura Casadio; Pietro Morasso; Elena Vergaro

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses force/movement control in a dynamic "hybrid" task: the master sub-task is continuous manual tracking of a target moving along an eight-shaped Lissajous figure, with the tracking error as the primary performance index; the slave sub-task is compensation of a disturbing curl viscous field, compatibly with the primary performance index. The two sub-tasks are correlated because the lateral force the subject must exert on the eight-shape must be proportional to the longitudina...

  8. 76 FR 57026 - Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... Force Research Laboratory overview focusing on the Air Force Science and Technology plan emphasizing... Department of the Air Force Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: Under...

  9. Force-field compensation in a manual tracking task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Squeri

    Full Text Available This study addresses force/movement control in a dynamic "hybrid" task: the master sub-task is continuous manual tracking of a target moving along an eight-shaped Lissajous figure, with the tracking error as the primary performance index; the slave sub-task is compensation of a disturbing curl viscous field, compatibly with the primary performance index. The two sub-tasks are correlated because the lateral force the subject must exert on the eight-shape must be proportional to the longitudinal movement speed in order to perform a good tracking. The results confirm that visuo-manual tracking is characterized by an intermittent control mechanism, in agreement with previous work; the novel finding is that the overall control patterns are not altered by the presence of a large deviating force field, if compared with the undisturbed condition. It is also found that the control of interaction-forces is achieved by a combination of arm stiffness properties and direct force control, as suggested by the systematic lateral deviation of the trajectories from the nominal path and the comparison between perturbed trials and catch trials. The coordination of the two sub-tasks is quickly learnt after the activation of the deviating force field and is achieved by a combination of force and the stiffness components (about 80% vs. 20%, which is a function of the implicit accuracy of the tracking task.

  10. Task Force on Innovation in Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, James; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The background, origins, functions, and recommendations of the American Association of Dental Schools' task force investigating improvement of access to dental hygiene training programs and of curriculum and program design are presented. (MSE)

  11. 77 FR 16256 - Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... minutes on the ANS Task Force Web site at: http://anstaskforce.gov/meetings.php . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... site at: http://anstaskforce.gov/meetings.php . Accessibility Information The meeting location...

  12. Report of the Fermilab ILC Citizens' Task Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory convened the ILC Citizens' Task Force to provide guidance and advice to the laboratory to ensure that community concerns and ideas are included in all public aspects of planning and design for a proposed future accelerator, the International Linear Collider. In this report, the members of the Task Force describe the process they used to gather and analyze information on all aspects of the proposed accelerator and its potential location at Fermilab in northern Illinois. They present the conclusions and recommendations they reached as a result of the learning process and their subsequent discussions and deliberations. While the Task Force was charged to provide guidance on the ILC, it became clear during the process that the high cost of the proposed accelerator made a near-term start for the project at Fermilab unlikely. Nevertheless, based on a year of extensive learning and dialogue, the Task Force developed a series of recommendations for Fermilab to consider as the laboratory develops all successor projects to the Tevatron. The Task Force recognizes that bringing a next-generation particle physics project to Fermilab will require both a large international effort and the support of the local community. While the Task Force developed its recommendations in response to the parameters of a future ILC, the principles they set forth apply directly to any large project that may be conceived at Fermilab, or at other laboratories, in the future. With this report, the Task Force fulfills its task of guiding Fermilab from the perspective of the local community on how to move forward with a large-scale project while building positive relationships with surrounding communities. The report summarizes the benefits, concerns and potential impacts of bringing a large-scale scientific project to northern Illinois.

  13. 78 FR 18326 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... outbriefs, as well as discussion of the SAB's review of Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) science and... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under...

  14. 76 FR 78906 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... Oxygen Generation Study; review of the recently completed SAB Air Force Research Laboratory science and... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting AGENCY Department of the Air Force, U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. ACTION Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: Under...

  15. 75 FR 81591 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... Force Research Laboratory Science and Technology FY11 Review. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552b, as amended, and... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under...

  16. 77 FR 73026 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... study outbriefs, as well as discussion of the SAB's review of Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, Department of the Air Force, DOT. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: Under...

  17. CHANGE@CERN:Task Force 4: Matching personnel to activities

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Our series on the work of the Task Forces moves on to Human Ressources at CERN. Staff mobility and topics related to contract policy were the main personnel issues to be considered by Task Force 4, led by John Ferguson, head of AS Division. The aim, as with the other Task Forces, was to find ways to focus resources on the LHC, and once again the recommendations recognise the opportunity to make constructive changes, in this case in Human Resources policy at CERN. Movement of staff between divisions at CERN has generally not been easy, with 'staff complements' (total numbers) set for each sector (research, accelerator, technical and administration). However, the restructuring of the accelerator sector (proposed by Task Force 5 and already agreed in principle) should allow some staff to move to LHC activities. More generally, Task Force 4 recommends that the Laboratory carries out a review of all activities, at a relatively detailed level, so as to identify the resources required to achieve specific goals (t...

  18. First interim report of the Federal Fleet Conversion Task Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The Federal Fleet Conversion Task Force was created by Executive Order 12844, signed by President Clinton on April 21, 1993. In the Order, the President directed that purchases of alternative fueled vehicles by the Federal Government be substantially increased beyond the levels required by current law. The President charged the Task Force with developing recommendations for carrying out the Executive Order, with special emphasis on setting a course that will lead to the widespread use of alternative fueled vehicles by Federal, State, and local government fleets, by private fleets and, ultimately, by individuals. The chief recommendation of the Task Force is the establishment of a Presidential Clean Cities Initiative. To support creation of the Presidential Initiative, the Task Force identified 38 cities and regions, prioritized into three tiers, for concentrating the Initiative`s efforts in Fiscal Years 1994 through 1996. This concentration of effort is key to the effectiveness of the Initiative. The 38 cities and regions would receive priority funding for Federal vehicle purchases and for infrastructure development. In addition, the Task Force has made specific recommendations for overcoming numerous regulatory, economic, and technical barriers that have slowed the introduction of alternative fueled vehicles into general use.

  19. Family pediatrics: report of the Task Force on the Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Edward L

    2003-06-01

    female-headed families than for married-couple families. The comped families than for married-couple families. The composition of children's families and the time parents have for their children affect child rearing. Consequent to the increase in female-headed households, rising economic and personal need, and increased opportunities for women, the proportion of mothers who are in the workforce has climbed steadily over the past several decades. Currently, approximately two thirds of all mothers with children younger than 18 years are employed. Most families with young children depend on child care, and most child care is not of good quality. Reliance on child care involves longer days for children and families, the stress imposed by schedules and created by transitions, exposure to infections, and considerable cost. An increasing number and proportion of parents are also devoting time previously available to their children to the care of their own parents. The so-called "sandwich generation" of parents is being pulled in multiple directions. The amount and use of family time also has changed with a lengthening workday, including the amount of commuting time necessary to travel between work and home, and with the intrusion of television and computers into family life. In public opinion polls, most parents report that they believe it is more difficult to be a parent now than it used to be; people seem to feel more isolated, social and media pressures on and enticements of their children seem greater, and the world seems to be a more dangerous place. Social and public policy has not kept up with these changes, leaving families stretched for time and stressed to cope and meet their responsibilities. What can and what should pediatrics do to help families raise healthy and well-adjusted children? How can individual pediatricians better support families? FAMILY PEDIATRICS: The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Board of Directors appointed the Task Force on the Family to

  20. From the CLA Task Force on Open Access

    OpenAIRE

    Waller, Andrew; Morrison, Heather

    2008-01-01

    In 2006, the Canadian Library Association created a Task Force on Open Access, to develop a policy on open access to CLA's own publications, and develop a Position Statement on Open Access for Canada's libraries. CLA now has a strong open access policy for CLA publications, and a Position Statement on OA for Canadian libraries has been drafted. This brief article is an updated on the work of the CLA Task Force on Open Access (OA) and the activity of the Canadian Library Association regardin...

  1. Proceedings of the IRI task force activity 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains the programme, summary and write up of 12 presentations delivered during the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) Task Force Activity 96 that have taken place at the ICTP Trieste during August 1996. The 1996 task force has focussed on the model descriptions for the bottomside F-region including the F1 layer and started the consideration of the topside ionosphere. This was the third successful encounter of specialists organized by the URSI-COSPAR IRI Working Group and the Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics of Trieste, Italy. Each presentation was indexed separately. Refs, figs, tabs

  2. Proceedings of the IRI Task Force Activity 2002. 1. ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This ICTP Internal Report contains the list of papers presented, activity reports and the write up of a number of presentations delivered during the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) Task Force Activity 2002 which took place at the Abdus Salam ICTP during August 2002. The 2002 Task Force Activity is the ninth successful encounter of specialists organized by the URSI-Cospar IRI Working Group and the Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics of Trieste, Italy. The main topics of the meeting were ionosphere variability and topside ionosphere

  3. 75 FR 22560 - Federal Advisory Committee; U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Charter... that it is renewing the charter for the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (hereafter referred to... an intermittent basis to work specific Board-related efforts, and shall have no voting rights....

  4. Comparison of impact forces, accelerations and ankle range of motion in surfing-related landing tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Lina E; Tran, Tai T; Nimphius, Sophia; Raymond, Ellen; Secomb, Josh L; Farley, Oliver R L; Newton, Robert U; Sheppard, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the impact forces, accelerations and ankle range of motion in five different landing tasks that are used in training and testing for competitive surfing athletes, to assist coaches in the prescription of landing task progression and monitoring training load. Eleven competitive surfing athletes aged 24 ± 7 years participated, and inertial motion sensors were fixed to the anterior aspect of the feet, mid-tibial shafts, sacrum and eighth thoracic vertebrae on these athletes. Three tasks were performed landing on force plates and two tasks in a modified gymnastics set-up used for land-based aerial training. Peak landing force, resultant peak acceleration and front and rear side ankle dorsiflexion ranges of motion during landing were determined. The peak acceleration was approximately 50% higher when performing aerial training using a mini-trampoline and landing on a soft-density foam board, compared to a similar landing off a 50 cm box. Furthermore, the ankle ranges of motion during the gymnastic type landings were significantly lower than the other landing types (P ≤ 0.05 and P ≤ 0.001), for front and rear sides, respectively. Conclusively, increased task complexity and specificity of the sport increased the tibial peak acceleration, indicating greater training load. PMID:26383823

  5. 7 CFR 1900.6 - Chair, Loan Resolution Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... under 7 CFR part 1951, subpart S; (b) The responsibility for making and directing the making of loan... servicing rights and pre-acceleration homestead and preservation loan servicing rights under 7 CFR part 1951... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chair, Loan Resolution Task Force. 1900.6...

  6. Proceedings of the IRI Task Force Activity 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This ICTP Internal Report contains the list of papers presented, activity report and the write up of a number of presentations delivered during the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) Task Force Activity 2001 which took place at the Abdus Salam ICTP during May 2001, particularly centred in the week from 21-25 May. The 2001 Task Force Activity is the eighth successful encounter of specialists organized by the URSI-Cospar IRI Working Group and the Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics of Trieste, Italy. This project continues the IRI Task Force Activities at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy. The primary focus of this activity was the development of a specification model for ionospheric variability. Such a model is high on the wish list of users of ionospheric models. Climatological models like IRI provide monthly mean values of ionospheric parameters. Understandably a satellite designer or operator needs to know not only the monthly average conditions but also the expected deviations from these mean values. The main discussions and presentations took place during the week 21-25 May. The format was similar to last year's activity with presentations and round-table discussions in the morning and follow-on work in small subgroups in front of computer terminals in the afternoon. This Proceedings contains also four papers of the previous IRI Task Force Activity which were omitted

  7. Consumer Information. NASFAA Task Force Report. Consumer Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The National Association of Student Financial Aid and Administrators (NASFAA) Consumer Information Task Force was convened to conduct a thorough review of the current student consumer information requirements and propose ways to streamline both the content and delivery of those requirements. The proposals in the this report were produced for…

  8. TMI-2 Lessons Learned Task Force. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its final report reviewing the Three Mile Island accident, the TMI-2 Lessons Learned Task Force has suggested change in several fundamental aspects of basic safety policy for nuclear power plants. Changes in nuclear power plant design and operations and in the regulatory process are discussed in terms of general goals. The appendix sets forth specific recommendations for reaching these goals

  9. The OMERACT ultrasound task force -- Advances and priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Conaghan, Philip G; Naredo, Esperanza;

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the most recent work of the OMERACT Ultrasound Task Force (post OMERACT 8) and highlights of future research priorities discussed at the OMERACT 9 meeting, Kananaskis, Canada, May 2008. Results of 3 studies were presented: (1) assessing intermachine reliability; (2) applying ...... standard clinical variables. Future disease areas of importance to develop include a scoring system for enthesitis and osteoarthritis....

  10. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-04-01

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

  11. Task force on compliance and enforcement. Final report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-01

    Recommendations for measures to strengthen the FEA enforcement program in the area of petroleum price regulation are presented. Results of task force efforts are presented in report and recommendations sections concerned with pending cases, compliance program organization, enforcement powers, compliance strategy, and audit staffing and techniques. (JRD)

  12. U.S. Transport Task Force 2010 Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Transport Task Force (TTF) Meeting is a venue for vigorous scientific discourse and discussion on topics in transport and turbulence in fusion plasmas. Its participation is international. The 2010 meeting was highly effective, with 139 registered participants and 131 presentations. This is remarkable for an even year (IAEA year) meeting. The meeting clearly fostered progress in understanding and control of turbulent transport.

  13. 75 FR 70764 - Small Business Information Security Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Small Business Information Security Task Force AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION..., U.S. Small Business Administration, Rusty.Pickens@sba.gov . Paul T. Christy, SBA Chief...

  14. 76 FR 65321 - Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... download the Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Draft Report for Public Comment at http://www.va.gov... submission of public comments through http://www.regulations.gov ; written comments may be submitted through... period, through the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) at http://www.regulations.gov . You can...

  15. 77 FR 18307 - Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... Veterans' Illnesses Task Force Report is available on the VA Web site at: http://www.va.gov/opa... published the report in the Federal Register (76 FR 65321) and posted it on a social media Web site created...: Notice. SUMMARY: The Secretary Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) established the Gulf War...

  16. Update on the OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging Task Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; McQueen, Fiona M; Bird, Paul;

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an important biomarker across a range of rheumatological diseases. At the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 11 meeting, the MRI task force continued its work of developing and improving the use of MRI outcomes for use in clinical trials. The...

  17. 78 FR 9891 - South Dakota Task Force Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... Restoration Act of 2000 (Title IX) to promote conservation practices in the Missouri River watershed, control... sedimentation, and protect Indian and non-Indian historical and cultural sites along the Missouri River from erosion. DATES: The Task Force will hold a meeting on February 26, 2013 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30...

  18. Flexible Training Strategy (National Task Force on Medical Staffing)

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health

    2003-01-01

    Flexible Training Strategy (National Task Force on Medical Staffing) The Flexible Training Strategy, while endorsing flexible/part-time options recognises that the preferred option for the majority of doctors-in-training and consultants is most likely to continue to be full-time training and work. Click here to download PDF

  19. The Campus-Based Formula. NASFAA Task Force Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA) Campus-Based Aid Allocation Task Force was to examine the formula by which congressional appropriations for the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), Federal Work-Study (FWS), and Perkins Loan programs are distributed to schools,…

  20. Nintendo Wii Balance Board is sensitive to effects of visual tasks on standing sway in healthy elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslucher, Frank; Wade, Michael G; Nelson, Brent; Lim, Kelvin; Chen, Fu-Chen; Stoffregen, Thomas A

    2012-07-01

    Research has shown that the Nintendo Wii Balance Board (WBB) can reliably detect the quantitative kinematics of the center of pressure in stance. Previous studies used relatively coarse manipulations (1- vs. 2-leg stance, and eyes open vs. closed). We sought to determine whether the WBB could reliably detect postural changes associated with subtle variations in visual tasks. Healthy elderly adults stood on a WBB while performing one of two visual tasks. In the Inspection task, they maintained their gaze within the boundaries of a featureless target. In the Search task, they counted the occurrence of designated target letters within a block of text. Consistent with previous studies using traditional force plates, the positional variability of the center of pressure was reduced during performance of the Search task, relative to movement during performance of the Inspection task. Using detrended fluctuation analysis, a measure of movement dynamics, we found that COP trajectories were more predictable during performance of the Search task than during performance of the Inspection task. The results indicate that the WBB is sensitive to subtle variations in both the magnitude and dynamics of body sway that are related to variations in visual tasks engaged in during stance. The WBB is an inexpensive, reliable technology that can be used to evaluate subtle characteristics of body sway in large or widely dispersed samples. PMID:22748469

  1. 77 FR 52316 - U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with 10 U.S.C. 9355... Diversity in the Dean's Faculty brief. In accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552b, as amended, and 41 CFR...

  2. Task Force Report 3. Report of the Task Force on Continuous Personal, Professional, and Practice Development in Family Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Warren A; Avant, Robert F.; Davis, Nancy; Saultz, John; Lyons, Paul

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE This Future of Family Medicine task force report proposes a plan for lifelong learning that is designed to ensure family physicians are prepared to deliver the core attributes and system services of family medicine throughout their careers, especially within the New Model of family medicine that has been proposed.

  3. Die zukünftige Ausrichtung der AGMB: ein Bericht aus der Task-Force / The future strategic concept of the AGMB: a preliminary report given by the task force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kintzel, Melanie

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In the spring of 2008 the managing-committee of the Medical Library Association (AGMB invited the members to form a task force in order to concentrate on a new strategic concept for the association and develop corresponding recommendations and visions. Stagnating attendance at the association’s annual conferences in recent years as well as difficulties in finding future venues and new candidates for the elections to the board gave reason to this scheme. This article introduces the members of the task force and their work hitherto with a special focus on the member survey conducted in the summer of 2008 and its first results.

  4. Task force on resource development and the economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Alberta, the development and growth of the economy relies heavily on the resource sectors, which drive half of all employment. In 2009, the Alberta Chamber of Resources commissioned a task force, comprising groups from the 9 resource sectors in Alberta, to examine resource development and the economy. The aim of this team was to present the impact that the resource sectors had on Alberta's economy in the past, the impact it could have in the future, and to make recommendations on how to meet the full potential of resource development in the province. This reports states that considerable resources of bitumen and coal are present in Alberta and that forestry and diamonds could also play important roles in future resource development. The task force believes that the resource sectors will continue lead gross domestic product growth in Alberta and 16 recommendations for meeting the province's full potential are provided.

  5. Task Force of the EFMI Journals: Background, Rationale and Purpose

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Masic, I.; Kern, J.; Zvárová, Jana; de Lusignan, S.

    Amsterdam : IOS Press, 2009 - (Adlassnig, K.; Blobel, P.; Mantas, J.; Masic, I.), s. 946-950 ISBN 978-1-60750-044-5. - (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. 150). [MIE 2009. International Congress of the European Federation for Medical Informatics /22./. Sarajevo (BA), 30.08.2009-02.09.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : EFMI * mission statement * task force of medical informatics journals Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  6. Proceedings of the IRI task force activity 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains the programme, conclusions and the write up of 11 presentations delivered during the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) Task Force Activity 1995 that took place at the ICTP Trieste between 13-17 November 1995. The presentations included have been grouped in three chapters: Status report and data availability (2 presentations), Electron density profile shape below Nmax (5 presentations) and Intermediate regions (F1) electron density profile (4 presentations). Each presentation was indexed separately. Refs, figs, tabs

  7. Canadian Library Association : Task Force on Open Access

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The Canadian Library Association adopted a Resolution on Open Access in 2005. The mandate of the CLA Task Force on Open Access is to draft recommendations on policy for CLA's own publications, draft a position statement on open access for Canadian libraries on behalf of CLA, and liaise with other library associations, such as CARL. Heather Morrison reports on activities to date, such as drafted a response to the CIHR Draft Policy on Access to Research Outputs. Context: Members of the CLA T...

  8. Final Report of the Simulation Optimization Task Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Rimoldi, A.; Carli, T.; Dell' Acqua, A.; Froidevaux, D.; Gianotti, F.; Guyot, C.; Hinchliffe, I.; Jakobs, K.; Marshall, Z.; Nisati, A.; Quarrie, D.; Unal, G.; Young, C.

    2008-12-15

    This is the final report of the ATLAS Simulation Optimization Task Force, establishedin June of 2007. This note justifies the selected Geant4 version, physics list, and range cuts to be used by the default ATLAS simulation for initial data taking and beyond. The current status of several projects, including detector description, simulation validation, studies of additional Geant4 parameters, and cavern background, are reported.

  9. An Overview of the NOAA Drought Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, S.; Mo, K.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Wood, A.

    2012-01-01

    The charge of the NOAA Drought Task Force is to coordinate and facilitate the various MAPP-funded research efforts with the overall goal of achieving significant advances in understanding and in the ability to monitor and predict drought over North America. In order to achieve this, the task force has developed a Drought Test-bed that individual research groups can use to test/evaluate methods and ideas. Central to this is a focus on three high profile North American droughts (1998-2004 western US drought, 2006-2007 SE US drought, 2011- current Tex-Mex drought) to facilitate collaboration among projects, including the development of metrics to assess the quality of monitoring and prediction products, and the development of an experimental drought monitoring and prediction system that incorporates and assesses recent advances. This talk will review the progress and plans of the task force, including efforts to help advance official national drought products, and the development of early warning systems by the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS). Coordination with other relevant national and international efforts such as the emerging NMME capabilities and the international effort to develop a Global Drought Information System (GDIS) will be discussed.

  10. CHANGE@CERN:Task Force 5 : Restructuring the accelerator sector

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The last of our series on the Task Forces. PS accelerator 'We had a clear mandate, which we could approach in a logical way', explains Steve Myers, Head of SL Division and convenor of Task Force 5, 'To avoid duplication of effort in the accelerator sector through a restructuring that would lead to greater efficiency and flexibility and so release resources for the LHC.' The implementation of all their recommendations is already underway, albeit with different time scales. In 2001 the accelerator sector involved more than 900 staff members in three divisions (LHC, PS and SL) and one unit (AC), working in 141 sections within 34 groups. The first step for the Task Force was to identify major activities within the sector and to set up inter-divisional working groups to review these activities (16 in all), identifying the technologies and the numbers of staff associated with each activity. The working groups were also asked to propose ways of grouping the activities into a new more efficient organizational stru...

  11. 76 FR 10008 - Meeting of the Reserve Forces Policy Board (RFPB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    .... Purpose of the Meeting: An open meeting of the Reserve Forces Policy Board. Agenda: Total Force Readiness... statements must be submitted no later than five business days prior to the meeting in question....

  12. 75 FR 63846 - Meeting of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ..., Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Meeting of the Task Force on Community...) announces the next meeting of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services (Task Force). The Task...

  13. 76 FR 55394 - Meeting of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... and Analysis Program Office, Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Meeting of the Task Force on Community...) announces the next meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force). The Task...

  14. 76 FR 4115 - Meeting of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... Office, Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers for Disease Control and... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Meeting of the Task Force on Community...) announces the next meeting of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services (Task Force). The Task...

  15. 76 FR 30722 - Meeting of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ..., Epidemiology and Analysis Program Office, Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Meeting of the Task Force on Community...) announces the next meeting of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services (Task Force). The Task...

  16. 77 FR 24480 - U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Air Force....S.C. 9355 and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the U.S. Air Force Academy (USAFA) Board of Visitors (BoV) will hold... Brief; a USAFA Diversity Budget Update; and a Subcommittee Out-brief. In accordance with 5 U.S.C....

  17. Sandia-Power Surety Task Force Hawaii foam analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, Annie

    2010-11-01

    The Office of Secretary of Defense (OSD) Power Surety Task Force was officially created in early 2008, after nearly two years of work in demand reduction and renewable energy technologies to support the Warfighter in Theater. The OSD Power Surety Task Force is tasked with identifying efficient energy solutions that support mission requirements. Spray foam insulation demonstrations were recently expanded beyond field structures to include military housing at Ft. Belvoir. Initial results to using the foam in both applications are favorable. This project will address the remaining key questions: (1) Can this technology help to reduce utility costs for the Installation Commander? (2) Is the foam cost effective? (3) What application differences in housing affect those key metrics? The critical need for energy solutions in Hawaii and the existing relationships among Sandia, the Department of Defense (DOD), the Department of Energy (DOE), and Forest City, make this location a logical choice for a foam demonstration. This project includes application and analysis of foam to a residential duplex at the Waikulu military community on Oahu, Hawaii, as well as reference to spray foam applied to a PACOM facility and additional foamed units on Maui, conducted during this project phase. This report concludes the analysis and describes the utilization of foam insulation at military housing in Hawaii and the subsequent data gathering and analysis.

  18. 76 FR 71333 - U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ... perspective on Diversity; the Air Force Academy Athletic Corporation; Air Force Academy fiscal issues; and the... with the approval of the DFO and Chairperson. For the benefit of the public, rosters that list the... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Air...

  19. Report of the Task Force on Sawmill Wood Residue Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sawmill Wood Residue Task Force was established in 1993 to seek solutions to managing wood residue at sawmills, shingle mills, and log sort yards in British Columbia without burning or landfilling. In particular, the Task Force was formed to address the phaseout of beehive-type wood waste burners by January 1, 1996. The Task Force was formed at the forest product industry's request and included representatives from industry associations and government. It reviewed existing information on the quantities of mill residues and the options available for reducing, reusing, and recycling the residues. Nearly half of all the province's residues of 5 million bone dry tonnes/y is disposed of by burning with no energy recovery, or by landfilling. It was recognized that the total volume of wood residue cannot be handled by any one method suitable for all sources but that in the near term, electricity generation could deal with a significant percentage of wood currently being burned. The most immediate technically viable opportnity by industry in this area may be in cogeneration of electricity for load displacement at pulp mills. Other opportunities exist such as conversion of wood residue to liquid fuels but these require greater commitments to research and development. The need to handle bark and sawdust was identified as a critical requirement for alternate uses. Small niche uses for wood residue must be examined on a case by case basis for each company or group of companies in a region. The provincial government can also promote better use of wood wastes through policies such as social costing of power generation options and sales tax exemption for ethanol fuel. 1 tab

  20. Interim report of the task force on energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Task Force was established by the Premier of British Columbia in August 2001 to draft an energy policy framework for the province. Based on best practices worldwide, and keeping in mind the specific energy needs of British Columbia, this framework aims at fostering energy development in British Columbia, in accordance with exemplary environmental practices. This interim report comprises the preliminary findings of the Task Force, and public input is sought before the final report is finalized and presented to government. The energy sector of British Columbia comprises hydroelectric power, oil, gas and coal resources. In addition, green energy and alternative energy technologies are being developed, such as wind, solar, and wave power, and hydrogen fuel cells. Industry and individual consumers are well served by the highly developed transmission and distribution systems for energy. Several strategic directions were identified by the Task Force for inclusion in the energy policy of British Columbia, to meet its full potential. They are: growth to ensure safe, reliable energy and take advantage of economic opportunities; diversification; competitiveness; industry restructuring and expansion; environmental imperative; government leadership; and community and First Nations' involvement. Some changes are also required for the continuing success of the energy sector in British Columbia: a move to fully competitive markets in the electricity system, the development of natural gas storage capacity in the Lower Mainland, additional considerations for coal use, and the development of alternative energy sources. It is expected that private capital and more energy supply will result from a fully competitive energy market, which in turn would lower energy costs. Jobs and income would increase as a result of the growth in the sector. Diversification makes good economic and environmental sense. tabs., figs

  1. Final Report: ATLAS Phase-2 Tracker Upgrade Layout Task Force

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Hessey, N; Mättig, P; Styles, N; Wells, P; Burdin, S; Cornelissen, T; Todorov, T; Vankov, P; Watson, I; Wenig, S

    2012-01-01

    he mandate of the Upgrade Layout Task Force was to develop a benchmark layout proposal for the ATLAS Phase-2 Upgrade Letter of Intent (LOI), due in late 2012. The work described in this note has evolved from simulation and design studies made using an earlier "UTOPIA" upgrade tracker layout, and experience gained from the current ATLAS Inner Detector during the first years of data taking. The layout described in this document, called the LoI-layout, will be used as a benchmark layout for the LoI and will be used for simulation and engineering studies described in the LoI.

  2. Can agile software tools bring the benefits of a task board to globally distributed teams?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katsma, Christiaan; Amrit, Chintan; Hillegersberg, van Jos; Sikkel, Klaas; Oshri, Ilan; Kotlarsky, Julia; Willcocks, Leslie P.

    2013-01-01

    Software-based tooling has become an essential part of globally disitrbuted software development. In this study we focus on the usage of such tools and task boards in particular. We investigate the deployment of these tools through a field research in 4 different companies that feature agile and glo

  3. CHANGE@CERN:Task Force 2: reshaping for the future

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Second in our series reviewing the Task Forces reports. How to lay the foundations for a more efficient organisational structure. Our present organization is based on sixteen Divisions and units under the Directorate. CERN's organization is based on a Directorate and sixteen Divisions and units, while its activities are broadly divided into four Sectors: Research, Accelerators, Technical and Administration. The mandate of Task Force 2, led by Horst Wenninger, was to identify if a structural change and a reduction of duplicated efforts could result in an increased efficiency at CERN, especially as the Laboratory continues to focus its resources on the LHC. 'This is the most difficult project ever undertaken at CERN', acknowledges Wenninger, 'a double accelerator at a temperature of 1.9 K'. For the next five years the success of the LHC must be the main priority, and CERN will have to adapt the procedures of how it works. Wenninger sees the process as an opportunity for the Laboratory to move into the 21st c...

  4. Product Evaluation Task Force Phase Two report for CAGR graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been proposed that all Intermediate Level Wastes arising at Sellafield should be encapsulated prior to ultimate disposal. The Product Evaluation Task Force (PETF) was set up to investigate possible encapsulants and to produce an adequate data base to justify the preferred matrices. This report details the work carried out under Phase 2 of the Product Evaluation Task Force programme, on CAGR graphite. Three possible types of encapsulants for CAGR graphites:-Inorganic cements, Polymer cements and Polymers are evaluated using the Kepner Tregoe decision analysis technique. This technique provides a methodology for scoring and ranking alternative options and evaluating any risks associated with an option. The analysis shows that for all four stages of waste management operations ie Storage, Transport, handling and emplacement, Disposal and Process, cement matrices are considerably superior to other potential matrices. A matrix, consisting of three parts Blast Furnace Slag (BFS) to one part Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) is recommended as the preferred matrix for Phase 3 studies on CAGR graphite. (author)

  5. 78 FR 29378 - Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force; Public Teleconference/Webinar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force; Public Teleconference/ Webinar AGENCY..., announce a public teleconference/webinar of the Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force (ANS Task Force). The... disseminate related information. DATES: Teleconference/webinar: Monday June 17, 2013, from 1 p.m. to 4...

  6. Performing Isometric Force Control in Combination with a Cognitive Task: A Multidimensional Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Jacques Temprado; Solveig Vieluf; Nicolas Bricot; Eric Berton; Rita Sleimen-Malkoun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We used a multidimensional approach to study isometric force control in single and dual-task conditions. Methods Multiple measures of performance, efficiency, variability, and structural interference were calculated at low and higher force levels under single (force maintenance) and dual-task (force maintenance and reaction time) conditions. Results Reaction time and signal-to-noise ratio were larger in the dual-task conditions. They were also greater for the higher force conditi...

  7. 76 FR 22083 - U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... Diversity; an Ethics briefing; and Air Force Academy fiscal issues in relation to the reduction of... the BoV before the meeting that is the subject of this notice. For the benefit of the public, rosters... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Air...

  8. The OMERACT ultrasound task force--status and perspectives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naredo, Esperanza

    2011-09-01

    This article reports the most recent work of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Ultrasound Task Force, and highlights the future research priorities discussed at the OMERACT 10 meeting. Results of the following studies were presented: (1) intra- and interobserver reliability of ultrasound detecting and scoring synovitis in different joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); (2) systematic review of previous ultrasound scoring systems of synovitis in RA; (3) enthesitis systematic review and Delphi definition exercise in spondyloarthritis enthesitis; (4) enthesitis intra- and interobserver reliability exercise; and (5) Delphi definition exercise in hand osteoarthritis, and reliability exercises. Study conclusions were discussed, and a future research agenda was approved, notably further validation of an OMERACT ultrasound global synovitis score (GLOSS) in RA, emphasizing the importance of testing feasibility, predictive value, and added value over standard clinical variables. Future research areas will include validating scoring systems for enthesitis and osteoarthritis, and testing the metric qualities of ultrasound for evaluating tenosynovitis and structural damage in RA.

  9. International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force on Suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaffer, Ayal; Isometsä, Erkki T; Tondo, Leonardo;

    2015-01-01

    suicide deaths in bipolar disorder. These findings do not address causation, and the heterogeneity of data sources should limit the direct clinical ranking of correlates. Our results nonetheless support the notion of incorporating diagnosis-specific data in the development of models of understanding......OBJECTIVES: Bipolar disorder is associated with a high risk of suicide attempts and suicide death. The main objective of the present study was to identify and quantify the demographic and clinical correlates of attempted and completed suicide in people with bipolar disorder. METHODS: Within the...... framework of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force on Suicide, a systematic review of articles published since 1980, characterized by the key terms bipolar disorder and 'suicide attempts' or 'suicide', was conducted, and data extracted for analysis from all eligible articles...

  10. Progress Report of the Engineering Data Management System Task Force

    CERN Document Server

    Faber, G; CERN. Geneva; Hervé, A; Hauviller, Claude; Klempt, W; Kuipers, J; Loos, R; Nicquevert, B; Onnela, A; Price, M; Rollinger, G; Witzeling, W; Hameri, A P; Mottier, M; Nikkola, J; Pettersson, Thomas Sven; Schinzel, Josi; Tarrant, M; Vuoskoski, J; Farthouat, Philippe; Palazzi, P; Rousseau, B; Ferran, M; Høimyr, Nils-Joar; De Jonghe, J; Strubin, Pierre M; Oliger, S

    1996-01-01

    An Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) is a collection of tools and rules, which enables, as a minimum, a body of vetted information to be built up in a safe place and be easily accessible to the users. The Task Force worked through 1995 - to elucidate CERN's needs for an EDMS in the construction and lifetime of LHC and its experiments - to discover the state of the art of EDMS and find a product on the market which fulfilled CERN's needs. A Call for Tenders was issued in December 1995 and the replies are being evaluated. The name CEDAR has been chosen for the activity of implementing an EDMS at CERN. (CERN EDMS for Detectors and AcceleratoRs). see http://cadd.cern.ch/cedar/.

  11. The OMERACT ultrasound task force -- Advances and priorities.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta

    2009-08-01

    This article reports the most recent work of the OMERACT Ultrasound Task Force (post OMERACT 8) and highlights of future research priorities discussed at the OMERACT 9 meeting, Kananaskis, Canada, May 2008. Results of 3 studies were presented: (1) assessing intermachine reliability; (2) applying the scoring system developed in the hand to other joints most commonly affected in rheumatoid arthritis (RA); and (3) assessing interobserver reliability on a deep target joint (shoulder). Results demonstrated good intermachine reliability between multiple examiners, and good applicability of the scoring system for the hand on other joints (including shoulder). Study conclusions were discussed and a future research agenda was generated, notably the further development of a Global OMERACT Sonography Scoring (GLOSS) system in RA, emphasizing the importance of testing feasibility and added value over standard clinical variables. Future disease areas of importance to develop include a scoring system for enthesitis and osteoarthritis.

  12. The OMERACT ultrasound task force--status and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naredo, Esperanza; Wakefield, Richard J; Iagnocco, Annamaria;

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the most recent work of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Ultrasound Task Force, and highlights the future research priorities discussed at the OMERACT 10 meeting. Results of the following studies were presented: (1) intra- and interobserver reliability of......- and interobserver reliability exercise; and (5) Delphi definition exercise in hand osteoarthritis, and reliability exercises. Study conclusions were discussed, and a future research agenda was approved, notably further validation of an OMERACT ultrasound global synovitis score (GLOSS) in RA...... ultrasound detecting and scoring synovitis in different joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); (2) systematic review of previous ultrasound scoring systems of synovitis in RA; (3) enthesitis systematic review and Delphi definition exercise in spondyloarthritis enthesitis; (4) enthesitis intra...

  13. Product Evaluation Task Force Phase Two report for centrifuge cake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been proposed that all Intermediate Level Wastes arising at Sellafield should be encapsulated prior to ultimate disposal. The Product Evaluation Task Force (PETF) was set up to investigate possible encapsulants and to produce and adequate data base to justify the preferred matrices. Three possible types of encapsulants for Centrifuge Cake;- Inorganic cements, Polymer cements, and Polymers, are evaluated using the Kepner Tregoe decision analysis technique. This technique provides a methodology for scoring and ranking alternative options and evaluating any risks associated with an option. The analysis shows that for all four stages of waste management operations ie. Storage Transport, handling and emplacement Disposal, and Process, cement matrices are considerably superior to other potential matrices. A matrix, consisting of nine parts Blast Furnace Slag (BFS) to one part Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) is recommended as the preferred matrix for Phase 3 studies on Centrifuge Cake. (author)

  14. 77 FR 51526 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... technology solution partnerships; and intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance needs for contested... FY13 Board schedule; the Air Force's science and technology needs with respect to space operations; Department of the Army acquisition and technology practices and lessons learned; latest perspectives...

  15. Workshop on establishing institutional credibility for SEAB Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the request of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board's Task Force on Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, the National Research Council sponsored a workshop on Establishing Institutional Credibility. The purpose of the workshop was to (1) identify the range of available knowledge regarding the theoretical and conceptual issues of how institutions establish their credibility and legitimacy with key constituents, and (2) to help explore and clarify fundamental concepts in management theory related to these issues. The examination was to include what is known about how organizations establish, maintain, lose, and regain public trust and confidence. There was to be no attempt to develop consensus on these issues or to suggest particular courses of action. The workshop was held on October 24-25, 1991, in Denver, Colorado

  16. 75 FR 47624 - U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public Comment AGENCY: Fish and... U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce a public meeting of the U.S. Coral Reef Task...: Andrew_Gude@fws.gov ); or Liza Johnson, U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Department of the Interior Liaison,...

  17. 77 FR 6786 - U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public..., Notice of public comment. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of a public meeting of the U.S. Coral Reef Task.... Coral Reef Task Force, provides a forum for coordinated planning and action among federal...

  18. 76 FR 3617 - U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ...-annual Sexual Assault and Gender Relations Report; an overview of the USAFA diversity strategic plan; an... notice. For the benefit of the public, rosters that list the names of BoV members and any releasable... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Air...

  19. 76 FR 37794 - U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... this meeting include a USAFA metrics review, the USAFA Diversity strategic plan, the USAFA Prep School... provided to members of the BoV before the meeting that is the subject of this notice. For the benefit of... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S....

  20. 78 FR 31907 - U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    .... Specific topics for this meeting include a Superintendent's Update; a Character Update; Diversity and... is the subject of this notice. For the benefit of the public, rosters that list the names of BoV... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S....

  1. Early career professionals: the mission of a task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, G D; Lauw, M N

    2016-07-01

    Early career researchers and clinicians face unique challenges in comparison with more senior colleagues, for instance connecting with expert leaders outside of their own institution to enhance their expertise. As the largest international thrombosis and hemostasis professional society, the ISTH can play a central role in supporting the development of early career professionals. The ISTH Early Career Task Force was formed to improve support for, and encourage collaboration between early career thrombosis and hemostasis researchers and clinicians. These activities include (1) maintaining an online forum for early career ISTH members to connect, promote clinical, research, funding and educational activities, and to generate a sense of community; (2) broaden ISTH's reach with early career professionals in the developing world through promotion of the Reach-the-World fellowships and translating ISTH websites into six languages; (3) encourage early career engagement with ISTH activities, such as guidelines and guidance document processing and online webinar series; and (4) establishing this early career forum series in this journal. The JTH Forum series will highlight the early career perspective on a wide range of issues relevant to this group, and all ISTH early career members are encouraged to contribute. PMID:27173129

  2. Task Force on oil spill preparedness: Offshore implementation progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industry members of the Canadian Petroleum Association (CPA) and the Independent Petroleum Association of Canada (IPAC) undertook a review of oil spill preparedness and response capabilities in 1989. The resulting report summarized the current state of readiness, focusing on oil spills resulting from exploration and production activities in Canada. The report recommended expenditures in research and development, equipment acquisition, and training to prevent and control offshore and onshore oil spills more effectively. The release of an implementation plan for the Task Force on Oil Spill Preparedness (TFOSP) in 1990 provided the impetus for a 5-year plan to improve this state of preparedness. The plan outlined the mechanisms for implementing the 45 recommendations developed by TFOSP. It also recommended how to incorporate them into the daily business activities of the CPA member companies. It identified the appropriate groups within industry to carry out the implementation of each recommendation. It also indicated the government interfaces, the implementation schedule, and cost estimates for putting each recommendation into place. It also recommended a vigorous monitoring program to follow and report on the status of implementation. Based on the TFOSP implementation plan recommendations, work plans were developed, specific work projects identified, and a budget approved for 1991 programs. The first year of implementation of recommendations is now complete and work plans have been developed for continuation in 1992. 2 refs

  3. Government Applications Task Force ground truth study of WAG 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evers, T.K.; Smyre, J.L.; King, A.L.

    1997-06-01

    This report documents the Government Applications Task Force (GATF) Buried Waste Project. The project was initiated as a field investigation and verification of the 1994 Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program`s (SERDP) Buried Waste Identification Project results. The GATF project team included staff from three US Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratories [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC)] and from the National Exploitation Laboratory. Similar studies were conducted at each of the three DOE laboratories to demonstrate the effective use of remote sensing technologies. The three locations were selected to assess differences in buried waste signatures under various environmental conditions (i.e., climate, terrain, precipitation, geology, etc.). After a brief background discussion of the SERDP Project, this report documents the field investigation (ground truth) results from the 1994--1995 GATF Buried Waste Study at ORNL`s Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4. Figures for this report are located in Appendix A.

  4. UCLA Information Literacy Program. Blended Instruction Course (BICo) Task Force Report

    OpenAIRE

    Grassian, Esther; Botello, Keri; Phares, Sue; Turnbow, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    In Spring 2005, the UCLA Information Literacy Program charged a Task Force to investigate blended instruction options for information literacy credit courses and labs. The BICo Task Force was charged with investigating and making recommendations for a model 1-unit information literacy blended instruction course which would combine elements of in-person and online instruction. The Task Force looked into existing blended instruction courses, both for information literacy and for other disciplin...

  5. Performing Isometric Force Control in Combination with a Cognitive Task: A Multidimensional Assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Jacques Temprado

    Full Text Available We used a multidimensional approach to study isometric force control in single and dual-task conditions.Multiple measures of performance, efficiency, variability, and structural interference were calculated at low and higher force levels under single (force maintenance and dual-task (force maintenance and reaction time conditions.Reaction time and signal-to-noise ratio were larger in the dual-task conditions. They were also greater for the higher force condition, while sample entropy was lower. Perturbation analyses revealed smaller relative amplitude of downward perturbations for the higher force level.Attentional effort and efficiency are positively related when force level increases, and inversely related to entropy. These relations were presumably mediated by attentional investment. Behavioral perturbations show that attentional resources and structural interference models are not mutually exclusive to account for dual-task situation. Overall, the present study highlights the interest of a multidimensional assessment of force control.

  6. The Board of Directors as a Team: Investigating the Influence of Shared Leadership on Board Task Performance.

    OpenAIRE

    VANDEWAERDE, Maarten; Voordeckers, Wim; Lambrechts, Frank; BAMMENS, Yannick

    2010-01-01

    This theoretical paper aims to contribute to the promising stream of research which focuses on behavioural perspectives and processes within the corporate board, by delving into one of the research areas perhaps plagued most by the well-known methodological (i.e., input-output studies) and theoretical (i.e., agency theory) research fortresses of past board studies: board leadership. In adopting a team approach to the board of directors, our study goes beyond traditional board leadership resea...

  7. Task dependency of grip stiffness--a study of human grip force and grip stiffness dependency during two different tasks with same grip forces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Höppner

    Full Text Available It is widely known that the pinch-grip forces of the human hand are linearly related to the weight of the grasped object. Less is known about the relationship between grip force and grip stiffness. We set out to determine variations to these dependencies in different tasks with and without visual feedback. In two different settings, subjects were asked to (a grasp and hold a stiffness-measuring manipulandum with a predefined grip force, differing from experiment to experiment, or (b grasp and hold this manipulandum of which we varied the weight between trials in a more natural task. Both situations led to grip forces in comparable ranges. As the measured grip stiffness is the result of muscle and tendon properties, and since muscle/tendon stiffness increases more-or-less linearly as a function of muscle force, we found, as might be predicted, a linear relationship between grip force and grip stiffness. However, the measured stiffness ranges and the increase of stiffness with grip force varied significantly between the two tasks. Furthermore, we found a strong correlation between regression slope and mean stiffness for the force task which we ascribe to a force stiffness curve going through the origin. Based on a biomechanical model, we attributed the difference between both tasks to changes in wrist configuration, rather than to changes in cocontraction. In a new set of experiments where we prevent the wrist from moving by fixing it and resting it on a pedestal, we found subjects exhibiting similar stiffness/force characteristics in both tasks.

  8. 75 FR 9399 - Defense Health Board (DHB) Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... Prevention of Suicide by Members of the Armed Forces, a subcommittee of the Defense Health Board (DHB), will..., Department of Defense Task Force on the Prevention of Suicide by Members of the Armed Forces, One Skyline... Health Board's subcommittee, Department of Defense Task Force on the Prevention of Suicide by Members...

  9. The disturbance board concept for intelligent support of fault management tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fault management is the identification of and response to abnormal conditions. Traditionally, alarm systems consist of messages about simple set-point or state (e.g., open-closed) violations displayed as one dedicated message per set-point. However, the history of incidents is full with cases where operators were unable to detect, identify and respond to abnormal plant conditions with this type of alarm system. This paper describes a new concept for intelligent support of operator fault management tasks - the disturbance board. It uses a knowledge representation to define an information space

  10. Childhood Obesity Task Forces Established by State Legislatures, 2001-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashleigh L. May, MS, PhD

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction States and communities are considering policy and environmental strategies, including enacting legislation, to reduce and prevent childhood obesity. One legislative approach has been to create task forces to understand key issues and develop a course of action. The goal of this study was to describe state-level, childhood obesity task forces in the United States created by legislation from 2001 through 2010. Methods We used the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity database to identify state-level childhood obesity task forces created through legislation from 2001 through 2010. Results We identified 21 states that had enacted legislation creating childhood obesity task forces of which 6 had created more than one task force. Most task forces were charged with both gathering and reviewing information and making recommendations for obesity-prevention actions in the state. Most legislation required that task forces include representation from the state legislature, state agencies, community organizations, and community members. Conclusion Evaluation of the effectiveness of obesity-prevention task forces and the primary components that contribute to their success may help to determine the advantages of the use of such strategies in obesity prevention.

  11. 76 FR 67761 - Hearing of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... Violence AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). ACTION: Notice of hearing... Children Exposed to Violence (hereafter refered to as the Task Force). The Task Force is chartered to provide the Attorney General with valuable advice in the areas of children's exposure to ] violence...

  12. Identification of Occupational Areas for Indiana's Future. Final Report of the Technology Forecasting Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiana State Commission on Vocational and Technical Education, Indianapolis.

    A task force representing the Indiana private sector was convened for two purposes: to (1) identify the impact of technology on required worker skills, the labor market, and the vocational education, training, and employment system; and (2) identify occupational areas that should be future growth areas for the state. Task force members reviewed…

  13. 3 CFR - White House Task Force on Middle-Class Working Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Task Force. The Department of Labor shall provide funding and administrative support for the Task Force...: (1) the Department of Commerce; (2) the Department of Labor; (3) the Department of Health and Human...) restore labor standards, including workplace safety; (d) protect the incomes of middle-class...

  14. 76 FR 7579 - U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public Comment AGENCY: Fish and... U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce a public business meeting of the U.S. Coral Reef...-mail: Andrew_Gude@fws.gov ); or Liza Johnson, U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Department of the...

  15. Screening for Ovarian Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Reaffirmation Recommendation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Screening for Ovarian Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Reaffirmation Recommendation Statement The full report is titled “Screening for Ovarian Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Reaffirmation Recommendation Statement.” ...

  16. 75 FR 30002 - Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Task Force on Sexual Assault in the Military Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Task Force on Sexual Assault in the Military... terminating the Defense Task Force on Sexual Assault in the Military Services, effective June 1, 2010....

  17. Screening for Syphilis Infection in Pregnancy : US Preventive Services Task Force Reaffirmation Recommendation Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calonge, Ned; Petitti, Diana B.; DeWitt, Thomas G.; Dietrich, Allen; Gregory, Kimberly D.; Grossman, David; Isham, George; LeFevre, Michael L.; Leipzig, Rosanne; Marion, Lucy N.; Melnyk, Bernadette; Moyer, Virginia A.; Ockene, Judith K.; Sawaya, George F.; Schwartz, J. Sanford; Wilt, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Description: Update of the 2004 U. S. Preventive Services Task Force statement about screening for syphilis in pregnancy. Methods: The U. S. Preventive Services Task Force did a targeted literature search for evidence on the benefits of screening, the harms of screening, and the harms of treatment o

  18. 76 FR 67761 - Establishment of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... to Violence AGENCY: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) ACTION: Notice of... Exposed to Violence (the Task Force) is established in accordance with the provisions of the Federal... exposure to violence. The Task Force will conduct 4 public hearings at various locations around the...

  19. Cancer classification using the Immunoscore: a worldwide task force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galon Jérôme

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prediction of clinical outcome in cancer is usually achieved by histopathological evaluation of tissue samples obtained during surgical resection of the primary tumor. Traditional tumor staging (AJCC/UICC-TNM classification summarizes data on tumor burden (T, presence of cancer cells in draining and regional lymph nodes (N and evidence for metastases (M. However, it is now recognized that clinical outcome can significantly vary among patients within the same stage. The current classification provides limited prognostic information, and does not predict response to therapy. Recent literature has alluded to the importance of the host immune system in controlling tumor progression. Thus, evidence supports the notion to include immunological biomarkers, implemented as a tool for the prediction of prognosis and response to therapy. Accumulating data, collected from large cohorts of human cancers, has demonstrated the impact of immune-classification, which has a prognostic value that may add to the significance of the AJCC/UICC TNM-classification. It is therefore imperative to begin to incorporate the ‘Immunoscore’ into traditional classification, thus providing an essential prognostic and potentially predictive tool. Introduction of this parameter as a biomarker to classify cancers, as part of routine diagnostic and prognostic assessment of tumors, will facilitate clinical decision-making including rational stratification of patient treatment. Equally, the inherent complexity of quantitative immunohistochemistry, in conjunction with protocol variation across laboratories, analysis of different immune cell types, inconsistent region selection criteria, and variable ways to quantify immune infiltration, all underline the urgent requirement to reach assay harmonization. In an effort to promote the Immunoscore in routine clinical settings, an international task force was initiated. This review represents a follow-up of the announcement of

  20. Functional muscle synergies constrain force production during postural tasks

    OpenAIRE

    McKay, J. Lucas; Ting, Lena H.

    2007-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that a set of five functional muscle synergies were sufficient to characterize both hindlimb muscle activity and active forces during automatic postural responses in cats standing at multiple postural configurations. This characterization depended critically upon the assumption that the endpoint force vector (synergy force vector) produced by the activation of each muscle synergy rotated with the limb axis as the hindlimb posture varied in the sagittal plane. Here, we...

  1. Force Based Skill Learning for Robot Tasks in Contact Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琴; 梅志千; 张广立; 杨汝清

    2004-01-01

    To acquire human operation skill based on force sense, element contact form (ECF) is proposed to describe contact condition firstly. The skill is modeled as a sequence of discrete ECFs. Since different ECF has different force distribution, a support vector machine classifier is built to identify the contact conditions according to the force signal. Finally, the robot can obtain the skill from the human demonstration.

  2. Validity of the Nintendo Wii Balance Board to assess weight bearing asymmetry during sit-to-stand and return-to-sit task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abujaber, Sumayeh; Gillispie, Gregory; Marmon, Adam; Zeni, Joseph

    2015-02-01

    Weight bearing asymmetry is common in patients with unilateral lower limb musculoskeletal pathologies. The Nintendo Wii Balance Board (WBB) has been suggested as a low-cost and widely-available tool to measure weight bearing asymmetry in a clinical environment; however no study has evaluated the validity of this tool during dynamic tasks. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the concurrent validity of force measurements acquired from the WBB as compared to laboratory force plates. Thirty-five individuals before, or within 1 year of total joint arthroplasty performed a sit-to-stand and return-to-sit task in two conditions. First, subjects performed the task with both feet placed on a single WBB. Second, the task was repeated with each foot placed on an individual laboratory force plate. Peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) under each foot and the inter-limb symmetry ratio were calculated. Validity was examined using Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC), regression analysis, 95% limits of agreement and Bland-Altman plots. Force plates and the WBB exhibited excellent agreement for all outcome measurements (ICC=0.83-0.99). Bland-Altman plots showed no obvious relationship between the difference and the mean for the peak VGRF, but there was a consistent trend in which VGRF on the unaffected side was lower and VGRF on the affected side was higher when using the WBB. However, these consistent biases can be adjusted for by utilizing regression equations that estimate the force plate values based on the WBB force. The WBB may serve as a valid, suitable, and low-cost alternative to expensive, laboratory force plates for measuring weight bearing asymmetry in clinical settings. PMID:25715680

  3. 77 FR 42334 - Meeting of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence (Correction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... Violence (Correction) AGENCY: Office of Justice Programs, Justice. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The... meeting of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence (the ``task...

  4. TMI-2 Lessons Learned Task Force status report and short-term recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Review of the Three Mile Island accident by the TMI-2 Lessons Learned Task Force has disclosed a number of actions in the areas of design and analysis and plant operations that the Task Force recommends be required in the short term to provide substantial additional protection which is required for the public health and safety. All nuclear power plants in operation or in various stages of construction or licensing action are affected to varying degrees by the specific recommendations. The Task Force is continuing work in areas of general safety criteria, systems design requirements, nuclear power plant operations, and nuclear power plant licensing

  5. Cold Lake-Beaver River water management study update: Report of the Cold Lake Regional Water Management Task Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cold Lake Regional Water Management Task Force was formed in 1992, comprising representatives from local governments, aboriginal groups, the oil industry, and the public. The Task Force's mandate was to advise Alberta Environmental Protection on updating the Cold Lake-Beaver River Water Management Plan, taking into acocunt the views and concerns of the public, industry, and local governments. Industrial water use was found to be the key issue to be addressed in the plan update, so the Task Force focused on reviewing industrial water supply options and developing recommendations on the appropriate water supply to meet long-term requirements. A subcommittee was established to monitor groundwater use by the heavy oil industry. This committee took readings at Imperial Oil's water production and observation wells on a biweekly basis. Nine options for supplying industrial water requirements were examined and evaluated using criteria including supply reliability, economic factors, and impacts on other users and the environment. The Task Force found that the preferred source of water for industrial use is the North Saskatchewan River, to be accessed by a water pipeline. The second and less desirable source of water for industrial use would be a system of weirs on Cold or Primrose Lakes and Wolf Lake, supplemented by the use of brackish water to the maximum extent possible. In the interim, industry was recommended to maximize its use of brackish water and continue to use surface and ground water within existing license limits. Other recommendations were to form provincial or regional boards to oversee water use and issue water licenses, to treat water as a resource, and to establish a fee for industrial use of water. 3 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Task Dependency of Grip Stiffness—A Study of Human Grip Force and Grip Stiffness Dependency during Two Different Tasks with Same Grip Forces

    OpenAIRE

    Höppner, Hannes; McIntyre, Joseph; van der Smagt, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    It is widely known that the pinch-grip forces of the human hand are linearly related to the weight of the grasped object. Less is known about the relationship between grip force and grip stiffness. We set out to determine variations to these dependencies in different tasks with and without visual feedback. In two different settings, subjects were asked to (a) grasp and hold a stiffness-measuring manipulandum with a predefined grip force, differing from experiment to experiment, or (b) grasp a...

  7. Task Dependency of Grip Stiffness-A Study of Human Grip Force and Grip Stiffness Dependency during Two Different Tasks with Same Grip Forces

    OpenAIRE

    Höppner, Hannes; McIntyre, Joseph; van der Smagt, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    It is widely known that the pinch-grip forces of the human hand are linearly related to the weight of the grasped object. Less is known about the relationship between grip force and grip stiffness. We set out to determine variations to these dependencies in different tasks with and without visual feedback. In two different settings, subjects were asked to (a) grasp and hold a stiffness-measuring manipulandum with a predefined grip force, differing from experiment to experiment, or (b) grasp a...

  8. Task Force Report 5. Report of the Task Force on Family Medicine’s Role in Shaping the Future Health Care Delivery System

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Richard G.; Snape, Pam S.; Burke, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recognizing that the implementation of needed changes within family medicine will be enhanced through a concurrent effort to transform the broader health care system, this Future of Family Medicine task force was charged with determining family medicine’s leadership role in shaping the future health care delivery system.

  9. Task Force 1. Report of the Task Force on Patient Expectations, Core Values, Reintegration, and the New Model of Family Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Larry A.; Graham, Robert; Bagley, Bruce; Kilo, Charles M.; Spann, Stephen J.; Bogdewic, Stephen P.; Swanson, John

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND To lay the groundwork for the development of a comprehensive strategy to transform and renew the specialty of family medicine, this Future of Family Medicine task force was charged with identifying the core values of family medicine, developing proposals to reform family medicine to meet consumer expectations, and determining systems of care to be delivered by family medicine in the future.

  10. Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus : US preventive services task force recommendation statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calonge, Ned; Petitti, Diana B.; DeWitt, Thomas G.; Gordis, Leon; Gregory, Kimberly D.; Harris, Russell; Isham, George; LeFevre, Michael L.; Loveland-Cherry, Carol; Marion, Lucy N.; Moyer, Virginia A.; Ockene, Judith K.; Sawaya, George F.; Siu, Albert L.; Teutsch, Steven M.; Yawn, Barbara P.

    2008-01-01

    Description: Update of 2003 U. S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation about screening for gestational diabetes. Methods: The USPSTF weighed the evidence on maternal and neonatal benefits (reduction in preeclampsia, mortality, brachial plexus injury, clavicular fractures, admission

  11. 76 FR 8393 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... business development and entrepreneurship opportunities; (5) Increasing and improving training and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development AGENCY: U.S. Small...

  12. 75 FR 62438 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ... business development and entrepreneurship opportunities; (5) Increasing and improving training and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Small...

  13. 78 FR 45996 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ...) Reducing paperwork and administrative burdens in accessing business development and entrepreneurship... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development AGENCY: U.S. Small...

  14. 77 FR 71471 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ... accessing business development and entrepreneurship opportunities; (5) Increasing and improving training and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development; Notice of Meeting AGENCY:...

  15. 76 FR 56863 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... business development and entrepreneurship opportunities; (5) Increasing and improving training and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development AGENCY: U.S. Small...

  16. 75 FR 62611 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... business development and entrepreneurship opportunities; (5) increasing and improving training and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development AGENCY: U.S. Small...

  17. 75 FR 15742 - NASA Advisory Council; Ad-Hoc Task Force on Planetary Defense; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... include: Ad-Hoc Task Force on Planetary Defense Terms of Reference. NASA Near Earth Object (NEO) Program... will need to sign in and show a valid government-issued picture identification such as driver's...

  18. 77 FR 4561 - Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... Tobacco, Skin Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, Mental Health, and Alcohol. Meeting Accessibility: This... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and...

  19. Childhood Obesity Task Forces Established by State Legislatures, 2001-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Ashleigh L. May, MS, PhD; Sonia A. Kim, PhD; Bettylou Sherry, RD, PhD; Heidi M. Blanck, MS, PhD

    2013-01-01

    Introduction States and communities are considering policy and environmental strategies, including enacting legislation, to reduce and prevent childhood obesity. One legislative approach has been to create task forces to understand key issues and develop a course of action. The goal of this study was to describe state-level, childhood obesity task forces in the United States created by legislation from 2001 through 2010. Methods We used the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division...

  20. How effective are task forces in tackling illegal logging? Empirical evidence from Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franck, Marte; Hansen, Christian Pilegaard

    2014-01-01

    proven effective in Ghana. The task forces are influenced by corruption; interference by powerful actors; fear of violence; and logistical and resource-related challenges. The paper suggests that effectively addressing illegal logging in Ghana will require a more normative approach that involves policy...... reforms addressing fundamental issues such as rights to trees and benefits from them. Without such reforms, timber task forces as well as other types of “hard” law enforcement become illusive....

  1. Report of the National Institute on Aging Task Force on Comorbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Yancik, Rosemary; Ershler, William; Satariano, William; Hazzard, William; Cohen, Harvey J.; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2007-01-01

    The National Institute on Aging (NIA) Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology (GCG) Program convened an interdisciplinary Task Force on Comorbidity to foster the development of a research agenda on the multiple concurrent health problems that often occur in older persons. This report summarizes Task Force discussions held in Bethesda, Maryland (October 21–22, 2003; July 20–21, 2004) and serves as an introduction to the following three articles that address specific issues such as the nosological ...

  2. IAU Office of Astronomy for Development: Task Force Children and School Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Pedro; Gomez, Edward

    2015-03-01

    The main mission of the IAU OAD Task Force on Children and School Education is to support the implementation of the pre-tertiary education part of the IAU Strategic Plan `Astronomy for Development'. In this presentation we will give an overview of the role and programme of the task force as well as a general discussion about the past, present and future IAU education activities and programmes.

  3. DESIGNING PHARMACEUTICAL TRIALS FOR SARCOPENIA IN FRAIL OLDER ADULTS: EU/US TASK FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Vellas, B; Pahor, M.; MANINI, T.; ROOKS, D.; Guralnik, J. M.; Morley, J.; Studenski, S.; W. Evans; ASBRAND, C.; Fariello, R.; Pereira, S; Rolland, Y.; VAN KAN, G. ABELLAN; Cesari, M.; Chumlea, WM.C.

    2013-01-01

    An international task force of academic and industry leaders in sarcopenia research met on December 5, 2012 in Orlando, Florida to develop guidelines for designing and executing randomized clinical trials of sarcopenia treatments. The Task Force reviewed results from previous trials in related disease areas to extract lessons relevant to future sarcopenia trials, including practical issues regarding the design and conduct of trials in elderly populations, the definition of appropriate target ...

  4. Visual servoing and force control fusion for complex insertion tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Pomares Baeza, Jorge; Torres Medina, Fernando; Gil Vázquez, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    Comunicación presentada en el 11th International Conference on Advanced Robotics, June 30-July 3, 2003, University of Coimbra, Portugal To have access to force sensing is indispensable element for applications in which robots interact directly with objects in external settings. The very nature and the limited accuracy of the vision systems used for position control, implies that these types of systems are not adequate for controlling the interaction of the robot with its set...

  5. CHANGE@CERN:Task Force 1: finding the least painful cuts

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This week sees the first in our series of reports on the work of the Task Forces By 2004, COMPASS will be the main experiment at the SPS, but the LHC experiments will also be calibrating detectors. 'It was a painful task, with which we had to proceed in the least damaging way', says Dieter Schlatter, Head of the EP Division, when describing his experience as Convenor of Task Force 1. This Task Force was charged with responsibility for advising on how money could be saved within CERN's research programme, in order to help deal with the increased cost to completion of the LHC project. Their role, as with the other Task Forces, was to suggest where savings could be made, and in most cases their suggestions have been incorporated in the Management's draft Long Term Plan. The pain of the task was to some extent alleviated by developments within the LHC project itself. Delays in the delivery of superconducting cable meant that the start up of the LHC would be delayed by a year, to 2007, and this gave Task Force ...

  6. Summary of the work of the NEANDC task force on U-238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of the Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Data Committee (NEANDC) Task Force on U-238 is summarised. The Task Force was set up in 1982 to consider two discrepancies in U-238 data - the neutron widths of the resolved resonance above 1.4 keV and the capture cross-section in the resolved and unresolved resonance regions. The work is summarised historically and to put the activities of the Task Force into context the paper starts with a brief description of the methods and data used to determine U-238 resonance parameters. It follows with a description of the state of the data in 1982 and then describes the work of the Task Force in the period up to 1985, the period during which the Task Force found the reasons for the discrepancies. Consideration is then given to the period following 1985 during which resonance analysis on U-238 has been performed and a recommended set of parameters covering the energy range 0-10 keV produced. These are listed in an appendix to the paper and are now included in the U-238 evaluations contained in JEF-2 and ENDF/B-VI. Finally a review is given of the main conclusions of the Task Force followed by a list of work still requiring to be done. (author). 15 figs., 10 tabs., 49 refs., 3 appendix

  7. 77 FR 39724 - U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public Comment AGENCY: Fish and... U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce a public meeting of the U.S. Coral Reef Task... protect coral reef ecosystems. The Departments of Commerce and the Interior co-chair the USCRTF,...

  8. 77 FR 29351 - Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Meeting of the Community Preventive Services... (CDC) announces the next meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF). The Task... and Human Services (HHS) to assess the effectiveness of community, environmental, population,...

  9. Those Who Served: Report of the Twentieth Century Fund Task Force on Policies Toward Veterans. Background Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taussig, Michael K.

    Veterans' policies and programs are examined by a task force of the Twentieth Century Fund. Part 1, the report of the task force, includes sections on the rationale for veterans benefits, recommendations for further benefits and programs, and a dissenting opinion by one task force member. Recommendations are summarized into five basic areas: (1)…

  10. Grip force adjustments induced by predictable load perturbations during a manipulative task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrien, D J; Kaluzny, P; Wicki, U; Wiesendanger, M

    1999-01-01

    The experiment examined the anticipatory modulation of grip force with respect to load force during a drawer opening task. An impact force was introduced by a mechanical stop that arrested movement of the pulling hand. The results showed a typical grip force profile which consisted of two evolving phases, one to control drawer movement onset, and the other to secure grip force at the expected impact. Initially, grip force increased with the load force that was developed to overcome the inertia of the drawer. After the first peak, a small decline was observed, followed by a proactive grip force increase prior to the time of impact. During this ramp-like increase of grip force, load force remained unchanged. In addition, a reactive response was triggered by the impact. That anticipatory control with respect to an impact force is not innate but, rather, is learned by experience was evidenced by a comparison of adults and children. Whereas adults made the characteristic grip force adjustments to anticipate the impact, children used a probing strategy with irregular build-up of force until impact. Furthermore, adults calibrated the second phase of the grip force profile in the initial trials of the task, indicating that grip force was rapidly updated with information related to the impact force. The present results demonstrate that grip-load force coordination during manipulation is a necessity for dealing with destabilizing load perturbations produced by self-induced movement and impact forces. It is concluded that grip force is adjusted automatically, but in a flexible manner, to secure grip in accordance with the characteristics of the pulling synergy. PMID:9928794

  11. Psychophysical testing of visual prosthetic devices: a call to establish a multi-national joint task force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Joseph F., III; Ayton, Lauren N.

    2014-04-01

    vision to the blind. Decisions about the guidelines will be made democratically, with precautions to prevent any one group or company from having a more dominant voice than any other. One or more smaller working groups may be established to delve more deeply into specific issues, like the ethics of testing or governance structure, and to develop specific wording for recommendations that would be voted on by the entire Task Force group. Ultimately, the various recommendations, once approved democratically, will serve as the consensus document for the Multi-National Joint Task Force. The full list of members of the Task Force and the rules of governance will be published to promote transparency. The Joint Task force will post its guidelines with all signatories on a dedicated page within the website of the Henry Ford Department of Ophthalmology (Detroit). This site was chosen in recognition of the consistent support that Phillip Hessburg MD and the Board of Directors of the Detroit Institute of Ophthalmology, which has recently merged with the Henry Ford Department of Ophthalmology, have so generously and selflessly provided to our field over the past 14 years. This website will also contain a list of all human psychophysical testing that has been performed in the visual prosthetic field, with designations for those studies that were performed in accordance with the guidelines of the Multi-National Task Force, which will assume responsibility for the accuracy of the material. For those who wish to join this Task Force or have further questions, Dr Rizzo and Dr Ayton can be contacted at the email addresses listed above. The founding members of the Task Force anticipate that this digital resource will prove valuable to anyone who has interest in learning more about the achievements in our field, especially our prospective patients, to whom we dedicate our work.

  12. Accuracy of force and center of pressure measures of the Wii Balance Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Harrison L; Ting, Lena H; Bingham, Jeffrey T

    2014-01-01

    The Nintendo Wii Balance Board (WBB) is increasingly used as an inexpensive force plate for assessment of postural control; however, no documentation of force and COP accuracy and reliability is publicly available. Therefore, we performed a standard measurement uncertainty analysis on 3 lightly and 6 heavily used WBBs to provide future users with information about the repeatability and accuracy of the WBB force and COP measurements. Across WBBs, we found the total uncertainty of force measurements to be within ± 9.1N, and of COP location within ± 4.1mm. However, repeatability of a single measurement within a board was better (4.5 N, 1.5mm), suggesting that the WBB is best used for relative measures using the same device, rather than absolute measurement across devices. Internally stored calibration values were comparable to those determined experimentally. Further, heavy wear did not significantly degrade performance. In combination with prior evaluation of WBB performance and published standards for measuring human balance, our study provides necessary information to evaluate the use of the WBB for analysis of human balance control. We suggest the WBB may be useful for low-resolution measurements, but should not be considered as a replacement for laboratory-grade force plates. PMID:23910725

  13. Montana's Clark Fork River Basin Task Force: A Vehicle for Integrated Water Resources Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, David D.; Mueller, Gerald

    2010-11-01

    This article examines what is generally considered to be an unattainable goal in the western United States: integrated water resources management (IWRM). Specifically, we examine an organization that is quite unique in the West, Montana’s Clark Fork River Basin Task Force (Task Force), and we analyze its activities since its formation in 2001 to answer the question: are the activities and contributions of the Task Force working to promote a more strongly integrated approach to water resources management in Montana? After reviewing the concepts underlying IWRM, some of the issues that have been identified for achieving IWRM in the West, and the Montana system of water right allocation and issues it faces, we adapt Mitchell’s IWRM framework and apply it to the analysis of the Task Force’s activities in the context of IWRM. In evaluating the physical, interaction, and protocol/planning/policy components of IWRM, we find that the Task Force has been contributing to the evolution of Montana’s water resources management towards this framework, though several factors will likely continue to prevent its complete realization. The Task Force has been successful in this regard because of its unique nature and charge, and because of the authority and power given it by successive Montana legislatures. Also critical to the success of the organization is its ability to help translate into policy the outcomes of legal and quasi-judicial decisions that have impacted the state’s water resources management agency.

  14. Ethics in cardiovascular medicine. Task Force IV: Scientific responsibility and integrity in medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommer, P L; Ross, J; Benson, J A; Friedman, W F; Friesinger, G C; Goldstein, S; Huth, E J; Levine, R J; Malone, T E; Quash, J A

    1990-07-01

    Ethical standards are a set of affirmative responsibilities to which the investigator must subscribe; behavior that is incompatible with these responsibilities should be presumed unethical, whether or not it is explicitly proscribed. This Task Force sought to present these standards as principles or guidelines. In undertaking research an investigator must accept that publicly funded or supported research is intended to yield public benefit; personal gain should be only incidental to and not at the expense of the public benefit. The responsibilities of the investigator are summarized as follows: Design of Research To develop a research design that effectively and efficiently addresses the scientific question while minimizing the likelihood of incorrect or misleading results. To protect the rights and welfare of human subjects, assure the humane use of laboratory animals and protect the safety of laboratory workers and the environment. Conduct of Research To ensure that accepted laboratory and research practices are followed and that all data are accurately collected and properly recorded; the investigator must participate in the review of original data. To carry out research in accordance with that approved by the institutional review board and ensure that fully informed consent is obtained, that the welfare of human subjects is protected and that animal welfare and laboratory safety procedures are carried out. To provide effective ongoing supervision of research trainees and technicians. In multidisciplinary collaborative research, to have at least an overview familiarity with the work outside his or her areas of expertise. In fixed protocol, multicenter collaborative research the investigator must be satisfied with the adequacy of the collaborative activities.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2358596

  15. Aespoe Task Force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Review of Task 6C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report forms part of an independent review of the specifications, execution and results of Task 6 of the Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes, which is seeking to provide a bridge between site characterization (SC) and performance assessment (PA) approaches to solute transport in fractured rock. The present report is concerned solely with Task 6C, which relates to the construction and parametrisation of a block-scale hydrostructural model of the TRUE Block Scale region of the Aespoe Hard Rock laboratory. The task objectives, specifications and outcome are summarised and reviewed. Also, consideration is given to how the hydrostructural model might affect the outcomes of Task 6D and 6E. The main conclusions of this review are summarised below: The Task 6C hydrostructural model is a more comprehensive approach to quantitatively describing a volume of fractured rock than has been achieved hitherto. The idea of including solute retention characteristics as indices attached to individual fractures is an efficient device resulting in a whole volume of fractured rock described by a few spreadsheets. The hydrostructural model is clearly defined and provides a useful test bed for Tasks 6D and 6E. It would have been beneficial if the specifications for Task 6C had been more clearly defined as a hierarchy of requirements, and performance measures had been defined and evaluated to allow comparison of alternative approaches. The device used to reduce connectivity, namely reducing the average size of background fractures, has the effect of producing a final model with an 'unnatural' gap in the overall distribution of fracture sizes. It appears that the exploratory boreholes could be important conductive structures within the region of the 200 m block even though they are segmented into shorter sections by packers. If correct, this implies that the boreholes should be included explicitly in the model if close replication of TRUE Block

  16. Task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Task 5 Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhen, Ingvar [SWECO VIAK AB, Goeteborg (Sweden); Smellie, John [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2003-02-01

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory is located in the Simpevarp area, southeast Sweden, some 35 km north of Oskarshamn. Construction of the underground laboratory commenced in 1990 and was completed in 1995, consisting of a 3.6 km. long tunnel excavated in crystalline rock to a depth of approximately 460 m. Prior to, during and subsequent to completion, research concerning the deep geological disposal of nuclear waste in fractured crystalline rock has been carried out. Central to this research has been the characterisation of the groundwater flow system and the chemistry of the groundwaters at Aespoe prior to excavation (Pre-investigation Phase) and subsequently to monitor changes in these parameters during the evolution of laboratory construction (Construction Phase). The principle aim of the Aespoe Task 5 modelling exercise has been to compare and ultimately integrate hydrogeochemistry and hydrogeology using the input data from the pre-investigation and construction phases. The main objectives were: to assess the consistency of groundwater-flow models and hydrogeochemical mixing-reaction models through integration and comparison of hydraulic and hydrogeochemical data obtained before and during tunnel construction, and to develop a procedure for integration of hydrological and hydrogeochemical information which could be used for disposal site assessments. Task 5 commenced in 1998 and was finalised in 2002. Participating modelling teams in the project represented ANDRA (France; three modelling teams - ANTEA, ITASCA, CEA), BMWi/BGR (Germany), ENRESA (Spain), JNC (Japan), CRIEPI (Japan), Posiva (Finland) and SKB (Sweden; two modelling teams - CFE and Intera (now GeoPoint)). Experience from Task 5 has highlighted several important aspects for site investigations facilitating the possibilities for mathematically integrated modelling and consistency checks that should be taken into account for future repository performance assessments. Equally important is that Task 5 has

  17. Task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Task 5 Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory is located in the Simpevarp area, southeast Sweden, some 35 km north of Oskarshamn. Construction of the underground laboratory commenced in 1990 and was completed in 1995, consisting of a 3.6 km. long tunnel excavated in crystalline rock to a depth of approximately 460 m. Prior to, during and subsequent to completion, research concerning the deep geological disposal of nuclear waste in fractured crystalline rock has been carried out. Central to this research has been the characterisation of the groundwater flow system and the chemistry of the groundwaters at Aespoe prior to excavation (Pre-investigation Phase) and subsequently to monitor changes in these parameters during the evolution of laboratory construction (Construction Phase). The principle aim of the Aespoe Task 5 modelling exercise has been to compare and ultimately integrate hydrogeochemistry and hydrogeology using the input data from the pre-investigation and construction phases. The main objectives were: to assess the consistency of groundwater-flow models and hydrogeochemical mixing-reaction models through integration and comparison of hydraulic and hydrogeochemical data obtained before and during tunnel construction, and to develop a procedure for integration of hydrological and hydrogeochemical information which could be used for disposal site assessments. Task 5 commenced in 1998 and was finalised in 2002. Participating modelling teams in the project represented ANDRA (France; three modelling teams - ANTEA, ITASCA, CEA), BMWi/BGR (Germany), ENRESA (Spain), JNC (Japan), CRIEPI (Japan), Posiva (Finland) and SKB (Sweden; two modelling teams - CFE and Intera (now GeoPoint)). Experience from Task 5 has highlighted several important aspects for site investigations facilitating the possibilities for mathematically integrated modelling and consistency checks that should be taken into account for future repository performance assessments. Equally important is that Task 5 has

  18. The influence of catch trials on the consolidation of motor memory in force field adaptation tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eFocke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In computational neuroscience it is generally accepted that human motor memory contains neural representations of the physics of the musculoskeletal system and the objects in the environment. These representations are called internal models. Force field studies, in which subjects have to adapt to dynamic perturbations induced by a robotic manipulandum, are an established tool to analyze the characteristics of such internal models. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether catch trials during force field learning could influence the consolidation of motor memory in more complex tasks. Thereby, the force field was more than double the force field of previous studies (35 Ns/m. Moreover, the arm of the subjects was not supported. A total of forty-six subjects participated in this study and performed center-out movements at a robotic manipulandum in two different force fields. Two control groups learned force field A on day 1 and were retested in the same force field on day 3 (AA. Two test groups additionally learned an interfering force field B (=-A on day 2 (ABA. The difference between the two test and control groups, respectively, was the absence (0% or presence (19% of catch trials, in which the force field was turned off suddenly. The results showed consolidation of force field A on day 3 for both control groups. Test groups showed no consolidation of force field A (19% catch trials and even poorer performance on day 3 (0% catch trials. In conclusion, it can be stated that catch trials seem to have a positive effect on the performance on day 3 but do not trigger a consolidation process as shown in previous studies that used a lower force field viscosity with supported arm. These findings indicate that the results of previous studies in which less complex tasks were analyzed, cannot be fully transferred to more complex tasks. Moreover, the effects of catch trials in these situations are insufficiently understood and further research

  19. A compilation of minutes for the Stripa task force on fracture flow modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a compilation of minutes from the nine meetings of the Stripa task force on fracture flow modelling, held at various locations around the world from February 1988 to December 1991. The task force was set up as a peer review group with the specific objectives of 1. recommending criteria for the verification and validation of fracture flow models, 2. facilitating the dissemination of information to countries participating in the Stripa project, and 3. coordinating the work of the three modelling groups form AEA Harwell, Golder Associates and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The report provides a detailed technical commentary of the interplay between the development and application of mathematical models, and the design, execution and interpretation of experiment, within a structured project management framework. In particular, the task force has pioneered the definition and implementation of a validation process and associated criteria based on the analysis of a wide range of experimental data. (au)

  20. TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2] reactor building dose reduction task force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In late October 1982, the director of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) created the dose reduction task force with the objective of identifying the principal radiological sources in the reactor building and recommending actions to minimize the dose to workers on labor-intensive projects. Members of the task force were drawn form various groups at TMI. Findings and recommendations were presented to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in a briefing on November 18, 1982. The task force developed a three-step approach toward dose reduction. Step 1 identified the radiological sources. Step 2 modeled the source and estimated its contribution to the general area dose rates. Step 3 recommended actions to achieve dose reductions consistent with general exposure rate goals

  1. Conference-EC-US Task Force Joint US-EU Workshop on Metabolomics and Environmental Biotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PI: Lily Y. Young

    2009-06-04

    Since 1990, the EC-US Task Force on Biotechnology Research has been coordinating transatlantic efforts to guide and exploit the ongoing revolution in biotechnology and the life sciences. The Task Force was established in June 1990 by the European Commission and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. The Task Force has acted as an effective forum for discussion, coordination, and development of new ideas for the last 18 years. Task Force members are European Commission and US Government science and technology administrators who meet annually to enhance communication across the Atlantic, and to encourage collaborative research. Through sponsoring workshops, and other activities, the Task Force also brings together scientific leaders and early career researchers from both sides of the Atlantic to forecast research challenges and opportunities and to promote better links between researchers. Over the years, by keeping a focus on the future of science, the Task Force has played a key role in establishing a diverse range of emerging scientific fields, including biodiversity research, neuroinformatics, genomics, nanobiotechnology, neonatal immunology, transkingdom molecular biology, biologically-based fuels, and environmental biotechnology. The EC-US Task Force has sponsored a number of Working Groups on topics of mutual transatlantic interest. The idea to create a Working Group on Environmental Biotechnology research was discussed in the Task Force meeting of October 1993. The EC-US Working Group on Environmental Biotechnology set as its mission 'To train the next generation of leaders in environmental biotechnology in the United States and the European Union to work collaboratively across the Atlantic.' Since 1995, the Working Group supported three kinds of activities, all of which focus one early career scientists: (1) Workshops on the use of molecular methods and genomics in environmental biotechnology; (2) Short courses with theoretical

  2. 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connor, J.W.; Fasoli, A.; Hidalgo, C.;

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the contributions presented at the 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, 1-4 September 2008. There were sessions on core heat and particle transport; core and edge momentum transport; edge and scrape-off-layer ......This report summarizes the contributions presented at the 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, 1-4 September 2008. There were sessions on core heat and particle transport; core and edge momentum transport; edge and scrape...

  3. Preserving Digital Information. Report of the Task Force on Archiving of Digital Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Donald; Garrett, John

    The 21-member Task Force on Archiving of Digital Information was formed in December 1994 and spent a year studying what is needed to make digital libraries stable, accessible, and valid. Their final report is divided into the following sections: (1) "Introduction," which examines the fragility of cultural memory in a digital age and the limits of…

  4. Task Force Report. State of the Art of Adult Education: CONFINTEA Follow Up. [and] Workshop Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convergence, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Includes task force recommendations on the role of the International Council for Adult Education in monitoring achievement of adult education objectives, qualitative and quantitative indicators, and diverse data collection methods. Eleven workshop reports discuss progress on adult education policy advocacy, documentation, health care reform,…

  5. American Psychologist Task Force Report: Clarifying Mission, Coverage, Communication, and Review Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbardo, Philip G.

    2002-01-01

    An American Psychological Association task force reviewed the role and function of "American Psychologist," (AP) focusing on its coverage domain and issues related to its editorial review process. This report examines AP editorial domain, AP editorial instructions, AP editorship, communications within the AP editorial process, use of ad hoc action…

  6. 77 FR 39264 - Meeting of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... Violence AGENCY: Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Justice. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: This is an announcement of a meeting of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence (the..., with valuable advice in the areas of children exposed to violence for the purpose of addressing...

  7. 77 FR 12881 - Hearing of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... Violence AGENCY: Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Justice. ACTION: Notice of hearing. SUMMARY: This is an announcement of the third hearing of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence... Justice, with valuable advice in the areas of children exposed to violence for the purpose of...

  8. 78 FR 57161 - Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    ..., practice, and policy expertise in prevention, wellness and health promotion, and public health, and are... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Task Force AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and...

  9. President's Task Force on Communications Policy. Staff Paper Five. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    President's Task Force on Communications Policy, Washington, DC.

    The second part of a staff paper to the President's Task Force on Communications Policy dealing with the domestic telecommunications carrier industry consists of the final two appendices. In the first, the history, structure, present services, and future plans of the Western Union Telegraph Company are discussed. Evidence is given that by allowing…

  10. 78 FR 46671 - Membership on the Presidential Task Force on Wildlife Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Membership on the Presidential Task Force on Wildlife Trafficking By virtue of the authority vested in me as... for Civilian Security, Democracy and Human Rights, and in the Under Secretaries' collective...

  11. Report of the Task Force on the Incident of 19th September 2008 at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bajko, M; Catalan-Lasheras, N; Claudet, S; Cruikshank, P; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Denz, R; Fessia, P; Garion, C; Jimenez, JM; Kirby, G; Lebrun, Ph; Le Naour, S; Mess, K-H; Modena, M; Montabonnet, V; Nunes, R; Parma, V; Perin, A; de Rijk, G; Rijllart, A; Rossi, L; Schmidt, R; Siemko, A; Strubin, P; Tavian, L; Thiesen, H; Tock, J; Todesco, E; Veness, R; Verweij, A; Walckiers, L; Van Weelderen, R; Wolf, R; Fehér, S; Flora, R; Koratzinos, M; Limon, P; Strait, J

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings and recommendations of the AT department Task Force established to investigate the 19th September 2008 incident which occurred in sector 3-4 of the LHC. It includes a number of annexes where specific analyses are detailed.

  12. NBEA Business/Industry Task Force: Report of Survey on Office Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Harry R.; Weaver, David H.

    1984-01-01

    The National Business Education Association Business/Industry Task Force conducted a survey of companies throughout the United States that hire large numbers of management-support employees in order to obtain information about current and future plans for office automation, particularly word processing. Survey results are reported as well as…

  13. Natural Gas Deliverability Task Force report: A joint FERC/DOE project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the FERC/DOE Natural Gas Deliverability Task Force Report was threefold: (1) to review current deliverability data for utility, accuracy, and timeliness; (2) to identify mechanisms for closing significant gaps in information resulting from changing market structures; and (3) to ensure that technologies are available to meet the needs of the emerging, competitive natural gas industry

  14. Herself: Elle-Meme. Report of the Nova Scotia Task Force on the Status of Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nova Scotia Task Force on the Status of Women, Halifax.

    This report to the Canadian Government from the Nova Scotia Women's Task Force examines the social issues and problems pertaining to the women's movement in that province. Discussions are provided on the situations and attitudes toward homemakers, working women, marriage, divorce, child care, education, health, and political participation.…

  15. First Report to the General Assembly of the Rhode Island Task Force on Teenage Suicide Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode Island Office of the Lieutenant Governor, Providence.

    This document reports on the activities of the Rhode Island Task Force on Teenage Suicide Prevention which held its first meeting in September 1985. The function, progress, membership, and meetings of the three committees (public relations, resource, and research) are discussed. A pilot program on suicide prevention is described which provided…

  16. Screening for Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Pregnancy : US Preventive Services Task Force Reaffirmation Recommendation Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calonge, Ned; Petitti, Diana B.; DeWitt, Thomas G.; Dietrich, Allen J.; Gregory, Kimberly D.; Grossman, David; Isham, George; LeFevre, Michael L.; Leipzig, Rosanne M.; Marion, Lucy N.; Melnyk, Bernadette; Moyer, Virginia A.; Ockene, Judith K.; Sawaya, George F.; Schwartz, J. Sanford; Wilt, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Description: Reaffirmation of the 2004 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for hepatitis B virus hepatitis B virus infection in pregnancy. Methods: The USPSTF performed a brief literature update, including a search for new and substantial evidence on the benefits

  17. The Domestic Telecommunications Carrier Industry. Part I. President's Task Force on Communications Policy. Staff Paper Five.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostow, Eugene V.

    A staff paper submitted to the President's Task Force on Communications Policy recommends that public policy ensure an integrated structure in the telecommunications industry, while fostering limited competition to keep the system responsive to new technology and to consumer demands. The present system of regulated monopoly for companies supplying…

  18. Report of the Governor's Task Force on Aerospace-Aviation Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Office of General Aviation.

    The purpose of the Aerospace-Aviation Education Task Force was to study the problems and present recommendations for space and aviation education in California. Educational trends and the increasing rate of dropout occurrence reveal a need to introduce changes in the education and training of students. Many career opportunities exist in the field…

  19. Summary of the 19th Joint EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angioni, C.; Mantica, P.; Naulin, Volker;

    2015-01-01

    This conference report summarizes the contributions to, and discussions at, the 19th Joint EU-US Transport Task Force workshop, held in Culham, UK, during 8-11 September 2014. The workshop was organized under six topics: momentum transport, energetic particles, challenges in modelling transport i...

  20. Report of the Psychotherapy Task Force of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    OpenAIRE

    Ritvo, Rachel; Al-mateen, Cheryl; Ascherman, Lee; Beardslee, William; Hartmann, Lawrence; Lewis, Owen; Papilsky, Shirley; Sargent, John; Sperling, Eva; Stiener, Gregory; Szigethy, Eva

    1999-01-01

    In this task force report, the authors define the field of child and adolescent psychotherapy; review the state of the field with respect to advocacy, training, research, and clinical practice; and recommend steps to ensure that psychotherapy remains a core competence of child and adolescent psychiatrists. (The Journal of Psychotherapy Practice and Research 1999; 8:93–102)

  1. 78 FR 7849 - Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... ADMINISTRATION Interagency Task Force on Veterans Small Business Development AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... 2nd floor. ADDRESSES: U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Washington, DC 20416... Liaison, Office of Veterans Business Development, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street...

  2. 75 FR 76744 - National Disaster Housing Task Force Concept of Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency National Disaster Housing Task Force Concept of Operations... of disaster housing assistance in preparation for, response to and recovery from all levels of... Disaster Housing Strategy (Strategy). DATES: Comments must be received by January 10, 2011....

  3. CHANGE@CERN:Task Force 3: adjusting services to future needs

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We continue our articles on the Task Force reports The number of craftsmen and technicians could be increased with a change in the staff composition. The mandate for Task Force 3 was to make proposals for savings and new cost control procedures in the area of Industrial Support and Contracts for the period until 2009. The aim, explains the convenor, Karl-Heinz Kissler, was to keep spending under control under difficult conditions when staff numbers are decreasing and the work for the LHC becomes more demanding. The measures proposed, if implemented, could lead to savings of around 170 MCHF. The proposals involve both Industrial Services contracts, which were discussed in the Bulletin of the 22nd of April (n°17/2002) and readjustments for staff at CERN, on which we concentrate here. As with other Task Forces the principle aim was to be able to refocus resources onto the LHC project. In this respect, Task Force 3 could work within the framework of the revised programme for the LHC and the reduced non-LHC pro...

  4. 75 FR 45091 - Notice of Request for Nominations to the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... Natural Resources Conservation Service Notice of Request for Nominations to the Agricultural Air Quality... the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force (AAQTF) and requests nominations for qualified persons to... Conservation Service, 420 South State Road 7, Suite 160, Royal Palm Beach, Florida 33414; telephone: (561)...

  5. 77 FR 46730 - Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force Strategic Plan 2013-2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC120 Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force Strategic Plan 2013-2017 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of availability of Strategic Plan; request for comments....

  6. Two citizen task forces and the challenge of the evolving nuclear waste siting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siting any nuclear waste facility is problematic in today's climate of distrust toward nuclear agencies and fear of nuclear waste. This study compares and contrasts the siting and public participation processes as two citizen task forces dealt with their difficult responsibilities. 10 refs., 3 tabs

  7. Two citizen task forces and the challenge of the evolving nuclear waste siting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper compares and contrasts the siting and public participation processes as two citizen task forces dealt with their difficult responsibilities. The needs of citizen decision makers are discussed. Key differences found in the communities themselves as well as in the siting and public participation (PP) processes are presented

  8. A study on the effectiveness of task manager board game as a training tool in managing project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Shahrul Azmi Mohd; Radzi, Shanizan Herman Md; Din, Sharifah Nadera Syed; Khalid, Nurhafizah

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, games have become one of the useful tools in training. Many instructors choose to use games to enhance the way of delivering the subject. Failure to apply the suitable tool in training will lead to discouragement in learning and causing waste to the resources. An effective game will help the student understand the concept quickly. It can also help students to get involve in experiential learning where the student can manage and solve the problem as in the actual situation. This study will focus on the effectiveness of board game as a training tool for managing projects. This game has 4 tasks to be completed by students. They will be divided into a group of 4 or 5. Two methods are used in this study, pilot test, and post-test. These methods are chosen to analyze the effectiveness of using Task Manager Board Game as a teaching tool and the improvement of student's knowledge in project management. Three sub-components assessed were motivation, user experience and learning using case studies on Kirkpatrick's level one base on the perception of the students. The result indicated that the use of Task Manager board game as a training tool for managing project has a positive impact on students. It helps students to experience the situation of managing projects. It is one of the easiest ways for improving time management, human resources and communication skill.

  9. Handle Shape Affects the Grip Force Distribution and the Muscle Loadings During Power Grip Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Jérémy; Goislard De Monsabert, Benjamin; Berton, Eric; Vigouroux, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of handle shape on the grip force distribution in the hand and on the muscle forces during maximal power grip tasks. Eleven subjects maximally grasped 3 handles with different external shapes (circular, elliptic, and double-frustum). A handle dynamometer, equipped with both a force sensor and a pressure map, was used to record the forces exerted at the hand/handle interface. The finger and wrist joint postures were also computed from synchronized kinematic measurement. These processed data were then used as input of a biomechanical hand model to estimate muscle forces. The results showed that handle shape influences the maximal grip force, the grip force distribution, and the finger joint postures. Particularly, we observed that the elliptical shape resulted in a 6.6% lower maximal grip force compared with the circular and double-frustum handle. Concomitantly, the estimated muscle forces also varied significantly according to the handle shape, with up to 48% differences for the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle for example. Interestingly, different muscle coordination strategies were observed depending on the handle shape, therefore suggesting a potential influence of these geometrical characteristics on pathological risks such as tendonitis. PMID:26214057

  10. Force control tasks with pure haptic feedback promote short-term focused attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dangxiao; Zhang, Yuru; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Gaofeng; Yang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Focused attention has great impact on our quality of life. Our learning, social skills and even happiness are closely intertwined with our capacity for focused attention. Attention promotion is replete with examples of training-induced increases in attention capability, most of which rely on visual and auditory stimulation. Pure haptic stimulation to increase attention capability is rarely found. We show that accurate force control tasks with pure haptic feedback enhance short-term focused attention. Participants were trained by a force control task in which information from visual and auditory channels was blocked, and only haptic feedback was provided. The trainees were asked to exert a target force within a pre-defined force tolerance for a specific duration. The tolerance was adaptively modified to different levels of difficulty to elicit full participant engagement. Three attention tests showed significant changes in different aspects of focused attention in participants who had been trained as compared with those who had not, thereby illustrating the role of haptic-based sensory-motor tasks in the promotion of short-term focused attention. The findings highlight the potential value of haptic stimuli in brain plasticity and serve as a new tool to extend existing computer games for cognitive enhancement. PMID:25296407

  11. Recommendations for a National High Blood Pressure Community Education Plan. Report of Task Force III--Community Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. High Blood Pressure Information Center.

    Hypertensive disease being one of the most important medical problems now facing American medicine brought about the formation of the Federally sponsored National High Blood Pressure Education Program, which included four Task Forces. Task Force 3 reviews in this study information and experience useful for the development of guidelines for…

  12. Preparing Educators for Partnerships with Families. Report of the Advisory Task Force on Educator Preparation for Parent Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammon, Mary Sue; Chrispeels, Janet; Safran, Daniel; Sandy, Mary Vixie; Dear, Joseph; Reyes, Maria

    This report presents the consensus of the Assembly Bill 1264 Task Force. The task force conducted a statewide review of standards and requirements pertinent to the preparation of teachers and other educators to serve as active partners with parents and guardians in the education of California's public school students. The report includes: an…

  13. 77 FR 6822 - Second Hearing of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... to Violence AGENCY: Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Justice. ACTION: Notice of hearing. SUMMARY... Exposed to Violence (the ``Task Force''). The Task Force is chartered to provide OJP, a component of the Department of Justice, with valuable advice in the areas of children exposed to violence for the purpose...

  14. AGU's new task force on scientific ethics and integrity begins work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleick, Peter; Townsend, Randy

    2011-11-01

    In support of the new strategic plan, AGU has established a new task force to review, evaluate, and update the Union's policies on scientific misconduct and the process for investigating and responding to allegations of possible misconduct by AGU members. As noted by AGU president Michael McPhaden, "AGU can only realize its vision of `collaboratively advancing and communicating science and its power to ensure a sustainable future' if we have the trust of the public and policy makers. That trust is earned by maintaining the highest standards of scientific integrity in all that we do. The work of the Task Force on Scientific Ethics is essential for defining norms of professional conduct that all our members can aspire to and that demonstrate AGU's unwavering commitment to excellence in Earth and space science."

  15. A task force model for statewide change in nursing education: building quality and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Mary H; Clark, Margherita Procaccini; Klemczak, Jeanette Wrona

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a statewide planning process to transform nursing education in Michigan to improve quality and safety of patient care. A task force model was used to engage diverse partners in issue identification, consensus building, and recommendations. An example of a statewide intervention in nursing education and practice that was executed was the Michigan Quality and Safety in Nursing Education Institute, which was held using an integrated approach to academic-practice partners from all state regions. This paper describes the unique advantage of leadership by the Michigan Chief Nurse Executive, the existence of a nursing strategic plan, and a funding model. An overview of the Task Force on Nursing Education is presented with a focus on the model's 10 process steps and resulting seven recommendations. The Michigan Nurse Education Council was established to implement the recommendations that included quality and safety. PMID:23566458

  16. Quality assurance task force, an interagency cooperative approach to assess quality of environmental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1985, the Washington State Legislature charged the Department of Social and Health Services' Office of Radiation Protection with reviewing, evaluating and improving environmental monitoring programs within the state. Special emphasis was placed on the Hanford Site in Richland. Government and private organizations involved in monitoring radiation effects on the environment were asked to advise and support the State of Washington. Together, these organizations formed the Environmental Radiation Quality Assurance Task Force for the Pacific Northwest. Data on radiation levels are collected by the various organizations and compared. If findings are not consistent, the Task Force investigates and makes recommendations for long-term solutions. Thus, a system of checks and balances is created, enhancing the credibility of the various monitoring programs. Efficiency in use of resources is increased because overlap and duplication by different monitoring agencies are minimized

  17. Proceedings of Task Force Meeting "Organizational Structures in Innovation Management", Prague 30 May-3 June, 1983

    OpenAIRE

    Goncharov, V.; Vasko, T.

    1983-01-01

    The papers in this volume are the proceedings of the Task Force Meeting on "Organizational Structures in Innovation Management" held in Prague from 30 May to 4 June, 1983, within the framework of the IIASA Innovation Management Case Study. This study is not primarily the result of IIASA in-house research but is based on collaboration with various organizations from IIASA's National Member Organization (NMO) countries. At present the study has more than 70 collaborators from 17 countries, incl...

  18. Task-Force Entwicklungspolitik in China: Herausforderungen, Lösungsstrategien und deutsch-chinesische Entwicklungszusammenarbeit

    OpenAIRE

    Heberer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Das vorliegende Heft untersucht verschiedene aktuelle Entwicklungs- und Spannungsfelder im gegenwärtigen China, die von Studierenden im Rahmen eines Task-Force-Seminars erarbeitet wurden: Umwelt-NGOs, Konflikte und Konfliktmanagement am Fallbeispiel Wasser, Neuerungen und Implementierungslücken im Arbeitsrecht, Probleme und Herausforderungen sozialer Sicherungssysteme, Corporate Social Responsibility und Währungspolitik. Nach einer jeweiligen Skizzierung der Probleme geben die Autoren Empfehl...

  19. Strategic change and the Joint Terrorism Task Force : ideas and recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    D'Angelo, Anthony P.

    2007-01-01

    CHDS State/Local The September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks were a watershed event in this country's history that significantly affected law enforcement agencies and organizations at all levels, including the FBI and the multidisciplinary Joint Terrorism Task Forces. The terrorist attacks served as a catalyst for evaluating cultural, psychological and organizational processes, policies and procedures that influenced the FBI and impacted the JTTF program. In 2006 a comprehensive study wa...

  20. Development of methods of male contraception: impact of the World Health Organization Task Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GeoffreyM.H.WaitesSc.D

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To give an historical record of the research of the World Health Organization (WHO) Task Force to develop methods of male contraception; to examine the social, political, medical, pharmaceutical, funding, and other factors that influenced progress; and to suggest reasons why such methods are only now becoming available. Design:Review of basic and clinical research over 30 years. Setting: Task force of a multinational Objective:To give an historical agency and collaborating agencies. Conclusion(s): Through the involvement of many international scientists, the WHO Task Force has uniquely contributed to the exploratory phases of the research in male contraception and by its multicenter contraceptive efficacy studies has accelerated progress towards the ideal hormonal method. Despite an adverse climate involving social and political attitudes, funding constraints, and pharmaceutical industry hesitations, WHO formed coalitions with governments and international agencies to sustain research with results that apply to men in culturally diverse populations and thereby to influence activities across the whole range of global reproductive health and family planning.

  1. Joint Task Force on Undergraduate Physics Programs (J-TUPP): Overview and Major Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Paula

    2016-03-01

    The Joint Task Force on Undergraduate Physics Programs (JTUPP) was formed in response to growing awareness in the physics community that physics majors pursue a wide range of careers after graduation, with very few ending up in academia. The task force is charged with identifying the skills and knowledge that undergraduate physics degree holders should possess to be well prepared for a diverse set of careers, and providing guidance for physicists considering revising the undergraduate curriculum to improve the education of a diverse student population. Task force members represent large and small universities, professional societies, and industry, and have expertise in a broad range of areas including entrepreneurship, physics education research and systemic change in education. We reviewed employment data, surveys of employers, and reports generated by other disciplines. We also met with physicists in selected industries to get their views on the strengths and weaknesses of physics graduates, commissioned a series of interviews with recent physics graduates employed in the private sector, and identified exemplary programs that ensure that all of their students are well prepared to pursue a wide range of career paths. The findings and recommendations will be summarized.

  2. Optimization of Muscle Activity for Task-Level Goals Predicts Complex Changes in Limb Forces across Biomechanical Contexts

    OpenAIRE

    McKay, J. Lucas; Ting, Lena H.

    2012-01-01

    Optimality principles have been proposed as a general framework for understanding motor control in animals and humans largely based on their ability to predict general features movement in idealized motor tasks. However, generalizing these concepts past proof-of-principle to understand the neuromechanical transformation from task-level control to detailed execution-level muscle activity and forces during behaviorally-relevant motor tasks has proved difficult. In an unrestrained balance task i...

  3. Overall evaluation of the modelling of the TRUE-1 tracer tests - Task 4. The Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes is a forum for the international organisations supporting the Aespoe HRL Project. The purpose of the Task Force is to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Task 4 of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force consists of modelling exercises in support of the TRUE-1 tracer tests. The task was carried out in 1995-2000 and consisted of several modelling exercises in support of the TRUE-1 tracer tests, including predictive modelling where experimental results were not available beforehand. This report presents an overall evaluation of the achievements of Task 4. The specific objectives of the overall evaluation were to highlight innovative and successful modelling approaches developed, to assess the stages of the task which proved most beneficial for conceptual understanding of transport processes at the TRUE-1 site and to assess the success of various steering tools. A concise summary of scientific achievements is given and conclusions drawn with respect to unresolved technical issues. Recommendations are presented that can optimise the management of future modelling tasks

  4. Task-oriented design of a fully pre-stressed double-layer six-component force/torque sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Hou, Yulei; Yao, Jiantao; Wang, Zhijun; Zhao, Yongsheng

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a method to study and design a fully pre-stressed double-layer six-component force/torque sensor. The structure characteristic of the fully pre-stressed sensor is analyzed. In order to achieve the best performance, the static mathematical model is built by using screw theory. Based on the task ellipsoid, the task model of the pre-stressed force sensor is built. The relationship between the sensor and the task is studied systematically. And the mathematic description of task-oriented performance evaluation of the fully pre-stressed sensor is proposed. The key parameters of the fully pre-stressed force sensor satisfying the purpose of the task are obtained. The research results of this paper are useful for the further research and practical application of the six-component force sensor.

  5. Hybrid and dependent task scheduling algorithm for on-board system software

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏振华; 洪炳熔; 乔永强; 蔡则苏; 彭俊杰

    2003-01-01

    In order to solve the hybrid and dependent task scheduling and critical source allocation problems, atask scheduling algorithm has been developed by first presenting the tasks, and then describing the hybrid anddependent scheduling algorithm and deriving the predictable schedulability condition. The performance of thisagorithm was evaluated through simulation, and it is concluded from the evaluation results that the hybrid taskscheduling subalgorithm based on the comparison factor can be used to solve the problem of aperiodic task beingblocked by periodic task in the traditional operating system for a very long time, which results in poor schedu-ling predictability; and the resource allocation subalgorithm based on schedulability analysis can be used tosolve the problems of critical section conflict, ceiling blocking and priority inversion; and the scheduling algo-rithm is nearest optimal when the abortable critical section is 0.6.

  6. BILATERAL GROUND REACTION FORCES AND JOINT MOMENTS FOR LATERAL SIDESTEPPING AND CROSSOVER STEPPING TASKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William I. Sellers

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Racquet sports have high levels of joint injuries suggesting the joint loads during play may be excessive. Sports such as badminton employ lateral sidestepping (SS and crossover stepping (XS movements which so far have not been described in terms of biomechanics. This study examined bilateral ground reaction forces and three dimensional joint kinetics for both these gaits in order to determine the demands of the movements on the leading and trailing limb and predict the contribution of these movements to the occurrence of overuse injury of the lower limbs. A force platform and motion-analysis system were used to record ground reaction forces and track marker trajectories of 9 experienced male badminton players performing lateral SS, XS and forward running tasks at a controlled speed of 3 m·s-1 using their normal technique. Ground reaction force and kinetic data for the hip, knee and ankle were analyzed, averaged across the group and the biomechanical variables compared. In all cases the ground reaction forces and joint moments were less than those experienced during moderate running suggesting that in normal play SS and XS gaits do not lead to high forces that could contribute to increased injury risk. Ground reaction forces during SS and XS do not appear to contribute to the development of overuse injury. The distinct roles of the leading and trailing limb, acting as a generator of vertical force and shock absorber respectively, during the SS and XS may however contribute to the development of muscular imbalances which may ultimately contribute to the development of overuse injury. However it is still possible that faulty use of these gaits might lead to high loads and this should be the subject of future work

  7. Minutes and group memories from all NERBC/USGS-RPA power plant siting task force meetings through October, 1980. Appendix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The New England River Basins Commission/United States Geological Survey-Resource Planning Analysis Office (NERBC/USGS-RPA) Power Plant Siting Task Force has formerly met seven times between July 1979 and August 1980. At the first meeting on July 13, 1979, the members agreed that there were many problems with the current process of selecting sites for power plants in New England, and that they would work by consensus to find solutions for these problems. At the second meeting on October 19, 1979, NERBC staff presented information on the site selection and approval processes in New England. The Task Force began a preliminary discussion of problems in these processes, and agreed that the initial scope of work of the Task Force would focus on issues in site selection. At the third meeting on January 18, 1980, the Task Force began initial discussions in three areas: imperfections in the site selection process, stakeholders in the site selection process, and principles to guide solutions to the problems in site selection. On March 7, 1980, at the fourth meeting, the Task Force continued discussions on imperfections, stakeholders, and principles. At the fifth meeting on May 2, 1980, the Task Force reached a wide range of agreements on the difficulties encountered in the site selection process and on the principles guiding problem solving in site selection. At the sixth meeting on May 29, 1980, the Task Force focused on solutions to the problems identified at earlier meetings. Groups of Task Force members constructed eight different scenarios describing alternative power plant siting processes. In July 1980, the Task Force met for the seventh time and refined the eight scenarios, paring them down to five. An attempt was made to develop two scenarios using the common elements from the five. One of these two graphic models was based on government involvement in the site selection process, and the other was based on stakeholder involvement in the process

  8. Status Report of the Inter-Laboratory Task Force on Remote Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The next generation of particle accelerators will be major projects which may require a new mode of international and inter-laboratory collaboration. They are likely to be too costly to be funded by a single nation and too large to be built by a single laboratory. The tremendous technical challenge of a new facility requires a critical mass of highly qualified and experienced physicists and engineers. These experts are presently distributed among the major accelerator centers around the world and it is believed important to maintain and develop this broad base of expertise. The successful accelerator technology development of recent decades depended on extensive exchange of people with complementary technical skills. Therefore, it is desirable and probably necessary that several accelerator laboratories will participate in any future project. A consequence of a multi-laboratory project is that the accelerator will be located a considerable distance from most of the contributing institutions which design, build and operate it. These considerations led the International Committee for Future Accelerators to initiate a study on the general and technical implications of such a collaboration. Two task forces were formed in February 2000 to conduct this study and they were asked to prepare a report on a time scale of one year. The task force on Remote Operation included members from most of the major accelerator laboratories around the world with expertise on accelerator operation, controls software, communication technologies, hardware design and maintenance. The task force members gathered information from the experts at their own institutions and from available experience in other fields, particularly astronomy. The task force on Remote Operations began by developing a model for an international multi-laboratory collaboration to construct and operate an accelerator facility. This model is described in section 3. While it is clear that there are numerous alternative

  9. Report of the Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-08-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) refers to a set of technologies that can greatly reduce carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from new and existing coal- and gas-fired power plants, industrial processes, and other stationary sources of CO{sub 2}. In its application to electricity generation, CCS could play an important role in achieving national and global greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction goals. However, widespread cost-effective deployment of CCS will occur only if the technology is commercially available and a supportive national policy framework is in place. In keeping with that objective, on February 3, 2010, President Obama established an Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage composed of 14 Executive Departments and Federal Agencies. The Task Force, co-chaired by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was charged with proposing a plan to overcome the barriers to the widespread, cost-effective deployment of CCS within ten years, with a goal of bringing five to ten commercial demonstration projects online by 2016. Composed of more than 100 Federal employees, the Task Force examined challenges facing early CCS projects as well as factors that could inhibit widespread commercial deployment of CCS. In developing the findings and recommendations outlined in this report, the Task Force relied on published literature and individual input from more than 100 experts and stakeholders, as well as public comments submitted to the Task Force. The Task Force also held a large public meeting and several targeted stakeholder briefings. While CCS can be applied to a variety of stationary sources of CO{sub 2}, its application to coal-fired power plant emissions offers the greatest potential for GHG reductions. Coal has served as an important domestic source of reliable, affordable energy for decades, and the coal industry has provided stable and quality high-paying jobs for American workers. At the same time, coal-fired power

  10. Beryllium Health and Safety Committee Data Reporting Task Force White Paper #2 -- Uses of Uncensored Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacQueen, D H

    2007-10-10

    TS was a suggestion that certain of the statistical comparisons described in the TS could be better implemented if analytical results, even when below a reporting limit, were to be reported by analytical laboratories. See Appendix 1 for a review of terminology related to reporting limits. The Beryllium Health and Safety Committee (BHSC) formed a Sampling and Analysis Subcommittee (SAS) in 2003. The SAS established a working group on accreditation and reporting limits. By 2006 it had become evident that the issues extended to data reporting as a whole. The SAS proposed to the BHSC the formation of a Data Reporting Task Force (DRTF) to consider issues related to data reporting. The BHSC Board agreed, and requested that the DRTF generate a white paper, to be offered by the BHSC to potential interested parties such as the DOE policy office that is responsible for beryllium health and safety policy. It was noted that additional products could include detailed guidance and potentially a journal article in the future. The SAS proposed that DRTF membership represent the affected disciplines (chemists, industrial hygiene professionals and statisticians, and the DOE office that is responsible for beryllium health and safety policy). The BHSC Board decided that DRTF membership should come from DOE sites, since the focus would be on reporting in the context of the TS and the Rule. The DRTF came into existence in late 2006. The DRTF membership includes industrial hygienists, analytical chemists and laboratory managers, members of the regulatory and oversight community, and environmental statisticians. A first White Paper, ''Summary of Issues and Path Forward'', was reviewed by the BHSC in March 2007 and issued by the DRTF in June 2007. It describes the charter of the DRTF, introduces some basic terminology (reproduced here in Appendix 1), lays out the issues the DRTF is expected to address, and describes a path forward for the DRTF's work. This first

  11. Making the first fracture the last fracture: ASBMR task force report on secondary fracture prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisman, John A; Bogoch, Earl R; Dell, Rick; Harrington, J Timothy; McKinney, Ross E; McLellan, Alastair; Mitchell, Paul J; Silverman, Stuart; Singleton, Rick; Siris, Ethel

    2012-10-01

    Fragility fractures are common, affecting almost one in two older women and one in three older men. Every fragility fracture signals increased risk of future fractures as well as risk of premature mortality. Despite the major health care impact worldwide, currently there are few systems in place to identify and "capture" individuals after a fragility fracture to ensure appropriate assessment and treatment (according to national guidelines) to reduce future fracture risk and adverse health outcomes. The Task Force reviewed the current evidence about different systematic interventional approaches, their logical background, as well as the medical and ethical rationale. This included reviewing the evidence supporting cost-effective interventions and developing a toolkit for reducing secondary fracture incidence. This report presents this evidence for cost-effective interventions versus the human and health care costs associated with the failure to address further fractures. In particular, it summarizes the evidence for various forms of Fracture Liaison Service as the most effective intervention for secondary fracture prevention. It also summarizes the evidence that certain interventions, particularly those based on patient and/or community-focused educational approaches, are consistently, if unexpectedly, ineffective. As an international group, representing 36 countries throughout Asia-Pacific, South America, Europe, and North America, the Task Force reviewed and summarized the international data on barriers encountered in implementing risk-reduction strategies. It presents the ethical imperatives for providing quality of care in osteoporosis management. As part of an implementation strategy, it describes both the quality improvement methods best suited to transforming care and the research questions that remain outstanding. The overarching outcome of the Task Force's work has been the provision of a rational background and the scientific evidence underpinning

  12. Report of Task Force for review of nuclear waste management. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the findings of the Task Force are: a majority of independent technical experts have concluded that high-level waste can be safely disposed in geological media, but validation of the specific technical choices will be an important element of the licensing process. Reprocessing is not required for the safe disposal of commercial spent fuel. Consideration should be given to an early demonstration of the geologic disposal of a limited number of spent fuel assemblies in the waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Spent Fuel Policy announced by President Carter in October 1977 must be integrated with the Waste Management Policy. The Task Force report highlights the importance of away from reactor storage that occurs between on-site storage of spent fuel at utilities and ultimate disposal. The target for initial operation in 1985 os a National Waste Repository for the permanent disposal of commercial high-level waste as spent fuel may not be met; this does not affect the early 1980s schedule for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The responsibility for the ultimate disposal for all forms of nuclear waste should be with the Federal Government and long-term waste disposal facilities should be subject to NRC licensing. The NEPA process is an essential part of the nuclear waste management program and Department of Energy efforts in this regard must be strengthened. Policy and program management responsibility for Waste Management should be raised to a higher level in the Department of Energy. There are substantial budgetary impacts of the Task Force recommendations and legislation would be required to carry out many of the suggested changes

  13. Proceedings of the 12th Task Force Meeting in Silkeborg, Denmark, October 23-25, 1996

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, S. E.; Friberg, Nikolai

    Preface: At the twelfth meeting of the Programme Task Force held on 23-25 October 1996, in Silkeborg, Denmark, several national experts presented information on relevant ongoing national research and monitoring activities and recent results. In the proceedings of the meeting we have compiled five...... of these presentations in the manuscript form in which we have received them from the respective authors. The editors have, however, undertaken a slight linguistic revision of the manuscripts. Together the five papers give a broad picture of the various lines of studies pertinent to this...

  14. International PV QA Task Force's Proposed Comparative Rating System for PV Modules: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.

    2014-10-01

    The International PV Quality Assurance Task Force is developing a rating system that provides comparative information about the relative durability of PV modules. Development of accelerated stress tests that can provide such comparative information is seen as a major step toward being able to predict PV module service life. This paper will provide details of the ongoing effort to determine the format of such an overall module rating system. The latest proposal is based on using three distinct climate zones as defined in IEC 60721-2-1 for two different mounting systems. Specific stresses beyond those used in the qualification tests are being developed for each of the selected climate zones.

  15. 76 FR 2924 - National Science Board; Sunshine Act Meetings; Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... of the teleconference. UPDATES & POINT OF CONTACT: Please refer to the National Science Board Web... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION National Science Board; Sunshine Act Meetings; Notice The National Science Board's Task Force...

  16. 78 FR 37244 - National Science Board; Sunshine Act Meetings; Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... Science Board Web site www.nsf.gov/nsb for additional information and schedule updates (time, place... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION National Science Board; Sunshine Act Meetings; Notice The National Science Board's Task Force...

  17. 77 FR 20009 - Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ... Tourism Advisory Board (Board). The agenda may change to accommodate Board business. The final agenda will... Processing Goals and the Task Force on Travel and Competitiveness, 77 FR 3373). Public Participation: The... International Trade Administration Meeting of the United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board...

  18. Time to Redefine PD? Introductory Statement of the MDS Task Force on the Definition of Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, D; Postuma, R B; Bloem, B; Chan, P; Dubois, B.; Gasser, T.; Goetz, C. G.; Halliday, G. M.; Hardy, J.; Lang, A. E.; Litvan, I.; Marek, K; Obeso, J; Oertel, W.; Olanow, C. W.

    2014-01-01

    With advances in knowledge disease, boundaries may change. Occasionally, these changes are of such a magnitude that they require redefinition of the disease. In recognition of the profound changes in our understanding of Parkinson's disease (PD), the International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society (MDS) commissioned a task force to consider a redefinition of PD. This review is a discussion article, intended as the introductory statement of the task force. Several critical issues were i...

  19. DOE Task Force meeting on Electrical Breakdown of Insulating Ceramics in a High Radiation Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the abstracts and presentation material from the Research Assistance Task Force Meeting ''Electrical Breakdown of Insulating Ceramics in a High-Radiation Field.'' The meeting was jointly sponsored by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences and the Office of Fusion Energy of the US Department of Energy in Vail, Colorado, May 28--June 1, 1991. The 26 participants represented expertise in fusion, radiation damage, electrical breakdown, ceramics, and semiconductor and electronic structures. These participants came from universities, industries, national laboratories, and government. The attendees represented eight nations. The Task Force meeting was organized in response to the recent discovery that a combination of temperature, electric field, and radiation for an extended period of time has an unexplained adverse effect in ceramics, termed radiation-enhanced electrical degradation (REED). REED occurs after an incubation period and continues to accelerate with irradiation until the ceramics can no longer be regarded as insulators. It appears that REED is irreversible and the ceramic insulators cannot be readily annealed or otherwise repaired for future services. This effect poses a serious threat for fusion reactors, which require electrical insulators in diagnostic devices, in radio frequency and neutral beam systems, and in magnetic assemblies. The problem of selecting suitable electrical insulating materials in thus far more serious than previously anticipated

  20. Ontario gas prices review task force report : fairness at the pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-06-29

    Sudden gas price increases hit Ontario consumers in July 1999, and as a result, the Gas Busters Hotline operated by the provincial government received over 4,000 complaints concerning the price of gas. World crude oil prices increased to above 34 American dollars per barrel by March 2000, and there were discrepancies by as much as 10 cents a litre in the price of gas in Ontario, depending on the community where the purchase was made. The Gas Prices Review Task Force was established in November 1999 to assist in the identification of an adequate solution to the rising price of gas. Public participation was sought, as well as input from representatives of consumer groups and industry. The Task Force was also mandated to conduct policy options research to ensure fair prices at the pump, to examine the regulatory or legislative initiatives that would work best for the protection of the consumer, in accordance with the federal Competition Act. A report was submitted to the Minister of Consumer and Commercial Relations. A total of fourteen recommendations were made to the Minister. The recommendations touched topics as varied as tax collection legislation, price monitoring, segmented earnings reports, removal of the Goods and Services Tax (GST). refs., figs.

  1. Report of the NASA lunar energy enterprise case study task force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lunar Energy Enterprise Cast Study Task Force was formed to determine the economic viability and commercial business potential of mining and extracting He-3 from the lunar soil for use in earth-based fusion reactors. In addition, the Solar Power Satellite (SPS) and the Lunar Power Station (LPS) were also evaluated because they involve the use of lunar materials and could provide energy for lunar-based activities. The Task Force considered: (1) the legal and liability aspects of the space energy projects; (2) the long-range terrestrial energy needs and options; (3) the technical maturity of the three space energy projects; and (4) their commercial potential. The use of electricity is expected to increase, but emerging environmental concerns and resource availability suggest changes for the national energy policy. All three options have the potential to provide a nearly inexhaustible, clean source of electricity for the U.S. and worldwide, without major adverse impacts on the Earth's environment. Assumption by industry of the total responsibility for these energy projects is not yet possible. Pursuit of these energy concepts requires the combined efforts of government and industry. The report identifies key steps necessary for the development of these concepts and an evolving industrial role

  2. Pacific States/British Columbia Oil Spill Task Force : Places of Refuge Project : final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Members of the Pacific States/British Columbia Oil Spill Task Force sponsored a roundtable discussion on establishing Places of Refuge for ships in need of assistance following a spill incident. The discussion was launched following the Prestige oil spill that occurred off the coast of Spain in 2002 and in recognition of the possibility that a Place of Refuge incident could occur on the west coast of North America (United States and Canada). The Task Force then invited the United States Coast Guard and Canadian authorities to jointly sponsor a stakeholder work group (Places of Refuge Work group) to discuss the places of refuge issue and develop recommendations. A project charter was created and an annex was developed to be used as a consistent decision-making tool on the West Coast of Canada and the United States, to enable the best actions and decisions during a place of refuge response situation. This paper summarizes the project charter and mandate of the work group and contains information on the annex that was developed

  3. Product Evaluation Task Force Phase Two report for MEB crud/filter aid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been proposed that all Intermediate Level Wastes arising at Sellafield should be encapsulated prior to ultimate disposal. The Product Evaluation Task Force (PETF) was set up to investigate possible encapsulants and to produce an adequate data base to justify the preferred matrices. This report details the work carried out, under Phase 2 of the Product Evaluation Task Force programme, on MEB Crud/Filter Aid. Three possible types of encapsulants for MEB Crud/Filter Aid:- Inorganic cements, Polymer cements, and Polymers are evaluated using the Kepner Tregoe decision and analysis technique. This technique provides a methodology for scoring and ranking alternative options and evaluating any risks associated with an option. The analysis shows that for all four stages of waste management operations, ie Storage, Transport, handling and emplacement, Disposal and, Process, cement matrices are considerably superior to other potential matrices. A matrix, consisting of nine parts Blast Furnace Slag (BFS) to one part Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) is recommended as the preferred matrix for Phase 3 studies on MEB/Filter Aid. (author)

  4. Ontario gas prices review task force report : fairness at the pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudden gas price increases hit Ontario consumers in July 1999, and as a result, the Gas Busters Hotline operated by the provincial government received over 4,000 complaints concerning the price of gas. World crude oil prices increased to above 34 American dollars per barrel by March 2000, and there were discrepancies by as much as 10 cents a litre in the price of gas in Ontario, depending on the community where the purchase was made. The Gas Prices Review Task Force was established in November 1999 to assist in the identification of an adequate solution to the rising price of gas. Public participation was sought, as well as input from representatives of consumer groups and industry. The Task Force was also mandated to conduct policy options research to ensure fair prices at the pump, to examine the regulatory or legislative initiatives that would work best for the protection of the consumer, in accordance with the federal Competition Act. A report was submitted to the Minister of Consumer and Commercial Relations. A total of fourteen recommendations were made to the Minister. The recommendations touched topics as varied as tax collection legislation, price monitoring, segmented earnings reports, removal of the Goods and Services Tax (GST). refs., figs

  5. Product Evaluation Task Force Phase Two report for BWR/PWR dissolver wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been proposed that all Intermediate Level Wastes arising at Sellafield should be encapsulated prior to ultimate disposal. The Product Evaluation Task Force (PETF) was set up to investigate possible encapsulants and to produce an adequate data base to justify the preferred matrices. This report details the work carried out, under Phase 2 of the Product Evaluation Task Force programme, on BWR/PWR Dissolver Wastes. Three possible types of encapsulants for BWR/PWR Dissolver Wastes:- Inorganic cements, Polymer cements and Polymers are evaluated using the Kepner Tregoe decision analysis technique. This technique provides a methodology for scoring and ranking alternative options and evaluating any risks associated with an option. The analysis shows that for all four stages of waste management operations ie Storage, Transport, handling and emplacement, Disposal and Process, cement matrices are considerably superior to other potential matrices. A matrix, consisting of three parts Blast Furnace Slag (BFS) to one part Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), is recommended for Phase 3 studies on BWR/PWR Dissolver Wastes. (author)

  6. Aespoe Task Force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Review of Tasks 6A, 6B and 6B2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report forms part of an independent review of the specifications, execution and results of Task 6 of the Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes, which is seeking to provide a bridge between site characterization and performance assessment approaches to solute transport in fractured rock. The present report is concerned solely with Tasks 6b, 6b and 6b which relate to the transport of tracers on a 5-metre scale in Feature A at the TRUE-1 site. The task objectives, specifications and individual modelling team results are summarised and reviewed, and an evaluation of the overall exercise is presented. The report concludes with assessments of what has been learnt, the implications for the Task 6 objectives, and some possible future directions

  7. Classification images reveal decision variables and strategies in forced choice tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Lisa M; Murray, Richard F

    2015-06-01

    Despite decades of research, there is still uncertainty about how people make simple decisions about perceptual stimuli. Most theories assume that perceptual decisions are based on decision variables, which are internal variables that encode task-relevant information. However, decision variables are usually considered to be theoretical constructs that cannot be measured directly, and this often makes it difficult to test theories of perceptual decision making. Here we show how to measure decision variables on individual trials, and we use these measurements to test theories of perceptual decision making more directly than has previously been possible. We measure classification images, which are estimates of templates that observers use to extract information from stimuli. We then calculate the dot product of these classification images with the stimuli to estimate observers' decision variables. Finally, we reconstruct each observer's "decision space," a map that shows the probability of the observer's responses for all values of the decision variables. We use this method to examine decision strategies in two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) tasks, for which there are several competing models. In one experiment, the resulting decision spaces support the difference model, a classic theory of 2AFC decisions. In a second experiment, we find unexpected decision spaces that are not predicted by standard models of 2AFC decisions, and that suggest intrinsic uncertainty or soft thresholding. These experiments give new evidence regarding observers' strategies in 2AFC tasks, and they show how measuring decision variables can answer long-standing questions about perceptual decision making. PMID:26015584

  8. Challenges in ethics, safety, best practices, and oversight regarding HIT vendors, their customers, and patients: a report of an AMIA special task force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Eta S; Dente, Mark A; Kaplan, Bonnie; Koppel, Ross; Rucker, Donald; Sands, Daniel Z; Winkelstein, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The current commercial health information technology (HIT) arena encompasses a number of competing firms that provide electronic health applications to hospitals, clinical practices, and other healthcare-related entities. Such applications collect, store, and analyze patient information. Some vendors incorporate contract language whereby purchasers of HIT systems, such as hospitals and clinics, must indemnify vendors for malpractice or personal injury claims, even if those events are not caused or fostered by the purchasers. Some vendors require contract clauses that force HIT system purchasers to adopt vendor-defined policies that prevent the disclosure of errors, bugs, design flaws, and other HIT-software-related hazards. To address this issue, the AMIA Board of Directors appointed a Task Force to provide an analysis and insights. Task Force findings and recommendations include: patient safety should trump all other values; corporate concerns about liability and intellectual property ownership may be valid but should not over-ride all other considerations; transparency and a commitment to patient safety should govern vendor contracts; institutions are duty-bound to provide ethics education to purchasers and users, and should commit publicly to standards of corporate conduct; and vendors, system purchasers, and users should encourage and assist in each others' efforts to adopt best practices. Finally, the HIT community should re-examine whether and how regulation of electronic health applications could foster improved care, public health, and patient safety. PMID:21075789

  9. Medical guidelines for space passengers. Aerospace Medical Association Task Force on Space Travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    In the foreseeable future, private companies will manufacture space vehicles with a capacity of transporting tourists into low Earth orbit. Because of the stresses of spaceflight, the effects of microgravity, and limited medical care capability, a system of medical clearance is highly recommended for these space tourists. It is our purpose to establish guidelines for use by private businesses, medical providers, and those planning on being a space tourist. Consequently, a Task Force was organized by the Aerospace Medical Association (AsMA) for the purpose of facilitating safety of passengers, fellow passengers, crew, and flight operations. The guidelines are meant to serve only as a template with the full expectation that exceptions might be made with appropriate rationale. PMID:11601561

  10. Progress report of the Engineering Data Management System Task Force CERN-CN-96-002

    CERN Document Server

    Chevalley, J L; Faber, G; Farthouat, Philippe; Ferran, M; Flegel, Wilfried; Hameri, A P; Hauviller, Claude; Hervé, A; Høimyr, Nils-Joar; Klempt, W; Kuipers, J P M; Loos, R; Mottier, M; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nikkola, J; Oliger, S; Onnela, A; Palazzi, P; Pettersson, Thomas Sven; Price, M; Rollinger, G; Rousseau, B; Schinzel, Josi; Strubin, Pierre M; Tarrant, M; Vuoskoski, J; Witzeling, W

    1996-01-01

    An Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) is a collection of tools and rules, which enables, as a minimum, a body of vetted information to be built up in a safe pla and be easily accessible to the users. The Task Force worked through 1995 to elucidate CERN's needs for an EDMS in the construction and lifetime of LHC and its experiments, to discover the state of the art of EDMS and find a product on the market which fulfilled CERN's needs. A Call for Tenders was issued in December 1995 and the replies are being evaluated. The name DAR has been chosen for the activity of implenting an EDMS at CERN (CERN EDMS for Detectors and Accelerators) see http://cadd.cern.ch/cedar

  11. Carbon Issues Task Force Report for the Idaho Strategic Energy Alliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travis L. Mcling

    2010-10-01

    The Carbon Issues Task Force has the responsibility to evaluate emissions reduction and carbon offset credit options, geologic carbon sequestration and carbon capture, terrestrial carbon sequestration on forest lands, and terrestrial carbon sequestration on agricultural lands. They have worked diligently to identify ways in which Idaho can position itself to benefit from potential carbon-related federal legislation, including identifying opportunities for Idaho to engage in carbon sequestration efforts, barriers to development of these options, and ways in which these barriers can be overcome. These are the experts to which we will turn when faced with federal greenhouse gas-related legislation and how we should best react to protect and provide for Idaho’s interests. Note that the conclusions and recommended options in this report are not intended to be exhaustive, but rather form a starting point for an informed dialogue regarding the way-forward in developing Idaho energy resources.

  12. Congressional liaison task force - a briefing of the October 1994 meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    As the US Senate overturned roadblocks attempting-unsuccessfully-to halt passage of the elementary and secondary education reauthorization legislation representatives from several federal agencies and laboratories addressed Congressional Liaison Task Force (CLTF) participants October 12th. They spoke about their commitment, programs, and accomplishments toward the nation`s science knowledge, particularly at the precollege level. Marjorie S. Steinberg legislative assistant to bill cosponsor Sen. Jeff Bingaman (DNM), and Gary Allen, Triangle Coalition director of Governmental affairs, spoke about education legislation and specifically about the Technology for Education Act that was on the Senate floor for a vote in October and now is law. Bruce A. Fuchs talked about the National Institute of Health`s (NIH) work in science literacy and education. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration`s (NASA) Frank C. Owens and Eddie Anderson contributed to this report.

  13. Specialty Task Force: A Strategic Component to Electronic Health Record (EHR) Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Mary Rachel; Staub, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Post-implementation stage comes after an electronic health record (EHR) deployment. Analyst and end users deal with the reality that some of the concepts and designs initially planned and created may not be complementary to the workflow; creating anxiety, dissatisfaction, and failure with early adoption of system. Problems encountered during deployment are numerous and can vary from simple to complex. Redundant ticket submission creates backlog for Information Technology personnel resulting in delays in resolving concerns with EHR system. The process of optimization allows for evaluation of system and reassessment of users' needs. A solid and well executed optimization infrastructure can help minimize unexpected end-user disruptions and help tailor the system to meet regulatory agency goals and practice standards. A well device plan to resolve problems during post implementation is necessary for cost containment and to streamline communication efforts. Creating a specialty specific collaborative task force is efficacious and expedites resolution of users' concerns through a more structured process. PMID:27332478

  14. A universal access layer for the Integrated Tokamak Modelling Task Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Integrated Tokamak Modelling (ITM) Task Force aims at providing a suite of codes for preparing and analyzing future ITER discharges. In the framework of the ITM, the universal access layer (UAL) provides the capability of storing and retrieving data involved in simulation. The underlying data structure is hierarchical and the granularity in data access is given by the definition of a set of consistent physical objects (CPOs). To describe the data structure of the overall ITM database, the XML schema description (XSD) has been used. Originally intended to describe the structure of XML documents, XSD is used here to provide an unambiguous way of describing how data are structured, regardless of the actual implementation of the underlying database. The MDSplus-based UAL implementation is currently under test and other prototypes for investigating alternative data storage systems are foreseen

  15. Diagnosis of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy/Dysplasia:Proposed Modification of the Task Force Criteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童鸿

    2011-01-01

    @@ The original 1994 International Task Force criteria for the clinical diagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC / D) were based on structural,histological,ECG,arrhythmic,and familial features of the disease (Table 1).Abnormalities were subdivided into major and minor categories according to the specificity of their association with ARVC / D.Right precordial T-wave inversion,though well recognized in ARVC / D,was considered a minor criterion because of its presence in other conditions,including anterior ischemia and right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy.Arrhythmias of RV origin,another cardinal feature of ARVC / D,was designated a minor criterion because of its occurrence in other diseases,particularly idiopathic RV outflow tract tachycardia.

  16. Education and training of radiation task forces for nuclear emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of education and training of the special task forces for radiation accidents is the produce conditions close to reality. The author describes the development of the software module S3Exercise (safety support systems) that allows to present emergency situations close to reality. The module S3FAST (field assessment survey tool) is an emergency management system for the real-time field data transfer to the emergency team headquarter. For the radiation release from nuclear power plants, nuclear submarines and dirty bombs typical radioactive inventory data are provided. The scenarios are loaded on GPS supported handheld computers and allow the following notifications: dose rate, personal dosimeter, contamination and aerosol activity. The trained personal is supplied with realistic detector readouts. The field exploration is based exclusively on the indicated ''measured values''. The behavior in a given radiation field can be trained. The software is successfully used in the Canadian marine in their NER (nuclear emergency response) teams for training purposes.

  17. Report of the Census Task Force on beamline control system requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A special task force was appointed to study the experience with the present beamline control system at Fermilab and to make recommendations in this area. The charge of the committee and the list of its members are appended. In order to carry out its assignment, the committee conducted a series of meetings in which it discussed the controls situation in general and the best way to approach the user community. The various groups of users were identified, and a letter was written to representatives of these groups asking questions concerning the present system and future needs. The committee met with each group to discuss the response to these questions. Written summaries of the discussions are appended. Conclusions are drawn regarding current problems, systematic upgrades and specific recommendations

  18. Enhancing board effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Connie R; Totten, Mary K

    2010-01-01

    Like any other job, board work is associated with specific competencies. Competencies are the combination of knowledge, skills, personal characteristics, and behaviors needed to perform a job or task effectively. Boards are only as strong as their weakest member. Board education should focus on improving the knowledge and skills of the board and individual members and on overall board performance. Assessment of individual board member performance is designed to evaluate the trustee's knowledge of board roles and responsibilities and the expectations of board members. Board effectiveness is built through competency-based board member recruitment and selection; board member education and development; and evaluation of board, board member, and meeting performance. PMID:21291066

  19. Minutes of the 2. Meeting of the WPRS / EGRPANS / Sodium Fast Reactor Task Force (SFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five organizations (SCK/CEN, KIT, KFKI, CEA, ANL) participated in the Sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) Benchmark calculations and all results were collected and compiled by CEA and ANL. The compiled results of the large size cores and medium size cores were presented by V. Pascal (CEA) and T. K. Kim (ANL), respectively. Separately, A. Kereszturi presented his recently updated results. It was observed that there is wide variation in core multiplication factor, kinetics parameters, and reactivity feedback coefficients. In particular, compared to the CEA results, ANL calculated smaller k-eff, Doppler constant, but higher sodium void worth and control rod worth. The core modeling issue (heterogeneous vs. homogeneous) and solution method (diffusion vs. transport) were identified as the potential reasons of these discrepancies, including the minor impacts from the depletion chains and lumped fission product modeling. All participants agreed that additional investigation was needed to identify the reasons of these discrepancies. In addition, V. Pascal presented the informative notes of the reactivity feedback calculations methodology proposed by CEA. This document brings together the 5 presentations (slides) given at this meeting: 1 - SFR Task Force : Core behavior during transient as a function of power size and fuel nature (L. Buiron, V. Pascal, F. Varaine); 2 - Sodium Fast Reactor core Feedback and Transient response (SFRFT) Expert Group: preliminary benchmark results for large cores (L. Buiron, V. Pascal, F. Varaine); 3 - Numerical Benchmark Results for 1000 MWth Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (T.K. Kim and T.A. Taiwo); 4 - Preliminary results of the WPRS Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Benchmark problems (A. Kereszturi, I. Pataki, A. Tota, P. Vertes); 5 - SFR Task Force : proposal for Feedback coefficients estimation methodology (L. Buiron, V.Pascal, F. Varaine)

  20. Preparing for Routine Satellite Global Volcano Deformation Observations: The Volcano Deformation Database Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Jay, J.; Andrews, B. J.; Cooper, J.; Henderson, S. T.; Delgado, F.; Biggs, J.; Ebmeier, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has greatly expanded the number volcanoes that can be monitored for ground deformation - the number of known deforming volcanoes has increased almost five-fold since 1997 (to more than 213 volcanoes in 2014). However, from 1992-2014, there are still gaps in global volcano surveillance and only a fraction of the 1400 subaerial Holocene volcanoes have frequent observations in this time period. Starting in 2014, near global observations of volcano deformation should begin with the Sentinel satellites from the European Space Agency, ALOS-2 from the Japanese Space Agency, and eventually NISAR from the Indian Space Agency and NASA. With more frequent observations, more volcano deformation episodes are sure to be observed, but evaluating the significance of the observed deformation is not always straightforward -- how can we determine if deformation will lead to eruption? To answer this question, an international task force has been formed to create an inventory of volcano deformation events as part of the Global Volcano Model (http://globalvolcanomodel.org/gvm-task-forces/volcano-deformation-database/). We present the first results from our global study focusing on volcanoes that have few or no previous studies. In some cases, there is a lack of SAR data (for example, volcanoes of the South Sandwich Islands). For others, observations either show an absence of deformation or possible deformation that requires more data to be verified. An example of a deforming volcano that has few past studies is Pagan, an island in the Marianas Arc comprised of 2 stratovolcanoes within calderas. Our new InSAR measurements from both the ALOS and Envisat satellites show deformation near the 1981 May VEI 4 lava flow eruption on North Pagan at 2-3 cm/year between 2004-2010. Another example of a newly observed volcano is Karthala volcano in the Comoros. InSAR observations between 2004-2010 span four eruptions, only one of which is

  1. Report of the Material Control and Material Accounting Task Force: summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A special review was made of the safeguards maintained by licensees possessing 5 kg or more of strategic special nuclear material (SSNM), i.e., plutonium, uranium-233, or uranium enriched in the uranium-235 isotope to 20 percent or more. A Task Force was formed to define the roles and objectives of material control and material accounting in the NRC safeguards program; recommend goals for material control and material accounting systems based on their roles and objectives; assess the extent to which the existing regulatory base meets or provides the capability to meet the recommended goals; and to provide direction for material control and material accounting development, including both near-term and long-term upgrades. Based on results of Task Force investigations it is recommended that licensee plans for measurement control programs be submitted in response to Section 70.57(c) of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Other recommendations include the review and upgrading, as necessary, of measurement error propagation models used by each licensee; revision of Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS) reporting entities for SSNM licensees to be consistent with the partitioning of facilities into plants or, if appropriate, accounting units; review of NMMSS reporting entities for SSNM licensees to assure that data for high enriched uranium operations are clearly separated from low enriched uranium operations; upgrading of the editing by NMMSS of reported licensee safeguards data for accuracy and consistency; and the acquisition of (a) a secure interactive computer capability for use in collecting, storing, sorting, and analyzing special nuclear material accounting data, and (b) associated flexible computer software that presents safeguards information in a succinct and comprehensive manner

  2. Aespoe Task Force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Review of Tasks 6D, 6E, 6F and 6F2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report forms part of an independent review of the specifications, execution and results of Task 6 of the Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes, which is seeking to provide a bridge between site characterization and performance assessment approaches to modelling solute transport in fractured rock. The objectives of Task 6 are: To assess simplifications used in Performance Assessment (PA) models. To determine how, and to what extent, experimental tracer and flow experiments can constrain the range of parameters used in PA models. To support the design of Site Characterisation (SC) programmes to ensure that the results have optimal value for performance assessment calculations. To improve the understanding of site-specific flow and transport behaviour at different scales using site characterisation models. The present report is concerned with Tasks 6D, 6E, 6F and 6F2. It follows on from two previous reviews of Tasks 6A, 6B and 6B2, and Task 6C. In Task 6D the transport of tracers through a fracture network is modelled using the conditions of the C2 TRUE-Block Scale tracer test, based on the synthetic structural model developed in Task 6C. Task 6E extends the Task 6D transport calculations to a reference set of PA time scales and boundary conditions. Task 6F consists of a series of 'benchmark' studies on single features from the Task 6C hydrostructural model in order to improve the understanding of differences between the participating models. Task 6F2 utilises models set up for Tasks 6E and 6F to perform additional sensitivity studies with the aim of increasing the understanding of how models behave, the reason for differences in modelling results, and the sensitivity of models to various assumptions and parameter values. Eight modelling teams representing five organisations participated in this exercise using Discrete Fracture Network (DFN), continuum and channel network concepts implemented in a range of different codes and

  3. Aespoe Task Force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Review of Tasks 6D, 6E, 6F and 6F2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgkinson, David (Quintessa, Henley-on-Thames (GB))

    2007-09-15

    This report forms part of an independent review of the specifications, execution and results of Task 6 of the Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes, which is seeking to provide a bridge between site characterization and performance assessment approaches to modelling solute transport in fractured rock. The objectives of Task 6 are: To assess simplifications used in Performance Assessment (PA) models. To determine how, and to what extent, experimental tracer and flow experiments can constrain the range of parameters used in PA models. To support the design of Site Characterisation (SC) programmes to ensure that the results have optimal value for performance assessment calculations. To improve the understanding of site-specific flow and transport behaviour at different scales using site characterisation models. The present report is concerned with Tasks 6D, 6E, 6F and 6F2. It follows on from two previous reviews of Tasks 6A, 6B and 6B2, and Task 6C. In Task 6D the transport of tracers through a fracture network is modelled using the conditions of the C2 TRUE-Block Scale tracer test, based on the synthetic structural model developed in Task 6C. Task 6E extends the Task 6D transport calculations to a reference set of PA time scales and boundary conditions. Task 6F consists of a series of 'benchmark' studies on single features from the Task 6C hydrostructural model in order to improve the understanding of differences between the participating models. Task 6F2 utilises models set up for Tasks 6E and 6F to perform additional sensitivity studies with the aim of increasing the understanding of how models behave, the reason for differences in modelling results, and the sensitivity of models to various assumptions and parameter values. Eight modelling teams representing five organisations participated in this exercise using Discrete Fracture Network (DFN), continuum and channel network concepts implemented in a range of different

  4. Report of the Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-08-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) refers to a set of technologies that can greatly reduce carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from new and existing coal- and gas-fired power plants, industrial processes, and other stationary sources of CO{sub 2}. In its application to electricity generation, CCS could play an important role in achieving national and global greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction goals. However, widespread cost-effective deployment of CCS will occur only if the technology is commercially available and a supportive national policy framework is in place. In keeping with that objective, on February 3, 2010, President Obama established an Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage composed of 14 Executive Departments and Federal Agencies. The Task Force, co-chaired by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was charged with proposing a plan to overcome the barriers to the widespread, cost-effective deployment of CCS within ten years, with a goal of bringing five to ten commercial demonstration projects online by 2016. Composed of more than 100 Federal employees, the Task Force examined challenges facing early CCS projects as well as factors that could inhibit widespread commercial deployment of CCS. In developing the findings and recommendations outlined in this report, the Task Force relied on published literature and individual input from more than 100 experts and stakeholders, as well as public comments submitted to the Task Force. The Task Force also held a large public meeting and several targeted stakeholder briefings. While CCS can be applied to a variety of stationary sources of CO{sub 2}, its application to coal-fired power plant emissions offers the greatest potential for GHG reductions. Coal has served as an important domestic source of reliable, affordable energy for decades, and the coal industry has provided stable and quality high-paying jobs for American workers. At the same time, coal-fired power

  5. Robust versus optimal strategies for two-alternative forced choice tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacksenhouse, M; Bogacz, R; Holmes, P

    2010-04-01

    It has been proposed that animals and humans might choose a speed-accuracy tradeoff that maximizes reward rate. For this utility function the simple drift-diffusion model of two-alternative forced-choice tasks predicts a parameter-free optimal performance curve that relates normalized decision times to error rates under varying task conditions. However, behavioral data indicate that only ≈ 30% of subjects achieve optimality, and here we investigate the possibility that, in allowing for uncertainties, subjects might exercise robust strategies instead of optimal ones. We consider two strategies in which robustness is achieved by relinquishing performance: maximin and robust-satisficing. The former supposes maximization of guaranteed performance under a presumed level of uncertainty; the latter assumes that subjects require a critical performance level and maximize the level of uncertainty under which it can be guaranteed. These strategies respectively yield performance curves parameterized by presumed uncertainty level and required performance. Maximin performance curves for uncertainties in response-to-stimulus interval match data for the lower-scoring 70% of subjects well, and are more likely to explain it than robust-satisficing or alternative optimal performance curves that emphasize accuracy. For uncertainties in signal-to-noise ratio, neither maximin nor robust-satisficing performance curves adequately describe the data. We discuss implications for decisions under uncertainties, and suggest further behavioral assays. PMID:23180885

  6. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 631 - Armed Forces Disciplinary Control Board Procedures Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (11) State and local school board or education officials. (12) Any other representation deemed... detrimental to the good order and discipline, health, morale, welfare, safety, and morals of Armed...

  7. Preventing skin cancer: findings of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services On reducing Exposure to Ultraviolet Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiya, Mona; Glanz, Karen; Briss, Peter; Nichols, Phyllis; White, Cornelia; Das, Debjani

    2003-10-17

    Rates of skin cancer, the most common cancer in the United States, are increasing. The most preventable risk factor for skin cancer is unprotected ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Seeking to identify effective approaches to reducing the incidence of skin cancer by improving individual and community efforts to reduce unprotected UV exposure, the Task Force on Community Preventive Services conducted systematic reviews of community interventions to reduce exposure to ultraviolet light and increase protective behaviors. The Task Force found sufficient evidence to recommend two interventions that are based on improvements in sun protective or "covering-up" behavior (wearing protective clothing including long-sleeved clothing or hats): educational and policy approaches in two settings--primary schools and recreational or tourism sites. They found insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of a range of other population-based interventions and recommended additional research in these areas: educational and policy approaches in child care centers, secondary schools and colleges, recreational or tourism sites for children, and workplaces; interventions conducted in health-care settings and targeted to both providers and children's parents or caregivers; media campaigns alone; and community wide multicomponent interventions. This report also presents additional information regarding the recommended community interventions, briefly describes how the reviews were conducted, provides resources for further information, and provides information that can help in applying the interventions locally. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force conducted a systematic review of counseling by primary care clinicians to prevent skin cancer (CDC. Counseling to prevent skin cancer: recommendation and rationale of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. MMWR 2003;52[No. RR-15]:13-17), which is also included in this issue, the first jointly released findings from the Task Force on Community

  8. IUCN/SSC Otter Specialist Group: Otters in Captivity Task Force (OCT – Supporting Quality Captive Otter Care Worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Reed-Smith

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Work on creating the Otters in Captivity Task Force was begun in earnest in 2007 after OSG chair Jim Conroy reiterated Claus Reuther’s earlier request that the OSG look at how we could best interface with our colleagues working with otters in captive settings. I am pleased to report that this task force, known as OCT, has made some valuable progress in establishing our goals, identifying objectives, meeting some targets, and solidifying positive working relationships with otter professionals worldwide.

  9. Optimization of muscle activity for task-level goals predicts complex changes in limb forces across biomechanical contexts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Lucas McKay

    Full Text Available Optimality principles have been proposed as a general framework for understanding motor control in animals and humans largely based on their ability to predict general features movement in idealized motor tasks. However, generalizing these concepts past proof-of-principle to understand the neuromechanical transformation from task-level control to detailed execution-level muscle activity and forces during behaviorally-relevant motor tasks has proved difficult. In an unrestrained balance task in cats, we demonstrate that achieving task-level constraints center of mass forces and moments while minimizing control effort predicts detailed patterns of muscle activity and ground reaction forces in an anatomically-realistic musculoskeletal model. Whereas optimization is typically used to resolve redundancy at a single level of the motor hierarchy, we simultaneously resolved redundancy across both muscles and limbs and directly compared predictions to experimental measures across multiple perturbation directions that elicit different intra- and interlimb coordination patterns. Further, although some candidate task-level variables and cost functions generated indistinguishable predictions in a single biomechanical context, we identified a common optimization framework that could predict up to 48 experimental conditions per animal (n = 3 across both perturbation directions and different biomechanical contexts created by altering animals' postural configuration. Predictions were further improved by imposing experimentally-derived muscle synergy constraints, suggesting additional task variables or costs that may be relevant to the neural control of balance. These results suggested that reduced-dimension neural control mechanisms such as muscle synergies can achieve similar kinetics to the optimal solution, but with increased control effort (≈2× compared to individual muscle control. Our results are consistent with the idea that hierarchical, task

  10. Large-Scale Brain Networks in Board Game Experts: Insights from a Domain-Related Task and Task-Free Resting State

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Xujun; Liao, Wei; Liang, Dongmei; Qiu, Lihua; Gao, Qing; Liu, Chengyi; Gong, Qiyong; Chen, Huafu

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive performance relies on the coordination of large-scale networks of brain regions that are not only temporally correlated during different tasks, but also networks that show highly correlated spontaneous activity during a task-free state. Both task-related and task-free network activity has been associated with individual differences in cognitive performance. Therefore, we aimed to examine the influence of cognitive expertise on four networks associated with cognitive task performance...

  11. Report of the task force on low-temperature magnet operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-07-02

    The task force has studied two options for an 8 T ring operating at 2 K. In the first of these the synchrotron light load is taken at 2 K, and in the second it is intercepted on a bore liner at 4.5 K. The possibility of staged construction of the 20 Tev, 8 T, 2 K ring with initial operation at 15 Tev, 6 T and 4.5 K has also been considered. A set of dimensions and specifications has been developed for each of the two 8 T options in the three categories: magnets, cryostat, and refrigeration system with the object of providing for a detailed cost comparison with the 6 T, design D ring. Cost information for refrigeration systems that are not strictly comparable to design D have been developed from component quotations. A very preliminary discussion of costs is included in the report. A summary of the principal findings of the task force is as follows: the temperature at which a 6 T, 4.5 K magnet will operate at 8 T with the same critical current safety margin is found to be 2 K; an increase of 0.5 cm in the magnet inner diameter is found to be sufficient to accommodate a fluid-cooled bore liner; the most important change in going from the design D magnet to a magnet suitable for operation at 8 T, 2 K is an increase of about 10% in the superconductor and 60% in the iron per unit length; the cryostat for 2 K is fundamentally the same as for design D; for the same load ratings complete refrigeration system for the 2 K ring costs about 1.5 times as much as a system for a 4.5 K ring and uses twice the power; two ideas have come up in the investigations that clearly have merit and deserve further study independent of the choice of magnet style. These are the bore liner for synchrotron radiation interception and the ESCAR or pool-boiling cooling system.

  12. Subject-Specific Tendon-Aponeurosis Definition in Hill-Type Model Predicts Higher Muscle Forces in Dynamic Tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Gerus, Pauline; Rao, Guillaume; Berton, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Neuromusculoskeletal models are a common method to estimate muscle forces. Developing accurate neuromusculoskeletal models is a challenging task due to the complexity of the system and large inter-subject variability. The estimation of muscles force is based on the mechanical properties of tendon-aponeurosis complex. Most neuromusculoskeletal models use a generic definition of the tendon-aponeurosis complex based on in vitro test, perhaps limiting their validity. Ultrasonography allows subjec...

  13. Regulation of naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive materials. A Task Force review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of accelerator-produced radioisotopes (NARM), particularly in medicine, is growing rapidly. One NARM radioisotope, 226Ra, is one of the most hazardous of radioactive materials, and 226Ra is used by about 1/5 of all radioactive material users. Also, there are about 85,000 medical treatments using 226Ra each year. All of the 25 Agreement States and 5 non-Agreement States have licensing programs covering NARM users. The Agreement States' programs for regulating NARM are comparable to their programs for regulating byproduct, source, and special nuclear materials under agreements with NRC. But there are 7 states who exercise no regulatory control over NARM users, and the remaining States have control programs which are variable in scope. There are no national, uniformly applied programs to regulate the design, fabrication and quality of sources and devices containing NARM or consumer products containing NARM which are distributed in interstate commerce. Naturally occurring radioactive material (except source material) associated with the nuclear fuel cycle is only partially subject to NRC regulation, i.e., when it is associated with source or special nuclear material being used under an active NRC license. The Task Force recommends that the NRC seek legislative authority to regulate naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive materials for the reason that these materials present significant radiation exposure potential and present controls are fragmentary and non-uniform at both the State and Federal level

  14. Workshop report and presentations from the Semiconductor Research Corporation-DOE Semiconductor Task Force Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Semiconductor Research Corporation-DOE Semiconductor Task Force Workshop was held in Oak ridge, Tennessee, on November 2-3, 1987. It was to provide a forum for representatives of the national laboratories, DOE, and the semiconductor industry in which to discuss capabilities of the national laboratories which could contribute to the future competitiveness of the US semiconductor industry, to identify specific large and small projects at the national laboratories which would be of direct benefit to the semiconductor industry, and to find ways of implementing these projects. Numerous small projects were identified which would utilize unique capabilities of the national laboratories in advanced ion implantation, plasma processing (including electron cyclotron resonance plasmas), ion and cluster beam deposition, materials characterization, electronic packaging, and laser processing and deposition. Five large-scale candidate projects were identified in synchrotron x-ray lithography, silicon process integration, advanced materials processing science, process analysis and diagnostics, and ultra clean room engineering. The major obstacle to implementing these projects if the lack of appropriate funds to initiate and stimulate interactions between the national laboratories and the semiconductor industry. SEMATECH and the federal government are potential sources of seed funds for these projects. The Semiconductor Research Corporation is ideally suited to interface the semiconductor industry and the national laboratories for many of these interactions.

  15. Applying the Quebec Task Force criteria as a frame of reference for studies of whiplash injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteegen, G J; van Es, F D; Kingma, J; Meijler, W J; ten Duis, H J

    2001-04-01

    Research prior to 1995 showed a diversity of either inclusion or exclusion criteria (or both) for diagnosing whiplash injury. As a consequence, the Quebec Task Force (QTF) developed expert-based criteria, which may be considered as a the 'new' gold standard. Here, we examined the inclusion criteria and exclusion criteria used in research populations from the major 82 research studies performed during the period 1980-1998, comparing their similarities and dissimilarities to the QTF standard. None of the articles satisfied the QTF definitions completely, either before or after their introduction in 1995. Nevertheless, the QTF still seems to have had some impact on either the published inclusion or exclusion criteria. We observed that both sets of criteria showed a qualitative shift following the QTF publication in 1995. For the inclusion criteria, we found both a statistically significant increase in use of the QTF definition (acceleration-deceleration mechanism, rear-end collision, motor vehicle collision or other mishaps) and in the criterion 'neck pain'. We also observed some smaller changes in both inclusion and exclusion criteria but none of these was significant statistically. PMID:11240293

  16. Good in parts: the Gay Men's Task Force in Glasgow--a response to Kelly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, G J; Williamson, L M; Flowers, P

    2004-02-01

    We know that peer education, or the use of popular opinion leaders (POLs), works in terms of reducing reported risk behaviour for HIV infection amongst gay men. The work of Jeffrey Kelly and his colleagues provides some of the best scientific evidence in support of this approach. Influenced by this work, we undertook a peer education intervention amongst gay men in bars in Glasgow--the Gay Men's Task Force (GMTF)--but failed to demonstrate any reduction in sexual risk behaviour for HIV infection. In this paper we describe why we were unable to repeat in Scotland the success in small cities in the USA of the POL model. Our explanations include: failure to replicate the 'core elements' of POL; spatial and temporal differences between the original POL settings and the bars of Glasgow; and the currency of ideas such as 'peer education' beyond the protocols designed for their implementation. However, we also describe some of the successful features of the GMTF in Glasgow, and the continued value of peer education in contributing to reductions in sexual risk behaviour for HIV infection. PMID:14676022

  17. Operational Stress and Correlates of Mental Health Among Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb-Murphy, Jennifer A; De La Rosa, Gabriel M; Schmitz, Kimberly J; Vishnyak, Elizabeth J; Raducha, Stephanie C; Roesch, Scott C; Johnston, Scott L

    2015-12-01

    Military personnel deployed to Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay (JTF-GTMO) faced numerous occupational stressors. As part of a program evaluation, personnel working at JTF-GTMO completed several validated self-report measures. Personnel were at the beginning, middle, or end of their deployment phase. This study presents data regarding symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, alcohol abuse, depression, and resilience among 498 U.S. military personnel deployed to JTF-GTMO in 2009. We also investigated individual and organizational correlates of mental health among these personnel. Findings indicated that tenure at JTF-GTMO was positively related to adverse mental health outcomes. Regression models including these variables had R2 values ranging from .02 to .11. Occupation at JTF-GTMO also related to mental health such that guards reported poorer mental health than medical staff. Reluctance to seek out mental health care was also related to mental health outcomes. Those who reported being most reluctant to seek out care tended to report poorer mental health than those who were more willing to seek out care. Results suggested that the JTF-GTMO deployment was associated with significant psychological stress, and that both job-related and attitude-related variables were important to understanding mental health symptoms in this sample. PMID:26595460

  18. Report of the International Society of Nephrology: North American Renal Disaster Response Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Peter G; Parker, Thomas F

    2003-04-01

    This article comprises a report from the North American Renal Disaster Response Task Force (RDRTF) set up in 2001 by the International Society of Nephrology Acute Renal Failure Commission. The conclusions of the report are (1) given the rarity of renal disasters in the Americas the North American and Latin American RDRTF's should be merged; (2) for the same reason, a single RDRFT Coordination Center for the whole world should be established and it is suggested that this be in Ghent, Belgium; (3) the collaborative group set up in Europe and involving the European RDRTF and Medecins Sans Frontiers be asked to extend their rapid response service to cover acute renal disasters in the Americas south of the United States-Mexico border; (4) the combined RDRTF for the Americas should establish a list of nephrologists, nurses, and technicians who are available to assist in the acute response to renal disasters; (5) the combined RDRTF of the Americas establish an inventory of equipment, machines, and methods for their transport that would be available in the event of a disaster; and (6) the RDRTF of the Americas should undertake a large-scale educational initiative on management of renal disasters. PMID:12879370

  19. Trajectory Adjustments Underlying Task-Specific Intermittent Force Behaviors and Muscular Rhythms

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yi-Ching; Lin, Yen-Ting; Huang, Chien-Ting; Shih, Chia-Li; Yang, Zong-Ru; Hwang, Ing-Shiou

    2013-01-01

    Force intermittency is one of the major causes of motor variability. Focusing on the dynamics of force intermittency, this study was undertaken to investigate how force trajectory is fine-tuned for static and dynamic force-tracking of a comparable physical load. Twenty-two healthy adults performed two unilateral resistance protocols (static force-tracking at 75% maximal effort and dynamic force-tracking in the range of 50%–100% maximal effort) using the left hand. The electromyographic activi...

  20. Evidence-Based Interventions in School Psychology: An Illustration of Task Force Coding Criteria Using Single-Participant Research Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shernoff, Elisa Steele; Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Stoiber, Karen Callan

    2002-01-01

    Illustrates the application of the Task Force on Evidence-Based Interventions in School Psychology coding criteria using a single-participant research design study. Concludes that this study possessed several important strengths, including a strong research design, identifiable intervention components, and strong intervention effects for several…

  1. Final Report of the National Black Health Providers Task Force on High Blood Pressure Education and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    This is the final report of National Black Health Providers Task Force (NBHPTF) on High Blood Pressure Education and Control. The first chapter of the report recounts the history of the NBHPTF and its objectives. In the second chapter epidemiological evidence is presented to demonstrate the need for a suggested 20 year plan aimed at controlling…

  2. Cognitive Task Analysis and Intelligent Computer-Based Training Systems: Lessons Learned from Coached Practice Environments in Air Force Avionics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Sandra N.; Hall, Ellen; Lesgold, Alan

    This paper describes some results of a collaborative effort between the University of Pittsburgh and the Air Force to develop advanced troubleshooting training for F-15 maintenance technicians. The focus is on the cognitive task methodology used in the development of three intelligent tutoring systems to inform their instructional content and…

  3. 76 FR 66763 - Models for Plant-Specific Adoption of Technical Specifications Task Force Traveler TSTF-510...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ..., Revision 2, ``Revision to Steam Generator Program Inspection Frequencies and Tube Sample Selection'' AGENCY...) Task Force (TSTF) Traveler TSTF-510, Revision 2, ``Revision to Steam Generator Program Inspection..., and -1432, Specification 5.5.9, ``Steam Generator (SG) Program,'' Specification 5.6.7,...

  4. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures: report of a task force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shane, Elizabeth; Burr, David; Ebeling, Peter R;

    2010-01-01

    Reports linking long-term use of bisphosphonates (BPs) with atypical fractures of the femur led the leadership of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) to appoint a task force to address key questions related to this problem. A multidisciplinary expert group reviewed pertinent...

  5. Our Families, Our Children: The Lesbian and Gay Child Care Task Force Report on Quality Child Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dispenza, Mary

    The Lesbian and Gay Child Care Task Force documented anecdotal evidence of homophobia in child care and school age communities, including: (1) refusal to accept children from lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) families into child care; (2) biased attitudes expressed to children when they speak about their families; and (3) demonstrated…

  6. 78 FR 52560 - Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force-Rebuild-by-Design; Announcement of Selection of Design Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... Design Teams AGENCY: Hurricane Sandy Task Force, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In June 2013, the... resilience for the Sandy-affected region. This notice announces the design teams selected under the... the competition are to attract highly experienced building design teams, promote innovation...

  7. The Challenge: Latinos in a Changing California. The Report of the University of California SCR 43 Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Univ., Riverside. Consortium on Mexico and the United States.

    This document presents a report from a task force composed of scholars, professionals, and community leaders to the State of California and the University of California (UC) addressing issues affecting Latinos in California. The following major recommendations are discussed: (1) continuing research must be undertaken concerning dynamic changes and…

  8. Using Nontraditional Risk Factors in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Assessment : US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calonge, Ned; Petitti, Diana B.; DeWitt, Thomas G.; Gregory, Kimberly D.; Harris, Russell; Isham, George; LeFevre, Michael L.; Loveland-Cherry, Carol; Marion, Lucy N.; Moyer, Virginia A.; Ockene, Judith K.; Sawaya, George F.; Siu, Albert L.; Teutsch, Steven M.; Yawn, Barbara P.

    2009-01-01

    Description: New recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) on the use of nontraditional, or novel, risk factors in assessing the coronary heart disease (CHD) risk of asymptomatic persons. Methods: Systematic reviews were conducted of literature since 1996 on 9 proposed non

  9. Report of the Special Task Force to Study Not-for-Profit Hospitals and Unsponsored Charity Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R J; Milburn, L T

    1990-04-01

    Texas not-for-profit hospitals recently received intense scrutiny regarding their involvement in charity-related contributions when Texas Attorney General Jim Mattox formed the Task Force to Study Not-for-Profit Hospitals and Unsponsored Charity Care. This article details the task force's recommendations concerning charity care obligations of Texas not-for-profit hospitals. Setting the stage for these recommendations was a broad definition of charitable services that included costs for delivering services to indigents and for providing community services to fulfill the hospital's charitable, religious, educational, research, or eleemosynary purposes. The task force unanimously agreed that a mandated level of charity care was incongruent with the hospitals' individual missions and specific community needs, but they supported the formation of standard accounting procedures for charitable services and the voluntary submission of their mission statements to the attorney general of Texas. While the hospitals' role in providing charitable services is very important, the task force emphasized that the overall need for adequate financing and reimbursement of health care is a societal problem that needs specific state and federal actions. PMID:2336640

  10. Changes in ipsilateral motor cortex activity during a unilateral isometric finger task are dependent on the muscle contraction force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is possible to examine bilateral primary motor cortex (M1) activation during a sustained motor task using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), in which it is assumed that increased oxygenation reflects cortical activation. The purpose of this study was to examine bilateral M1 activation in response to graded levels of force production during a unilateral finger task. Ten healthy right-handed male subjects participated in this study. NIRS probes were placed over the cortex to measure M1 activity while the subjects performed the finger task. The subjects performed a 10 s finger task at 20%, 40%, and 60% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Symmetrical activation was found over both M1 areas at all force levels investigated. In the contralateral M1, there were significant differences in oxygenation between 20% and 60% MVC, as well as between 40% and 60% MVC. In the ipsilateral M1, there were significant differences among all force levels. These results indicate the ipsilateral M1 takes part in muscle force control. (paper)

  11. A report on older-age bipolar disorder from the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sajatovic, Martha; Strejilevich, Sergio A; Gildengers, Ariel G;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In the coming generation, older adults with bipolar disorder (BD) will increase in absolute numbers as well as proportion of the general population. This is the first report of the International Society for Bipolar Disorder (ISBD) Task Force on Older-Age Bipolar Disorder (OABD). METHODS...

  12. Aespoe modelling task force - experiences of the site specific flow and transport modelling (in detailed and site scale)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Aespoe Task Force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes was initiated in 1992. The Task Force shall be a forum for the organisations supporting the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory Project to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Much emphasis is put on building of confidence in the approaches and methods in use for modelling of groundwater flow and nuclide migration in order to demonstrate their use for performance and safety assessment. The modelling work within the Task Force is linked to the experiments performed at the Aespoe Laboratory. As the first Modelling Task, a large scale pumping and tracer experiment called LPT2 was chosen. This was the final part of the characterisation work for the Aespoe site before the construction of the laboratory in 1990. The construction of the Aespoe HRL access tunnel caused an even larger hydraulic disturbance on a much larger scale than that caused by the LPT2 pumping test. This was regarded as an interesting test case for the conceptual and numerical models of the Aespoe site developed during Task No 1, and was chosen as the third Modelling Task. The aim of Task 3 can be seen from two different perspectives. The Aespoe HRL project saw it as a test of their ability to define a conceptual and structural model of the site that can be utilised by independent modelling groups and be transformed to a predictive groundwater flow model. The modelling groups saw it as a means of understanding groundwater flow in a large fractured rock volume and of testing their computational tools. A general conclusion is that Task 3 has served these purposes well. Non-sorbing tracers tests, made as a part of the TRUE-experiments were chosen as the next predictive modelling task. A preliminary comparison between model predictions made by the Aespoe Task Force and the experimental results, shows that most modelling teams predicted breakthrough from

  13. 77 FR 8809 - United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board; Teleconference Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... International Trade Administration United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board; Teleconference Meeting... teleconference meeting. SUMMARY: The United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (Board) will hold a... and Competitiveness, as the Task Force works to develop a National Travel and Tourism...

  14. A two-state citizen task force responds to Dept. of Energy on defense waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Successes in public involvement efforts for nuclear waste management are so few that they deserve careful documentation and analysis. This paper chronicles the goals, process, problems and outcomes of one such success, the Northwest Defense Waste Citizens Forum (CF), created by the DOE-Richland manager in 1986 to advise DOE on its plans for nuclear waste disposal and cleanup of the Hanford site in eastern Washington state. DOE under-took an extensive multi-facted public involvement program to gain advice, understanding and support on heretofore neglected defense waste (DW) cleanup problems. DOE sought broad public input for a draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) at an early stage before all characterization data were complete and before a recommended alternative was formulated. In the evolving, often-controversial, highly-visible area of agency-public interactions, citizen task forces (TFs) have been shown to be useful in developing public policy at the local level. For DOE-Richland, the high-risk gamble in undertaking a public involvement program involving reversals of long-term DOE policies of secrecy and unresponsiveness to its host area paid off handsomely in an improved EIS, better relationships with state agencies and regional businesses, and unexpected political support for DW cleanup funding. The Hanford citizen forum was highly successful in both DOE's and participant views, with significant achievements, unusual process and technical findings of its own. By the authors' criteria discussed earlier for public participation efforts, the CF effort was successful in all 3 areas. The success of this approach suggests its use as a model for other federal cleanup activities

  15. Large-scale brain networks in board game experts: insights from a domain-related task and task-free resting state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xujun Duan

    Full Text Available Cognitive performance relies on the coordination of large-scale networks of brain regions that are not only temporally correlated during different tasks, but also networks that show highly correlated spontaneous activity during a task-free state. Both task-related and task-free network activity has been associated with individual differences in cognitive performance. Therefore, we aimed to examine the influence of cognitive expertise on four networks associated with cognitive task performance: the default mode network (DMN and three other cognitive networks (central-executive network, dorsal attention network, and salience network. During fMRI scanning, fifteen grandmaster and master level Chinese chess players (GM/M and fifteen novice players carried out a Chinese chess task and a task-free resting state. Modulations of network activity during task were assessed, as well as resting-state functional connectivity of those networks. Relative to novices, GM/Ms showed a broader task-induced deactivation of DMN in the chess problem-solving task, and intrinsic functional connectivity of DMN was increased with a connectivity pattern associated with the caudate nucleus in GM/Ms. The three other cognitive networks did not exhibit any difference in task-evoked activation or intrinsic functional connectivity between the two groups. These findings demonstrate the effect of long-term learning and practice in cognitive expertise on large-scale brain networks, suggesting the important role of DMN deactivation in expert performance and enhanced functional integration of spontaneous activity within widely distributed DMN-caudate circuitry, which might better support high-level cognitive control of behavior.

  16. Appendix to the report from the low-residue soldering task force: Phase 2 results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iman, R.L.; Anderson, D.J.; Huffman, D.D. [and others

    1995-12-01

    The LRSTF report for Phase I of its evaluation of low-residue soldering was issued in June 1995. This Appendix summarizes the results of follow-on testing performed in Phase II and compares electrical test results for both phases. Deliberate decisions were made by the LRSTF in Phase I to challenge the design guideline limits in MILSTD-275, Printed Wiring for Electronic Equipment The LRSTF considered this approach to produce a ``worst case`` design and provide useful information about the robustness of LR soldering processes. As such, good design practices were sometimes deliberately violated in designing the LRSTF board. This approach created some anomalies for both LR boards and RMA/cleaned controls. Phase II testing verified that problems that affected both RMA/cleaned and LR boards in Phase I were design related.

  17. Guidelines for Cognitive Behavioral Training within Doctoral Psychology Programs in the United States: Report of the Inter-Organizational Task Force on Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepac, Robert K.; Ronan, George F.; Andrasik, Frank; Arnold, Kevin D.; Belar, Cynthia D.; Berry, Sharon L.; Christofff, Karen A.; Craighead, Linda W.; Dougher, Michael J.; Dowd, E. Thomas; Herbert, James D.; McFarr, Lynn M.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Sauer, Eric M.; Strauman, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies initiated an interorganizational task force to develop guidelines for integrated education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology at the doctoral level in the United States. Fifteen task force members representing 16 professional associations participated in a yearlong series of…

  18. Staff Report on the Guaranteed Student Loan Program, Belmont Task Force Recommendations. Prepared for the Subcommittee on Postsecondary Education of the Committee on Education and Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    Recommendations of the Belmont Task Force concerning the problem of student loan defaults are offered to the U.S. House of Representatives. The task force concludes that the purpose of the Guaranteed Student Loan (GSL) program has changed significantly in the last decade. While originally established as a loan of convenience for middle-income…

  19. Report and Recommendations of the British Columbia Teacher's Federation's (BCTF) Task Force on First Nations Education to the Annual General Meeting (January 1999). (Revised Annotated Version).

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Columbia Teachers' Federation, Vancouver.

    In 1998, the British Columbia Teachers' Federation (BCTF) appointed an eight-member task force to investigate the effectiveness of the education system for First Nations students. The task force report and recommendations are intended to serve several groups of Aboriginal students: First Nations students, with or without status under Canada's…

  20. U.S. Transport Task Force Meeting - April 2014 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tynan, George R. [UC San Diego

    2014-09-19

    The ultimate goal of the U.S. Transport Task Force is to develop a physics-based understanding of confinement and particle, momentum and heat transport in magnetic fusion devices. This understanding should be of sufficient depth that it allows the development of predictive models of plasma transport that can be validated against experiment, and then used to anticipate the future performance of burning plasmas in ITER, as well as to provide guidance to the design of next-step fusion nuclear science facilities. To achieve success in transport science, it is essential to characterize local fluctuations and transport in toroidal plasmas, to understand the basic mechanisms responsible for transport, and ultimately to control these transport processes. These goals must be pursued in multiple areas, including ion and electron thermal transport, particle and momentum transport, the physics of H-modes and the edge pedestal, Internal Transport Barriers, energetic particle transport and 3D effects on all the underlying transport processes. Demonstrating our understanding requires multiple, successful, quantitative tests of theory, simulation and modeling using experimental results in fusion-relevant and basic plasmas (i.e., verification and validation). The 2014 U.S. TTF meeting was held in April 2014 in San Antonio TX to provide a forum for leading scientists focused on the study of transport of particles, momentum and heat in fusion plasmas. Approximately 110 scientists from the US and several from the EU and from China attended and heard oral talks on recent transport results. Several poster sessions were also held. One day of plenary talks were followed by Breakout sessions and poster sessions that were held on focused topics, including L-H transition physics, energetic particles, transport in high performance plasmas, divertor particle and heat flux management and innovative divertor designs, fundamental turbulence studies, end edge transport shortfall. Most of the

  1. UN-ECE task force: 'by-product utilization from stationary installations'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The task force has concluded as followed: Major sources of by-products considered in this report from stationary installations are large scale firing installations, waste incineration, upgrading processes and utilization in iron and steel, aluminium and copper industry, and the pulp and paper industry. The share of each sector source to the total amount of by-products generated differs significantly in the participating countries. State of the art processes as described in the report take account of the need for integrated pollution prevention and control. In particular the requirements set out in the Convention on Long Range Transboundary Air Pollution can still be satisfied when applying these state of the art processes. The report shows that a number of techniques for avoidance, reduction and/or utilization of by-products are in commercial operation in the branches discussed. They can therefore be considered to be best available. For some special by-products technical processes for the treatment are still in development and are not yet state-of-the-art. The implementation of the already proven techniques varies considerably in the different ECE-countries. This is mainly due to the following circumstances: differences in the design and stringency of legal regulations, availability of landfilling sites, costs of disposal, differences in industrial structure. Problems with by-product utilization originate mainly from: a) from a loss of international competitiveness of the respective industrial sector, if the reduction of the amount of by-products or their utilization leads to higher costs than conventional processes; b) from quality standards for materials which are inadequate for secondary raw materials thus creating acceptance problems of these materials. C) In some cases incineration and/or thermal recycling processes generate PCDD/F. quantities produces may be capable of reduction by means of process modification. If, however PCDD/F is released to the

  2. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target: 2014 update of the recommendations of an international task force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Josef S; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R; Bykerk, Vivian; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Kvien, Tore K; Navarro-Compán, M Victoria; Oliver, Susan; Schoels, Monika; Scholte-Voshaar, Marieke; Stamm, Tanja; Stoffer, Michaela; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Aletaha, Daniel; Andreu, Jose Louis; Aringer, Martin; Bergman, Martin; Betteridge, Neil; Bijlsma, Hans; Burkhardt, Harald; Combe, Bernard; Durez, Patrick; Fonseca, Joao Eurico; Gibofsky, Alan; Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Graninger, Winfried; Hannonen, Pekka; Haraoui, Boulos; Kouloumas, Marios; Landewe, Robert; Martin-Mola, Emilio; Nash, Peter; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Östör, Andrew; Richards, Pam; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; Thorne, Carter; Tzioufas, Athanasios G; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; de Wit, Martinus

    2016-01-01

    Background Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards this therapeutic goal in routine clinical practice, but these recommendations need to be re-evaluated for appropriateness and practicability in the light of new insights. Objective To update the 2010 treat-to-target recommendations based on systematic literature reviews (SLR) and expert opinion. Methods A task force of rheumatologists, patients and a nurse specialist assessed the SLR results and evaluated the individual items of the 2010 recommendations accordingly, reformulating many of the items. These were subsequently discussed, amended and voted upon by >40 experts, including 5 patients, from various regions of the world. Levels of evidence, strengths of recommendations and levels of agreement were derived. Results The update resulted in 4 overarching principles and 10 recommendations. The previous recommendations were partly adapted and their order changed as deemed appropriate in terms of importance in the view of the experts. The SLR had now provided also data for the effectiveness of targeting low-disease activity or remission in established rather than only early disease. The role of comorbidities, including their potential to preclude treatment intensification, was highlighted more strongly than before. The treatment aim was again defined as remission with low-disease activity being an alternative goal especially in patients with long-standing disease. Regular follow-up (every 1–3 months during active disease) with according therapeutic adaptations to reach the desired state was recommended. Follow-up examinations ought to employ composite measures of disease activity that include joint counts. Additional items provide further details for particular aspects of the

  3. Report of the Error and Emittance Task Force on the superconducting super collider: Part 1, Resistive machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-10-01

    A review of the design and specifications of the resistive accelerators in the SSC complex was conducted during the past year. This review was initiated in response to a request from the SSC Project Manager. The Error and Emittance Task Force was created October 30, 1992, and charged with reviewing issues associated with the specification of errors and tolerances throughout the injector chain and in the Collider, and to optimize the global error budget. Effects which directly impact the emittance budget were of prime importance. The Task Force responded to three charges: Examination of the resistive accelerators and their injection and extraction systems; examination of the connecting beamlines and the overall approach taken in their design; and global filling, timing, and synchronization issues. The High Energy Booster and the Collider were deemed to be sufficiently different from the resistive accelerators that it was decided to treat them as a separate group. They will be the subject of a second part to this report.

  4. Report of the Error and Emittance Task Force on the superconducting super collider: Part 1, Resistive machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the design and specifications of the resistive accelerators in the SSC complex was conducted during the past year. This review was initiated in response to a request from the SSC Project Manager. The Error and Emittance Task Force was created October 30, 1992, and charged with reviewing issues associated with the specification of errors and tolerances throughout the injector chain and in the Collider, and to optimize the global error budget. Effects which directly impact the emittance budget were of prime importance. The Task Force responded to three charges: Examination of the resistive accelerators and their injection and extraction systems; examination of the connecting beamlines and the overall approach taken in their design; and global filling, timing, and synchronization issues. The High Energy Booster and the Collider were deemed to be sufficiently different from the resistive accelerators that it was decided to treat them as a separate group. They will be the subject of a second part to this report

  5. Report and recommendations of the task force on tree and shrub planting on active oil sands tailings dams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-02-15

    In oil sands reclamation operations in Canada there is a conflict between dam safety and the planting of trees and woody shrubs. Indeed, tree planting is being restricted on the downstream slopes of dams to avoid damage to drains and to ensure the integrity of visual and instrumentation monitoring conflicting thus with progressive reclamation. Alberta Environment hired the Oil Sands Research and Information Network (OSRIN), an independent organization which analyzes and interprets available knowledge on soil and water reclamation in the oil sands mining sector, to address this issue and make recommendations. The organization appointed a Task Force which presented its final report in March 2011. The Task Force recommended that the Engineer of Record should be responsible for determining the tree and shrub planting zones and that he should submit his plans to Alberta Environment for approval.

  6. Psychophysical testing of visual prosthetic devices: a call to establish a multi-national joint task force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Joseph F., III; Ayton, Lauren N.

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in the field of visual prostheses, as showcased in this special feature of Journal of Neural Engineering , have led to promising results from clinical trials of a number of devices. However, as noted by these groups there are many challenges involved in assessing vision of people with profound vision loss. As such, it is important that there is consistency in the methodology and reporting standards for clinical trials of visual prostheses and, indeed, the broader vision restoration research field. Two visual prosthesis research groups, the Boston Retinal Implant Project (BRIP) and Bionic Vision Australia (BVA), have agreed to work cooperatively to establish a multi-national Joint Task Force. The aim of this Task Force will be to develop a consensus statement to guide the methods used to conduct and report psychophysical and clinical results of humans who receive visual prosthetic devices. The overarching goal is to ensure maximum benefit to the implant recipients, not only in the outcomes of the visual prosthesis itself, but also in enabling them to obtain accurate information about this research with ease. The aspiration to develop a Joint Task Force was first promulgated at the inaugural 'The Eye and the Chip' meeting in September 2000. This meeting was established to promote the development of the visual prosthetic field by applying the principles of inclusiveness, openness, and collegiality among the growing body of researchers in this field. These same principles underlie the intent of this Joint Task Force to enhance the quality of psychophysical research within our community. Despite prior efforts, a critical mass of interested parties could not congeal. Renewed interest for developing joint guidelines has developed recently because of a growing awareness of the challenges of obtaining reliable measurements of visual function in patients who are severely visually impaired (in whom testing is inherently noisy), and of the importance of

  7. Performance of repetitive tasks induces decreased grip strength and increased fibrogenic proteins in skeletal muscle: role of force and inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir M Abdelmagid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study elucidates exposure-response relationships between performance of repetitive tasks, grip strength declines, and fibrogenic-related protein changes in muscles, and their link to inflammation. Specifically, we examined forearm flexor digitorum muscles for changes in connective tissue growth factor (CTGF; a matrix protein associated with fibrosis, collagen type I (Col1; a matrix component, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFB1; an upstream modulator of CTGF and collagen, in rats performing one of two repetitive tasks, with or without anti-inflammatory drugs. METHODOLOGY/RESULTS: To examine the roles of force versus repetition, rats performed either a high repetition negligible force food retrieval task (HRNF, or a high repetition high force handle-pulling task (HRHF, for up to 9 weeks, with results compared to trained only (TR-NF or TR-HF and normal control rats. Grip strength declined with both tasks, with the greatest declines in 9-week HRHF rats. Quantitative PCR (qPCR analyses of HRNF muscles showed increased expression of Col1 in weeks 3-9, and CTGF in weeks 6 and 9. Immunohistochemistry confirmed PCR results, and also showed greater increases of CTGF and collagen matrix in 9-week HRHF rats than 9-week HRNF rats. ELISA, and immunohistochemistry revealed greater increases of TGFB1 in TR-HF and 6-week HRHF, compared to 6-week HRNF rats. To examine the role of inflammation, results from 6-week HRHF rats were compared to rats receiving ibuprofen or anti-TNF-α treatment in HRHF weeks 4-6. Both treatments attenuated HRHF-induced increases in CTGF and fibrosis by 6 weeks of task performance. Ibuprofen attenuated TGFB1 increases and grip strength declines, matching our prior results with anti-TNFα. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Performance of highly repetitive tasks was associated with force-dependent declines in grip strength and increased fibrogenic-related proteins in flexor digitorum muscles. These changes were

  8. Clinical Skills Verification in General Psychiatry: Recommendations of the ABPN Task Force on Rater Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibson, Michael D.; Broquet, Karen E.; Anzia, Joan Meyer; Beresin, Eugene V.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Kaye, David; Rao, Nyapati Raghu; Rostain, Anthony Leon; Sexson, Sandra B.; Summers, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) announced in 2007 that general psychiatry training programs must conduct Clinical Skills Verification (CSV), consisting of observed clinical interviews and case presentations during residency, as one requirement to establish graduates' eligibility to sit for the written certification…

  9. PHARMACOLOGICAL INTERVENTIONS IN FRAILTY AND SARCOPENIA: REPORT BY THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON FRAILTY AND SARCOPENIA RESEARCH TASK FORCE

    OpenAIRE

    Cesari, M.; Fielding, R.; Bénichou, O.; Bernabei, R.; Bhasin, S.; Guralnik, J. M.; Jette, A; Landi, F.; Pahor, M.; Rodriguez-Manas, L.; Rolland, Y.; Roubenoff, R.; Sinclair, A J; Studenski, S.; Travison, T.

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia and frailty often co-exist and both have physical function impairment as a core component. Yet despite the urgency of the problem, the development of pharmaceutical therapies for sarcopenia and frailty has lagged, in part because of the lack of consensus definitions for the two conditions. A task force of clinical and basic researchers, leaders from the pharmaceutical and nutritional industries, and representatives from non-profit organizations was established in 2012 with the aim ...

  10. Consensus on circulatory shock and hemodynamic monitoring. Task force of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Cecconi, Maurizio; De Backer, Daniel; Antonelli, Massimo; Beale, Richard; Bakker, Jan; Hofer, Christoph; Jaeschke, Roman; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Pinsky, Michael R; Teboul, Jean Louis; Vincent, Jean Louis; Rhodes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Objective Circulatory shock is a life-threatening syndrome resulting in multiorgan failure and a high mortality rate. The aim of this consensus is to provide support to the bedside clinician regarding the diagnosis, management and monitoring of shock. Methods The European Society of Intensive Care Medicine invited 12 experts to form a Task Force to update a previous consensus (Antonelli et al.: Intensive Care Med 33:575–590, 2007). The same five questions addressed in the earlier consensus we...

  11. Endpoints for Pre-Dementia AD Trials: A Report from the EU/US/CTAD Task Force

    OpenAIRE

    Vellas, B.; Bateman, R; Blennow, K; FRISONI, G; Johnson, K.; Katz, R.; Langbaum, J.; Marson, D.; Sperling, R.; Wessels, A.; Salloway, S.; Doody, R; Aisen, P

    2015-01-01

    For Alzheimer’s disease treatment trials that focus on the pre-dementia stage of disease, outcome measures are needed that will enable assessment of disease progression in patients who are clinically normal. The EU/US CTAD Task Force, an international collaboration of investigators from industry, academia, non-profit foundations, and regulatory agencies, met in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, on November 19, 2014 to discuss existing and novel outcome assessments that may be useful in pre-dem...

  12. Exploring Individual Creativity from Network Structure Perspective: Comparison of Task Force Team and R&D Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun Chang; Chae, Seong Wook; Seo, Young Wook

    The objectives of this paper are to empirically investigate the fact that the factors affecting individual creativity differ depending on team characteristics and the fact that its practical implications are plentiful, especially for those who are concerned with how to design team network structures with a bid to motivate individual creativity. From previous studies, this paper suggests crucial factors for facilitating individual creativity: intrinsic motivation, organizational learning culture, and network structure. To maximize practical implications, we divide team characteristics into two types: task force teams and R&D teams. A task force team is organized with a clear mission to be completed within a rather short period. In contrast, an R&D team exists for a long time with numerous projects to finish with various terms and conditions. Empirical results reveal that individual creativity in the task force team should be controlled by adjusting the organizational learning culture and degree centrality, while individual creativity in the R&D team must be administered in a way that the individual's intrinsic motivation is stimulated and encouraged through the use of a structural hole through which external information from outside team is available.

  13. Integrating Tactile and Force Feedback for Highly Dynamic Tasks : Technological, Experimental and Epistemological Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Khatchatourov, Armen; Castet, Julien; Florens, Jean-Loup; Luciani, Annie; Lenay, Charles

    2009-01-01

    For hand-object interaction in real situations the interplay between the local tactile interaction and force interaction seems to be very important. In current haptic interfaces, however, two different trends are present: force feedback devices which offer a permanent invariable grip and a resultant force, and tactile devices, which offer variable local patterns, often used for texture rendering. The purpose of the present work is to combine the two types of devices in a coherent manner. In t...

  14. Plantarflexor force production in isometric and stretch-shortening cycle tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Furlong, Laura-Anne M; Harrison, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    peer-reviewed The ankle joint and its surrounding musculature are vital in sprinting, and recent work has developed a method to isolate the plantarflexor muscle group for analysis of its force-producing capabilities. The aim of this study was to compare values for plantarflexor force obtained using isometric dynamometry and an adapted force sledge in twenty healthy subjects. Results showed low relationships between isometric and dynamic strength measures, probably because the dynamic test ...

  15. Complex tasks force hand laterality and technological behaviour in naturalistically housed chimpanzees: inferences in hominin evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, M; Geribàs, N; Bargalló, A; Llorente, M; Riba, D

    2012-01-01

    Clear hand laterality patterns in humans are widely accepted. However, humans only elicit a significant hand laterality pattern when performing complementary role differentiation (CRD) tasks. Meanwhile, hand laterality in chimpanzees is weaker and controversial. Here we have reevaluated our results on hand laterality in chimpanzees housed in naturalistic environments at Fundació Mona (Spain) and Chimfunshi Wild Orphanage (Zambia). Our results show that the difference between hand laterality in humans and chimpanzees is not as great as once thought. Furthermore, we found a link between hand laterality and task complexity and also an even more interesting connection: CRD tasks elicited not only the hand laterality but also the use of tools. This paper aims to turn attention to the importance of this threefold connection in human evolution: the link between CRD tasks, hand laterality, and tool use, which has important evolutionary implications that may explain the development of complex behaviour in early hominins. PMID:22550466

  16. 75 FR 11893 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Task Force; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Open Government Directive, issued by the Director of the Office of Management and Budget on December 8... transparent, collaborative, and participatory government. FDA has formed an internal Transparency Task...

  17. Analysis of applied forces and electromyography of back and shoulders muscles when performing a simulated hand scaling task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, William; Gallagher, Sean; Torma-Krajewski, Janet

    2010-05-01

    Hand scaling is a physically demanding task responsible for numerous overexertion injuries in underground mining. Scaling requires the miner to use a long pry bar to remove loose rock, reducing the likelihood of rock fall injuries. The experiments described in this article simulated "rib" scaling (scaling a mine wall) from an elevated bucket to examine force generation and electromyographic responses using two types of scaling bars (steel and fiberglass-reinforced aluminum) at five target heights ranging from floor level to 176 cm. Ten male and six female subjects were tested in separate experiments. Peak and average force applied at the scaling bar tip and normalized electromyography (EMG) of the left and right pairs of the deltoid and erectores spinae muscles were obtained. Work height significantly affected peak prying force during scaling activities with highest force capacity at the lower levels. Bar type did not affect force generation. However, use of the lighter fiberglass bar required significantly more muscle activity to achieve the same force. Results of these studies suggest that miners scale points on the rock face that are below their knees, and reposition the bucket as often as necessary to do so. PMID:19800050

  18. 76 FR 52318 - U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Public Meeting and Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ....coralreef.gov . Public Comments: Comments may address the meeting, the role of the USCRTF, or general coral... Force. The meeting will be held in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. This meeting, the 26th bi-annual meeting...

  19. A Vision/Position/Force Control Approach for Performing Assembly Tasks with a Humanoid Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Dauchez, Pierre; Fraisse, Philippe; Pierrot, François

    2005-01-01

    Humanoid robots are currently widely studied because of the many future applications they could be used for. Many researchers are working on the locomotion aspects. We are more interested in dual-arm manipulation tasks, because of our long experience on this topic. In this paper, we consider the task consisting in assembling two objects, each of them being held by one of the humanoid arms, as human beings often do. In this framework, we briefly recall methods that we have developed in the pas...

  20. NRC Fact-Finding Task Force report on the ATWS event at Salem Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1, on February 25, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An NRC Region I Task Force was established on March 1, 1983 to conduct fact finding and data collection with regard to the circumstances which led to an anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) event at the Public Service Electric and Gas Company's Salem Generating Station, Unit 1 on February 25, 1983. The charter of the Task Force was to determine the factual information pertinent to management and administrative controls which should have ensured proper operation of the reactor trip breakers in the solid state protection system. This report documents the findings of the Task Force along with its conclusions

  1. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 03: The Global Task Force on Radiotherapy for Cancer Control: Core Investments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) is a membership-based, non-governmental organization with a mandate to “…to unite the cancer community to reduce the global cancer burden, to promote greater equity, and to integrate cancer control into the world health and development agenda.” COMP is an associate member of the UICC. It is well recognized by the UICC that there are major gaps between high, and low and middle income countries, in terms of access to cancer services including access to radiation therapy. In this context, the UICC has developed a Global Task Force on Radiotherapy for Cancer Control with a charge to answer a single question: “What does it cost to close the gap between what exists today and reasonable access to radiotherapy globally?” The Task Force consists of leaders internationally recognized for their radiation treatment related expertise (radiation oncologists, medical physicists, radiation therapists) as well as those with global health and economics specialization. The Task Force has developed three working groups: (1) to look at the global burden of cancer; (2) to look at the infrastructure requirements (facilities, equipment, personnel); and (3) to consider outcomes in terms of numbers of lives saved and palliated patients. A report is due at the World Cancer Congress in December 2014. This presentation reviews the infrastructure considerations under analysis by the second work group. The infrastructure parameters being addressed include capital costs of buildings and equipment and operating costs, which include human resources, equipment servicing and quality control, and general overhead

  2. T-maze Forced Alternation and Left-right Discrimination Tasks for Assessing Working and Reference Memory in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Shoji, Hirotaka; Hagihara, Hideo; Takao, Keizo; Hattori, Satoko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Forced alternation and left-right discrimination tasks using the T-maze have been widely used to assess working and reference memory, respectively, in rodents. In our laboratory, we evaluated the two types of memory in more than 30 strains of genetically engineered mice using the automated version of this apparatus. Here, we present the modified T-maze apparatus operated by a computer with a video-tracking system and our protocols in a movie format. The T-maze apparatus consists of runways pa...

  3. Schizophrenia: from the brain to peripheral markers. A consensus paper of the WFSBP task force on biological markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stober, Gerald; Ben-Shachar, Dorit; Cardon, M;

    2009-01-01

    traits that are specific to particular conditions. An important aim of biomarker discovery is the detection of disease correlates that can be used as diagnostic tools. Method. A selective review of the WFSBP Task Force on Biological Markers in schizophrenia is provided from the central nervous system to...... phenotypes, functional brain systems, chromosomal loci with potential genetic markers to the peripheral systems. Results. A number of biological measures have been proposed to be correlated with schizophrenia. At present, not a single biological trait in schizophrenia is available which achieves sufficient...

  4. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures: report of a task force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shane, Elizabeth; Burr, David; Ebeling, Peter R;

    2010-01-01

    . Given the relative rarity of atypical femoral fractures, the task force recommends that specific diagnostic and procedural codes be created and that an international registry be established to facilitate studies of the clinical and genetic risk factors and optimal surgical and medical management of...... by BPs. Moreover, a causal association between BPs and atypical fractures has not been established. However, recent observations suggest that the risk rises with increasing duration of exposure, and there is concern that lack of awareness and underreporting may mask the true incidence of the problem...... and clinical data to establish the true incidence of and risk factors for this condition and to inform orthopedic and medical management....

  5. Force and complexity of tongue task training influences behavioral measures of motor learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Svensson, Peter; Huo, Xueliang;

    2012-01-01

    Relearning of motor skills is important in neurorehabilitation. We investigated the improvement of training success during simple tongue protrusion (two force levels) and a more complex tongue-training paradigm using the Tongue Drive System (TDS). We also compared subject-based reports of fun, pa...

  6. [Medical support of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation: results of activity and tasks for 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisun, A Ya

    2016-01-01

    The author gives an analysis of activity of the medical service of the Armed Forces in 2015 concerning development of normative legal basis for the military health care, improvement of the level of operational and mobilization readiness of subunits of army group, and military-medical institutions, improvement of effectiveness of treatment and evacuation measures, health resort treatment, medical stuff training optimization, sanitary-and-epidemiologic support, material and technical support improvement, adoption of advanced scientific achievements focusing on medical care delivery to army group, active development and increase in medical information systems, telehealth. system. The author gives data characterizing state and level of development of medical service of the Armed Forces and its dynamics. Main tasks and parameters of development of the service in 2016 and up to 2020 are formulated. PMID:27120950

  7. Final report on the Federal/State/Local Nonpoint Source Task Force and recommended National Nonpoint Source Policy. Report for March 1984-January 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the Federal/State/Local Nonpoint Source Task Force. In recognition of the many agencies involved in managing nonpoint source (NPS) pollution and the need for coordination among these agencies, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) convened the Task Force in March 1984. The Task Force developed a recommended National Nonpoint Source Policy and implementation strategies to carry out the goals of the policy. The report of the Task Force provides a brief overview of the NPS problem including defining nonpoint sources and the nature and scope of the NPS problem; it describes the steps involved in developing and implementing the National Nonpoint Source Policy; and it contains a copy of the recommended National Nonpoint Source Policy and summaries of agency implementation strategies.

  8. The influence of vessel movements on the energy expenditure of fishermen in relation to activities and occupational tasks on board

    OpenAIRE

    Breidahl, Tomas; Christensen, Michael; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis; Omland, Øyvind

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies of professional fishing activities have indicated that vessel movements correlate to fishermen’s energy expenditure. We have previously demonstrated that even in calm weather, the heel and pitch significantly increase the fishermen’s energy expenditure, ignoring the activities carried out on board. This continuation of the study goes further by exploring the relation between the exposure to the ship’s movements and the fishermen’s energy expenditure during various...

  9. Minutes of the kick-off Meeting of the WPRS / EGRPANS / Sodium Fast Reactor Task Force (SFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kick-off meeting of the Sodium-cooled fast reactor Task Force (SFR) was an informal one where discussion among participants was encouraged. F. Varaine reminded the participants of the objectives and milestones of the proposed benchmark. A discussion followed on how to define transients in a safety approach. Speaking for ANL, T.A Taiwo anticipated the need to include experts from ANL safety division in the thermal-hydraulics/transient part of the benchmark and observed the initial timeline proposed was too tight to meet. It was agreed the timeline of the benchmark would be modified to a more realistic schedule, keeping the neutronic part as the first stage to finish before the end of the year. It was decided that CEA would provide a spreadsheet template to fill out by benchmark participants to facilitate compilation of results. During the presentations, L. Buiron presented the benchmark in detail and introduced the bibliographic study he has been compiling with the aim to develop a state of the art of feedback calculations. He reported this work is ongoing and could become a contribution for a report of the Expert Group. E. Ivanov presented a proposal for complementary calculations to be included in the benchmark. He reported these calculations would allow for interpretation of the discrepancies that may be observed between the different results obtained by the participants, and commented such an interpretation is essential in any safety analysis presented before decision-makers. A discussion followed on the necessity to include the additional calculations proposed by IRSN at such an early state of the benchmark. The proposal was met with interest, and it was decided that it would be discussed again at the next meeting where first neutronic results could be shown and the importance of these calculations demonstrated. E. Ivanov agreed to provide more detailed specifications of the tallies requested by the next meeting. It was decided that these complementary

  10. Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  11. Pre-Trial EEG-Based Single-Trial Motor Performance Prediction to Enhance Neuroergonomics for a Hand Force Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinel, Andreas; Castaño-Candamil, Sebastián; Reis, Janine; Tangermann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We propose a framework for building electrophysiological predictors of single-trial motor performance variations, exemplified for SVIPT, a sequential isometric force control task suitable for hand motor rehabilitation after stroke. Electroencephalogram (EEG) data of 20 subjects with mean age of 53 years was recorded prior to and during 400 trials of SVIPT. They were executed within a single session with the non-dominant left hand, while receiving continuous visual feedback of the produced force trajectories. The behavioral data showed strong trial-by-trial performance variations for five clinically relevant metrics, which accounted for reaction time as well as for the smoothness and precision of the produced force trajectory. 18 out of 20 tested subjects remained after preprocessing and entered offline analysis. Source Power Comodulation (SPoC) was applied on EEG data of a short time interval prior to the start of each SVIPT trial. For 11 subjects, SPoC revealed robust oscillatory EEG subspace components, whose bandpower activity are predictive for the performance of the upcoming trial. Since SPoC may overfit to non-informative subspaces, we propose to apply three selection criteria accounting for the meaningfulness of the features. Across all subjects, the obtained components were spread along the frequency spectrum and showed a variety of spatial activity patterns. Those containing the highest level of predictive information resided in and close to the alpha band. Their spatial patterns resemble topologies reported for visual attention processes as well as those of imagined or executed hand motor tasks. In summary, we identified subject-specific single predictors that explain up to 36% of the performance fluctuations and may serve for enhancing neuroergonomics of motor rehabilitation scenarios. PMID:27199701

  12. Joint Task Force on Undergraduate Physics Programs: Implications for physics programs and why you should care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodapp, Theodore

    2016-03-01

    The content of undergraduate physics programs has not changed appreciably in 50 years, however, the jobs our students take have changed dramatically. Preparing students for careers they are likely to encounter requires physics programs to rethink and in some cases retool to provide an education that will not only educate an individual in the habits of mind and keen sense of how to solve complex technical problems, but also what related skills they will need to be effective in those careers. Do you teach your student how to read or create a budget? How about dealing with a low-performing member of an R&D team? This talk will explore driving forces behind this report, potential implications for physics departments, and practical steps faculty members can take to continue to consider improvements in experiences for our students. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF-1540570).

  13. Standardized cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR protocols, society for cardiovascular magnetic resonance: board of trustees task force on standardized protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Raymond J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Index 1. General techniques 1.1. Stress and safety equipment 1.2. Left ventricular (LV structure and function module 1.3. Right ventricular (RV structure and function module 1.4. Gadolinium dosing module. 1.5. First pass perfusion 1.6. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE 2. Disease specific protocols 2.1. Ischemic heart disease 2.1.1. Acute myocardial infarction (MI 2.1.2. Chronic ischemic heart disease and viability 2.1.3. Dobutamine stress 2.1.4. Adenosine stress perfusion 2.2. Angiography: 2.2.1. Peripheral magnetic resonance angiography (MRA 2.2.2. Thoracic MRA 2.2.3. Anomalous coronary arteries 2.2.4. Pulmonary vein evaluation 2.3. Other 2.3.1. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathy 2.3.2. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC 2.3.3. Congenital heart disease 2.3.4. Valvular heart disease 2.3.5. Pericardial disease 2.3.6. Masses

  14. Standardized cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) protocols, society for cardiovascular magnetic resonance: board of trustees task force on standardized protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Raymond J; Flamm Scott D; Barkhausen Jorg; Kramer Christopher M; Nagel Eike

    2008-01-01

    Index 1. General techniques 1.1. Stress and safety equipment 1.2. Left ventricular (LV) structure and function module 1.3. Right ventricular (RV) structure and function module 1.4. Gadolinium dosing module. 1.5. First pass perfusion 1.6. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) 2. Disease specific protocols 2.1. Ischemic heart disease 2.1.1. Acute myocardial infarction (MI) 2.1.2. Chronic ischemic heart disease and viability 2.1.3. Dobutamine stress 2.1.4. Adenosine stress perfusion 2.2. Angiograph...

  15. Status Report on Activities of the Systems Assessment Task Force, OECD-NEA Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon Michelle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development /Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) Nuclear Science Committee approved the formation of an Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) for LWRs (EGATFL) in 2014. Chaired by Kemal Pasamehmetoglu, INL Associate Laboratory Director for Nuclear Science and Technology, the mandate for the EGATFL defines work under three task forces: (1) Systems Assessment, (2) Cladding and Core Materials, and (3) Fuel Concepts. Scope for the Systems Assessment task force includes definition of evaluation metrics for ATF, technology readiness level definition, definition of illustrative scenarios for ATF evaluation, parametric studies, and selection of system codes. The Cladding and Core Materials and Fuel Concepts task forces will identify gaps and needs for modeling and experimental demonstration; define key properties of interest; identify the data necessary to perform concept evaluation under normal conditions and illustrative scenarios; identify available infrastructure (internationally) to support experimental needs; and make recommendations on priorities. Where possible, considering proprietary and other export restrictions (e.g., International Traffic in Arms Regulations), the Expert Group will facilitate the sharing of data and lessons learned across the international group membership. The Systems Assessment Task Force is chaired by Shannon Bragg-Sitton (INL), while the Cladding Task Force will be chaired by a representative from France (Marie Moatti, Electricite de France [EdF]) and the Fuels Task Force will be chaired by a representative from Japan (Masaki Kurata, Japan Atomic Energy Agency [JAEA]). This report provides an overview of the Systems Assessment Task Force charter and status of work accomplishment.

  16. Secondary traumatic stress among Internet Crimes Against Children task force personnel: impact, risk factors, and coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Michael L; Craun, Sarah W

    2014-12-01

    Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) task force personnel face various forms of child exploitation on a daily basis; their jobs require them to view child pornography, participate in undercover chats, interact with offenders in person, and interview abuse survivors. Although exposure to child exploitation and sexual violence has been shown to cause secondary traumatic stress (STS) in certain professions, this is the first large-scale study to investigate risk for STS among ICAC personnel. We circulated an Internet-based survey to ICAC personnel throughout the country and more than 600 individuals responded. Results provide insight into how STS impacts personal and professional well-being. In addition, they highlight which coping mechanisms were inversely related to STS scores. Implications and limitations of the results are discussed. PMID:24259539

  17. Impact of the Joint Task Force on Undergraduate Physics Programs for Innovation and Entrepreneurship Education in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arion, Douglas

    The Joint Task Force on Undergraduate Physics Programs has worked diligently to develop recommendations for what physics programs could and should be doing to prepare graduates for 21st century careers. While the `traditional' physics curriculum has served for many years, the demands of the new workforce, and the recognition that only a few percent of physics students actually become faculty - the vast majority entering the workforce and applying their skills to a very diverse range of problems, projects, and products - implies that a review of the education undergraduates receives is in order. The outcomes of this study point to the need to provide greater connection between the education process and the actual skills, knowledge, and abilities that the workplace demands. This presentation will summarize these considerations, and show how entrepreneurship and innovation programs and curricula are a particularly effective means of bringing these elements to physics students.

  18. Preventing nuclear terrorism: the report and papers of the International Task Force on Prevention of Nuclear Terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Task Force on Prevention of Nuclear Terrorism, formed in 1985 under the Nuclear Control Institute, commissioned 26 studies and produced an extensive report on the problem and prevention of nuclear terrorism, Part I of this book is the full report, and part II contains the individual studies under two section: (A) Defining the Threat (8 studies); and (B) Strategies for Dealing with the Threat (18 studies). Detailed recommendations are made, in many of the studies, for better protection of nuclear weapons, materials, and facilities; greater cooperation among national intelligence agencies; tighter controls on nuclear transfers; more effective arms control initiatives; and emergency management programs. A separate abstract was prepared for the report and each of the 26 studies

  19. Report to the 238U discrepancy task force on SIOB fits to the ORNL, CBNM, and JAERI transmission data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer code SIOB has been used to obtain least-squares simultaneous-sample shape fits to the recent 238U transmission data of ORNL, CBNM, and JAERI over the energy regions 1460 to 1820 eV, 2470 to 2740 eV, and 3820 to 4000 eV. The fits indicate that much of the systematic discrepancy in the published neutron widths from these data arose in the data analysis procedure. Except for the 3820- to 4000-eV JAERI data, the systematic differences in the resulting neutron widths from the present widths are larger than those contained in any existing evaluation. These fits were performed as part of the work for the NEANDC ad hoc 238U Discrepancy Task Force. 20 references

  20. The southern Hessen waste management task force - initial situation, objectives, state of development; Suedhessische Arbeitsgemeinschaft Abfallwirtschaft - Ausgangssituation, Zielsetzung und Entwicklungsstand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, H.J. [Stadt Darmstadt (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    In 1994, the rural districts of Darmstadt-Dieburg, Bergstrasse, Odenwald and Gross-Gerau in southern Hessen and the town of Darmstadt concluded a cooperation agreement permitting them to meet the future demands of the technical code on municipal waste and the `Kreislaufwirtschafts- und Abfallgesetz` (act concerning waste recycling and waste management). In order to formally prepare different forms of cooperation and to accompany corresponding preliminary investigations, the Suedhessische Arbeitsgemeinschaft Abfallwirtschaft (SAGA) was founded as a municipal task force. SAGA`s task is to debate common affairs in the waste management sector with a view to joint planning and joint facilities. In particular, the requirements of the technical code on municipal waste must be met. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Jahre 1994 haben die suedhessischen Landkreise Darmstadt-Dieburg, Bergstrasse, Odenwald, Gross-Gerau sowie die Stadt Darmstadt beschlossen, bezueglich der kuenftigen Anforderung der TA Siedlungsabfall und des Kreislaufwirtschafts- und Abfallgesetzes zu kooperieren. Zur formellen Vorbereitung von verschiedenen dann auszufuehrenden Kooperationsformen und zur Begleitung entsprechender Voruntersuchungen wurde die Suedhessische Arbeitsgemeinschaft Abfallwirtschaft (SAGA) als Kommunale Arbeitsgemeinschaft gegruendet. Aufgabe der Kommunalen Arbeitsgemeinschaft ist es, gemeinsam beruehrende Angelegenheiten im Abfallbereich unter dem Gesichtspunkt gemeinsamer Planung und gemeinsamer Einrichtungen zu beraten. Hierbei sollen insbesondere die Vorgaben der TA Siedlungsabfall beruecksichtigt werden. (orig.)

  1. Current Status and Recommendations for the Future of Research, Teaching, and Testing in the Biological Sciences of Radiation Oncology: Report of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force, Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report

  2. Current Status and Recommendations for the Future of Research, Teaching, and Testing in the Biological Sciences of Radiation Oncology: Report of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force, Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallner, Paul E., E-mail: pwallner@theabr.org [21st Century Oncology, LLC, and the American Board of Radiology, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Anscher, Mitchell S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Barker, Christopher A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bassetti, Michael [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bristow, Robert G. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Biophysics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cha, Yong I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Norton Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Formenti, Silvia C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University, New York, New York (United States); Graves, Edward E. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania (United States); Hei, Tom K. [Center for Radiation Research, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States); Kimmelman, Alec C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan (United States); Marples, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University, Oakland, California (United States); and others

    2014-01-01

    In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report.

  3. Sustainable energy for all. Technical report of task force 1 in support of the objective to achieve universal access to modern energy services by 2030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birol, Fatih [International Energy Agency, Paris (France); Brew-Hammond, Abeeku (University of Science and Technology (Ghana

    2012-04-15

    The UN Secretary General established the Sustainable Energy for All initiative in order to guide and support efforts to achieve universal access to modern energy, rapidly increase energy efficiency, and expand the use of renewable energies. Task forces were formed involving prominent energy leaders and experts from business, government, academia and civil society worldwide. The goal of the Task Forces is to inform the implementation of the initiative by identifying challenges and opportunities for achieving its objectives. This report contains the findings of Task Force One which is dedicated to the objective of achieving universal access to modern energy services by 2030. The report shows that universal energy access can be realized by 2030 with strong, focused actions set within a coordinated framework.

  4. Fuel safety criteria technical review - Results of OECD/CSNI/PWG2 Task Force on Fuel Safety Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advent of advanced fuel and core designs, the adoption of more aggressive operational modes and the implementation of more accurate (best estimate or statistical) design and analysis methods, there is a concern if safety margins have remained adequate. Most - if not all - of the currently existing safety criteria were established during the 60's and early 70's, and verified against experiments with fuel that was available at that time, mostly with unirradiated specimens. Verification was of course performed as designs progressed in later years, however mostly with the aim to be able to prove that these designs adequately complied with existing criteria, and not to establish new limits. The OECD/CSNI/PWG2 Task Force on Fuel Safety Criteria (TFFSC) was therefore given the mandate to technically review the existing fuel safety criteria, focusing on the 'new design' elements (new fuel and core design, cladding materials, manufacturing processes, high burnup, MOX, etc.) introduced by the industry. It should also identify if additional efforts may be required (experimental, analytical) to ensure that the basis for fuel safety criteria is adequate to address the relevant safety issues. In this report, fuel-related criteria are discussed without attempting to categorize them according to event type or risk significance. For each of these 20 criteria, we present a brief description of the criterion as it is used in several applications along with the rationale for having such a criterion. New design elements, such as different cladding materials, higher burnup, and the use of MOX fuels, can affect fuel-related margins and, in some cases, the criteria themselves. Some of the more important effects are mentioned in order to indicate whether the criteria need to be re-evaluated. The discussion may not cover all possible effects, but should be sufficient to identify those criteria that need to be addressed. A summary of these discussions is given in Section 7. As part

  5. An overview of the activities of the OECD/NEA Task Force on adapting computer codes in nuclear applications to parallel architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subsequent to the introduction of High Performance Computing in the developed countries, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) created the Task Force on Adapting Computer Codes in Nuclear Applications to Parallel Architectures (under the guidance of the Nuclear Science Committee's Working Party on Advanced Computing) to study the growth area in supercomputing and its applicability to the nuclear community's computer codes. The result has been four years of investigation for the Task Force in different subject fields - deterministic and Monte Carlo radiation transport, computational mechanics and fluid dynamics, nuclear safety, atmospheric models and waste management

  6. EFNS task force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippi, M; Agosta, F; Barkhof, F; Dubois, B; Fox, N C; Frisoni, G B; Jack, C R; Johannsen, P; Miller, B; Nestor, P J; Scheltens, P; Sorbi, S; Teipel, S; Thompson, P M; Wahlund, L-O

    2012-01-01

    The European Federation of the Neurological Societies (EFNS) guidelines on the use of neuroimaging in the diagnosis and management of dementia are designed to revise and expand previous EFNS recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to provide ...... overview of the evidence for the use of neuroimaging techniques in non-AD dementias, as well as general recommendations that apply to all types of dementia in clinical practice....

  7. ATLAS Metadata Task Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Costanzo, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Gadomski, S.; Jezequel, S.; Klimentov, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Malon, D.; Mornacchi, G.; Nemethy, P.; Pauly, T.; von der Schmitt, H.; Barberis, D.; Gianotti, F.; Hinchliffe, I.; Mapelli, L.; Quarrie, D.; Stapnes, S.

    2007-04-04

    This document provides an overview of the metadata, which are needed to characterizeATLAS event data at different levels (a complete run, data streams within a run, luminosity blocks within a run, individual events).

  8. The M 7.7 Tocopilla earthquake and its aftershock sequence: deployment of a Task Force local network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiesiak, M.; Eggert, S.; Woith, H.; Grosser, H.; Peyrat, S.; Vilotte, J.; Medina, E.; Ruch, J.; Walter, T.; Victor, P.; Barrientos, S.; Gonzalez, G.

    2008-05-01

    After the November 14, 2007 Tocopilla earthquake in northern Chile, a local network of 20 short period seismic stations, 5 strong motion instruments, 6 GPS stations and 3 extensometers has been installed in the fault plane area between Tocopilla and Antofagasta by the German Task Force for earthquakes (GFZ Potsdam). The hydrogeology group of the TF sampled 20 thermal water sources in the area of the El Tatio geyser field, located about 170 km E of the epicentre. In collaboration with the IPG Paris, 4 broad band stations were deployed at the northern end of the fault plane between Tocopilla and Maria Elena. Major targets of the investigations of the aftershock sequence are the segment boundary between the 1995 Antofagasta earthquake and the recent Tocopilla event, stress transfer between both successively ruptured subduction zone segments, structural properties of the fault plane, possible consequences for the northern adjacent Iquique segment, and the influence of earthquake seismic waves on the El Tatio hydrothermal field. In our presentation we would like to show first results on the spatial distribution of the aftershocks and discuss these in relation to studies we have made on the Antofagasta aftershock sequence.

  9. Recommendations concerning Tennessee's hazardous waste management policies by a task force representing generators, environmentalists, and other key constituencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four recommendations are proposed. 1) A Governor's Roundtable on Hazardous and Solid Wastes should be established to ensure that Tennessee have sound policies and plans for waste management, adequate waste treatment and disposal capacity, and the means to meet the October, 1989 deadline for certification of hazardous waste capacity. 2) Opportunities for early public information and participation in Tennessee's RCRA permitting process should be improved. 3) A Superfund Public Involvement Task Force should be appointed by the Commissioner of Health and Environment to find ways to ensure that a community affected by a Tennessee Superfund site has early and adequate opportunities for information and involvement. 4) Communications about hazardous waste issues should be improved by the appointment of a hazardous waste information officer, the establishment of a Speakers Bureau, the funding of the UT Center for Industrial Services' Hazardous Waste Extension Program, establishment of a crisis situation network of consultants for communities, and exploration of the possibility of Amnesty Days for household hazardous waste and for small-quantity generators waste

  10. Bringing gay and lesbian activism to the White House: Midge Costanza and the National Gay Task Force Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Doreen J; Boyd, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    In March 1977, President Carter's Assistant Margaret "Midge" Costanza made history by meeting with representatives from the National Gay Task Force (NGTF) to hear their grievances about discriminatory federal policies. The effects of the meeting were many, including changes in policies of the Bureau of Prisons and the Public Health Service. It also initiated policy discussions that would continue for decades and contributed to the incorporation of gay rights within the Democratic Party. Midge Costanza was fundamental to the process. It was her decision to hold the meeting and to advocate on behalf of the NGTF, and she bore many of the meeting's political costs. In this article we make use of Costanza's own papers and multiple interviews with her to closely analyze Costanza's role in the historic meeting. In addition to adding detail to its politics and policy impacts of the meeting, we also look at her complex motivations for holding such a controversial meeting. Costanza maintained until her death in 2010 that she was motivated by her feminism and overall commitment to social justice, rather than her own identity or experiences. PMID:23855947

  11. Indoor Air Quality In Maine Schools: Report of the Task Force To Examine the Establishment and Implementation of State Standards for Indoor Air Quality in Maine Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Judith

    Asserting that in Maine and across the nation, school buildings are becoming increasingly plagued with indoor air quality (IAQ) problems which contribute to a variety of illnesses in children and adults, this report from a Maine state legislative task force identifies appropriate policies and identifies actions necessary for the prevention and…

  12. Review and Response to the Final Report of the National Black Health Providers Task Force on High Blood Pressure Education and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    This report presents the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's (NHLBI) review of and response to the final report of the National Black Health Providers Task Force on High Blood Pressure Education and Control. The response includes a statement of NHLBI's involvement in health research, and descriptions of what steps can be taken to solve the…

  13. Nursing Education in High Blood Pressure Control. Report of the Task Force on the Role of Nursing in High Blood Pressure Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. High Blood Pressure Information Center.

    This curriculum guide on high blood pressure (hypertension) for nursing educators has five sections: (1) Introduction and Objectives provides information regarding the establishment and objectives of the National Task Force on the Role of Nursing in High Blood Pressure Control and briefly discusses nursing's role in hypertension control; (2) Goals…

  14. The clinicopathologic spectrum of focal cortical dysplasias: A consensus classification proposed by an ad hoc Task Force of the ILAE Diagnostic Methods Commission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Bluemcke; M. Thom; E.M.A. Aronica; D.D. Armstrong; H.V. Vinters; A. Palmini; T.S. Jacques; G. Avanzini; A.J. Barkovich; G. Battaglia; A. Becker; C. Cepeda; F. Cendes; N. Colombo; P. Crino; J.H. Cross; O. Delalande; F. Dubeau; J. Duncan; R. Guerrini; P. Kahane; G. Mathern; I. Najm; C. Ozkara; C. Raybaud; A. Represa; S.N. Roper; N. Salamon; A. Schulze-Bonhage; L. Tassi; A. Vezzani; R. Spreafico

    2011-01-01

    P>Purpose: Focal cortical dysplasias (FCD) are localized regions of malformed cerebral cortex and are very frequently associated with epilepsy in both children and adults. A broad spectrum of histopathology has been included in the diagnosis of FCD. An ILAE task force proposes an international conse

  15. Urban energy management today: Ten year compendium of UCETF programs. Products and expertise of the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force, 1979--1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The reports listed in this Overview summarize projects conducted through the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force by local government staff who have defined and implemented many of the energy strategies described above. Reports from their projects illustrate effective approaches to plan and implement these strategies, as well as software tools, surveys, and technical instruments valuable to other local government officials conducting similar projects.

  16. Selecting a Dynamic Simulation Modeling Method for Health Care Delivery Research—Part 2: Report of the ISPOR Dynamic Simulation Modeling Emerging Good Practices Task Force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Deborah A.; Burgos-Liz, Lina; IJzerman, M.J.; Crown, William; Padula, William V.; Wong, Peter K.; Pasupathy, Kalyan S.; Higashi, Mitchell K.; Osgood, Nathaniel D.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous report, the ISPOR Task Force on Dynamic Simulation Modeling Applications in Health Care Delivery Research Emerging Good Practices introduced the fundamentals of dynamic simulation modeling and identified the types of health care delivery problems for which dynamic simulation modeling c

  17. Business and International Education. A Report Submitted by the Task Force on Business and International Education to Government/Academic Interface Committee. Occasional Paper No.4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC. International Education Project.

    A study was undertaken of the educational needs of present and future managers of the large number of business firms in the United States that are or will be affected by economic and political environments abroad. The task force concluded that most firms, regardless of size and type of operation, will be affected by economic and political…

  18. Changes in ground reaction force during a rebound-jump task after hip strength training for single-sided ankle dorsiflexion restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Hitoshi; Someya, Fujiko

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral ankle sprains are common injuries suffered while playing sports, and abnormal forward- and inward-directed ground reaction force occurs during a jumping task. However, the influence of hip muscle strength training on jumping performance after ankle injuries has not been fully examined. This study thus examined changes in ground reaction force during a rebound-jump task after training to strengthen hip muscles. [Subjects and Methods] Ten of 30 female high school basketball players were assigned as subjects who showed a difference of 7 or more degrees in dorsiflexion ranges between the bilateral ankles. The subjects underwent 12 weeks of training to strengthen hip abductors and external rotators. Comparisons between before and after training were made regarding ground reaction force components, hip and knee joint angles, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction in leg muscles, and muscle strength of hip muscles during the rebound-jump task. [Results] After training, the subjects showed increased strength of external rotator muscles, increased percentage of maximum voluntary contraction in the gluteus medius muscle, decreased inward ground reaction force, and increased flexion angles of the hip and knee joints. [Conclusion] This study suggests that training to strengthen hip muscles may ameliorate the inward ground reaction force in athletes with ankle dorsiflexion restriction. PMID:27065513

  19. Analysis of the situation of the vacuum in FTU; Analisi della situazione del vuoto di FTU (Resoconto del lavoro svolto dalla task force)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessandrini, C.; Angelini, B.; Apicella, M.L.; Mazzitelli, G.; Pirani, S.; Zanza, V. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Energia

    1999-01-01

    To analyze the situation of the vacuum in the FTU tokamak, on 22/5/96 was set up a task force to identify the problem(s) and to settle the operative and cleaning procedures. The main actions of the task force were: leak tests, automatic procedure to monitor on line the state of the machine vacuum and an exhaustive analysis of the work done before. The task force reviewed the outgassing measurements of the plastic materials inserted into the machine and was decided to repeat the test on the thermocouples. The results pointed out that the thermocouples are a practically infinite reservoir of water. The outcome of the task force was a set of new procedures and recommendations during both the operation of FTU and the shutdown periods. FTU is now operating at more acceptable plasma purity. [Italiano] Il 22/5/96 fu costituita una Task Force (TF) per analizzare le cause della `non pulizia` di FTU e per identificare le nuove procedure da seguire per la pulizia della camera da vuoto. Le azioni che la TF intraprese furono: leak tests, monitoraggio continuo dello stato del vuoto e revisione critica del lavoro fatto precedentemente. Vennero poi analizzate delle misure fatte a suo tempo sui materiali presenti nella camera da vuoto di FTU e, nel caso delle termocoppie, si decise di ripetere il test. Da questa seconda prova emerse che i cilindretti di queste termocoppie sono delle riserve inesauribili di acqua che vengono alimentate da ogni riapertura della macchina. Il lavoro della TF si concluse con una serie di procedure e raccomandazioni, da seguire prima di ogni riapertura della macchina e durante le campagne sperimentali a macchina fredda; tali procedure tengono conto del fatto che negli anni e` aumentata la quantita` di materiali plastici presenti nella camera da vuoto, soprattutto nei ports. FTU sta attualmente operando in condizioni piu` accettabili di pulizia della camera.

  20. Investigating biological traces of traumatic stress in changing societies: challenges and directions from the ESTSS Task Force on Neurobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Thomaes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic stress can have severe consequences for both mental and physical health. Furthermore, both psychological and biological traces of trauma increase as a function of accumulating traumatic experiences. Neurobiological research may aid in limiting the impact of traumatic stress, by leading to advances in preventive and treatment interventions. To promote the possibility for clinical implementation of novel research findings, this brief review describes timely conceptual and methodological challenges and directions in neurobiological trauma research on behalf of the Task Force “Neurobiology of Traumatic Stress” of the European Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ESTSS. The most important conceptual challenges are the heterogeneity of disorders and existence of subtypes across diagnostic categories: differential latent profiles and trajectories regarding symptom expression and neural correlates are being unraveled; however, similar latent classes’ approaches for treatment response and neurobiological data remain scarce thus far. The key to improving the efficacy of currently available preventive interventions and treatments for trauma-related disorders lies in a better understanding and characterization of individual differences in response to trauma and interventions. This could lead to personalized treatment strategies for trauma-related disorders, based on objective information indicating whether individuals are expected to benefit from them. The most important methodological challenge identified here is the need for large consortia and meta-analyses or, rather, mega-analyses on existent data as a first step. In addition, large multicenter studies, combining novel methods for repeated sampling with more advanced statistical modeling techniques, such as machine learning, should aim to translate identified disease mechanisms into molecular blood-based biomarker combinations to predict disorder vulnerability and treatment responses.

  1. From 'D' to 'I': A critique of the current United States preventive services task force recommendation for testicular cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovito, Michael J; Manjelievskaia, Janna; Leone, James E; Lutz, Michael J; Nangia, Ajay

    2016-06-01

    In 2004, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) gave testicular cancer (TCa) screening a 'D' recommendation, discouraging the use of this preventive service. The USPSTF suggested that screening, inclusive of testicular self-examination (TSE) and clinician examination, does not reduce TCa mortality rates and that the high risk of false positives could serve as a detriment to patient quality of life. Others suggests that TCa screening is ineffective at detecting early-stage cases of TCa and readily highlights a lack of empirical evidence demonstrating said efficacy. These assertions, however, stand in stark contrast to the widely held support of TCa screening among practicing public health professionals, advocacy groups, and clinicians. In this present study, a review was conducted of the methods and processes used by the USPSTF in their 2011 reaffirmation of the 'D' grade recommendation. The evidence base and commentary offered as to why TSE, as part of the overall recommendation for TCa screening, was given a 'D' grade were analyzed for logical reasoning and methodological rigor. Considering the methodological flaws and the veritable lack of evidence needed to grant a conclusive recommendation, the question is raised if the current 'D' grade for TCa screening (i.e. discourage the use of said service) should be changed to an 'I' statement (i.e. the balance of benefits and harms is indeterminate). Therefore the purpose of this paper is to present the evidence of TCa screening in the context of efficacy and prevention in order for the field to reassess its relative value. PMID:27419037

  2. Stabilization of the total force in multi-finger pressing tasks studied with the ‘inverse piano’ technique

    OpenAIRE

    J R Martin; Budgeon, M.K.; Zatsiorsky, V.M.; Latash, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    When one finger changes its force, other fingers of the hand can show unintended force changes in the same direction (enslaving) and in the opposite direction (error compensation). We tested a hypothesis that externally imposed changes in finger force predominantly lead to error compensation effects in other fingers thus stabilizing the total force. A novel device, the “inverse piano”, was used to impose controlled displacements to one of the fingers over different magnitudes and at different...

  3. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 4, Health and Safety Plan (HSP); Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation report: Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

  4. Stabilization of the total force in multi-finger pressing tasks studied with the ‘inverse piano’ technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J.R.; Budgeon, M.K.; Zatsiorsky, V.M.; Latash, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    When one finger changes its force, other fingers of the hand can show unintended force changes in the same direction (enslaving) and in the opposite direction (error compensation). We tested a hypothesis that externally imposed changes in finger force predominantly lead to error compensation effects in other fingers thus stabilizing the total force. A novel device, the “inverse piano”, was used to impose controlled displacements to one of the fingers over different magnitudes and at different rates. Subjects (n =10) pressed with four fingers at a constant force level and then one of the fingers was unexpectedly raised. The subjects were instructed not to interfere with possible changes in the finger forces. Raising a finger caused an increase in its force and a drop in the force of the other three fingers. Overall, total force showed a small increase. Larger force drops were seen in neighbors of the raised finger (proximity effect). The results show that multi-finger force stabilizing synergies dominate during involuntary reactions to externally imposed finger force changes. Within the referent configuration hypothesis, the data suggest that the instruction “not to interfere” leads to adjustments of the referent coordinates of all the individual fingers. PMID:21450360

  5. Stabilization of the total force in multi-finger pressing tasks studied with the 'inverse piano' technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J R; Budgeon, M K; Zatsiorsky, V M; Latash, M L

    2011-06-01

    When one finger changes its force, other fingers of the hand can show unintended force changes in the same direction (enslaving) and in the opposite direction (error compensation). We tested a hypothesis that externally imposed changes in finger force predominantly lead to error compensation effects in other fingers thus stabilizing the total force. A novel device, the "inverse piano", was used to impose controlled displacements to one of the fingers over different magnitudes and at different rates. Subjects (n=10) pressed with four fingers at a constant force level and then one of the fingers was unexpectedly raised. The subjects were instructed not to interfere with possible changes in the finger forces. Raising a finger caused an increase in its force and a drop in the force of the other three fingers. Overall, total force showed a small increase. Larger force drops were seen in neighbors of the raised finger (proximity effect). The results showed that multi-finger force stabilizing synergies dominate during involuntary reactions to externally imposed finger force changes. Within the referent configuration hypothesis, the data suggest that the instruction "not to interfere" leads to adjustments of the referent coordinates of all the individual fingers. PMID:21450360

  6. GAO's Views on the Default Task Force's Recommendations for Reducing Default Costs in the Guaranteed Student Loan Program. Testimony before the Subcommittee on Postsecondary Education, Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainer, William J.

    This General Accounting Office (GAO) testimony before the Subcommittee on Postsecondary Education, Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives, concerns the findings of the task force that addressed the increasing costs of student loan defaults. The task force report is considered, generally, to provide additional incentives and…

  7. A definition and classification of status epilepticus--Report of the ILAE Task Force on Classification of Status Epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinka, Eugen; Cock, Hannah; Hesdorffer, Dale; Rossetti, Andrea O; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Shinnar, Shlomo; Shorvon, Simon; Lowenstein, Daniel H

    2015-10-01

    The Commission on Classification and Terminology and the Commission on Epidemiology of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) have charged a Task Force to revise concepts, definition, and classification of status epilepticus (SE). The proposed new definition of SE is as follows: Status epilepticus is a condition resulting either from the failure of the mechanisms responsible for seizure termination or from the initiation of mechanisms, which lead to abnormally, prolonged seizures (after time point t1 ). It is a condition, which can have long-term consequences (after time point t2 ), including neuronal death, neuronal injury, and alteration of neuronal networks, depending on the type and duration of seizures. This definition is conceptual, with two operational dimensions: the first is the length of the seizure and the time point (t1 ) beyond which the seizure should be regarded as "continuous seizure activity." The second time point (t2 ) is the time of ongoing seizure activity after which there is a risk of long-term consequences. In the case of convulsive (tonic-clonic) SE, both time points (t1 at 5 min and t2 at 30 min) are based on animal experiments and clinical research. This evidence is incomplete, and there is furthermore considerable variation, so these time points should be considered as the best estimates currently available. Data are not yet available for other forms of SE, but as knowledge and understanding increase, time points can be defined for specific forms of SE based on scientific evidence and incorporated into the definition, without changing the underlying concepts. A new diagnostic classification system of SE is proposed, which will provide a framework for clinical diagnosis, investigation, and therapeutic approaches for each patient. There are four axes: (1) semiology; (2) etiology; (3) electroencephalography (EEG) correlates; and (4) age. Axis 1 (semiology) lists different forms of SE divided into those with prominent motor

  8. Public comments and Task Force responses regarding the environmental survey of the reprocessing and waste management portions of the LWR fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains responses by the NRC Task Force to comments received on the report ''Environmental Survey of the Reprocessing and Waste Management Portions of the LWR Fuel Cycle'' (NUREG-0116). These responses are directed at all comments, inclding those received after the close of the comment period. Additional information on the environmental impacts of reprocessing and waste management which has either become available since the publication of NUREG-0116 or which adds requested clarification to the information in that document

  9. Interim report of the interagency coal export task force: draft for public comment. [Trade by country 1960-1979; general forecasting to 1985, 1990 and 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    The Interagency Coal Export Task Force was formed in the Spring of 1980 at the direction of the President, in support of the international efforts of the United States, encouraging the use of coal. Its purpose was to report on possible courses of action to increase United States steam coal exports in a manner consistent with other national policies, including our commitment to environmental protection. The Task Force assembled existing data, developed significant new information regarding the international coal market and undertook analyses of apparent problems underlying coal exports. The Task Force contributed to a public awareness of the fact that increased coal exports will serve both the domestic and international interests of the United States. Based upon extensive, independent field studies in Europe and the Far East, the Task Force concludes that there will be significant growth in world demand for steam coal. Such growth has already begun, has contributed to the almost seven-fold increase in United States overseas steam coal exports for 1990 over 1979, and is expected to continue beyond the end of this century. The growth in world steam coal trade projected in the report does not guarantee United States coal exporters a large or expanding share of the market. The United States' role depends on the buying strategies of the consuming countries, the policies and prices of competing exporters, and the actions taken by the United States to maintain reasonable prices, prompt delivery and dependable quality. Projections of United States steam coal exports, therefore, rest upon a number of highly uncertain factors which are discussed in some detail.

  10. Management of opioid use disorders among veterans in subacute rehab: Use of an interdisciplinary task force to address an emerging concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Kate L M; Sharma, Samata; Thurston, Joe; Sivashanker, Karthik; Chang, Grace H

    2016-01-01

    There is both rapidly growing need, and limited evidence-based guidelines, for the management of opioid use disorders in subacute rehab and other nonaddiction medical settings. Following 2 unintentional opioid overdoses within the Community Living Center (CLC), a VA (Veterans Administration) subacute rehab setting, an interdisciplinary CLC Addictions Task Force was created to address a critical issue: how to best meet the combined neuropsychiatric and medical needs of the opiate use disorder patient through a multifaceted treatment approach. The goals of the task force were to develop and institute educational initiatives for providers; create patient care guidelines; increase safety on the unit; improve provider confidence when caring for this high-risk population; and mitigate the risk of unintentional overdose. The task force divided into 4 working groups to meet these aims. Process and outcomes are discussed. We found that in-services by addiction specialists improved clinician comfort in caring for this high-risk patient group. Specific areas that yielded the greatest clinician satisfaction ratings included didactics on how to identify at-risk patients and techniques on how to manage the patient in a general rehab setting. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach, and an iterative process, at all stages was critical to the success of the CLC Addictions Task Force, as it improved buy-in and motivation from all disciplines. Improvements have been made to enhance patient safety, improve communication amongst providers, and provide a foundation to improve patient outcomes. Our preliminary work to enhance the identification and management of opioid use disorders at our CLC is an important first step towards a standardized curriculum that could be applied to other VA and non-VA subacute rehab settings. PMID:26672391

  11. DESIGNING DRUG TRIALS FOR SARCOPENIA IN OLDER ADULTS WITH HIP FRACTURE - A TASK FORCE FROM THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ONFRAILTY AND SARCOPENIA RESEARCH (ICFSR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellas, B; Fielding, R; Miller, R; Rolland, Y; Bhasin, S; Magaziner, J; Bischoff-Ferrari, H

    2014-01-01

    In May 2012, a Sarcopenia Consensus Summit was convened by the Foundation of the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), National Institute of Aging (NIA), and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA); and co-sponsored by five pharmaceutical companies. At this summit, sarcopenia experts from around the world worked to develop agreement on a working definition of sarcopenia, building on the work of previous efforts to generate a consensus. With the ultimate goal of improving function and independence in individuals with sarcopenia, the Task Force focused its attention on people at greatly increased risk of muscle atrophy as a consequence of hip fracture. The rationale for looking at this population is that since hip fracture is a recognized condition, there is a clear regulatory path forward for developing interventions. Moreover, patients with hip fracture may provide an appropriate population to advance understanding of sarcopenia, for example helping to define diagnostic criteria, develop biomarkers, understand the mechanisms that underlie the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength, and identify endpoints for clinical trials that are reliable, objective, and clinically meaningful. Task Force members agreed that progress in treating sarcopenia will require strengthening of partnerships between academia, industry, and government agencies, and across continents to reach consensus on diagnostic criteria, optimization of clinical trials design, and identification of improved treatment and preventive strategies. In this report, the main results of the Task Force discussion are presented. PMID:26380231

  12. Government agencies and alternative environmental conflict management: the Michigan Oil and Gas Leasing Task Force as a dispute resolution process. (Volumes I and II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesnick, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    Environmental decision making by government agencies is typically controversial and the focal point for many environmental disputes. New, alternative environmental conflict management processes that emphasize negotiation and problem-solving, hold the potential to more effectively manage these complex disputes. However, because these processes are relatively new, little is known about the actual advantages and disadvantages of participating. Using six conceptual dimensions and twelve hypotheses, this dissertation examined the impacts of participation on an agency's: organizational structures and processes; ability to formulate and implement policy; and decision making authority. Data were collected from participants and observers of the Oil and Gas Leasing Task Force conducted by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR). This was a two-year, policy-level process initiated by the agency to resolve internal and external disputes over the state's leasing policy. The seventeen member Task Force of DNR staff, environmentalists and oil and gas industry representatives; revised the state's oil and gas lease; developed and implemented administrative rules; and revised the DNR's environmental field review process. Data analysis showed that the Task Force resolved internal differences between DNR divisions over the goals of the oil and gas program.

  13. Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis for Health Care Decision Making--Emerging Good Practices: Report 2 of the ISPOR MCDA Emerging Good Practices Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Kevin; IJzerman, Maarten; Thokala, Praveen; Baltussen, Rob; Boysen, Meindert; Kaló, Zoltán; Lönngren, Thomas; Mussen, Filip; Peacock, Stuart; Watkins, John; Devlin, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Health care decisions are complex and involve confronting trade-offs between multiple, often conflicting objectives. Using structured, explicit approaches to decisions involving multiple criteria can improve the quality of decision making. A set of techniques, known under the collective heading, multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA), are useful for this purpose. In 2014, ISPOR established an Emerging Good Practices Task Force. The task force's first report defined MCDA, provided examples of its use in health care, described the key steps, and provided an overview of the principal methods of MCDA. This second task force report provides emerging good-practice guidance on the implementation of MCDA to support health care decisions. The report includes: a checklist to support the design, implementation and review of an MCDA; guidance to support the implementation of the checklist; the order in which the steps should be implemented; illustrates how to incorporate budget constraints into an MCDA; provides an overview of the skills and resources, including available software, required to implement MCDA; and future research directions. PMID:27021745

  14. Oak Ridge Reservation volume I. Y-12 mercury task force files: A guide to record series of the Department of Energy and its contractors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this guide is to describe each of the series of records identified in the documents of the Y-12 Mercury Task Force Files that pertain to the use of mercury in the separation and enrichment of lithium isotopes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of DOE's Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, which seeks to verify and conduct inventories of epidemiologic and health-related records at various DOE and DOE contractor sites. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI's role in the project. Specific attention will be given to the history of the DOE-Oak Ridge Reservation, the development of the Y-12 Plant, and the use of mercury in the production of nuclear weapons during the 1950s and early 1960s. This introduction provides background information on the Y-12 Mercury Task Force Files, an assembly of documents resulting from the 1983 investigation of the Mercury Task Force into the effects of mercury toxicity upon workplace hygiene and worker health, the unaccountable loss of mercury, and the impact of those losses upon the environment. This introduction also explains the methodology used in the selection and inventory of these record series. Other topics include the methodology used to produce this guide, the arrangement of the detailed record series descriptions, and information concerning access to the collection

  15. Oak Ridge Reservation volume I. Y-12 mercury task force files: A guide to record series of the Department of Energy and its contractors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-17

    The purpose of this guide is to describe each of the series of records identified in the documents of the Y-12 Mercury Task Force Files that pertain to the use of mercury in the separation and enrichment of lithium isotopes at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, which seeks to verify and conduct inventories of epidemiologic and health-related records at various DOE and DOE contractor sites. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project. Specific attention will be given to the history of the DOE-Oak Ridge Reservation, the development of the Y-12 Plant, and the use of mercury in the production of nuclear weapons during the 1950s and early 1960s. This introduction provides background information on the Y-12 Mercury Task Force Files, an assembly of documents resulting from the 1983 investigation of the Mercury Task Force into the effects of mercury toxicity upon workplace hygiene and worker health, the unaccountable loss of mercury, and the impact of those losses upon the environment. This introduction also explains the methodology used in the selection and inventory of these record series. Other topics include the methodology used to produce this guide, the arrangement of the detailed record series descriptions, and information concerning access to the collection.

  16. Comparisons of an open-ended vs. forced-choice 'mind reading' task: implications for measuring perspective-taking and emotion recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy G Cassels

    Full Text Available Perspective-taking and emotion recognition are essential for successful social development and have been the focus of developmental research for many years. Although the two abilities often overlap, they are distinct and our understanding of these abilities critically rests upon the efficacy of existing measures. Lessons from the literature differentiating recall versus recognition memory tasks led us to hypothesize that an open-ended emotion recognition measure would be less reliant on compensatory strategies and hence a more specific measure of emotion recognition abilities than a forced-choice task. To this end, we compared an open-ended version of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task with the original forced-choice version in two studies: 118 typically-developing 4- to 8-year-olds (Study 1 and 139 5- to 12-year-olds; 85 typically-developing and 54 with learning disorders (Study 2. We found that the open-ended version of the task was a better predictor of empathy and more reliably discriminated typically-developing children from those with learning disorders. As a whole, the results suggest that the open-ended version is a more sensitive measure of emotion recognition specifically.

  17. 高原抗震救灾任务部队食品卫生保障%Food hygiene security for earthquake relief task forces on plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王涛; 刘兵; 杨得涛; 田原

    2011-01-01

    总结高原震区任务部队食品卫生安全保障经验,为展行多样化军事任务后勤保障提供依据.在现场卫生学调查高原灾区环境特点、灾情和任务部队食品卫生现状的基础上,分析确定任务部队食品卫生保障关健控制点,采取针对性综合保障措施.主要做法是:(1)加强宣传教育,普及高原所致疾患和鼠疫等自然疫源性疾病的防治和食品卫生知识,提高广大官兵的自我防病能力;(2)提高认识,确保任务部队食品卫生监督质量;(3)明确责任,逐级负责,使食品卫生监督主动化;(4)结合高原环境特点与任务部队实际,制定高原震区任务部队食品卫生保障制度;(5)严把食品采购、运输、加工和储藏关;(6)建立军地联动的食品卫生监督应急机制.基于以上综合保障措施,震区任务部队未发生任何食品卫生安全相关事件.结合高原环境医学特点和任务部队实际情况,有针对性地采取食品卫生保降措施,可确保任务部队食品卫生安全.%To summarize the experiences on the assurance of food hygiene security for the task forces in plateau earthquake areas in order to provide basis for health and logistics support of military troops carrying out diversified tasks.On the basis of food hygiene survey in the disaster areas and the surveillance on earthquake relief task forces, critical control points for food hygiene were identified.A comprehensive surveillance was pertinently done as follows: ( 1 ) Improving the knowledge on preventing altitude diseases and natural focus diseases (such as plague).the ability of self protection was improved generally through propagation and education; (2) Improving the knowledge on the importance of food hygiene for earthquake relief task forces to ensure the quality of food hygiene surveillance; (3) Clarifying responsibilities and undertaking responsibilities level by level to make the surveillance activated; (4) Combining the plateau

  18. Evaluation of modelling of the TRUE-1 radially converging tests with sorbing tracers. The Aespoe task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Tasks 4E and 4F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elert, M.; Svensson, Haakan [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-05-01

    The Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes is a forum for the international organisations supporting the Aespoe HRL Project. The purpose of the Task Force is to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Task 4 of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force consists of modelling exercises in support of the TRUE-1 tracer tests. In this report, the modelling work performed within Tasks 4E and 4F is evaluated, which comprised predictive modelling of the tracer tests (STT-1, STT-1b and STT-2) performed within the TRUE-1 project using sorbing and non-sorbing tracers. The tests were made between packed off boreholes penetrating a water-conducting geological feature with a simple structure (Feature A). Nine modelling teams representing eight organisations have performed predictive modelling of the tracer tests using different modelling approaches and models. The modelling groups were initially given data from the site characterisation, data from preliminary tracer tests performed with non-sorbing tracers and data on the experimental set-up of the sorbing tracer tests. Based on this information, model predictions were made of drawdown, tracer mass recovery and tracer breakthrough. For the predictions of the STT-1b and STT-2 tests results from previous tracer tests with sorbing tracer were also available. The predictions of the sorbing tracer breakthrough in the initial tracer test (STT-1) generally underestimated the breakthrough time, suggesting the need to include additional processes and evaluate the application of the laboratory data. As a result of model calibration and modification the predictions were considerably improved for the latter tracer tests (STT-1b and STT-2). Task 4E and 4F have proved to be very valuable in increasing the understanding of non-sorbing tracer transport in fractured rock. There is a general consensus on the major processes responsible for

  19. Evaluation of modelling of the TRUE-1 radially converging tests with sorbing tracers. The Aespoe task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Tasks 4E and 4F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Aespoe Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport of Solutes is a forum for the international organisations supporting the Aespoe HRL Project. The purpose of the Task Force is to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Task 4 of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force consists of modelling exercises in support of the TRUE-1 tracer tests. In this report, the modelling work performed within Tasks 4E and 4F is evaluated, which comprised predictive modelling of the tracer tests (STT-1, STT-1b and STT-2) performed within the TRUE-1 project using sorbing and non-sorbing tracers. The tests were made between packed off boreholes penetrating a water-conducting geological feature with a simple structure (Feature A). Nine modelling teams representing eight organisations have performed predictive modelling of the tracer tests using different modelling approaches and models. The modelling groups were initially given data from the site characterisation, data from preliminary tracer tests performed with non-sorbing tracers and data on the experimental set-up of the sorbing tracer tests. Based on this information, model predictions were made of drawdown, tracer mass recovery and tracer breakthrough. For the predictions of the STT-1b and STT-2 tests results from previous tracer tests with sorbing tracer were also available. The predictions of the sorbing tracer breakthrough in the initial tracer test (STT-1) generally underestimated the breakthrough time, suggesting the need to include additional processes and evaluate the application of the laboratory data. As a result of model calibration and modification the predictions were considerably improved for the latter tracer tests (STT-1b and STT-2). Task 4E and 4F have proved to be very valuable in increasing the understanding of non-sorbing tracer transport in fractured rock. There is a general consensus on the major processes responsible for

  20. D1 and D2 Inhibitions of the Soleus H-Reflex Are Differentially Modulated during Plantarflexion Force and Position Tasks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Henrique Magalhães

    Full Text Available Presynaptic inhibition (PSI has been shown to modulate several neuronal pathways of functional relevance by selectively gating the connections between sensory inputs and spinal motoneurons, thereby regulating the contribution of the stretch reflex circuitry to the ongoing motor activity. In this study, we investigated whether a differential regulation of Ia afferent inflow by PSI may be associated with the performance of two types of plantarflexion sensoriomotor tasks. The subjects (in a seated position controlled either: 1 the force level exerted by the foot against a rigid restraint (force task, FT; or 2 the angular position of the ankle when sustaining inertial loads (position task, PT that required the same level of muscle activation observed in FT. Subjects were instructed to maintain their force/position at target levels set at ~10% of maximum isometric voluntary contraction for FT and 90° for PT, while visual feedback of the corresponding force/position signals were provided. Unconditioned H-reflexes (i.e. control reflexes and H-reflexes conditioned by electrical pulses applied to the common peroneal nerve with conditioning-to-test intervals of 21 ms and 100 ms (corresponding to D1 and D2 inhibitions, respectively were evoked in a random fashion. A significant main effect for the type of the motor task (FT vs PT (p = 0.005, η2p = 0.603 indicated that PTs were undertaken with lower levels of Ia PSI converging onto the soleus motoneuron pool. Additionally, a significant interaction between the type of inhibition (D1 vs D2 and the type of motor task (FT vs PT (p = 0.038, η2p = 0.395 indicated that D1 inhibition was associated with a significant reduction in PSI levels from TF to TP (p = 0.001, η2p = 0.731, whereas no significant difference between the tasks was observed for D2 inhibition (p = 0.078, η2p = 0.305. These results suggest that D1 and D2 inhibitions of the soleus H-reflex are differentially modulated during the performance of

  1. D1 and D2 Inhibitions of the Soleus H-Reflex Are Differentially Modulated during Plantarflexion Force and Position Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Fernando Henrique; Elias, Leonardo Abdala; da Silva, Cristiano Rocha; de Lima, Felipe Fava; de Toledo, Diana Rezende; Kohn, André Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Presynaptic inhibition (PSI) has been shown to modulate several neuronal pathways of functional relevance by selectively gating the connections between sensory inputs and spinal motoneurons, thereby regulating the contribution of the stretch reflex circuitry to the ongoing motor activity. In this study, we investigated whether a differential regulation of Ia afferent inflow by PSI may be associated with the performance of two types of plantarflexion sensoriomotor tasks. The subjects (in a seated position) controlled either: 1) the force level exerted by the foot against a rigid restraint (force task, FT); or 2) the angular position of the ankle when sustaining inertial loads (position task, PT) that required the same level of muscle activation observed in FT. Subjects were instructed to maintain their force/position at target levels set at ~10% of maximum isometric voluntary contraction for FT and 90° for PT, while visual feedback of the corresponding force/position signals were provided. Unconditioned H-reflexes (i.e. control reflexes) and H-reflexes conditioned by electrical pulses applied to the common peroneal nerve with conditioning-to-test intervals of 21 ms and 100 ms (corresponding to D1 and D2 inhibitions, respectively) were evoked in a random fashion. A significant main effect for the type of the motor task (FT vs PT) (p = 0.005, η2p = 0.603) indicated that PTs were undertaken with lower levels of Ia PSI converging onto the soleus motoneuron pool. Additionally, a significant interaction between the type of inhibition (D1 vs D2) and the type of motor task (FT vs PT) (p = 0.038, η2p = 0.395) indicated that D1 inhibition was associated with a significant reduction in PSI levels from TF to TP (p = 0.001, η2p = 0.731), whereas no significant difference between the tasks was observed for D2 inhibition (p = 0.078, η2p = 0.305). These results suggest that D1 and D2 inhibitions of the soleus H-reflex are differentially modulated during the performance of

  2. School Boards -- Losing Power or Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynia, Bob

    1973-01-01

    The authority of school boards is being eroded by teacher militancy, administrative professionalism, and technology. Boards are performing a legal rather than a deliberative function. Court decisions regarding due process are forcing important adjustments in board power. (Author/WM)

  3. Evaluation of modelling of the TRUE-1 radially converging and dipole tests with conservative tracers. The Aespoe task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes. Tasks 4C and 4D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Aespoe task force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes' is a forum for the international organisations supporting the Aespoe HRL Project. The purpose of the Task Force is to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Task 4 of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force consists of modelling exercises in support of the TRUE-1 tracer tests. In this report, the modelling work performed within Tasks 4C and 4D is evaluated, which comprised predictive modelling of the radially converging tracer tests and dipole tracer tests performed within the TRUE-1 tests using non-sorbing tracers. The tests were performed between packed off boreholes penetrating a water-conducting geological feature with a simple structure (Feature A). These tests are to a great extent preparatory steps for the subsequent tests with sorbing radioactive tracers. In Tasks 4E and 4F of the Aespoe Modelling Task Force predictive modelling of the sorbing tracer tests is performed. Eight modelling teams representing seven organisations have performed predictive modelling using different modelling approaches and models. The modelling groups were initially given data from the site characterisation and data on the experimental set-up of the tracer tests. Based on this information model predictions were performed of drawdown, tracer mass recovery and tracer breakthrough. The performed predictions shows that the concept of Feature A as a singular well-connected feature with limited connectivity to its surroundings is quite adequate for predictions of drawdown in boreholes and conservative tracer breakthrough. Reasonable estimates were obtained using relatively simple models. However, more elaborate models with calibration or conditioning of transmissivities and transport apertures are required for more accurate predictions. The general flow and transport processes are well understood, but the methodology to derive the

  4. Muscle Fatigue in the Three Heads of the Triceps Brachii During a Controlled Forceful Hand Grip Task with Full Elbow Extension Using Surface Electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Asraf; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Badlishah Ahmad, R.; Ahamed, Nizam Uddin; Islam, Anamul; Sundaraj, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the time to fatigue and compare the fatiguing condition among the three heads of the triceps brachii muscle using surface electromyography during an isometric contraction of a controlled forceful hand grip task with full elbow extension. Eighteen healthy subjects concurrently performed a single 90 s isometric contraction of a controlled forceful hand grip task and full elbow extension. Surface electromyographic signals from the lateral, long and medial heads of the triceps brachii muscle were recorded during the task for each subject. The changes in muscle activity among the three heads of triceps brachii were measured by the root mean square values for every 5 s period throughout the total contraction period. The root mean square values were then analysed to determine the fatiguing condition for the heads of triceps brachii muscle. Muscle fatigue in the long, lateral, and medial heads of the triceps brachii started at 40 s, 50 s, and 65 s during the prolonged contraction, respectively. The highest fatiguing rate was observed in the long head (slope = −2.863), followed by the medial head (slope = −2.412) and the lateral head (slope = −1.877) of the triceps brachii muscle. The results of the present study concurs with previous findings that the three heads of the triceps brachii muscle do not work as a single unit, and the fiber type/composition is different among the three heads. PMID:26240650

  5. Substitution of prescribing tasks from doctors to nurses: an international expert survey on forces, conditions and jurisdictional control.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Francke, A.L.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Dijk, L. van

    2011-01-01

    Background: Nurse prescribing is highly relevant in the current climate of cost containment and task substitution in health care, and is being introduced in a growing number of countries. However, international comparisons are scarce. This survey aims to provide a comprehensive and recent overview o

  6. Summary of recommendations for the management of infantile seizures: Task Force Report for the ILAE Commission of Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmshurst, Jo M; Gaillard, William D; Vinayan, Kollencheri Puthenveettil; Tsuchida, Tammy N; Plouin, Perrine; Van Bogaert, Patrick; Carrizosa, Jaime; Elia, Maurizio; Craiu, Dana; Jovic, Nebojsa J; Nordli, Doug; Hirtz, Deborah; Wong, Virginia; Glauser, Tracy; Mizrahi, Eli M; Cross, J Helen

    2015-08-01

    Evidence-based guidelines, or recommendations, for the management of infants with seizures are lacking. A Task Force of the Commission of Pediatrics developed a consensus document addressing diagnostic markers, management interventions, and outcome measures for infants with seizures. Levels of evidence to support recommendations and statements were assessed using the American Academy of Neurology Guidelines and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. The report contains recommendations for different levels of care, noting which would be regarded as standard care, compared to optimal care, or "state of the art" interventions. The incidence of epilepsy in the infantile period is the highest of all age groups (strong evidence), with epileptic spasms the largest single subgroup and, in the first 2 years of life, febrile seizures are the most commonly occurring seizures. Acute intervention at the time of a febrile seizure does not alter the risk for subsequent epilepsy (class 1 evidence). The use of antipyretic agents does not alter the recurrence rate (class 1 evidence), and there is no evidence to support initiation of regular antiepileptic drugs for simple febrile seizures (class 1 evidence). Infants with abnormal movements whose routine electroencephalography (EEG) study is not diagnostic, would benefit from video-EEG analysis, or home video to capture events (expert opinion, level U recommendation). Neuroimaging is recommended at all levels of care for infants presenting with epilepsy, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) recommended as the standard investigation at tertiary level (level A recommendation). Genetic screening should not be undertaken at primary or secondary level care (expert opinion). Standard care should permit genetic counseling by trained personal at all levels of care (expert opinion). Genetic evaluation for Dravet syndrome, and other infantile-onset epileptic encephalopathies, should be available

  7. Substitution of prescribing tasks from doctors to nurses: an international expert survey on forces, conditions and jurisdictional control.

    OpenAIRE

    Kroezen, M.; Francke, A.L.; Groenewegen, P. P.; Van Dijk, L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Nurse prescribing is highly relevant in the current climate of cost containment and task substitution in health care, and is being introduced in a growing number of countries. However, international comparisons are scarce. This survey aims to provide a comprehensive and recent overview of the organization of nurse prescribing internationally and the ensuing division of urisdictional control between the medical and nursing professions. Moreover, this study pays attention to the for...

  8. A workflow task force affects emergency physician compliance for point-of-care ultrasound documentation and billing

    OpenAIRE

    Lewiss, Resa E; Cook, Jessica; Sauler, Allison; Avitabile, Nicholas; Kaban, Nicole L.; Rabrich, Jeffrey; Saul, Turandot; Siadecki, Sebastian D.; Wiener, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Background Emergency point-of-care ultrasound (POC u/s) is an example of a health information technology that improves patient care and time to correct diagnosis. POC u/s examinations should be documented, as they comprise an integral component of physician decision making. Incomplete documentation prevents coding, billing and physician group compensation for ultrasound-guided procedures and patient care. We aimed to assess the effect of directed education and personal feedback through a task...

  9. NSC-WPFC task force on potential benefits and impacts of advanced fuel cycles with actinide partitioning and transmutation (WPFC/TFPT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been performed by a Task Force within the Working Party on Scientific Issues of the Fuel Cycle (WPFC) of the OECD NEA Nuclear Science Committee with the objective to gather and analyze results of different studies performed to assess the potential impact of P and T on different types of repositories in different licensing and regulatory environments. The present paper summarizes the approach and the main finding of that study and reviews the extent to which P and T will impact geological disposal depending on the disposal environment and the details of the P and T approach. (author)

  10. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, December 1990--February 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, April--June 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiedemann, H.A. (ed.) (USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (USA))

    1991-03-01

    The Oil Implementation Task Force was appointed to implement the US DOE's new oil research program directed toward increasing domestic oil production by expanded research on near- or mid-term enhanced oil recovery methods. An added priority is to preserve access to reservoirs that have the largest potential for oil recovery, but that are threatened by the large number of wells abandoned each year. This report describes the progress of research activities in the following areas: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery; resource assessment; microbial technology; geoscience technology; and environmental technology. (CK)

  11. Public comments and Task Force responses regarding the environmental survey of the reprocessing and waste management portions of the LWR fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-03-01

    This document contains responses by the NRC Task Force to comments received on the report ''Environmental Survey of the Reprocessing and Waste Management Portions of the LWR Fuel Cycle'' (NUREG-0116). These responses are directed at all comments, inclding those received after the close of the comment period. Additional information on the environmental impacts of reprocessing and waste management which has either become available since the publication of NUREG-0116 or which adds requested clarification to the information in that document.

  12. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, July--September 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiedemann, H.A. (ed.) (USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (USA))

    1991-05-01

    The report contains a general introduction and background to DOE's revised National Energy Strategy Advanced Oil Recovery Program and activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; a detailed synopsis of the symposium, including technical presentations, comments and suggestions; a section of technical information on deltaic reservoirs; and appendices containing a comprehensive listing of references keyed to general deltaic and geological aspects of reservoirs and those relevant to six selected deltaic plays. Enhanced recovery processes include chemical floodings, gas displacement, thermal recovery, geoscience, and microbial recovery.

  13. Dynamic Transmission Modeling : A Report of the ISPOR-SMDM Modeling Good Research Practices Task Force Working Group-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitman, Richard; Fisman, David; Zaric, Gregory S.; Postma, Maarten; Kretzschmar, Mirjam; Edmunds, John; Brisson, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The transmissible nature of communicable diseases is what sets them apart from other diseases modeled by health economists. The probability of a susceptible individual becoming infected at any one point in time (the force of infection) is related to the number of infectious individuals in the popula

  14. Dynamic Transmission Modeling : A Report of the ISPOR-SMDM Modeling Good Research Practices Task Force-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitman, Richard; Fisman, David; Zaric, Gregory S.; Postma, Maarten; Kretzschmar, Mirjam; Edmunds, John; Brisson, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The transmissible nature of communicable diseases is what sets them apart from other diseases modeled by health economists. The probability of a susceptible individual becoming infected at any one point in time (the force of infection) is related to the number of infectious individuals in the popula

  15. Dynamic transmission modeling: A report of the ISPOR-SMDM modeling good research practices task force-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitman, Richard; Fisman, David; Zaric, Gregory S.; Postma, Maarten; Kretzschmar, Mirjam; Edmunds, John; Brisson, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The transmissible nature of communicable diseases is what sets them apart from other diseases modeled by health economists. The probability of a susceptible individual becoming infected at any one point in time (the force of infection) is related to the number of infectious individuals in the popula

  16. Dynamic transmission modeling: a report of the ISPOR-SMDM Modeling Good Research Practices Task Force Working Group-5.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitman, Richard; Fisman, David; Zaric, Gregory S; Postma, Maarten; Kretzschmar, Mirjam; Edmunds, John; Brisson, Marc; ISPOR-SMDM Modeling Good Research Practices Task Force, [No Value

    2012-01-01

    The transmissible nature of communicable diseases is what sets them apart from other diseases modeled by health economists. The probability of a susceptible individual becoming infected at any one point in time (the force of infection) is related to the number of infectious individuals in the popula

  17. European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society Guideline on management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: Report of a joint task force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society - First Revision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.Y.K. van den Bergh; R.D.M. Hadden; P. Bouche; D.R. Cornblath; A. Hahn; I. Illa; C.L. Koski; J.M. Leger; E. Nobile-Orazio; J. Pollard; C. Sommer; P.A. van Doorn; I.N. van Schaik

    2010-01-01

    Recommendations: The Task Force agreed on Good Practice Points to define clinical and electrophysiological diagnostic criteria for CIDP with or without concomitant diseases and investigations to be considered. The principal treatment recommendations were: (i) intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) (Recom

  18. Sustainable energy for all. Technical report of task force 2 in support of doubling the global rate of energy efficiency improvement and doubling the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix by 2030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakicenovic, Nebojsa [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis and Vienna University of Technology (Austria); Kammen, Daniel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jewell, Jessica [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (Austria)

    2012-04-15

    The UN Secretary General established the Sustainable Energy for All initiative in order to guide and support efforts to achieve universal access to modern energy, rapidly increase energy efficiency, and expand the use of renewable energies. Task forces were formed involving prominent energy leaders and experts from business, government, academia and civil society worldwide. The goal of the Task Forces is to inform the implementation of the initiative by identifying challenges and opportunities for achieving its objectives. This report contains the findings of Task Force Two which is dedicated energy efficiency and renewable energy objectives. The report shows that doubling the rate of energy efficiency improvements and doubling the share of energy from renewable sources by 2030 is challenging but feasible if sufficient actions are implemented. Strong and well-informed government policies as well as extensive private investment should focus on the high impact areas identified by the task force.

  19. Promoting oral health: interventions for preventing dental caries, oral and pharyngeal cancers, and sports-related craniofacial injuries. A report on recommendations of the task force on community preventive services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-30

    The Task Force on Community Preventive Services (the Task Force) has conducted systematic reviews of the evidence of effectiveness of selected population-based interventions to prevent and control dental caries (tooth decay), oral (mouth) and pharyngeal (throat) cancers, and sports-related craniofacial injuries. The Task Force strongly recommends community water fluoridation and school-based or school-linked pit and fissure sealant delivery programs for prevention and control of dental caries. Using the rules of evidence it has established, the Task Force found insufficient evidence of effectiveness or ineffectiveness of the remaining interventions reviewed. Therefore, the Task Force makes no recommendation for or against use of statewide or communitywide sealant promotion programs, population-based interventions for early detection of precancers and cancers, or population-based interventions to encourage use of helmets, facemasks, and mouthguards to reduce oral-facial trauma in contact sports. The Task Force's finding of insufficient evidence indicates the need for more research on intervention effectiveness. Until the results of such research become available, readers are encouraged to judge the usefulness of these interventions by other criteria. This report presents additional information regarding the recommendations, briefly describes how the reviews were conducted, and provides information designed to help apply the strongly recommended interventions locally. PMID:11770576

  20. Red River flooding, short-term measures : interim report to the International Red River Basin Task Force to the International Joint Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1997 flood of the Red River Basin was one of the worst in recorded history. The basin covers 45,000 square miles and includes portions of South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota and Manitoba. This report of a special task force provides an overview of the environmental impacts of the 1997 flood and recommends a series of strategies to prevent or reduce future flood damage in the Basin. For example, within Manitoba, more than 550 containers that held hazardous materials were retrieved from the Red River. The contents of the containers which included propane, heating fuel, petroleum products, fire-fighting foam, tar, alcohol, solvents, corrosive liquids, polyester resin, paint, and pesticides, made their way into the floodwaters. Estimates of the amount of fuel oil that spilled in Manitoba are not available, but some 15,000 gallons of gasoline spilled from service stations in Breckenridge, Minnesota. The precursors that lead to the severe flooding in 1997 included heavy precipitation and higher than average temperatures that created less than ideal melt conditions. Since 1989, weekly maps of snow and water in the Canadian prairies have been produced because knowledge of the spatial distribution and amount of snow cover during the winter is important for forecasting spring water supply conditions. The Task Force made 40 recommendations that should be initiated within the short term. One of the recommendations was to remove or secure hazardous materials stored in the flood plain. 3 tabs., 4 figs

  1. Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis for Health Care Decision Making-An Introduction: Report 1 of the ISPOR MCDA Emerging Good Practices Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thokala, Praveen; Devlin, Nancy; Marsh, Kevin; Baltussen, Rob; Boysen, Meindert; Kalo, Zoltan; Longrenn, Thomas; Mussen, Filip; Peacock, Stuart; Watkins, John; Ijzerman, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    Health care decisions are complex and involve confronting trade-offs between multiple, often conflicting, objectives. Using structured, explicit approaches to decisions involving multiple criteria can improve the quality of decision making and a set of techniques, known under the collective heading multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA), are useful for this purpose. MCDA methods are widely used in other sectors, and recently there has been an increase in health care applications. In 2014, ISPOR established an MCDA Emerging Good Practices Task Force. It was charged with establishing a common definition for MCDA in health care decision making and developing good practice guidelines for conducting MCDA to aid health care decision making. This initial ISPOR MCDA task force report provides an introduction to MCDA - it defines MCDA; provides examples of its use in different kinds of decision making in health care (including benefit risk analysis, health technology assessment, resource allocation, portfolio decision analysis, shared patient clinician decision making and prioritizing patients' access to services); provides an overview of the principal methods of MCDA; and describes the key steps involved. Upon reviewing this report, readers should have a solid overview of MCDA methods and their potential for supporting health care decision making. PMID:26797229

  2. The Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test forced-choice recognition task: Base-rate data and norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreh, Amir; Bezdicek, Ondrej; Korobkova, Irina; Levin, Jennifer B; Dines, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes a novel Forced-Choice Response (FCR) index for detecting poor effort on the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT). This retrospective study analyzes the performance of 4 groups on the new index: clinically referred patients with suspected dementia, forensic patients identified as not exhibiting adequate effort on other measures of response bias, students who simulated poor effort, and a large normative sample collected in the Gulf State of Oman. Using sensitivity and specificity analyses, the study shows that much like the California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition FCR index, the RAVLT FCR index misses a proportion of individuals with inadequate effort (low sensitivity), but those who fail this measure are highly likely to be exhibiting poor effort (high specificity). The limitations and benefits of utilizing the RAVLT FCR index in clinical practice are discussed. PMID:26507316

  3. "A Change of Paradigm" in Developing Land Forces Officers' Professional Skills in Accordance with Hybrid Warfare Task-Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Rizescu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In future conflicts, not only traditional or asymmetric actions will be used, but also a combination of the two in order to solve the disputes involving national and international actors, materialized today in different manifestation forms called hybrid war. The hybrid threats tell about the evolution of the contemporary and future threats, about the necessity of a national effort concerted towards providing an immediate effective response to these threats. From a different perspective, the diversity and the complexity of the issues raised by the hybrid threats prove that it is necessary to go beyond the technical or sequential nowadays answers. It results first that it is required to develop an appropriate security strategy which will make possible the efficient action against hybrid risks and threats, in an effective, operational and unitary manner. Therefore, the present article aims at sequentially highlighting the aspects supporting the need to correlate the coordinates of the national security strategy to the planning, conduct and quality assessment of the process of training officers from the “change of paradigm” perspective, in order to acquire the professional skills conforming to the task-requirements specific to the hybrid war. Nothing more natural, more necessary and at the same time more current in this perspective than modernizing the military continuous education system in accordance with the strategic norm of competence.

  4. Primer printed circuit boards

    CERN Document Server

    Argyle, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Step-by-step instructions for making your own PCBs at home. Making your own printed circuit board (PCB) might seem a daunting task, but once you master the steps, it's easy to attain professional-looking results. Printed circuit boards, which connect chips and other components, are what make almost all modern electronic devices possible. PCBs are made from sheets of fiberglass clad with copper, usually in multiplelayers. Cut a computer motherboard in two, for instance, and you'll often see five or more differently patterned layers. Making boards at home is relatively easy

  5. Benthic habitat map of U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Faga‘alu Bay priority study area, Tutuila, American Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Susan A.; Gibbs, Ann E.; D'Antonio, Nicole L.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2016-01-01

    The coral reef in Faga‘alu Bay, Tutuila, American Samoa, has suffered numerous natural and anthropogenic stresses. Areas once dominated by live coral are now mostly rubble surfaces covered with turf or macroalgae. In an effort to improve the health and resilience of the coral reef system, the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force selected Faga‘alu Bay as a priority study area. To support these efforts, the U.S. Geological Survey mapped nearly 1 km2 of seafloor to depths of about 60 m. Unconsolidated sediment (predominantly sand) constitutes slightly greater than 50 percent of the seafloor in the mapped area; reef and other hardbottom potentially available for coral recruitment constitute nearly 50 percent of the mapped area. Of this potentially available hardbottom, only slightly greater than 37 percent is covered with at least 10 percent coral, which is fairly evenly distributed between the reef flat, fore reef, and offshore bank/shelf. 

  6. The MRS [Monitored Retrievable Storage] task force: Economic and non-economic incentives for local public acceptance of a proposed nuclear waste packaging and storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A joint Oak Ridge - Roane County citizen task force (TF) evaluated the Department of Energy's (DOE) proposal to site a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility in Tennessee in terms of environmental, transportation, and socioeconomic impacts. The case study examines how the TF used mitigation, compensation and incentives (economic and non-economic) to address the problem of distrust of DOE and to change the net local impact balance from negative to positive. Intensive group interaction during their investigations and development of trust within the TF led to consensus decisions on safety and conditional acceptance. DOE accepted most of the TF conditions after informal negotiations. The siting process was stopped by extensive state-wide opposition resulting in legal challenge by the state and vetoes by the governor and state legislature

  7. Analysis and implications of the omission of offenders in the DoD Care for Victims of Sexual Assault Task Force report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Kristen

    2007-09-01

    This note addresses the weaknesses in the Department of Defense (DoD) Care for Victims of Sexual Assault Task Force (CVSATF) Report, released in May 2004. Sound policy and protocol cannot be developed to prevent and to respond to sexual assault in the military if the role of sex offenders is not understood, yet the report excludes information relevant to understanding sex offender behavior and to responsibility. Shortcomings in the CVSATF recommendations to improve military definitions of sexually violent behavior and data collection are summarized, as are limitations in the recommendations for sexual assault prevention strategies. This analysis highlights problems with the DoD CVSATF recommendations to improve offender accountability and secure safety for communities and discusses how the military social climate is prohibitive to facilitating these goals. This note suggests that policy and procedures guided by recommendations that omit information about sex offenders may actually leave communities at continued risk of sexual assault. PMID:17704054

  8. Cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease: consensus statement from the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute, Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cerro, Maria Jesus; Moledina, Shahin; Haworth, Sheila G; Ivy, Dunbar; Al Dabbagh, Maha; Banjar, Hanaa; Diaz, Gabriel; Heath-Freudenthal, Alexandria; Galal, Ahmed Nasser; Humpl, Tilman; Kulkarni, Snehal; Lopes, Antonio; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Puri, G D; Rossouw, Beyra; Harikrishnan, S; Saxena, Anita; Udo, Patience; Caicedo, Lina; Tamimi, Omar; Adatia, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac catheterization is important in the diagnosis and risk stratification of pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease (PHVD) in children. Acute vasoreactivity testing provides key information about management, prognosis, therapeutic strategies, and efficacy. Data obtained at cardiac catheterization continue to play an important role in determining the surgical options for children with congenital heart disease and clinical evidence of increased pulmonary vascular resistance. The Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute met to develop a consensus statement regarding indications for, conduct of, acute vasoreactivity testing with, and pitfalls and risks of cardiac catheterization in children with PHVD. This document contains the essentials of those discussions to provide a rationale for the hemodynamic assessment by cardiac catheterization of children with PHVD. PMID:27076908

  9. Impact failure of MHW fuel sphere MHFT 65: report on interagency task force investigation and SRL evaluation of failure, November 1979-February 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a safety verification impact test failure of a Multi-Hundred Watt (MHW) fuel sphere made at Savannah River Plant, from which 2.1 g of 238PuO2 escaped containment, the Department of Energy organized a task force to investigate the cause of the test failure and to assess the failure probability of MHW fuel made at SRP. The task force described a two-part failure mechanism: embrittlement of the iridium containment shell by phosphorus which may have been picked up from the fuel; and large shear strains in the iridium caused by shearing or push-through of large chunks of fuel. Because the likelihood of push-through in this failure model depends on preexisting cracks in the fuel and their orientation to the impact face, the probability of further impact failures could not be easily assessed. From independent analysis of the available data at the Savannah River Laboratory, we concluded that the impact failure was caused by phosphorus embrittlement of the iridium, and breaching during impact of the graphite impact shell surrounding and cushioning the iridium-clad fuel. Excessive strain in the iridium is caused by extrusion of the iridium into the breach. This model predicts that impact failure is essentially independent of pre-existing cracks in the fuel and that SRP fuel, upon impact, should have no more failures than previously used fuel made at Mound Facility. Impact data to date indicate that SRP fuel clad in DOP-26 iridium cladding actually has fewer impact failures than earlier fuel clad in undoped iridium at MF

  10. "FACILS 2014: Microbially-driven facilitation systems in environmental biotechnology" (hereafter "FACILS") presented here by the European Commission (EC)-United States (US) Task Force on Biotechnology Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Methe, Barbara

    2016-02-03

    As we enter the 21st century, the sustainability of the biosphere is a global challenge that can best be met with a global response. This includes how we train and promote our next generation of research scientists in the emerging arenas of genome-enabled biology and a bio-based economy. It is this fundamental issue that formed the motivation for designing and conducting a shortcourse entitled “FACILIS 2014: Microbially-driven facilitation systems in environmental biotechnology” (hereafter “FACILIS”) presented here by the European Commission (EC)-United States (US) Task Force on Biotechnology Research. This WG was established in 1994 under the umbrella of the US-EC Task Force on Biotechnology Research, a transatlantic collaborative group overseen by the US Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and the EC. The Environmental Biotechnology Working Group maintains several goals, including establishing research links between scientists in EU countries and the US and fostering the careers of junior scientists from both sides of the Atlantic to the global nature of scientific cooperation. To that end, a shortcourse was held at the University of Milan in Italy on July 12-25 2014 organized around cross-cutting themes of genomic science and designed to attract a stellar group of interdisciplinary early carrier researchers. A total of 22 students, 10 from the US and 12 from the EU participated. The course provided them with hands-on experience with the latest scientific methods in genomics and bioinformatics; using a format that combines lectures, laboratory research and field work with the final goal to enable researchers to finally turn data into knowledge.

  11. Report of the Material Control and Material Accounting Task Force: the role of material control and material accounting in the safeguards program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented of NRC Task Force investigations to identify the functions of a safeguards program in relation to the NRC safeguards objective, define the role and objectives of material control and material accounting systems within that program, develop goals for material control and material accounting based on those roles and objectives, assess current material control and material accounting requirements and performance levels in the light of the goals, and recommend future actions needed to attain the proposed goals. It was found that the major contribution of material accounting to the safeguards program is in support of the assurance function. It also can make secondary contributions to the prevention and response functions. In the important area of loss detection, a response measure, it is felt that limitations inherent in material accounting for some fuel cycle operations limit its ability to operate as a primary detection system to detect a five formula kilogram loss with high assurance (defined by the Task Force as a probability of detection of 90 percent or more) and that, in those cases, material accounting can act only in a backup role. Physical security and material control must make the primary contributions to the prevention and detection of theft, so that safeguards do not rely primarily for detection capabilities on material accounting. There are several areas of accounting that require more emphasis than is offered by the current regulatory base. These areas include: timely shipper-receiver difference analysis and reconciliation; a demand physical inventory capability; improved loss localization;discard measurement verification; timely recovery of scrap; improved measurement and record systems; and limits on cumulative inventory differences and shipper-receiver differences. An increased NRC capability for monitoring and analyzing licensee accounting data and more timely and detailed submittals of data to NRC by licensees are recommended

  12. “Astronomy for a Better World”: IAU/OAD Task Force One Activities to Develop Astronomy Education and Research at Universities in the Developing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, Edward Francis; Kolenberg, Katrien

    2015-08-01

    The Task Force (1) on Astronomy for Universities & Research (TF-1) was established in 2012 as part of the IAU Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD). This Task Force drives activities related to astronomy education and research at universities mainly in the developing world. Astronomy is used to stimulate research and education in STEM fields and to develop and promote astronomy in regions of the world where there is little or no astronomy. There is also potential for developing research in the historical and cultural aspects of astronomy which may prove important for stimulating an interest in the subject in communities where there is yet no established interest in the science.Since the establishment of the OAD, over 25 TF-1 programs have been funded (or partially funded) to support a wide variety of interesting and innovative astronomy programs in Africa, Asia, South-East Asia, Middle-East, and in South & Central America. Nearly every aspect of development has been supported. These programs include supporting: regional astronomy training schools, specialized workshops, research visits, university twinning programs, distance learning projects, university astronomy curriculum development, as well as small telescope and equipment grants. In addition, a large new program - Astrolab - was introduced (by J-P De Greve and Michele Gerbaldi) to bring starlight” into the class room. In the Astrolab program students carry out and reduce CCD photometry secured by them using remotely controlled telescopes. Results from pilot programs will be discussed.OAD TF-1 programs will be discussed along with future plans for improving and expanding these programs to bring astronomy education and research to a greater number of people and indeed to use Astronomy for a Better World. Information and advice will also be provided about applying for support in the future.

  13. Oncology Section EDGE Task Force on Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review of Outcome Measures for Health-Related Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Shana; Lee, Jeannette; Colon, Genevieve; Alappattu, Meryl

    2016-01-01

    Background Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is multidimensional and subjective, encompassing occupational and physical function, psychological state, social interaction, and somatic sensation. Because of the wide scope of HRQOL and its implications for the medical management of prostate cancer survivors, clinicians and researchers need to know the most reliable and valid measures currently available for addressing this clinical construct in men diagnosed with prostate cancer. Purpose To identify and evaluate patient-reported outcome measures used to assess HRQOL in men diagnosed with prostate cancer and make recommendations for the use of these patient-reported outcome measures in both the research and clinic settings. Methods The literature was systematically reviewed for patient-reported outcome measures used in peer-reviewed, published research to assess HRQOL in men diagnosed with prostate cancer. The goals were to examine the psychometric properties of commonly used HRQOL measures in order to determine their clinical utility. Results The following patient-reported outcome measures are highly recommended by the Task Force to assess HRQOL in men diagnosed with prostate cancer: EORTC QLQ-P25 (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire–Prostate 25), EPIC (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite), FACT-P (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Prostate), UCLA-PCI (UCLA–Prostate Cancer Index), EORTC QLQ-C30 (EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire–Cancer 30), FACT-G (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–General), and SF (Short-Form) 36, 12, and 8. Conclusions A variety of patient-reported outcome measures have been reported in the literature to assess HRQOL in men diagnosed with prostate cancer. Seven measures were found to have satisfactory psychometric properties, as well as good clinical utility, and are recommended for use by the researchers on this Task Force.

  14. Impact failure of MHW fuel sphere MHFT 65: report on interagency task force investigation and SRL evaluation of failure, November 1979-February 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, D.H.

    1981-06-01

    Following a safety verification impact test failure of a Multi-Hundred Watt (MHW) fuel sphere made at Savannah River Plant, from which 2.1 g of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ escaped containment, the Department of Energy organized a task force to investigate the cause of the test failure and to assess the failure probability of MHW fuel made at SRP. The task force described a two-part failure mechanism: embrittlement of the iridium containment shell by phosphorus which may have been picked up from the fuel; and large shear strains in the iridium caused by shearing or push-through of large chunks of fuel. Because the likelihood of push-through in this failure model depends on preexisting cracks in the fuel and their orientation to the impact face, the probability of further impact failures could not be easily assessed. From independent analysis of the available data at the Savannah River Laboratory, we concluded that the impact failure was caused by phosphorus embrittlement of the iridium, and breaching during impact of the graphite impact shell surrounding and cushioning the iridium-clad fuel. Excessive strain in the iridium is caused by extrusion of the iridium into the breach. This model predicts that impact failure is essentially independent of pre-existing cracks in the fuel and that SRP fuel, upon impact, should have no more failures than previously used fuel made at Mound Facility. Impact data to date indicate that SRP fuel clad in DOP-26 iridium cladding actually has fewer impact failures than earlier fuel clad in undoped iridium at MF.

  15. Muscle activation during maximal effort tasks: evidence of the selective forces that shaped the musculoskeletal system of humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Carrier

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The selective forces that played a role in the evolution of the musculoskeletal system of the genus Homo have long been debated and remain poorly understood. In this investigation, we introduce a new approach for testing alternative hypotheses. Our analysis is based on the premise that natural selection can be expected to have resulted in muscles that are large enough to achieve necessary levels of maximum performance in essential behaviors, but not larger. We used surface electromyography in male subjects to identify maximum activation levels in 13 muscles of the back and leg during eight behaviors that have been suggested to have been important to foraging, hunting and fighting performance in early humans. We asked two questions: (1 what behaviors produce maximum activation in each of the investigated muscles and (2 are there specific behaviors that elicit maximum recruitment from all or most of the muscles? We found that in eight of the 13 muscles, the highest activity occurred during maximal effort vertical jumping (i.e. whole-body acceleration. Punching produced the highest median activity in the other five muscles. Together, jumping and punching accounted for 73% of the incidences of maximum activity among all of the muscles and from all of the subjects. Thus, the size of the muscles of the back and leg appear to be more related to the demands of explosive behaviors rather than those of high speed sprinting or sustained endurance running. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that selection on aggressive behavior played an important role in the evolution of the genus Homo.

  16. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 3, Sampling and analysis plan (SAP): Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation: Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

  17. Iowa Utilities Board survey of state commission restructuring efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In mid-July, the Iowa Utilities Board invited all Commission staff to be part of a Reorganization Task Force. Subsequent to this meeting, four working groups were established and each was given an outline of tasks. The logical starting point was to survey other state public utility commissions on their restructuring efforts. The remainder of this article summarizes the ''hows and whys'' of the state commission reorganizations. The report will end with some of the author's observations and possible ideas for further development

  18. Building better boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, David A

    2004-05-01

    Companies facing new requirements for governance are scrambling to buttress financial-reporting systems, overhaul board structures--whatever it takes to comply. But there are limits to how much good governance can be imposed from the outside. Boards know what they ought to be: seats of challenge and inquiry that add value without meddling and make CEOs more effective but not all-powerful. A board can reach that goal only if it functions as a high-performance team, one that is competent, coordinated, collegial, and focused on an unambiguous goal. Such entities don't just evolve; they must be constructed to an exacting blueprint--what the author calls board building. In this article, Nadler offers an agenda and a set of tools that boards can use to define and achieve their objectives. It's important for a board to conduct regular self-assessments and to pay attention to the results of those analyses. As a first step, the directors and the CEO should agree on which of the following common board models best fits the company: passive, certifying, engaged, intervening, or operating. The directors and the CEO should then analyze which business tasks are most important and allot sufficient time and resources to them. Next, the board should take inventory of each director's strengths to ensure that the group as a whole possesses the skills necessary to do its work. Directors must exert more influence over meeting agendas and make sure they have the right information at the right time and in the right format to perform their duties. Finally, the board needs to foster an engaged culture characterized by candor and a willingness to challenge. An ambitious board-building process, devised and endorsed both by directors and by management, can potentially turn a good board into a great one. PMID:15146740

  19. Final report on the Federal/State/Local Nonpoint-Source Task Force and recommended national nonpoint source policy. Appendix B. Agency strategies. Report for March 1984-January 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    The Appendix presents the full text of agency implementation strategies developed by each Federal and some State and local agencies participating on the Federal/State/Local Nonpoint Source Task Force. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) convened a Federal/State/Local Nonpoint Source Task Force in March 1984 in recognition of the many agencies involved in managing nonpoint source (NPS) pollution and the need for coordination among these agencies. The Task Force developed a recommended National Nonpoint Source Policy and implementation strategies to carry out the goals of the Policy. The Appendix contains copies of these implementation strategies which outline agency-specific activities to be undertaken in implementing the National Nonpoint Source Policy.

  20. Standardized image interpretation and post processing in cardiovascular magnetic resonance: Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) Board of Trustees Task Force on Standardized Post Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz-Menger, J.; Bluemke, D.A.; Bremerich, J; Flamm, S.D.; Fogel, M.A.; Friedrich, M.G.; Kim, R. J.; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, F.; Kramer, C.M.; Pennell, D. J.; Plein, S; Nagel, E.

    2013-01-01

    With mounting data on its accuracy and prognostic value, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is becoming an increasingly important diagnostic tool with growing utility in clinical routine. Given its versatility and wide range of quantitative parameters, however, agreement on specific standards for the interpretation and post-processing of CMR studies is required to ensure consistent quality and reproducibility of CMR reports. This document addresses this need by providing consensus recomm...

  1. Ownership Concentration, Monitoring and Optimal Board Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Graziano, Clara; Luporini, Annalisa

    2005-01-01

    The paper analyzes the optimal structure of board of directors in a firm with ownership concentrated in the hands of a large shareholder who sits on the board. We focus our attention on the choice between one-tier board who performs all tasks and two-tier board where the management board is in charge of project selection and the supervisory board is in charge of monitoring. We consider the case in which the large shareholder sits on (and controls) the supervisory board but not the management ...

  2. Prediction of human observer performance in a 2-alternative forced choice low-contrast detection task using channelized Hotelling observer: Impact of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Efficient optimization of CT protocols demands a quantitative approach to predicting human observer performance on specific tasks at various scan and reconstruction settings. The goal of this work was to investigate how well a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) can predict human observer performance on 2-alternative forced choice (2AFC) lesion-detection tasks at various dose levels and two different reconstruction algorithms: a filtered-backprojection (FBP) and an iterative reconstruction (IR) method. Methods: A 35 × 26 cm2 torso-shaped phantom filled with water was used to simulate an average-sized patient. Three rods with different diameters (small: 3 mm; medium: 5 mm; large: 9 mm) were placed in the center region of the phantom to simulate small, medium, and large lesions. The contrast relative to background was −15 HU at 120 kV. The phantom was scanned 100 times using automatic exposure control each at 60, 120, 240, 360, and 480 quality reference mAs on a 128-slice scanner. After removing the three rods, the water phantom was again scanned 100 times to provide signal-absent background images at the exact same locations. By extracting regions of interest around the three rods and on the signal-absent images, the authors generated 21 2AFC studies. Each 2AFC study had 100 trials, with each trial consisting of a signal-present image and a signal-absent image side-by-side in randomized order. In total, 2100 trials were presented to both the model and human observers. Four medical physicists acted as human observers. For the model observer, the authors used a CHO with Gabor channels, which involves six channel passbands, five orientations, and two phases, leading to a total of 60 channels. The performance predicted by the CHO was compared with that obtained by four medical physicists at each 2AFC study. Results: The human and model observers were highly correlated at each dose level for each lesion size for both FBP and IR. The Pearson's product

  3. Prediction of human observer performance in a 2-alternative forced choice low-contrast detection task using channelized Hotelling observer: Impact of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Lifeng; Leng Shuai; Chen Lingyun; Kofler, James M.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Carter, Rickey E. [Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Efficient optimization of CT protocols demands a quantitative approach to predicting human observer performance on specific tasks at various scan and reconstruction settings. The goal of this work was to investigate how well a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) can predict human observer performance on 2-alternative forced choice (2AFC) lesion-detection tasks at various dose levels and two different reconstruction algorithms: a filtered-backprojection (FBP) and an iterative reconstruction (IR) method. Methods: A 35 Multiplication-Sign 26 cm{sup 2} torso-shaped phantom filled with water was used to simulate an average-sized patient. Three rods with different diameters (small: 3 mm; medium: 5 mm; large: 9 mm) were placed in the center region of the phantom to simulate small, medium, and large lesions. The contrast relative to background was -15 HU at 120 kV. The phantom was scanned 100 times using automatic exposure control each at 60, 120, 240, 360, and 480 quality reference mAs on a 128-slice scanner. After removing the three rods, the water phantom was again scanned 100 times to provide signal-absent background images at the exact same locations. By extracting regions of interest around the three rods and on the signal-absent images, the authors generated 21 2AFC studies. Each 2AFC study had 100 trials, with each trial consisting of a signal-present image and a signal-absent image side-by-side in randomized order. In total, 2100 trials were presented to both the model and human observers. Four medical physicists acted as human observers. For the model observer, the authors used a CHO with Gabor channels, which involves six channel passbands, five orientations, and two phases, leading to a total of 60 channels. The performance predicted by the CHO was compared with that obtained by four medical physicists at each 2AFC study. Results: The human and model observers were highly correlated at each dose level for each lesion size for both FBP and IR. The

  4. Proceedings of the meeting of a task force on problems of rare events in the reliability analysis of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In safety problems of nuclear plants interest centres on various types of rare events. These may extend from rare modes of failures in the component parts of the system and plant, the simultaneous occurrence of a very low resistance of a structural member and an extremely high load, to rare catastrophic failures which affect whole plant and system complexes. The obvious need is therefore to understand the patterns of behaviour of these events in space and time domains and be able to make some adequate estimate of their probability of occurrence. In 1975, a Task Force of Experts on the Statistical Analysis of Rare Events in Nuclear Installations was set up, its main objective being to explore methods for handling the problems of reliability analysis involving rare events. The main topic area of the Ispra meeting concerns the statistical analysis of structures such as containment and pressure vessels, automatic protection systems, and allied items, with a view to giving a quantified probabilistic statement on particular reliability characteristics. The particular subjects covered by the invited experts who would normally be working in specialized fields, includes, specifically, statistical modelling of rare events, decision theory applied to rare events, small sampling theory in the case of rare events. Man-made phenomena as well as natural phenomena are also considered, as they involve different approaches to modelling. 22 papers are presented, with reports on group discussions

  5. Understanding Research Gaps and Priorities for Improving Behavioral Counseling Interventions: Lessons Learned From the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Ann E; Miller, Therese L; Woo, Meghan; Davidson, Karina W

    2015-09-01

    Behavioral counseling interventions can address significant causes of preventable morbidity and mortality. However, despite a growing evidence base for behavioral counseling interventions, there remain significant research gaps that limit translating the evidence into clinical practice. Using U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) examples, we address how researchers and funders can move the research portfolio forward to achieve better application of behavioral counseling interventions to address substantial health burdens in the U.S. This paper describes the types of gaps that the USPSTF encounters across its behavioral counseling intervention topics and provides suggestions for opportunities to address these gaps to enhance the evidence base for primary care-based behavioral counseling recommendations. To accomplish this, we draw from both the USPSTF experience and issues identified by researchers and clinicians during the USPSTF-sponsored Behavioral Counseling Intervention Forum. We also discuss the dilemma posed by having "insufficient" evidence with which to make a behavioral counseling intervention-related recommendation, and describe two case examples (screening for alcohol misuse in adolescence and screening for child maltreatment), detailing the research gaps that remain. Recommendations are outlined for researchers, funders, and practice implementers to improve behavioral counseling intervention research and application. PMID:26296550

  6. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 2, Work plan: Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation: Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990 Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential CERCLA removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground-water contamination in the Mad River Valley Aquifer within and across WPAFB boundaries. The action will be based on a Focused Feasibility Study with an Action Memorandum serving as a decision document that is subject to approval by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. The first phase (Phase 1) of this effort involves an investigation of ground-water contamination migrating across the southwest boundary of Area C and across Springfield Pike adjacent to Area B. Task 4 of Phase 1 is a field investigation to collect sufficient additional information to evaluate removal alternatives. The field investigation will provide information in the following specific areas of study: water-level data which will be used to permit calibration of the ground-water flow model to a unique time in history; and ground-water quality data which will be used to characterize the current chemical conditions of ground water.

  7. End-of-life care in the intensive care unit: Report from the Task Force of World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myburgh, John; Abillama, Fayez; Chiumello, Davide; Dobb, Geoff; Jacobe, Stephen; Kleinpell, Ruth; Koh, Younsuk; Martin, Claudio; Michalsen, Andej; Pelosi, Paolo; Torra, Lluis Blanch; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Yeager, Susan; Zimmerman, Janice

    2016-08-01

    End-of-life care in the intensive care unit (ICU) was identified as an objective in a series of Task Forces developed by the World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine Council in 2014. The objective was to develop a generic statement about current knowledge and to identify challenges relevant to the global community that may inform regional and local initiatives. An updated summary of published statements on end-of-life care in the ICU from national Societies is presented, highlighting commonalities and differences within and between international regions. The complexity of end-of-life care in the ICU, particularly relating to withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatment while ensuring the alleviation of suffering, within different ethical and cultural environments is recognized. Although no single statement can therefore be regarded as a criterion standard applicable to all countries and societies, the World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine endorses and encourages the role of Member Societies to lead the debate regarding end-of-life care in the ICU within each country and to take a leading role in developing national guidelines and recommendations within each country. PMID:27288625

  8. International recommendation for a comprehensive neuropathologic workup of epilepsy surgery brain tissue: A consensus Task Force report from the ILAE Commission on Diagnostic Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blümcke, Ingmar; Aronica, Eleonora; Miyata, Hajime; Sarnat, Harvey B; Thom, Maria; Roessler, Karl; Rydenhag, Bertil; Jehi, Lara; Krsek, Pavel; Wiebe, Samuel; Spreafico, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    Epilepsy surgery is an effective treatment in many patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsies. An early decision for surgical therapy is facilitated by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible brain lesion congruent with the electrophysiologically abnormal brain region. Recent advances in the pathologic diagnosis and classification of epileptogenic brain lesions are helpful for clinical correlation, outcome stratification, and patient management. However, application of international consensus classification systems to common epileptic pathologies (e.g., focal cortical dysplasia [FCD] and hippocampal sclerosis [HS]) necessitates standardized protocols for neuropathologic workup of epilepsy surgery specimens. To this end, the Task Force of Neuropathology from the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Commission on Diagnostic Methods developed a consensus standard operational procedure for tissue inspection, distribution, and processing. The aims are to provide a systematic framework for histopathologic workup, meeting minimal standards and maximizing current and future opportunities for morphofunctional correlations and molecular studies for both clinical care and research. Whenever feasible, anatomically intact surgical specimens are desirable to enable systematic analysis in selective hippocampectomies, temporal lobe resections, and lesional or nonlesional neocortical samples. Correct orientation of sample and the sample's relation to neurophysiologically aberrant sites requires good communication between pathology and neurosurgical teams. Systematic tissue sampling of 5-mm slabs along a defined anatomic axis and application of a limited immunohistochemical panel will ensure a reliable differential diagnosis of main pathologies encountered in epilepsy surgery. PMID:26839983

  9. A global perspective on irritable bowel syndrome: a consensus statement of the World Gastroenterology Organisation Summit Task Force on irritable bowel syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2012-08-15

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is common in western Europe and North America, and many aspects of its epidemiology, risk factors, and natural history have been described in these regions. Recent data suggest, however, that IBS is also common in the rest of the world and there has been some evidence to suggest some differences in demographics and presenting features between IBS in the west and as it is experienced elsewhere. The World Gastroenterology Organization, therefore, established a Task Force comprising experts on the topic from all parts of the world to examine IBS from a global perspective. IBS does, indeed, seem to be common worldwide though with some significant variations in prevalence rates between regions and countries and there may well be some potentially interesting variations in presenting symptoms and sex distribution. The global map of IBS is far from complete; community-based prevalence data is not available from many areas. Furthermore, while some general trends are evident in terms of IBS impact and demographics, international comparisons are hampered by differences in diagnostic criteria, study location and methodology; several important unanswered questions have been identified that should form the basis for future collaborative research and have the potential to shed light on this challenging disorder.

  10. The Literacy Connection: Improving Adult Literacy in New Jersey. Report and Recommendations from the Commission on Higher Education and the State Employment and Training Commission's Task Force on Adult Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Jersey State Employment and Training Commission, Trenton.

    A New Jersey Task Force on Adult Literacy recommended ways to improve the literacy delivery system for adults. This report and its recommendations focus on improving coordinated interagency planning and accountability to increase governmental efficiency, and on advancing the employability and self-sufficiency of the three million low-literate…

  11. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, reporting period March--August 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, reporting period October--December 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    Activities of DOE's Oil Implementation Task Force for the period March--August 1991 are reviewed. Contracts for fields projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery are discussed, with a list of related publications given. Enhanced recovery processes covered include chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, and microbial recovery.

  12. Report of the External Advisory Committee with respect to the report of the Task Force on Safety of Personnel in LHC underground areas following the sector 3-4 accident of 19 September 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Hoppe, A; Petersen, B; Schrader, S; Tartaglia, R

    2009-01-01

    Based on the mandate given by the CERN Director‐General, the Task Force on Safety of Personnel (TFSP) in LHC underground areas following the sector 3‐4 accident of 19‐September‐2008 has carried out an assessment of the situation concerning safety of personnel after the accident.

  13. Defining conditions where long-term glucocorticoid treatment has an acceptably low level of harm to facilitate implementation of existing recommendations: viewpoints from an EULAR task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehl, Cindy; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; de Wit, Maarten; Boers, Maarten; Caeyers, Nele; Cutolo, Maurizio; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Dixon, William G; Geenen, Rinie; Huizinga, Tom W J; Kent, Alison; de Thurah, Annette Ladefoged; Listing, Joachim; Mariette, Xavier; Ray, David W; Scherer, Hans U; Seror, Raphaèle; Spies, Cornelia M; Tarp, Simon; Wiek, Dieter; Winthrop, Kevin L; Buttgereit, Frank

    2016-06-01

    There is convincing evidence for the known and unambiguously accepted beneficial effects of glucocorticoids at low dosages. However, the implementation of existing recommendations and guidelines on the management of glucocorticoid therapy in rheumatic diseases is lagging behind. As a first step to improve implementation, we aimed at defining conditions under which long-term glucocorticoid therapy may have an acceptably low level of harm. A multidisciplinary European League Against Rheumatism task force group of experts including patients with rheumatic diseases was assembled. After a systematic literature search, breakout groups critically reviewed the evidence on the four most worrisome adverse effects of glucocorticoid therapy (osteoporosis, hyperglycaemia/diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases and infections) and presented their results to the other group members following a structured questionnaire for final discussion and consensus finding. Robust evidence on the risk of harm of long-term glucocorticoid therapy was often lacking since relevant study results were often either missing, contradictory or carried a high risk of bias. The group agreed that the risk of harm is low for the majority of patients at long-term dosages of ≤5 mg prednisone equivalent per day, whereas at dosages of >10 mg/day the risk of harm is elevated. At dosages between >5 and ≤10 mg/day, patient-specific characteristics (protective and risk factors) determine the risk of harm. The level of harm of glucocorticoids depends on both dose and patient-specific parameters. General and glucocorticoid-associated risk factors and protective factors such as a healthy lifestyle should be taken into account when evaluating the actual and future risk. PMID:26933146

  14. Does remnant gastric cancer really differ from primary gastric cancer? A systematic review of the literature by the Task Force of Japanese Gastric Cancer Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Hideaki; Fukagawa, Takeo; Haga, Yoshio; Oba, Koji

    2016-04-01

    Remnant gastric cancer, most frequently defined as cancer detected in the remnant stomach after distal gastrectomy for benign disease and those cases after surgery of gastric cancer at least 5 years after the primary surgery, is often reported as a tumor with poor prognosis. The Task Force of Japanese Gastric Cancer Association for Research Promotion evaluated the clinical impact of remnant gastric cancer by systematically reviewing publications focusing on molecular carcinogenesis, lymph node status, patient survival, and surgical complications. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE with the keywords "remnant," "stomach," and "cancer," revealing 1154 relevant reports published up to the end of December 2014. The mean interval between the initial surgery and the diagnosis of remnant gastric cancer ranged from 10 to 30 years. The incidence of lymph node metastases at the splenic hilum for remnant gastric cancer is not significantly higher than that for primary proximal gastric cancer. Lymph node involvement in the jejunal mesentery is a phenomenon peculiar to remnant gastric cancer after Billroth II reconstruction. Prognosis and postoperative morbidity and mortality rates seem to be comparable to those for primary proximal gastric cancer. The crude 5-year mortality for remnant gastric cancer was 1.08 times higher than that for primary proximal gastric cancer, but this difference was not statistically significant. In conclusion, although no prospective cohort study has yet evaluated the clinical significance of remnant gastric cancer, our literature review suggests that remnant gastric cancer does not adversely affect patient prognosis and postoperative course. PMID:26667370

  15. National gas survey: report to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission by the Conservation-Technical Advisory Task Force on Efficiency in the Use of Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    As the available supplies of natural gas diminish, it is imperative that existing supplies of gas be utilized in the most prudent manner. The most important stimulus to promote the wise use of gas is the price of gas itself. The inevitable rising prices of natural gas will continue to enhance the cost-effectiveness of many natural gas conservation strategies. It is widely recognized that there are significant opportunities to reduce the wasteful and inefficient use of gas and that some of the most cost-effective conservation strategies are being applied only locally or regionally. This paper identifies and analyzes methods that promote the efficient use of and conservation of natural gas. To assist in the evaluation of the methods, the relative cost of implementing each strategy and the impact on gas usage were identified. The Task Force has identified 25 energy-conservation strategies that may be useful to the homeowner. Solar-assisted gas hot-water heating is reviewed. In the near future, solar hot-water heating with natural gas as a backup may prove to be economically viable. Many of the strategies that may benefit the residential sector can be directly applied to many small commercial and industrial customers. Individual metering of tenants of a commercial building makes each user cognizant of his consumption. A methodology for identifying potential energy savings in commercial buildings is presented in Appendix C. Large commercial and industrial consumers often have unique process requirements for gas and no generalized approaches are available. Moreover, most of these consumers have the in-house technical expertise to identify gas-saving measures on a case-by-case basis. Appendix D provides a guide to energy conservation for industrial consumers. Incentives for implementing energy conservation are discussed in detail. (MCW)

  16. WWC Review of the Report "Meeting the Challenge of Combating Chronic Absenteeism: Impact of the NYC Mayor's Interagency Task Force on Chronic Absenteeism and School Attendance and Its Implications for Other Cities." What Works Clearinghouse Single Study Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 study, "Meeting the Challenge of Combating Chronic Absenteeism: Impact of the NYC Mayor's Interagency Task Force on Chronic Absenteeism and School Attendance and Its Implications for Other Cities", examined the impact of the strategies developed by an interagency task force in New York City to combat chronic absenteeism in…

  17. Selecting a dynamic simulation modeling method for health care delivery research-part 2: report of the ISPOR Dynamic Simulation Modeling Emerging Good Practices Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Deborah A; Burgos-Liz, Lina; IJzerman, Maarten J; Crown, William; Padula, William V; Wong, Peter K; Pasupathy, Kalyan S; Higashi, Mitchell K; Osgood, Nathaniel D

    2015-03-01

    In a previous report, the ISPOR Task Force on Dynamic Simulation Modeling Applications in Health Care Delivery Research Emerging Good Practices introduced the fundamentals of dynamic simulation modeling and identified the types of health care delivery problems for which dynamic simulation modeling can be used more effectively than other modeling methods. The hierarchical relationship between the health care delivery system, providers, patients, and other stakeholders exhibits a level of complexity that ought to be captured using dynamic simulation modeling methods. As a tool to help researchers decide whether dynamic simulation modeling is an appropriate method for modeling the effects of an intervention on a health care system, we presented the System, Interactions, Multilevel, Understanding, Loops, Agents, Time, Emergence (SIMULATE) checklist consisting of eight elements. This report builds on the previous work, systematically comparing each of the three most commonly used dynamic simulation modeling methods-system dynamics, discrete-event simulation, and agent-based modeling. We review criteria for selecting the most suitable method depending on 1) the purpose-type of problem and research questions being investigated, 2) the object-scope of the model, and 3) the method to model the object to achieve the purpose. Finally, we provide guidance for emerging good practices for dynamic simulation modeling in the health sector, covering all aspects, from the engagement of decision makers in the model design through model maintenance and upkeep. We conclude by providing some recommendations about the application of these methods to add value to informed decision making, with an emphasis on stakeholder engagement, starting with the problem definition. Finally, we identify areas in which further methodological development will likely occur given the growing "volume, velocity and variety" and availability of "big data" to provide empirical evidence and techniques

  18. Dysautonomia Rating Scales in Parkinson’s Disease: Sialorrhea, Dysphagia, and Constipation—Critique and Recommendations by Movement Disorders Task Force on Rating Scales for Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Evatt, Marian L; Chaudhuri, K Ray; Chou, Kelvin L; Cubo, Ester; Hinson, Vanessa; Kompoliti, Katie; Yang, Chengwu; Poewe, Werner; Rascol, Olivier; Sampaio, Cristina; Stebbins, Glenn T.; Goetz, Christopher G.

    2009-01-01

    Upper and lower gastrointestinal dysautonomia symptoms (GIDS)—sialorrhea, dysphagia, and constipation are common in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and often socially as well as physically disabling for patients. Available invasive quantitative measures for assessing these symptoms and their response to therapy are time-consuming, require specialized equipment, can cause patient discomfort and present patients with risk. The Movement Disorders Society commissioned a task force to assess available cl...

  19. The work of the containment performance task force of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outstanding role of reactor containment systems in public safety has long been recognised by CSNI, and particularly by those CSNI groups concerned with severe accidents, source terms and environmental consequences. Aspects of containment loading and primary circuit integrity are covered by other CSNI Working Groups but the members of these feel that they lack the appropriate interests and multidisciplinary expertise required to deal with the range of issues involved in containment performance especially in view of the variety of containment types. Consequently, at the end of 1985, the NEA proposed that a Task Force on LWR containment performance be established to identify generic issues appropriate for international collaboration and to propose a programme of work to CSNI. This Task Force has since met three times and the efforts of its various members have, by the end of 1986, resulted in a report on the current state of containment technology and a consequent work programme. This paper reviews the results of the Containment Performance Task Force and outlines its proposed programme of work on generic containment issues felt suitable for international collaboration. (author)

  20. Clinical Outcome Assessments: Conceptual Foundation-Report of the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment - Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Marc K; Powers, John H; Hobart, Jeremy; Patrick, Donald; Marquis, Patrick; Vamvakas, Spiros; Isaac, Maria; Molsen, Elizabeth; Cano, Stefan; Burke, Laurie B

    2015-09-01

    An outcome assessment, the patient assessment used in an endpoint, is the measuring instrument that provides a rating or score (categorical or continuous) that is intended to represent some aspect of the patient's health status. Outcome assessments are used to define efficacy endpoints when developing a therapy for a disease or condition. Most efficacy endpoints are based on specified clinical assessments of patients. When clinical assessments are used as clinical trial outcomes, they are called clinical outcome assessments (COAs). COAs include any assessment that may be influenced by human choices, judgment, or motivation. COAs must be well-defined and possess adequate measurement properties to demonstrate (directly or indirectly) the benefits of a treatment. In contrast, a biomarker assessment is one that is subject to little, if any, patient motivational or rater judgmental influence. This is the first of two reports by the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment - Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force. This report provides foundational definitions important for an understanding of COA measurement principles. The foundation provided in this report includes what it means to demonstrate a beneficial effect, how assessments of patients relate to the objective of showing a treatment's benefit, and how these assessments are used in clinical trial endpoints. In addition, this report describes intrinsic attributes of patient assessments and clinical trial factors that can affect the properties of the measurements. These factors should be considered when developing or refining assessments. These considerations will aid investigators designing trials in their choice of using an existing assessment or developing a new outcome assessment. Although the focus of this report is on the development of a new COA to define endpoints in a clinical trial, these principles may be applied more generally. A critical element in appraising or developing a COA is to

  1. 77 FR 16213 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting Cancellation of the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) Subcommittee of the Air University Board of Visitors... the Air University Board of Visitors was scheduled to meet on Monday, March 12th, 2012, from 8 a.m....

  2. Three essays on board composition

    OpenAIRE

    Menozzi, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The thesis consists of three articles concerning the composition of board of directors in Italy. The first article analyzes the effects of board composition on the behaviour of a sample of 114 Italian local public utilities, for which information about 1630 directors during 1994–2004 has been collected. During this period, the deregulation process inspired institutional interventions that forced utilities, traditionally owned by local municipalities, to change their juridical form...

  3. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Aespoe Task Force on Engineered Barrier System. Modelling of THM-coupled processes for benchmark 2.2 with the code GeoSys/RockFlow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, Thomas; Kunz, Herbert (Federal Inst. for Geosciences and Natural Resources, Hannover (Germany))

    2010-02-15

    In 2004 the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) initiated the project 'Task Force on Engineered Barrier Systems'. This project has the objective to verify the feasibility of modelling THM-coupled processes (task 1) and gas migration processes (task 2) in clay-rich buffer materials. The tasks are performed on the basis of appropriate benchmarks. This report documents the modelling results of the THM-benchmark 2.2 - the Canister Retrieval Test - using the code GeoSys/RockFlow. The Temperature Buffer Test which was performed in the immediate vicinity of the Canister Retrieval Test is included in the model. Especially the heat transport requires the handling of the problem in 3-D. Due to limitations imposed by post-processing different spatial discretisations of the model had to be used during the processing of the benchmark. The calculated temperatures agree well with measured data. Concerning hydraulic parameters the values of permeability and tortuosity were varied in the calculations. The time necessary to saturate the buffer is very sensitive to both of these values. In comparison to thermal and hydraulic processes the model only has limited capacity to predict the measured evolution of total pressure

  4. The effects of shoulder load and pinch force on electromyographic activity and blood flow in the forearm during a pinch task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Bart; Kofoed Nielsen, Pernille; de Kraker, Heleen; Smits, Miriam; Jensen, Bente Rona; Veeger, Dirkjan; van Dieën, Jaap H.

    2006-01-01

    loaded with 4.95 kg each) were combined with intermittent pinch forces at 0, 10 and 25% of the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Blood flow to the forearm was measured with Doppler ultrasound. Myoelectric activity of the forearm and neck-shoulder muscles was recorded to check for the workload levels......The object of the current study was to determine whether static contraction of proximal musculature has an effect on the blood flow more distally in the upper extremity. Static contractions of muscles in the neck shoulder region at three levels (relaxed, shoulders elevated and shoulders elevated....... Across all levels of shoulder load, blood flow increased significantly with increasing pinch force (21% at 10% MVC and by 44% at 25% MVC). Blood flow was significantly affected by shoulder load, with the lowest blood flow at the highest shoulder load. Interactions of pinch force and shoulder load were...

  5. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    2011-2015 The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics Editorial Board consists of 411 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in surgery research. They are from 47 countries, including Argentina (3), Australia (13), Austria (4), Belarus (1), Belgium (3), Brazil (10), Canada (10), China (41), Czech Republic (1), Denmark (1), Egypt (3), Estonia (1), Finland

  6. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    2011-2015 The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics Editorial Board consists of 411 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in surgery research.They are from 47 countries,including Argentina(3),Australia(13),Austria(4),Belarus(1),Belgium(3),Brazil(10),Canada(10),China(41),Czech Republic(1),Denmark

  7. Board of Governors enlarged

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Professor Carlo Salvetti, of Italy, was elected Chairman by the Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency for 1963-64, when the new Board met for the first time on 2 October 1963. Professor Salvetti is Head of the Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Milan. He is also a member of the Executive Board of the Italian National Committee for Nuclear Energy (CNEN), President of the OECD Study Group on High Flux Reactors, and Italian Representative of the Working Group of the European Nuclear Energy Society. Formerly he was Director of the IAEA Division of Research. The election of seven new members at the seventh session of the General Conference in October 1963 increased the membership of the Board of Governors from 23 to 25. This resulted from a decision of the General Conference in 1961, designed to provide more equitable representation for Africa and the Middle East. The necessary amendment to the Agency's Statute came into force in January 1963, when the requisite number of instruments of acceptance had been deposited.

  8. Mandatory gender balance and board independence

    OpenAIRE

    Bøhren, Øyvind; Staubo, Siv

    2016-01-01

    We find that forcing radical gender balance on corporate boards is associated with increased board independence and reduced firm value. A mandatory 40-percent gender quota shifts the average fraction of independent directors from 46 to 67 percent because female directors are much more often independent directors than males are. This shock to board independence via gender quotas is strongest in small, young, profitable, non-listed firms with powerful stockholders and few female directors. Such...

  9. Buddy Board

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enggaard, Helle; Moselund, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Projekt ’BuddyBoard’ er kommet i stand via et samarbejde mellem Frederikshavn kommune, Bunker43 og Lab. X. Afdeling en ’Havly’ på Sæby Ældrecenter fungerer som living lab, hvilket betyder, at det udgør et levende laboratorium for udvikling og afprøvning af teknologi (Schultz, 2013). Projektet er....... Bunker43 har udviklet en teknologi (BuddyBoard) til hurtig formidling af billeder fra pårørende og personale til beboere på institutioner. Pårørende og personale uploader billeder via en APP eller en hjemmeside og har mulighed for at tilføje en kort forklarende tekst til hvert billede. Beboeren ser...... billederne via en tablet. Systemet bygger på et simpelt og brugervenligt design, så ældre med kognitive og/eller fysiske funktionsnedsættelser kan anvende teknologien. BuddyBoard fungerer via internettet, og billederne gemmes på en sikret server hos udbyderen, som er Bunker43. Intentionerne med BuddyBoard er...

  10. Designing drug trials for Alzheimer's disease: what we have learned from the release of the phase III antibody trials: a report from the EU/US/CTAD Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellas, Bruno; Carrillo, Maria C; Sampaio, Cristina; Brashear, H Robert; Siemers, Eric; Hampel, Harald; Schneider, Lon S; Weiner, Michael; Doody, Rachelle; Khachaturian, Zaven; Cedarbaum, Jesse; Grundman, Michael; Broich, Karl; Giacobini, Ezio; Dubois, Bruno; Sperling, Reisa; Wilcock, Gordon K; Fox, Nick; Scheltens, Philip; Touchon, Jacques; Hendrix, Suzanne; Andrieu, Sandrine; Aisen, Paul

    2013-07-01

    An international task force of investigators from academia, industry, nonprofit foundations, and regulatory agencies met in Monte Carlo, Monaco, on October 31, 2012, to review lessons learned from the recent bapineuzumab and solanezumab trials, and to incorporate insights gained from these trials into future clinical studies. Although there is broad consensus that Alzheimer's disease (AD) should be treated during its earliest stages, the concept of secondary prevention has evolved to be described more accurately as treatment of preclinical, presymptomatic, or early AD. There continues to be a strong emphasis on biomarkers and a need for new biomarkers; however, there has also been a realization, based on completed trials, that the most reliable indicator of clinical efficacy across the entire spectrum of disease from asymptomatic to AD dementia is likely a measure of cognition. The task force made many recommendations that should improve the likelihood of success in future trials, including larger phase 2 or combined phase 2/phase 3 studies, clear evidence of target engagement in the central nervous system, evidence of downstream effects on biomarkers before initiating phase 3 studies, consideration of adaptive and targeted trial designs, and use of sensitive measures of cognition as the most robust indicator of treatment benefit. PMID:23809364

  11. Health care ethics consultation: nature, goals, and competencies. A position paper from the Society for Health and Human Values-Society for Bioethics Consultation Task Force on Standards for Bioethics Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulisio, M P; Arnold, R M; Youngner, S J

    2000-07-01

    Patients, families, and health care providers have a right to expect that ethics consultants can deal competently with the complex issues that they are asked to address. The Society for Health and Human Values-Society for Bioethics Consultation Task Force on Standards for Bioethics Consultation explored core competencies and related issues in ethics consultation. This position paper summarizes the content of the resulting Task Force Report, which included nine general conclusions: 1) U.S. societal context makes "ethics facilitation" an appropriate approach to ethics consultation; 2) ethics facilitation requires certain core competencies; 3) core competencies can be acquired in various ways; 4) individual consultants, teams, or committees should have the core competencies for ethics consultation; 5) consult services should have policies that address access, patient notification, documentation, and case review; 6) abuse of power and conflicts of interest must be avoided; 7) ethics consultation must have institutional support; 8) evaluation of process, outcomes, and competencies is needed; and 9) certification of individuals and accreditation of programs are rejected. PMID:10877742

  12. The Board's missing link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Cynthia A; Kaufman, Rhonda

    2003-03-01

    If a dam springs several leaks, there are various ways to respond. One could assiduously plug the holes, for instance. Or one could correct the underlying weaknesses, a more sensible approach. When it comes to corporate governance, for too long we have relied on the first approach. But the causes of many governance problems lie well below the surface--specifically, in critical relationships that are not structured to support the players involved. In other words, the very foundation of the system is flawed. And unless we correct the structural problems, surface changes are unlikely to have a lasting impact. When shareholders, management, and the board of directors work together as a system, they provide a powerful set of checks and balances. But the relationship between shareholders and directors is fraught with weaknesses, undermining the entire system's equilibrium. As the authors explain, the exchange of information between these two players is poor. Directors, though elected by shareholders to serve as their agents, aren't individually accountable to the investors. And shareholders--for a variety of reasons--have failed to exert much influence over boards. In the end, directors are left with the Herculean task of faithfully representing shareholders whose preferences are unclear, and shareholders have little say about who represents them and few mechanisms through which to create change. The authors suggest several ways to improve the relationship between shareholders and directors: Increase board accountability by recording individual directors' votes on key corporate resolutions; separate the positions of chairman and CEO; reinvigorate shareholders; and give boards funding to pay for outside experts who can provide perspective on crucial issues. PMID:12632807

  13. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    2012-2016 The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery Editorial Board consists of 341 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in pediatrics.They are from 37 countries,including Australia(6),Austria(2),Belgium(6),Brazil(9),Bulgaria(2),Canada(8),China(29),Denmark(1),Finland(2),France(9),Germany(21),Greece(7),India(11),Ireland(3),Israel(3),Italy(50),Jamaica(1),Japan(47),Lithuania(1),Malaysia(1),Netherlands(11),Pakistan(1),Poland(1),Portugal(1),Russia(1),Saudi Arabia(1),Serbia(2),Singapore(5),South Korea(8),Spain(5),Sweden(2),Switzerland(3),Thailand(2),Tunisia(1),Turkey(8),United Kingdom(11),and United States(59).

  14. Rules for scoring respiratory events in sleep: update of the 2007 AASM Manual for the Scoring of Sleep and Associated Events. Deliberations of the Sleep Apnea Definitions Task Force of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Richard B; Budhiraja, Rohit; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Gozal, David; Iber, Conrad; Kapur, Vishesh K; Marcus, Carole L; Mehra, Reena; Parthasarathy, Sairam; Quan, Stuart F; Redline, Susan; Strohl, Kingman P; Davidson Ward, Sally L; Tangredi, Michelle M

    2012-10-15

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) Sleep Apnea Definitions Task Force reviewed the current rules for scoring respiratory events in the 2007 AASM Manual for the Scoring and Sleep and Associated Events to determine if revision was indicated. The goals of the task force were (1) to clarify and simplify the current scoring rules, (2) to review evidence for new monitoring technologies relevant to the scoring rules, and (3) to strive for greater concordance between adult and pediatric rules. The task force reviewed the evidence cited by the AASM systematic review of the reliability and validity of scoring respiratory events published in 2007 and relevant studies that have appeared in the literature since that publication. Given the limitations of the published evidence, a consensus process was used to formulate the majority of the task force recommendations concerning revisions.The task force made recommendations concerning recommended and alternative sensors for the detection of apnea and hypopnea to be used during diagnostic and positive airway pressure (PAP) titration polysomnography. An alternative sensor is used if the recommended sensor fails or the signal is inaccurate. The PAP device flow signal is the recommended sensor for the detection of apnea, hypopnea, and respiratory effort related arousals (RERAs) during PAP titration studies. Appropriate filter settings for recording (display) of the nasal pressure signal to facilitate visualization of inspiratory flattening are also specified. The respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) signals to be used as alternative sensors for apnea and hypopnea detection are specified. The task force reached consensus on use of the same sensors for adult and pediatric patients except for the following: (1) the end-tidal PCO(2) signal can be used as an alternative sensor for apnea detection in children only, and (2) polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) belts can be used to monitor respiratory effort (thoracoabdominal

  15. Corporate Board Structure, Managerial Self-Dealing, and Common Agency

    OpenAIRE

    Vinicius Carrasco

    2005-01-01

    This paper compares the effects on corporate performance and managerial self-dealing in a situation in which a (privately informed) CEO reports to a single Board that is responsible for both monitoring management and establishing performance targets to an alternative in which the CEO reports to two different Boards, each of them responsible for a different task. The equilibrium set of the common agency game induced by the dual board structure is fully characterized. Compared to a single board...

  16. 78 FR 36752 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air University Board of Visitors. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (5...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air University Board of...

  17. 76 FR 62787 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air University Board of Visitors. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (5...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air University Board of...

  18. 77 FR 9633 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of meeting of the Air University Board of Visitors. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (5... (AFIT) Subcommittee of the Air University Board of Visitors will meet on Monday, March 12, 2012, from...

  19. 75 FR 63165 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of meeting of the Air University Board of Visitors. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (5...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air University Board of...

  20. 75 FR 8049 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air University Board of Visitors. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (5...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air University Board of...

  1. 75 FR 34440 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air University Board of Visitors. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (5...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air University Board of...

  2. 76 FR 57979 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air University Board of Visitors. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (5...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air University Board of...

  3. 76 FR 10341 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air University Board of Visitors. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (5...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air University Board of...

  4. 77 FR 31338 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air University Board of Visitors. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (5...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air University Board of...

  5. EFFORTS Sub-task report on task 4.2: Cold forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Christensen, Thomas Vennick; Bay, Niels

    1999-01-01

    Task 4.2 is a sub-task of task 4: Physical modelling validation. In sub-task 4.2 experimental analysis of cold forming as regards form filling, interface stresses and forces and moments using sof model materials have been carried out.......Task 4.2 is a sub-task of task 4: Physical modelling validation. In sub-task 4.2 experimental analysis of cold forming as regards form filling, interface stresses and forces and moments using sof model materials have been carried out....

  6. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    2011-2015The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics Editorial Board consists of 411 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in surgery research.They are from 47 countries,including Argentina(3),Australia(13),Austria(4),Belarus(1),Belgium(3),Brazil(10),Canada(10),China(41),Czech Republic(1),Denmark(1),Egypt(3),Estonia(1),Finland(1),France(5),Germany(21),Greece(6),Hungary(4),India(18),Iran(6),Ireland(1),Israel(4),Italy(35),Japan(34),Lebanon(1),Lithuania(3),Mexico(2),Netherlands(10),New Zealand(2),Norway(2),Pakistan(2),Philippines(1),Poland(3),Portugal(2),Romania(1),Russia(1),Saudi Arabia(2),Singapore(3),Slovenia(1),South Africa(1),South Korea(16),Spain(13),Sweden(3),Switzerland(1),Thailand(4),Turkey(7),United Kingdom(20),and United States(84).

  7. Guidelines for the first-line treatment of restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease, prevention and treatment of dopaminergic augmentation: a combined task force of the IRLSSG, EURLSSG, and the RLS-foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Silber, Michael H; Winkelman, John W; Högl, Birgit; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn; Buchfuhrer, Mark; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios; Inoue, Yuichi; Manconi, Mauro; Oertel, Wolfgang; Ondo, William; Winkelmann, Juliane; Allen, Richard P

    2016-05-01

    A Task Force was established by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG) in conjunction with the European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (EURLSSG) and the RLS Foundation (RLS-F) to develop evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of long-term pharmacologic treatment of dopaminergic-induced augmentation in restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED). The Task Force made the following prevention and treatment recommendations: As a means to prevent augmentation, medications such as α2δ ligands may be considered for initial RLS/WED treatment; these drugs are effective and have little risk of augmentation. Alternatively, if dopaminergic drugs are elected as initial treatment, then the daily dose should be as low as possible and not exceed that recommended for RLS/WED treatment. However, the physician should be aware that even low dose dopaminergics can cause augmentation. Patients with low iron stores should be given appropriate iron supplementation. Daily treatment by either medication should start only when symptoms have a significant impact on quality of life in terms of frequency and severity; intermittent treatment might be considered in intermediate cases. Treatment of existing augmentation should be initiated, where possible, with the elimination/correction of extrinsic exacerbating factors (iron levels, antidepressants, antihistamines, etc.). In cases of mild augmentation, dopamine agonist therapy can be continued by dividing or advancing the dose, or increasing the dose if there are breakthrough night-time symptoms. Alternatively, the patient can be switched to an α2δ ligand or rotigotine. For severe augmentation the patient can be switched either to an α2δ ligand or rotigotine, noting that rotigotine may also produce augmentation at higher doses with long-term use. In more severe cases of augmentation an opioid may be considered, bypassing α2δ ligands and rotigotine. PMID

  8. 32 CFR 865.122 - Summary of statistics for Discharge Review Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Summary of statistics for Discharge Review Board. 865.122 Section 865.122 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ORGANIZATION AND MISSION-GENERAL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARDS Air Force Discharge Review Board § 865.122 Summary of statistics for Discharge...

  9. Report of the AOD Format Task Force

    CERN Document Server

    Assamagan, K A; Calafiura, P; Costanzo, D; Cranmer, K; Dell'Acqua, A; Farbin, A; Van Gemmeren, P; Gowdy, S; Jones, R; Lari, T; Malon, D; Paige, F; Polesello, G; Snyder, S; Barberis, D; Giannotti, F; Hinchliffe, Ian; Quarrie, D

    2006-01-01

    The Analysis Object Data (AOD) are produced by ATLAS reconstruction and are the main input for most analyses. AOD, like the Event Summary Data (ESD, the other main output of reconstruction) are written as POOL files and are readable from Athena, and, to a limited extent, from ROOT. The AOD typical size, processing speed, and their relatively complex class structure and package dependencies, make them inconvenient to use for most interactive analysis. According to the computing model, interactive analysis will be based on Derived Physics Data (DPD), a user-defined format commonly produced from the AOD. As of release 12.0.3 it is common practice to write DPD as Athena-aware Ntuples (AANT) in ROOT. In an effort to organize and standardize AANT, we introduced the Structured Athena-aware Ntuple (SAN), an AANT containing objects that behave, as much as it is allowed by ROOT interpreter limitations, as their AOD counterparts. Recently it was proposed to extend SAN functionality beyond DPD implementation. SAN objects...

  10. Report of the Dark Energy Task Force

    OpenAIRE

    Albrecht, Andreas; Bernstein, Gary; Cahn, Robert; Freedman, Wendy L.; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Hu, Wayne; Huth, John; Kamionkowski, Marc; Edward W. Kolb; Knox, Lloyd; Mather, John C.; Staggs, Suzanne; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.

    2006-01-01

    Dark energy appears to be the dominant component of the physical Universe, yet there is no persuasive theoretical explanation for its existence or magnitude. The acceleration of the Universe is, along with dark matter, the observed phenomenon that most directly demonstrates that our theories of fundamental particles and gravity are either incorrect or incomplete. Most experts believe that nothing short of a revolution in our understanding of fundamental physics will be required to achieve a f...

  11. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potschka, Heidrun; Fischer, Andrea; Löscher, Wolfgang;

    2015-01-01

    Common criteria for the diagnosis of drug resistance and the assessment of outcome are needed urgently as a prerequisite for standardized evaluation and reporting of individual therapeutic responses in canine epilepsy. Thus, we provide a proposal for the definition of drug resistance and partial...... therapeutic success in canine patients with epilepsy. This consensus statement also suggests a list of factors and aspects of outcome, which should be considered in addition to the impact on seizures. Moreover, these expert recommendations discuss criteria which determine the validity and informative value of...

  12. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Muñana, Karen;

    2015-01-01

    initial drug is unsatisfactory, and 4) when treatment changes should be considered. In this consensus proposal, an overview is given on the aim of AED treatment, when to start long-term treatment in canine epilepsy and which veterinary AEDs are currently in use for dogs. The consensus proposal for drug...... management of canine idiopathic epilepsy. Furthermore, for the management of structural epilepsy AEDs are inevitable in addition to treating the underlying cause, if possible....

  13. In vacuum undulator task force report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Green-Chasman lattice, which is the basis for both NSLS storage rings, was conceived with insertion devices in mind. Long, field-free straight sections were provided in the design. The electron optics were chosen so that these sections had zero dispersion and the effects of new magnetic structures placed in these regions would have minimal effect on the emittance of the electron beam. This design concept has been followed by all high-brightness rings which were built subsequent to the NSLS. The X-Ray Ring straight sections also have a very small vertical β function, in addition to the zero dispersion. This was done to optimize the brightness of wiggler sources. There is a further benefit however. The β function determines the beam size and divergence at a particular point in the storage ring lattice. The size is proportional to √β and the divergence is proportional to 1/√β. Thus the electron beam is very small at the center of the X-Ray Ring straight sections. In the initial development of the insertion device program, no specific advantage was taken of this feature. Of the eight straight sections in the X-Ray Ring lattice, five are readily available for magnetic insertion devices and the remaining three are dedicated to radio-frequency drive cavities (2) and injection (1)

  14. IN VACUUM UNDULATOR TASK FORCE REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HASTINGS,J.B.; KAO,C.C.; STEFAN,P.; BURLEY,S.; CARGILL,G.S.; CHANCE,M.; DIERKER,S.; HENDRICKSON,W.; EVANS-LUDERODT,K.; MAO,H.K.

    1998-06-01

    The Green-Chasman lattice, which is the basis for both NSLS storage rings, was conceived with insertion devices in mind. Long, field-free straight sections were provided in the design. The electron optics were chosen so that these sections had zero dispersion and the effects of new magnetic structures placed in these regions would have minimal effect on the emittance of the electron beam. This design concept has been followed by all high-brightness rings which were built subsequent to the NSLS. The X-Ray Ring straight sections also have a very small vertical {beta} function, in addition to the zero dispersion. This was done to optimize the brightness of wiggler sources. There is a further benefit however. The {beta} function determines the beam size and divergence at a particular point in the storage ring lattice. The size is proportional to {radical}{beta} and the divergence is proportional to 1/{radical}{beta}. Thus the electron beam is very small at the center of the X-Ray Ring straight sections. In the initial development of the insertion device program, no specific advantage was taken of this feature. Of the eight straight sections in the X-Ray Ring lattice, five are readily available for magnetic insertion devices and the remaining three are dedicated to radio-frequency drive cavities (2) and injection (1).

  15. Chiral Magnetic Effect Task Force Report

    CERN Document Server

    Skokov, Vladimir; Koch, Volker; Schlichting, Soeren; Thomas, Jim; Voloshin, Sergei; Wang, Gang; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we briefly examine the current status of the study of the chiral magnetic effect including theory and experimental progress. We recommend future strategies for resolving uncertainties in interpretation including recommendations for theoretical work, recommendations for measurements based on data collected in the past five years, and recommendations for beam use in the coming years of RHIC. We have specifically investigated the case for colliding nuclear isobars (nuclei with the same mass but different charge) and find the case compelling. We recommend that a program of nuclear isobar collisions to isolate the chiral magnetic effect from background sources be placed as a high priority item in the strategy for completing the RHIC mission.

  16. Report of the Dark Energy Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Andreas; Bernstein, Gary; Cahn, Robert; Freedman, Wendy L.; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Hu, Wayne; Huth, John; Kamionkowski, Marc; Kolb, Edward W.; Knox, Lloyd; Mather, John C.

    2006-01-01

    Dark energy appears to be the dominant component of the physical Universe, yet there is no persuasive theoretical explanation for its existence or magnitude. The acceleration of the Universe is, along with dark matter, the observed phenomenon that most directly demonstrates that our theories of fundamental particles and gravity are either incorrect or incomplete. Most experts believe that nothing short of a revolution in our understanding of fundamental physics will be required to achieve a full understanding of the cosmic acceleration. For these reasons, the nature of dark energy ranks among the very most compelling of all outstanding problems in physical science. These circumstances demand an ambitious observational program to determine the dark energy properties as well as possible.

  17. Task Force on Culture and Ethnic Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    especially in training the scholars and practitioners in the cultural and other competences relevant for treating the increasing diversity of the populations. Besides there is a critical discussion of patholisation of some aspects of general human life leading to medical- diagnostic practices...... for cultural training and Eastern practices course developed on students� demand, yet these papers reflect a salient commonality � developing psychological understandings among the professionals, which are responsive to the current demographical transformations in Europe. The symposium invites the participants...... for an interactive discussion to enhance the paradigms presented leading to reciprocal inspiration and exchange. 1.Abstract for presentation in Symposium An Academic Teaching Program in Culture and Ethnic Diversity for M.A. students of Psychology Prof.em. Dr. Alexander Thomas, Regensburg University, Germany Since...

  18. Awareness of the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force recommended changes in mammography screening guidelines, accuracy of awareness, sources of knowledge about recommendations, and attitudes about updated screening guidelines in women ages 40–49 and 50+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiviniemi Marc T

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The US Preventive Services Task Force updated mammography recommendations in 2009, recommending against routine screening for women ages 40–49 and reducing recommended frequency for women 50+. The recommendation changes were highly controversial and created conflicting recommendations across professional organizations. This study examines overall awareness of the changes, accuracy of knowledge about changes, factors related to both overall awareness and accuracy, sources of knowledge about changes, and attitudes about the new recommendations. Method National telephone survey of 508 women, half aged 40–49 and half 50+, conducted one year after the update (November/December 2010; cooperation rate was 36%. Measures include awareness, accuracy, source of knowledge, interactions with providers, and attitudes about the changes. Results Fewer than half of women were aware of the guideline changes. Younger, more educated, and higher income women were more aware. Of those who were aware, only 12% correctly reported both change in age and frequency. Accuracy was not associated with demographics. The majority learned of changes through the media and the majority had negative attitudes about the changes. Conclusions Despite widespread coverage of the recommendation changes, overall awareness in the relevant population is low. Increasing awareness and addressing attitudes about the changes is necessary to ensure the use of recommendations to impact screening behavior.

  19. Genetic Counselors' and Genetic Counseling Students' Attitudes Around the Clinical Doctorate and Other Advanced Educational Options for Genetic Counselors: A Report from the Genetic Counseling Advanced Degree Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Rebecca; Peay, Holly; Hicks, Melissa; Kloos, Jacqueline; Westman, Rachel; Conway, Laura; Finucane, Brenda; Fitzpatrick, Jennifer; Gordon, Erynn; Ramos, Erica; Sekhon-Warren, Jaspreet; Silver, Josh; Walton, Carol; Reiser, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    Since its establishment over 40 years ago, the genetic counseling profession has grown to an estimated ~4,000 professionals in North America. While the profession has maintained the Master's degree as the entry-level and terminal degree, many other allied health professions have added advanced training pathways, such as the clinical doctorate (ClinD) either as an optional post-professional degree or required entry-level degree. Discussions regarding advanced degrees have also occurred within the genetic counseling profession, dating back to as early as the 1980s. In 2011, the Genetic Counseling Advanced Degree Task Force (GCADTF) was convened to explore the issue again, with the goal of "[engaging] all of the professional leadership organizations in the field of genetic counseling in a decision-making process about whether the profession should move to a Clinical Doctorate". As part of their work, the GCADTF surveyed practicing genetic counselors (n = 4,321) and genetic counseling students (n = 522) in the US and Canada regarding their interest in moving to the ClinD as the entry-level degree. This survey also included questions about other options for advanced training to generate data to inform future discussions around this very important professional issue. Herein, we describe the results of the survey, with particular attention to genetic counselor preferences for additional advanced education/certification opportunities and recommendations for future discussion. PMID:25352337

  20. Benthic habitat map of the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force Watershed Partnership Initiative Kā'anapali priority study area and the State of Hawai'i Kahekili Herbivore Fisheries Management Area, west-central Maui, Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Susan A.; Gibbs, Ann E.; White, Darla J.

    2014-01-01

    Nearshore areas off of west-central Maui, Hawai‘i, once dominated by abundant coral coverage, now are characterized by an increased abundance of turf algae and macroalgae. In an effort to improve the health and resilience of the coral reef system, the Kahekili Herbivore Fisheries Management Area was established by the State of Hawai‘i, and the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force selected the Kā‘anapali region as a priority study area. To support these efforts, the U.S. Geological survey mapped nearly 5 km2 of sea floor from the shoreline to water depths of about 30 m. Unconsolidated sediment (predominantly sand) constitutes 65 percent of the sea floor in the mapped area. Reef and other hardbottom potentially available for coral recruitments constitutes 35 percent of the mapped area. Of this potentially available hardbottom, only 51 percent is covered with a minimum of 10 percent coral, and most is found between 5 and 10 m water depth.