WorldWideScience

Sample records for board community care

  1. The longitudinal effect of technical assistance dosage on the functioning of Communities That Care prevention boards in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Mark E; Ridenour, Ty A; Greenberg, Mark T

    2008-03-01

    This study examined the impact of on-site and off-site technical assistance (TA) dosage on the functioning of Communities That Care prevention boards in Pennsylvania. Data on board functioning were collected over three years from board member and TA providers. Results of path models indicated little overall impact of TA dosage on board functioning the subsequent year. However, on-site TA dosage did appear to influence board functioning for younger boards and for boards who were relatively better functioning. In addition, the stability of board functioning and off-site TA was moderate to strong, the stability of on-site TA dosage was low, and poor functioning sites did not receive more TA in the following year. EDITORS' STRATEGIC IMPLICATIONS: This paper is one of the first quantitative examinations of the impact of TA on community-based prevention or health promotion coalitions. The authors provide a number of implications for further study with respect to TA. Thus, it should be valuable to researchers and practitioners involved in the development and implementation of such community-based efforts.

  2. Nursing care community health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Acosta-Salazar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Process Nursing Care (PAE is a systematic tool that facilitates the scientificity of care in community practice nurse, the application of scientific method in community practice, allows nursing to provide care in logical, systematic and comprehensive reassessing interventions to achieve the proposed results. It began with the valuation of Marjory Gordon Functional Patterns and then at the stage of diagnosis and planning North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA, Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC is interrelate. It is a descriptive and prospective study. Diagnosis was made by applying the instruments measuring scale of the socio-demographic characteristics, symptom questionnaire for early detection of mental disorders in the community and appreciation for functional patterns. The PAE includes more frequent diagnoses, criteria outcomes, indicators, interventions and activities to manage community issues. alteration was evidenced in patterns: Adaptation and Stress Tolerance, Self-perception-Self-concept-, Role-Relationships, sleep and rest and Perception and Health Management. A standardized NANDA-NIC-NOC can provide inter care holistic care from the perspective of community mental health with a degree of scientific nature that frames the professional work projecting the individual, family and community care.

  3. Boards of directors under fire: an examination of nonprofit board duties in the health care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, N

    1998-01-01

    Attorney Ono presents a detailed discussion of fiduciary duty principles as applied to the directors of nonprofit health care corporations in the current health care environment. The article reviews general corporate responsibilities, the implication of the taxpayer's Bill of Rights 2, the care of In re Caremark International Inc. Derivative Litigation and particular issues faced by boards in nonprofit conversions.

  4. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    payment for health care services; a widely used strategy to supplement ... and opportunities for sustainable health care financing for low income communities in sub-. Saharan ..... funding and rising costs for health care services, More so, evidence from research studies have ... provider payment method has the potential to.

  5. Hospital boards and medical specialists collaborating for quality of care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botje, D.; Plochg, T.; Klazinga, N.; Wagner, C.

    2012-01-01

    Context: In European countries policy briefs are stressing the importance of hospital governance for the quality of care. When governing towards quality it is essential for Hospital Boards to receive the proper information to do so. In the Netherlands, the national association for medical

  6. Hospital boards and medical specialists collaborating for quality of care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botje, D.; Plochg, T.; Klazinga, N.; Wagner, C.

    2012-01-01

    Context: In European countries policy briefs are stressing the importance of hospital governance for the quality of care. When governing towards quality it is essential for Hospital Boards to receive the proper information to do so. In the Netherlands, the national association for medical specialist

  7. A Community Coalition Board Creates a Set of Values for Community-based Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Blumenthal, MD, MPH

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundResearchers generally agree that communities should participate in the community-based research process, but neither a universally accepted approach to community participation nor a set of guiding principles exists.ContextThe Morehouse School of Medicine Prevention Research Center was established in 1999 with the support of a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Its partners include a low-income, predominantly African American community, six public agencies, and two other academic institutions. A Community Coalition Board was established to represent the partners. The majority of the board is community members; it serves in a governance rather than an advisory capacity, with the community acting as the senior partner in interactions with the medical school, the agencies, and other academic institutions.MethodsThe Community Coalition Board developed a set of research priorities and a set of 10 community values, or principles, to guide research. A board committee reviews each protocol to ensure they uphold the values.ConsequencesThe Community Coalition Board has been using the values since 1999, and in this article we describe its experience. After an initial period that included some disagreements between researchers and community members on the board, relationships have been good, and protocols have been approved with only minor changes.InterpretationAlthough the established community values reflect universally acknowledged principles of research ethics, they also address local concerns. An equal partnership between community members and researchers is most beneficial if the partners can agree on a set of values to govern research.

  8. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    Department of Community Health & Primary Care, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, P.M.B. ... the child's health, culturally based beliefs and ..... immunization safety as this was a rural ... Charles SW, Olalekan AU, Peter MN,.

  9. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. ... This is one of the factors that determine whether or ..... Expired vaccines found in fridge / cold box .... date vaccine temperature monitoring charts. were stored on refrigerator door ...

  10. Cultivating a Doctoral Community of Inquiry and Practice: Designing and Facilitating Discussion Board Online Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Linda; Darrow, Rob

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a promising and powerful approach used to cultivate a doctoral community of inquiry and practice and harness the intelligence, commitment, and energy of all of its members in a blended learning environment. The discussion board online learning community approach was developed to transform a traditional face-to-face doctoral…

  11. Impact of a preceptor education board and computer network to engage community faculty at Dartmouth Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollisch, D O; Gephart, D; Brooks, W B; Gagne, R; Allen, C; Donahue, D

    1999-01-01

    In 1994, as part of the Generalist Physician Initiative of The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Dartmouth Medical School established two programs to support and engage community-based teaching. The Preceptor Education Board and Community Computer Network were established to support a network of community-based preceptors and to facilitate communication between course directors at the school and community-based teachers. The board's mission is to organize, develop, and support a network of community-based primary care faculty, and to create and review community-based curricula. Through the board, community faculty members have made substantial contributions to curriculum, evaluation, faculty development, governance, and financing in community-based teaching. The Community Computer Network provides hardware, software, network systems, and support. Course directors and students have reported improved community-based educational experiences as a direct result of the Network. These two initiatives are dynamic and effective ways to improve the quality of community-based education and preceptors' morale. These efforts have strengthened the community faculty and their connection to the academic medical center.

  12. Community Advisory Boards in Community-Based Participatory Research: A Synthesis of Best Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan D. Newman, PhD, RN, CRRN

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Community-based participatory research (CBPR is a paradigm to study and reduce disparities in health outcomes related to chronic disease. Community advisory boards (CABs commonly formalize the academic–community partnerships that guide CBPR by providing a mechanism for community members to have representation in research activities. Researchers and funding agencies increasingly recognize the value of the community’s contribution to research and acknowledge that community advisory boards are a key component of successful CBPR projects. In this article, we describe the best processes for forming, operating, and maintaining CABs for CBPR. We synthesize the literature and offer our professional experiences to guide formation, operation, and maintenance of CABs.

  13. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    availability and affordability of ACTs in Secondary Health Care (SHC) facilities in Lagos State and ... percent (37.5%) of the hospitals did not have the drug in stock at the time of visit and drugs had been out of .... Only one in the community pharmacies as single dose .... funding and international competitive bidding for.

  14. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26 (1) 96-107 ... obesity. Specific criteria for MetS developed by. 19 of hypertension. .... Triglycerides 150 mg/dL or more or on Christians 329 (96.2%); and lower grade income.

  15. Creating A Sustainable Model of Spine Care in Underserved Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldeman, Scott; Nordin, Margareta; Outerbridge, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    The world lacks sustainable models of care to manage spinal disorders in poor and underserved communities. The purpose of this article is to: (1) review the rationale and importance of developing a sustainable evidence-based model of care at low cost for people with spinal disorders in underserved...... leadership, research and a model of care, there is an opportunity to help reduce the burden of the leading cause of disability in the world....... adequate care, World Spine Care (WSC) was established to "improve lives in underserved communities through sustainable, integrated, evidence-based, spinal care." WSC is comprised of volunteers and institutions from 6 continents and several countries, and incorporates a Board of Directors, an executive...

  16. Preserving community in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, E J; Emanuel, L L

    1997-02-01

    There are two prominent trends in health care today: first, increasing demands for accountabilty, and second, increasing provision of care through managed care organizations. These trends promote the question: What form of account-ability is appropriate to managed care plans? Accountability is the process by which a party justifies its actions and policies. Components of accountability include parties that can be held or hold others accountable, domains and content areas being assessed, and procedures of assessment. Traditionally, the professional model of accountability has operated in medical care. In this model, physicians establish the standards of accountability and hold each other accountable through professional organizations. This form of accountability seems outdated and inapplicable to managed care plans. The alternatives are the economic and the political models of accountability. In the economic model, medicine becomes more like a commodity, and "exit" (consumers changing providers for reasons of cost and quality) is the dominant procedure of accountability. In the political model, medicine becomes more like a community good, and "voice" (citizens communicating their views in public forums or on policy committees, or in elections for representatives) is the dominant procedure of accountability. The economic model's advantages affirm American individualism, make minimal demands on consumers, and use a powerful incentive, money. Its disadvantages undermine health care as a nonmarket good, undermine individual autonomy, undermine good medical practice, impose significant demands on consumers to be informed, sustain differentials of power, and use indirect procedures of accountability. The political model's advantages affirm health care as a matter of justice, permit selecting domains other than price and quality for accountability, reinforce good medical practice, and equalize power between patients and physicians. Its disadvantages include inefficiency in

  17. Facility charter and quality of care for board and care residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation structure, process, and outcome measures of quality in for-profit and not-for-profit board and care homes are compared. We find one structural measure (providing nursing care), three process measures (food quality, staff treat residents with respect, and staff verbally abuse residents), and two outcomes measures (cleanliness of the facility and complaints to Ombudsman) to be significant. Moreover, the directions of these effects are all consistent, with for-profit facilities rated more poorly that not-for-profit facilities. These results are discussed emphasizing their implications for efficient and effective resident care.

  18. Satisfaction with care and rehabilitation among people with stroke, from hospital to community care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tholin, Helena; Forsberg, Anette

    2014-12-01

    Despite recent improvements in Swedish stroke care some patients still experience a lack of support and follow-up after discharge from hospital. In order to provide good care according to the National Board of Health and Welfare, systematic evaluations of stroke care must be performed. Quality indicators in the national guidelines could be useful when measuring quality of care in all parts of the stroke care chain. To investigate how people with stroke experienced their care, rehabilitation, support, and participation from hospital to community care. Qualitative interviews were performed with 11 people in 2009-2010 covering their experiences of care, rehabilitation, support, and participation. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis. The interviewees were satisfied with their hospital care, but reported both positive and negative experiences of the continuing care. Most of them appreciated intense, specific, and professional rehabilitation, and had experienced these qualities in the rehabilitation they received in most parts of the stroke care chain. Those who received support from the community services expressed satisfaction with the staff, but also felt that autonomy was lost. Several did not feel involved in the health care planning, but instead relied on the judgement of the staff. To ensure high quality throughout the whole stroke care chain, people with stroke must be invited to participate in the care and the planning of care. To offer evidence-based stroke rehabilitation, it is important that the rehabilitation is specific, intense, and performed by professionals, regardless of where the rehabilitation is performed. A changed view of the patient's autonomy in residential community services should be developed, and this process must start from the staff and residents. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  19. Public and Tribal Community College Institutional Review Boards: A National Descriptive Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocean, Mia; Hirschi, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    It is currently unknown how many Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) exist at community colleges. This study investigates the percentage of public and Tribal community colleges that have active IRBs. It also examines the potential relationships between states that allow community colleges to confer baccalaureate degrees, or that have articulation…

  20. 77 FR 51616 - Open Meeting of the Community Development Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ...) of the Community Development Banking and Financial Institutions Act of 1994 (12 U.S.C. 4703(d... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Community Development Financial Institutions Fund Open Meeting of the Community Development Advisory Board...

  1. Maximizing Child Care Services: The Role of Owners and Boards. A Discussion Paper [and] Legislation Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, E. Elaine; Ferguson, Tammy McCormick; Jacobs, John

    The Early Childhood Development Communique articulated a commitment to increasing positive outcomes for children from birth to age 6 in Canada. Noting that owners and boards of child care programs are charged with providing a quality service to young children and their families, this discussion paper articulates the owners' and boards'…

  2. Board oversight of quality: any differences in process of care and mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H Joanna; Lockee, Carlin; Bass, Karma; Fraser, Irene

    2009-01-01

    In response to legal and accreditation mandates as well as pressures from purchasers and consumers for quality improvement, hospital governing boards seek to improve their oversight of quality of care by adopting various practices. Based on a previous survey of hospital presidents/chief executive officers, this study examines differences in hospital quality performance associated with the adoption of particular practices in board oversight of quality. Quality was measured by performance in process of care and risk-adjusted mortality, using the Hospital Compare data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project inpatient databases of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Board practices found to be associated with better performance in both process of care and mortality include (1) having a board quality committee; (2) establishing strategic goals for quality improvement; (3) being involved in setting the quality agenda for the hospital; (4) including a specific item on quality in board meetings; (5) using a dashboard with national benchmarks that includes indicators for clinical quality, patient safety, and patient satisfaction; and (6) linking senior executives' performance evaluation to quality and patient safety indicators. Involvement of physician leadership in the board quality committee further enhanced the hospital's quality performance. Taken together, these findings seem to support the will-execution-constancy of purpose framework on improving the effectiveness of hospital boards in overseeing quality. Future study should examine how specific board practices influence the culture and operations of the hospital that lead to better quality of care.

  3. Students in Caring School and Classroom Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Daniel; Battistich, Victor

    This study examined the sense of community felt by students and teachers at 24 elementary schools in 6 school districts in different regions of the United States. The study is based on the assumption that students who feel part of a caring community will adopt the community's norms and values. On a 38-item questionnaire, students indicated the…

  4. Interaction between community pharmacists and community nurses in dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Veronica M

    2016-04-01

    There has been little research that explores the interaction between community pharmacists and community nurses and how this interaction could benefit people affected by dementia. Using information taken from a larger study, this article presents the views of community pharmacists and one community nurse on how their communication, information sharing and team integration may improve care for this patient group. The community pharmacists reported positive attitudes to supporting people affected by dementia, but they highlighted barriers to integrated team working. In contrast, the community nurse conveyed the belief that the community pharmacist was an integrated member of the community health team. Community pharmacists and community nurses are keen to interact with each other to support people affected by dementia, but this interaction stops short of collaborative, integrated team working. Further research is needed to address this issue.

  5. [Community health in primary health care teams: a management objective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebot Adell, Carme; Pasarin Rua, Maribel; Canela Soler, Jaume; Sala Alvarez, Clara; Escosa Farga, Alex

    2016-12-01

    To describe the process of development of community health in a territory where the Primary Health Care board decided to include it in its roadmap as a strategic line. Evaluative research using qualitative techniques, including SWOT analysis on community health. Two-steps study. Primary care teams (PCT) of the Catalan Health Institute in Barcelona city. The 24 PCT belonging to the Muntanya-Dreta Primary Care Service in Barcelona city, with 904 professionals serving 557,430 inhabitants. Application of qualitative methodology using SWOT analysis in two steps (two-step study). Step 1: Setting up a core group consisting of local PCT professionals; collecting the community projects across the territory; SWOT analysis. Step 2: From the needs identified in the previous phase, a plan was developed, including a set of training activities in community health: basic, advanced, and a workshop to exchange experiences from the PCTs. A total of 80 team professionals received specific training in the 4 workshops held, one of them an advanced level. Two workshops were held to exchange experiences with 165 representatives from the local teams, and 22 PCTs presenting their practices. In 2013, 6 out of 24 PCTs have had a community diagnosis performed. Community health has achieved a good level of development in some areas, but this is not the general situation in the health care system. Its progression depends on the management support they have, the local community dynamics, and the scope of the Primary Health Care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Master Agreement Between Bay de Noc Community College Governing Board and Bay de Noc Community College Faculty Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay de Noc Community Coll., Escanaba, MI.

    This agreement between the Bay de Noc Community College Governing Board and the Bay de Noc Community College Faculty Association covers the period from 1973-75. Contents cover recognition, rights, and guarantees; faculty, personnel, and division procedures; appointments, promotions, reductions, and related matters; leaves and absences; grievance…

  7. 77 FR 12577 - Department of Defense (DoD) Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries; Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... of the Secretary Department of Defense (DoD) Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries... Board of Actuaries will take place. DATES: Friday, August 3, 2012, from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ADDRESSES... Medicare- Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries meeting or make an oral presentation or submit...

  8. Assessment of pharmaceutical care practices of community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of pharmaceutical care practices of community pharmacists in patients with co-morbidity of hypertension and diabetes in Delta state. ... The most encountered drug therapy problem was non- compliance. The low level of ...

  9. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2Department of Community Health, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria. ... public health problem that can lead to a great burden of disability in the community. ..... women. Equally worthy of note, is the fact that a higher proportion of females ...

  10. Governance of quality of care: a qualitative study of health service boards in Victoria, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bismark, Marie M; Studdert, David M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe the engagement of health service boards with quality-of-care issues and to identify factors that influence boards’ activities in this area. Methods We conducted semistructured interviews with 35 board members and executives from 13 public health services in Victoria, Australia. Interviews focused on the role currently played by boards in overseeing quality of care. We also elicited interviewees’ perceptions of factors that have influenced their current approach to governance in this area. Thematic analysis was used to identify key themes from interview transcripts. Results Virtually all interviewees believed boards had substantial opportunities to influence the quality of care delivered within the service, chiefly through setting priorities, monitoring progress, holding staff to account and shaping culture. Perceived barriers to leveraging this influence included insufficient resources, gaps in skills and experience among board members, inadequate information on performance and regulatory requirements that miss the mark. Interviewees converged on four enablers of more effective quality governance: stronger regional collaborations; more tailored board training on quality issues; smarter use of reporting and accreditation requirements; and better access to data that was reliable, longitudinal and allowed for benchmarking against peer organisations. Conclusions Although health service boards are eager to establish quality of care as a governance priority, several obstacles are blocking progress. The result is a gap between the rhetoric of quality governance and the reality of month-to-month activities at the board level. The imperative for effective board-level engagement in this area cannot be met until these barriers are addressed. PMID:24327735

  11. Health Services in Boarding School: An Oasis of Care, Counseling, and Comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavletic, Adria C.; Dukes, Thomas; Greene, Jamelle Gardine; Taylor, Jennifer; Gilpin, Louise B.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents who attend high school as preparatory boarding students are growing up and learning to care for themselves in a very different set of circumstances than those who live at home with their families. Although this choice may present myriad opportunities for personal growth and academic advantages, nurturance and support from caring adults…

  12. Illinois Community College Board Uniform Accounting Procedures Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    This manual was designed to provide chief finance officers and other administrators with a summary of laws and policies that relate to Illinois public community colleges and to provide a uniform system for accounting, budgeting, auditing, and reporting in the state's community colleges. After chapter I describes the fiscal philosophies and…

  13. Establishing community advisory boards for clinical trial research in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    trial research in Malawi: engendering ethical conduct in research. Abstract ... participants; minimise risk and balance benefit; and fairly ... on the Harmonisation of Good Clinical Practice (ICHGCP) to faculty ... of, and acceptable to the community'10. They can ..... any study-related questions and concerns community members ...

  14. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    223 nursing mothers with babies over three months old on the immunization clinic days at Federal Medical Center,. Abeokuta. ... prevalent in communities with poor food hygiene,. 1 ... rice, mashed potatoes, and boiled carrots help in reducing ...

  15. Integrating rheumatology care in the community: can shared care work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita YN Lim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Singapore's rapidly ageing population and chronic disease burden at public hospital specialist clinics herald a silver tsunami. In Singapore, “right siting” aims to manage stable chronic disease in primary care at a lower cost. To improve the quality of rheumatology care, we created shared care between rheumatologist and family physician to reduce hospital visits.Methods: Clinical practice improvement methodology was used to structure shared care of stable patients between hospital rheumatologists and eleven community family physicians; one ran a hospital clinic. A case manager coordinated the workflow.Results: About 220 patients entered shared care over 29 months. Patients without hospital subsidies (private patients and private family physicians independently predicted successful shared care, defined as one cycle of alternating care.Discussion: Our shared care model incorporated a case manager, systematic workflows, patient selection criteria, willing family physician partners and rheumatologists in the absence of organizational integration. Health care affordability impacts successful shared care. Government subsidy hindered right siting to private primary care.Conclusions: Financing systems in Singapore, at health policy level, must allow transfer of hospital subsidies to primary care, both private and public, to make it more affordable than hospital care. Structural integration will create a seamless continuum between hospital and primary care.

  16. Integrating rheumatology care in the community: can shared care work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita YN Lim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Singapore's rapidly ageing population and chronic disease burden at public hospital specialist clinics herald a silver tsunami. In Singapore, “right siting” aims to manage stable chronic disease in primary care at a lower cost. To improve the quality of rheumatology care, we created shared care between rheumatologist and family physician to reduce hospital visits. Methods: Clinical practice improvement methodology was used to structure shared care of stable patients between hospital rheumatologists and eleven community family physicians; one ran a hospital clinic. A case manager coordinated the workflow. Results: About 220 patients entered shared care over 29 months. Patients without hospital subsidies (private patients and private family physicians independently predicted successful shared care, defined as one cycle of alternating care. Discussion: Our shared care model incorporated a case manager, systematic workflows, patient selection criteria, willing family physician partners and rheumatologists in the absence of organizational integration. Health care affordability impacts successful shared care. Government subsidy hindered right siting to private primary care. Conclusions: Financing systems in Singapore, at health policy level, must allow transfer of hospital subsidies to primary care, both private and public, to make it more affordable than hospital care. Structural integration will create a seamless continuum between hospital and primary care.

  17. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    infection prevention and control programmes for the protection of patients, patient care givers and healthcare ... laundry, pharmacy etc where there is exposure to a .... unused sterile swabs (10) and culture media plates ..... patient safety.

  18. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    catastrophic health expenditures (CHE) and risk of being impoverished as a result of cost of care were assessed. Statistical ... Impact and contributors to cost of managing long term conditions in a ... sectors is ongoing, it has become clear that.

  19. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    birth attendants, and if there is a proper division of labour amongst the three tiers of the health system. 3 ... Obstetric. Care,. Traditional. Birth. Attendants,. Maternal. Mortality,. Neonatal ..... interview believed that sudden onset of labor and.

  20. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    This was a cross-sectional, multi clinic study involving 265 mothers whose children had erupted at least a tooth and attending the ... parents, health care workers and personal experiences were the sources of beliefs ..... Ethiopians abroad.

  1. Community Care and the Care Transition in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ymke Kelders

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available “Community care” en de zorgtransitie in Nederland De transitie in de gezondheidszorg in Nederland is al jaren een centraal thema in de politiek en het maatschappelijke debat. De recente veranderingen vereisen (opnieuw aandacht in onder andere onderzoek en onderwijs. In dit artikel reflecteren we op de ideologie en doelen die schuilen achter de transitie in Nederland en linken we deze naar het onderzoek en onderwijs dat georganiseerd wordt door het lectoraat Community Care. Wat betekent het “nieuwe denken” van de transitie voor het Community Care gedachtegoed in relatie tot onderwijs en onderzoek? Het lectoraat Community Care van de Hogeschool van Amsterdam houdt zich bezig met verschillende onderzoeksonderwerpen verdeeld onder drie stromingen: informele zorg, sociale inclusie en netwerkversterking. Binnen deze drie onderzoekslijnen wordt er gefocust op zorg door de samenleving en hoe dit gelinkt kan worden aan professionele zorg. In dit artikel zetten we uiteen waarom dit relevant is in onderzoek en onderwijs, zeker wanneer de transitie in Nederland eens temeer benadrukt dat zorg in en door de samenleving belangrijk is, en de rol van de zorgprofessional verandert. Tot slot reflecteren we op de manieren waarop we dit gedachtegoed en het huidige zorgbeleid kunnen vertalen in onderwijs voor studenten die later in het sociaal- en zorgdomein werkzaam zullen zijn. Community Care and the Care Transition in the NetherlandsThe transition taking place within the Dutch healthcare system has been a central theme in politics and public debate for decades. The recent changes again demand the full attention of researchers and educators in the field. In this article, we reflect on the current ideology and goals of the transition and link these to the range of ideas that lie behind the ideal of “community care”. Additionally, we pose the question of what these changes may mean for research and education within the social care domain in general and

  2. Continuity of care in community midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, John; Cheyne, Helen; Mould, Gillian; Page, Miranda

    2015-06-01

    Continuity of care is often critical in delivering high quality health care. However, it is difficult to achieve in community health care where shift patterns and a need to minimise travelling time can reduce the scope for allocating staff to patients. Community midwifery is one example of such a challenge in the National Health Service where postnatal care typically involves a series of home visits. Ideally mothers would receive all of their antenatal and postnatal care from the same midwife. Minimising the number of staff-handovers helps ensure a better relationship between mothers and midwives, and provides more opportunity for staff to identify emerging problems over a series of home visits. This study examines the allocation and routing of midwives in the community using a variant of a multiple travelling salesmen problem algorithm incorporating staff preferences to explore trade-offs between travel time and continuity of care. This algorithm was integrated in a simulation to assess the additional effect of staff availability due to shift patterns and part-time working. The results indicate that continuity of care can be achieved with relatively small increases in travel time. However, shift patterns are problematic: perfect continuity of care is impractical but if there is a degree of flexibility in the visit schedule, reasonable continuity is feasible.

  3. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    western Nigeria to Participate in Community Based Health Insurance. 1. 2 ..... Islam. Others. 159. 225. 3. 41.1. 58.1. 0.8. Marital status. Single. Married. 96. 287. 24.8 ..... services in southeast Nigeria. ... and the poor: evidence from Nigeria",.

  4. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lifestyle Changes and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer among. Immigrants in the United .... food rich in red meat, animal fat, sugars and refined of CRC in Africa .... region to improve health care delivery and secure the is obtainable in the UK, ...

  5. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    proir permission to their pregnant wives to seek care studies, a husband ... two or three male CHOs, while a female CHO getting safe blood, given prior permission for comes once a week .... and note taker, both of whom were native speakers.

  6. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4 and optimal use. In Nigeria, despite the The main objective of this study is therefore to .... Islam. Others. 185. 205. 5. 46.8. 51.9. 1.3. Utilization (use) of PHC Services and educational qualifications and of low socio-economic .... other zones except in the south-east region. .... primary health care interventions, the evidence is.

  7. Building Schools as Caring Communities: Why, What, and How?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Lynn H.; Doyle, Patrick M.

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that a caring community has an "ethic of care" that works to develop students who will become empathetic adults and transport a caring mission beyond the walls of the school into their communities. Discusses establishing powerful policies for equity, empowering groups, teaching caring in classrooms, caring for students, and caring by…

  8. Psychogeriatric care: building rural community capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, M H; Hemingway, D; Grant, J; Jamer, B

    2012-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, British Columbia (BC) Canada has been undergoing a process of regionalization of health services which includes decentralization and the demand for self-sufficiency with respect to caring for people with mental health issues. In BC, regionalization has meant the continued downsizing of its one large provincial psychiatric hospital Riverview, which has resulted in relocating patients from this hospital to cities and towns throughout BC, and the establishment and/or renovation of psychiatric tertiary-care facilities to treat local community members who experience mental ill health. In the context of the relocation of psychiatric tertiary care, communities in northern BC face the specific challenge of having to provide these specialized services in remote settings, not only for people transferred from Riverview, but also for the increasing number of people 'aging-in-place' in a region that has the fastest growth of older adults in BC. Little is known about the capacity of these remote communities to manage change, develop broader models of care, and integrate people with psychogeriatric mental health issues with residents at existing facilities. This study employed a qualitative research design which involved field research in the rural community where people were transferred, and interviews and focus groups with key people involved in the transfer process. In the analysis of the data a gender-based lens was applied to clarify the differing needs and concerns of male and female patients and to attend to possible needs relating to culture and ethnicity. The findings illustrate persistent 'hinterland-metropolis' and 'front-line versus administrative staff' tensions, with respect to resource distribution and top-down governance, and demonstrate the need for more transparent and comprehensive planning by health authorities with respect to instituting mental health reforms in a northern context, as well as improved communication between administrative

  9. Community care in practice: social work in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymbery, M; Millward, A

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the establishment of social work within primary health care settings in Great Britain, following the passage of the National Health Service and Community Care Act in 1990. Although the improvement of relationships between social workers and primary health care teams has been promoted for a number of years, the advent of formal policies for community care has made this a priority for both social services and health. This paper presents interim findings from the evaluation of three pilot projects in Nottinghamshire, Great Britain. These findings are analysed from three linked perspectives. The first is the extent to which structures and organisations have worked effectively together to promote the location of social workers within health care settings. The second is the impact of professional and cultural factors on the work of the social worker in these settings. The third is the effect of interpersonal relationships on the success of the project. The paper will conclude that there is significant learning from each of these perspectives which can be applied to the future location of social workers to primary health care.

  10. Use of Electronic Health Records in Residential Care Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the National Technical Information Service NCHS Use of Electronic Health Records in Residential Care Communities Recommend on ... Facilities Most residential care communities did not use electronic health records in 2010, and use varied by ...

  11. Home and community care sector accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele Gray, Carolyn; Berta, Whitney; Deber, Raisa B; Lum, Janet

    2014-09-01

    This paper focuses on accountability for the home and community care (HCC) sector in Ontario. The many different service delivery approaches, funding methods and types of organizations delivering HCC services make this sector highly heterogeneous. Findings from a document analysis and environmental scan suggest that organizations delivering HCC services face multiple accountability requirements from a wide array of stakeholders. Government stakeholders tend to rely on regulatory and expenditure instruments to hold organizations to account for service delivery. Semi-structured key informant interview respondents reported that the expenditure-based accountability tools being used carried a number of unintended consequences, both positive and negative. These include an increased organizational focus on quality, shifting care time away from clients (particularly problematic for small agencies), dissuading innovation, and reliance on performance indicators that do not adequately support the delivery of high-quality care.

  12. Antidepressant prescribing in community cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbury, Fredrick D; Madlensky, Lisa; Raich, Peter; Thompson, Mark; Whitney, Geoff; Hotz, Ken; Kralj, Boris; Edell, William S

    2003-05-01

    To describe patterns of antidepressant (ADs) prescribing in community oncology practice. Data were collected using an electronic medical record on all staged breast, colon, and lung cancer patients in three community-based oncology practices. The data were analyzed retrospectively, using descriptive and bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression modeling. There were 850 breast, 299 colon, and 473 lung cancer patients identified in this analysis. Overall, 19.2% of breast, 11% of colon, and 13.7% of lung cancer patients had been prescribed ADs during the 2-year period. The clinic in which cancer treatment was received predicted AD prescribing. The relationship between AD administration and age proved to be nonlinear; the pattern exhibited an "inverted U" shape. Patients with comorbidities and on pain medications were more likely to be administered ADs. Colon cancer patients on pain medications were five times more likely to be administered ADs than those not on pain medications. While some predictors of AD prescribing appear to be consistent with other studies, such as being on pain medication, there is still a great amount of variability in prescribing patterns across community practices, age groups, and cancer diagnoses. This study demonstrates that prescriptions of ADs seem to be influenced by parameters other than psychopathology. Given the importance of major depression in oncology care, diagnosis of psychiatric disorders and prescription patterns of psychotropics should be part of the routine monitoring and quality management in oncology patient care.

  13. Integrating child dental care at Community Smiles: the director's goals fulfilled....

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaer, Paul J; Benjamin, Paul L; Lopez, Manuel G; Patterson, Chip

    2010-01-01

    Community Smiles/Dade County Dental Research Clinic provides dental care to the indigent population of Miami-Dade County. A local board of directors governs the organization, with dental procedures performed by volunteer professionals from the community. The research clinic partners with community organizations to obtain sustained funding from diverse sources. The clinic has a long-term commitment to the growth and development of children in the community. Certainly, changing the structure and focus of the clinic toward children's dental care and seeking community funding and resources to institute this program was an experiment. In his four years as clinic director and chief executive officer (CEO) at Community Smiles, the late Dr. Robert M. Wolf brought increased clinic productivity and organizational change that expanded community involvement. Dr. Wolf's tenure at Community Smiles brought general increases in patients care in terms of patients visits, new patients and number of procedures performed. However, the key to his administration as clinic director and CEO was the production and integration of a children's dentistry program into the mainstream activities of the clinic. Furthermore, he oversaw the successful corporate reorganization of Community Smiles as the clinic emerged under a non-profit corporate structure employing multi-faceted community resources. Emphasizing new dental programs for children in the community is culturally and socially competent--positively impacting the public health. Community Smiles became a venue where disparities were largely eliminated and access to dental treatment increased. Health care was promoted as Community Smiles became a place that helped build a healthier community.

  14. Pioneering community-oriented primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susser, M

    1999-01-01

    This is a retrospective report on the importance of Kark and Cassel's 1952 paper on community-oriented primary care (COPC). In 1978, WHO and UNICEF endorsed COPC. However, the ideas girding and framing this approach had first been given full expression in practice some four decades earlier. In Depression-Era South Africa, Sidney Kark, a leader of the National Department of Health, converted the emergent discipline of social medicine into a unique form of comprehensive practice and established the Pholela Health Center, which was the explicit model for COPC. COPC as founded and practiced by Kark was a community, family and personal practice; it also was a multidisciplinary and team practice. Furthermore, the innovations of COPC entailed monitoring, evaluation, and research. Evaluation is the essence of Kark and Kassel's paper, which offers a convincing demonstration of the effects of COPC. Its key findings include the following: 1) that there was a decline in the incidence of syphilis in the area served by the health center; 2) that diet and nutrition improved; and 3) that the crude mortality rate as well as the infant mortality rate--the standard marker--declined in Pholela. In the succeeding decades, OPC had an international legacy (through WHO and H. Jack Geiger's influence in the US Office of Economic Opportunity), which came full circle in the 1980s, when a young generation of South Africans began to search their history for models for their health care programs at the dawn of the post-Apartheid Era.

  15. Four C: Community Coordinated Child Care: Concept, Goals, Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Child Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    This document reports on a day care program for children of working mothers, the 4-C program. This program is a federally sponsored effort conducted through community cooperation. Its goals include: (1) more and better child care, (2) mobilization of community resources and coordination of existing and new child care programs, (3) ensuring the…

  16. The palliative care interdisciplinary team: where is the community pharmacist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Moira; Pugh, Judith; Jiwa, Moyez; Hughes, Jeff; Fisher, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    Palliative care emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach to care to improve quality of life and relieve symptoms. Palliative care is provided in many ways; in hospices, hospital units, and the community. However, the greatest proportion of palliative care is in the community. In hospice and palliative care units in hospitals, clinical pharmacists are part of the interdisciplinary team and work closely with other health care professionals. Their expertise in the therapeutic use of medications is highly regarded, particularly as many palliative care patients have complex medication regimens, involving off-label or off-license prescribing that increases their risk for drug-related problems. However, this active involvement in the palliative care team is not reflected in the community setting, despite the community pharmacist being one of the most accessible professionals in the community, and visiting a community pharmacist is convenient for most people, even those who have limited access to private or public transport. This may be due to a general lack of understanding of skills and knowledge that particular health professionals bring to the interdisciplinary team, a lack of rigorous research supporting the necessity for the community pharmacist's involvement in the team, or it could be due to professional tensions. If these barriers can be overcome, community pharmacists are well positioned to become active members of the community palliative care interdisciplinary team and respond to the palliative care needs of patients with whom they often have a primary relationship.

  17. Institutional review board challenges related to community-based participatory research on human exposure to environmental toxins: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudel Ruthann A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report on the challenges of obtaining Institutional Review Board (IRB coverage for a community-based participatory research (CBPR environmental justice project, which involved reporting biomonitoring and household exposure results to participants, and included lay participation in research. Methods We draw on our experiences guiding a multi-partner CBPR project through university and state Institutional Review Board reviews, and other CBPR colleagues' written accounts and conference presentations and discussions. We also interviewed academics involved in CBPR to learn of their challenges with Institutional Review Boards. Results We found that Institutional Review Boards are generally unfamiliar with CBPR, reluctant to oversee community partners, and resistant to ongoing researcher-participant interaction. Institutional Review Boards sometimes unintentionally violate the very principles of beneficence and justice which they are supposed to uphold. For example, some Institutional Review Boards refuse to allow report-back of individual data to participants, which contradicts the CBPR principles that guide a growing number of projects. This causes significant delays and may divert research and dissemination efforts. Our extensive education of our university Institutional Review Board convinced them to provide human subjects protection coverage for two community-based organizations in our partnership. Conclusions IRBs and funders should develop clear, routine review guidelines that respect the unique qualities of CBPR, while researchers and community partners can educate IRB staff and board members about the objectives, ethical frameworks, and research methods of CBPR. These strategies can better protect research participants from the harm of unnecessary delays and exclusion from the research process, while facilitating the ethical communication of study results to participants and communities.

  18. The development of quality indicators for community pharmacy care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bie, J. de; Kijlstra, N.B.; Daemen, B.J.G.; Bouvy, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: To develop a national system of quality indicators for community pharmacy care, reported by community pharmacies. Methods: After preliminary validation, an online consensus study was conducted. Pharmacy practice experts (round 1) and practising pharmacists (round 2) were approached.

  19. Capacity to deliver pharmaceutical care by community pharmacies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The capacity of community pharmacies to deliver pharmaceutical care was studied ... Ninety five percent (95%) of the respondents always educated customers on ... of the principles of Millennium Development Goals and pharmaceutical care ...

  20. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. ... of research findings, reviews, theories and information on all aspects of public health. ... health planning and management, health policy, health care financing, public health nutrition, ...

  1. The Effects of Training Community Leaders in Prevention Science: Communities that Care in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Mark E.; Greenberg, Mark T.; Osgood, D. Wayne; Anderson, Amy; Babinski, Leslie

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of training community leaders in prevention science in the context of the Communities That Care (CTC) model fo community empowerment. Data from an evaluation of CTC in 21 Pennsylvania communities and interviews with 203 community leaders show that training is positively, although modestly, associated with participant attitudes…

  2. Contract between the Board of Trustees of Community College District No. 20 and the Walla Walla Community College Association for Higher Education, 1987-89.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walla Walla Community Coll., WA.

    This contract between the Board of Trustees of Community College District No. 20 and the Walla Walla Community College Association for Higher Education covers the period between 1987 and 1989. The 14 articles in the contract set forth provisions related to: (1) administration, including recognition of the bargaining unit, status of the contract,…

  3. Integrating palliative care in the surgical and trauma intensive care unit: a report from the Improving Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit (IPAL-ICU) Project Advisory Board and the Center to Advance Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosenthal, Anne C; Weissman, David E; Curtis, J Randall; Hays, Ross M; Lustbader, Dana R; Mulkerin, Colleen; Puntillo, Kathleen A; Ray, Daniel E; Bassett, Rick; Boss, Renee D; Brasel, Karen J; Campbell, Margaret; Nelson, Judith E

    2012-04-01

    Although successful models for palliative care delivery and quality improvement in the intensive care unit have been described, their applicability in surgical intensive care unit settings has not been fully addressed. We undertook to define specific challenges, strategies, and solutions for integration of palliative care in the surgical intensive care unit. We searched the MEDLINE database from inception to May 2011 for all English language articles using the term "surgical palliative care" or the terms "surgical critical care," "surgical ICU," "surgeon," "trauma" or "transplant," and "palliative care" or "end-of- life care" and hand-searched our personal files for additional articles. Based on review of these articles and the experiences of our interdisciplinary expert Advisory Board, we prepared this report. We critically reviewed the existing literature on delivery of palliative care in the surgical intensive care unit setting focusing on challenges, strategies, models, and interventions to promote effective integration of palliative care for patients receiving surgical critical care and their families. Characteristics of patients with surgical disease and practices, attitudes, and interactions of different disciplines on the surgical critical care team present distinctive issues for intensive care unit palliative care integration and improvement. Physicians, nurses, and other team members in surgery, critical care and palliative care (if available) should be engaged collaboratively to identify challenges and develop strategies. "Consultative," "integrative," and combined models can be used to improve intensive care unit palliative care, although optimal use of trigger criteria for palliative care consultation has not yet been demonstrated. Important components of an improvement effort include attention to efficient work systems and practical tools and to attitudinal factors and "culture" in the unit and institution. Approaches that emphasize delivery of

  4. 78 FR 9890 - DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries; Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... of the Secretary DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries; Notice of Federal... Board of Actuaries will take place. DATES: Friday, August 2, 2013, from 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m..., DoD Office of the Actuary, 4800 Mark Center Drive, STE 06J25-01, Alexandria, VA 22350-4000....

  5. The citizen scientist: Community-academic partnerships through Translational Advisory Boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Darpan I; Winkler, Paula; Botello, Jorge; Villarreal, Jocelin; Puga, Frank

    2016-12-01

    To describe the effectiveness of engaging patient partners as "citizen scientists" in the research process to boost patient centered outcomes research in underrepresented populations. Translational Advisory Boards in South Texas have effectively collaborated with University researchers to develop community-based patient centered research. Here we describe innovative approaches in research to engage patients and offer practical methods to enhance partnerships between patients and researchers to facilitate patient engagement. Three health issues identified by the TABs were diabetes, obesity and teen pregnancy Examples of other community inspired research topics include air and water quality, methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, intimate partner violence, chronic pain, and human papilloma virus and hepatitis C vaccinations. Patient engagement of underrepresented populations is inverse to the vast disparities they experience. In order to adequately address our nation's deficits in providing equitable healthcare, we must fully integrate disparate partners into the research process. By engaging community champions, academic health centers can fully integrate meaningful interventions on topics of interest to the catchment area in which they serve. These lessons can be used in developing local and regional collaborations across the country to boost active participation of patient stakeholder in PCOR to reduce healthcare disparities and improve our healthcare systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Stoma care nursing: what the community nurse needs to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julia

    2007-08-01

    The transition from hospital to home can be a worrying period of time for a patient with a newly formed stoma. It is well documented that community care is important, however this transition has been seen as a weak link in the care for a patient with a stoma (Allison 1996). In most cases following discharge from hospital, the nurse specialist in stoma care will visit the patient at home as a means of maintaining continuity of care. It is also important that the patient's GP, district nurse and other relevant community services are introduced to ensure a cohesive approach to the patients care at home (Taylor, 2003). This article therefore aims to offer the community nurse an overview of stoma care nursing in order to provide the continuity of care much needed by this group of patients.

  7. Planning community-oriented primary care in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doron, H

    1984-01-01

    The concept of primary care in the Kupat Holim Health Insurance Institution encompasses all the stages of health: the promotion of health, personal preventive care, curative care, and rehabilitation in the community. Primary care is, thus, the foundation of this nationwide comprehensive health insurance and health care delivery system; Kupat Holim covers 3.2 million people, close to 80 percent of Israel's total population in 1983. Primary care clinics in the community are the main focus of care and have undergone changes in the types of health care providers and functions as population characteristics change. In this system, the planning process allows constant review of changing needs and demands and the introduction of new functions. The main approaches to planning primary care that are presented deal with team members and the division of work in the community clinic, manpower training at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, and the content of primary care. Current trends include the extension of services provided to the patient in his home as well as the clinic and greater emphasis on preventive care. The interrelationship between policy and planning for primary care is strengthened by the linkage between financer, provider, and consumer in Kupat Holim. The planning process must make optimal use of this linkage to guide those responsible for health policy in implementing effective change.

  8. A Fire Safety Certification System for Board and Care Operators and Staff. SBIR Phase I: Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bonnie L.

    This report describes the development and pilot testing of a fire safety certification system for board and care operators and staff who serve clients with developmental disabilities. During Phase 1, training materials were developed, including a trainer's manual, a participant's coursebook a videotape, an audiotape, and a pre-/post test which was…

  9. A Fire Safety Certification System for Board and Care Operators and Staff. SBIR Phase II: Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bonnie L.

    This report describes Phase II of a project which developed a system for delivering fire safety training to board and care providers who serve adults with developmental disabilities. Phase II focused on developing and pilot testing a "train the trainers" workshop for instructors and field testing the provider's workshop. Evaluation of the 2-day…

  10. 75 FR 6360 - Federal Advisory Committee; DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-09

    ... Actuaries AGENCY: Department of Defense (DoD). ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the... that the DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries will meet on August 18, 2010... Actuary, 4040 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 308, Arlington, VA 22203; phone 703-696-7404....

  11. Threats and violence in Swedish community elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefsson, Karin; Ryhammar, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Violence in elderly care has been reported on a global scale. The aim of this study was to describe nurses' perceptions of threats and violence, directed at themselves and other staff in community elderly care. Another aim was to describe nurses' access to prevention measures for handling threats and violence. A questionnaire was answered by registered nurses (RNs) (n=213) in community elderly care. Data was analyzed by SPSS. The results showed that nurses had experienced high-degree indirect threats (48%), direct threats of violent acts (40%) and violent acts (40%). Forty-five percent of the nurses had witnessed violence and threats toward other staff. Twenty percent of the nurses stated to have access to education in managing threats and violence. The conclusions were that violence occurred frequently in community elderly care, as perceived by nurses, as well as that community authority should increase staff education for handling violence.

  12. Community-based rehabilitation: working in partnership with eye care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Weber

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Any response to the needs of people with visual impairment and their families will be more effective if eye care workers and CBR programme staff can work together at the community level.

  13. Community nurses working in piloted primary care teams: Irish Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Triona; O'Neill, Catherine

    2010-08-01

    Primary care health services in the Irish Republic have undergone fundamental transformation with the establishment of multidisciplinary primary care teams nationwide. Primary care teams provide a community-based health service delivered through a range of health professionals in an integrated way. As part of this initiative ten pilot teams were established in 2003. This research was undertaken in order to gain an understanding of nurse's experiences of working in a piloted primary care team. The methodology used was a focus group approach. The findings from this study illustrated how community nurse's roles and responsibilities have expanded within the team. The findings also highlighted the benefits and challenges of working as a team with various other community-based health-care disciplines.

  14. Community nurses working in piloted primary care teams: Irish Republic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Triona

    2010-08-01

    Primary care health services in the Irish Republic have undergone fundamental transformation with the establishment of multidisciplinary primary care teams nationwide. Primary care teams provide a community-based health service delivered through a range of health professionals in an integrated way. As part of this initiative ten pilot teams were established in 2003. This research was undertaken in order to gain an understanding of nurse\\'s experiences of working in a piloted primary care team. The methodology used was a focus group approach. The findings from this study illustrated how community nurse\\'s roles and responsibilities have expanded within the team. The findings also highlighted the benefits and challenges of working as a team with various other community-based health-care disciplines.

  15. Learning communities of community care nurses and lecturers: the exchange of knowledge and skills.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkleij, K.A.M.; Francke, A.L.; Voordouw, I.; Sol, B.G.M.; Latour, C.H.M.; Wallner, C.; Baronner, W.M.; Jacobs, G.; Janssen, B.M.; Koopman-van den Berg, D.J.E.M.; Bosma, C.; Theunissen, J.M.J.; Gobbens, R.J.J.; Albers, M.; Jager, B. de; Keuning, A.; Finnema, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Due to the aging population and the governmental policy to substitute institutional care with home care, more community care nurses are needed in the Netherlands. In addition, new competences, for instance regarding promoting self-management and multidisciplinary collaboration, are

  16. Learning communities of community care nurses and lecturers: the exchange of knowledge and skills.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkleij, K.A.M.; Francke, A.L.; Voordouw, I.; Sol, B.G.M.; Latour, C.H.M.; Wallner, C.; Baronner, W.M.; Jacobs, G.; Janssen, B.M.; Koopman-van den Berg, D.J.E.M.; Bosma, C.; Theunissen, J.M.J.; Gobbens, R.J.J.; Albers, M.; Jager, B. de; Keuning, A.; Finnema, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Due to the aging population and the governmental policy to substitute institutional care with home care, more community care nurses are needed in the Netherlands. In addition, new competences, for instance regarding promoting self-management and multidisciplinary collaboration, are req

  17. Community pharmacists: a forgotten resource for palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Paul Anthony; Gray, John; Hakendorf, Paul; Morris, Bel; Currow, David Christopher; Rowett, Debra S

    2013-12-01

    Timely access to medicines within the community is important for palliative patients where their preferred place of care is the home environment. The objective of this observational study is to establish baseline data to quantify the issue of poor access to medicines for symptom control in the last few days of life. The list of 13 medicines was generated from medicine use within a metropolitan palliative care unit. A survey was designed to determine which of these 13 medicines community pharmacies stock, the expiry date of this stock, awareness of palliative care patients by community pharmacists and basic demographic characteristics of the community pharmacies. Surveys were distributed, by post, to all community pharmacies in South Australia. The response rate was 23.7%, and was representative of all socioeconomic areas. Each pharmacy stocked a median of 3 medicines (range 0-12) with 1 in 8 pharmacies having none of the 13 medicines listed in the survey. When the data was combined to identify the range of medicines from all pharmacies within a geographical postcode region, the median number of medicines increased to 5 medicines per postcode. Just over 1 in 5 pharmacies reported learning about the palliative status of a patient through another health practitioner. Community pharmacies remain an underused resource to support timely access to medicines for community-based palliative patients. Palliative care services and government agencies can develop new strategies for better access to medicines that will benefit community patients and their carers.

  18. Communities as co-producers in integrated care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk Nies

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Integrated care has become too much a professionals' concept, in research and theory development, as well as in practice, especially in high-income countries. The current debate on integrated care is dominated by norms and values of professionals, while most of the care is provided by non-professionals. The paradigms of integrated care for people with complex needs need to be reconsidered. It is argued that non-professional care and care by local communities need to be incorporated as a resource and a co-producer of care. It seems fair to assume that the community as such can take a more prominent role in organising and delivering health and long-term care. This implies redefining professional and non-professional responsibilities and boundaries. The boundary between public and private space is losing its significance, as is the distinction between formal and non-formal care. It also requires renegotiating and transforming organisational boundaries. This has consequences for legislation, funding and professional qualifications, as well as for management and governance. It challenges current professional identities as well as identities of service users, their informal carers and citizens. It may also require new types of funding, including non-monetary currencies, time-sharing and social impact bonds. The challenge is that big, that it needs to be addressed at its smallest scale: the citizen in his social network and local community, being co-producer of really integrated care

  19. Continuing Care Retirement Communities: An Analysis of Financial Viability and Health Care Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchlin, Hirsch S.

    1988-01-01

    Calculated financial ratios for 109 Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs). Noted problems with regard to asset productivity, profitability, and equity levels. Found that a risk-spreading charge structure for financing health care needs appeared to exist among CCRCs providing a full-care contract. (Author/ABL)

  20. A New Arduino Datalogger Board for Simple, Low Cost Environmental Monitoring and the EnviroDIY Web Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, S. D.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Montgomery, D. S.; Damiano, S. G.; Brooks, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Scientists and educators around the world have been building their own dataloggers and devices using a variety of boards based on the Arduino open source electronics platform. While there have been several useful boards on the market in the past few years, they still required significant modification or additional components in order to use them with various sensors or deploy them in remote areas. Here we introduce our new custom datalogger board that makes it very easy to build a rugged environmental monitoring system. These custom boards contain all of the essential features of a solar-powered datalogger with radio telemetry, plus they have a very convenient and modular method for attaching a wide variety of sensors and devices. Various deployment options and installations are shown, as well as the online database that is used for capturing the live streaming data from the loggers and displaying graphs on custom web pages. Following the introduction last year of the EnviroDIY online community (http://enviroDIY.org), it continues to gain new members and share new ideas about open-source hardware and software solutions for observing our environment. EnviroDIY members can showcase their gadgets or describe their projects, ask questions, or follow along with helpful tutorials. Our new datalogger board, together with the EnviroDIY website, will make it easy for anyone to build and deploy their own environmental monitoring stations.

  1. Influences on Case-Managed Community Aged Care Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Emily Chuanmei; Dunt, David; Doyle, Colleen

    2016-10-01

    Case management has been widely implemented in the community aged care setting. In this study, we aimed to explore influences on case-managed community aged care practice from the perspectives of community aged care case managers. We conducted 33 semistructured interviews with 47 participants. We drew these participants from a list of all case managers working in aged care organizations that provided publicly funded case management program(s)/packages in Victoria, Australia. We used a multilevel framework that included such broad categories of factors as structural, organizational, case manager, client, and practice factors to guide the data analysis. Through thematic analysis, we found that policy change, organizational culture and policies, case managers' professional backgrounds, clients with culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, and case management models stood out as key influences on case managers' practice. In the future, researchers can use the multilevel framework to undertake implementation research in similar health contexts.

  2. A management, leadership, and board road map to transforming care for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, John

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade I have studied 115 healthcare organizations in II countries, examining them from the boardroom to the patient bedside. In that time, I have observed one critical element missing from just about every facility: a set of standards that could reliably produce zero-defect care for patients. This lack of standards is largely rooted in the Sloan management approach, a top-down management and leadership structure that is void of standardized accountability. This article offers an alternative approach: management by process--an operating system that engages frontline staff in decisions and imposes standards and processes on the act of managing. Organizations that have adopted management by process have seen quality improve and costs decrease because the people closest to the work are expected to identify problems and solve them. Also detailed are the leadership behaviors required for an organization to successfully implement the management-by-process operating system and the board of trustees' role in supporting the transformation.

  3. Primary care teams: New Zealand's experience with community-governed non-profit primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, Peter; Davis, Peter; Lay-Yee, Roy

    2005-05-01

    Community-governed non-profit primary care organisations started developing in New Zealand in the late 1980s with the aim to reduce financial, cultural and geographical barriers to access. New Zealand's new primary health care strategy aims to co-ordinate primary care and public health strategies with the overall objective of improving population health and reducing health inequalities. The purpose of this study is to carry out a detailed examination of the composition and characteristics of primary care teams in community-governed non-profit practices and compare them with more traditional primary care organisations, with the aim of drawing conclusions about the capacity of the different structures to carry out population-based primary care. The study used data from a representative national cross-sectional survey of general practitioners in New Zealand (2001/2002). Primary care teams were largest and most heterogeneous in community-governed non-profit practices, which employed about 3% of the county's general practitioners. Next most heterogeneous in terms of their primary care teams were practices that belonged to an Independent Practitioner Association, which employed the majority of the country's general practitioners (71.7%). Even though in absolute and relative terms the community-governed non-profit primary care sector is small, by providing a much needed element of professional and organisational pluralism and by experimenting with more diverse staffing arrangements, it is likely to continue to have an influence on primary care policy development in New Zealand.

  4. Dementia Care Knowledge Sharing within a First Nations Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Dorothy; Blake, Catherine; Thiessen, Emily; Finkelstein, Sara; Gibson, Maggie; Morgan, Debra G; Markle-Reid, Maureen; Culum, Ivan

    2013-12-01

    This article discusses the First Nations sample of a larger study on dementia care decisions and knowledge sharing.The purpose is to enhance understanding of the process of knowledge sharing among health care practitioners(HCPs), care partners, and persons with dementia (PWDs) within a rural First Nations community. A constructivist grounded theory methodology was used. Nineteen interviews were conducted at three points in time with two dementia care networks that included two PWDs, three care partners, and two HCPs. A sharing dementia care knowledge model was conceived, with the PWDs and their care partners at the centre. Knowledge sharing in the model was represented by three broad themes: (1) developing trusting relationships, (2) accessing and adapting the information, and (3) applying the information. Culturally sensitive approaches were essential to developing trusting relationships. Once developed, knowledge sharing through accessing, adapting, and applying the information was possible.

  5. Pharmaceutical care in community pharmacies: practice and research in Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volmer, Daisy; Vendla, Kaidi; Vetka, Andre; Bell, J Simon; Hamilton, David

    2008-07-01

    To describe practice and research related to pharmaceutical care in Estonia following the country's restoration of independence from Russia in 1991. The transition from a Soviet to a free market economy has impacted the healthcare and pharmacy systems in Estonia. Following independence, ownership of community pharmacies was transferred from the State government to individual pharmacists. However, pharmacy ownership is no longer restricted to pharmacists and recent years have seen the emergence of large pharmacy chains. The number of community pharmacies in Estonia increased from 270 in 1992 to 523 in 2007. In addition to dispensing, Estonian pharmacies retain a focus on compounding of extemporaneous products and supply of herbal medications. Research into pharmaceutical care has addressed topics including pharmaceutical policy and the quality of pharmacy services provided at community pharmacies. There has been limited pressure to date from the governmental institutions and patient organizations to introduce extended pharmaceutical services. However, the trend toward providing health services in primary care will create greater responsibilities and new opportunities for community pharmacists. Recent inclusion of clinical pharmacy and interprofessional learning in the undergraduate pharmacy curriculum will help ensure ongoing development of the profession and high-quality pharmacy services in the future. Pharmaceutical care services in Estonian community pharmacies have become more patient-oriented over the past 17 years. However, community pharmacies continue to retain a focus on traditional roles.

  6. Communication issues for the interdisciplinary community palliative care team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, A; Blackford, J

    2001-09-01

    This paper discusses the findings of a critical study that examined the communication patterns between nurses and general practitioners (GPs) providing palliative care in Australia. Interviews and focus groups involved 40 palliative care nurses who worked in the three settings of care: community, hospice and hospital. Issues that impeded effective communication strategies between palliative care nurses and GPs were networking, case management, multiple service providers, lack of standardized documentation and formal tracking of clients, along with difficulties in transmission of relevant practice knowledge. Supporting strategies for effective formal modes of communicating and reporting are described.

  7. Prenatal care disparities and the migrant farm worker community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    The pregnant migrant farm worker faces many barriers to accessing healthcare in the United States due to poverty, language/literacy issues, transportation difficulties, and geographic isolation. The advanced practice nurse has the opportunity to contribute solutions to the problems of lack of adequate prenatal care among the migrant farm worker community, if he/she is aware of the need and can institute novel models of care. This article describes the problem of migrant farm worker health and suggests ways that advanced practice nurses can provide cost effective, competent professional care to reduce or eliminate the obstacles to care for this population.

  8. Forging community partnerships to improve health care: the experience of four Medicaid managed care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silow-Carroll, Sharon; Rodin, Diana

    2013-04-01

    Some managed care organizations (MCOs) serving Medicaid beneficiaries are actively engaging in community partnerships to meet the needs of vulnerable members and nonmembers. We found that the history, leadership, and other internal factors of four such MCOs primarily drive that focus. However, external factors such as state Medicaid policies and competition or collaboration among MCOs also play a role. The specific strat­egies of these MCOs vary but share common goals: (1) improve care coordination, access, and delivery; (2) strengthen the community and safety-net infrastructure; and (3) prevent illness and reduce disparities. The MCOs use data to identify gaps in care, seek community input in designing interventions, and commit resources to engage community organiza­tions. State Medicaid programs can promote such work by establishing goals, priorities, and guidelines; providing data analysis and technical assistance to evaluate local needs and community engagement efforts; and convening stakeholders to collaborate and share best practices.

  9. Development of printed-circuit-board based industry-compatible point-of-care biosensing and bioprocessing technology with applications

    OpenAIRE

    Tseng, Hsiu-Yang

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents the development of a technology employing printed circuit board (PCB) technology to facilitate the performance and translation of point-of-care (POC) biosensing and bioprocessing devices toward practical products. Key features of the proposed technology are a universal, standardized platform and a set of techniques, featuring integrated functional units, three-dimensional (3D) configurations, convenient device-instrumentation interconnections, and industry-compatible prec...

  10. Evaluation of the integrated community based home care model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LR Uys

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In 1999-2000 the Integrated Community-Based Home Care model for the care of people with AIDS in communities were implemented in seven sites across the country. The post-implementation evaluation showed that most respondents felt that the model could be replicated if a functioning and informed network including all partners, and a strong management team were in place. The effects of the project were mainly positive for all stakeholders (hospice, clinic, hospital, PWA and their carers, professionals and other community members. Hospitals and community- based services became more aware of and involved in the needs of PWA and felt that the model enabled them to address these needs. PWA and their carers felt supported and respected.

  11. End-of-life care at a community cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowall, David E; Yu, Bennett W; Heineken, Sandra L; Lewis, Elizabeth N; Chaudhry, Vishal; Daugherty, Joan M

    2012-07-01

    The evidence-based use of resources for cancer care at end of life (EOL) has the potential to relieve suffering, reduce health care costs, and extend life. Internal benchmarks need to be established within communities to achieve these goals. The purpose for this study was to evaluate data within our community to determine our EOL cancer practices. A random sample of 390 patients was obtained from the 942 cancer deaths in Wicomico County, Maryland, for calendar years 2004 to 2008. General demographic, clinical event, and survival data were obtained from that sample using cancer registry and hospice databases as well as manual medical record reviews. In addition, the intensity of EOL cancer care was assessed using previously proposed indicator benchmarks. The significance of potential relationships between variables was explored using χ(2) analyses. Mean age at death was 70 years; 52% of patients were male; 34% died as a result of lung cancer. Median survival from diagnosis to death was 8.4 months with hospice admission and 5.8 months without hospice (P = .11). Four of eight intensity-of-care indicators (ie, intensive care unit [ICU] admission within last month of life, > one hospitalization within last month of life, hospital death, and hospice referral < 3 days before death) all significantly exceeded the referenced benchmarks. Hospice versus nonhospice admissions were associated (P < .001) with ICU admissions (2% v 13%) and hospital deaths (2% v 54%). These data suggest opportunities to improve community cancer center EOL care.

  12. Palliative care in the community: setting practice guidelines for primary care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, L; Stacy, R

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Previous studies have demonstrated deficiencies in palliative care in the community. One method of translating the results of research into clinical practice, in order to produce more effective health care, is the development of clinical guidelines. Setting standards for such care has been performed by care teams in both hospital and hospice settings but not in primary care. AIM. This study set out to develop guidelines for primary care teams to follow in the provision of palliative care in the community using facilitated case discussions with the members of such teams, as a form of internal audit. METHOD. Five practices were randomly chosen from the family health services authority medical list. Meetings between the facilitators and primary care teams were held over a period of one year. The teams were asked to describe good aspects of care, areas of concern and suggestions to improve these, in recent cases of patient deaths. RESULTS. In total 56 cases were discussed. All practices felt that cohesive teamwork, coordinated management, early involvement of nursing staff and the identification of a key worker were essential for good terminal care. Concerns arose in clinical and administrative areas but the majority were linked to poor communication, either between patient and professionals within the primary care team or between primary and secondary care. All the positive aspects of care, concerns and suggestions were collated by the facilitators into guidelines for teams to refer to from the initial diagnosis of a terminal illness through to the patient's death and care of the relatives afterwards. CONCLUSION. Developing multidisciplinary as opposed to medical guidelines for palliative care allows primary health care teams to create standards that are acceptable to them and stimulates individuals within the teams to accept responsibility for initiating the change necessary for more effective care. The process of facilitating teams to discuss their work

  13. Developing communities of practice in health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rasmus; Edwards, Kasper

    the use of SOPs. A CoP is a social community formed around a practice (e.g. ICU nursing) which induce a propensity to share experiences and thereby constitute knowledge sharing (Lave & Wenger 1991; Brown & Duguid 1991). CoP was conceived as a descriptive construct but has gained popularity and is found...... to improve practice performance, but knowledge about developing and measuring CoP is lacking (Ison et al. 2014). We propose a method to develop a CoP and the method is tested in a blood analysis unit at ‘Nordsjællands Hospital’ in Denmark. Design/methodology/approach The interventions were identified from...... current CoP research. Interventions were initiated just after baseline measurement.  The following interventions took place: The practice was operationalized narrowly as employees performing a specific operational task. The practice was chosen due to a high frequency and recurring problems. A voluntary Co...

  14. Community wide electronic distribution of summary health care utilization data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westert Gert P

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the use of digital technology has supported widespread sharing of electronic health care data. Although this approach holds considerable promise, it promises to be a complicated and expensive undertaking. This study described the development and implementation of a community wide system for electronic sharing of summary health care utilization data. Methods The development of the community wide data system focused on the following objectives: ongoing monitoring of the health care system, evaluation of community wide individual provider initiatives, identification and development of new initiatives. The system focused on the sharing of data related to hospital acute care, emergency medical services, long term care, and mental health. It was based on the daily distribution of reports among all health care providers related to these services. Results The development of the summary reports concerning health care utilization produced a system wide view of health care in Syracuse, New York on a daily basis. It was not possible to isolate the results of these reports because of the impact of specific projects and other factors. At the same time, the reports were associated with reduction of hospital inpatient stays, improvement of access to hospital emergency departments, reductions in stays for patients discharged to nursing homes, and increased access of mental health patients to hospital inpatient units. Conclusion The implementation of the system demonstrated that summary electronic utilization data could provide daily information that would support the improvement of health care outcomes and efficiency. This approach could be implemented in a simple, direct manner with minimal expenses.

  15. New methods of seafarer's training: an internet "refresher course on first-aid and medical care on board".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, M L

    1999-01-01

    Our objective is to facilitate seamen's health education, according to the recommendations of international organisations like IMO (STCW 1995) and EC (Directive 92/29): They recommend a refresher course on first-aid at least every 5 years for persons in charge of medical care on board. In Spain the transposition of this Directive was published (RD 258/99). So, we thought that in order to help seafarers and officers in their training in prevention and in solving health problems derived from their occupational risks on board, continuing education could be implemented using an innovative and adaptable tool. No first-aid course can be useful without practical exercises. The term "refresher" (in this paper) is a way of reminding what people have learnt and practised in a previous practical course. In 1998, the Spanish Society of Maritime Medicine promoted a pilot internet refresher course for seafarers in its web, URL: "http://www.semm.org/curso/pauxm.html++ +". There are 10 didactic units (resources for medical assistance on board, radio-medical advice, environmental problems, travel medicine, cardio-respiratory resuscitation, prevention of problems in diving, death on board, occupational risk prevention ... etc.). Hypertext linked keywords help the student to revise the subject, a teacher can counsel him by e-mail and a multiple choice test, and clinical cases are included to check the comprehension of the didactic units. A CD and an English version of the course is being prepared.

  16. Integrating Palliative Care into the Care of Neurocritically Ill Patients: A Report from The IPAL-ICU (Improving Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit) Project Advisory Board and the Center to Advance Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontera, Jennifer A.; Curtis, J. Randall; Nelson, Judith E.; Campbell, Margaret; Gabriel, Michelle; Hays, Ross M.; Mosenthal, Anne C.; Mulkerin, Colleen; Puntillo, Kathleen A.; Ray, Daniel E.; Bassett, Rick; Boss, Renee D.; Lustbader, Dana R.; Brasel, Karen J.; Weiss, Stefanie P.; Weissman, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe unique features of neurocritical illness that are relevant to provision of high-quality palliative care; To discuss key prognostic aids and their limitations for neurocritical illnesses; To review challenges and strategies for establishing realistic goals of care for patients in the neuro-ICU; To describe elements of best practice concerning symptom management, limitation of life support, and organ donation for the neurocritically ill. Data Sources A search of Pubmed and MEDLINE was conducted from inception through January 2015 for all English-language articles using the term “palliative care,” “supportive care,” “end-of-life care,” “withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy,” “limitation of life support,” “prognosis,” or “goals of care” together with “neurocritical care,” “neurointensive care,” “neurological,” “stroke,” “subarachnoid hemorrhage,” “intracerebral hemorrhage,” or “brain injury.” Data Extraction and Synthesis We reviewed the existing literature on delivery of palliative care in the neurointensive care unit setting, focusing on challenges and strategies for establishing realistic and appropriate goals of care, symptom management, organ donation, and other considerations related to use and limitation of life-sustaining therapies for neurocritically ill patients. Based on review of these articles and the experiences of our interdisciplinary/interprofessional expert Advisory Board, this report was prepared to guide critical care staff, palliative care specialists, and others who practice in this setting. Conclusions Most neurocritically ill patients and their families face the sudden onset of devastating cognitive and functional changes that challenge clinicians to provide patient-centered palliative care within a complex and often uncertain prognostic environment. Application of palliative care principles concerning symptom relief, goal setting, and family emotional support, will

  17. Client Self-Assessment in Community Aged Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goetz Ottmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-assessment of support needs is a relatively new and under-researched phenomenon in domiciliary aged care. This article outlines the results of a comparative study focusing on whether a self-assessment approach assists clients to identify support needs and the degree to which self-assessed needs differ from an assessment conducted by community care professionals. A total of 48 older people and their case managers completed a needs assessment tool. Twenty-two semi-structured interviews were used to ascertain older people’s views and preferences regarding the self-assessment process. The study suggests that while a co-assessment approach as outlined in this article has the potential to assist older people to gain a better understanding of their care needs as well as the assessment process and its ramifications, client self-assessment should be seen as part of a co-assessment process involving care professionals. Such a co-assessment process allows older people to gain a better understanding of their support needs and the wider community aged care context. The article suggests that a co-assessment process involving both clients and care professionals contains features that have the capacity to enhance domiciliary aged care.

  18. Audit Trail Management System in Community Health Care Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Nakayama, Masaharu; Nakaya, Jun; Tominaga, Teiji; Suganuma, Takuo; Shiratori, Norio

    2015-01-01

    After the Great East Japan Earthquake we constructed a community health care information network system. Focusing on the authentication server and portal server capable of SAML&ID-WSF, we proposed an audit trail management system to look over audit events in a comprehensive manner. Through implementation and experimentation, we verified the effectiveness of our proposed audit trail management system.

  19. A joint venture in providing home care and community service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifsteck, S

    1987-01-01

    General discussion of a joint venture providing home care and community service including future possibilities, business and financial aspects and demand is presented. The author then provides a group practice joint venture model including descriptions of operating structure, contract arrangements and management.

  20. When Research Is Not Enough: Community, Care, and Love.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Yvonna S.

    2000-01-01

    The 1998 presidential address for the Association for the Study of Higher Education shares comments of graduate students in higher education. Suggests that both students and faculty desire a learning community based on an ethic of caring and love in a classroom context. (DB)

  1. Integrated community-based dementia care: the Geriant model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludo Glimmerveen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article gives an in-depth description of the service delivery model of Geriant, a Dutch organization providing community-based care services for people suffering from dementia. Core to its model is the provision of clinical case management, embedded in multidisciplinary dementia care teams. As Geriant's client group includes people from the first presumption of dementia until they can no longer live at home, its care model provides valuable lessons about how different mechanisms of integration are flexibly put to use if the complexity of clients” care needs increases. It showcases how the integration of services for a specific sub-population is combined with alignment of these services with generalist network partners. After a detailed description of the programme and its results, this article builds on the work of Walter Leutz for a conceptual discussion of Geriant's approach to care integration. 

  2. Integrating Community Health Workers (CHWs) into Health Care Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Julianne; Razi, Sima; Emery, Kyle; Quattrone, Westleigh; Tardif-Douglin, Miriam

    2017-04-08

    Health care organizations increasingly employ community health workers (CHWs) to help address growing provider shortages, improve patient outcomes, and increase access to culturally sensitive care among traditionally inaccessible or disenfranchised patient populations. Scholarly interest in CHWs has grown in recent decades, but researchers tend to focus on how CHWs affect patient outcomes rather than whether and how CHWs fit into the existing health care workforce. This paper focuses on the factors that facilitate and impede the integration of the CHWs into health care organizations, and strategies that organizations and their staff develop to overcome barriers to CHW integration. We use qualitative evaluation data from 13 awardees that received Health Care Innovation Awards from the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to enhance the quality of health care, improve health outcomes, and reduce the cost of care using programs involving CHWs. We find that organizational capacity, support for CHWs, clarity about health care roles, and clinical workflow drive CHW integration. We conclude with practical recommendations for health care organizations interested in employing CHWs.

  3. Using Community Advisory Boards to Reduce Environmental Barriers to Health in American Indian Communities, Wisconsin, 2007–2012

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Alexandra K.; Scott, Jamie R.; Prince, Ron; Williamson, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Background American Indian communities have a high prevalence of chronic diseases including diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Innovative community-based approaches are needed to identify, prioritize, and create sustainable interventions to reduce environmental barriers to healthy lifestyles and ultimately improve health. Community Context Healthy Children, Strong Families was a family-based and community-based intervention to increase healthy lifestyles on Wisconsin Ameri...

  4. PROMOTE TO THE LIFE: THE PHYSIOTHERAPY IN THE CARE TO THE AGED IN THE FAMILY AND THE COMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Graziele Dias de Almeida

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The process of aging population in Brasil and the change in the age structure of the population has occurred many alterations in the way to approach the care to the health of the people in the oldness. The scientific community, now a days, has to accept the importance of the familiar context as "locus" for the care to the aged sick people and the relevance of a multiprofessional boarding to the these families. From there, the necessity of the affirmation of the physiotherapy work in domiciliary environment, searching to add strategies for effectiveness in the therapeutical boarding. This study is a description, of qualitative nature, that had for objective to characterize the domiciliary care to the families of the project "Physiotherapy in Attention to the Health of Aged in the Family and the Community". For in such a way, visits to the twelve families of aged had been made in the Inocoop Quarter, Jequié-BA, by four consecutive months, two times for week and had been analyzed handbooks constructed from the carried through visits domiciliary. Thus, the physiotherapy work in the domiciliary as directed to the three spheres could be characterized: familiar education (promotion and prevention, care and reabilitation. Thus, the Collective Physioterapy comes to search to promote the attention for aged and theirs families, contributing for the process of human and collective development.

  5. Publishing for the Protected Area Community: A vision for PARKS from its editorial board

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amend, T.; Brooks, T.; Choudhury, B.C.; Verschuuren, B.

    2014-01-01

    In this editorial essay, members of the Editorial Board of PARKS review the status of conservation literature. Three problems are identified: 1) the growing gap between the formal conservation literature and the so-called ‘grey literature’ of project reports, studies and working papers; 2) the effec

  6. Structuring Community Care using Multi-Agent Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Martin D.

    Community care is a complex operation that requires the interaction of large numbers of dedicated individuals, managed by an equally wide range of organisations. They are also by their nature highly mobile and flexible, moving between clients in whatever order person receiving care is that they receive what they expect regularly, reliably and when they expect to receive it. Current systems are heavily provider focused on providing the scheduled care with as high apparent cost effectiveness as possible. Unfortunately, the lack of focus on the client often leads to inflexibility with expensive services being provided when they are not needed, large scale duplication of effort or inadequate flexibility to change the care regime to meet changing circumstances. Add to this the problems associated with the lack of integration of emergency and routing care and the extensive support given by friends and family and many opportunities exist to improve both the levels of support and the efficiency of care. The move towards Individual Care Plans requires much closer monitoring to ensure that the care specified for each individual is actually delivered and when linked with smart home technology in conjunction with appropriate sensors allows a much richer range of services to be offered which can be customised to meet the needs of each individual, giving them the assurance to continue to live independently.

  7. Madness and care in the community: a medieval perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffe, D.; Roffe, C.

    1995-01-01

    Care in the community for insane people today is more a matter of expert provision than communal support. In consequence, although they are no longer confined to hospital, mentally ill people largely remain marginalised in a society that does not have the resources, nor often the inclination, to take responsibility for their care. The experience of insane people in medieval England seems to have been of a different order, as shown by a particularly well documented case dating from 1383. From the late 13th century congenital idiots were protected by law. Care of lunatics, by contrast, was primarily the responsibility of the family. However, where the family could not or was unwilling to provide, provision was made by the crown. Through the instrument of the inquisition, the diagnosis and social circumstances of each case were determined by commissioners in consultation with a local jury and all interested parties, including the subject himself or herself. The best interests of the subject remained a prime concern, and the settlement that was ordained was tried and enforced in law. The process was confined to those with real or personal estate, but it encompassed poor as well as rich and proved, through the close identity of the local community with the process, to be a sophisticated and effective mechanism for maintaining and sustaining insane people. Unlike today, care in the community was a communal activity that ensured a truly public provision for those who could not look after themselves. Images p1711-a Fig 1 PMID:8541770

  8. Comradery, community, and care in military medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael L

    2011-10-01

    Medical ethics prohibits caregivers from discriminating and providing preferential care to their compatriots and comrades. In military medicine, particularly during war and when resources may be scarce, ethical principles may dictate priority care for compatriot soldiers. The principle of nondiscrimination is central to utilitarian and deontological theories of justice, but communitarianism and the ethics of care and friendship stipulate a different set of duties for community members, friends, and family. Similar duties exist among the small cohesive groups that typify many military units. When members of these groups require medical care, there are sometimes moral grounds to treat compatriot soldiers ahead of enemy or allied soldiers regardless of the severity of their respective wounds.

  9. The community need index. A new tool pinpoints health care disparities in communities throughout the nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Richard; Barsi, Eileen

    2005-01-01

    Catholic Healthcare West, San Francisco (CHW), has developed a national Community Need Index (CNI) in partnership with Solucient, an information products company, to help health care organizations, not-for-profits, and policymakers identify and address barriers to health care access in their communities. The CNI aggregates five socioeconomic indicators long known to contribute to health disparity--income, culture/language, education, housing status, and insurance coverage--and applies them to every zip code in the United States. Each zip code is then given a score ranging from 1.0 (low need) to 5.0 (high need). Residents of communities with the highest CNI scores were shown to be twice as likely to experience preventable hospitalization for manageable conditions--such as ear infections, pneumonia or congestive heart failure--as communities with the lowest CNI scores. The CNI provides compelling evidence for addressing socioeconomic barriers when considering health policy and local health planning. The tool highlights health care disparities between geographic regions and illustrates the acute needs of several notable geographies, including inner city and rural areas.Further, it should enable health care providers, policymakers, and others to allocate resources where they are most needed, using a standardized, quantitative tool. The CNI provides CHW with an important means to strategically allocate resources where it will be most effective in maintaining a healthy community.

  10. Workforce diversity and community-responsive health-care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivet, Marc A; Berlin, Anne

    2014-01-01

    While the levers for the social determinants of health reside largely outside institutional walls, this does not absolve health professional schools from exercising their influence to improve the communities in which they are located. Fulfilling this charge will require a departure from conventional thinking, particularly when it comes to educating future health professionals. We describe efforts within medical education to transform recruitment, admissions, and classroom environments to emphasize diversity and inclusion. The aim is to cultivate a workforce with the perspectives, aptitudes, and skills needed to fuel community-responsive health-care institutions.

  11. Pharmaceutical care in community pharmacies: practice and research in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herborg, Hanne; Sørensen, Ellen Westh; Frøkjaer, Bente

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the current status of Danish community pharmacy in both practice and research and discuss future trends. FINDINGS: Denmark has a social welfare system that provides health care, social services, and pensions to its population. Medical care and surgery are free. Prescription......-the-counter products, advice about medicine use, dose dispensing, generic substitutions, and administration of individual reimbursement registers. Except for very simple processes, compounding is centralized at 3 pharmacies. Many pharmacies offer measurement of blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol, and 60...

  12. A burn center paradigm to fulfill deferred consent public disclosure and community consultation requirements for emergency care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Martha G; Falletta, Lynn; Andrews, David A; Reed, Michael D

    2012-09-01

    To fulfill Food and Drug Administration and Department of Health and Human Services emergency care research informed consent requirements, our burn center planned and executed a deferred consent strategy gaining Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval to proceed with the clinical study. These federal regulations dictate public disclosure and community consultation unique to acute care research. Our regional burn center developed and implemented a deferred consent public notification and community consultation paradigm appropriate for a burn study. Published accounts of deferred consent strategies focus on acute care resuscitation practices. We adapted those strategies to design and conduct a comprehensive public notification/community consultation plan to satisfy deferred consent requirements for burn center research. To implement a robust media campaign we engaged the hospital's public relations department, distributed media materials, recruited hospital staff for speaking engagements, enlisted community volunteers, and developed initiatives to inform "hard-to-reach" populations. The hospital's IRB determined we fulfilled our obligation to notify the defined community. Our communication strategy should provide a paradigm other burn centers may appropriate and adapt when planning and executing a deferred consent initiative. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  13. Variability in ADHD care in community-based pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Jeffery N; Kelleher, Kelly J; Baum, Rebecca; Brinkman, William B; Peugh, James; Gardner, William; Lichtenstein, Phil; Langberg, Joshua

    2014-12-01

    Although many efforts have been made to improve the quality of care delivered to children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in community-based pediatric settings, little is known about typical ADHD care in these settings other than rates garnered through pediatrician self-report. Rates of evidence-based ADHD care and sources of variability (practice-level, pediatrician-level, patient-level) were determined by chart reviews of a random sample of 1594 patient charts across 188 pediatricians at 50 different practices. In addition, the associations of Medicaid-status and practice setting (ie, urban, suburban, and rural) with the quality of ADHD care were examined. Parent- and teacher-rating scales were used during ADHD assessment with approximately half of patients. The use of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria was documented in 70.4% of patients. The vast majority (93.4%) of patients with ADHD were receiving medication and only 13.0% were receiving psychosocial treatment. Parent- and teacher-ratings were rarely collected to monitor treatment response or side effects. Further, fewer than half (47.4%) of children prescribed medication had contact with their pediatrician within the first month of prescribing. Most variability in pediatrician-delivered ADHD care was accounted for at the patient level; however, pediatricians and practices also accounted for significant variability on specific ADHD care behaviors. There is great need to improve the quality of ADHD care received by children in community-based pediatric settings. Improvements will likely require systematic interventions at the practice and policy levels to promote change. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. A Community Oriented Approach to Primary Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Leslie

    1983-01-01

    A broader perspective is needed in family medicine. The traditional nuclear family is in transition; extended, single parent, reconstituted and surrogate families and couples living together without marrying, are becoming more common. The community is therefore replacing the family as the functional unit of society, and has become a significant determinant of health. Also, there are still social and economic barriers to health care. Those of lower socioeconomic status have poorer health and u...

  15. Quality care for community-based FP / MCH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The Regional Workshop on Quality Care for Community-based FP/MCH in Asia was organized by the Family Planning Association of Nepal (FPAN) in cooperation with JOICFP and held in Kathmandu, Nepal, December 4-9. Representatives of counterpart organizations in Bangladesh, Laos, Nepal, and the Philippines implementing the UNFPA-supported Sustainable Community-based FP/MCH Project with Special Focus on Women were included among the forty participants. Representatives of China and Vietnam as well as resource persons from Mexico and Japan also attended the event. The workshop was held with the goal of providing participants with effective strategies for promoting quality care for community-based FP/MCH activities based upon the Nepalese experience. The event also provided the opportunity for participants to share experiences, develop strategies for project sustainability, and identify strategies and action plans suitable for their particular country situations. In field trips to Panchkhal, Sunsari, and Morang where the project is being implemented in 26 villages, participants noted the strong community involvement and village leader support. They were also impressed by the communities' awareness of services provided under the project. FPAN has succeeded despite geographical and cultural difficulties in promoting fee-based services toward project sustainability. By paying nominal fees, villagers also enjoy access to drugs and services which may not have been available through the government free of charge. Participants at the end of the workshop recommended the identification of specific indicators and systems for monitoring services and activities, training and orientation at all levels to improve the skills and attitudes of health care workers, the development of potential income-generating activities, the provision of essential FP/MCH equipment, and the equal involvement of men and women at the policy and implementation levels.

  16. Abortion services in a high-needs district: a community-based model of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snook, Simon; Silva, Martha

    2013-06-01

    In 2009, a high-deprivation district health board in New Zealand set up a community-based abortion clinic in order to provide a local service and to avoid out-of-region referrals. The service offers medical abortions for women with pregnancies of up to 63 days' gestation, and surgical abortion with local anaesthetic for women with pregnancies of up to 14 weeks' gestation. To describe the services developed and assess safety and timeliness for the first year of community-based services. An audit of clinical records for patients seen in 2010 was performed in order to obtain data on location of services, timeliness, safety and complications. Eighty-two percent of locally provided abortions in 2010 were medical abortions, completed on average less than two days after referral to the service. One percent of patients experienced haemorrhaging post abortion, and 4% had retained products. These rates are within accepted standards for an abortion service. This report illustrates that a community-based model of care can be both clinically and culturally safe, while providing a much-needed service to a high-needs population.

  17. Abortion services in a high-needs district: a community-based model of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snook S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In 2009, a high-deprivation district health board in New Zealand set up a community-based abortion clinic in order to provide a local service and to avoid out-of-region referrals. The service offers medical abortions for women with pregnancies of up to 63 days' gestation, and surgical abortion with local anaesthetic for women with pregnancies of up to 14 weeks' gestation. AIM: To describe the services developed and assess safety and timeliness for the first year of community-based services. METHODS: An audit of clinical records for patients seen in 2010 was performed in order to obtain data on location of services, timeliness, safety and complications. RESULTS: Eighty-two percent of locally provided abortions in 2010 were medical abortions, completed on average less than two days after referral to the service. One percent of patients experienced haemorrhaging post abortion, and 4% had retained products. These rates are within accepted standards for an abortion service. DISCUSSION: This report illustrates that a community-based model of care can be both clinically and culturally safe, while providing a much-needed service to a high-needs population.

  18. The social responsibility commitment to the community and care environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Elena López Regalado

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of csr has evolved in recent years, currently the main objective of the Company cannot lie only meet the monetary needs of the shareholders, but to seek the participation of all stakeholders in the company, with the different stakeholders that interact with the environment either customers, suppliers, employees and society at large, impacting the community with socially responsible actions. Because the concept has acquired new shades as social, economic and environmental responsibility among others, being on the great responsibility of the actions of companies to make social or common good acts to achieve their objectives without harming their economies community, the next job is presented focusing especially on two major indicators of social responsibility such as environmental care, and welfare of the community.

  19. Community mental health care worldwide: current status and further developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornicroft, Graham; Deb, Tanya; Henderson, Claire

    2016-10-01

    This paper aims to give an overview of the key issues facing those who are in a position to influence the planning and provision of mental health systems, and who need to address questions of which staff, services and sectors to invest in, and for which patients. The paper considers in turn: a) definitions of community mental health care; b) a conceptual framework to use when evaluating the need for hospital and community mental health care; c) the potential for wider platforms, outside the health service, for mental health improvement, including schools and the workplace; d) data on how far community mental health services have been developed across different regions of the world; e) the need to develop in more detail models of community mental health services for low- and middle-income countries which are directly based upon evidence for those countries; f) how to incorporate mental health practice within integrated models to identify and treat people with comorbid long-term conditions; g) possible adverse effects of deinstitutionalization. We then present a series of ten recommendations for the future strengthening of health systems to support and treat people with mental illness.

  20. About virtual communities and Alzheimer's disease - Solidarity, care and information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Maria da Silva Melo Bruno

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available From an approach to the environment virtual communities related to Alzheimer’s Disease, this study sought highlighted the scale of this issue in internet and watch how to approach the pathology in fourteen communities specific. The theoretical study focused on the complexities of family care to old guided the course of drafting the research. Through and analysis qualitative community, observed the importance of virtual environment training support networks for caregivers of relatives with Alzheimer’s. Among 5337 shares of virtual users from a same community it was felt content suggesting the formation of social ties-affective quite significant in reference to an exercise of solidarity social and ability to resist adversities of the progression of degenerative disease. Once standing as a tool for information dissemination and exchange of experience, the internet could represent an additional resource potentially able to establish greater approach among caregivers, which in ultimately could contribute to creation of an interactive network of care beyond the virtual environment.

  1. [Community health workers in HIV/AIDS care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefeuvre, Delphine; Dieng, Mamadou; Lamara, Farid; Raguin, Gilles; Michon, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Faced with the lack of human resources manage people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in developing countries, community health workers (CHWs) provide support to health professionals. The objective of this study was to describe the characteristics of CHWs and study the impact of their intervention on HIV care. A literature search was performed on Pubmed and the websites of international organizations. A literature review was conducted, including studies describing the impact of the CHWs' intervention on the care of PLWHA. Thirteen articles were selected concerning twelve studies. The names and functions of CHWs are multiple; training and remuneration are very heterogeneous. Nevertheless, the impact of their intervention appears to be positive. Trials comparing community-based care versus hospital care show no difference between the two in terms of survival, retention, viral load or CD4 counts. The support provided by CHWs improves quality of life, compliance and self-confidence and decreases stigma (qualitative studies). It also allows coverage of previously remote areas. CHWs have various names, functions, formations and salaries. Their actions appear to have a positive impact both on the therapeutic management of PLHIV and on strengthening health systems. Recognition of CHWs by health systems remains marginal and remains a public health priority.

  2. The Arkansas AHEC model of community-oriented primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, M S; Landis, B J

    1999-07-01

    This article explicates the Arkansas Area Health Education Center (AHEC) model of community-oriented primary care (COPC) and the role of the family nurse practitioner (FNP) in its implementation. The AHECs collaborate with local agencies to provide comprehensive, accessible, quality health care to specific patient populations, and offer learning opportunities to a wide variety of health professions students. The FNP demonstrates organizational and role competencies that include directing patient care, providing professional leadership, and developing the advanced practice nursing role. Two case studies are used to illustrate the FNPs' approach to COPC: (1) selection of interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary approaches to management of a patient with chronic illnesses, and (2) the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners Training Project.

  3. Pharmaceutical care and community pharmacists' understanding of bisphosphonate dosing information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W W; Kendler, D L

    2004-12-01

    To evaluate pharmacists' knowledge of approved dosing information for cyclic etidronate, alendronate and risedronate in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis; and to assess its relationship to demographic and pharmaceutical care factors. Fax-back questionnaire to evaluate pharmacists' knowledge of approved bisphosphonate dosing information and their involvement in pharmaceutical/patient care activities through independent indices. Community pharmacies in both urban and rural settings in British Columbia. Pharmacies surveyed with 22% response rate (163 pharmacists), 47% male and 54% owners/managers. Most were independent (31%) or volunteer chain (28%) pharmacies. Mean bisphosphonate dosing knowledge score was 76 +/- 11% (mean +/- SD). Mean scores (+/-SD) for questions pertaining to alendronate (92 +/- 13%) were higher than risedronate (81 +/- 26%) and etidronate (48 +/- 19). Pharmacists were least familiar with approved dosing instructions regarding the lack of need to remain upright after etidronate dosing, spacing out of etidronate from food/antacids/calcium/vitamins, and whether risedronate may be taken at bedtime. Factors found to affect pharmacists' bisphosphonate knowledge scores included employment in higher volume pharmacies and greater number of years in practice. Pharmacists in the upper tertile of pharmaceutical care index scores had similar bisphosphonate knowledge scores to those delivering less pharmaceutical care. Pharmacist gender, being owner/manager, and continuing education hours were not significantly associated with higher knowledge or pharmaceutical care scores. There is a wide range of knowledge of bisphosphonate dosing and delivery of pharmaceutical care amongst community pharmacists surveyed. Given the importance of proper bisphosphonate dosing to optimize drug absorption and to minimize toxicity, pharmacist education should be a priority.

  4. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  5. Implementation and adaptation in Colombia of the Communities That Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Trujillo, Juliana; Pérez-Gómez, Augusto; Reyes-Rodríguez, María Fernanda

    2015-12-15

    For more than two years, Corporación Nuevos Rumbos (Colombia) has been carrying out, in eight Colombian communities, a preventive system called Comunidades Que se Cuidan (CQC), an adaptation of Communities That Care (CTC), created at the University of Washington (Seattle), developed for more than 25 years in the United States of America and implemented in eight countries of America, Oceania, and Europe. The system is based on the public health approach, and the social development strategy for community empowerment. The core idea is to teach communities how to make decisions based on data regarding drugs and alcohol consumption and the identification of protective and risk factors, on the basis of the original survey validated in Colombia: these will allow communities to choose the best preventive interventions, tailored for each of them according to their needs. This paper describes the process of implementation of CQC in Colombia, its differences with CTC, the creation of Colombian cut-points, the main difficulties and how these were solved. CQC seems to be a preventive system with a wide potential applicability in other Latin American countries.

  6. An outbreak of community-associated methicilin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in a boarding school in Hong Kong (China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Mui-ling

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In November 2012, an outbreak of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA skin and soft tissue infections affecting students at a boarding school in Hong Kong (China was detected. Methods: A case was defined as any student or staff notified with MRSA infection from 25 October 2012 to 5 July 2013 with the clinical isolate being of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV or V and positive for Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene. We conducted field investigations, advised on control measures and enhanced surveillance for skin and soft tissue infections at the school. Decolonization therapies were offered to all cases and contacts, and carrier screening was conducted. Results: There were five cases; two (40% were hospitalized and three (60% required surgical treatments. Initial screening comprised 240 students and 81 staff members. Overall, four cases (80% plus eight other students (3.3% were carriers, with eight of 12 (66.7% from the same dormitory. All staff members screened negative. After intensified control measures, the number of students screened positive for CA-MRSA decreased from nine to one with no more cases identified in the school. Conclusion: Identification of carriers, decolonization therapy, monitoring of cases and contacts and strengthening of environmental and personal hygiene were control measures that helped contain this CA-MRSA outbreak in a boarding school in Hong Kong (China.

  7. Pharmacists in primary care. Determinants of the care-providing function of Dutch community pharmacists in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijrers, P.E.; Knottnerus, J.A.; Sijbrandij, J.; Janknegt, R.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify determinants of the care-providing function of the community pharmacists (CPs) to explain variations in professional practice. SETTING: The Netherlands 2001. PARTICIPANTS: 328 CPs. METHOD: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed. Questionnaires were used to

  8. Pharmacists in primary care. Determinants of the care-providing function of Dutch community pharmacists in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijrers, P.E.; Knottnerus, J.A.; Sijbrandij, J.; Janknegt, R.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify determinants of the care-providing function of the community pharmacists (CPs) to explain variations in professional practice. SETTING: The Netherlands 2001. PARTICIPANTS: 328 CPs. METHOD: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed. Questionnaires were used to collec

  9. Monks' Health: Holistic Health Care Model by Community Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decha Buates

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Monks’ health tended to be a continuous increased problem. They were groups who had limitations to access health services due to their monastic disciplines and their most importance for Buddhist institution. Without urgent solution, their normal way of life would have been affected. Approach: This research aimed to study current conditions and to develop monks’ holistic health care models by community participation in central region of Thailand. The study was a qualitative research conducted in 9 temples; 3 temples in urban area, 3 in semi-urban area and 3 in rural area. Samples were 224 persons; consisted of monks, public health officers from Department of Religious Affairs, local administrative organizations and people; selected by purposive sampling method. Observation form, survey form, interview form, focus group discussion and workshop were used as research tools while data was analyzed by descriptive research. Results: The result founded that in former time culture of monks’ health care was leaned on community, social, culture and tradition. People spoke in style of central Thai language and were in agricultural sector as well as had their belief in merit, sin and elder respect. Relation in communities was in form of generosity and living as similar as relatives. When some monk got sick, they would visit, take care and give foods and medicines. Most of medicines were household remedy and Thai herbal medicine that bought from drug stores in local market or grocery stores in village and monks were sent to hospital in case of severe illness. Temple was a part of community, so they had close relation. Nowadays people increasingly worked in manufactories that caused conflicts and alienations among them. Monks leaned on local markets for receiving foods offering and most of foods were cooked from flour, sugar, coconut milk and fat. These caused three-fourth of monks having chronic disease as diabetes

  10. Improved continuity of care in a community teaching hospital model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, V; David, W; Young, S; McKendrick, A; Gentile, T; Casalou, R

    1999-05-01

    We created an ambulatory resident clinic in a community teaching hospital to improve the continuity of care in a surgery residency program. A retrospective chart review analysis. A community hospital, general surgery residency training program, and its ambulatory practice. Providence Hospital, Southfield, Mich, has established a new model, the Surgical Associates of Michigan, which is an association comprising private practice physicians serving as full-time faculty in the Department of Surgery. In addition to clarification of teaching requirements and reimbursement for educational activities, the most dramatic feature is the relocation of private practice offices and the staff surgical office to one central location within the hospital. The proximity of the staff and private surgical offices facilitates closer interaction of attending physicians, residents, and patients. Compliance rates of continuity of patient care provided by the same resident, as presented by the Surgery Residency Review Committee, including confirmation of diagnosis, provision of preoperative care, discussion with attending physician, selection and provision of intervention, direction of postoperative care, and postdischarge follow-up. Since the inception of this arrangement at our institution, surgical residents have seen 229 staff patients and 465 private patients in the offices under supervision. Compliance rate of continuity of care was defined as patient follow-up with the same senior surgical resident who performed an operation or evaluated the patient on initial presentation to the emergency department or offices. We achieved a compliance rate of 92.8% (169/182) in the staff surgical clinics. A compliance rate of 63.5% (205/323) for private general surgical patients and 70.4% (100/142) for vascular surgical patients was obtained. With the establishment of the teaching faculty group and the relocation of offices, we were able to achieve a dramatic improvement in continuity of care. In

  11. Acceptability of community pharmaceutical care in Portugal: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Mara; Cantrill, Judith; Martins, Paula

    2010-10-01

    In developed countries, community pharmacists are increasingly involved in clinical care. This study aimed to explore the acceptability to users of pharmaceutical care (drug therapy monitoring and management) provided in Portuguese community pharmacies, thereby informing future practice, policy and research. Qualitative semi-structured telephone interviews with a maximum variability sample of 21 service users. Interviews were audio-taped with permission of interviewees, transcribed verbatim and analysed using the 'framework approach' with the help of NVIVO(®) software. A perception of convenient access is one of the key themes associated with acceptability to users. Four factors are central in understanding this perception: shorter waiting time; flexibility of appointments; service organization; and proximity to home. Data analysis suggests that these factors have different weights. Another key theme underpinning user acceptability is the formation of a therapeutic relationship with the pharmacist. Patients' accounts provide evidence of a trusting and collaborative relationship where the pharmacist is seen as a health care provider. Recognition of interpersonal and technical skills were associated with the formation of this relationship. Although patients generally trusted the pharmacist's ability to help, patients were unable to voice clear expectations about the service, either in terms of the pharmacist's role or expected outcomes. Acceptability to patients is mainly determined by perceptions of convenient access and the development of a therapeutic relationship with the pharmacist. Patients' expectations concerning the service are not well developed, but not necessarily low.

  12. Early detection of dementia in the community under a community-based integrated care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Yohko; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu

    2014-04-01

    Early detection of dementia is recommended in the stages from mild cognitive impairment to early dementia, excluding the asymptomatic stage. The advantages of early detection for patients and their caregivers include early receipt of pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies, and early access to appropriate agencies and/or support networks. The disadvantages include psychological damage related to anxiety and depression, and risk of stigmatization and/or social exclusion. The possibility of false positive diagnoses is also problematic. For detection of dementia, various screening tests and questionnaires have been developed. However, none of these techniques are sensitive and specific enough to avoid false positives. Thus, these screening tools are recommended for assessment of the severity of functional decline after sufficient information has been gathered to suspect dementia. In terms of social services, early detection might delay institutionalization. However, implementation of early detection would add a heavy burden on social resources, especially human resources. For effective implementation of early diagnosis and management of dementia, measures are required to improve social and human resources, including the following: improvement of the diagnostic abilities of general practitioners, improvement of necessary care and support systems after diagnosis, and organizing volunteers to support local communities. Under a community-based integrated care system, each community will create a "tailored" system that meets the health needs, health status and values of the community. Promoting social participation and community involvement of the residents should be one of the key strategies to address the shortage of human resources. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  13. Comparing the implementation of team approaches for improving diabetes care in community health centers

    OpenAIRE

    Wees, P.J. van der; Friedberg, M.W.; Guzman, E.; Ayanian, J.Z.; Rodriguez, H.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient panel management and community-based care management may be viable strategies for community health centers to improve the quality of diabetes care for vulnerable patient populations. The objective of our study was to clarify implementation processes and experiences of integrating office-based medical assistant (MA) panel management and community health worker (CHW) community-based management into routine care for diabetic patients. Methods Mixed m...

  14. Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Academic Year Report 2013-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The "Academic Year Report 2013-14" provides a snapshot of funding, facilities, staffing, and enrollments in Washington's community and technical colleges for the past academic year. The report also describes key measures of student outcomes and addresses the most frequently asked questions related to expenditures, personnel, and…

  15. Acute care in Tanzania: Epidemiology of acute care in a small community medical centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. Little

    2013-12-01

    Discussion: Respiratory infections, malaria, and skin or soft tissue infections are leading reasons for seeking medical care at a small community medical centre in Arusha, Tanzania, highlighting the burden of infectious diseases in this type of facility. Males may be more likely to present with trauma, burns, and laceration injuries than females. Many patients required one or no procedures to determine their diagnosis, most treatments administered were inexpensive, and most patients were discharged home, suggesting that providing acute care in this setting could be accomplished with limited resources.

  16. Sexual dysfunction in multiple myeloma: survivorship care plan of the International Myeloma Foundation Nurse Leadership Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Tiffany A; Bertolotti, Page A; Doss, Deborah; McCullagh, Emily J

    2011-08-01

    The World Health Organization describes sexuality as a "central aspect of being human throughout life and encompasses sex, gender identities and roles, sexual orientation, eroticism, pleasure, intimacy, and reproduction. Sexuality is influenced by the interaction of biological, psychological, social, economic, political, cultural, ethical, legal, historical, religious, and spiritual factors." Currently, no research has been conducted regarding sexual dysfunction in patients with multiple myeloma; therefore, information related to the assessment and evaluation of sexual dysfunction is gleaned from other malignancies and diseases. In this article, members of the International Myeloma Foundation's Nurse Leadership Board discuss the definition, presentation, and causes of sexual dysfunction; provide recommendations for sexual assessment practices; and promote discussion among patients with multiple myeloma, their healthcare providers, and their partners.

  17. [Promotion of community-based care in Africa: example of community general practice in Benin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplain, Roland; Yacoubou, Ismaïl; Adedemy, Didier; Sani, Alidou; Takam, Sandrine; Desplats, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Considerable effort has been made to provide rural African populations with basic health care, but the quality of this care remains unsatisfactory due to the absence of first-line GPs. This is a paradoxical situation in view of the large number of physicians trained in medical schools in French-speaking Africa and Madagascar. of the lack of GPs working in rural areas is a real concern, as many young doctors remain unemployed in cities. For more than 20 years, the NGO Santé Sud has proposed a Community General Medicine concept, which, combined with a support system, has allowed the installation of more than 200 community GPs in Mali and Madagascar. The advantage of this concept is that it provides family medicine and primary health care in the same practice. Since 2009, Santé Sud supports an installation project in rural areas of northern Benin, where community GPs work independently, as a complementary partner of the public sector. Since 2013, the installation process comprises a university degree created with the University of Parakou Faculty of Medicine. Based on this experience in Benin, the authors show that the presence of a first-line general practitioner is an original strategy that provides a major contribution to health promotion : reducing health inequalities between rural and urban populations, allowing women to receive medically assisted childbirth close to home, developing family planning activities, education and health care for chronic diseases, strengthening health coverage by participating in vaccination campaigns, etc. Due to their functions and proximity, community GPs represent an added value for health promotion.

  18. A Guide for Foodservice Education; Health Care; Community Care and School Feeding in California. Dietetic Service Supervision Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schickling, Clarice; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended to help California community college educators understand and develop a vocational program in health care, community care, and school food service. It establishes the general need for such a program, and provides guidelines to help educators determine if there is a need for such a program in their geographic…

  19. Can care of elderly be measured? A method for estimating the individual care of recipients in community health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyberg Per

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Almost every country in the Western world has great difficulties allocating enough financial resources to meet the needs in the care of the increasing elderly population. The main problem is common to all countries and concerns the efforts to meet elderly persons' needs on an individual level while still maintaining society's responsibility for distributing justice. The aim of this study is to elaborate an instrument for measuring the quality of individual care and staff's working time in order to allocate public resources fairly. The present study gives an account of a new classification system named TiC (Time in Care, indicating how it can be used most effectively and also investigating the validity and reliability of the system. Methods All recipients in 13 sheltered homes for elderly care (n = 505 in a Swedish municipality were surveyed regarding the care they needed, in dimensions of General Care, Medical Care, Cognitive Dysfunction and Rehabilitation, and the time required. Construct validity was assessed by means of factor analysis. The inter-rater agreement of two raters concerning 79 recipients was measured using weighted Kappa. The stability of the instrument and its sensitivity to change were investigated through test-retest reliability measurements, conducted once a month during a six-month period. The content validity of the instrument was also assessed. Results Factor analysis resulted in a reduction of the number of items from 25 to 16 in three dimensions: General Care, Medical Care and Cognitive Dysfunction. The Kappa analysis showed satisfactory to excellent inter-rater agreement. The care need scores were basically stable but showed sensitivity to change in health status. Conclusion The instrument was found to be useful and reliable for assessing individual needs in community health care.

  20. Agreement Between the Association for Higher Education of Shoreline Community College and the Board of Trustees concerning Salary, Working Conditions, and Related College Policies 1973-74.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoreline Community Coll., Seattle, WA.

    This document presents the agreement between the Association for Higher Education of Shoreline Community College and the Board of Trustees concerning salary, working conditions, and related college policies for the period from July 19, 1973 to June 30, 1974. The articles of the agreement cover initial placement of teaching faculty, salary…

  1. Role of community pharmacists in patients' self-care and self-medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutter P

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Paul RutterSchool of Pharmacy, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UKAbstract: This review highlights the growing prominence of self-care and explores the contribution of community pharmacy. Firstly, background to self-care is discussed, followed by placing self-care in context with regard to the general public and accessing community pharmacy. From this perspective the contribution community pharmacy currently makes is assessed, paying particular attention to the factors that negatively impact on the ability of community pharmacy to facilitate self-care.Keywords: community pharmacy, health promotion, disease prevention, health maintenance, health belief

  2. Quality of Prenatal Care Services in Karabuk Community Health Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binali Catak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the quality and quantity of prenatal care services according to gestastional week in Karabuk Community Health Center (CHC. Methods: In this descriptive study 365 pregnant women was selected as sample among 753 pregnant women registered at Karabuk CHC in 18/01/2011. 93.0% of women in the selected sample has been visited in their homes and the face to face interviews were done. The questionnaire was prepared according to Prenatal Care Management Guidelines (PCMG of Ministry of Health. Findings The number of follow-ups was not complete in 23.7% of 15-24 month, 34.4% of 25-32 month, 52,1% of 33-42 month pregnant women. At least four follow-up visits were completed only in 66,7% of postpartum women. Timing of first visit was after 15th week in 15,6% of women. In follow up visits 62.5% of of women’s height were never measured, in 13,0% the women hearth sound of infants didn’t monitored at least once. Laboratory test numbers were under the level required by PCMG. The delivery conditions weren’t planned in 41,8% of last trimester and postpartum women and training about breastfeeding wasn’t given to 15,5 of the same group. Result In family medicine model in Karabuk CHC developments in number of prenatal follow-up visits were observed, but no substantial improvements were found in quality of prenatal visits. Regular in service trainings shoud be given to family doctors and midwives. The use of prenatal care guideline published by MoH should be increased. Keywords: Prenatal care, pregnancy, timing of first visit, qality of prenatal care [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(2.000: 153-162

  3. Improving pain care through implementation of the Stepped Care Model at a multisite community health center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson DR

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Daren R Anderson,1 Ianita Zlateva,1 Emil N Coman,2 Khushbu Khatri,1 Terrence Tian,1 Robert D Kerns3 1Weitzman Institute, Community Health Center, Inc., Middletown, 2UCONN Health Disparities Institute, University of Connecticut, Farmington, 3VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA Purpose: Treating pain in primary care is challenging. Primary care providers (PCPs receive limited training in pain care and express low confidence in their knowledge and ability to manage pain effectively. Models to improve pain outcomes have been developed, but not formally implemented in safety net practices where pain is particularly common. This study evaluated the impact of implementing the Stepped Care Model for Pain Management (SCM-PM at a large, multisite Federally Qualified Health Center. Methods: The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework guided the implementation of the SCM-PM. The multicomponent intervention included: education on pain care, new protocols for pain assessment and management, implementation of an opioid management dashboard, telehealth consultations, and enhanced onsite specialty resources. Participants included 25 PCPs and their patients with chronic pain (3,357 preintervention and 4,385 postintervention cared for at Community Health Center, Inc. Data were collected from the electronic health record and supplemented by chart reviews. Surveys were administered to PCPs to assess knowledge, attitudes, and confidence. Results: Providers’ pain knowledge scores increased to an average of 11% from baseline; self-rated confidence in ability to manage pain also increased. Use of opioid treatment agreements and urine drug screens increased significantly by 27.3% and 22.6%, respectively. Significant improvements were also noted in documentation of pain, pain treatment, and pain follow-up. Referrals to behavioral health providers for patients with pain increased by 5.96% (P=0.009. There was no

  4. Knowledge of community care workers about key family practices in a rural community in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethelwynn Stellenberg

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interventions by community care workers within the context of communitybased integrated management of childhood illness (CIMCI may have a positive effect on child health if the health workers have adequate knowledge about key family practices.Setting: The study was conducted in rural areas of the West Coast district in the Western Cape, South Africa.Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the knowledge of community care workers about five of the 16 key family practices of CIMCI.Methods: A descriptive survey collected a self-administered questionnaire from 257 community care workers out of a possible total of 270 (95.2% response rate. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis was applied.Results: Only 25 of the respondents (10% obtained a score higher than 70% on the knowledgebased items of the questionnaire. Less than 25% of respondents answered questions in these key areas correctly (pneumonia [17%], tuberculosis [13%], HIV/AIDS [9%] immunisation [3%] and recommendations for a child with fever [21%]. Statistically significant correlations were found between the total score a respondent achieved and the highest level of education obtained (p < 0.01, the level of in-service training (p < 0.01, attendance of a CIMCI five-day training course (p < 0.01, and completing a subsequent refresher course (p < 0.01.Conclusion: The knowledge of CCWs was inadequate to provide safe, quality CIMCI. CIMCI refresher courses should be offered annually to improve CCWs’ knowledge and the quality of care that they render. Regular update courses could contribute to building competence.

  5. The FELICIA bulletin board system and the IRBIS anonymous FTP server: Computer security information sources for the DOE community. CIAC-2302

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orvis, W.J.

    1993-11-03

    The Computer Incident Advisory Capability (CIAC) operates two information servers for the DOE community, FELICIA (formerly FELIX) and IRBIS. FELICIA is a computer Bulletin Board System (BBS) that can be accessed by telephone with a modem. IRBIS is an anonymous ftp server that can be accessed on the Internet. Both of these servers contain all of the publicly available CIAC, CERT, NIST, and DDN bulletins, virus descriptions, the VIRUS-L moderated virus bulletin board, copies of public domain and shareware virus- detection/protection software, and copies of useful public domain and shareware utility programs. This guide describes how to connect these systems and obtain files from them.

  6. The Shifting Sands of Health Care Delivery: Curriculum Revision and Integration of Community Health Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Cynthia O'Neill; Baldwin, Joan H.; Abegglen, JoAnn; Callister, Lynn C.

    1999-01-01

    Brigham Young University's nursing curriculum was revised to reflect the community-driven nature of primary health care. Curricular threads of inquiry, practice, stewardship, spirituality, and service are the framework for integrating community health nursing practice. (SK)

  7. Community Vital Signs: Taking the Pulse of the Community While Caring for Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L; DeVoe, Jennifer E; Bazemore, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    In 2014 both the Institute of Medicine and the National Quality Forum recommended the inclusion of social determinants of health data in electronic health records (EHRs). Both entities primarily focus on collecting socioeconomic and health behavior data directly from individual patients. The burden of reliably, accurately, and consistently collecting such information is substantial, and it may take several years before a primary care team has actionable data available in its EHR. A more reliable and less burdensome approach to integrating clinical and social determinant data exists and is technologically feasible now. Community vital signs-aggregated community-level information about the neighborhoods in which our patients live, learn, work, and play-convey contextual social deprivation and associated chronic disease risks based on where patients live. Given widespread access to "big data" and geospatial technologies, community vital signs can be created by linking aggregated population health data with patient addresses in EHRs. These linked data, once imported into EHRs, are a readily available resource to help primary care practices understand the context in which their patients reside and achieve important health goals at the patient, population, and policy levels.

  8. Role of community pharmacists in patients' self-care and self-medication

    OpenAIRE

    Rutter P

    2015-01-01

    Paul RutterSchool of Pharmacy, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UKAbstract: This review highlights the growing prominence of self-care and explores the contribution of community pharmacy. Firstly, background to self-care is discussed, followed by placing self-care in context with regard to the general public and accessing community pharmacy. From this perspective the contribution community pharmacy currently makes is assessed, paying particular attention to the factors that negativ...

  9. Assessing the acceptability of community pharmacy based pharmaceutical care services in Karachi

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Amir, B.Pharmacy, MSc. MBA, Assistant Professor/Clinical Pharmacist

    2011-01-01

    Provision of pharmaceutical care services in community pharmacies is a new trend in pharmacy practice worldwide. Published literature from developed countries is available showing benefits of pharmaceutical care services provided in community pharmacies. However, relatively little published literature is available from developing countries in which unique market environments are encountered. This study was conducted to assess the acceptability of community pharmacy based pharmaceutical care s...

  10. Improving organisational systems for diabetes care in Australian Indigenous communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Gary

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indigenous Australians experience disproportionately high prevalence of, and morbidity and mortality from diabetes. There is an urgent need to understand how Indigenous primary care systems are organised to deliver diabetes services to those most in need, to monitor the quality of diabetes care received by Indigenous people, and to improve systems for better diabetes care. Methods The intervention featured two annual cycles of assessment, feedback workshops, action planning, and implementation of system changes in 12 Indigenous community health centres. Assessment included a structured review of health service systems and audit of clinical records. Main process of care measures included adherence to guideline-scheduled services and medication adjustment. Main patient outcome measures were HbA1c, blood pressure and total cholesterol levels. Results There was good engagement of health centre staff, with significant improvements in system development over the study period. Adherence to guideline-scheduled processes improved, including increases in 6 monthly testing of HbA1c from 41% to 74% (Risk ratio 1.93, 95% CI 1.71–2.10, 3 monthly checking of blood pressure from 63% to 76% (1.27, 1.13–1.37, annual testing of total cholesterol from 56% to 74% (1.36, 1.20–1.49, biennial eye checking by a ophthalmologist from 34% to 54% (1.68, 1.39–1.95, and 3 monthly feet checking from 20% to 58% (3.01, 2.52–3.47. Medication adjustment rates following identification of elevated HbA1c and blood pressure were low, increasing from 10% to 24%, and from 13% to 21% respectively at year 1 audit. However, improvements in medication adjustment were not maintained at the year 2 follow-up. Mean HbA1c value improved from 9.3 to 8.9% (mean difference -0.4%, 95% CI -0.7;-0.1, but there was no improvement in blood pressure or cholesterol control. Conclusion This quality improvement (QI intervention has proved to be highly acceptable in the

  11. Working Together to Connect Care: a metropolitan tertiary emergency department and community care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcourt, Debra; McDonald, Clancy; Cartlidge-Gann, Leonie; Burke, John

    2017-03-02

    Objective Frequent attendance by people to an emergency department (ED) is a global concern. A collaborative partnership between an ED and the primary and community healthcare sectors has the potential to improve care for the person who frequently attends the ED. The aims of the Working Together to Connect Care program are to decrease the number of presentations by providing focused community support and to integrate all healthcare services with the goal of achieving positive, patient-centred and directed outcomes.Methods A retrospective analysis of ED data for 2014 and 2015 was used to ascertain the characteristics of the potential program cohort. The definition used to identify a 'frequent attendee' was more than four presentations to an ED in 1 month. This analysis was used to develop the processes now known as the Working Together to Connect Care program. This program includes participant identification by applying the definition, flagging of potential participants in the ED IT system, case review and referral to community services by ED staff, case conferencing facilitated within the ED and individualised, patient centred case management provided by government and non-government community services.Results Two months after the date of commencement of the Working Together to Connect Care program there are 31 active participants in the program: 10 are on the Mental Health pathway, and one is on the No Consent pathway. On average there are three people recruited to the program every week. The establishment of a new program for supporting frequent attendees of an ED has had its challenges. Identifying systems that support people in their community has been an early positive outcome of this project.Conclusion It is expected that data regarding the number of ED presentations, potential fiscal savings and client outcomes will be available in 2017.What is known about the topic? Frequent attendance at EDs is a global issue and although the number of 'super users' is

  12. Improving pain care through implementation of the Stepped Care Model at a multisite community health center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daren R; Zlateva, Ianita; Coman, Emil N; Khatri, Khushbu; Tian, Terrence; Kerns, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Treating pain in primary care is challenging. Primary care providers (PCPs) receive limited training in pain care and express low confidence in their knowledge and ability to manage pain effectively. Models to improve pain outcomes have been developed, but not formally implemented in safety net practices where pain is particularly common. This study evaluated the impact of implementing the Stepped Care Model for Pain Management (SCM-PM) at a large, multisite Federally Qualified Health Center. Methods The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework guided the implementation of the SCM-PM. The multicomponent intervention included: education on pain care, new protocols for pain assessment and management, implementation of an opioid management dashboard, telehealth consultations, and enhanced onsite specialty resources. Participants included 25 PCPs and their patients with chronic pain (3,357 preintervention and 4,385 postintervention) cared for at Community Health Center, Inc. Data were collected from the electronic health record and supplemented by chart reviews. Surveys were administered to PCPs to assess knowledge, attitudes, and confidence. Results Providers’ pain knowledge scores increased to an average of 11% from baseline; self-rated confidence in ability to manage pain also increased. Use of opioid treatment agreements and urine drug screens increased significantly by 27.3% and 22.6%, respectively. Significant improvements were also noted in documentation of pain, pain treatment, and pain follow-up. Referrals to behavioral health providers for patients with pain increased by 5.96% (P=0.009). There was no significant change in opioid prescribing. Conclusion Implementation of the SCM-PM resulted in clinically significant improvements in several quality of pain care outcomes. These findings, if sustained, may translate into improved patient outcomes. PMID:27881926

  13. Integrated complex care coordination for children with medical complexity: A mixed-methods evaluation of tertiary care-community collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Eyal

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care medical homes may improve health outcomes for children with special healthcare needs (CSHCN, by improving care coordination. However, community-based primary care practices may be challenged to deliver comprehensive care coordination to complex subsets of CSHCN such as children with medical complexity (CMC. Linking a tertiary care center with the community may achieve cost effective and high quality care for CMC. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of community-based complex care clinics integrated with a tertiary care center. Methods A before- and after-intervention study design with mixed (quantitative/qualitative methods was utilized. Clinics at two community hospitals distant from tertiary care were staffed by local community pediatricians with the tertiary care center nurse practitioner and linked with primary care providers. Eighty-one children with underlying chronic conditions, fragility, requirement for high intensity care and/or technology assistance, and involvement of multiple providers participated. Main outcome measures included health care utilization and expenditures, parent reports of parent- and child-quality of life [QOL (SF-36®, CPCHILD©, PedsQL™], and family-centered care (MPOC-20®. Comparisons were made in equal (up to 1 year pre- and post-periods supplemented by qualitative perspectives of families and pediatricians. Results Total health care system costs decreased from median (IQR $244 (981 per patient per month (PPPM pre-enrolment to $131 (355 PPPM post-enrolment (p=.007, driven primarily by fewer inpatient days in the tertiary care center (p=.006. Parents reported decreased out of pocket expenses (p© domains [Health Standardization Section (p=.04; Comfort and Emotions (p=.03], while total CPCHILD© score decreased between baseline and 1 year (p=.003. Parents and providers reported the ability to receive care close to home as a key benefit. Conclusions Complex

  14. Independent community care gerontological nursing: becoming an entrepreneur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Rosalie A

    2005-08-01

    Few nurses have the experience of developing an independent practice. This ethnographic study explores the process and challenges of becoming an entrepreneur as described by nurses developing independent practices in community care gerontologic nursing. The process included developing a legal contract, marketing strategies, and reimbursement amounts and strategies. Major barriers to implementing this role identified by the nurses included ignorance and confusion by others about their role, financial issues related to an uncertain income, time management, and legal concerns especially around delegation. These were experienced and dedicated nurses who were also risk-takers and enjoyed the independence of practicing nursing because they believed it was meant to be practiced. Suggestions for research, education, and practice are included.

  15. Making it local: Beacon Communities use health information technology to optimize care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Amy; Des Jardins, Terrisca R; Heider, Arvela; Kanger, Chatrian R; Lobach, David F; McWilliams, Lee; Polello, Jennifer M; Rein, Alison L; Schachter, Abigail A; Singh, Ranjit; Sorondo, Barbara; Tulikangas, Megan C; Turske, Scott A

    2014-06-01

    Care management aims to provide cost-effective, coordinated, non-duplicative care to improve care quality, population health, and reduce costs. The 17 communities receiving funding from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology through the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program are leaders in building and strengthening their health information technology (health IT) infrastructure to provide more effective and efficient care management. This article profiles 6 Beacon Communities' health IT-enabled care management programs, highlighting the influence of local context on program strategy and design, and describing challenges, lessons learned, and policy implications for care delivery and payment reform. The unique needs (eg, disease burden, demographics), community partnerships, and existing resources and infrastructure all exerted significant influence on the overall priorities and design of each community's care management program. Though each Beacon Community needed to engage in a similar set of care management tasks--including patient identification, stratification, and prioritization; intervention; patient engagement; and evaluation--the contextual factors helped shape the specific strategies and tools used to carry out these tasks and achieve their objectives. Although providers across the country are striving to deliver standardized, high-quality care, the diverse contexts in which this care is delivered significantly influence the priorities, strategies, and design of community-based care management interventions. Gaps and challenges in implementing effective community-based care management programs include: optimizing allocation of care management services; lack of available technology tailored to care management needs; lack of standards and interoperability; integrating care management into care settings; evaluating impact; and funding and sustainability.

  16. Bridging the gap between health care professionals and communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Hartley

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Bridging the gap between health care professionals and communities is a difficult task. It involves establishing a culture of community participation and improving the process of communication between the two groups. Effective communication between these groups is not easy. The people concerned often speak different languages, have different levels of education and competence, different priorities in life and generally understand things differently. In addition, the greatest proportion of communication is transmitted non-verbally, through gestures, facial expressions and ‘body language’. This is important for two reasons. Firstly, any feelings of pity, superiority, frustration, dismissal or respect, will almost certainly be transmitted through these alternative modes of communication, they carry much more powerful messages than those contained in what is said. Secondly, many of these non-verbal messages, with the major exception of speech intonation, are visual and are therefore missed by people who cannot see well enough to pick them up. This combines to give an effective recipe for communication breakdown.

  17. Advance Care Planning for Older Australians Living in the Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Crowe

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the impact of advance care planning (ACP education with people aged ≥60 years living in the community. The interactive workshop explored all aspects of ACP—legal, emotional, physical, spiritual, role of significant others—and allowed reflection time, questions, and group discussion. Evaluation of knowledge and attitudes toward ACP were completed pre- and post-training. Readiness-to-change and feedback about the workshop quality were collected post-training. Eleven workshops were delivered in Queensland (132 matched pre- and post-questionnaires compared for analysis. Participant’s ACP knowledge and confidence increased significantly (12/13 statements, p<0.05 alongside some shift in attitudes (4/12 statements, p<0.05 after training. Participants were engaged and rated the workshop positively. Single ACP workshops are an effective intervention for healthy older people in the community. Training should focus on demystifying legislation and documentation, the importance of planning and communicating wishes while still healthy, and the need to regularly review and update plans. Follow-up is required to assess translation of education into ACP action.

  18. Feminist Interruptions: Creating Care-ful and Collaborative Community-Based Research with Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Concannon

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a feminist community-based research project involving faculty and student collaboration to evaluate a dating and domestic violence awareness initiative. Using a critical ethics of care that emphasizes relationships and allows for constant reflection about power dynamics, role, positionality, and emotions, the authors reflect on what was learned during the research process. Faculty and student researchers share their perspectives and offer suggestions for future feminist collaborative research projects. Significant lessons learned include ensuring that all are invested from the outset of the project, guaranteeing that student researchers understand why their role is so critical in community-based research, and acknowledging not just faculty power over students but student privilege as well.

  19. Effective leadership behaviour: leading "the third way" from a primary care group perspective. A study of leadership constructs elicited from members of primary care group management boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaughan, A C

    2001-01-01

    The UK National Health Service (NHS) is undergoing cataclysmic change following the election of the first Labour Government in 18 years. This is primarily embodied in the implementation of the White Paper The New NHS Modern-Dependable, which has resulted in the creation of primary care groups (PCGs) and primary care trusts (PCTs). The task facing both PCGs and PCTs is a radically new and complex one, requiring a new set of leadership skills to the traditional command and control style management. Leadership theories have evolved over the past 70 years. However, it was not until the 1980s that a major change in the paradigm of thinking around what is the nature of leadership occurred. The interaction between the leader and his/her followers is explored in what has become known as transformational leadership theories, developed by Bass and Avolio. Recent studies have, however, questioned the applicability of leadership models derived in the USA, to other cultures. This paper explores the leadership behaviours required for the management boards of PCGs and PCTs. A qualitative research method "Grounded Theory" approach was chosen for this study of leadership. The Repertory Grid technique was used to collect data. There are a number of implications arising from the findings of this study for both leadership models in general, and more specifically, for the development of leadership skills in both PCGs and PCTs.

  20. Evaluate Your Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Glenn

    1982-01-01

    A checklist can be used to evaluate a school board's current level of performance as either "adequate" or "needs improvement." The areas covered include goal setting, policy, finance, relationships with the superintendent, community relations, board meetings, staff and personnel relationships, instructional programs, leadership, energy…

  1. Facilitating organizational mergers: amalgamation of community care access centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    The development of 14 Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs) in Ontario necessitated the re-organization of Community Care Access Centres (CCACs). The achievement of LHIN objectives was contingent upon the organizations responsible for home and long-term care placement being aligned within the LHIN geographic boundaries. This re-alignment required 42 provincial organizations to re-structure, integrate and reduce to 14. This project was focused on the amalgamation of two CCACs in the Waterloo Wellington LHIN. Both were distinctly different due to their organizational evolution, the composition of the region and leadership approach. The different organizational cultures, if not managed properly, could result in a derailing of several current projects that were underway and were also key to the overall health system transformation agenda. A literature search provided a plethora of critiques of organizational change approaches and practical suggestions. Of particular relevance was a report to the Royal Commission on Health Care in 2002 that authenticates the dismal success in health care to meet change objectives. The project included a joint planning day for the leadership teams of the two organizations followed by an Organizational Readiness Assessment conducted by the Canadian Council on Health Services Accreditation (CCHSA). Both activities brought the leadership and staff of Waterloo and Wellington together, started the integration process and solicited staff participation. A follow-up survey of the leadership teams revealed the effectiveness of the project in advancing integration between the two organizations and recognizing organizational cultural differences. The CCHSA Organizational Readiness Assessment process was viewed as an effective means for advancing the integration of the two organizations, particularly as it relates to allowing the staff groups to define for themselves the benefits of the merger. The lack of hard evidence on the benefits of a

  2. Contextualizing learning to improve care using collaborative communities of practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffs, Lianne; McShane, Julie; Flintoft, Virginia; White, Peggy; Indar, Alyssa; Maione, Maria; Lopez, A J; Bookey-Bassett, Sue; Scavuzzo, Lauren

    2016-09-02

    The use of interorganizational, collaborative approaches to build capacity in quality improvement (QI) in health care is showing promise as a useful model for scaling up and accelerating the implementation of interventions that bridge the "know-do" gap to improve clinical care and provider outcomes. Fundamental to a collaborative approach is interorganizational learning whereby organizations acquire, share, and combine knowledge with other organizations and have the opportunity to learn from their respective successes and challenges in improvement areas. This learning approach aims to create the conditions for collaborative, reflective, and innovative experiential systems that enable collective discussions regarding daily practice issues and finding solutions for improvement. The concepts associated with interorganizational learning and deliberate learning activities within a collaborative 'Communities-of-practice'(CoP) approach formed the foundation of the of an interactive QI knowledge translation initiative entitled PERFORM KT. Nine teams participated including seven teams from two acute care hospitals, one from a long term care center, and one from a mental health sciences center. Six monthly CoP learning sessions were held and teams, with the support of an assigned mentor, implemented a QI project and monitored their results which were presented at an end of project symposium. 47 individuals participated in either a focus group or a personal interview. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using an iterative content analysis. Four key themes emerged from the narrative dataset around experiences and perceptions associated with the PERFORM KT initiative: 1) being successful and taking it to other levels by being systematic, structured, and mentored; 2) taking it outside the comfort zone by being exposed to new concepts and learning together; 3) hearing feedback, exchanging stories, and getting new ideas; and 4) having a pragmatic and accommodating approach to

  3. Renal complications in multiple myeloma and related disorders: Survivorship care plan of the IMF Nurse Leadership Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiman, Beth; Tariman, Joseph D.; Mangan, Patricia A.; Spong, Jacy

    2012-01-01

    Kidney dysfunction is a common clinical feature of symptomatic multiple myeloma. Some degree of renal insufficiency or renal failure is present at diagnosis or will occur during the course of the disease, and which, if not reversed, will adversely effect overall survival and quality of life. Chronic insults to the kidneys from other illnesses, treatment, or multiple myeloma itself can further damage renal function and increase the risk for additional complications, such as anemia. Patients with multiple myeloma who have light chain (Bence Jones protein) proteinuria may experience renal failure or progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and require dialysis due to light chain cast nephropathy. Kidney failure in patients with presumed multiple myeloma may also result from amyloidosis, light chain deposition disease, or acute tubular necrosis caused by nephrotoxic agents; therefore identification of patients at risk for kidney damage is essential. The International Myeloma Foundation’s Nurse Leadership Board have developed these practice recommendations for screening for renal function, identifying positive and negative contributing risk and environmental factors, selecting appropriate therapies and supportive care measures to decrease progression to ESRD and dialysis, and reducing and managing renal complications in patients with multiple myeloma. PMID:21816711

  4. Renal complications in multiple myeloma and related disorders: survivorship care plan of the International Myeloma Foundation Nurse Leadership Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiman, Beth M; Mangan, Patricia; Spong, Jacy; Tariman, Joseph D

    2011-08-01

    Kidney dysfunction is a common clinical feature of symptomatic multiple myeloma. Some degree of renal insufficiency or renal failure is present at diagnosis or will occur during the course of the disease and, if not reversed, will adversely affect overall survival and quality of life. Chronic insults to the kidneys from other illnesses, treatment, or multiple myeloma itself can further damage renal function and increase the risk for additional complications, such as anemia. Patients with multiple myeloma who have light chain (Bence Jones protein) proteinuria may experience renal failure or progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and require dialysis because of light chain cast nephropathy. Kidney failure in patients with presumed multiple myeloma also may result from amyloidosis, light chain deposition disease, or acute tubular necrosis caused by nephrotoxic agents; therefore, identification of patients at risk for kidney damage is essential. The International Myeloma Foundation's Nurse Leadership Board has developed practice recommendations for screening renal function, identifying positive and negative contributing risk and environmental factors, selecting appropriate therapies and supportive care measures to decrease progression to ESRD, and enacting dialysis to reduce and manage renal complications in patients with multiple myeloma.

  5. The Adaptation of Scale of School as a Caring Community Profile for Secondary School Students into Turkish: Adaptation of School as a Caring Community Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çinkir, Sakir; Nayir, K. Funda; Çetin, Saadet Kuru

    2016-01-01

    Schools are social organizations where children came together from different cultures. Creating sense of community is important for schools for the formation of social culture. In schools where sense of community is formed, it is observed that students treat each other with respect, are caring and sharing and have high academic success, and rates…

  6. Transforming Health Care Coalitions From Hospitals to Whole of Community: Lessons Learned From Two Large Health Care Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Scott; Wargo, Michael; Winslow, Walter

    2015-12-01

    A health care emergency preparedness coalition (coalition) is a group of health care organizations, public safety agencies, and public health partners that join forces for the common cause of making their communities safer, healthier, and more resilient. Coalitions have been characterized as being focused on hospital systems instead of the health care of the community as a whole. We discuss 2 examples of coalition partners that use a more inclusive approach to planning, response, and recovery. The first is a large health care system spread across 23 states, and the other is a public safety agency in northeast Pennsylvania that took the lead to address the preparedness and response toward a large influx of burn patients and grew to encompass all aspects of community health care.

  7. Rural health systems' perceptions of referral to community pharmacists during transitions of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Stephanie; DiDonato, Kristen L; Liu, Yifei; Hartwig, D Matthew; May, Justin; Schramm, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    To identify rural health systems' perceptions of value, benefits, barriers, and opportunities associated with community pharmacist involvement in patient transitions of care. Rural health systems in northwest and central Missouri. Qualitative descriptive study of key informant interviews with self-identified decision makers of rural health systems within a 50-mile radius of 15 independent community pharmacy chain locations. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and coded to evaluate themes in participant responses. Fifteen interviews were conducted at 8 rural health systems. Participants expressed significant value in community pharmacist involvement in transitions of care and highlighted several benefits, barriers, and opportunities related to potential collaboration. Benefits that were identified included medication monitoring, resource for patient information, and desire among health care providers to work with community pharmacists. Barriers included legal and regulatory issues with referral, communication, and prescriber utilization. Opportunities described included: patient education, monitoring, and follow-up; targeted interventions; medication access assistance; bedside medication delivery; and collaboration between community pharmacies and health care entities. Rural health system informants perceived community pharmacy involvement to be valuable and were receptive to collaboration during transitional care to improve patient outcomes. They highlighted barriers to overcome to truly incorporate community pharmacists into the transitional care arena. Understanding these rural health systems' perceptions can guide community pharmacies in developing collaborative relationships and patient care services to assist with care transitions. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparing the implementation of team approaches for improving diabetes care in community health centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, P.J. van der; Friedberg, M.W.; Guzman, E.; Ayanian, J.Z.; Rodriguez, H.P.

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundPatient panel management and community-based care management may be viable strategies for community health centers to improve the quality of diabetes care for vulnerable patient populations. The objective of our study was to clarify implementation processes and experiences of integrating o

  9. Paying Down the Care Deficit: The Health Consequences for Grandmothers Caring for Grandchildren in a Mexican Migrant Community of Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Alice Scott

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available While significant research addresses global chains of care work from the perspective of female migrant workers engaged in low-paid, unstable domestic labor in “receiving” communities, little research has focused on those who substitute for migrant workers to provide care in communities of origin. This article addresses that gap by focusing on the health consequences of care work for grandmothers in southern Veracruz, Mexico who assume the primary responsibility for caring for their grandchildren when the parents migrate out of the community. Based in the literature on care work and transnational families, this ethnographically-based article argues that grandmothers suffer consequences for their own health in three ways. They must deduct from their own health care resources – including time and money – to provide for their grandchildren. They must concede to the exploitation of already ill bodies to engage in the physical care of children and the household. Finally, they must transfer energy for self-care to caring for others thereby exacerbating their own existing health issues in order to meet the physical and emotional needs of their grandchildren. The article calls for further research in this area that aims to develop solutions to the problem of “care substitution” in transnational families.

  10. Cold-spotting: linking primary care and public health to create communities of solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, John M

    2013-01-01

    By providing enhanced primary care and social services to patients with high utilization of expensive emergency and hospital care, there is evidence that their health can improve and their costs can be lowered. This type of "hot-spotting" improves the care of individual patients. It may be that these patients live in communities with disintegrated social determinants of health, little community support, and poor access to primary care. These "cold spots" in the community may be amenable to interventions targeted at linking primary care and public health at broader community and population levels. Building local communities of solution that address the individual and population may help decrease these cold spots, thereby eliminating the hot spots as well.

  11. Community health workers in primary care practice: redesigning health care delivery systems to extend and improve diabetes care in underserved populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinsworth, Ashley; Vulimiri, Madhulika; Snead, Christine; Walton, James

    2014-11-01

    New, comprehensive, approaches for chronic disease management are needed to ensure that patients, particularly those more likely to experience health disparities, have access to the clinical care, self-management resources, and support necessary for the prevention and control of diabetes. Community health workers (CHWs) have worked in community settings to reduce health care disparities and are currently being deployed in some clinical settings as a means of improving access to and quality of care. Guided by the chronic care model, Baylor Health Care System embedded CHWs within clinical teams in community clinics with the goal of reducing observed disparities in diabetes care and outcomes. This study examines findings from interviews with patients, CHWs, and primary care providers (PCPs) to understand how health care delivery systems can be redesigned to effectively incorporate CHWs and how embedding CHWs in primary care teams can produce informed, activated patients and prepared, proactive practice teams who can work together to achieve improved patient outcomes. Respondents indicated that the PCPs continued to provide clinical exams and manage patient care, but the roles of diabetes education, nutritional counseling, and patient activation were shifted to the CHWs. CHWs also provided patients with social support and connection to community resources. Integration of CHWs into clinical care teams improved patient knowledge and activation levels, the ability of PCPs to identify and proactively address specific patient needs, and patient outcomes.

  12. Examining missed care in community nursing: A cross section survey design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Amanda; Mccarthy, Sandra; Adams, Elizabeth

    2017-09-27

    To examine the prevalence of missed care in the community nursing. Previous studies have used a missed care framework to identify challenges routine nursing care in acute care environments. Several issues related to quality of care, safe staffing, job satisfaction and poor teamwork. However, this concept has not been examined in the community nursing context. A cross-sectional survey design was used to explore the concept of missed care in community nursing using demographical information, community nursing roles and reasons for missed care. Online questionnaires were completed by 458 community nurses in the Republic of Ireland to determine the prevalence of and reasons for missed care (31 July -25 September 2015). With a response rate of 29%, findings were above 70 percent in several routine care responsibilities. Other findings point to a higher level of missed care in nurses who had less than five years' experience and other variables such as age, those who worked additional unpaid hours and there were some regional variations. The results of the study indicate a high prevalence of missed care in the community nurses surveyed and that preventative care was the type of care most likely to be missed. This has serious implications for a nursing service that is preventative in nature and suggests that the missed care framework could benefit workforce planning for community nursing services both in Ireland and elsewhere. Accordingly, policy, practice and educational reforms are fundamental to meet current and future population needs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Perceptions of Cancer Care and Clinical Trials in the Black Community: Implications for Care Coordination Between Oncology and Primary Care Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague Martinez, Linda; Freeman, Elmer R; Winkfield, Karen M

    2017-07-13

    Despite efforts to ameliorate disparities in cancer care and clinical trials, barriers persist. As part of a multiphase community-engaged assessment, an exploratory community-engaged research partnership, forged between an academic hospital and a community-based organization, set out to explore perceptions of cancer care and cancer clinical trials by black Bostonians. Key informant interviews with health care providers and patient advocates in community health centers (CHCs), organizers from grassroots coalitions focused on cancer, informed the development of a focus group protocol. Six focus groups were conducted with black residents in Boston, including groups of cancer survivors and family members. Transcripts were coded thematically and a code-based report was generated and analyzed by community and academic stakeholders. While some participants identified clinical trials as beneficial, overall perceptions conjured feelings of fear and exploitation. Participants describe barriers to clinical trial participation in the context of cancer care experiences, which included negative interactions with providers and mistrust. Primary care physicians (PCPs) reported being levied as a trusted resource for patients undergoing care, but lamented the absence of a mechanism by which to gain information about cancer care and clinical trials. Confusion about cancer care and clinical trials persists, even among individuals who have undergone treatment for cancer. Greater coordination between PCPs and CHC care teams and oncology care teams may improve patient experiences with cancer care, while also serving as a mechanism to disseminate information about treatment options and clinical trials. Inequities in cancer care and clinical trial participation persist. Our findings indicate that greater coordination with primary care physicians (PCPs) and community health center (CHC) providers may be an important step for both improving the quality of cancer care in communities and

  14. The transition from managed care to consumerism: a community-level status report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Jon B; Ginsburg, Paul B; Draper, Debra A

    2008-01-01

    This paper assesses the evolving "facilitated consumerism" model of health care at the community level using data from the Community Tracking Study (CTS). We find that in a relatively short time, large employers and health plans have made notable progress in putting the building blocks in place to support their vision of consumerism. However, developments in the CTS communities suggest that the consumerism strategy evolving in local markets is more nuanced than implied by some descriptions of health care consumerism.

  15. Community Partnerships: Educational Linkages to Increase the Number of Primary Care Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Ronald W.; Henry, Rebecca C.

    1993-01-01

    The Kellogg Foundation's Community Partnerships in Health Professions Education, a program designed to increase multidisciplinary, comprehensive, cost-effective primary care teams in communities, uses an organizational structure linking academic medical education with communities. The new structures have resulted in new curricula and other…

  16. The In-Between People: Community Health Workers in the Circle of Care

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2006-01-01

    Community Health Workers in Native American and Latino communities help bridge the gap between communities and the health care system.  Created: 1/1/2006 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/7/2012.

  17. The delivery of preventive care to clients of community health services

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Smoking, poor nutrition, risky alcohol use, and physical inactivity are the primary behavioral risks for common causes of mortality and morbidity. Evidence and guidelines support routine clinician delivery of preventive care. Limited evidence describes the level delivered in community health settings. The objective was to determine the: prevalence of preventive care provided by community health clinicians; association between client and service characteristics and receipt of care; ...

  18. A Systematic Review of the Literature Addressing Veterinary Care for Underserved Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVallee, Elizabeth; Mueller, Megan Kiely; McCobb, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Currently, there is a care gap in veterinary medicine affecting low-income and underserved communities, resulting in decreased nonhuman-animal health and welfare. The use of low-price and community veterinary clinics in underserved populations is a strategy to improve companion-animal health through preventative care, spay/neuter, and other low-price care programs and services. Little research has documented the structure and effectiveness of such initiatives. This systematic review aimed to assess current published research pertaining to accessible health care, community-based veterinary medicine, and the use of community medicine in teaching programs. The review was an in-depth literature search identifying 51 publications relevant to the importance, benefits, drawbacks, and use of low-price and community clinics in underserved communities. These articles identified commonly discussed barriers to care that may prevent underserved clientele from seeking veterinary care. Five barriers were identified including the cost of veterinary care, accessibility of care, problems with or lack of veterinarian-client communication, culture/language, and lack of client education. The review also identified a need for additional research regarding evidence of effectiveness and efficiency in community medicine initiatives.

  19. Mental health care professionals' experiences with the discharge planning process and transitioning patients attending outpatient clinics into community care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noseworthy, Ann Marie; Sevigny, Elizabeth; Laizner, Andrea M; Houle, Claudine; La Riccia, Pina

    2014-08-01

    Health care reform promotes delivery of mental health care in the community. Outpatient mental healthcare professionals (HCPs) are pressured to discharge patients. This study's purpose: to understand the experience and perceptions of mental HCPs with discharge planning and transitioning patients into community care. Twelve HCPs participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews. Three main categories: engaging in the discharge planning process, making the transition smooth, and guiding values emerged. A conceptual framework was created to explain the phenomenon. HCPs valued strengthening partnerships and building relationships to ensure smooth transition. Sufficient resources and trust imperative for safe patient discharge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Commitment, Community, and Passion: Dimensions of a Care-Centered Approach to Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Lisa S.

    2002-01-01

    Builds on Nel Noddings' work on caring encounters to develop a care-centered approach to teacher education. This model emphasizes the important contributions to the process of preparing caring teachers made by enhanced interpersonal commitment, membership in a community of learners, and passion for the creative, intellectual aspects of teaching.…

  1. Caring in Schools is not Enough: Community, Narrative, and the Limits of Alterity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, Aaron

    1998-01-01

    Examines Nel Noddings' interpretation of caring and investigates the implications of Noddings' caring as a foundation for school communities. The paper also examines the work of Arendt, noting that Arendt's theory of the public offers solutions to many dilemmas presented by caring. The paper emphasizes the importance of looking to multiple…

  2. Diversity Training for Community Aged Care Workers: An Interdisciplinary Meta-Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Claudia; Ogrin, Rajna; Al-Zubaidi, Hamzah; Appannah, Arti; McMillan, Sally; Barrett, Elizabeth; Browning, Colette

    2017-01-01

    Population ageing signals the need for a responsive community aged care workforce respectful of older people's diverse healthcare needs. Person-centered care premises individual needs and preferences to enhance participation in health care. Training for diversity does not yet exist for this workforce, but is necessary to ensure appropriate care…

  3. Le Bon Samaritain: A Community-Based Care Model Supported by Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Valerie; Leijdekkers, Peter; Gill, Asif; Felix Navarro, Karla

    2015-01-01

    The effective care and well-being of a community is a challenging task especially in an emergency situation. Traditional technology-based silos between health and emergency services are challenged by the changing needs of the community that could benefit from integrated health and safety services. Low-cost smart-home automation solutions, wearable devices and Cloud technology make it feasible for communities to interact with each other, and with health and emergency services in a timely manner. This paper proposes a new community-based care model, supported by technology, that aims at reducing healthcare and emergency services costs while allowing community to become resilient in response to health and emergency situations. We looked at models of care in different industries and identified the type of technology that can support the suggested new model of care. Two prototypes were developed to validate the adequacy of the technology. The result is a new community-based model of care called 'Le Bon Samaritain'. It relies on a network of people called 'Bons Samaritains' willing to help and deal with the basic care and safety aspects of their community. Their role is to make sure that people in their community receive and understand the messages from emergency and health services. The new care model is integrated with existing emergency warning, community and health services. Le Bon Samaritain model is scalable, community-based and can help people feel safer, less isolated and more integrated in their community. It could be the key to reduce healthcare cost, increase resilience and drive the change for a more integrated emergency and care system.

  4. Integrating community health workers within Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nadia; Nadkarni, Smiti Kapadia; Zahn, Deborah; Skillman, Megan; Kwon, Simona C; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2015-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act's (PPACA) emphasis on community-based initiatives affords a unique opportunity to disseminate and scale up evidence-based community health worker (CHW) models that integrate CHWs within health care delivery teams and programs. Community health workers have unique access and local knowledge that can inform program development and evaluation, improve service delivery and care coordination, and expand health care access. As a member of the PPACA-defined health care workforce, CHWs have the potential to positively impact numerous programs and reduce costs. This article discusses different strategies for integrating CHW models within PPACA implementation through facilitated enrollment strategies, patient-centered medical homes, coordination and expansion of health information technology (HIT) efforts, and also discusses payment options for such integration. Title V of the PPACA outlines a plan to improve access to and delivery of health care services for all individuals, particularly low-income, underserved, uninsured, minority, health disparity, and rural populations. Community health workers' role as trusted community leaders can facilitate accurate data collection, program enrollment, and provision of culturally and linguistically appropriate, patient- and family-centered care. Because CHWs already support disease management and care coordination services, they will be critical to delivering and expanding patient-centered medical homes and Health Home services, especially for communities that suffer disproportionately from multiple chronic diseases. Community health workers' unique expertise in conducting outreach make them well positioned to help enroll people in Medicaid or insurance offered by Health Benefit Exchanges. New payment models provide opportunities to fund and sustain CHWs. Community health workers can support the effective implementation of PPACA if the capacity and potential of CHWs to serve as cultural

  5. Dedicated researcher brings cancer care to rural communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharan Bhuller

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As an ardent cancer researcher, Dr. Smita Asthana has a vision to create wider awareness on cancer and its prevention, and aims to work on translational research to benefit the general public through the implementation of evidence-based research. “I have been associated with the National Institute of Cancer Prevention and Research (NICPR and Institute of Cytology and Preventive Oncology (ICPO since November 2004 and have progressed over a period of time from being a staff scientist to the current role of a senior scientist,” says Dr. Asthana, who is presently with NICPR’s Biostatistics and Epidemiology division.“I have been working in various positions that deal with the design, execution, and evaluation of medical projects. Recently, we have concluded two major cervical cancer screening projects and conducted a screening of 10,000 women in rural areas,” she tells AMOR. One project, funded by the Indian Council of Medical Research, was carried out 100 km west of New Delhi in the rural town of Dadri “as part of an operational research to see the implementation of VIA (visual inspection with acetic acid and VILI (visual inspection with Lugol's iodine screenings with the help of existing healthcare infrastructure,” she explains.As a leading researcher in cervical cancer screening, she completed an Indo-US collaborative project on the clinical performance of a human papillomavirus (HPV test, used as a strategy for screening cervical cancer in rural communities, with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation via the international non-profit global health organization PATH. “The primary objective of the project was to observe the performance of careHPV, a new diagnostic kit, in a rural setup,” she says.CareHPV is a highly sensitive DNA test, which detects 14 different types of the human papillomavirus that cause cervical cancer, providing results more rapidly than other DNA tests and is designed especially for use in clinics

  6. Stigma in patients with schizophrenia receiving community mental health care: a review of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestdagh, Annelien; Hansen, Bart

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to identify consistent themes among the qualitative literature on stigma as experienced by patients with schizophrenia receiving community mental health care. With the treatment focus of schizophrenia nowadays shifting more and more towards community-based mental health care, professionals need to be aware of the increased vulnerability of their clients in their social environment as a result of stigma towards their disease. In-depth knowledge on stigma is critical in order to offer a dignifying community mental health care. A systematic search of the qualitative literature in Web of Science, PubMed, PsycINFO and Francis was performed to review the subjective experiences and ideas on stigma in outpatients with schizophrenia. Three major themes were identified in 18 studies and need to be taken into consideration when implementing an adequate community mental health care: (i) the continuing existence of stigma inherent in the health care setting, (ii) the importance of relational aspects of stigma encounters in daily life and (iii) the significance of the behavioural aspects related to previous stigma experiences and beliefs among patients. Despite much effort in community treatment, patients still experience stigma and discrimination. Community mental health care professionals should not only be aware of structural problems in mental health care, but should also pay considerable attention towards the relational and behavioural aspects in their clients' life concerning stigma. Furthermore, they have the crucial role in the community to raise awareness about stigma in order to increase their clients' acceptance in society.

  7. Safety and community: the maternity care needs of rural parturient women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornelsen, Jude; Grzybowski, Stefan

    2005-06-01

    To investigate rural parturient women's experiences of obstetric care in the context of the social and economic realities of life in rural, remote, and small urban communities. Data collection for this exploratory qualitative study was carried out in 7 rural communities chosen to represent diversity of size, distance to hospital with Caesarean section capability and distance to secondary hospital, usual conditions for transport and access, and cultural and ethnic subpopulations. We interviewed 44 women who had given birth up to 24 months before the study began. When asked about their experiences of giving birth in rural communities, many participants spoke of unmet needs and their associated anxieties. Self-identified needs were largely congruent with the deficit categories of Maslow's hierarchy of needs, which recognizes the contingency and interdependence of physiological needs, the need for safety and security, the need for community and belonging, self-esteem needs, and the need for self-actualization. For many women, community was critical to meeting psychosocial needs, and women from communities that currently have (or have recently had) access to local maternity care said that being able to give birth in their own community or in a nearby community was necessary if their obstetric needs were to be met. Removing maternity care from a community creates significant psychosocial consequences that are imperfectly understood but that probably have physiological implications for women, babies, and families. Further research into rural women's maternity care that considers the loss of local maternity care from multiple perspectives is needed.

  8. Developing a sustainable foot care clinic in a homeless shelter within an academic-community partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoon, Patricia M; Champlin, Barbara E; Hunt, Roberta J

    2012-12-01

    Nursing faculty are confronted with the need to design community learning activities with vulnerable populations to prepare students for nursing practice. The creation of sustainable academic-community partnerships with agencies providing care to underserved populations meets this challenge. This article describes the development and implementation of a foot care clinic in a homeless shelter, created through a model of curricular integration, faculty engagement, and a long-term academic-community partnership. A transformative pedagogical approach based on service-learning was used to facilitate student understanding of social justice through activities that promote citizenship, develop advocacy skills, and increase knowledge and skills related to the role of the public health nurse in the community. The process of designing and developing a community clinical learning activity and the essential components for sustainability are discussed. Student outcomes are addressed. Recommendations for implementing a foot care clinic within an academic–community partnership are outlined.

  9. Integrating substance abuse care with community diabetes care: implications for research and clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghitza UE

    2013-01-01

    preventive services and evidence-based treatments for substance use disorders with diabetes care in community-based medical settings. These laws also offer emerging areas for research.Keywords: addiction, illicit drug use, substance use disorder, substance abuse treatment, alcohol use, diabetes care, primary care, screening, brief intervention

  10. Transforming nursing home-based day care for people with dementia into socially integrated community day care: process analysis of the transition of six day care centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haeften-van Dijk, A M; Meiland, F J M; van Mierlo, L D; Dröes, R M

    2015-08-01

    The community-based Meeting Centres Support Programme for people with dementia and their carers has been proven more effective in influencing behaviour and mood problems of people with dementia and improving sense of competence of carers compared to nursing home-based day care centres for people with dementia. Six Dutch nursing home-based day care centres were transformed into Community-based day care centres with carer support, according to this Meeting Centres model. To determine which factors facilitate or impede the transition to Community-based day care. A process evaluation was conducted with a qualitative study design. Six nursing home-based day care centres transformed into Community-based day care centres for people with dementia and their carers. Stakeholders (n=40) that were involved during the transition. Factors that facilitated or impeded the transition were traced by means of (audiotaped and transcribed) interviews with stakeholders and document analysis. All data were coded by two independent researchers and analyzed using thematic analysis based on the Theoretical framework of adaptive implementation. Six nursing home-based day care centres successfully made the transition to Community-based day care with carer support. Success factors for the start of the project were: the innovation being in line with the current trend towards more outpatient care and having motivated pioneers responsible for the execution of the transition. Barriers were difficulties reaching/recruiting the target group (people with dementia and carers), inflexible staff and little or no experience with collaboration with community-based care and welfare organizations. Facilitating factors during the implementation phase were: finding a suitable location in the community, positive changes in staff attitude and adoption of the new vision, and good cooperation with care and welfare organizations. Barriers were insufficient involvement of, and support from the managers of the

  11. Integrating Primary Care Into Community Mental Health Centers: Impact on Utilization and Costs of Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupski, Antoinette; West, Imara I; Scharf, Deborah M; Hopfenbeck, James; Andrus, Graydon; Joesch, Jutta M; Snowden, Mark

    2016-11-01

    This evaluation was designed to assess the impact of providing integrated primary and mental health care on utilization and costs for outpatient medical, inpatient hospital, and emergency department treatment among persons with serious mental illness. Two safety-net, community mental health centers that received a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration (PBHCI) grant were the focus of this study. Clinic 1 had a ten-year history of providing integrated services whereas clinic 2 began integrated services with the PBHCI grant. Difference-in-differences (DID) analyses were used to compare individuals enrolled in the PBHCI programs (N=373, clinic 1; N=389, clinic 2) with propensity score-matched comparison groups of equal size at each site by using data obtained from medical records. Relative to the comparison groups, a higher proportion of PBHCI clients used outpatient medical services at both sites following program enrollment (p<.003, clinic 1; p<.001, clinic 2). At clinic 1, PBHCI was also associated with a reduction in the proportion of clients with an inpatient hospital admission (p=.04) and a trend for a reduction in inpatient hospital costs per member per month of $217.68 (p=.06). Hospital-related cost savings were not observed for PBHCI clients at clinic 2 nor were there significant differences between emergency department use or costs for PBHCI and comparison groups at either clinic. Investments in PBHCI can improve access to outpatient medical care for persons with severe mental illness and may also curb hospitalizations and associated costs in more established programs.

  12. Mental health nurses' contributions to community mental health care: An Australian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Brett; Wynaden, Dianne; Tohotoa, Jenny; Heslop, Karen

    2016-10-01

    Australian mental health policy is focused on providing mental health care in the community setting and community mental health teams provide services to clients in a shared model with primary care. The historical literature reports that community mental health nurses' experience high levels of stress and are often allocated the most complex and challenging clients managed by the team. Yet information on their specific roles remains limited. This paper reports on research conducted at one Australian public mental health service to identify the components of the community mental health nursing role and to quantify the time nurses spent in each component during the study period. Six focus groups were conducted with community mental health nurses to identify their perceived role within the team. Data analysis identified 18 components of which 10 were related to direct clinical contact with clients and eight covered administrative and care coordination activities. A data collection tool based on the findings of the focus groups was designed and nurses recorded workload data on the tool in 15-min intervals over a 4-week period. Seventeen nurses collected 1528 hours of data. Internal coordination of care was identified as the top workload item followed by clinical documentation and national data collection responsibilities supporting the complexity of the community mental health nursing role. The high rating attached to the internal coordination of care role demonstrates an important contribution that community mental health nurses make to the functioning of the team and the delivery of quality mental health care.

  13. Delivering care to oncology patients in the community: an innovative integrated approach.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanan, Terry

    2014-08-01

    A community oncology nursing programme was developed in Ireland between the hospital and community health services for patients receiving systemic cancer therapy, in response to a service need. A robust evaluation of the pilot programme was undertaken, which found that defined clinical procedures traditionally undertaken in hospitals were safely undertaken in the patient\\'s home with no adverse effects. There was a dramatic decrease in hospital attendances for these defined clinical procedures, and hospital capacity was consequently freed up. Patients valued having aspects of their care delivered at home and reported that it improved their quality of life, including reduced hospital visits and travel time. Community nurses expanded their scope of practice and became partners with oncology day-ward nurses in caring for these patients. Community nurses developed the competence and confidence to safely deliver cancer care in the community. This initiative shows that defined elements of acute cancer care can be safely delivered in the community so long as the training and support are provided. The findings and recommendations of the evaluation resulted in university accreditation and approval for national roll-out of the programme. Integration of services between primary and secondary care is a key priority. This innovative programme is a good example of shared integrated care that benefits both patients and health-care providers.

  14. Community health workers improve diabetes care in remote Australian Indigenous communities: results of a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Robyn A; Schmidt, Barbara; Preece, Cilla; Owens, Vickie; Taylor, Sean; Li, Ming; Esterman, Adrian

    2015-02-19

    Health outcomes for Indigenous Australians with diabetes in remote areas remain poor, including high rates of avoidable complications which could be reduced with better primary level care. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a community-based health-worker led case management approach to the care of Indigenous adults with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes in primary care services in remote northern Australia. Two hundred and thirteen adults with poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c > 8.5%) and significant comorbidities in 12 remote communities were randomly assigned by service cluster to receive chronic care co-ordination from a community-based health worker supported by a clinical outreach team, or to a waitlist control group which received usual care. At baseline, mean age of participants was 47.9 years, 62.4% were female, half were Aboriginal and half identified as Torres Strait Islander, 67% had less than 12 years of education, 39% were smokers, median income was $18,200 and 47% were unemployed. Mean HbA1c was 10.7% (93 mmol/mol) and BMI 32.5. At follow-up after 18 months, HbA1c reduction was significantly greater in the intervention group (-1.0% vs -0.2%, SE (diff) = 0.2, p = 0.02). There were no significant differences between the groups for blood pressure, lipid profile, BMI or renal function. Intervention group participants were more likely to receive nutrition and dental services according to scheduled care plans. Smoking rates were unchanged. A culturally safe, community level health-worker led model of diabetes care for high risk patients can be effective in improving diabetes control in remote Indigenous Australian communities where there is poor access to mainstream services. This approach can be effective in other remote settings, but requires longer term evaluation to capture accrued benefits. ANZCTR 12610000812099, Registered 29 September 2010.

  15. Using Community-Based Participatory Research to Investigate Meaningful Prenatal Care Among African American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nypaver, Cynthia F; Shambley-Ebron, Donna

    2016-11-01

    In the United States, African American babies die more than twice as often as White babies. The cause for this difference remains elusive, yet is likely complex with one factor being inadequate cultural care of pregnant African American women. The purpose of this study was to explore African American women's perspectives of meaningful prenatal care. Community-based participatory research was employed for this study using photovoice. The sample included 11 African American mothers in an urban community in Midwestern United States. Five themes were abstracted from the data: (1) Access to Care; (2) Soul Nourishment; (3) Companionship; (4) Help Me, Teach Me; and (5) The Future. Meaningful prenatal care is influenced by culture. African American women need physical, social, and soulful support to enhance meaningfulness of care during pregnancy. The findings support that meaningfulness of prenatal care for African American women may be enhanced by accessible and uniquely designed, culturally congruent models of prenatal care. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. The nutrition care profile: an aid to delivery of quality nutrition care in a small community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, P W; Littleton, E M

    1984-12-01

    In an effort to improve nutrition care in a small community hospital with one registered dietitian (R.D.), a system using a nutrition care profile (NCP) and a certified dietetic assistant (C.D.A.) was developed. The NCP includes criteria recognized in the literature or through clinical experience to be indicators of nutrition care needs. The profile is completed by the C.D.A. and reviewed by the R.D., who determines priorities for the patient's nutrition care needs. The NCP has proved to be an effective and efficient tool for prioritizing and systematizing follow-up of nutrition care needs. Indeed, because the NCP form is itself so effective as a follow-up tool for dietary records, the R.D. has found she must make a conscious effort to document nutrition care in the medical record.

  17. The changing landscape of health care financing and delivery: how are rural communities and providers responding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, K J; Coburn, A; Cordes, S; Crittenden, R; Hart, J P; McBride, T; Myers, W

    1999-01-01

    Rural communities have not kept pace with the recent dramatic changes in health care financing and organization. However, the Medicare provisions in the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 will require rural providers to participate in the new systems. Case studies revealed the degree of readiness for change in six rural communities and charted their progress along a continuum, as reflected in three sets of activities: the development of networking; the creation of new strategies for managing patient care; and the adoption of new methods for contracting with health insurers. Some communities had constructed highly integrated systems, whereas others were just beginning to change their billing practices; a few were signing contracts for capitated care, in contrast to those that were resisting discounts in current fee structures. These six rural areas still have considerable ground to cover before their health care organization and financing reach the levels achieved by urban communities.

  18. A Molecular Biomarker to Diagnose Community-acquired Pneumonia on Intensive Care Unit Admission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scicluna, Brendon P; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M C; van Vught, Lonneke A; Wiewel, Maryse A; Ong, David S Y; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Franitza, Marek; Toliat, Mohammad R; Nürnberg, Peter; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Horn, Janneke; Cremer, Olaf L; Schultz, Marcus J; Bonten, Marc J; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) accounts for a major proportion of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions for respiratory failure and sepsis. Diagnostic uncertainty complicates case management, which may delay appropriate cause-specific treatment. Objectives: To characterize the blood

  19. Geriatric nursing education in community health: CareLink--partnering for excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmens, Donna; Goldstein, Jill M; Clarke, Kitty; Moriarty, Mari; Soberman, Rhonda Karp; Gardner, Daniel S

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate how participation in the CareLink program influenced the community health knowledge and skill of baccalaureate nursing students regarding the care of community-dwelling older adults. Students were assigned three to four clients each during their 14-week clinical placement with a home care agency, situated in a naturally occurring retirement community or senior center. Students contracted with their clients to set goals and provided standardized health assessments and teaching. Students completed pretest and posttest surveys, and attended focus groups to address their learning. Students' public health nursing and cultural competence improved significantly. The CareLink program provides a meaningful learning experience for baccalaureate nursing students. Attitudes toward older adults and community health nursing in general shifted to acknowledge that older adults have strengths and resilience not previously acknowledged.

  20. The continuing care retirement community executive: a manager for all seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, R E; Brewer, K P

    1991-01-01

    The continuing care retirement community industry is a growing source of residential and health care services for the elderly population. It is also a relatively new and expanding career path for both health care and hospitality managers. Using in-depth interviews with executives in a sample of 26 communities, this study provides one of the most complete portraits to date of the nature of managing these communities. The findings indicate that these organizations are complex and multifaceted, demanding versatile skills and abilities. Most critical are those skills that enable a manager to interact effectively with residents and staff to build and maintain a hospitable, accommodating community environment. As competition in the industry intensifies, community viability may become synonymous with customer satisfaction. Management training and development will need to be highly attentive to the distinctive features of these intriguing organizations.

  1. Understanding access to care and health needs of Hispanic women from an urban community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome-D'Emilia, Bonnie; Dunphy Suplee, Patricia; Gardner, Marcia R

    2014-01-01

    As a first step in a proposed program of community-based participatory research, this study investigated access to care and specific health needs in a population of Hispanic women from a medically underserved, urban community. There were 66 Hispanic women recruited at a local church to complete a 94-item researcher-developed survey. Thirty-two percent of women in the study were not U.S. citizens. Being insured, being a citizen, and having a medical diagnosis were significant in satisfaction with care. The most prevalent health issue for this population was being overweight or obese. This study demonstrates the use of the community needs assessment process in the development of interventions to improve a community's health and health care. This is especially true in the Hispanic community in which large variations based on culture and country of origin will impact the success of planned interventions.

  2. Home and community care services: a major opportunity for preventive health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lujic Sanja

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Australia, the Home and Community Care (HACC program provides services in the community to frail elderly living at home and their carers. Surprisingly little is known about the health of people who use these services. In this study we sought to describe health-related factors associated with use of HACC services, and to identify potential opportunities for targeting preventive services to those at high risk. Methods We obtained questionnaire data from the 45 and Up Study for 103,041 men and women aged 45 years and over, sampled from the general population of New South Wales, Australia in 2006-2007, and linked this with administrative data about HACC service use. We compared the characteristics of HACC clients and non-clients according to a range of variables from the 45 and Up Study questionnaire, and estimated crude and adjusted relative risks for HACC use with generalized linear models. Results 4,978 (4.8% participants used HACC services in the year prior to completing the questionnaire. Increasing age, female sex, lower pre-tax household income, not having a partner, not being in paid work, Indigenous background and living in a regional or remote location were strongly associated with HACC use. Overseas-born people and those speaking languages other than English at home were significantly less likely to use HACC services. People who were underweight, obese, sedentary, who reported falling in the past year, who were current smokers, or who ate little fruit or vegetables were significantly more likely to use HACC services. HACC service use increased with decreasing levels of physical functioning, higher levels of psychological distress, and poorer self-ratings of health, eyesight and memory. HACC clients were more likely to report chronic health conditions, in particular diabetes, stroke, Parkinson's disease, anxiety and depression, cancer, heart attack or angina, blood clotting problems, asthma and osteoarthritis

  3. Oncology Advanced Practitioners Bring Advanced Community Oncology Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Oncology care is becoming increasingly complex. The interprofessional team concept of care is necessary to meet projected oncology professional shortages, as well as to provide superior oncology care. The oncology advanced practitioner (AP) is a licensed health care professional who has completed advanced training in nursing or pharmacy or has completed training as a physician assistant. Oncology APs increase practice productivity and efficiency. Proven to be cost effective, APs may perform varied roles in an oncology practice. Integrating an AP into an oncology practice requires forethought given to the type of collaborative model desired, role expectations, scheduling, training, and mentoring.

  4. Challenges of establishing a Community Advisory Board (CAB in a low-income, low-resource setting: experiences from Bagamoyo, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubis Kafuruki

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Community Advisory Boards are now seen as standard practice for clinical vaccine and drug trials worldwide. In the past, most Community Advisory Boards (CABs were established by activists and lobbyists to monitor HIV/AIDS vaccine and drug trials in developed countries. In Africa the first CAB was established in Uganda in 1990 in conjunction with an HIV vaccine project and has since been followed by others in South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Kenya. In 2007, the Bagamoyo branch of the Ifakara Health Institute initiated the formation of a CAB. The aim was to properly educate and empower elected CAB members to become full partners in all research activities concerning the public within the Bagamoyo area. Methods and Results Beginning in 2007, staff visited each of the 24 villages within the study area to inform the communities about the proposed CAB and asked them to elect two individuals to represent their village on the CAB. The first attempt was hampered by community leaders selecting themselves, which led to inconsistent attendance, gender imbalance, and political infighting. New criteria for the selection of representatives were implemented to exclude governmental leaders, illiterate representatives and to promote a one-to-one gender balance. The newly appointed representatives underwent training and have participated in CAB meetings largely devoid of the negative issues previously encountered. Conclusion The successfully established CAB has led to improved relations with the community and facilitated the recruitment of study subjects. Our experiences show that, it is possible to establish a non-specific CAB in a low-income setting.

  5. Getting better at chronic care in remote communities: study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled of community based management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Prevalence and incidence of diabetes and other common comorbid conditions (hypertension, coronary heart disease, renal disease and chronic lung disease) are extremely high among Indigenous Australians. Recent measures to improve quality of preventive care in Indigenous community settings, while apparently successful at increasing screening and routine check-up rates, have shown only modest or little improvements in appropriate care such as the introduction of insulin and other scaled-up drug regimens in line with evidence-based guidelines, together with support for risk factor reduction. A new strategy is required to ensure high quality integrated family-centred care is available locally, with continuity and cultural safety, by community-based care coordinators with appropriate system supports. Methods/design The trial design is open parallel cluster randomised controlled trial. The objective of this pragmatic trial is to test the effectiveness of a model of health service delivery that facilitates integrated community-based, intensive chronic condition management, compared with usual care, in rural and remote Indigenous primary health care services in north Queensland. Participants are Indigenous adults (aged 18–65 years) with poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c>=8.5) and at least one other chronic condition. The intervention is to employ an Indigenous Health Worker to case manage the care of a maximum caseload of 30 participants. The Indigenous Health Workers receive intensive clinical training initially, and throughout the study, to ensure they are competent to coordinate care for people with chronic conditions. The Indigenous Health Workers, supported by the local primary health care (PHC) team and an Indigenous Clinical Support Team, will manage care, including coordinating access to multidisciplinary team care based on best practice standards. Allocation by cluster to the intervention and control groups is by simple randomisation after participant

  6. Getting better at chronic care in remote communities: study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled of community based management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Barbara

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevalence and incidence of diabetes and other common comorbid conditions (hypertension, coronary heart disease, renal disease and chronic lung disease are extremely high among Indigenous Australians. Recent measures to improve quality of preventive care in Indigenous community settings, while apparently successful at increasing screening and routine check-up rates, have shown only modest or little improvements in appropriate care such as the introduction of insulin and other scaled-up drug regimens in line with evidence-based guidelines, together with support for risk factor reduction. A new strategy is required to ensure high quality integrated family-centred care is available locally, with continuity and cultural safety, by community-based care coordinators with appropriate system supports. Methods/design The trial design is open parallel cluster randomised controlled trial. The objective of this pragmatic trial is to test the effectiveness of a model of health service delivery that facilitates integrated community-based, intensive chronic condition management, compared with usual care, in rural and remote Indigenous primary health care services in north Queensland. Participants are Indigenous adults (aged 18–65 years with poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c>=8.5 and at least one other chronic condition. The intervention is to employ an Indigenous Health Worker to case manage the care of a maximum caseload of 30 participants. The Indigenous Health Workers receive intensive clinical training initially, and throughout the study, to ensure they are competent to coordinate care for people with chronic conditions. The Indigenous Health Workers, supported by the local primary health care (PHC team and an Indigenous Clinical Support Team, will manage care, including coordinating access to multidisciplinary team care based on best practice standards. Allocation by cluster to the intervention and control groups is by simple

  7. Effect of community mobilization on appropriate care seeking for pneumonia in Haripur, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Sadruddin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Appropriate and timely care seeking reduces mortality for childhood illnesses including pneumonia. Despite over 90 000 Lady Health Workers (LHWs deployed in Pakistan, whose tasks included management of pneumonia, only 16% of care takers sought care from them for respiratory infections. As part of a community case management trial for childhood pneumonia, community mobilization interventions were implemented to improve care seeking from LHWs in Haripur district, Pakistan. The objective of the study was to increase the number of children receiving treatment for pneumonia and severe pneumonia by Lady Health Workers (LHWs through community mobilization approaches for prompt recognition and care seeking in 2 to 59 month–old children. Methods: To assess pneumonia care seeking practices, pre and post– intervention household surveys were conducted in 28 target Union Councils. Formative research to improve existing LHW training materials, job aids and other materials was carried out. Advocacy events were organized, LHWs and male health promoters were trained in community mobilization, non–functional women and male health committees were revitalized and LHWs and male health promoters conducted community awareness sessions. Results: The community mobilization interventions were implemented from April 2008 – December 2009. Project and LHW program staff organized 113 sensitization meetings for opinion leaders, which were attended by 2262 males and 3288 females. The 511 trained LHWs organized 6132 community awareness sessions attended by 50 056 women and 511 male promoters conducted 523 sessions attended by 7845 males. In one year period, the number of LHWs treating pneumonia increased from 11 in April 2008 to 505 in March 2009. The care seeking from LHWs for suspected pneumonia increased from 0.7% in pre–intervention survey to 49.2% in post–intervention survey. Conclusion: The increase in care seeking from LHWs benefited the community

  8. Describing and analysing primary health care system support for chronic illness care in Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory – use of the Chronic Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Allison

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indigenous Australians experience disproportionately high prevalence of, and morbidity and mortality from chronic illness such as diabetes, renal disease and cardiovascular disease. Improving the understanding of how Indigenous primary care systems are organised to deliver chronic illness care will inform efforts to improve the quality of care for Indigenous people. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 12 Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory. Using the Chronic Care Model as a framework, we carried out a mail-out survey to collect information on material, financial and human resources relating to chronic illness care in participating health centres. Follow up face-to-face interviews with health centre staff were conducted to identify successes and difficulties in the systems in relation to providing chronic illness care to community members. Results Participating health centres had distinct areas of strength and weakness in each component of systems: 1 organisational influence – strengthened by inclusion of chronic illness goals in business plans, appointment of designated chronic disease coordinators and introduction of external clinical audits, but weakened by lack of training in disease prevention and health promotion and limited access to Medicare funding; 2 community linkages – facilitated by working together with community organisations (e.g. local stores and running community-based programs (e.g. "health week", but detracted by a shortage of staff especially of Aboriginal health workers working in the community; 3 self management – promoted through patient education and goal setting with clients, but impeded by limited focus on family and community-based activities due to understaffing; 4 decision support – facilitated by distribution of clinical guidelines and their integration with daily care, but limited by inadequate access to and support from specialists; 5 delivery system

  9. De Madres a Madres: a community, primary health care program based on empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, J; Fehir, J

    1994-01-01

    Based on the concepts of empowerment of indigenous women through unity, validation of women as key health promoters, and the acceptance of a community's ability to identify and redress its own health needs, the de Madres a Madres Program was started in a Houston inner-city Hispanic community. The program has become a strategy for mobilizing a total community for health. Indigenous volunteer mothers learned how to provide information to increase access to health care. Information was provided through community coalitions the mothers formed with health clinics, social service agencies, local businesses, schools, churches, elected officials, and the media. Outcome data identified the covert functions of the program to be the enhancement of individual women's self-esteem and power, and the collective enhancement of community self-esteem, power, and economy. The concept of a community economy and a theoretical basis of empowerment of women are discussed in terms of community empowerment for community health.

  10. Role Model Ambulatory Care Clinical Training Site in a Community-Based Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarian, Edward O.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    An interdisciplinary project provided ambulatory care clinical training for pharmacy and nursing students in community-based pharmacies, promoting early detection and medical follow-up of common health problems within the community. Students learned new clinical skills in patient health assessment, new diagnostic technologies, patient education…

  11. Impact of critically ill patients in regards to the boarding time from the emergency department to the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Fildissis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the association between ED overcrowding and outcomes for critically ill patients Design and Setting: We included medical and surgical pts that all of them were intubated promptly to ED of 2 general hospitals of Athens GR, for 12 months. Pts survived > 24hours were divided into 2 groups: ED boarding 61 yrs, female gender and direct admission to ICU were associated with lower hospital survival (odds ratio 0.815; 95% 0.612-0.976. Conclusions: Boarding time of critically ill from ED to ICUs is very important because it is strongly related to the hospital LOS and mortality rate.

  12. What matters most for end-of-life care? Perspectives from community-based palliative care providers and administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Bina; Bainbridge, Daryl; Bryant, Deanna; Tan Toyofuku, Sue; Seow, Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There has been little research conducted to understand the essential meaning of quality, community-based, end-of-life (EOL) care, despite the expansion of these services. The purpose of this study was to define what matters most for EOL care from the perspective of a diverse range of palliative care providers in the community who have daily encounters with death and dying. Methods We used interviews to explore the perceptions of providers and administrators from 14 specialised palliative care teams in Ontario, Canada. Participants were prompted with the question ‘What matters most for EOL care?’ Responses were analysed using a phenomenological approach to derive themes depicting the universal essence of EOL care. Results Data from 107 respondents were obtained and analysed, from which 40 formulated concepts emerged; these were further grouped into 9 themes. Of the respondents, 39% were nurses, 19% physicians, 27% were supervisors or executives and 15% other. The most predominate concept was that Patient's Wishes are Fulfilled, cited by almost half the respondents. The most prominent themes were Addressing the Non-physical Needs, Healthcare Teams’ Nature of Palliative Care Delivery, Patient Wishes are Honoured, Addressing the Physical Needs, Preparing for and Accepting Death, Communication and Relationship Development, and Involving and Supporting the Family. Conclusions 9 critical domains of EOL care evolved from the interviews, indicating that quality EOL care extends beyond managing physical pain, but includes a holistic perspective of care, a healthcare team dedicated to the EOL journey and a patient-centred pathway. Tailoring the provision of care to consider these important elements plays a critical role in supporting a positive EOL experience for patients and families. PMID:26124510

  13. Evaluation of Croatian Community Pharmacists' Patient Care Competencies Using the General Level Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Mestrovic, A.; Stanicic, Z.; Hadziabdic, M. O.; Mucalo, I.; Bates, I.; Duggan, C; Carter, S; Bruno, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To assess Croatian community pharmacists' patient care competencies using the General Level Framework (GLF). Methods. The competencies of 100 community pharmacists working in 38 community pharmacies were evaluated using an adapted version of the GLF. Results. Pharmacists demonstrated the best performance in the competency areas drug specific issues and provision of drug products; the poorest performance was in the competency areas evaluation of outcomes and monitoring drug therapy...

  14. Patient perspectives on care received at community acupuncture clinics: a qualitative thematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippens, Kimberly M; Chao, Maria T; Connelly, Erin; Locke, Adrianna

    2013-10-29

    Community acupuncture is a recent innovation in acupuncture service delivery in the U.S. that aims to improve access to care through low-cost treatments in group-based settings. Patients at community acupuncture clinics represent a broader socioeconomic spectrum and receive more frequent treatments compared to acupuncture users nationwide. As a relatively new model of acupuncture in the U.S., little is known about the experiences of patients at community acupuncture clinics and whether quality of care is compromised through this high-volume model. The aim of this study was to assess patients' perspectives on the care received through community acupuncture clinics. The investigators conducted qualitative, thematic analysis of written comments from an observational, cross-sectional survey of clients of the Working Class Acupuncture clinics in Portland, Oregon. The survey included an open-ended question for respondents to share comments about their experiences with community acupuncture. Comments were received from 265 community acupuncture patients. Qualitative analysis of written comments identified two primary themes that elucidate patients' perspectives on quality of care: 1) aspects of health care delivery unique to community acupuncture, and 2) patient engagement in health care. Patients identified unique aspects of community acupuncture, including structures that facilitate access, processes that make treatments more comfortable and effective and holistic outcomes including physical improvements, enhanced quality of life, and empowerment. The group setting, community-based locations, and low cost were highlighted as aspects of this model that allow patients to access acupuncture. Patients' perspectives on the values and experiences unique to community acupuncture offer insights on the quality of care received in these settings. The group setting, community-based locations, and low cost of this model potentially reduce access barriers for those who might not

  15. New Practices of Farm-Based Community-Oriented Social Care Services in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassink, Jan; Grin, John; Hulsink, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Social care services provided by farmers provide a community-based collaboration that can empower people and improve their quality of life. The objective of this study was to increase understanding of the collaboration between care organizations and farmers. The study involves 4 cases, and all st

  16. disability and care-giving in old age in a nigerian community

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most of the older subjects' children had left the community and females were the ... psychiatric symptoms or specific psychological impairments ... caregiver as any person involved in the treatment or ... Providing care for disabled or dependent older ... emotional outcome of providing care. .... and cutting down on their work.

  17. Coaching to Quality: Increasing Quality in Early Care and Education Programmes through Community-University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jaesook Lee; Harte, Helene Arbouet

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes efforts to increase the quality in early care and education through targeted coaching. A collaborative including several community agencies and a university developed a framework of support for early care and education providers, using coaching as its foundational basis, called Coaching to Quality (CTQ). This paper provides a…

  18. Effects of community-care networks on psychiatric emergency contacts, hospitalisation and involuntary admission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.I. Wierdsma (André); H.D. Poodt (Hilde); C.L. Mulder (Niels)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Community-care networks are a partnership between the local police force, housing corporations, general social services, specialised home care and mental healthcare services. The networks were set up to improve the healthcare for patients with (chronic) psychiatric problems t

  19. Predictors of quality of life of people receiving intensive community-based care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmerink, P.M.J.; Roeg, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intensive community-based care (ICBC) is a home-treatment approach aiming to support people ‘living in the community’ with severe psychiatric and addiction problems. Although subjective quality of life (SQOL) is an increasingly important outcome measure in health care, little is known on ICB

  20. Personal health communities: A phenomenological study of a new health-care concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W.M. Aarts (Johanna); F.D. Vennik (Femke); W.L.D.M. Nelen (Willianne); M. van der Eijk (Martijn); B.R. Bloem (Bastiaan); M.J. Faber (Marjan); J.A.M. Kremer

    2015-01-01

    textabstractContext: Fragmentation of care, complexity of diseases and the need to involve patients actively in their individual health care led to the development of the personal health community (PHC). In a PHC, patients can -regardless of the nature of their condition- invite all professionals

  1. Using online health communities to deliver patient-centered care to people with chronic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, M. van der; Faber, M.J.; Aarts, J.W.M.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our health care system faces major threats as the number of people with multiple chronic conditions rises dramatically. OBJECTIVE: To study the use of Online Health Communities (OHCs) as a tool to facilitate high-quality and affordable health care for future generations. METHODS: OHCs ar

  2. Effects of community-care networks on psychiatric emergency contacts, hospitalisation and involuntary admission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.I. Wierdsma (André); H.D. Poodt (Hilde); C.L. Mulder (Niels)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Community-care networks are a partnership between the local police force, housing corporations, general social services, specialised home care and mental healthcare services. The networks were set up to improve the healthcare for patients with (chronic) psychiatric problems

  3. Personal health communities: a phenomenological study of a new health-care concept.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, J.W.M.; Vennik, F.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.; Eijk, M. van; Bloem, B.R.; Faber, M.J.; Kremer, J.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Fragmentation of care, complexity of diseases and the need to involve patients actively in their individual health care led to the development of the personal health community (PHC). In a PHC, patients can -regardless of the nature of their condition- invite all professionals that are invol

  4. Personal health communities: A phenomenological study of a new health-care concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W.M. Aarts (Johanna); F.D. Vennik (Femke); W.L.D.M. Nelen (Willianne); M. van der Eijk (Martijn); B.R. Bloem (Bastiaan); M.J. Faber (Marjan); J.A.M. Kremer

    2015-01-01

    textabstractContext: Fragmentation of care, complexity of diseases and the need to involve patients actively in their individual health care led to the development of the personal health community (PHC). In a PHC, patients can -regardless of the nature of their condition- invite all professionals th

  5. Oral health screening of elderly people attending a community care centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diu, S; Gelbier, S

    1989-08-01

    A socio-dental survey was carried out to determine the level of dental disease and treatment requirement among elderly people attending a Community Care Centre. A screening programme involving 293 elderly people demonstrated a normative need of 82% and a felt need of 53%. Seventy-six per cent would have benefited from dental care. Many individuals who both needed and wanted dental care were not receiving it because they were discouraged from doing so predominantly because of poor mobility. It is recommended, therefore, that dentists be included in multi-disciplinary teams caring for elderly people so that they can be screened and given the opportunity to obtain dental care.

  6. Burnout and Self-Reported Quality of Care in Community Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyers, Michelle P.; Fukui, Sadaaki; Rollins, Angela L.; Firmin, Ruth; Gearhart, Timothy; Noll, James P.; Williams, Stacy; Davis, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Staff burnout is widely believed to be problematic in mental healthcare, but few studies have linked burnout directly with quality of care. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between burnout and a newly developed scale for quality of care in a sample of community mental health workers (N=113). The Self-Reported Quality of Care scale had three distinct factors (Client-Centered Care, General Work Conscientiousness, and Low Errors), with good internal consistency. Burnout, particularly personal accomplishment, and to a lesser extent depersonalization, were predictive of overall self-reported Quality of Care, over and above background variables. PMID:24659446

  7. Health care and end-of-life decisions: community engagement with adults in East Harlem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Nathan A; Guadalupe, Erika; Lara, Luz; Alejandro, Maria

    2014-12-01

    This was a model of community engagement for a Hispanic population in East Harlem, New York City to assess health care decision-making processes, with a focus on end-of-life decisions, among older men and women. The design involved two senior center-based semi-structured focus groups conducted in Spanish and English followed by a series of bilingual skills-building workshops focusing on situational decision-making. All program aspects were conducted between April and June of 2013. The themes for the workshops included: "Getting the most from your pharmacist encounter;" "How to prepare for your primary care visit;" and "I am getting discharged from the hospital: what do I do?" For the two focus groups, 21 community members participated, each of whom self-identified as Hispanic or Latina/o. Ten common themes emerged from a two-stage/two coder, grounded theory-based qualitative analysis and included: Where Community Members Receive Care; General Challenges, Cultural Challenges, and Benefits of Health Care in New York City/East Harlem; Key Facilitators in Health Care Decision Making; Key Facilitators in End-of-Life Decision Making; and Perceptions of Health Care Disparity. Themes and their subcategories, discussed herein, may offer guidance for area health providers and health care delivery entities. This project served as formative, qualitative data collection for a larger scale forthcoming community assessment while offering community benefit related to health decision-making, especially end-of-life decision making, in the context of a rapidly changing urban American health care delivery landscape. Application of this synergistic community benefit and data collection model is recommended for similar and other communities in the U.S. and other countries.

  8. Differences in health care seeking behaviour between rural and urban communities in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Hoeven Marinka

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The aim of this study was to explore possible differences in health care seeking behaviour among a rural and urban African population. Design A cross sectional design was followed using the infrastructure of the PURE-SA study. Four rural and urban Setswana communities which represented different strata of urbanisation in the North West Province, South Africa, were selected. Structured interviews were held with 206 participants. Data on general demographic and socio-economic characteristics, health status, beliefs about health and (access to health care was collected. Results The results clearly illustrated differences in socio-economic characteristics, health status, beliefs about health, and health care utilisation. In general, inhabitants of urban communities rated their health significantly better than rural participants. Although most urban and rural participants consider their access to health care as sufficient, they still experienced difficulties in receiving the requested care. The difference in employment rate between urban and rural communities in this study indicated that participants of urban communities were more likely to be employed. Consequently, participants from rural communities had a significantly lower available weekly budget, not only for health care itself, but also for transport to the health care facility. Urban participants were more than 5 times more likely to prefer a medical doctor in private practice (OR:5.29, 95% CI 2.83-988. Conclusion Recommendations are formulated for infrastructure investments in rural communities, quality of health care and its perception, improvement of household socio-economical status and further research on the consequences of delay in health care seeking behaviour.

  9. AmbCare--A Relational Database for Implementing a Community Pharmacy Ambulatory Care Teaching Program: A Descriptive Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarian, Edward O.; Peterson, Charles D.

    1995-01-01

    An IBM-compatible information storage and retrieval software program was developed to support an eight-week community pharmacy ambulatory care clerkship for entry-level Doctor of Pharmacy students. The program helps evaluate and identify patients for health and medication problems, perform patient risk-factor assessment, monitor drug therapy,…

  10. Implementing an integrated care management program in community pharmacies: A focus on medication management services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Megan G; Ferreri, Stefanie P; Brown, Patrick; Wines, Kristen; Shea, Christopher M; Pfeiffenberger, Trista M

    To describe the initiation of a community pharmacy medication management service within a statewide integrated care management program. One hundred twenty-three community and community health center pharmacies in 58 counties of North Carolina. Independent and community health center pharmacies offering medication management as part of an integrated care management program to Medicaid, Medicare, dually eligible Medicare-Medicaid, and NC Health Choice beneficiaries in North Carolina. Community pharmacies joined an enhanced service network created by Community Care of North Carolina to provide medication management services as part of an integrated care management program. During the first 3 months of the program, 41% of pharmacies consistently documented the medication management services. Interviews were conducted with pharmacists from the inconsistent pharmacies to drive program improvements. Pharmacists at 73 community and community health center pharmacies were interviewed. The majority of pharmacists reported that challenges in "initiating services" and "documenting" were due to increased intensity of service and documentation compared with Medicare Part D medication therapy management requirements. Program changes to improve participation included revision of documentation requirements, authorization of technicians to transcribe pharmacists' interventions, additional documentation templates, workflow consultations, and feedback on documentation quality. Community pharmacies are capable of providing medication management integrated with care management. Some pharmacies have more difficulty initiating new services in the current workflow landscape. To facilitate implementation, it is important to minimize administrative burden and provide mechanisms for direct feedback. Pharmacy owners, managers, and leaders in pharmacy policy can use these findings to aid implementation of new services in community pharmacies. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association

  11. Sufficient competence in community elderly care? Results from a competence measurement of nursing staff

    OpenAIRE

    Bing-Jonsson, Pia C; Hofoss, Dag; Kirkevold, Marit; Bjørk, Ida T; Foss, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Background Multi-morbidity, poly-pharmacy and cognitive impairment leave many old patients in a frail condition with a high risk of adverse outcomes if proper health care is not provided. Knowledge about available competence is necessary to evaluate whether we are able to offer equitable and balanced health care to older persons with acute and/or complex health care needs. This study investigates the sufficiency of nursing staff competence in Norwegian community elderly car...

  12. Abortion care services delivered from a community sexual and reproductive health setting: views of health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michie, Lucy; Cameron, Sharon T; Glasier, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Abortion services should provide high-quality contraceptive care. The community sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services may be well placed to deliver more abortion care in the UK. We wished to determine the views of health professionals working in SRH regarding their attitudes towards providing more abortion services and also the views of staff within one community SRH centre in Scotland where a service providing early medical abortion (EMA) was due to commence. An anonymous questionnaire distributed to attendees at a UK SRH scientific meeting collected data on demographics, current practice of and attitude to abortion, and views on delivery of abortion services. An internet questionnaire distributed by e-mail to staff at a community SRH clinic in Scotland sought demographics, views regarding the planned introduction of an EMA service and willingness to participate in it. 165 questionnaires were completed out of 200 distributed at the scientific meeting (an 82% response rate). 128 (78%) respondents felt that abortion services were suited to community clinics and 115 (70%) stated that they would be willing to participate in them. 62/90 (69%) staff from the SRH clinic responded to the internet questionnaire. 44 (71%) felt the plan to introduce abortion services was a natural extension to services already offered and the same number would be willing to be involved in such a service. There is clear support amongst health professionals in community SRH in the UK towards greater participation in the provision of abortion care services.

  13. Community Readiness Within Systems of Care: The Validity and Reliability of the System of Care Readiness and Implementation Measurement Scale (SOC-RIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Scott R; Behar, Lenore B; Hydaker, William M

    2016-01-01

    Establishing a system of care requires communities to identify ways to successfully implement strategies and support positive outcomes for children and their families. Such community transformation is complex and communities vary in terms of their readiness for implementing sustainable community interventions. Assessing community readiness and guiding implementation, specifically for the funded communities implementing a system of care, requires a well-designed tool with sound psychometric properties. This scale development study used the results of a previously published concept mapping study to create, administer, and assess the psychometric characteristics of the System of Care Readiness and Implementation Measurement Scale (SOC-RIMS). The results indicate the SOC-RIMS possesses excellent internal consistency characteristics, measures clearly discernible dimensions of community readiness, and demonstrates the target constructs exist within a broad network of content. The SOC-RIMS can be a useful part of a comprehensive assessment in communities where system of care practices, principles, and philosophies are implemented and evaluated.

  14. Patient neglect in 21st century health-care institutions: a community health psychology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, Tom W; Gillespie, Alex; Mannell, Jenevieve

    2014-01-01

    Despite the technological and organisational advances of 21st century health-care systems, care scandals and burgeoning complaints from patients have raised concerns about patient neglect in hospitals. This article reviews the concept of patient neglect and the role of community health psychology in understanding its occurrence. Patient neglect has previously been conceptualised as a problem associated with hospital staff attitudes and behaviours, with regulation and training cited as solutions. Yet, a community health psychology perspective shows that the wider symbolic, material and relational aspects of care are crucial for understanding why patient neglect occurs and for outlining new solutions to augment existing interventions.

  15. Strengthening the Effectiveness of State-Level Community Health Worker Initiatives Through Ambulatory Care Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Caitlin; Nell Brownstein, J.; Jayapaul-Philip, Bina; Matos, Sergio; Mirambeau, Alberta

    2017-01-01

    The transformation of the US health care system and the recognition of the effectiveness of community health workers (CHWs) have accelerated national, state, and local efforts to engage CHWs in the support of vulnerable populations. Much can be learned about how to successfully integrate CHWs into health care teams, how to maximize their impact on chronic disease self-management, and how to strengthen their role as emissaries between clinical services and community resources; we share examples of effective strategies. Ambulatory care staff members are key partners in statewide initiatives to build and sustain the CHW workforce and reduce health disparities. PMID:26049655

  16. An Opportunity for Healing and Holistic Care: Exploring the Roles of Health Care Providers Working Within Northern Canadian Aboriginal Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Zaida; Holmes, Dave; Chartrand, Larry

    2016-05-22

    The purpose of this qualitative study was exploring what the roles and challenges of health care providers working within Northern Canadian Aboriginal communities are and what resources can help support or impede their efforts in working toward addressing health inequities within these communities. The qualitative research conducted was influenced by a postcolonial epistemology. The works of theorists Fanon on colonization and racial construction, Kristeva on semiotics and abjection, and Foucault on power/knowledge, governmentality, and biopower were used in providing a theoretical framework. Critical discourse analysis of 25 semistructured interviews with health care providers was used to gain a better understanding of their roles and challenges while working within Northern Canadian Aboriginal communities. Within this research study, three significant findings emerged from the data. First, the Aboriginal person's identity was constructed in relation to the health care provider's role of delivering essential health services. Second, health care providers were not treating the "ill" patient, but rather treating the patient for being "ill." Third, health care providers were treating the Aboriginal person for being "Aboriginal" by separating the patient from his or her identity. The treatment involved reforming the Aboriginal patient from the condition of being "Aboriginal." © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. [Attitude survey of medical staff on the participation of community pharmacists in palliative home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akai, Namika; Fujita-Hamabe, Wakako; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2009-11-01

    The treatment of cancer pain requires an individually-targeted multidimensional team approach. Further, the basic act for the Anti-Cancer Measures describes that medical staff including pharmacists should participate in the palliative care. Thus it is obvious that community pharmacists should also participate in palliative home care. In addition, a misunderstanding about opioids remains strong in Japan, which could be one of the barriers to palliative home care. In our previous report, we clarified for local residents the importance of educational activity using opioids as a new role for community pharmacists, and it was recognized of great significance by these pharmacists. In this study, we conducted a questionnaire survey among medical doctors, nurses, care managers and home helpers about the need and meaning of the educational activity performed by pharmacists in palliative home care. 86.4% of respondents felt pharmacists' participation in home care was required. Furthermore, most respondents thought that misunderstanding remained about opioids in palliative home care, and believed that pharmacists could play an important role in educational activity about opioids as experts in medicine. This study clarified that other medical team members need the participation of community pharmacists in palliative home care. Therefore, it seems important for these pharmacists to be proactive in participating in such care in the future.

  18. Emergence of Virtual Communities as Means of Communication: A Case Study on Virtual Health Care Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argan, Mehpare Tokay; Argan, Metin; Suher, Idil K.

    2011-01-01

    Like in all areas, virtual communities make their presence felt in the area of healthcare too. Virtual communities play an important role in healthcare in terms of gathering information on healthcare, sharing of personal interests and providing social support. Virtual communities provide a way for a group of peers to communicate with each other.…

  19. Community Mobilization and Readiness: Planning Flaws which Challenge Effective Implementation of 'Communities that Care' (CTC) Prevention System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic, Josipa

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the experience of implementing a community approach to drug use and youth delinquency prevention based on the 'Communities that Care' (CTC) system implemented in one Croatian county consisting of 12 communities, 2002 to 2013 (Hawkins, 1999; Hawkins & Catalano, 2004). This overview explores selected critical issues which are often not considered in substance use(r) community intervention planning, implementation as well as in associated process and outcome assessments. These issues include, among others, the mobilization process of adequate representation of people; the involvement of relevant key individual and organizational stakeholders and being aware of the stakeholders' willingness to participate in the prevention process. In addition, it is important to be aware of the stakeholders' knowledge and perceptions about the 'problems' of drug use and youth delinquency in their communities as well as the characteristics of the targeted population(s). Sometimes there are community members and stakeholders who block needed change and therefore prevention process enablers and 'bridges' should be involved in moving prevention programming forward. Another barrier that is often overlooked in prevention planning is community readiness to change and a realistic assessment of available and accessible resources for initiating the planned change(s) and sustaining them. All of these issues have been found to be potentially related to intervention success. At the end of this article, I summarize perspectives from prevention scientists and practitioners and lessons learned from communities' readiness research and practice in Croatian that has international relevance.

  20. Board news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1997-01-01

    Composition of the Board of the Foundation Flora Malesiana. — The Board met during the Flora of Thailand Symposium in Phuket. The members Dr. P. Baas and Dr. K. Iwatsuki, whose terms had expired, were happy to continue on the Board. Dr. S.H. Sohmer withdrew and Dr. A. Hay agreed to take the vacant

  1. Board news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1997-01-01

    Composition of the Board of the Foundation Flora Malesiana. — The Board met during the Flora of Thailand Symposium in Phuket. The members Dr. P. Baas and Dr. K. Iwatsuki, whose terms had expired, were happy to continue on the Board. Dr. S.H. Sohmer withdrew and Dr. A. Hay agreed to take the vacant c

  2. Community Perceptions on the Provision of Quality Health Care in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-10-02

    Oct 2, 2014 ... people with respect to their perceived quality of health care received at health facilities. ... 2003, and, passed into law, legislative instrument, LI 1809 in 2004 ... For this reason, the authors argue that, in trying to understand the.

  3. How community members and health professionals conceptualize medical emergencies: implications for primary care promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkin, Holley A; Tannebaum, Michael A; Cohen, Elizabeth L; Leslie, Travie; Williams, Nora; Haley, Leon L

    2012-12-01

    Access to continuous care through a primary care provider is associated with improved health outcomes, but many communities rely on emergency departments (EDs) for both emergent and non-emergent health problems. This article describes one portion of a community-based participatory research project and investigates the type of education that might be needed as part of a larger intervention to encourage use of a local primary care clinic. In this article we examine how people who live in a low-income urban community and the healthcare workers who serve them conceptualize 'emergency medical condition'. We conducted forum and focus group discussions with 52 community members and individual interviews with 32 healthcare workers. Our findings indicate that while community members share a common general definition of what constitutes a medical emergency, they also desire better guidelines for how to assess health problems as requiring emergency versus primary care. Pain, uncertainty and anxiety tend to influence their choice to use EDs rather than availability of primary care. Implications for increasing primary care use are discussed.

  4. Integration of the primary health care approach into a community nursing science curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SS Vilakazi

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to explore and describe guidelines for integration of the primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum in a Nursing College in Gauteng. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was utilized. The focus group interviews were conducted with community nurses and nurse educators as respondents. Data were analysed by a qualitative descriptive method of analysis as described in Creswell (1994:155. Respondents in both groups held similar perceptions regarding integration of primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum. Five categories, which are in line with the curriculum cycle, were identified as follows: situation analysis, selection and organisation of objectives/ goals, content, teaching methods and evaluation. Guidelines and recommendations for the integration of the primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum were described.

  5. [Seamless community coordination of rehabilitation nutrition care management in patients with Dysphagia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka

    2010-12-01

    Community coordination is necessary in nutrition care management and dysphagia rehabilitation, because they are not completed in one hospital or facility. For seamless community coordination of rehabilitation nutrition care management in patients with dysphagia, it is useful to define why, who, when, where, what, and how. Common communication materials of nutrition support team and dysphagia rehabilitation made by Kanagawa society of dysphagia rehabilitation is effective in promoting community coordination. In qualitative research for participants in community nutrition support team at Yokohama south area, two issues were emerged: strengthening collaboration of the community nutrition support team including visiting medical staffs and offering opportunity to learn clinical nutrition and dysphagia rehabilitation. Concept of rehabilitation nutrition is also useful for community coordination. Rehabilitation nutrition is to assess with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health including nutrition status and to practice rehabilitation nutrition care plan under adequate prognosis prediction. It is not enough for patients with dysphagia to coordinate only clinical nutrition or rehabilitation. Seamless community coordination of rehabilitation nutrition care management is important for patients with dysphagia to improve their activities of daily living and quality of life.

  6. 'Spending My Own Money, Harming My Own Body': Addiction Care in a Chinese Therapeutic Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Sandra Teresa

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I explore a Chinese residential therapeutic community I call Sunlight in order to understand its quotidian therapies, its fraught nature binding China's past with its future, and the to care for the self under postsocialism. Reviewing Sunlight ethnographically allows for broader theoretical exploration into how China's economic transition created tensions between capitalism, socialism, and communism; between individual and community, care and coercion, and discipline and freedom. Sunlight blended democratic, communal, and communist values that in several ways transition drug addicts into a market-socialist society. In focusing on the socialist transition to capitalism much work concentrates on the neoliberal transition as the only path out of communism rather than exploring its exceptions. In exploring China as an exception, I ask: What do the residents, peer-educators and administrators reveal in their stories and reactions to community-based therapeutics of care and what happens when their notions of care clash?

  7. Transfer of disability care of leprosy to the affected persons and the community members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porichha, D; Rao, V N; Samal, P; Rao, A K

    2011-01-01

    Bargarh district in the western Orissa had high leprosy burden and LEPRA India supported in control activities. Its main focus was on POD care with community participation. After motivation and capacity building, it transferred the responsibility of POD care to affected persons, family, community partners and GHS staff in 2006. The effectiveness of this approach was evaluated in 2009. With personal contact responses from 112 (17%) persons with disability and 18 stakeholders were obtained. Result shows 98% affected persons are staying with family; 92% are practicing self-care; 92% felt self-care is beneficial; 57% and 36% are using commercial and MCR footwear respectively. Surgical correction of deformity is maintained in 80% of cases. Difficulty in activity and in community participation was experienced in about one third of affected persons the latter is mostly due to self stigma. The facilitators were happy with their beneficiaries.

  8. Poststroke Rehabilitation and Restorative Care Utilization: A Comparison Between VA Community Living Centers and VA-contracted Community Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Huanguang; Pei, Qinglin; Sullivan, Charles T; Cowper Ripley, Diane C; Wu, Samuel S; Bates, Barbara E; Vogel, W Bruce; Bidelspach, Douglas E; Wang, Xinping; Hoffman, Nannette

    2016-03-01

    Effective poststroke rehabilitation care can speed patient recovery and minimize patient functional disabilities. Veterans affairs (VA) community living centers (CLCs) and VA-contracted community nursing homes (CNHs) are the 2 major sources of institutional long-term care for Veterans with stroke receiving care under VA auspices. This study compares rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care among Veterans residing in VA CLCs versus those Veterans in VA-contracted CNHs. Retrospective observational. All Veterans diagnosed with stroke, newly admitted to the CLCs or CNHs during the study period who completed at least 2 Minimum Data Set assessments postadmission. The outcomes were numbers of days for rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care received by the Veterans during their stays in CLCs or CNHs as documented in the Minimum Data Set databases. For rehabilitation therapy, the CLC Veterans had lower user rates (75.2% vs. 76.4%, P=0.078) and fewer observed therapy days (4.9 vs. 6.4, Ptherapy (odds ratio=1.16, P=0.033), although they had fewer average therapy days (coefficient=-1.53±0.11, Prehabilitation therapy days (both unadjusted and adjusted), but they were significantly more likely to receive restorative nursing care both before and after risk adjustment.

  9. Pharmacists' perception of pharmaceutical care in community pharmacy: a questionnaire survey in Northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu; Yang, Shimin; Feng, Bianling; Ni, Yufei; Zhang, Kanghuai

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of community pharmacists towards the concept of pharmaceutical care, implementing frequencies of pharmaceutical care, and barriers to implementation of pharmaceutical care in China. A 38-item self-completion pre-tested questionnaire was administered to a quota sample of 130 pharmacists in community pharmacies in Xi'an, Shaanxi Province, northwest China in April 2008. Main outcome measures included understanding of pharmaceutical care; perceived frequency of pharmaceutical care activities; attitude towards pharmaceutical care; barriers to implementation of pharmaceutical care. A response rate of 77.7% (101/130) was achieved. The data were analysed descriptively. Factor analysis was used to explore potential barriers to the provision of pharmaceutical care. Respondents' understanding of the definition of pharmaceutical care was not entirely satisfactory: it was widely but incorrectly seen as a medication counselling service and many pharmacists appeared to misunderstand their role in the process. Respondents spent most of their work time performing prescription checks and providing patients with directions for drug administration, dosage, and precautions, but they tended to ignore health promotion within and outside of pharmacy settings. Factor analysis suggested four factors influencing the implementation of pharmaceutical care in the surveyed community pharmacies: lack of external conditions for developing or providing pharmaceutical care, lack of time and skills, absence of information and economic incentive, and lack of full support from other health professionals, with a cumulative variance of 64.7%. Cronbach's alpha for the four factors was 0.71, 0.72, 0.69 and 0.74, respectively. Although the respondent pharmacists had a certain degree of understanding of the definition, aim, function and use of pharmaceutical care, and carried out some activities currently, a range of barriers need to be overcome before

  10. Applying community-based participatory research to better understand and improve kinship care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chukwudozie, Oge; Feinstein, Clare; Jensen, Celina

    2015-01-01

    While the principles behind community-based participatory research are firmly established, the process of taking community-based participatory research with children and youth to scale and integrating it into the programming of non-governmental organizations has been scarcely documented. This art......While the principles behind community-based participatory research are firmly established, the process of taking community-based participatory research with children and youth to scale and integrating it into the programming of non-governmental organizations has been scarcely documented....... This article reflects on the experiences of Save the Children in implementing a multicountry community-based participatory research program to increase understanding of kinship care in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. The article discusses challenges faced and lessons learned...... and highlights how the research process enabled action and advocacy initiatives at different levels-leading to an increase in support and policy attention for children living in kinship care....

  11. The barriers to sustaining and scaling-up housing experiments in community-care: the dutch experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cramer, H.J.; Voordijk, J.T.; Dewulf, G.P.M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide new insights into barriers to sustaining and scaling-up housing and community-care innovations related to changing the long-term care (LTC) system. Design/methodology/approach – Two housing and community-care experiments were studied. The 11 barrie

  12. How Community Organizations Promote Continuity of Care for Young People with Mental Health Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgar, By Michael F.; Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Morrissey, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    Young people between the ages of 16 and 25 who experience mental health problems experience transitions and need help from a variety of organizations. Organizations promote continuity of care by assisting young adults with developmental, service, and systemic transitions. Providers offer specific services to help transitions and also form cooperative relationships with other community organizations. Results from a survey of 100 service providers in one community describe organizational attributes and practices which are associated with continuity of care in a regional system for young adults. Data analyses show that full-service organizations which practice cultural competence offer more specific services that foster continuity of care. Larger, full-service organizations are also more likely to have more extensive and collaborative inter-organizational networks that help young adults continue care over time within the regional system of care. PMID:24833485

  13. How Community Organizations Promote Continuity of Care for Young People with Mental Health Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgar, Michael F; Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Morrissey, Joseph P

    2016-04-01

    Young people between the ages of 16 and 25 who experience mental health problems experience transitions and need help from a variety of organizations. Organizations promote continuity of care by assisting young adults with developmental, service, and systemic transitions. Providers offer specific services to help transitions and also form cooperative relationships with other community organizations. Results from a survey of 100 service providers in one community describe organizational attributes and practices which are associated with continuity of care in a regional system for young adults. Data analyses show that full-service organizations which practice cultural competence offer more specific services that foster continuity of care. Larger, full-service organizations are also more likely to have more extensive and collaborative inter-organizational networks that help young adults continue care over time within the regional system of care.

  14. A Community Needs Assessment for the Development of an Interprofessional Palliative Care Training Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Heather; Paganelli, Tia; Starks, Helene; Lindhorst, Taryn; Starks Acosta, Anne; Mauksch, Larry; Doorenbos, Ardith

    2017-03-01

    There is a known shortage of trained palliative care professionals, and an even greater shortage of professionals who have been trained through interprofessional curricula. As part of an institutional Palliative Care Training Center grant, a core team of interprofessional palliative care academic faculty and staff completed a state-wide palliative care educational assessment to determine the needs for an interprofessional palliative care training program. The purpose of this article is to describe the process and results of our community needs assessment of interprofessional palliative care educational needs in Washington state. We approached the needs assessment through a cross-sectional descriptive design by using mixed-method inquiry. Each phase incorporated a variety of settings and subjects. The assessment incorporated multiple phases with diverse methodological approaches: a preparatory phase-identifying key informants; Phase I-key informant interviews; Phase II-survey; and Phase III-steering committee endorsement. The multiple phases of the needs assessment helped create a conceptual framework for the Palliative Care Training Center and developed an interprofessional palliative care curriculum. The input from key informants at multiple phases also allowed us to define priority needs and to refine an interprofessional palliative care curriculum. This curriculum will provide an interprofessional palliative care educational program that crosses disciplinary boundaries to integrate knowledge that is beneficial for all palliative care clinicians. The input from a range of palliative care clinicians and professionals at every phase of the needs assessment was critical for creating an interprofessional palliative care curriculum.

  15. Evaluation Following Staggered Implementation of the "Rethinking Critical Care" ICU Care Bundle in a Multicenter Community Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Vincent; Herbert, David; Foss-Durant, Anne; Marelich, Gregory P; Patel, Anandray; Whippy, Alan; Turk, Benjamin J; Ragins, Arona I; Kipnis, Patricia; Escobar, Gabriel J

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate process metrics and outcomes after implementation of the "Rethinking Critical Care" ICU care bundle in a community setting. Retrospective interrupted time-series analysis. Three hospitals in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California integrated healthcare delivery system. ICU patients admitted between January 1, 2009, and August 30, 2013. Implementation of the Rethinking Critical Care ICU care bundle which is designed to reduce potentially preventable complications by focusing on the management of delirium, sedation, mechanical ventilation, mobility, ambulation, and coordinated care. Rethinking Critical Care implementation occurred in a staggered fashion between October 2011 and November 2012. We measured implementation metrics based on electronic medical record data and evaluated the impact of implementation on mortality with multivariable regression models for 24,886 first ICU episodes in 19,872 patients. After implementation, some process metrics (e.g., ventilation start and stop times) were achieved at high rates, whereas others (e.g., ambulation distance), available late in the study period, showed steep increases in compliance. Unadjusted mortality decreased from 12.3% to 10.9% (p Rethinking Critical Care implementation. The mean duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay also did not demonstrate incrementally greater declines after implementation. Rethinking Critical Care implementation was associated with changes in practice and a 12-15% reduction in the odds of short-term mortality. However, these findings may represent an evaluation of changes in practices and outcomes still in the midimplementation phase and cannot be directly attributed to the elements of bundle implementation.

  16. Care and the Construction of Hacker Identities, Communities, and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toombs, Austin Lewis

    2016-01-01

    Recent scholarship in Human-Computer Interaction, science and technology studies, and design research has focused on hacker communities as sites of innovation and entrepreneurship, novel forms of education, and the democratization of technological production. However, hacking practices are more than new technical practices; they are also…

  17. Evaluation of a formal care worker educational intervention on pressure ulceration in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Carol; Hindley, Jenny; Carey, Nicola

    2017-09-01

    To develop and evaluate an educational intervention for formal care workers on pressure ulceration in the community. Pressure ulcers are a major burden to health care and with an ageing population likely to increase. Formal care workers are ideally placed to identify high risk but lack standardised educational provision. An insider approach to action research in one provider organisation, November 2014-May 2015. Number and categorisation of pressure ulcers, within three community nursing teams before and four months after intervention was delivered to a purposive sample (n = 250) of formal care workers, were assessed and the taught element evaluated using a questionnaire and verbal feedback. Total number of pressure ulcers reduced from 28-20, category II, 19-11, III unchanged at 6 and IV from 2-0 following the educational intervention. Key risk factors included impaired mobility (71%), urinary incontinence (61%) and previous pressure damage (25%), and 71% had formal care worker input. The intervention was highly rated 4·95/5 by 215 (86%) formal care workers in the evaluation questionnaire. Formal care workers receive little, if any, education on pressure ulceration. An educational intervention can have a positive effect within community care, with the potential to reduce direct costs of care. However, a standardised approach to education is required; an urgent review of the education provision to formal care workers, in the UK and around the world, is therefore essential if the potential that formal care workers offer is to be realised. Formal care workers are ideally placed to help identify and alert healthcare professionals about patients at high risk of developing pressure ulcers. If this potential is to be realised, a standardised approach to education is required. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Implementing advance care planning: a qualitative study of community nurses' views and experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Sheila

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advance care planning (ACP is a process of discussion about goals of care and a means of setting on record preferences for care of patients who may lose capacity or communication ability in the future. Implementation of ACP is widely promoted by policy makers. This study examined how community palliative care nurses in England understand ACP and their roles within ACP. It sought to identify factors surrounding community nurses' implementation of ACP and nurses' educational needs. Methods An action research strategy was employed. 23 community nurses from two cancer networks in England were recruited to 6 focus group discussions and three follow up workshops. Data were analysed using a constant comparison approach. Findings Nurses understood ACP to be an important part of practice and to have the potential to be a celebration of good nursing care. Nurses saw their roles in ACP as engaging with patients to elicit care preferences, facilitate family communication and enable a shift of care focus towards palliative care. They perceived challenges to ACP including: timing, how to effect team working in ACP, the policy focus on instructional directives which related poorly to patients' concerns; managing differences in patients' and families' views. Perceived barriers included: lack of resources; lack of public awareness about ACP; difficulties in talking about death. Nurses recommended the following to be included in education programmes: design of realistic scenarios; design of a flow chart; practical advice about communication and documentation; insights into the need for clinical supervision for ACP practice. Conclusions Nurses working in the community are centrally involved with patients with palliative care needs who may wish to set on record their views about future care and treatment. This study reveals some important areas for practice and educational development to enhance nurses' use and understanding of ACP.

  19. The prevalence, aetiology and management of wounds in a community care area in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Skerritt, Louise

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to establish the prevalence and aetiology of wounds, allowing an insight into the management of wound care, the use of dressings and the nursing time allocated to the provision of wound care in a community setting in Ireland. A cross-sectional survey was used, with data collected on all clients in the community who received treatment from public health nurses or community registered general nurses for wound care over a 1-week period in April 2013. A 98.9% response rate was realised, and 188 people were identified as having wounds, equating to a crude prevalence of 5% of the active community nursing caseload. A total of 60% (n=112) had leg ulcers, 22% (n=42) had pressure ulcers, 16% (n=30) had an acute wound (surgical or traumatic wounds), 1% (n=2) had a diabetic foot wound and a further 1% (n=2) had wounds of other aetiologies. The mean duration of wounds was 5.41 months. A total of 18% of wounds were identified as infected; however, 60% (n=112) of wounds had antimicrobial products in use as either a primary or secondary dressing. The study established that there is a significant prevalence of wounds in this community care area. There was absence of a clinical diagnosis in many cases, and evidence of inappropriate dressing use, risking an increase in costs and a decrease in good clinical outcomes. It also highlighted the importance of ongoing education and auditing in the provision of wound care.

  20. Community-based maternity care from the view of Iranian midwives: A phenomenological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Shahnaz; Sayyedi, Marziyeh; Nekuei, Nafisehsadat; Yousefi, Hojatollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Midwifery cares take place in diverse communities with different ethnics groups. Therefore, midwifery cares could be planned wisely and principally based on women's and their families’ changeable demands which focus on social and cultural issues. This qualitative study explored the midwives’ experiences of care in the community. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was conducted by descriptive phenomenological approach. The subjects, selected by purposive sampling, comprised 13 midwives employed in Isfahan, Iran. Semi-structured interviews were audio-taped, transcribed, and simultaneously analyzed through Colaizzi's method. Results: With descriptive analysis of participants’ experiences, three main themes were explored (personal characteristics of the community midwife, social determinants of women's health, and achieving community-based midwifery skills). Conclusions: Knowledge of women's social status, gender inequality in health, and existence of social health risk factors for women in their community helps midwives to provide reproductive health care based on clients’ needs and demands. Therefore, midwives should enhance the quality of their care through integrating professional skills with a full understanding of the social context. PMID:25709700

  1. Fundraising and Community College Chief Executives: A Study of Development in the Southern Regional Education Board States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchback, Garland Keith

    2011-01-01

    The atmosphere of monetary support for the community college and the community college president has changed. State funding and tuition have always been the primary sources of revenue at public higher education institutions. Unfortunately, tightening state budgets have led to a decrease in state financial support adding to the need to find…

  2. Community Care for People with Mental Retardation in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosen, Anton

    1988-01-01

    Services for people with mental retardation in the Netherlands are examined, with emphasis on normalization, placement options including group homes and institutionalization, guidance for families through the Social Pedological Service, and the care of mental illness in mentally retarded persons through special diagnostic and treatment centers.…

  3. Psychiatric Nursing Faculty Practice: Care within the Community Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, Mary Fern; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing faculty practice offers the academic nurse opportunity to generate salary support and integrate students into the real world of mental health care. It promotes scholarship and knowledge-building and has a direct impact on the lives of patients. (Author/JOW)

  4. Indonesia health care system and Asean economic community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Gunawan

    2015-07-01

    However, AEC, by looking at this challenges, is expected to improve health care system and service in Indonesia, and close the gap by collaborating among ten ASEAN member countries through 4 modes of AEC consisting of cross border supply, consumption abroad, commercial presence, and movement of natural persons. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(7.000: 1571-1577

  5. Community oriented primary care in Tshwane District, South Africa: Assessing the first phase of implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Tessa; Memon, Shehla; Bam, Nomonde; Hugo, Jannie

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Re-engineering primary health care is a cornerstone of the health sector reform initiated nationally in South Africa in 2009. Using the concept of ward based NGO-run health posts, Tshwane District, Gauteng, began implementing community oriented primary care (COPC) through ward based outreach teams (WBOT) in seven wards during 2011. Objectives This study sought to gain insight into how primary health care providers understood and perceived the first phase of implementing COPC in the Tshwane district. Method Qualitative research was performed through focus group interviews with staff of the seven health posts during September 2011 and October 2011. It explored primary health care providers’ understanding, perception and experience of COPC. Results Participants raised organisational, workplace and community relationship issues in the discussions. Organisationally, these related to the process of initiating and setting up COPC and the relationship between governmental and nongovernmental organisations. Issues that arose around the workplace related to the job situation and employment status and remuneration of health post staff. Community related issues centred on the role and relationship between service providers and their communities. Conclusion COPC touched a responsive nerve in the health care system, both nationally and locally. It was seen as an effective way to respond to South Africa's crisis of health care. Initiating the reform was inevitably a complex process. In this initial phase of implementing COPC the political commitment of governmental and nongovernmental organisations was evident. What still had to be worked through was how the collaboration would materialise in practice on the ground.

  6. Provision of pharmaceutical care by community pharmacists across Europe: Is it developing and spreading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Filipa A; Scullin, Claire; Al-Taani, Ghaith; Hawwa, Ahmed F; Anderson, Claire; Bezverhni, Zinaida; Binakaj, Zahida; Cordina, Maria; Foulon, Veerle; Garcia de Bikuña, Borja; de Gier, Han; Granås, Anne Gerd; Grinstova, Olga; Griese-Mammen, Nina; Grincevicius, Jonas; Grinceviciene, Svitrigaile; Kaae, Susanne; Kubiliene, Loreta; Mariño, Eduardo L; Martins, Silvia; Modamio, Pilar; Nadin, Giancarlo; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Obarcanin, Emina; Tadic, Ivana; Tasic, Ljiljana; McElnay, James C; Hersberger, Kurt E; Westerlund, Tommy

    2017-08-01

    Pharmaceutical care involves patient-centred pharmacist activity to improve medicines management by patients. The implementation of this service in a comprehensive manner, however, requires considerable organisation and effort, and indeed, it is often not fully implemented in care settings. The main objective was to assess how pharmaceutical care provision within community pharmacy has evolved over time in Europe. A cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey of community pharmacies, using a modified version of the Behavioural Pharmaceutical Care Scale (BPCS) was conducted in late 2012/early 2013 within 16 European countries and compared with an earlier assessment conducted in 2006. The provision of comprehensive pharmaceutical care has slightly improved in all European countries that participated in both editions of this survey (n = 8) with progress being made particularly in Denmark and Switzerland. Moreover, there was a wider country uptake, indicating spread of the concept. However, due to a number of limitations, the results should be interpreted with caution. Using combined data from participating countries, the provision of pharmaceutical care was positively correlated with the participation of the community pharmacists in patient-centred activities, routine use of pharmacy software with access to clinical data, participation in multidisciplinary team meetings, and having specialized education. The present study demonstrated a slight evolution in self-reported provision of pharmaceutical care by community pharmacists across Europe, as measured by the BPCS. The slow progress suggests a range of barriers, which are preventing pharmacists moving beyond traditional roles. Support from professional bodies and more patient-centred community pharmacy contracts, including remuneration for pharmaceutical care services, are likely to be required if quicker progress is to be made in the future. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Primary health care accessibility challenges in remote indigenous communities in Canada's North

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Michiel Oosterveer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite many improvements, health disparities between indigenous and non-indigenous populations in Canada's North persist. While a strong primary health care (PHC system improves the health of a population, the majority of indigenous communities are very remote, and their access to PHC services is likely reduced. Understanding the challenges in accessing PHC services in these communities is necessary to improve the health of the population. Objective: The objective of the study was to document and analyze the challenges in accessing PHC services by indigenous people in remote communities in Canada's Northwest Territories (NWT from the perspectives of users and providers of PHC services. Methods: Using explorative, qualitative methods, our study involved 14 semi-structured interviews with PHC service providers (SPs and service users (SUs in 5 communities across the NWT which varied according to population, remoteness, ethnic composition and health care resources. The interview guide was developed after key informant consultations. Results: Both SPs and SUs understood the constraints in providing equitable access to PHC services in remote communities. The provision of emergency care was found to be particularly challenging, because of the lack of qualified staff in the community and the dependence on aeromedical evacuations. Wider dissemination of first aid skills among community members was seen to cover some gaps and also increase self-confidence. For non-emergency care, the need to travel outside the community was generally disliked. All recognized the need for more preventive services which were often postponed or delayed because of the overwhelming demand for acute care. As long as services were provided in a community, the satisfaction was high among SUs. SPs appreciated the orientation they received and the ability to build rapport with the community. Conclusions: Northern SUs and SPs generally acknowledge the health

  8. A community virtual ward model to support older persons with complex health care and social care needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis C

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available C Lewis,1 Z Moore,1 F Doyle,2 A Martin,3 D Patton,1 LE Nugent1 1School of Nursing and Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons Ireland, 2Department of Psychology, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, 3Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland Background: Globally the older population is increasing rapidly. As a result there is an increase in frail older persons living within the community, with increased risks of a hospital admission and higher mortality and morbidity rates. Due to complexity of care, health care professionals face challenges in providing effective case management and avoiding unplanned admissions to hospital. A community virtual ward (CVW model was developed to assist health care professionals to support older persons at home during periods of illness and/or functional decline.Methods: A quantitative observational study was conducted to examine if a CVW model of care reduced unplanned hospital admissions and emergency department (ED presentations in 54 patients over a 12-month period. The sign-rank test examined matched data on bed days, ED presentations, and unplanned hospital admissions pre- and post-CVW implementation. Other risk factors for admission to hospital were examined using the Mann–Whitney test pre- and post-CVW admission, including falls, living alone, and cognition. Correlations between hospital admission avoidances and unplanned hospital admissions and ED presentations were tested using Spearman’s p test.Results: There was a reduction in ED presentations post-CVW admission (P<0.001, and median unscheduled admissions were reduced (P=0.001. Those living alone had a lower number of ED presentations (median 0.5, interquartile range 0–1 prior to admission in comparison to those living with a caregiver, with no differences observed during admission to CVW. For those who experienced a fall during CVW admission, the odds ratio (OR of requiring long-term care doubled for each extra fall (OR =2.24, 95% CI 1.11 to 4.52, P=0

  9. A pilot survey of post-deployment health care needs in small community-based primary care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pugh Mary J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relatively little is known regarding to what extent community-based primary care physicians are encountering post-deployment health care needs among veterans of the Afghanistan or Iraq conflicts and their family members. Methods This pilot study conducted a cross-sectional survey of 37 primary care physicians working at small urban and suburban clinics belonging to a practice-based research network in the south central region of Texas. Results Approximately 80% of the responding physicians reported caring for patients who have been deployed to the Afghanistan or Iraq war zones, or had a family member deployed. Although these physicians noted a variety of conditions related to physical trauma, mental illnesses and psychosocial disruptions such as marital, family, financial, and legal problems appeared to be even more prevalent among their previously deployed patients and were also noted among family members of deployed veterans. Conclusions Community-based primary care physicians should be aware of common post-deployment health conditions and the resources that are available to meet these needs.

  10. A Model for Community-Based Pediatric Oral Heath: Implementation of an Infant Oral Care Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Ramos-Gomez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Affordable Care Act (ACA mandates risk assessments, preventive care, and evaluations based on outcomes. ACA compliance will require easily accessible, cost-effective care models that are flexible and simple to establish. UCLA has developed an Infant Oral Care Program (IOCP in partnership with community-based organizations that is an intervention model providing culturally competent perinatal and infant oral care for underserved, low-income, and/or minority children aged 0–5 and their caregivers. In collaboration with the Venice Family Clinic's Simms/Mann Health and Wellness Center, UCLA Pediatrics, Women, Infants, and Children (WIC, and Early Head Start and Head Start programs, the IOCP increases family-centered care access and promotes early utilization of dental services in nontraditional, primary care settings. Emphasizing disease prevention, management, and care that is sensitive to cultural, language, and oral health literacy challenges, IOCP patients achieve better oral health maintenance “in health” not in “disease modality”. IOCP uses interprofessional education to promote pediatric oral health across multiple disciplines and highlights the necessity for the “age-one visit”. This innovative clinical model facilitates early intervention and disease management. It sets a new standard of minimally invasive dental care that is widely available and prevention focused, with high retention rates due to strong collaborations with the community-based organizations serving these vulnerable, high-risk children.

  11. Pharmacists implementing transitions of care in inpatient, ambulatory and community practice settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To introduce pharmacists to the process, challenges, and opportunities of creating transitions of care (TOC models in the inpatient, ambulatory, and community practice settings. Methods: TOC literature and resources were obtained through searching PubMed, Ovid, and GoogleScholar. The pharmacist clinicians, who are the authors in this manuscript are reporting their experiences in the development, implementation of, and practice within the TOC models. Results: Pharmacists are an essential part of the multidisciplinary team and play a key role in providing care to patients as they move between health care settings or from a health care setting to home. Pharmacists can participate in many aspects of the inpatient, ambulatory care, and community pharmacy practice settings to implement and ensure optimal TOC processes. This article describes establishing the pharmacist’s TOC role and practicing within multiple health care settings. In these models, pharmacists focus on medication reconciliation, discharge counseling, and optimization of medications. Additionally, a checklist has been created to assist other pharmacists in developing the pharmacist’s TOC roles in a practice environment or incorporating more TOC elements in their practice setting. Conclusion: Optimizing the TOC process, reducing medication errors, and preventing adverse events are important focus areas in the current health care system, as emphasized by The Joint Commission and other health care organizations. Pharmacists have the unique opportunity and skillset to develop and participate in TOC processes that will enhance medication safety and improve patient care.

  12. Implementation process and challenges for the community-based integrated care system in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Tsutsui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since 10 years ago, Japan has been creating a long-term vision to face its peak in the number of older people that will be reached in 2025 when baby boomers will turn 75 years of age. In 2003, the government set up a study group called “Caring for older people in 2015” which led to a first reform of the Long-Term Care Insurance System in 2006. This study group was the first to suggest the creation of a community-based integrated care system. Reforms: Three measures were taken in 2006: ‘Building an active ageing society: implementation of preventive care services’, ‘Improve sustainability: revision of the remuneration of facilities providing care’ and ‘Integration: establishment of a new service system’. These reforms are at the core of the community-based integrated care system. Discussion: The socialization of long-term care that came along with the ageing of the population, and the second shift in Japan towards an increased reliance on the community can provide useful information for other ageing societies. As a super ageing society, the attempts from Japan to develop a rather unique system based on the widely spread concept of integrated care should also become an increasing focus of attention.

  13. Primary care nursing role and care coordination: an observational study of nursing work in a community health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daren R; St Hilaire, Daniel; Flinter, Margaret

    2012-05-31

    Care coordination is a core element of the Patient-Centered Medical Home and requires an effective, well educated nursing staff. A greater understanding of roles and tasks currently being carried out by nurses in primary care is needed to help practices determine how best to implement care coordination and transform into PCMHs. We conducted an observational study of primary care nursing in a Community Health Center by creating a classification schema for nursing responsibilities, directly observing and tracking nurses' work, and categorizing their activities. Ten nurses in eight different practice sites were observed for a total of 61 hours. The vast majority of nursing time was spent in vaccine and medication administration; telephone work; and charting and paper work, while only 15% of their time was spent in activity that was classified broadly as care coordination. Care coordination work appeared to be subsumed by other daily tasks, many of which could have been accomplished by other, lesser trained members of the health care team. Practices looking to implement care coordination need a detailed look at work flow, task assignments, and a critical assessment of staffing, adhering to the principal of each team member working to the highest level of his or her education and license. Care coordination represents a distinct responsibility that requires dedicated nursing time, separate from the day to day tasks in a busy practice. To fully support these new functions, reimbursement models are needed that support such non visit-based work and provide incentives to coordinate and manage complex cases, achieve improved clinical outcomes and enhance efficiency of the health system. This article describes our study methods, data collection, and analysis, results, and discussion about reorganizing nursing roles to promote care coordination.

  14. Case managers speak out: responding to depression in community long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Michelle; Proctor, Enola; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Fedoravicius, Nicole; Ware, Norma

    2007-08-01

    This study sought to understand how case managers in one publicly funded health and social service system, community long-term care, understand and address depression among their clients. Four focus groups with a total of 18 case managers were conducted. Case managers were asked a series of questions about their perspectives on the recognition and treatment of depression, including subthreshold depression, in community long-term care. Case managers perceived addressing depression as complex because of competing demands. Furthermore, case managers perceived conflict between their current role and what it would take to expand their role to include addressing depression. Case managers suggested that in order to successfully improve the detection and treatment of depression in community long-term care, systemic changes, such as increased support and training, may be necessary, along with a shift in the professional role of case managers.

  15. Variation in Residential Care Community Nurse and Aide Staffing Levels: United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rome, Vincent; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D

    2016-02-19

    This report presents national and state estimates of staffing levels in residential care communities for registered nurses, licensed practical or vocational nurses, and aides in the United States for 2014. Data were drawn from the residential care community component of the 2014 wave of the biennial National Study of Long-Term Care Providers, conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. For each staff type, the "staffing level" measure is presented as average hours per resident per day, defined as the total number of hours worked divided by the total number of residents, which does not necessarily reflect the amount of care given to a specific resident. Analyses examined the extent to which residential care community nurse and aide staffing levels varied by selected organizational characteristics and selected resident composition characteristics of the communities. Differences among subgroups were evaluated using two-sided t tests at the 0.05 level. In 2014, the total registered nurse, licensed practical or vocational nurse, and aide staffing level among all residential care communities was about 2 hours and 50 minutes. Registered nurse staffing levels differed for two of the three organizational characteristics (size and metropolitan statistical area [MSA]) and for only one of the four resident composition characteristics (primarily serving residents needing any assistance with activities of daily living). Licensed practical or vocational nurse staffing levels differed for all three organizational characteristics (size, MSA, and ownership) and for only one of the four resident composition characteristics (primarily serving residents diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias). In contrast, differences in aide staffing levels were common when examining both community organizational and resident composition characteristics. Registered nursing, licensed practical and vocational nursing, and aide

  16. Community participation in primary care in Ireland: the need for implementation research.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEvoy, Rachel

    2012-04-30

    There are now several decades of history of community participation in health, with significant international evidence to suggest that there is much to be gained by primary health services and disadvantaged communities working in partnership.In this paper we provide an overview of community participation in primary care, establishing the policy context in which a recent \\'Joint Initiative on Community Participation in Primary Health Care\\' was developed in Ireland. This Initiative was designed to support the involvement of disadvantaged communities and groups in the development of primary health care services at local level.An independent formative evaluation of the Joint Initiative took place between September 2009 and April 2010. We present a summary of key findings from this evaluation. We pay particular attention to the issue of sustaining community participation in newly developed Primary Care Teams (PCTs) in the current and changing economic climate, an issue considered crucial if the documented positive impacts of the Joint Initiative are to be maintained and the potential for health gains in the longer term are to be realised.We then argue that the Joint Initiative referred to in this paper clearly provides a strong prototype for community participation in PCTs in Ireland. We also ask whether it can be replicated across all PCTs in the country and embedded as a core part of thinking and everyday health care. We highlight the need for research to build knowledge about the ways in which innovations such as this can be embedded into ongoing, routine healthcare practice. This research agenda will have relevance for policy makers, practitioners and evaluators in Ireland and other healthcare jurisdictions.

  17. Health care as a community good. Many dimensions, many communities, many views of justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarneau, Charlene A

    2002-01-01

    We often speak of health care as a social good. What kind of good it is--and what justice requires of us in making it available to the members of society--depends on how society understands it. Yet the value of health care may be understood in many different ways within society.

  18. Participation in Training for Depression Care Quality Improvement: A Randomized Trial of Community Engagement or Technical Support

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Bowen; Ngo, Victoria K; Ong, Michael K; Pulido, Esmeralda; Jones, Felica; Gilmore, James; Stoker-Mtume, Norma; Johnson, Megan; Tang, Lingqi; Wells, Kenneth Brooks; Sherbourne, Cathy; Miranda, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    .... This study compared program- and staff-level participation in depression care quality improvement training among programs enrolled in CEP, which trained networks of health care and social-community...

  19. Tracking the route to sustainability: a service evaluation tool for an advance care planning model developed for community palliative care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Jeanine; Street, Annette

    2012-08-01

    The study aim was to develop a service evaluation tool for an advance care planning model implemented in community palliative care. Internationally, advance care planning programmes usually measure success by completion rate of advance directives or plans. This outcome measure provides little information to assist nurse managers to embed advance care planning into usual care and measure their performance and quality over time. An evaluation tool was developed to address this need in Australian community palliative care services. Multisite action research approach. Three community palliative care services located in Victoria, Australia, participated. Qualitative and quantitative data collection strategies were used to develop the Advance Care Planning-Service Evaluation Tool. The Advance Care Planning-Service Evaluation Tool identified advance care planning progress over time across three stages of Establishment, Consolidation and Sustainability within previously established Model domains of governance, documentation, practice, education, quality improvement and community engagement. The tool was used by nurses either as a peer-assessment or self-assessment tool that assisted services to track their implementation progress as well as plan further change strategies. The Advance Care Planning-Service Evaluation Tool was useful to nurse managers in community palliative care. It provided a clear outline of service progress, level of achievement and provided clear direction for planning future changes. The Advance Care Planning-Service Evaluation Tool enables nurses in community palliative care to monitor, evaluate and plan quality improvement of their advance care planning model to improve end-of-life care. As the tool describes generic healthcare processes, there is potential transferability of the tool to other types of services. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Correlates of Caregiver Participation in a Brief, Community-Based Dementia Care Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavandadi, Shahrzad; Patel, Samir; Benson, Amy; DiFilippo, Suzanne; Streim, Joel; Oslin, David

    2016-12-07

    The evidence base for dementia care management interventions for informal caregivers (CGs) is strong, yet enrollment and sustained engagement in academic and community-based research trials is low. This study sought to examine rates and correlates of participation in a community-based, telephone-delivered dementia care management program designed to address logistic and practical barriers to participation in CG trials and services. Participants included 290 CGs of older, community-dwelling, low-income care recipients (CRs) who met criteria for enrollment in a collaborative dementia care management program that provides assessment, psychosocial support and education, and connection to community resources via telephone. Cross-sectional analyses examined the association between CG-related (e.g., financial status, relationship to CR, caregiving burden) and CR-related (e.g., functional limitations, symptom severity) factors and CG enrollment and engagement. The majority of CGs were non-Hispanic White, female, financially stable, and adult children of the CRs. Over half of CGs lived with the CR and provided 20 or more hours of care per week. Roughly half of CGs refused care management services. Adjusted logistic regression models revealed that perceived caregiving burden and financial status were related to initial enrollment and engagement in services once enrolled, respectively. A significant proportion of CGs refuse free, convenient, evidence-based dementia care management services, underscoring the need for further examination of correlates of program acceptance. Nonetheless, community-based programs that address barriers may improve enrollment and engagement rates among CGs, including those who are especially vulnerable to negative CG and CR outcomes. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. Inadequate syphilis screening among women with prenatal care in a community with a high syphilis incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepka, Mary Jo; Bloom, Sharon A; Zhang, Guoyan; Kim, Sunny; Nobles, Robert E

    2006-11-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the extent to which pregnant women in a community with a high syphilis incidence were screened for syphilis according to standard recommendations of twice during prenatal care and at labor and delivery. Labor and delivery records from 4 hospitals in Miami-Dade County, Florida, were abstracted to obtain maternal and prenatal care characteristics and syphilis screening practices. Of the 1991 women, records indicated that 1655 (83%) were screened at least once during prenatal care, 220 (11%) were screened twice during prenatal care before delivery, and 184 (9%) were screened twice during prenatal care and at delivery. Attending a private clinic, having more than adequate prenatal care and having private insurance were associated with not being screened at least twice before delivery. Few women were screened according to standard recommendations, and provider or institutional-related factors affected adequacy of screening.

  2. EMERGENCE OF VIRTUAL COMMUNITIES AS MEANS OF COMMUNICATION: A Case Study On Virtual Health Care Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Argan, Mehpare Tokay; ARGAN, Metin; Idil K. SUHER

    2011-01-01

    Today, like in all areas, the Internet has had an important effect in the area of health as well. With the development of the Internet many new and different applications have developed and one of the most important of these are probably virtual communities. Virtual communities, which are used as a tool for providing information and word of mouth communication, have become a widely used marketing tool in the area of healthcare services in recent years. A virtual community is a group that does...

  3. The Changing Landscape of Health Care Financing and Delivery: How Are Rural Communities and Providers Responding?

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Keith J.; Coburn, Andy; Cordes, Sam; Crittenden, Robert; Hart, J. Patrick; McBride, Timothy; Myers, Wayne

    1999-01-01

    Rural communities have not kept pace with the recent dramatic changes in health care financing and organization. However, the Medicare provisions in the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 will require rural providers to participate in the new systems. Case studies revealed the degree of readiness for change in six rural communities and charted their progress along a continuum, as reflected in three sets of activities: the development of networking; the creation of new strategies for managing patient...

  4. Social and economic value of Portuguese community pharmacies in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, Jorge; Ferreira, Diana; Afonso-Silva, Marta; Gomes, Marta Vargas; Ferreira, César; Vandewalle, Björn; Marques, Sara; Mota, Melina; Costa, Suzete; Cary, Maria; Teixeira, Inês; Paulino, Ema; Macedo, Bruno; Barbosa, Carlos Maurício

    2017-08-29

    Community pharmacies are major contributors to health care systems across the world. Several studies have been conducted to evaluate community pharmacies services in health care. The purpose of this study was to estimate the social and economic benefits of current and potential future community pharmacies services provided by pharmacists in health care in Portugal. The social and economic value of community pharmacies services was estimated through a decision-model. Model inputs included effectiveness data, quality of life (QoL) and health resource consumption, obtained though literature review and adapted to Portuguese reality by an expert panel. The estimated economic value was the result of non-remunerated pharmaceutical services plus health resource consumption potentially avoided. Social and economic value of community pharmacies services derives from the comparison of two scenarios: "with service" versus "without service". It is estimated that current community pharmacies services in Portugal provide a gain in QoL of 8.3% and an economic value of 879.6 million euros (M€), including 342.1 M€ in non-remunerated pharmaceutical services and 448.1 M€ in avoided expense with health resource consumption. Potential future community pharmacies services may provide an additional increase of 6.9% in QoL and be associated with an economic value of 144.8 M€: 120.3 M€ in non-remunerated services and 24.5 M€ in potential savings with health resource consumption. Community pharmacies services provide considerable benefit in QoL and economic value. An increase range of services including a greater integration in primary and secondary care, among other transversal services, may add further social and economic value to the society.

  5. Patient perspectives on care received at community acupuncture clinics: a qualitative thematic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Community acupuncture is a recent innovation in acupuncture service delivery in the U.S. that aims to improve access to care through low-cost treatments in group-based settings. Patients at community acupuncture clinics represent a broader socioeconomic spectrum and receive more frequent treatments compared to acupuncture users nationwide. As a relatively new model of acupuncture in the U.S., little is known about the experiences o...

  6. Stigma in patients with schizophrenia receiving community mental health care: a review of qualitative studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Bart; Mestdagh, Annelien

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this review is to identify consistent themes among the qualitative literature on stigma as experienced by community mental health patients with schizophrenia. With the treatment focus of schizophrenia nowadays shifting more and more towards community-based mental health care, professionals need to be aware of the increased vulnerability of their clients in their social environment as a result of stigma towards their disease. In-depth knowledge on stigma is cr...

  7. Thriving despite adversity: Job engagement and self-care among community nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Vinje, Hege Forbech

    2007-01-01

    Background: Community nursing in Norway has become an increasingly stressful occupation and many nurses who experience symptoms of burnout leave the profession. Yet others manage to cope with the adversity of nursing. This study addressed the question ‘how and why do nurses in community health care experience job engagement and stay healthy – and what can we learn from those who succeed?’ The assumption underlying this study was that job engagement is health promoting, and the ...

  8. Exporting the Buyers Health Care Action Group purchasing model: lessons from other communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Jon B; Feldman, Roger

    2005-01-01

    When first implemented in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota, the Buyers Health Care Action Group's (BHCAG) purchasing approach received considerable attention as an employer-managed, consumer-driven health care model embodying many of the principles of managed competition. First BHCAG and, later, a for-profit management company attempted to export this model to other communities. Their efforts were met with resistance from local hospitals and, in many cases, apathy by employers who were expected to be supportive. This experience underscores several difficulties that appear to be inherent in implementing purchasing models based on competing care systems. It also, once again, suggests caution in drawing lessons from community-level experiments in purchasing health care.

  9. A qualitative study: Mothers of late preterm infants relate their experiences of community-based care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosani, Aliyah; Oliver, Lynnette May; Lodha, Abhay K; Young, Marilyn

    2017-01-01

    Purpose In Alberta, the high occurrence of late preterm infants and early hospital discharge of mother-infant dyads has implications for postpartum care in the community. Shortened hospital stay and complexities surrounding the care of biologically and developmentally immature late preterm infants heighten anxiety and fears. Our descriptive phenomenological study explores mothers’ experience of caring for their late preterm infants in the community. Methods Eleven mothers were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Interview transcripts were analysed using an interpretive thematic approach. Findings The mothers’ hospital experience informed their perspective that being a late preterm infant was not a “big deal,” and they tended to treat their infant as normal. “Feeding was really problem,” especially the variability in feeding effectiveness, which was not anticipated. Failing to recognize late preterm infants’ feeding distress exemplified lack of knowledge of feeding cues and tendencies to either rationalize or minimize feeding concerns. Public health nurses represent a source of informational support for managing neonatal morbidities associated with being late preterm; however, maternal experiences with public health nurses varied. Some nurses used a directive style that overwhelmed certain mothers. Seeing multiple public health nurses and care providers was not always effective, given inconsistent and contradictory guidance to care. These new and changing situations increased maternal anxiety and stress and influenced maternal confidence in care. Fathers, family, and friends were important sources of emotional support. Conclusion After discharge, mothers report their lack of preparation to meet the special needs of their late preterm infants. Current approaches to community-based care can threaten maternal confidence in care. New models and pathways of care for late preterm infants and their families need to be responsive to the

  10. Evaluation of a community-based randomized controlled prenatal care trial in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhuochun; Viisainen, Kirsi; Wang, Ying; Hemminki, Elina

    2011-05-04

    A community-based randomized control prenatal care trial was performed in a rural county of China during 2000-2003. The purpose of this paper is to describe the trial implementation and the impact of the trial on the utilization of prenatal care and perinatal outcomes. In the study county, 10 townships (from a total of 55) were each paired with a control (20 study townships in total), with the criteria for pairing being the township's socioeconomic development, perinatal health, and maternal care utilization and provision. One of each township pair was randomly allocated to the intervention or control groups. The trial interventions were: 1) training township hospital midwives and instructing them in how to provide systematic maternal care, 2) informing women in the community of the importance of prenatal care, 3) if needed, providing basic medical instruments to the hospitals. A variety of data sources were used to describe the trial implementation (observations, group discussions, field notes, survey to women). The data on pregnancy and perinatal outcomes were from the original hand-written work-records in the village family planning centers of the study townships. Implementation of the intervention was deficient. The factors hindering the trial implementation included poor coordination between midwives and family planning officers, broader policy changes implemented by the provincial government during the trial, the decentralization of county governance, and the lack of government funding for maternal care. There was only little difference in the use of maternal care, in women's opinions related to maternal care or content of prenatal care, and no difference in the perinatal outcomes between the intervention and control townships. A community based randomized controlled trial could not be fully carried out in rural China as planned due to the changing political landscape, the complexity of the socio-economic situation and a lengthy planning stage. The study

  11. Analysis of the social network development of a virtual community for Australian intensive care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Kaye Denise; Hansen, Margaret; Jackson, Debra; Elliott, Doug

    2014-11-01

    Social media platforms can create virtual communities, enabling healthcare professionals to network with a broad range of colleagues and facilitate knowledge exchange. In 2003, an Australian state health department established an intensive care mailing list to address the professional isolation experienced by senior intensive care nurses. This article describes the social network created within this virtual community by examining how the membership profile evolved from 2003 to 2009. A retrospective descriptive design was used. The data source was a deidentified member database. Since 2003, 1340 healthcare professionals subscribed to the virtual community with 78% of these (n = 1042) still members at the end of 2009. The membership profile has evolved from a single-state nurse-specific network to an Australia-wide multidisciplinary and multiorganizational intensive care network. The uptake and retention of membership by intensive care clinicians indicated that they appeared to value involvement in this virtual community. For healthcare organizations, a virtual community may be a communications option for minimizing professional and organizational barriers and promoting knowledge flow. Further research is, however, required to demonstrate a link between these broader social networks, enabling the exchange of knowledge and improved patient outcomes.

  12. The illusion of control and the importance of community in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, T

    1993-01-01

    The complexity of our health care environment and organizations requires a management style that moves beyond control to empowerment. Even though this complexity minimizes our ability to control events, many organizations are still preoccupied with the illusion of control. This restrains the performance of our health care organizations. Some of the contributing factors supporting this illusion are bureaucracy, scientific methodology, individualism, and our confusion of management with leadership. The concept of "community" is discussed from an organizational perspective. It is suggested that we can improve the performance of our organizations by rediscovering the values of community.

  13. The personal value of being a palliative care Community Volunteer Worker in Uganda: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Barbara A; Kirton, Jennifer A; Birakurataki, Jerith; Merriman, Anne

    2012-07-01

    Volunteers in palliative care play a key role, particularly in the hospice setting. The expansion of palliative care into developing countries has been accompanied by the emergence of volunteer workers, who are providing a main source of support and care for patients, many of whom never see a health professional. The aim of this study was to evaluate the motivation for becoming a volunteer and the personal impact of being a palliative care Community Volunteer Worker in Uganda. A qualitative methodology using semi-structured individual and group digitally recorded interviews was adopted for the study. Data were analysed for emerging themes using thematic analysis. Forty-three interviews were undertaken, 32 with Community Volunteer Workers and 11 with the Hospice clinical teams, using semi-structured digitally recorded individual, group and focus group interviews at the Hospice Africa sites in Uganda. The results identified the cultural wish to help people as a key motivator in becoming a volunteer. Additionally, the volunteers reported having a sense of pride in their volunteering role, and this role had a positive impact on their perceived status in their local community. This model of volunteering is clearly having an impact on the volunteers, both personally and also in terms of how they are treated in their communities. Further research to explore the long-term personal benefits of being a palliative care volunteer is recommended.

  14. Knowledge and skills of Emergency Care During Disaster For Community Health Volunteers: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anda Kamal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, disaster preparedness and responses are essential for everyone to be involved since the disaster becomes increasing. The Community Health Volunteers (CHVs in particular are the key partners required adequately prepared in emergency care during disaster event. Purpose: The study aims to examine the essential knowledge and skills of emergency care during natural disaster for CHVs. Method: The reviews published during 2000 and 2011 searching from PubMed, Science Direct, CINAHL, ProQuest Medical Library were conducted. Result: Twenty-four articles and documents related to community-based disaster preparedness programs were intensively reviewed. Based on the review, six components of knowledge and skills for emergency care in natural disaster for CHVs are required including 1 early warning, 2 disaster triage, 3 first aid, 4 search and rescue, 5 logistic and communication, and 6 team organizations. Conclusion: There was a few studies focusing on the emergency care in disaster management and some factors related to knowledge and skills were shown. It is therefore recommended that the current CHVs’ knowledge and skills should be explored in order to assist people in their community following disaster event when professional responders are not immediately available to help. Key words: Knowledge, Skill, Community health volunteers, Emergency care, Natural disaster.

  15. Predictors of quality of life of people receiving intensive community-based care

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intensive community-based care (ICBC) is a home-treatment approach aiming to support people ‘living in the community’ with severe psychiatric and addiction problems. Although subjective quality of life (SQOL) is an increasingly important outcome measure in health care, little is known on ICBC clients’ SQOL. Methods Clients of three ICBC teams (N = 523) participated in the study. Upon intake, clients filled out a SQOL measure and indicated whether they had a good friend, partner, and c...

  16. [Implementation of a patient safety strategy in primary care of the Community of Madrid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañada Dorado, A; Drake Canela, M; Olivera Cañadas, G; Mateos Rodilla, J; Mediavilla Herrera, I; Miquel Gómez, A

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a patient safety strategy in primary care within the new organizational and functional structure that was created in October 2010 to cover the single primary health care area of the Community of Madrid. The results obtained in Patient Safety after the implementation of this new model over the first two years of its development are also presented. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Diabetes Connect: Developing a Mobile Health Intervention to Link Diabetes Community Health Workers with Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Cherrington, Andrea L.; Agne, April A; Lampkin, Yolanda; Birl, Annie; Shelton, Tanya C.; Guzman,Alfredo; Willig, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Community Health Worker (CHW) interventions can help improve diabetes self-management and health outcomes. There is limited evidence on how to effectively integrate CHW programs with primary care efforts. Mobile health technology (mHealth) can connect CHWs to members of the healthcare team and enhance care. We tested a model for the integration of a CHW delivered mHealth intervention to improve diabetes self-management. Seventy-two African American patients with diabetes were followed using t...

  18. Extended roles and the dietitian: community adult enteral tube care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, W; Borthwick, A M

    2013-06-01

    Role flexibility is considered central to a health policy agenda stressing workforce redesign measures and professional role boundary change. Extensions in health professionals' role boundaries may involve the incorporation of new or 'vacant' roles, as well as the competitive acquisition of others. In the present study, the experiences of dietitians with extended roles in home enteral tube feeding (HETF) were explored and considered within the context of workforce role transition. Six semi-structured interviews conducted with dietitians specialising in HETF were undertaken and the emergent role development for dietitians in HETF was explored. Dietetic HETF roles emerged as a form of diversification, occupying a task 'vacancy', commonly on an opportunistic basis. Role overlap in these community based tasks was negotiated with community nurses, privately funded industry nurses and other medical staff. Notably, role conflict was encountered only with nutrition nurse specialists. To date, a lack of role exclusivity in a small and confined speciality field with multiple potential competitors has resulted in surprisingly little role conflict. Financial constraints within the National Health Service are considered likely to favour a privately funded service model of delivery, and this may have implications for dietitians specialising in this field. Dietitians also perceived an increase in professional status as a result of extended roles. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2012 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  19. Communities that care for families: the LINC Model for enhancing individual, family, and community resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Judith

    2010-10-01

    The resilience of families and communities is inextricably linked. Their healthy functioning relies on a balance of stressors and resources. Both can be jeopardized by major challenges such as socioeconomic change or natural and man-made disasters. Such events can cause increased incidences of physical and mental problems such as addiction, posttraumatic stress syndrome, and heart disease. Trauma breeds marginalization, abuse of power, and prejudice. How these stressors are handled is profoundly influenced by the degree of connectedness-attachment-to family and culture of origin. Connectedness can be enhanced by mobilizing support systems, facilitating access to resources, strengthening family, community and cultural ties, and fostering resilience. The LINC Model increases connectedness at the individual, family, and community levels. This article includes methods for designing interventions, studies and clinical vignettes that illustrate the application of the LINC Model, and examples of communities that have overcome major stress.

  20. Developing community in care homes through a relationship-centred approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown Wilson, Christine

    2009-03-01

    Within the literature, the formation of therapeutic relationships between professionals, older people and others significant to them in their lives has been considered as central to current care philosophies. Furthermore, relationships between staff, residents and their families have emerged within the literature as fundamental to the experiences of life within the community of a care home. This paper reports part of a wider study that explored relationships between residents, families and staff. The aim of this paper is to contribute to an understanding of the factors that may be significant in the formation of relationships in care homes, and how this may support the development of community. Three case studies of care homes were undertaken using a constructivist approach. Constructivist methodology seeks to share multiple perceptions between participants with the aim of creating a joint construction. This process supported the development of shared meanings as views and ideas were shared between participants using interviews, participant observation and focus groups. The key factors influencing relationships that emerged were leadership, continuity of staff, personal philosophy of staff and contribution of residents and families. This paper suggests that considering how the style of leadership influences the organisation of care may be a useful starting point in developing community within care homes.

  1. The use of a family history risk assessment tool within a community health care system: views of primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Carol A; Powell, Karen Potter; Hahn, Susan Estabrooks; Blanton, Susan H; Bogacik, Jessica; Henrich, Vincent C

    2012-10-01

    Primary care providers (PCPs) offered input regarding the incorporation of a family health history (FHH) risk assessment tool into a community health care system (CHCS). Sixteen PCPs participated in one of three focus groups. Perceived impediments included the lack of standard screening guidelines, effective screening tests, genetic counseling resources, and services for high-risk patients. The PCPs were concerned about their level of expertise, the cost of preventive health care, and genetic discrimination. They also were concerned about the use of a FHH tool by oncologists within the CHCS because of communication gaps between oncologists and PCPs, lack of clarity regarding follow-up and legal liability, and reimbursement issues. To integrate a FHH tool into a CHCS, PCPs will need consultation and referral services, evidence-based recommendations, and "just-in-time" educational resources. Oncologists who use the tool will need to develop a streamlined communication system with PCPs, establish clearly defined roles, and ensure patient follow-up.

  2. The role of a community palliative care specialist nurse team in caring for people with metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbeater, Maria

    2013-02-01

    An audit was undertaken of people with a diagnosis of breast cancer who were referred to a community palliative care specialist nursing team over a 12-month period, to explore the reasons for referral to the service and the duration of involvement with the service. Breast cancer patients accounted for 10% of the total referrals to the specialist service, with symptom management (including pain control) and emotional support being the main reasons for referral. The majority of people referred with breast cancer had metastatic breast cancer (87%); interestingly, 13% had primary breast cancer. The mean duration of intervention was 3 months and 1 week. Referrals seemed to occur late in patients' disease trajectories, and total numbers were lower than might be expected. It may be concluded that there is scope for the specialist palliative care team to be a more integral part of care for patients with metastatic breast cancer.

  3. Implementing a community-based self care training initiative: a process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Jane; Darby, Frances; Bagnall, Anne-Marie; White, Alan

    2010-11-01

    Within the UK, there is growing recognition that individuals will need to take increased responsibility for managing their own health for there to be improvements in population health. The current evidence base on self care interventions reflects an interest in enhancing self care knowledge, skills and behaviour in relation to the management of long-term conditions. In contrast, this paper reports on a community-based self care initiative that was designed to promote self care approaches in the general population. The principal component was a self care skills training course delivered to groups of lay people in community and workplace settings. Self Care for People was piloted in three primary care trusts and a process evaluation was undertaken. The aim of this paper is to examine the feasibility, relevance and acceptability of the initiative. Qualitative interviews were conducted with a sample of stakeholders involved in implementation including coordinators, trainers and key informants from organisations hosting the course. In total 40 interviews and two focus groups were conducted from 2006 to 2008 and the data were analysed thematically. The evaluation found that implementation was relatively straightforward with few major barriers reported. Recruitment to the self care skills training course took place in both workplace and community group settings, including in organisations supporting socially excluded groups. The course was seen to provide a valuable space for contemplation on personal health, however, participation could raise sensitive issues that needed to be dealt with by skilled facilitators. Motivations for involvement differed markedly in host organisations and different strategies for marketing were adopted. The paper concludes by suggesting that while Self Care for People was both feasible and relevant to different stakeholder groups, there needs to be flexibility in responding to the needs of participants in different settings.

  4. Addressing Hearing Health Care Disparities among Older Adults in a US-Mexico Border Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Maia; Marrone, Nicole; Sanchez, Daisey Thalia; Sander, Alicia; Navarro, Cecilia; de Zapien, Jill Guernsey; Colina, Sonia; Harris, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is associated with cognitive decline and impairment in daily living activities. Access to hearing health care has broad implications for healthy aging of the U.S. population. This qualitative study investigated factors related to the socio-ecological domains of hearing health in a U.S.–Mexico border community experiencing disparities in access to care. A multidisciplinary research team partnered with community health workers (CHWs) from a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) in designing the study. CHWs conducted interviews with people with hearing loss (n = 20) and focus groups with their family/friends (n = 27) and with members of the community-at-large (n = 47). The research team conducted interviews with FQHC providers and staff (n = 12). Individuals experienced depression, sadness, and social isolation, as well as frustration and even anger regarding communication. Family members experienced negative impacts of deteriorating communication, but expressed few coping strategies. There was general agreement across data sources that hearing loss was not routinely addressed within primary care and assistive hearing technology was generally unaffordable. Community members described stigma related to hearing loss and a need for greater access to hearing health care and broader community education. Findings confirm the causal sequence of hearing impairment on quality of life aggravated by socioeconomic conditions and lack of access to hearing health care. Hearing loss requires a comprehensive and innovative public health response across the socio-ecological framework that includes both individual communication intervention and greater access to hearing health resources. CHWs can be effective in tailoring intervention strategies to community characteristics. PMID:27574602

  5. Development of Clinical Pharmacy in Switzerland: Involvement of Community Pharmacists in Care for Older Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersberger, Kurt E; Messerli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    The role of the community pharmacist in primary care has been undergoing change in Switzerland in parallel to international developments: it has become more clinically and patient oriented. Special services of community pharmacists to older patients taking long-term or multiple medications, discharged from hospitals or experiencing cognitive impairment or disability have been developed. These services require more clinical knowledge and skills from community pharmacists and are based on, for example, 'simple or intermediate medication reviews' focused primarily to improve medication adherence and rational drug use by a patient. Reflecting the new role of community pharmacies, this article describes the current services provided by community pharmacies in Switzerland, e.g., 'polymedication check', 'weekly pill organizer', and 'services for chronic patients', as well as new Swiss educational and reimbursement systems supporting development of these services. In the international context, involvement of community pharmacists in patient-oriented care is growing. This review summarizes positive and negative experiences from implementation of community pharmacy services in Switzerland and provides examples for the development of such services in other countries.

  6. A prescription for disruptions in care: community building among nurses to address horizontal violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Joy; Smith, Marlaine C

    2011-01-01

    In the health care environment, threats exist that can impact a nurse's ability to provide safe, quality care. One of these threats is disruptive behavior among health care workers in which negative interactions adversely affect communication and collaboration. When this occurs among nurses, it is identified as horizontal violence. An underlying concept is power. When attempting to address these behaviors in the workplace, it is important that nurses recognize the context in which they occur so sustaining changes can be made. Community building among nurses may be an appropriate approach to give nurses the skills to make these changes.

  7. Integration of palliative care in the context of rapid response: a report from the Improving Palliative Care in the ICU advisory board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Judith E; Mathews, Kusum S; Weissman, David E; Brasel, Karen J; Campbell, Margaret; Curtis, J Randall; Frontera, Jennifer A; Gabriel, Michelle; Hays, Ross M; Mosenthal, Anne C; Mulkerin, Colleen; Puntillo, Kathleen A; Ray, Daniel E; Weiss, Stefanie P; Bassett, Rick; Boss, Renee D; Lustbader, Dana R

    2015-02-01

    Rapid response teams (RRTs) can effectively foster discussions about appropriate goals of care and address other emergent palliative care needs of patients and families facing life-threatening illness on hospital wards. In this article, The Improving Palliative Care in the ICU (IPAL-ICU) Project brings together interdisciplinary expertise and existing data to address the following: special challenges for providing palliative care in the rapid response setting, knowledge and skills needed by RRTs for delivery of high-quality palliative care, and strategies for improving the integration of palliative care with rapid response critical care. We discuss key components of communication with patients, families, and primary clinicians to develop a goal-directed treatment approach during a rapid response event. We also highlight the need for RRT expertise to initiate symptom relief. Strategies including specific clinician training and system initiatives are then recommended for RRT care improvement. We conclude by suggesting that as evaluation of their impact on other outcomes continues, performance by RRTs in meeting palliative care needs of patients and families should also be measured and improved.

  8. Dementia Special Care Units in Residential Care Communities: United States, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Residential Care Facilities. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 1(54). 2011. RTI International. SUDAAN (Release 11.0.0) [computer software]. 2012. Suggested citation Park-Lee E, Sengupta M, ...

  9. Perceptions of Spanish-speaking clientele of patient care services in a community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenik, Nicole L; Gonzalvo, Jasmine D; Snyder, Margie E; Nash, Christy L; Smith, Cory T

    2015-01-01

    A paucity of studies exists that have assessed community pharmacy preferences of Spanish-speaking patients living in areas of the U.S. with rapidly growing Hispanic populations. The qualitative approach to this research affords a unique opportunity to further explore perceptions of the Spanish-speaking population. To identify perceptions of Spanish-speaking patients living in the U.S. with a focus on the care provided in community pharmacies, as well as to determine their satisfaction with community pharmacies. Participants were recruited after weekly Spanish-speaking church services for approximately one month. Qualitative, semi-structured individual interviews to identify perceived unmet patient care needs were conducted in Spanish and transcribed/translated verbatim. Qualitative thematic analysis was used to summarize findings. A written questionnaire was administered to collect patient satisfaction and demographic information, summarized using descriptive statistics. Twelve interviews were conducted by the principal investigator. Primary themes included lack of insurance coupled with high medical care costs serving as a barrier for acquisition of health care, difficulty accessing timely and convenient primary care, perceived negative attitudes from pharmacy personnel, lack of Spanish-speaking health care providers, and the provision of verbal and written medication information in English. The results of this study suggest a great need for health care providers, including pharmacists, to expand outreach services to the Spanish-speaking community. Some examples derived from the interview process include increasing marketing efforts of available services in the Spanish language, hiring Spanish-speaking personnel, and offering medical terminology education classes to Spanish-speaking patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A commitment to high-value care education from the internal medicine community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cynthia D; Levinson, Wendy S

    2015-05-05

    The Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM), ABIM Foundation, and American College of Physicians are collaborating to enhance the education of physicians in high-value care (HVC) and make its practice an essential competency in undergraduate and postgraduate education by 2017. This article serves as the organizations' formal commitment to providing a foundation of HVC education on which others may build. The 5 key targets for HVC education are experiential learning and curriculum, environment and culture, clinical support, regulatory requirements, and sustainability. The goal is to train future health care professionals for whom HVC is part of normal practice, thus providing patients with improved clinical outcomes at a lower cost.

  11. Chiropractic care and public health: answering difficult questions about safety, care through the lifespan, and community action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Claire; Rubinstein, Sidney M; Côté, Pierre; Hestbaek, Lise; Injeyan, H Stephen; Puhl, Aaron; Green, Bart; Napuli, Jason G; Dunn, Andrew S; Dougherty, Paul; Killinger, Lisa Zaynab; Page, Stacey A; Stites, John S; Ramcharan, Michael; Leach, Robert A; Byrd, Lori D; Redwood, Daniel; Kopansky-Giles, Deborah R

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this collaborative summary is to document current chiropractic involvement in the public health movement, reflect on social ecological levels of influence as a profession, and summarize the relationship of chiropractic to the current public health topics of: safety, health issues through the lifespan, and effective participation in community health issues. The questions that are addressed include: Is spinal manipulative therapy for neck and low-back pain a public health problem? What is the role of chiropractic care in prevention or reduction of musculoskeletal injuries in children? What ways can doctors of chiropractic stay updated on evidence-based information about vaccines and immunization throughout the lifespan? Can smoking cessation be a prevention strategy for back pain? Does chiropractic have relevance within the VA Health Care System for chronic pain and comorbid disorders? How can chiropractic use cognitive behavioral therapy to address chronic low back pain as a public health problem? What opportunities exist for doctors of chiropractic to more effectively serve the aging population? What is the role of ethics and the contribution of the chiropractic profession to public health? What public health roles can chiropractic interns perform for underserved communities in a collaborative environment? Can the chiropractic profession contribute to community health? What opportunities do doctors of chiropractic have to be involved in health care reform in the areas of prevention and public health? What role do citizen-doctors of chiropractic have in organizing community action on health-related matters? How can our future chiropractic graduates become socially responsible agents of change?

  12. Community Health Care for the Elderly and Nursing care%社区老年人的保健与护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付敏

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore community; health care for the elderly and nursing methods. Methods:since 2010 my community for people over 60 years old in 80 cases and nursing care data analysis. Results: Through community care and nursing work effectively prevent senile body function decline, maintain elderly normal activities, improve the elderly population health, delaying senility. Conclusion: The community nursing staff skilled in related professional knowledge, keen observation and accurate judgment, can be found in elderly patients with health problems and a variety of subtle changes, take effective measures, as soon as possible to restore the health of the elderly.%  目的:探讨社区老年人的保健及护理方法。方法:选取2010年以来我社区60岁以上老年人80例保健及护理资料进行分析。结果:通过社区保健及护理工作有效地预防老年人机体功能减退、维持老年人正常的生活活动能力,提高老年群体健康,延缓衰老。结论:社区护理人员熟练地掌握相关的专业知识,具备敏锐的观察能力和准确的判断能力,能够及时发现老年患者的健康问题及各种细微的变化,及早采取正确有效的措施,尽快恢复老人健康。

  13. The Dynamics of Community Health Care Consolidation: Acquisition of Physician Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Jon B; Carlin, Caroline S; Warrick, Louise H

    2014-01-01

    Context Health care delivery systems are becoming increasingly consolidated in urban areas of the United States. While this consolidation could increase efficiency and improve quality, it also could raise the cost of health care for payers. This article traces the consolidation trajectory in a single community, focusing on factors influencing recent acquisitions of physician practices by integrated delivery systems. Methods We used key informant interviews, supplemented by document analysis. Findings The acquisition of physician practices is a process that will be difficult to reverse in the current health care environment. Provider revenue uncertainty is a key factor driving consolidation, with public and private attempts to control health care costs contributing to that uncertainty. As these efforts will likely continue, and possibly intensify, community health care systems now are less consolidated than they will be in the future. Acquisitions of multispecialty and primary care practices by integrated delivery systems follow a common process, with relatively predictable issues relating to purchase agreements, employment contracts, and compensation. Acquisitions of single-specialty practices are less common, with motivations for acquisitions likely to vary by specialty type, group size, and market structure. Total cost of care contracting could be an important catalyst for practice acquisitions in the future. Conclusions In the past, market and regulatory forces aimed at controlling costs have both encouraged and rewarded the consolidation of providers, with important new developments likely to create momentum for further consolidation, including acquisitions of physician practices. PMID:25199899

  14. Beyond the biomedical: community resources for mental health care in rural Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhin Selamu

    Full Text Available The focus of discussion in addressing the treatment gap is often on biomedical services. However, community resources can benefit health service scale-up in resource-constrained settings. These assets can be captured systematically through resource mapping, a method used in social action research. Resource mapping can be informative in developing complex mental health interventions, particularly in settings with limited formal mental health resources.We employed resource mapping within the Programme for Improving Mental Health Care (PRIME, to systematically gather information on community assets that can support integration of mental healthcare into primary care in rural Ethiopia. A semi-structured instrument was administered to key informants. Community resources were identified for all 58 sub-districts of the study district. The potential utility of these resources for the provision of mental healthcare in the district was considered.The district is rich in community resources: There are over 150 traditional healers, 164 churches and mosques, and 401 religious groups. There were on average 5 eddir groups (traditional funeral associations per sub-district. Social associations and 51 micro-finance institutions were also identified. On average, two traditional bars were found in each sub-district. The eight health centres and 58 satellite clinics staffed by Health Extension Workers (HEWs represented all the biomedical health services in the district. In addition the Health Development Army (HDA are community volunteers who support health promotion and prevention activities.The plan for mental healthcare integration in this district was informed by the resource mapping. Community and religious leaders, HEWs, and HDA may have roles in awareness-raising, detection and referral of people with mental illness, improving access to medical care, supporting treatment adherence, and protecting human rights. The diversity of community structures will be

  15. Beyond the biomedical: community resources for mental health care in rural Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selamu, Medhin; Asher, Laura; Hanlon, Charlotte; Medhin, Girmay; Hailemariam, Maji; Patel, Vikram; Thornicroft, Graham; Fekadu, Abebaw

    2015-01-01

    The focus of discussion in addressing the treatment gap is often on biomedical services. However, community resources can benefit health service scale-up in resource-constrained settings. These assets can be captured systematically through resource mapping, a method used in social action research. Resource mapping can be informative in developing complex mental health interventions, particularly in settings with limited formal mental health resources. We employed resource mapping within the Programme for Improving Mental Health Care (PRIME), to systematically gather information on community assets that can support integration of mental healthcare into primary care in rural Ethiopia. A semi-structured instrument was administered to key informants. Community resources were identified for all 58 sub-districts of the study district. The potential utility of these resources for the provision of mental healthcare in the district was considered. The district is rich in community resources: There are over 150 traditional healers, 164 churches and mosques, and 401 religious groups. There were on average 5 eddir groups (traditional funeral associations) per sub-district. Social associations and 51 micro-finance institutions were also identified. On average, two traditional bars were found in each sub-district. The eight health centres and 58 satellite clinics staffed by Health Extension Workers (HEWs) represented all the biomedical health services in the district. In addition the Health Development Army (HDA) are community volunteers who support health promotion and prevention activities. The plan for mental healthcare integration in this district was informed by the resource mapping. Community and religious leaders, HEWs, and HDA may have roles in awareness-raising, detection and referral of people with mental illness, improving access to medical care, supporting treatment adherence, and protecting human rights. The diversity of community structures will be used to support

  16. What sort of medical care is ideal? Differences in thoughts on medical care among residents of urban and rural/remote Japanese communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikai, Tomoki; Suzuki, Tomio; Oshima, Tamiki; Kanayama, Hitomi; Kusaka, Yukinori; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Terasawa, Hidekazu

    2017-09-01

    Studies of aspirational ideals of medical care generally focus on patients rather than on ordinary people receiving or not receiving medications at the time of interview. The literature has not accurately conveyed the distinct ideals in individual communities or undertaken inter-regional comparisons. This current qualitative study focused on ideal medical care as perceived by residents of distinct Japanese communities in their everyday lives. Between December 2011 and November 2012, one-on-one and group-based semi-structured interviews were conducted with 105 individuals, each of whom had continuously lived for 20 years or more in one of the four types of communities classified as either 'metropolitan area', 'provincial city', 'mountain/fishing village' or 'remote island' in Japan. Interviews were transcribed from digital audio recordings and then analysed (in tandem with non-verbal data including participants' appearances, attitudes and interview atmospheres) using constructivist grounded theory, in which we could get the voice and mind of the participant concerning ideal medical care. The common themes observed among the four community types included 'peace of mind because of the availability of medical care' and 'trust in medical professionals'. Themes that were characteristic of urban communities were the tendency to focus on the content of medical care, including 'high-level medical care', 'elimination of unnecessary medical care' and 'faster, cheaper medical care', whereas those that were characteristic of rural communities were the tendency to focus on lifestyle-oriented medical care such as 'support for local lifestyles', 'locally appropriate standards of medical care' and 'being free from dependence on medical care'. The sense of ideal medical care in urban communities tended to centre around the satisfaction with the content of medical care, whereas that in rural communities tended to centre around the ability to lead a secure life. By considering

  17. 75 FR 67751 - Medicare Program: Community-Based Care Transitions Program (CCTP) Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... provide a forum for community-based organizations, hospitals, Quality Improvement Organizations... materials will be posted on the CMS Care Transitions Web site prior to the meeting. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juliana Tiongson, Social Science Research Analyst, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services,...

  18. Psychometric properties of the consumer quality index to assess shelter and community care services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, M.D.; Asmoredjo, J.K.; Christians, M.G.M.; Wolf, J.R.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our aim was to design a valid and reliable consumer quality index (CQI) specifically suited to assess the experiences that homeless people, homeless youth, and abused women have with shelter and community care services. METHODS: A pilot CQI questionnaire was constructed on the basis of

  19. Psychosocial care to affected citizens and communities in case of CBRN incidents: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouweloos, J.; Dückers, M.; Brake, H. te; Kleber, R.; Dorgendijk, A.

    2014-01-01

    Disasters are associated with a substantial psychosocial burden for affected individuals (including first responders) and communities. Knowledge about how to address these risks and problems is valuable for societies worldwide. Decades of research into post-disaster psychosocial care has resulted in

  20. Psychosocial care to affected citizens and communities in case of CBRN incidents: A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouweloos, Juul; Dückers, M.; Te Brake, Hans; Kleber, Rolf; Drogendijk, A.N.

    2014-01-01

    Disasters are associated with a substantial psychosocial burden for affected individuals (including first responders) and communities. Knowledge about how to address these risks and problems is valuable for societies worldwide. Decades of research into post-disaster psychosocial care has resulted in

  1. Clinical Problems in Community Mental Health Care for Patients with Severe Borderline Personality Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Koekkoek; B. van Meijel; A. Schene; G. Hutschemaekers

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the problems that professionals perceive in the community mental health care for patients with severe borderline personality disorder that do not fit into specialized therapy. A group of national experts (n = 8) participated in a four-phase Delphi-procedu

  2. COSTS AND BENEFITS OF DAY TREATMENT WITH COMMUNITY CARE FOR SCHIZOPHRENIC-PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERSMA, D; KLUITER, H; NIENHUIS, FJ; RUPHAN, M; GIEL, R

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of day treatment with community care for schizophrenic patients was tested by means of a longitudinal randomized experiment with 34 experimentals and 16 controls: 38 percent could be treated satisfactorily in a day program that included a very active ambulatory service. The new appro

  3. COSTS AND BENEFITS OF HOSPITAL AND DAY TREATMENT WITH COMMUNITY CARE OF AFFECTIVE AND SCHIZOPHRENIC DISORDERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERSMA, D; KLUITER, H; NIENHUIS, FJ; RUPHAN, M; GIEL, R

    1995-01-01

    Background. A randomised controlled trial of day treatment with community care for patients with schizophrenic and affective disorders, referred for in-patient psychiatric treatment, was conducted to evaluate patterns of treatment and the course of illness with its psychosocial consequences over a p

  4. Physician-Pharmacist Collaborative Care for Dyslipidemia Patients: Knowledge and Skills of Community Pharmacists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, Julie; Lamarre, Diane; Lussier, Marie-Therese; Vanier, Marie-Claude; Genest, Jacques; Blais, Lucie; Hudon, Eveline; Perreault, Sylvie; Berbiche, Djamal; Lalonde, Lyne

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: In a physician-pharmacist collaborative-care (PPCC) intervention, community pharmacists were responsible for initiating lipid-lowering pharmacotherapy and adjusting the medication dosage. They attended a 1-day interactive workshop supported by a treatment protocol and clinical and communication tools. Afterwards, changes in…

  5. Psychosocial care to affected citizens and communities in case of CBRN incidents: A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouweloos, Juul; Dückers, M.; Te Brake, Hans; Kleber, Rolf; Drogendijk, A.N.

    2014-01-01

    Disasters are associated with a substantial psychosocial burden for affected individuals (including first responders) and communities. Knowledge about how to address these risks and problems is valuable for societies worldwide. Decades of research into post-disaster psychosocial care has resulted in

  6. Psychosocial care to affected citizens and communities in case of CBRN incidents: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouweloos, J.; Dückers, M.; Brake, H. te; Kleber, R.; Dorgendijk, A.

    2014-01-01

    Disasters are associated with a substantial psychosocial burden for affected individuals (including first responders) and communities. Knowledge about how to address these risks and problems is valuable for societies worldwide. Decades of research into post-disaster psychosocial care has resulted in

  7. A Community Day Care Programme for Psychiatric Patients: The Role of Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradad, Akanksha; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the need for and role of occupational therapy in the organization and functioning of a community day care center for psychiatric patients in India. The occupational therapy program involves client evaluation, determination of therapeutic activities, physical exercise, recreational activities, group sessions, family involvement,…

  8. Toward a Model of Psychological Health Empowerment: Implications for Health Care in Multicultural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Sanjay T.

    2002-01-01

    The context for health empowerment includes individuals, health providers, and the regulatory environment. Psychological health empowerment consists of perceived control, perceived competence, and goal internalization. In multicultural communities, barriers to empowerment include locus of control, access to health care, and language and cultural…

  9. Capacity Enhancement of Hepatitis C Virus Treatment through Integrated, Community-Based Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren D Hill

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An estimated 250,000 Canadians are infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV. The present study describes a cohort of individuals with HCV referred to community-based, integrated prevention and care projects developed in British Columbia. Treatment outcomes are reported for a subset of individuals undergoing antiviral therapy at four project sites.

  10. From behind Dikes and Dunes: Communities that Care in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkman, Harrie B.; Junger-Tas, Josine; van Dijk, Bram

    2005-01-01

    This paper will provide a general overview of the implementation of the Communities that Care (CtC) programme in the Netherlands. It outlines the socio-historical development of the initiative and considers the rationale and starting point for the Dutch experiment and the tools used in the process. Attention will also be paid to the implementation…

  11. Preventive and Community Medicine in Primary Care. Teaching of Preventive Medicine Vol. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, William H., Ed.

    This monograph is the result of a conference on the role of preventive and community medicine in primary medical care and education. The following six papers were presented at the conference: (1) Roles of Departments of Preventive Medicine; (2) Competency-Based Objectives in Preventive Medicine for the Family Physician; (3) Preventive Medicine…

  12. Patient experience and use of probiotics in community-based health care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Lee B

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Blake Chin-Lee,1 William J Curry,1 John Fetterman,2 Marie A Graybill,1 Kelly Karpa2 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, 2Department of Pharmacology, Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine Hershey, PA, USA Objective: To investigate patient experience with probiotics and factors that influence probiotic use among adult patients.Method: Patients were invited to complete a questionnaire that assessed their experiences and opinions regarding probiotics. Questionnaires were distributed to patients seeking primary health care services at a family and community medicine practice site and a community pharmacy. Patients were invited to complete the questionnaire while awaiting the physician or waiting for prescriptions to be filled. Results: Overall, 162 surveys were completed and returned (66% response rate from patients aged 18 to 89 years of age (mean 49.5 years. Most patients (n=107; 65% were familiar with the term “probiotic”, and 49 patients (29.9% had personally used the supplements in the past. Of those who had used probiotics, the majority (57% had used the supplements to maintain “good gastrointestinal health” and most (59% felt that the supplements had been beneficial. However, most (59% had not informed their health care provider about their use of the supplements.Conclusion: Use of probiotic supplements is common among consumers, but may not be reported to health care providers. Keywords: primary care, community pharmacy, probiotic

  13. Blending Community Service and Teaching to Open Vision Care and Eye Health Awareness to University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Chi-wai; Chan, Lily Y. L.; Wong, Horace H. Y.; Chu, Geoffrey; Yu, Wing Yan; Pang, Peter C. K.; Cheong, Allen M. Y.; Ting, Patrick Wai-ki; Lam, Thomas Chuen; Kee, Chea-su; Lam, Andrew; Chan, Henry H. L.

    2016-01-01

    A vision care-based community service subject is offered to general university students for fulfillment of a service-learning compulsory credit requirement. Here, a professional health subject is taught in a way that caters to generalist learners. Students gain basic skills they can apply to provide vision screenings for the needy population. All…

  14. Agent-oriented context-aware platforms supporting communities of practice in health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonino da Silva Santos, L.O.; Guizzardi-Silva Souza, R.; Sinderen, van M.J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses the use of an agent-oriented context-aware platform to support communities of practice (CoPs) in the health care domain. Our work is based on a scenario where CoPs are applied in a hospital to enhance the knowledge sharing among the staff members who share interests

  15. Surveying Community Nursing Support for Persons with an Intellectual Disability and Palliative Care Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Maria; Doody, Owen; Lyons, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care services have developed over the years to support all persons with life-limiting conditions. Moreover, services for people with an intellectual disability have moved from the traditional institutional setting to supporting people with an intellectual disability to live in their own community and family home. The expansion of…

  16. The Social Ecology of Maternal Infant Care in Socially and Economically Marginalized Community in Southern Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Nihaya; O'Campo, Patricia; Anderson, Kim; Agbaria, Ayman K.; Shoham-Vardi, Ilana

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to better understand the social ecology of infant care (IC) as experienced and perceived by mothers living in a deprived Arab Bedouin community in Israel, where children's health indicators are poor. We used the integrative model of Garcia Coll et al. (Garcia Coll C, Lamberty G, Jenkins R "et al." An integrative model for the study…

  17. Primary Health Care Providers' Perspectives: Facilitating Older Patients' Access to Community Support Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeg, Jenny; Denton, Margaret; Hutchison, Brian; McAiney, Carrie; Moore, Ainsley; Brazil, Kevin; Tindale, Joseph; Wu, Amina; Lam, Annie

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the study examined in this article was to understand how non-physician health care professionals working in Canadian primary health care settings facilitate older persons' access to community support services (CSSs). The use of CSSs has positive impacts for clients, yet they are underused from lack of awareness. Using a qualitative description approach, we interviewed 20 health care professionals from various disciplines and primary health care models about the processes they use to link older patients to CSSs. Participants collaborated extensively with interprofessional colleagues within and outside their organizations to find relevant CSSs. They actively engaged patients and families in making these linkages and ensured follow-up. It was troubling to find that they relied on out-of-date resources and inefficient search strategies to find CSSs. Our findings can be used to develop resources and approaches to better support primary health care providers in linking older adults to relevant CSSs.

  18. Improving clinical research and cancer care delivery in community settings: evaluating the NCI community cancer centers program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fennell Mary L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this article, we describe the National Cancer Institute (NCI Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP pilot and the evaluation designed to assess its role, function, and relevance to the NCI's research mission. In doing so, we describe the evolution of and rationale for the NCCCP concept, participating sites' characteristics, its multi-faceted aims to enhance clinical research and quality of care in community settings, and the role of strategic partnerships, both within and outside of the NCCCP network, in achieving program objectives. Discussion The evaluation of the NCCCP is conceptualized as a mixed method multi-layered assessment of organizational innovation and performance which includes mapping the evolution of site development as a means of understanding the inter- and intra-organizational change in the pilot, and the application of specific evaluation metrics for assessing the implementation, operations, and performance of the NCCCP pilot. The assessment of the cost of the pilot as an additional means of informing the longer-term feasibility and sustainability of the program is also discussed. Summary The NCCCP is a major systems-level set of organizational innovations to enhance clinical research and care delivery in diverse communities across the United States. Assessment of the extent to which the program achieves its aims will depend on a full understanding of how individual, organizational, and environmental factors align (or fail to align to achieve these improvements, and at what cost.

  19. [PHARMACEUTICAL CARE FOR HEALTHY BREAKFAST PROMOTION IN COMMUNITY PHARMACIES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín Rives, Fátima; Morales Marin, Fatima; Marín Rives, Luz Virtudes; Gastelurrutia Garralda, Miguel Ángel

    2015-09-01

    a healthy breakfast is the one that includes a balanced portion of every nutrient qualitatively and quantitatively. Although it should supply the 20-25% calories of the day, it is usually insufficient or even absent. to study the food habits of schoolchildren and to participate in a health educational intervention of a Pharmaceutical Care Program with them. only the 36.6% of students have a healthy breakfast every day. The health education achieves favorable changes in the behavior and opinions of the schoolchildren participating. the percentage of students that have C group food is higher than in other studies. We can consider the fact that the School is located in a rural area with many vegetable gardens, and that can help students to eat more fruits. Another remarkable data is that the percentage of alumni that achieve a healthy breakfast is also higher than in other researchers. the breakfast of students of Fifth and Six Degree of Primary School is imbalanced. Health education by an educative and practical intervention benefits positive changes in the students' breakfast. It supports the effort of promoting Heath Education in Primary Schools. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  20. Community, service, and policy strategies to improve health care access in the changing urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrulis, D P

    2000-06-01

    Urban communities continue to face formidable historic challenges to improving public health. However, reinvestment initiatives, changing demographics, and growth in urban areas are creating changes that offer new opportunities for improving health while requiring that health systems be adapted to residents' health needs. This commentary suggests that health care improvement in metropolitan areas will require setting local, state, and national agendas around 3 priorities. First, health care must reorient around powerful population dynamics, in particular, cultural diversity, growing numbers of elderly, those in welfare-workplace transition, and those unable to negotiate an increasingly complex health system. Second, communities and governments must assess the consequences of health professional shortages, safety net provider closures and conversions, and new marketplace pressures in terms of their effects on access to care for vulnerable urban populations; they must also weigh the potential value of emerging models for improving those populations' care. Finally, governments at all levels should use their influence through accreditation, standards, tobacco settlements, and other financing streams to educate and guide urban providers in directions that respond to urban communities' health care needs.

  1. [Management of type 2 diabetes patients in community health care centers in Grenoble].

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Patrice; Pichon, Philippe; Poulizac, Morgan; Cruaud, Anna; Bal, Gaelle; Hirsch, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Community health care centers in Grenoble aim to provide quality primary health care, including prevention, to populations living in disadvantaged urban areas. The objective of the study was to assess the quality of follow-up provided by physicians in health care centers in Grenoble to patients with diabetes mellitus. A cross-sectional study was conducted for an observation period of one week in june 2007. All type 2 diabetes patients seen in community health care centers during this given week were included in the study's sample (n=121). During the consultation, the physician collected the data on diabetes follow-up recorded in the patient's medical record over the last year. The data were compared with the recommendations and guidance published by the French National Authority for Health in 2006. The result of a hemoglobin A1c test dated less that three months-old was present in 80% of patients' medical records. Serum creatinine concentration, blood lipids, and microalbuminuria levels were obtained and confirmed with annual tests, and were present and recorded in the last year in 95%, 91%, and 77% of cases, respectively. The patient's weight, recorded within the last year, was noted in all cases. An ophthalmology consultation had been provided within the year for 57% of patients and 55% had received an electrocardiogram. Compliance with French National Authority for Health recommendations for the follow-up of diabetics in the community health care centers was satisfactory. Thus, it seems relevant to analyze their organizational methods.

  2. Feasibility of pulse oximetry for assessment of infants born in community based midwifery care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Marrit; Ganzeboom, Angelina; Dawson, Jennifer A; Walther, Frans J; Bustraan, Jacqueline; van Roosmalen, Jos J M; te Pas, Arjan B

    2014-05-01

    to evaluate the feasibility of using pulse oximetry (PO) for evaluating infants born in community-based midwifery care. a prospective, observational study of infants born after midwifery supervised (home) births. 27 midwives from seven practices providing primary care in (home) births used PO at birth or the early puerperal period over a ten-month period. Data were obtained on the effect of PO on outcome, interventions and decision-making. Midwives were surveyed about applicability and usefulness of PO. 153 infants born in primary midwifery care. all births were uncomplicated except for one infant receiving supplemental oxygen and another was mask ventilated. In 138/153 (90%) infants PO was successfully used and 88% of midwives found PO easy to use. In 148/153 (97%) infants PO did not influence midwives' clinical judgment and referral policy. In 5/153 (3%) infants, midwives were uncertain of the infant's condition, but PO measurements were reassuring. In case of suboptimal neonatal condition or resuscitation, 100% of midwives declared they would use PO again. it is feasible to use PO in community based midwifery care, but not considered an important contribution to routine evaluation of infants. Midwives would like to have PO available during suboptimal neonatal condition or when resuscitation is required. PO can be applied in community based midwifery care; it does not lead to insecurity or extra referral. Further research on a larger group of infants must show the effect of PO on neonatal outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Expanding access to midwifery care: using one practice's success to create community change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijagal, Malini Anand; Wice, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Starting in 1991, Marin's County Certified Nurse-Midwife-Physician Collaborative Practice has proven to be a successful model of care for underinsured women. Functioning within the same hospital as traditional physician-led practices, the practice displayed excellent clinical outcomes and gained respect within the community. Twenty years later, the Marin obstetric community decided to restructure its programs to incorporate the care of underinsured and privately insured women into one system. The goal was to design a system that would be patient-centered, financially and professionally sustainable, and accessible to all women and would provide evidence-based care with excellent outcomes. The community agreed, based on its own experience and on current literature, that continuing and expanding the midwife-led model of care was a way to achieve these goals. Here we describe the history, practice, and outcomes of Marin's county practice and the factors that contributed to extending the availability of midwifery care to privately insured women. © 2012 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  4. [Community resources prescription for self-care improvement in chronic illnesses. Clinical case management in Primary Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Vico-Díaz de Rada, Lucía; González-Suárez, Miriam; Duarte-Clíments, Gonzalo; Brito-Brito, Pedro Ruymán

    2014-01-01

    A case is presented of a 52 year-old male seen in a Primary Care nursing clinic for a type 2 diabetes mellitus metabolic control. The frequency of the visits increased due to perceived difficulties caused by changing the medical treatment. A focused interview was conducted under functional health patterns framework. The patient was unable to write or read, had not worked for the last 25 years, and expressed a lack of control over his self-care. An action plan was prepared, prioritizing Ineffective Health Maintenance, Powerlessness, and Impaired Social Interaction NANDA-I nursing diagnoses. The goals were set at improving knowledge and control over his disease and participating in leisure activities. To achieve these, the social health resources in the area were contacted, and agreed that the patient could attend activities that could improve his self-care and his quality of life. An improvement in his diabetes control was observed in the following evaluations, with an increase in his level of knowledge and self-care. The Primary Health care nurse should consider available community resources by using a comprehensive approach to chronic diseases for their therapeutic benefit and management, especially in those patients with adverse sociocultural conditions.

  5. A Novel Model for Teaching Primary Care in a Community Practice Setting: Tufts at Tech Community Veterinary Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCobb, Emily; Rozanski, Elizabeth A; Malcolm, Elizabeth A; Wolfus, Gregory; Rush, John E

    2017-09-01

    Providing veterinary students with opportunities to develop clinical skills in a realistic, hands-on environment remains a challenge for veterinary education. We have developed a novel approach to teaching clinical medicine to fourth-year veterinary students and technical high school students via development of a primary care clinic embedded within a technical high school. The primary care clinic targets an underserved area of the community, which includes many of the participating high school students. Support from the veterinary community for the project has been strong as a result of communication, the opportunity for veterinarians to volunteer in the clinic, and the careful targeting of services. Benefits to veterinary students include the opportunity to build clinical competencies and confidence, as well as the exposure to a diverse client population. The financial model of the clinic is described and initial data on outcomes for case load, clinic income, veterinary student evaluations, and high school students' success in passing the veterinary assisting examination are reported. This clinical model, involving a partnership between a veterinary school and a technical high school, may be adoptable to other clinical teaching situations.

  6. Applying community-based participatory research to better understand and improve kinship care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chukwudozie, Oge; Feinstein, Clare; Jensen, Celina;

    2015-01-01

    While the principles behind community-based participatory research are firmly established, the process of taking community-based participatory research with children and youth to scale and integrating it into the programming of non-governmental organizations has been scarcely documented....... This article reflects on the experiences of Save the Children in implementing a multicountry community-based participatory research program to increase understanding of kinship care in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. The article discusses challenges faced and lessons learned...... and highlights how the research process enabled action and advocacy initiatives at different levels-leading to an increase in support and policy attention for children living in kinship care....

  7. An outbreak of Salmonella Paratyphi A in a boarding school: a community-acquired enteric fever and carriage investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H H; Gong, J; Zhang, J; Wang, M L; Yang, J; Wu, G Z; Quan, W L; Gong, H M; Szu, S C

    2010-12-01

    Salmonella Paratyphi A (SPA) is rapidly becoming a common cause of enteric fever in South East Asia. A large outbreak of SPA occurred in a boarding middle school in China in 2004. There were 394 suspected cases; 95·5% were students. The highest incidence was in the youngest children (7th grade). Forty-four of 151 (29%) blood cultures and 4/54 (7·4%) rectal swabs were positive for SPA; three were from kitchen workers. The geometric mean levels of serum IgG anti-lipopolysaccharide (anti-LPS) from patients was higher than from healthy individuals [35·25 vs. 5·20 ELISA units (EU), Pkitchen worker with a positive rectal swab, negative blood culture and a high level of serum IgG anti-LPS (529·65 EU), was identified as a possible SPA carrier. No SPA was isolated from water or food samples. A survey of students' habits indicated drinking unboiled water as being the main reason for contracting the disease. Hand washing was the second most important factor. A food handler with possible SPA carriage could also have been a risk factor. Attention to maintaining a safe water supply, enhancing food-handler hygiene and proper hand washing can help to prevent similar outbreaks in the future.

  8. Critical Contexts for Biomedical Research in a Native American Community: Health Care, History, and Community Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahota, Puneet Chawla

    2012-01-01

    Native Americans have been underrepresented in previous studies of biomedical research participants. This paper reports a qualitative interview study of Native Americans' perspectives on biomedical research. In-depth interviews were conducted with 53 members of a Southwest tribal community. Many interviewees viewed biomedical research studies as a…

  9. Creating Community Change to Improve Youth Development: The Communities That Care System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke-Weiss, Blaire; Haggerty, Kevin P.; Fagan, Abigail A.; Hawkins, J. David; Cady, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Advances in prevention science in the past 25 years provide important direction for neighborhood and community efforts to improve the lives of youth. Prevention scientists have applied a public health approach to youth problems such as drug use and delinquency, and have shown that these problems can be prevented. The identification of risk and…

  10. Critical Contexts for Biomedical Research in a Native American Community: Health Care, History, and Community Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahota, Puneet Chawla

    2012-01-01

    Native Americans have been underrepresented in previous studies of biomedical research participants. This paper reports a qualitative interview study of Native Americans' perspectives on biomedical research. In-depth interviews were conducted with 53 members of a Southwest tribal community. Many interviewees viewed biomedical research studies as a…

  11. Caring for Young Children with Asthma: Perspectives from Urban Community Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Ellen; Laws, Margaret A; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn; Nath, Anjali; Reid, Margaret J; Sandel, Megan; Cohen, Robyn T

    2017-07-24

    Asthma disproportionately affects low-income, minority youth, with notable disparities among children urban community health centers (CHCs) regarding treating young children with asthma could improve care for these patients. This study uses data from semi-structured focus groups with staff from eight urban CHCs. Themes emerged in three domains. Within the parent/family domain, providers noted low rates of follow-up visits, low health literacy, and-for young children specifically-misunderstanding about the diagnosis. At the CHC level, providers needed more staff, space, and comfort with applying the guidelines to infants and young children. CHCs reported asthma registries, population health oversight, and an asthma champion improved care. At the system level, providers wanted improved communication with emergency departments and community outreach programs. Reducing these multi-level barriers may improve care.

  12. Norovirus epidemiology in community and health care settings and association with patient age, denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franck, Kristina T; Fonager, Jannik; Ersbøll, Annette K;

    2014-01-01

    . In community and health care settings, we found an association between infection with GII.4 and increasing age. Norovirus GII.4 predominated in patients ≥60 years of age and in health care settings. A larger proportion of children than adults were infected with NoV GII.3 or GII.P21. Susceptibility to No......Norovirus (NoV) is a major cause of gastroenteritis. NoV genotype II.4 (GII.4) is the predominant genotype in health care settings but the reason for this finding is unknown. Stool samples containing isolates with a known NoV genotype from 2,109 patients in Denmark (patients consulting a general...... practitioner or outpatient clinic, inpatients, and patients from foodborne outbreaks) were used to determine genotype distribution in relation to age and setting. NoV GII.4 was more prevalent among inpatients than among patients in community settings or those who became infected during foodborne outbreaks...

  13. Student learning with concept mapping of care plans in community-based education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, Susan M; Webb, Patricia; Sims-Giddens, Susan; Helton, Caroline; Hope, Kathryn L; Utley, Rose; Savinske, Deborah; Fahey, Elizabeth M; Yarbrough, Sue

    2006-01-01

    Concept mapping, a learning strategy used to understand key concepts and relationships between concepts, has been suggested as a method to plan and evaluate nursing care. The purpose of this study was to empirically test the effectiveness of concept mapping for student learning and the students' satisfaction with the strategy. A quasi-experimental pre- and posttest design was used to examine the content of concept maps of care plans constructed by junior-level baccalaureate students (n = 23) at the beginning and end of a community-based mental health course. Additionally, students completed a questionnaire to self-evaluate their learning and report their satisfaction with concept mapping. Findings indicated that concept mapping significantly improved students' abilities to see patterns and relationships to plan and evaluate nursing care, and most students (21/23) expressed satisfaction in using the strategy. This study supported concept mapping as an additional learning strategy and has extended knowledge in community-based nursing education.

  14. Outsourcing mental health care services? The practice and potential of community-based farms in psychiatric rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iancu, Sorana C; Zweekhorst, Marjolein B M; Veltman, Dick J; van Balkom, Anton J L M; Bunders, Joske F G

    2015-02-01

    Psychiatric rehabilitation supports individuals with mental disorders to acquire the skills needed for independent lives in communities. This article assesses the potential of outsourcing psychiatric rehabilitation by analysing care farm services in the Netherlands. Service characteristics were analysed across 214 care farms retrieved from a national database. Qualitative insights were provided by five case descriptions, selected from 34 interviews. Institutional care farms were significantly larger and older than private care farms (comprising 88.8% of all care farms). Private, independent care farms provide real-life work conditions to users who are relatively less impaired. Private, contracted care farms tailor the work activities to their capacities and employ professional supervisors. Institutional care farms accommodate for the most vulnerable users. We conclude that collaborations with independent, contracted and institutional care farms would provide mental health care organizations with a diversity in services, enhanced community integration and a better match with users' rehabilitation needs.

  15. Eastern Health Board Regional Orthodontic Service: an initial audit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dowling, P A

    1997-01-01

    This initial audit of 600 recently assessed Eastern Health Board orthodontic patients suggests that a large number of them (47 per cent) requires referral for routine restorative and preventive dental care. Closer links are needed with general dental practitioners and community dental surgeons to resolve these needs. The trend for a high referral of females and Class 11 Division 1 malocclusion type correlated well with studies in other countries.

  16. Pharmaceutical care in community pharmacies: practice and research in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Dale B; Farris, Karen B

    2006-01-01

    To describe the state of community pharmacy, including patient care services, in the US. Chain pharmacies, including traditional chains, mass merchandisers, and supermarkets, comprise more than 50% of community pharmacies in the US. Dispensing of drugs remains the primary focus, yet the incidence of patients being counseled on medications appears to be increasing. More than 25% of independent community pharmacy owners report providing some patient clinical care services, such as medication counseling and chronic disease management. Most insurance programs pay pharmacists only for dispensing services, yet there are a growing number of public and private initiatives that reimburse pharmacists for cognitive services. Clinical care opportunities exist in the new Medicare prescription drug benefit plan, as it requires medication therapy management services for specific enrollees. The private market approach to healthcare delivery in the US, including pharmacy services, precludes national and statewide strategies to change the basic business model. To date, most pharmacies remain focused on dispensing prescriptions. With lower dispensing fees and higher operating costs, community pharmacies are focused on increasing productivity and efficiency through technology and technicians. Pharmacists remain challenged to establish the value of their nondispensing-related pharmaceutical care services in the private sector. As the cost of suboptimal drug therapy becomes more evident, medication therapy management may become a required pharmacy benefit in private drug insurance plans. Pharmacy school curricula, as well as national and state pharmacy associations, continually work to train and promote community pharmacists for these roles. Practice research is driven primarily by interested academics and, to a lesser degree, by pharmacy associations. Efficient dispensing of prescriptions is the primary focus of community pharmacies in the US. Some well designed practice-based research

  17. The social accountability of doctors: a relationship based framework for understanding emergent community concepts of caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green-Thompson, Lionel P; McInerney, Patricia; Woollard, Bob

    2017-04-12

    Social accountability is defined as the responsibility of institutions to respond to the health priorities of a community. There is an international movement towards the education of health professionals who are accountable to communities. There is little evidence of how communities experience or articulate this accountability. In this grounded theory study eight community based focus group discussions were conducted in rural and urban South Africa to explore community members' perceptions of the social accountability of doctors. The discussions were conducted across one urban and two rural provinces. Group discussions were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Initial coding was done and three main themes emerged following data analysis: the consultation as a place of love and respect (participants have an expectation of care yet are often engaged with disregard); relationships of people and systems (participants reflect on their health priorities and the links with the social determinants of health) and Ubuntu as engagement of the community (reflected in their expectation of Ubuntu based relationships as well as part of the education system). These themes were related through a framework which integrates three levels of relationship: a central community of reciprocal relationships with the doctor-patient relationship as core; a level in which the systems of health and education interact and together with social determinants of health mediate the insertion of communities into a broader discourse. An ubuntu framing in which the tensions between vulnerability and power interact and reflect rights and responsibility. The space between these concepts is important for social accountability. Social accountability has been a concept better articulated by academics and centralized agencies. Communities bring a richer dimension to social accountability through their understanding of being human and caring. This study also creates the connection between ubuntu and social

  18. The Vanguard of Community-based Integrated Care in Japan: The Effect of a Rural Town on National Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hatano

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Japan has the largest percentage of elderly people in the world. In 2012 the government implemented a community-based integrated care system which provides seamless community healthcare resources for elderly people with chronic diseases and disabilities.  Methods: This paper describes the challenges of establishing a community-based integrated care system in 1974 in Mitsugi, a rural town of Japan. This system has influenced the government and become the model for the nationwide system.  Results: In the 1970s, Mitsugi’s aging population was growing faster than Japan’s, but elder care was fragmented among a variety of service sections. A community-based integrated care system evolved because of the small but aging population size and the initiative of some local leaders of medical care and politics. After the system took effect, the proportion of bedridden people and medical care costs for the elderly dropped in Mitsugi while it continued to rise everywhere else in Japan. Mitsugi’s community-based integrated care system is now shaping national policy.  Conclusion: Mitsugi is in the vanguard of Japan’s community-based integrated care system. The case showed the community-based integrated care system can diffuse from rural to urban areas.

  19. Pharmacist's Demand for Optimal Primary Care Service Delivery in a Community Pharmacy: The OPTiPharm Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, Mark A; Walsh, Michael; Godin, Jon; Feehan, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The US population continues to expand providing the need for primary health care services. Community pharmacies integrated with medicine may provide greater access while providing high quality care. To gauge pharmacists' demand for primary health care services delivered through community pharmacies. An online survey was administered to determine community pharmacists' preferences for varying primary care services that could be offered in the community pharmacy setting. A Discrete Choice Experiment was employed to show pharmacists competing scenarios with varied primary care service offerings in the community pharmacy setting. Attributes evaluated were operation hours, service provider, medical records, service logistics, physical examinations, point-of-care diagnostic testing, preventative care, and drug prescribing. Respondents chose the scenario most likely to induce switching employment from base pharmacy to one providing advanced services. The optimal service delivery model from 291 community pharmacists comprised: inclusion of patient prescriptions and health information into the patient's medical record; provision of point of care testing and vital sign, including blood pressure, heart rate and breathing rate, and blood sugar and cholesterol measurement; and pharmacists prescribing (under physician oversight). Pharmacists were 4 times more likely to switch employment from their current pharmacy to their choice for advanced pharmacy services. Pharmacist demand was highest among those with a PharmD, less experience, working >40 hours per week, and in rural areas. This study provides empirical support for the model of pharmacists playing a greater role in the provision of primary care health services through community pharmacy settings.

  20. Smartphone hearing screening in mHealth assisted community-based primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf Hussein, Shouneez; Wet Swanepoel, De; Biagio de Jager, Leigh; Myburgh, Hermanus C; Eikelboom, Robert H; Hugo, Jannie

    2016-10-01

    Access to ear and hearing health is a challenge in developing countries, where the burden of disabling hearing loss is greatest. This study investigated community-based identification of hearing loss using smartphone hearing screening (hearScreen™) operated by community health workers (CHWs) in terms of clinical efficacy and the reported experiences of CHWs. The study comprised two phases. During phase one, 24 CHWs performed community-based hearing screening as part of their regular home visits over 12 weeks in an underserved community, using automated test protocols employed by the hearScreen™ smartphone application, operating on low-cost smartphones with calibrated headphones. During phase two, CHWs completed a questionnaire regarding their perceptions and experiences of the community-based screening programme. Data analysis was conducted on the results of 108 children (2-15 years) and 598 adults (16-85 years). Referral rates for children and adults were 12% and 6.5% respectively. Noise exceeding permissible levels had a significant effect on screen results at 25 dB at 1 kHz (pSmartphone-based hearing screening allows CHWs to bring hearing health care to underserved communities at a primary care level. Active noise monitoring and data management features allow for quality control and remote monitoring for surveillance and follow-up. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Feeling confident in burdensome yet enriching care: Community nurses describe the care of patients with hard-to-heal wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Eskilsson

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Treating patients with hard-to-heal wounds is a complex task that requires a holistic view. Therefore this study focuses on the nurse's perspective with the aim on describing how community nurses experience the phenomenon the care of patients with hard-to-heal wounds. The method used was a reflective lifeworld approach. Seven qualitative interviews with community nurses were conducted. The findings show a tension between enriching and burdensome care. In this tension, the nurses try to find energy to reach harmony in their work through reflection, acceptance, and distance. This is further described by the constituents: “taking responsibility,” “showing respect for the whole person,” “being confident in order to offer confidence,” “seeing time and place as important.” The discussion highlights the importance for a nurse to find how to give ideal care in one's duty but not beyond it. As a consequence the concept “compliance” needs to be challenged in order to promote confidence and mutual trust between nurses and patients. Confidence can be seen as a key, both for nurses and patients, and is dependent on good inter-professional cooperation, competence, and closure.

  2. Evaluation of Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Child Care Centers within Rural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jaime S; Contreras, Dawn; Gold, Abby; Keim, Ann; Oscarson, Renee; Peters, Paula; Procter, Sandra; Remig, Valentina; Smathers, Carol; Mobley, Amy R

    2015-10-01

    Although some researchers have examined nutrition and physical activity policies within urban child care centers, little is known about the potentially unique needs of rural communities. Child care centers serving preschool children located within low-income rural communities (n = 29) from seven states (Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin) were assessed to determine current nutrition and physical activity (PA) practices and policies. As part of a large-scale childhood obesity prevention project, the Community Healthy Living Index's previously validated Early Childhood Program Assessment Tool was used to collect data. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted to identify high-priority areas. Healthy People 2020 and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' recommendations for nutrition and PA policies in child care centers were used as benchmarks. Reports of not fully implementing (nutrition-related policies or practices within rural early child care centers were identified. Centers not consistently serving a variety of fruits (48%), vegetables (45%), whole grains (41%), limiting saturated fat intake (31%), implementing healthy celebration guidelines (41%), involving children in mealtime (62%), and referring families to nutrition assistance programs (24%) were identified. More than one third of centers also had limited structured PA opportunities. Although eligible, only 48% of the centers participated in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Overall, centers lacked parental outreach, staff training, and funding/resources to support nutrition and PA. These results provide insight into where child care centers within low-income, rural communities may need assistance to help prevent childhood obesity.

  3. Variation in quality of preventive care for well adults in Indigenous community health centres in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hains Jenny

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early onset and high prevalence of chronic disease among Indigenous Australians call for action on prevention. However, there is deficiency of information on the extent to which preventive services are delivered in Indigenous communities. This study examined the variation in quality of preventive care for well adults attending Indigenous community health centres in Australia. Methods During 2005-2009, clinical audits were conducted on a random sample (stratified by age and sex of records of adults with no known chronic disease in 62 Indigenous community health centres in four Australian States/Territories (sample size 1839. Main outcome measures: i adherence to delivery of guideline-scheduled services within the previous 24 months, including basic measurements, laboratory investigations, oral health checks, and brief intervention on lifestyle modification; and ii follow-up of abnormal findings. Results Overall delivery of guideline-scheduled preventive services varied widely between health centres (range 5-74%. Documentation of abnormal blood pressure reading ([greater than or equal to]140/90 mmHg, proteinuria and abnormal blood glucose ([greater than or equal to]5.5 mmol/L was found to range between 0 and > 90% at the health centre level. A similarly wide range was found between health centres for documented follow up check/test or management plan for people documented to have an abnormal clinical finding. Health centre level characteristics explained 13-47% of variation in documented preventive care, and the remaining variation was explained by client level characteristics. Conclusions There is substantial room to improve preventive care for well adults in Indigenous primary care settings. Understanding of health centre and client level factors affecting variation in the care should assist clinicians, managers and policy makers to develop strategies to improve quality of preventive care in Indigenous communities.

  4. Use of antenatal services and delivery care in Entebbe, Uganda: a community survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muwanga Moses

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disparities in perinatal health care occur worldwide. If the UN Millennium Development Goals in maternal and child health are to be met, this needs to be addressed. This study was conducted to facilitate our understanding of the changing use of maternity care services in a semi-urban community in Entebbe Uganda and to examine the range of antenatal and delivery services received in health care facilities and at home. Methods We conducted a retrospective community survey among women using structured questionnaires to describe the use of antenatal services and delivery care. Results In total 413 women reported on their most recent pregnancy. Antenatal care attendance was high with 96% attending once, and 69% the recommended four times. Blood pressure monitoring (95% and tetanus vaccination (91% were the services most frequently reported and HIV testing (47%, haematinics (58% and presumptive treatment for malaria (66% least frequently. Hospital clinics significantly outperformed public clinics in the quality of antenatal service. A significant improvement in the reported quality of antenatal services received was observed by year (p Conclusion Although antenatal services were well utilised, the quality of services varied. Women were able and willing to travel to a facility providing a good service. Access to essential skilled birth attendants remains difficult especially for less educated, poorer women, commonly mediated by financial and transport difficulties and several simple post delivery practices were commonly neglected. These factors need to be addressed to ensure that high quality care reaches the most vulnerable women and infants.

  5. Transition from Hospital to Community Care: The Experience of Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Admi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study examines care transition experiences of cancer patients and assesses barriers to effective transitions.Methods: Participants were adult Hebrew, Arabic, or Russian speaking oncology patients and health care providers from hospital and community settings. Qualitative (n=77 and quantitative (n=422 methods such as focus groups, interviews and self-administered questionnaires were used. Qualitative analysis showed that patients faced difficulties navigating a complex and fragmented healthcare system.Results: Mechanisms to overcome barriers included informal routes such as personal relationships, coordinating roles by nurse coordinators and the patients' general practitioners (GPs. The most significant variable was GPs involvement, which affected transition process quality as rated on the CTM (p<0.001. Our findings point to the important interpersonal role of oncology nurses to coordinate and facilitate the care transition process.Conclusion: Interventions targeted towards supporting the care transition process should emphasize ongoing counseling throughout a patient’s care, during and after hospitalization.-----------------------------------------Cite this article as:  Admi H, Muller E, Shadmi E. Transition from Hospital to Community Care: The Experience of Cancer Patients. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2015; 3(4:34011.[This abstract was presented at the BIT’s 8th Annual World Cancer Congress, which was held from May 15-17, 2015 in Beijing, China.

  6. Barriers to Repatriation of Afghan Refugees (A Case Study of Afghan Community at Shah and Khusar Colony Board Area Peshawar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Alam

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to explore the barriers to the repatriation of Afghan refugees. The data were collected from board area Peshawar from 76 respondents selected through simple random sampling technique and were interviewed. The study shows that Afghan refugees migrated to Pakistan mainly due to Soviet invasion in Afghanistan in year 1979. Despite having stay of almost three decades in Pakistan they have to repatriate to Afghanistan, but a large majority of the respondents had no intentions to repatriate while small number of respondents reported intention to repatriate mainly due to strict policies of Pakistan government. Those had no intention pointed out the political reasons such as lack of peace and stability in Afghanistan and bad law and order situation, they had no property/ land in Afghanistan, supplemented by lack of job opportunities while they have livelihood sources and better socioeconomic conditions in Pakistan. Socially in Afghanistan a new culture has been developed mostly favoring those like war. Social services are completely destroyed and many refugees called the new culture as alien for them especially to the new generation of Afghan refugees who have been grown in Pakistan. Many of them especially women and children enjoyed a life style that did not exist even before 1979 in Afghanistan. Refugees consider themselves more the part of Pakistani culture and hesitate to go back home. The overall impact shows that those people who had intention to repatriate mainly due to the use of force by government, destruction of houses and shops in camps. Study recommends that the repatriation process can be enhanced if peace and stability in Afghanistan is improved along with the availability of social services and job opportunities.

  7. Suffering caused by care—elderly patients’ experiences in community care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Svanström

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Growing old involves many changes in life and implies an increased risks of illness and different forms of disabilities. Life may change in a radical way when a person gets a disease like dementia or moves to a nursing home due to disabilities or needs. In both cases, it often leads to an increased dependency on care where the patient becomes exposed and vulnerable and thereby at a higher risk for experiencing different forms of suffering. Aim: The aim of this study was to elucidate and gain a deeper understanding of elderly patients’ experiences of suffering in relation to community care in nursing homes and home care services. Materials and methods: A lifeworld hermeneutical approach was used. Phenomenological interviews and conversations with an open approach were conducted and analysed with a focus on meanings. Findings: The findings were presented in four main themes; an absence of the other in care, an absence of dialogues, a sense of alienation and a sense of insecurity. The findings in this study revealed that persons who were cared for in nursing homes and home care services sometimes were exposed to an unnecessary suffering. The suffering sometimes was caused by various caring actions, that is, unnecessary suffering. The suffering caused by care that aroused was due to caregiver's inability to be present, to show their face, and truly meet the patient. Conclusion: Suffering from care increased the elderly patients’ feelings of insecurity, loneliness, and alienation; this seemed to be the foundation for patients’ experiences of being outside a human community. There was a lack of knowledge and understanding about the patient's lifeworld.

  8. Guidelines for a palliative approach for aged care in the community setting: a suite of resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Currow

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn Australia, many people ageing in their own homes are becoming increasingly frail and unwell, approaching the end of life. A palliative approach, which adheres to palliative care principles, is often appropriate. These principles provide a framework for proactive and holistic care in which quality of life and of dying is prioritised, as is support for families. A palliative approach can be delivered by the general practitioner working with the community aged care team, in collaboration with family carers. Support from specialist palliative care services is available if necessary. The Guidelines for a Palliative Approach for Aged Care in the Community Setting were published by the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing to inform practice in this area. There are three resource documents. The main document provides practical evidence based guidelines, good practice points, tools, and links to resources. This document is written for general practitioners, nurses, social workers, therapists, pastoral care workers, and other health professionals and responded to needs identified during national consultation. Evidence based guidelines were underpinned by systematic reviews of the research literature. Good practice points were developed from literature reviews and expert opinion. Two ‘plain English’ booklets were developed in a process involving consumer consultation; one is for older people and their families, the other for care workers. The resources are intended to facilitate home care that acknowledges and plans for the client’s deteriorating functional trajectory and inevitable death. At a time when hospitals and residential aged care facilities are under enormous pressure as the population ages, such a planned approach makes sense for the health system as a whole. The approach also makes sense for older people who wish to die in their own homes. Family needs are recognised and addressed. Unnecessary hospitalisations

  9. Charity and community: the role of nonprofit ownership in a managed health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, M; Gray, B; Bradley, E

    1996-01-01

    As American medicine has been transformed by the growth of managed care, so too have questions about the appropriate role of nonprofit ownership in the health care system. The standards for community benefit that are increasingly applied to nonprofit hospitals are, at best, only partially relevant to expectations for nonprofit managed care plans. Can we expect nonprofit ownership to substantially affect the behavior of an increasingly competitive managed care industry dealing with insured populations? Drawing from historical interpretations of tax exemption in health care and from the theoretical literature on the implications of ownership for organizational behavior, we identify five forms of community benefit that might be associated with nonprofit forms of managed care. Using data from a national survey of firms providing third-party utilization review services in 1993, we test for ownership-related differences in these five dimensions. Nonprofit utilization review firms generally provide more public goods, such as information dissemination, and are more "community oriented" than proprietary firms, but they are not distinguishable from their for-profit counterparts in addressing the implications of medical quality or the cost of the review process. However, a subgroup of nonprofit review organizations with medical origins are more likely to address quality issues than are either for-profit firms or other nonprofit agencies. Evidence on responses to information asymmetries is mixed but suggests that some ownership related differences exist. The term "charitable" is thus capable of a definition far broader than merely the relief of the poor. While it is true that in the past Congress and the federal courts have conditioned the hospital's charitable status on the level of free or below cost care that it provided for indigents, there is no authority for the conclusion that the determination of "charitable" status was always so limited. Such an inflexible

  10. Urban Poor community Access to reproductive Health care in Surabaya. An Equity Analysis Using Spider Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernawaty Ernawaty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available background:Poverty in urban area triggered new problem related with their access to health care services. Heavy burden of life in urban makes health, especially reproductive health, never become first priority for urban poor community. This study is aimed to analyzed equity of urban poor community when accessing the reproductive health care. Methods:This is descriptive study with cross sectional design applied. There were 78 women residents of Penjaringansari II Flats in Surabaya selected by simple random sampling (α=10% as respondents. Penjaringansari II Flats was choosen because it is a slum area that residence by unskilled labours and odd employees. The need fulfillment of respondents in reproductive health care was analyzed by spider web analysis. result: Most of respondents (55.1% were first married before 20 years old. There were 60.5% of them gave birth before 20 years old also, so it belongs to high risk pregnant women. Spider web area for health care of under age married was less than ideal age married which means that under age married urban poor experienced inequity for ANC health services. Approximately 10.3% of respondents had never use contraceptives because they fear of side effects and inhibiton of their husband. conclutions:Better equity shown in the prevention of cervical cancer. Being perceived as the poor who need assistance, free pap smear was often held by Penjaringansari II residents. Poor conditions experienced by a group not only can promote health care inequity, but also promote health care equity. recomendation:Health care equity for urban poor can be pursued through both aid schemes provided by the community or the government.

  11. Newborn Care Training and Perinatal Mortality in Communities in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Waldemar A.; Goudar, Shivaprasad S.; Jehan, Imtiaz; Chomba, Elwyn; Tshefu, Antoinette; Garces, Ana; Parida, Sailajanandan; Althabe, Fernando; McClure, Elizabeth M.; Derman, Richard J.; Goldenberg, Robert L.; Bose, Carl; Krebs, Nancy F.; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Buekens, Pierre; Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Hartwell, Tyler D.; Wright, Linda L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ninety-eight percent of the 3.7 million neonatal deaths and 3.3 million stillbirths per year occur in developing countries, and evaluation of community-based interventions is needed. Methods Using a train-the-trainer model, local instructors trained birth attendants from rural communities in six countries (Argentina, Democratic Republic of Congo, Guatemala, India, Pakistan, and Zambia) in the World Health Organization Essential Newborn Care course (routine neonatal care, resuscitation, thermoregulation, breastfeeding, kangaroo care, care of the small baby, and common illnesses), and in a modified version of the American Academy of Pediatrics Neonatal Resuscitation Program (in depth basic resuscitation), except in Argentina. The Essential Newborn Care intervention was assessed with a before and after design (N=57, 643). The Neonatal Resuscitation Program intervention was assessed as a cluster randomized controlled trial (N=62,366). The primary outcome was 7-day neonatal mortality. Results The 7-day follow-up rate was 99.2%. Following Essential Newborn Care training, there was no significant reduction from baseline in all-cause 7-day neonatal (RR 0.99; CI 0.81, 1.22) or perinatal mortality; there was a significant reduction in the stillbirth rate (RR 0.69; CI 0.54, 0.88; p<0.01). Seven-day neonatal mortality, stillbirth, and perinatal mortality were not reduced in clusters randomized to Neonatal Resuscitation Program training as compared with control clusters. Conclusions Seven-day neonatal mortality did not decrease following the introduction of Essential Newborn Care training of community-based birth attendants, although the rate of stillbirths was reduced following this intervention. Subsequent training in the Neonatal Resuscitation Program did not significantly reduce the mortality rates. (clinicaltrials.gov number, NCT00136708). PMID:20164485

  12. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>2011-2015 The World Journal of Diabetes Editorial Board now consists of 710 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in diabetes mellitus.They are from 56 countries,including Argentina(2),Australia(27),Austria(11),

  13. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    2009-2013 The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 529 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology. They are from 40 countries, including Argentina (1), Australia (7),

  14. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    2009-2013 The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 529 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology.They are from 40 countries,including Argentina(1),Australia(7),

  15. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2009-2013 The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 523 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology.They are from 40 countries,including Argentina(1),Australia(7),

  16. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    2009-2013The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 529 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology. They are from 40 countries, including Argentina (1), Australia (7),

  17. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    2011-2015 The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics Editorial Board consists of 411 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in surgery research. They are from 47 countries, including Argentina (3),

  18. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    2011-2015 The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics Editorial Board consists of 411 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in surgery research.They are from 47 countries,including Argentina(3),

  19. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    2009-2013 The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 529 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology.They are from 40 countries,including Argentina(1),Australia(7),

  20. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2010-2013 The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics Editorial Board consists of 188 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in gastrointestinal pharmacology and therapeutics research.They are from 36 countries,

  1. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    2010-2013 The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics Editorial Board consists of 188 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in gastrointestinal pharmacology and therapeutics research. They are from

  2. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    2010-2013 The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics Editorial Board consists of 188 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in gastrointestinal pharmacology and therapeutics research.They are from 36 countries,

  3. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010-2013 The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics Editorial Board consists of 188 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in pharmacology and therapeutics research. They are from 36 countries, including Australia (6), Austria (2),

  4. Recent developments in community mental health: Relevance and relationship with the mental health care bill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Chadda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Community mental health refers to the treatment of persons with mental disorders in the community. In the earlier periods, treatment of patients with mental illness was limited to the mental hospitals or asylums. This paper traces the beginnings of community psychiatry in India from the time Dr. Vidya Sagar initiated his famous experiment of treating patients with mental illnesses along with family members in tents outside the mental hospital, Amritsar. It then discusses the role of the National Mental Health Program and the District Mental Health Program. The role of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability in leading onto the development of the current Mental Health Care Bill, 2013 is discussed. Authors critically evaluate some of the merits and drawbacks of the Bill as related to recent developments in community mental health in India.

  5. Specialized dermatological care for marginalized populations and education at the primary care level: is community dermatology a feasible proposal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Roberto; Chavez-Lopez, Guadalupe; Estrada-Chavez, Guadalupe; Paredes-Solis, Sergio

    2012-11-01

    Skin diseases have a very high frequency either in developed as well as in undeveloped countries. Guerrero, Chiapas, and Oaxaca are the most impoverished states in Mexico, where 24% of the population lacks basic health care, and only 15% are estimated to have access to specialists. Community Dermatology program was founded in 1991 with the intention of improving the dermatological health of remote, marginalized inhabitants of the state of Guerrero. The program consists of a two-day visit to a pre-selected community; the first day includes a basic dermatology training course for local providers, and day 2 is a "Jornada",which means a day of free medical consultation and treatment. Pityriasis albus Cloasma, vitiligo, and acne continue to be the most frequent diagnosed primary disorders, as in rural areas occupational obligations include prolonged sun exposure. The experience and success of Community Dermatology over the last 20 years has demonstrated that this model of healthcare delivery and instruction is economically feasible, provides practical and quantifiable benefits for the communities served, and could be emulated by other disciplines within medicine.

  6. Piloting the role of a pharmacist in a community palliative care multidisciplinary team: an Australian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Box Margaret

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the home is the most common setting for the provision of palliative care in Australia, a common problem encountered here is the inability of patient/carers to manage medications, which can lead to misadventure and hospitalisation. This can be averted through detection and resolution of drug related problems (DRPs by a pharmacist; however, they are rarely included as members of the palliative care team. The aim of this study was to pilot a model of care that supports the role of a pharmacist in a community palliative care team. A component of the study was to develop a cost-effective model for continuing the inclusion of a pharmacist within a community palliative care service. Methods The study was undertaken (February March 2009-June 2010 in three phases. Development (Phase 1 involved a literature review; scoping the pharmacist's role; creating tools for recording DRPs and interventions, a communication and education strategy, a care pathway and evidence based patient information. These were then implemented in Phase 2. Evaluation (Phase 3 of the impact of the pharmacist's role from the perspectives of team members was undertaken using an online survey and focus group. Impact on clinical outcomes was determined by the number of patients screened to assess their risk of medication misadventure, as well as the number of medication reviews and interventions performed to resolve DRPs. Results The pharmacist screened most patients (88.4%, 373/422 referred to the palliative care service to assess their risk of medication misadventure, and undertook 52 home visits. Medication reviews were commonly conducted at the majority of home visits (88%, 46/52, and a variety of DRPs (113 were detected at this point, the most common being "patient requests drug information" (25%, 28/113 and "condition not adequately treated" (22%, 25/113. The pharmacist made 120 recommendations in relation to her interventions. Fifty percent of online

  7. Pharmaceutical care of older people: what do older people want from community pharmacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kathryn; Gibson, Fiona; Radley, Andrew; Williams, Brian

    2015-04-01

    To explore older people's opinions of current community pharmacy provision and identify potential areas for improvement. A pilot focus group was conducted to finalise the topic areas for discussion. Three focus groups and three small group interviews were held with a total of 25 people aged over 65 years. A purposive sampling approach was used to maximise variation in likely responses. All focus group discussions were transcribed and analysed for emerging themes. Data collection continued until saturation was reached. Finally, the themes were taken to a further five community groups to discuss and confirm the findings. Two main interlinked themes emerged around 'personal and relational factors' and 'service factors'. The participants valued continuity of personalised pharmaceutical care and described receiving this care in small community pharmacies. The ability to build a trusting relationship over time was important to the people in this study. There was a lack of awareness of services already available from community pharmacies. Ongoing disruption in the supply of medicines caused problems for this client group, and the complexity of prescription ordering, collection and delivery systems presented challenges for participants. Good communication from the community pharmacy helped to improve the experience. This study contributes some qualitative data on the opinions of older people about community pharmacies. There may be planning implications for the size of future community pharmacies and the range of services provided. Community pharmacies may need to take a more proactive role in promoting innovative services to older people who may benefit from these services. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  8. Neonatal care practices in a tribal community of Odisha, India: a cultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Sanghamitra; Chauhan, Abhimanyu S; Panda, Madhusmita; Swain, Subhashish; Hussain, Mohammad A

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal care practices have been shown to vary across tribal communities. This cross-sectional study was conducted in tribal block in Nabarangpur district of Odisha, India, to measure perinatal and antenatal practices by qualitative inquiries of 55 mothers who had babies aged traditional birth attendants. Reasons for home deliveries were cited as easy availability of traditional birth attendants and family preferences. Application of indigenously made substances on umbilical stump and skin of the baby, bathing baby immediately after birth, late initiation of breast-feeding and 'Budu practices' were common. Cultural issues, decision of family members and traditional beliefs still play a crucial role in shaping neonatal care practice in tribal communities. Awareness on child care, ethnographic understanding of health-seeking behavior of tribal community and mobilization of community by health workers can be useful in improving health status of mothers and newborn babies in tribal population. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Participation in Training for Depression Care Quality Improvement: A Randomized Trial of Community Engagement or Technical Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bowen; Ngo, Victoria K; Ong, Michael K; Pulido, Esmeralda; Jones, Felica; Gilmore, James; Stoker-Mtume, Norma; Johnson, Megan; Tang, Lingqi; Wells, Kenneth Brooks; Sherbourne, Cathy; Miranda, Jeanne

    2015-08-01

    Community engagement and planning (CEP) could improve dissemination of depression care quality improvement in underresourced communities, but whether its effects on provider training participation differ from those of standard technical assistance, or resources for services (RS), is unknown. This study compared program- and staff-level participation in depression care quality improvement training among programs enrolled in CEP, which trained networks of health care and social-community agencies jointly, and RS, which provided technical support to individual programs. Matched programs from health care and social-community service sectors in two communities were randomly assigned to RS or CEP. Data were from 1,622 eligible staff members from 95 enrolled programs. Primary outcomes were any staff trained (for programs) and total hours of training (for staff). Secondary staff-level outcomes were hours of training in specific depression collaborative care components. CEP programs were more likely than RS programs to participate in any training (p=.006). Within health care sectors, CEP programs were more likely than RS programs to participate in training (p=.016), but within social-community sectors, there was no difference in training by intervention. Among staff who participated in training, mean training hours were greater among CEP programs versus RS programs for any type of training (ptraining related to each component of depression care (pstaff participation in depression care improvement efforts in underresourced communities.

  10. Cincinnati Beacon Community Program highlights challenges and opportunities on the path to care transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Gerry; Trudnak, Tara; Christopher, Ronda; Mansour, Mona; Mandel, Keith

    2014-05-01

    The Cincinnati, Ohio, metropolitan area was one of seventeen US communities to participate in the federal Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program to demonstrate how health information technology (IT) could be used to improve health care. Given $13.7 million to spend in thirty-one months, the Cincinnati project involved hundreds of physicians, eighty-seven primary care practices, eighteen major hospital partners, and seven federally qualified health centers and community health centers. The thrust of the program was to build a shared health IT infrastructure to support quality improvement through data exchange, registries, and alerts that notified primary care practices when a patient visited an emergency department or was admitted to a hospital. A special focus of this program was on applying these tools to adult patients with diabetes and pediatric patients with asthma. Despite some setbacks and delays, the basic technology infrastructure was built, the alert system was implemented, nineteen practices focusing on diabetes improvement were recognized as patient-centered medical homes, and many participants agreed that the program had helped transform care. However, the experience also demonstrated that the ability to transfer data was limited in electronic health record systems; that considerable effort was required to adapt technology to support quality improvement; and that the ambitious agenda required more time for planning, training, and implementation than originally thought.

  11. Chronicity of Voice-Related Health Care Utilization in the General Medicine Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Seth M; Lee, Hui-Jie; Roy, Nelson; Misono, Stephanie

    2017-04-01

    Objectives To examine voice-related health care utilization of patients in the general medical community without otolaryngology evaluation and explore factors associated with prolonged voice-related health care. Study Design Retrospective cohort analysis. Setting Large, national administrative US claims database. Subjects and Methods Patients with voice disorders per International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification ( ICD-9-CM) codes from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2012, seen by a general medical physician, and who did not see an otolaryngologist in the subsequent year were included. Voice-related health care utilization, patient demographics, comorbid conditions, and index laryngeal diagnosis were collected. Logistic regression with variable selection was performed to evaluate the association between predictors and ≥30 days of voice-related health care use. Results In total, 46,205 unique voice-disordered patients met inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 8.5%, 10.0%, and 12.5% had voice-related health care use of ≥90, ≥60, and ≥30 days, respectively. Of the ≥30-day subset, 80.3% and 68.5%, respectively, had ≥60 and ≥90 days of voice-related health care utilization. The ≥30-day subset had more general medicine and nonotolaryngology specialty physician visits, more prescriptions and procedures, and 4 times the voice-related health care costs compared with those in the <30-day subset. Age, sex, employment status, initial voice disorder diagnosis, and comorbid conditions were related to ≥30 days of voice-related health care utilization. Conclusions Thirty days of nonotolaryngology-based care for a voice disorder may represent a threshold beyond which patients are more likely to experience prolonged voice-related health care utilization. Specific factors were associated with extended voice-related health care.

  12. European long-term care programs: lessons for community living assistance services and supports?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadash, Pamela; Doty, Pamela; Mahoney, Kevin J; Von Schwanenflugel, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    To uncover lessons from abroad for Community Living Assistance Services and Supports (CLASS), a federally run voluntary public long-term care (LTC) insurance program created under the Accountable Care Act of 2010. Program administrators and policy researchers from Austria, England, France, Germany, and the Netherlands. Qualitative methods focused on key parameters of cash for care: how programs set benefit levels; project expenditures; control administrative costs; regulate the use of benefits; and protect workers. Structured discussions were conducted during an international conference of LTC experts, followed by personal meetings and individual correspondence. Germany's self-financing mandate and tight targeting of benefits have resulted in a solvent program with low premiums. Black markets for care are likely in the absence of regulation; France addresses this via a unique system ensuing legal payment of workers. Programs in the five countries studied have lessons, both positive and negative, relevant to CLASS design. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  13. Community oriented primary care in Tshwane District, South Africa: Assessing the first phase of implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Friedemann Kinkel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Re-engineering primary health care is a cornerstone of the health sector reforminitiated nationally in South Africa in 2009. Using the concept of ward based NGO-run healthposts, Tshwane District, Gauteng, began implementing community oriented primary care (COPC through ward based outreach teams (WBOT in seven wards during 2011.Objectives: This study sought to gain insight into how primary health care providers understood and perceived the first phase of implementing COPC in the Tshwane district.Method: Qualitative research was performed through focus group interviews with staff of the seven health posts during September 2011 and October 2011. It explored primary health careproviders’ understanding, perception and experience of COPC.Results: Participants raised organisational, workplace and community relationship issues in the discussions. Organisationally, these related to the process of initiating and setting up COPC and the relationship between governmental and nongovernmental organisations. Issues that arose around the workplace related to the job situation and employment status and remuneration of health post staff. Community related issues centred on the role and relationship between service providers and their communities.Conclusion: COPC touched a responsive nerve in the health care system, both nationallyand locally. It was seen as an effective way to respond to South Africa’s crisis of health care. Initiating the reform was inevitably a complex process. In this initial phase of implementing COPC the political commitment of governmental and nongovernmental organisations was evident. What still had to be worked through was how the collaboration would materialise in practice on the ground.

  14. EFFECT OF INDIVIDUAL AND COMMUNITY FACTORS ON MATERNAL HEALTH CARE SERVICE USE IN INDIA: A MULTILEVEL APPROACH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Awdhesh; Kesarwani, Ranjana

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess empirically the influence of individual and community (neighbourhood) factors on the use of maternal health care services in India through three outcomes: utilization of full antenatal care (ANC) services, safe delivery and utilization of postnatal care services. Data were from the third round of the National Family Health Survey (2005-06). The study sample constituted ever-married women aged 15-49 from 29 Indian states. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was performed for the three outcomes of interest accounting for individual- and community-level factors associated with the use of maternal health care services. A substantial amount of variation was observed at the community level. About 45%, 51% and 62% of the total variance in the use of full ANC, safe delivery and postnatal care, respectively, could be attributed to differences across the community. There was significant variation in the use of maternal health care services at the individual level, with socioeconomic status and mother's education being the most prominent factors associated with the use of maternal health care services. At the community level, urban residence and poverty concentration were found to be significantly associated with maternal health care service use. The results suggest that an increased focus on community-level interventions could lead to an increase in the utilization of maternal health care services in India.

  15. Attitude about mental illness of health care providers and community leaders in rural Haryana, North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshal Ramesh Salve

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attitude about mental illness determines health seeking of the people. Success of National Mental Health Programme (NMHP is dependent on attitude about mental illness of various stakeholders in the programme. Material & Methods: A community based cross-sectional study was carried out in Ballabgarh block of Faridabad district in Haryana. We aimed to study attitude about mental illness of various stakeholders of health care providers (HCP, community leaders in rural area of Haryana, north India. Study area consisting of five Primary Health Centers (PHCs serving 2,12,000 rural population. All HCP working at PHCs, Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA and community leaders in study area were approached for participation. Hindi version of Opinion about Mental illness Scale for Chinese Community (OMICC was used to study attitude. Results: In total, 467 participants were participated in the study. Of which, HCP, ASHAs and community leaders were 81 (17.4%, 145 (31.0% and 241 (51.6% respectively. Community members reported socially restrictive, pessimistic and stereotyping attitude towards mentally ill person. ASHA and HCP reported stereotyping attitude about person with mental illness. None of the stakeholders reported stigmatizing attitude. Conclusion: Training programme focusing on spectrum of mental illness for HCP and ASHA working in rural area under NMHP programme is needed. Awareness generation of community leaders about bio-medical concept of mental illness is cornerstone of NMHP success in India.

  16. Community-based care for the management of type 2 diabetes: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In June 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began work on the Diabetes Strategy Evidence Project, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding strategies for successful management and treatment of diabetes. This project came about when the Health System Strategy Division at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care subsequently asked the secretariat to provide an evidentiary platform for the Ministry's newly released Diabetes Strategy.After an initial review of the strategy and consultation with experts, the secretariat identified five key areas in which evidence was needed. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these five areas: insulin pumps, behavioural interventions, bariatric surgery, home telemonitoring, and community based care. For each area, an economic analysis was completed where appropriate and is described in a separate report.To review these titles within the Diabetes Strategy Evidence series, please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/mas_about.html,DIABETES STRATEGY EVIDENCE PLATFORM: Summary of Evidence-Based AnalysesContinuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Pumps for Type 1 and Type 2 Adult Diabetics: An Evidence-Based AnalysisBehavioural Interventions for Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based AnalysisBARIATRIC SURGERY FOR PEOPLE WITH DIABETES AND MORBID OBESITY: An Evidence-Based SummaryCommunity-Based Care for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based AnalysisHome Telemonitoring for Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based AnalysisApplication of the Ontario Diabetes Economic Model (ODEM) to Determine the Cost-effectiveness and Budget Impact of Selected Type 2 Diabetes Interventions in Ontario The objective of this report is to determine the efficacy of specialized multidisciplinary community care for the management of type 2 diabetes compared to usual care. TARGET POPULATION AND CONDITION Diabetes (i.e. diabetes mellitus) is a highly prevalent

  17. Improving Integrated Care: Modelling the performance of an online community of practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Díaz-Chao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This article aims to confirm the following core hypothesis: a Community of Practice’s use of a Web 2.0 platform for communication between primary and hospital care leads to improved primary care and fewer hospital referrals. This core hypothesis will be corroborated by testing a further five partial hypotheses that complete the main hypothesis being estimated.Methods: An ad-hoc questionnaire was designed and sent to a sample group of 357 professionals from the Badalona-Sant Adrià de Besòs Primary Care Service in Catalonia, Spain, which includes nine primary care centres and three specialist care centres. The study sample was formed by 159 respondents. The partial least squares methodology was used to estimate the model of the causal relationship and the proposed hypotheses.Results: It was found that when healthcare staff used social networks and information and communication technologies professionally, and the more contact hours they have with patients, the more a Web 2.0 platform was likely to be used for communication between primary and hospital care professionals. Such use led to improved primary care and fewer hospital referrals according to the opinions of health professionals on its use.Conclusions: The research suggests that the efficiency of medical practice is explained by the intensity of Web 2.0 platform use for communication between primary and specialist care professionals. Public policies promoting the use of information and communication technologies in communities of practice should go beyond the technological dimension and consider other professional, organisational and social determinants.

  18. Quality indicators for pharmaceutical care: a comprehensive set with national scores for Dutch community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, Martina; Schoenmakers, Tim; Kylstra, Nico; Mosk, Berend; Bouvy, Marcel L; van de Vaart, Frans; De Smet, Peter A G M; Wensing, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Background The quality of pharmaceutical care in community pharmacies in the Netherlands has been assessed annually since 2008. The initial set has been further developed with pharmacists and patient organizations, the healthcare inspectorate, the government and health insurance companies. The set over 2012 was the first set of quality indicators for community pharmacies which was validated and supported by all major stakeholders. The aims of this study were to describe the validated set of quality indicators for community pharmacies and to report their scores over 2012. In subanalyses the score development over 5 years was described for those indicators, that have been surveyed before and remained unchanged. Methods Community pharmacists in the Netherlands were invited in 2013 to provide information for the set of 2012. Quality indicators were mapped by categories relevant for pharmaceutical care and defined for structures, processes and dispensing outcomes. Scores for categorically-measured quality indicators were presented as the percentage of pharmacies reporting the presence of a quality aspect. For numerical quality indicators, the mean of all reported scores was expressed. In subanalyses for those indicators that had been questioned previously, scores were collected from earlier measurements for pharmacies providing their scores in 2012. Multilevel analysis was used to assess the consistency of scores within one pharmacy over time by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Results For the set in 2012, 1739 Dutch community pharmacies (88 % of the total) provided information for 66 quality indicators in 10 categories. Indicator scores on the presence of quality structures showed relatively high quality levels. Scores for processes and dispensing outcomes were lower. Subanalyses showed that overall indicators scores improved within pharmacies, but this development differed between pharmacies. Conclusions A set of validated quality indicators provided

  19. Using telehealth to support end of life care in the community: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieman, Jennifer J; Swetenham, Kate; Morgan, Deidre D; To, Timothy H; Currow, David C

    2016-11-17

    Telehealth is being used increasingly in providing care to patients in the community setting. Telehealth enhanced service delivery could offer new ways of managing load and care prioritisation for palliative care patients living in the community. The study assesses the feasibility of a telehealth-based model of service provision for community based palliative care patients, carers and clinicians. This study was a prospective cohort study of a telehealth-based intervention for community based patients of a specialist palliative care service living in Southern Adelaide, South Australia. Participants were 43 community living patients enrolled in the Southern Adelaide Palliative Service. To be eligible patients needed to be over 18 years and have an Australian modified Karnofksy Performance Score > 40. Exclusion criteria included a demonstrated inability to manage the hardware or technology (unless living with a carer who could manage the technology) or non-English speaking without a suitable carer/proxy. Participants received video-based conferences between service staff and the patient/carer; virtual case conferences with the patient/carer, service staff and patient's general practitioner (GP); self-report assessment tools for patient and carer; and remote activity monitoring (ACTRN12613000733774). The average age of patients was 71.6 years (range: 49 to 91 years). All 43 patients managed to enter data using the telehealth system. Self-reported data entered by patients and carers did identify changes in performance status leading to changes in care. Over 4000 alerts were generated. Staff reported that videocalls were similar (22.3%) or better/much better (65.2%) than phone calls and similar (63.1%) or better/much better (27.1%) than face-to-face. Issues with the volume of alerts generated, technical support required and the impact of service change were identified. The trial showed that patients and carers could manage the technology and provide data that

  20. Barriers to specialty care and specialty referral completion in the community health center setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Katharine E; Perrin, James M; Hobrecker, Karin; Donelan, Karen

    2013-02-01

    To assess the frequency of barriers to specialty care and to assess which barriers are associated with an incomplete specialty referral (not attending a specialty visit when referred by a primary care provider) among children seen in community health centers. Two months after their child's specialty referral, 341 parents completed telephone surveys assessing whether a specialty visit was completed and whether they experienced any of 10 barriers to care. Family/community barriers included difficulty leaving work, obtaining childcare, obtaining transportation, and inadequate insurance. Health care system barriers included getting appointments quickly, understanding doctors and nurses, communicating with doctors' offices, locating offices, accessing interpreters, and inconvenient office hours. We calculated barrier frequency and total barriers experienced. Using logistic regression, we assessed which barriers were associated with incomplete referral, and whether experiencing ≥ 4 barriers was associated with incomplete referral. A total of 22.9% of families experienced incomplete referral. 42.0% of families encountered 1 or more barriers. The most frequent barriers were difficulty leaving work, obtaining childcare, and obtaining transportation. On multivariate analysis, difficulty getting appointments quickly, difficulty finding doctors' offices, and inconvenient office hours were associated with incomplete referral. Families experiencing ≥ 4 barriers were more likely than those experiencing ≤ 3 barriers to have incomplete referral. Barriers to specialty care were common and associated with incomplete referral. Families experiencing many barriers had greater risk of incomplete referral. Improving family/community factors may increase satisfaction with specialty care; however, improving health system factors may be the best way to reduce incomplete referrals. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Community-based care of children with HIV in Potchefstroom, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Graan, Anneke; Van der Walt, Engela; Watson, Mada

    2007-11-01

    Children contract HIV infection largely through vertical transmission and are vulnerable to AIDS illness due to an immature immune system. In South Africa, hospitals are often overburdened and thus children with HIV may be directed to the community for care. As a result, non-professional caregivers are a predominant source of care for children living with HIV. Various authors, including the Department of Health, have stipulated the importance of establishing the knowledge and needs of non-professional caregivers of children with HIV. Our research has investigated the extent of non-professional caregivers' knowledge and needs, specifically those within the Potchefstroom district of the North-West Province. The objectives included formulating guidelines for a training programme that can enhance relevant knowledge and skills among these caregivers. Quantitative data were gathered using a questionnaire, which was developed following a literature study. The 109 non-professional caregivers who responded to the questionnaire displayed some knowledge and skills concerning specifically the care of children with HIV or AIDS, although gaps existed concerning their knowledge of community-based referral, caring needs specific to children, and precautionary measures to prevent HIV transmission. Recommendations are made with specific reference to a training programme. We surmise that non-professional caregivers play a pivotal role in the care of children with HIV in the Potchefstroom district - a service that is sometimes rendered in perilous conditions. This study improves our understanding of the support and training needed for non-professional caregivers in their pursuit to care for children with HIV in resource-limited communities, and thus it contributes to the field of nursing science. The findings may generate ideas for future research on this important topic.

  2. Developing a rural transitional care community case management program using clinical nurse specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kathleen M; Black, Denice; Hammond, Sheri

    2014-01-01

    This quality improvement project developed a community nursing case management program to decrease preventable readmissions to the hospital and emergency department by providing telephonic case management and, if needed, onsite assessment and treatment by a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) with prescriptive authority. As more people reach Medicare age, the number of individuals with worsening chronic diseases with dramatically increases unless appropriate disease management programs are developed. Care transitions can result in breakdown in continuity of care, resulting in increased preventable readmissions, particularly for indigent patients. The CNS is uniquely educated to managing care transitions and coordination of community resources to prevent readmissions. After a thorough SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis, we developed and implemented a cost-avoidance model to prevent readmissions in our uninsured and underinsured patients. The project CNS used a wide array of interventions to decrease readmissions. In the last 2 years, there have been a total of 22 less than 30-day readmissions to the emergency department or hospital in 13 patients, a significant decrease from readmissions in these patients prior to the program. Three of them required transfer to a larger hospital for a higher level of care. Using advanced practice nurses in transitional care can prevent readmissions, resulting in cost avoidance. The coordination of community resources during transition from hospital to home is a job best suited to CNSs, because they are educated to work within organizations/systems. The money we saved with this project more than justified the cost of hiring a CNS to lead it. More research is needed into this technology. Guidelines for this intervention need to be developed. Replicating our cost-avoidance transitional care model can help other facilities limit that loss.

  3. Psychiatric expansionism and social control: the intersectioin of community care and state policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schissel, B

    1997-12-01

    Informed by the theories of political economy and professional interests, this research argues that psychiatric commitments to community care and to scientific categorization have contributed to expanding control of the mentally ill, and that these ideological commitments run parallel to and are exacerbated by state responses to macro-economic conditions. Time series analysis of the period from 1932 to 1975 is used to assess the relative impact of deinstitutionalization, medical entrenchment, and state fiscal policy on psychiatric expansionism. The findings demonstrate that a professional interests explanation (indicated by a commitment to community and to science) provides a significant contribution to a materialist-based explanation of expanding psychiatric control.

  4. Sociodemographic Correlates of Choice of Health Care Services in Six Rural Communities in North Central Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyemocho Audu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Household expenditure on health has increasingly remained a major source of health care financing in Nigeria despite the introduction of several social health scheme policies provided by the government for meeting the health care costs of patients. Recognizing these limitations, this study assessed the type of health care services people commonly use in various illnesses and the sociodemographic correlates of the preferred health care services by household heads in six rural communities of North Central Nigeria. A cross-sectional community-based descriptive study design was used to study 154 household heads in the settlements using a multistage sampling method. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to investigate independent predictors that had significant chi-square at P<0.05. The leading causes of illness experienced by respondents were medical conditions (42.0% and 41.7% of them sought treatment from patent medicine vendors. The dominant reasons for health-seeking preferences were financial access (53.7% and proximity (48.6%. Age had a higher impact (Beta = 0.892 on the health-seeking preferences of the respondents as compared to their occupation and religion (Beta = 0.368 and −0.746, resp.. Therefore, in order to meet the health care of patients, it is pertinent that the unmet needs of patients are properly addressed by appropriate agencies.

  5. How to care for a patient after death in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, Kathleen; Johnson, Paula

    2016-05-11

    Rationale and key points This article provides nurses with information about how to care for a patient after death, and support their family and loved ones in the community setting. ▶ Care after death involves supporting the family and significant others, and providing personal care to the patient. ▶ It is important to ensure privacy, dignity and respect of the deceased and to recognise this is a sensitive and difficult time for families. ▶ Staff undertaking care after death should be offered support. ▶ Local and national guidelines should be followed. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice, reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How reading this article will change your practice. 2. How this article could help you to consider the support mechanisms in place for the provision of care after death in the community setting. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio .

  6. Correlate of self-care and self-neglect among community-dwelling older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardan, Homa; Hamid, TengkuAizan; Redzuan, Ma’rof; Ibrahim, Rahimah

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of self-neglect among the elderly is expected to rise with a rapid increase in the growth of the older population. However, self-neglect in the elderly and the factors related to it are not fully understood due to the limited research in the area, lack of consensus in the definition of the concept, and limited instrumentation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between selected socio-demographic factors on self-care and self-neglect among older persons living in the community. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey design with cluster sampling was adopted for the study. Data were gathered from 201 older persons aged 60 years and over in the state of Selangor, Malaysia, through face-to-face interviews in their homes with a team of trained enumerators. A new instrument was developed to measure self-neglect. Results: The internal consistency of the new instrument showed a reliability of 0.90. A significant bivariate relationship was noted between self-care and self-neglect. The socio-demographic factors were also reported between self-care and self-neglect. Conclusions: The new instrument of elder self-neglect (ESN) could be used to measure self-neglect in a community dwelling. The need to increase the self-care skills and the capacity of self-care among older adults is crucial in order to reduce self-neglect and enhance their well-being. PMID:25949256

  7. Community Health Service in Urban China: Rebuilding Health Care Systems in New Ways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵志广; 卢祖洵

    2004-01-01

    IN THE 1970s, the World Health Organization(WHO) put forward a community-oriented healthservice model based on the experience of Europeancountries such as Britain. At present, this model hasbeen adopted as the key strategy to make health ser-vices accessible, affordable and socially acceptableand is an important component of health servicesystem in many countries.1,2In the early 1950s, China set out to establish athree-level primary health care network in urban andrural areas in order to provide health care...

  8. Community Oncology Medical Homes: Physician-Driven Change to Improve Patient Care and Reduce Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Teresa M; Webster, Jennifer A; Stevens, Laura A; Li, Tao; Kaplan, Cameron M; Graetz, Ilana; McAneny, Barbara L

    2015-11-01

    Although the patient-centered medical home is a well-established model of care for primary care providers, adoption by specialty providers has been relatively limited. Recently, there has been particular interest in developing specialty medical homes in medical oncology because of practice variation, care fragmentation, and high overall costs of care. In 2012, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation awarded Innovative Oncology Business Solutions a 3-year grant for their Community Oncology Medical Home (COME HOME) program to implement specialty medical homes in seven oncology practices across the country. We report our early experience and lessons learned.Through September 30, 2014, COME HOME has touched 16,353 unique patients through triage encounters, patient education visits, or application of clinical pathways. We describe the COME HOME model and implementation timeline, profile use of key services, and report patient satisfaction. Using feedback from practice sites, we highlight patient-centered innovations and overall lessons learned.COME HOME incorporates best practices care driven by triage and clinical pathways, team-based care, active disease management, enhanced access and care, as well as financial support for the medical home infrastructure. Information technology plays a central role, supporting both delivery of care and performance monitoring. Volume of service use has grown steadily over time, leveling out in second quarter 2014. The program currently averages 1,265 triage encounters, 440 extended hours visits, and 655 patient education encounters per month.COME HOME offers a patient-centered model of care to improve quality and continuity of care. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  9. Estimation of Palliative Care Need in the Urban Community of Puducherry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daya, A Praveena; Sarkar, Sonali; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar

    2017-01-01

    Context: The coverage of palliative care services is inadequate in India. Data on number of people needing palliative care and disease conditions needing palliative care needs to be estimated prior to planning of service in any area. Aims: To estimate the prevalence of need of palliative care in an urban area of Puducherry. Settings and Design: Exploratory cross-sectional study conducted in two areas, Senthamarainagar and Thiruvalluvarnagar having about 500 households each in Muthialpet area in urban Puducherry. Materials and Methods: All residents were interviewed using a structured questionnaire containing sociodemographic details, information regarding chronic illness and a screening tool to identify people in need of palliative care. Statistical Analysis: Variables such as sociodemographic characteristics were expressed in percentages. The main outcome variable, the number of people in need of palliative care was expressed in the prevalence percentages. Results: A total of 3554 individuals were surveyed in 1004 households. A period prevalence of need of palliative care in this community was 6.1/1000 population. The prevalence among those aged ≥15 years was 8/1000 population. The mean age of people requiring palliative care was 62 years. The most common disease condition in need of palliative care was old age-related weakness (41%). Most of them were women (17/22) and from lower socioeconomic class (6/22). Conclusions: Around 6/1000 population was identified to be in need of palliative care. The prevalence was highest among the elderly women, low socioeconomic class, widowed, those with less education, and those suffering from age-related weakness. PMID:28216868

  10. Teaching Chinese health care professionals about community-based long-term care (CBLTC) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bei

    2005-01-01

    Academic exchanges between the U.S. and other countries around the world are increasing and teaching students abroad is part of this trend. China is in its initial stage of developing gerontology education and is in great need of new concepts and ideas for dealing with its rapidly aging population. This paper discusses the challenges and rewards of teaching gerontology to health care professionals in China. To achieve the desired learning outcomes in another country requires culturally appropriate course materials and teaching methods; drawing on students' knowledge and expertise by using an interactive format and gaining students' respect.

  11. The Chilcapamba-McGill Partnership: Exploring Access to Maternal and Newborn Care in Indigenous Communities of Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, Annie; Bartlett, Gillian; Morales, Juana; Evans, Andrea; Doucet, Alison; Caudarella, Alexander; Roy, Melissa; Farid, Doaa; Macaulay, Ann C

    2015-01-01

    Based on a participatory research (PR) partnership between Family Medicine at McGill University, Canada and the Andean community of Chilcapamba, Ecuador, a medical student study focused on maternal and newborn health. To evaluate the access to maternal and newborn care and the occurrence of intrafamilial violence in women with children 5 years of age or less in three indigenous communities of Ecuador. A semistructured survey explored the perinatal and intrapartum care as well as intrafamilial violence. All women (N = 30) received prenatal care, 29 received postnatal care from a physician and 77% gave birth at the hospital. Eighty percent of women experienced intrafamilial violence; 73% reported psychological and 53% physical violence. There is good access to maternal and newborn health care, although the reported level of violence is high. Results were shared with the community and will be used in a local community health worker (CHW) training program. Our project highlights the importance of PR to investigate sensitive health challenges.

  12. A qualitative study of community home-based care and antiretroviral adherence in Swaziland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Root

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antiretroviral therapy (ART has rendered HIV and AIDS a chronic condition for individuals in many parts of the world. Adherence, however, is integral to achieving chronicity. Studies have shown both relatively high ART adherence rates in sub-Saharan Africa and the importance of community home-based care (CHBC to facilitating this process. In light of diminished HIV and AIDS funding globally and increased reliance on CHBC throughout Africa, a better understanding of how CHBC may strengthen ART adherence is essential to improving patients’ quality of life, tending to the needs of care supporters and achieving healthier populations. Methods: This article reports findings from a qualitative study of a CHBC organiztion serving an estimated 2500 clients in rural Swaziland. Semi-structured questionnaires with 79 HIV-positive clients [people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA] yielded data on diverse aspects of being HIV positive, including insights on whether and how PLWHA perceived care supporters to facilitate ART adherence in a high stigma and structurally impoverished setting. Results: Ninety-two percent of participants said their health had improved since care supporters came into their lives. A major finding was that an estimated 53% of participants said they would have died, a few from suicide had the care supporter never intervened. More than one in four participants (27.9% sought HIV testing after a care supporter began visiting them. Nearly a third (31% commenced ART after and largely as a consequence of care supporter intervention. Approximately one in four (23% reported that their care supporter had helped them to disclose their HIV-positive status to family members. Twenty-seven percent said they had felt discouraged or had been discouraged from taking ART by members of their family or community. Discussion: General inductive analysis of participant reports suggested two social mechanisms of CHBC impact on ART adherence: (i

  13. How Health Care Professionals Use Social Media to Create Virtual Communities: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Kaye; Hansen, Margaret; Jackson, Debra; Elliott, Doug

    2016-06-16

    Prevailing health care structures and cultures restrict intraprofessional communication, inhibiting knowledge dissemination and impacting the translation of research into practice. Virtual communities may facilitate professional networking and knowledge sharing in and between health care disciplines. This study aimed to review the literature on the use of social media by health care professionals in developing virtual communities that facilitate professional networking, knowledge sharing, and evidence-informed practice. An integrative literature review was conducted to identify research published between 1990 and 2015. Search strategies sourced electronic databases (PubMed, CINAHL), snowball references, and tables of contents of 3 journals. Papers that evaluated social media use by health care professionals (unless within an education framework) using any research design (except for research protocols or narrative reviews) were included. Standardized data extraction and quality assessment tools were used. Overall, 72 studies were included: 44 qualitative (including 2 ethnographies, 26 qualitative descriptive, and 1 Q-sort) and 20 mixed-methods studies, and 8 literature reviews. The most common methods of data collection were Web-based observation (n=39), surveys (n=23), interviews (n=11), focus groups (n=2), and diaries (n=1). Study quality was mixed. Social media studied included Listservs (n=22), Twitter (n=18), general social media (n=17), discussion forums (n=7), Web 2.0 (n=3), virtual community of practice (n=3), wiki (n=1), and Facebook (n=1). A range of health care professionals were sampled in the studies, including physicians (n=24), nurses (n=15), allied health professionals (n=14), followed by health care professionals in general (n=8), a multidisciplinary clinical specialty area (n=9), and midwives (n=2). Of 36 virtual communities, 31 were monodiscipline for a discrete clinical specialty. Population uptake by the target group ranged from 1.6% to 29% (n

  14. Collaborative drug therapy management: case studies of three community-based models of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Margie E; Earl, Tara R; Gilchrist, Siobhan; Greenberg, Michael; Heisler, Holly; Revels, Michelle; Matson-Koffman, Dyann

    2015-03-26

    Collaborative drug therapy management agreements are a strategy for expanding the role of pharmacists in team-based care with other providers. However, these agreements have not been widely implemented. This study describes the features of existing provider-pharmacist collaborative drug therapy management practices and identifies the facilitators and barriers to implementing such services in community settings. We conducted in-depth, qualitative interviews in 2012 in a federally qualified health center, an independent pharmacy, and a retail pharmacy chain. Facilitators included 1) ensuring pharmacists were adequately trained; 2) obtaining stakeholder (eg, physician) buy-in; and 3) leveraging academic partners. Barriers included 1) lack of pharmacist compensation; 2) hesitation among providers to trust pharmacists; 3) lack of time and resources; and 4) existing informal collaborations that resulted in reduced interest in formal agreements. The models described in this study could be used to strengthen clinical-community linkages through team-based care, particularly for chronic disease prevention and management.

  15. Marketing strategy adjustments in the ambulatory care center industry: implications for community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J H

    1989-01-01

    Each stage of a product's life cycle requires marketing strategy modifications in response to changing demand levels. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in ambulatory care center (ACC) operational characteristics indicative of product, market, and distribution channel adjustments that could have a competitive impact upon community pharmacy practice. A questionnaire was mailed to a national sample of 325 ACC managers. Evidence of new product feature additions includes increased emphasis on continued care and increased prevalence of prescription drug dispensing. Expansion into new market segments and distribution channels was demonstrated by increased participation in HMO and employer relationships. The observed adjustments in ACC marketing strategies present obvious challenges as well as less obvious opportunities for community pharmacy practice.

  16. Training primary care physicians in community eye health. Experiences from India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Sanjeev

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the impact of training on primary-care physicians in community eye health through a series of workshops. 865 trainees completed three evaluation formats anonymously. The questions tested knowledge on magnitude of blindness, the most common causes of blindness, and district level functioning of the National Programme for Control of Blindness (NPCB. Knowledge of the trainers significantly improved immediately after the course (chi 2 300.16; p < 0.00001. This was independent of the timing of workshops and number of trainees per batch. Presentation, content and relevance to job responsibilities were most appreciated. There is immense value addition from training primary-care physicians in community eye health. Despite a long series of training sessions, trainer fatigue was minimal; therefore, such capsules can be replicated with great success.

  17. [Transferring palliative-care patients from hospital to community care: A qualitative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Casado, Matías; Granero-Molina, José; Hernández-Padilla, José Manuel; Fernández-Sola, Cayetano

    To know the experience of case-manager nurses with regard to transferring palliative-care patients from the hospital to their homes. Qualitative phenomenological study carried out in 2014-2015. Poniente and Almería health districts, which referral hospitals are Poniente Hospital and Torrecárdenas Hospital, respectively. A purposive sample comprised of 12 case-manager nurses was recruited from the aforementioned setting. Theoretical data saturation was achieved after performing 7 in-depth individual interviews and 1 focus group. Data analysis was performed following Colaizzi's method. Three themes emerged: (1) 'Case-management nursing as a quality, patient-centred service' (2) 'Failures of the information systems', with the subthemes "patients" insufficient and inadequate previous information" and "ineffective between-levels communication channels for advanced nursing"; (3) 'Deficiencies in discharge planning', with the subthemes "deficient management of resources on admission", "uncertainty about discharge" and "insufficient human resources to coordinate the transfer". Case-manager nurses consider themselves a good-quality service. However, they think there are issues with coordination, information and discharge planning of palliative patients from hospital. It would be useful to review the communication pathways of both care and discharge reports, so that resources needed by palliative patients are effectively managed at the point of being transferred home. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of community pharmacists in asthma – Australian research highlighting pathways for future primary care models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini B

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the most common chronic conditions affecting the Australian population. Amongst primary healthcare professionals, pharmacists are the most accessible and this places pharmacists in an excellent position to play a role in the management of asthma. Globally, trials of many community pharmacy-based asthma care models have provided evidence that pharmacist delivered interventions can improve clinical, humanistic and economic outcomes for asthma patients. In Australia, a decade of coordinated research efforts, in various aspects of asthma care, has culminated in the implementation trial of the Pharmacy Asthma Management Service (PAMS, a comprehensive disease management model. There has been research investigating asthma medication adherence through data mining, ways in which usual asthma care can be improved. Our research has focused on self-management education, inhaler technique interventions, spirometry trials, interprofessional models of care, and regional trials addressing the particular needs of rural communities. We have determined that inhaler technique education is a necessity and should be repeated if correct technique is to be maintained. We have identified this effectiveness of health promotion and health education, conducted within and outside the confines of the pharmacy, in public for a and settings such as schools, and established that this outreach role is particularly well received and increases the opportunity for people with asthma to engage in their asthma management. Our research has identified that asthma patients have needs which pharmacists delivering specialized models of care, can address. There is a lot of evidence for the effectiveness of asthma care by pharmacists, the future must involve integration of this role into primary care.

  19. Primary health care nurses implement and evaluate a community outreach approach to health care in the South African agricultural sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, J; Clarke, M; van Zyl, H; Daniels, K

    2007-12-01

    Early detection and effective case management of tuberculosis (TB) among a high-risk group of materially poor farm workers in an area of the Cape Winelands, South Africa, presents special challenges to the health community, where resource constraints lead to service reduction. In order to address this problem, local nurses established a collaborative partnership between permanent farm workers and their families, their employers, selected non-governmental organizations and the public health sector. In consultation with stakeholders, they developed an intervention primarily focusing on having peer selected trained lay health workers (LHWs) on farms, mentored and managed by nurses. To describe the complex process of implementation and evaluation of the LHW project, and provide a summary of a number of discrete studies evaluating the effectiveness, cost implications, and the perceptions and experiences of key stakeholders of the intervention. Quantitative and qualitative research methods conducted within the context of a pragmatic unblinded community cluster randomized control trial were used. Emphasis was placed on an iterative participatory interaction between the researchers and key stakeholders. The intervention contributed to significantly better successful treatment completion rates among adult new smear-positive TB cases. The process implemented proved cost-effective and was pivotal in initiating a community-based social development programme. The use of peer-selected LHWs within a wider programme of integrated care designed to merge technical biomedical approaches to disease management with more holistic social development activities, appears essential to meet the complex health needs in conjunction with public health of the rural poor.

  20. Collaborative Drug Therapy Management: Case Studies of Three Community-Based Models of Care

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, Margie E; Earl, Tara R.; Gilchrist, Siobhan; Greenberg, Michael; Heisler, Holly; Revels, Michelle; Matson-Koffman, Dyann

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative drug therapy management agreements are a strategy for expanding the role of pharmacists in team-based care with other providers. However, these agreements have not been widely implemented. This study describes the features of existing provider?pharmacist collaborative drug therapy management practices and identifies the facilitators and barriers to implementing such services in community settings. We conducted in-depth, qualitative interviews in 2012 in a federally qualified hea...

  1. Inner City Community Oriented Primary Care to Improve Medical Student Skills and Combat Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez, José E.; Fornari, Alice B.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Efforts to increase medical student knowledge regarding obesity are needed in medi­cal school curriculum. This article examines a third year medical student intervention utilizing obesity group visits. Description: In our third-year family medicine clerkship, we implemented the Health not Cosmet­ics pilot intervention as part of a Community Oriented Primary Care experience. The intervention consisted of weekly group visits run by third and fourth year medical students to teach lif...

  2. Maintaining bone health in patients with multiple myeloma: survivorship care plan of the International Myeloma Foundation Nurse Leadership Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, Teresa S; Colson, Kathleen; Faiman, Beth M; Miller, Kena; Tariman, Joseph D

    2011-08-01

    About 90% of individuals with multiple myeloma will develop osteolytic bone lesions from increased osteoclastic and decreased osteoblastic activity. Severe morbidities from pathologic fractures and other skeletal events can lead to poor circulation, blood clots, muscle wasting, compromised performance status, and overall poor survival. Supportive care targeting bone disease is an essential adjunct to antimyeloma therapy. In addition, the maintenance of bone health in patients with multiple myeloma can significantly improve quality of life. Oncology nurses and other healthcare providers play a central role in the management of bone disease and maintenance throughout the course of treatment. Safe administration of bisphosphonates, promotion of exercise, maintenance of adequate nutrition, vitamin and mineral supplementation, scheduled radiographic examinations, and monitoring of bone complications are among the important functions that oncology nurses and healthcare providers perform in clinical practice.

  3. [Structural analysis of the new model of primary care in the community of Valencia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compañ, L; Portella, E; Peiró, S

    1996-11-15

    To analyse the structure of the new model of primary care (NMPC) in the Community of Valencia, and to identify the strategic importance of its characteristic variables and the possibilities of intervention to affect these variables. A qualitative study through a method of structural analysis (crossed impact method-multiplication applied to a classification) of the relationships between 37 variables characterising the NMPC which were identified by prior qualitative research, with interpretation of the results using the Téniere-Buchot Model. Community of Valencia. The structural variables identified were those relating to the political-legal framework and to the allocation of primary care resources; and the resultant variables, those relating to efficiency and primary care quality. Between these two categories, the intervention variables covered management, NMPC professionals, health needs and the community's use of services. The structural analysis gives the legal-political and economical framework a determining role in NMPC, which can hardly be influenced from within the system. Management and organisation are identified as key variables from which an intervention can be made in the short or medium term to achieve the aims of the system.

  4. Preventive dental care among Medicaid-enrolled senior adults: from community to nursing facility residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Mary C; Caplan, Daniel J; Bern-Klug, Mercedes; Cowen, Howard J; Cunningham-Ford, Marsha A; Marchini, Leonardo; Momany, Elizabeth T

    2017-09-08

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the utilization rate of preventive oral health care services while senior adults were community-dwelling differed from the rate after those same senior adults were admitted to nursing facilities. A secondary objective was to evaluate other significant predictors of receipt of preventive oral health procedures after nursing facility entry. Iowa Medicaid claims from 2007-2014 were accessed for adults who were 68+ years upon entry to a nursing facility and continuously enrolled in Medicaid for at least three years before and at least two years after admission (n = 874). Univariate, bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted. During the five years that subjects were followed, 52.8% never received a dental exam and 75.9% never received a dental hygiene procedure. More Medicaid-enrolled senior adults received ≥1 preventive dental procedure in the two years while residing in a nursing facility compared to the three years before entry. In multivariable analyses, the strongest predictor of preventive oral health care utilization after entry was the receipt of preventive oral health services before entry (p dental procedures in the two years after nursing facility entry was the receipt of dental procedures in the three years before entry while community-dwelling. This underscores the importance of the senior adult establishing a source of dental care while community-dwelling. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  5. Primary care physicians' perspectives on facilitating older patients' access to community support services: Qualitative case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeg, Jenny; Denton, Margaret; Hutchison, Brian; McAiney, Carrie; Moore, Ainsley; Brazil, Kevin; Tindale, Joseph; Lam, Annie

    2017-01-01

    To understand how family physicians facilitate older patients' access to community support services (CSSs) and to identify similarities and differences across primary health care (PHC) models. Qualitative, multiple-case study design using semistructured interviews. Four models of PHC delivery, specifically 2 family health teams (FHTs), 4 non-FHTs family health organizations, 4 fee-for-service practices, and 2 community health centres in urban Ontario. Purposeful sampling of 23 family physicians in solo and small and large group practices within the 4 models of PHC. A multiple-case study approach was used. Semistructured interviews were conducted and data were analyzed using within- and cross-case analysis. Case study tactics to ensure study rigour included memos and an audit trail, investigator triangulation, and the use of multiple, rather than single, case studies. Three main themes were identified: consulting and communicating with the health care team to create linkages; linking patients and families to CSSs; and relying on out-of-date resources and ineffective search strategies for information on CSSs. All participants worked with their team members; however, those in FHTs and community health centres generally had a broader range of health care providers available to assist them. Physicians relied on home-care case managers to help make linkages to CSSs. Physicians recommended the development of an easily searchable, online database containing available CSSs. This study shows the importance of interprofessional teamwork in primary care settings to facilitate linkages of older patients to CSSs. The study also provides insight into the strategies physicians use to link older persons to CSSs and their recommendations for change. This understanding can be used to develop resources and approaches to better support physicians in making appropriate linkages to CSSs. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  6. Primary care physicians’ perspectives on facilitating older patients’ access to community support services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeg, Jenny; Denton, Margaret; Hutchison, Brian; McAiney, Carrie; Moore, Ainsley; Brazil, Kevin; Tindale, Joseph; Lam, Annie

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To understand how family physicians facilitate older patients’ access to community support services (CSSs) and to identify similarities and differences across primary health care (PHC) models. Design Qualitative, multiple-case study design using semistructured interviews. Setting Four models of PHC delivery, specifically 2 family health teams (FHTs), 4 non-FHTs family health organizations, 4 fee-for-service practices, and 2 community health centres in urban Ontario. Participants Purposeful sampling of 23 family physicians in solo and small and large group practices within the 4 models of PHC. Methods A multiple-case study approach was used. Semistructured interviews were conducted and data were analyzed using within- and cross-case analysis. Case study tactics to ensure study rigour included memos and an audit trail, investigator triangulation, and the use of multiple, rather than single, case studies. Main findings Three main themes were identified: consulting and communicating with the health care team to create linkages; linking patients and families to CSSs; and relying on out-of-date resources and ineffective search strategies for information on CSSs. All participants worked with their team members; however, those in FHTs and community health centres generally had a broader range of health care providers available to assist them. Physicians relied on home-care case managers to help make linkages to CSSs. Physicians recommended the development of an easily searchable, online database containing available CSSs. Conclusion This study shows the importance of interprofessional teamwork in primary care settings to facilitate linkages of older patients to CSSs. The study also provides insight into the strategies physicians use to link older persons to CSSs and their recommendations for change. This understanding can be used to develop resources and approaches to better support physicians in making appropriate linkages to CSSs. PMID:28115458

  7. Community governance in primary health care: towards an international Ideal Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meads, Geoffrey; Russell, Grant; Lees, Amanda

    2016-05-27

    Against a global background of increased resource management responsibilities for primary health care agencies, general medical practices, in particular, are increasingly being required to demonstrate the legitimacy of their decision making in market oriented environments. In this context a scoping review explores the potential utility for health managers in primary health care of community governance as a policy concept. The review of recent research suggests that applied learning from international health systems with enhanced approaches to public and patient involvement may contribute to meeting this requirement. Such approaches often characterise local health systems in Latin America and North West Europe where innovative models are beginning to respond effectively to the growing demands on general practice. The study design draws on documentary and secondary data analyses to identify common components of community governance from the countries in these regions, supplemented by other relevant international studies and sources where appropriate. Within a comprehensive framework of collaborative governance the components are aggregated in an Ideal Type format to provide a point of reference for possible adaptation and transferable learning across market oriented health systems. Each component is illustrated with international exemplars from recent organisational practices in primary health care. The application of community governance is considered for the particular contexts of GP led Clinical Commissioning Groups in England and Primary Health Networks in Australia. Some components of the Ideal Type possess potentially powerful negative as well as positive motivational effects, with PPI at practice levels sometimes hindering the development of effective local governance. This highlights the importance of careful and competent management of the growing resources attributed to primary health care agencies, which possess an increasingly diverse range of non

  8. Psychosocial care to affected citizens and communities in case of CBRN incidents: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouweloos, Juul; Dückers, Michel; te Brake, Hans; Kleber, Rolf; Drogendijk, Annelieke

    2014-11-01

    Disasters are associated with a substantial psychosocial burden for affected individuals (including first responders) and communities. Knowledge about how to address these risks and problems is valuable for societies worldwide. Decades of research into post-disaster psychosocial care has resulted in various recommendations and general guidelines. However, as CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear) events form a distinctive theme in emergency planning and disaster preparedness, it is important to systematically explore their implications for psychosocial care. The aim of this study is to answer two questions: 1). To what extent does psychosocial care in the case of CBRN events differ from other types of events? 2). How strong is the scientific evidence for the effectiveness of psychosocial care interventions in the context of a CBRN event? A systematic literature review was conducted. Searches were performed in Medline, PsychINFO, Embase and PILOTS. Studies since January 2000 were included and evaluated by independent reviewers. The 39 included studies contain recommendations, primarily based on unsystematic literature reviews, qualitative research and expert opinions. Recommendations address: 1) public risk- and crisis communication, 2) training, education and exercise of responders, 3) support, and 4) psychosocial counselling and care to citizens and responders. Although none of the studies meet the design criteria for effectiveness research, a substantial amount of consensus exists on aspects relevant to CBRN related psychosocial care. Recommendations are similar or complementary to general post-disaster psychosocial care guidelines. Notable differences are the emphasis on risk communication and specific preparation needs. Relevant recurring topics are uncertainty about contamination and health effects, how people will overwhelm health care systems, and the possibility that professionals are less likely to respond. However, the lack of evidence on

  9. Standardization and Scaling of a Community-Based Palliative Care Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Janet; Kamal, Arif H; Harker, Matthew; Taylor, Donald H; Bonsignore, Lindsay; Morris, John; Massie, Lisa; Bhullar, Parampal Singh; Howell, Mary; Hendrix, Mark; Bennett, Deeana; Abernethy, Amy

    2017-08-16

    Although limited, the descriptions of Community-Based Palliative Care (CBPC) demonstrates variability in team structures, eligibility, and standardization across care settings. In 2014, Four Seasons Compassion for Life, a nonprofit hospice and palliative care (PC) organization in Western North Carolina (WNC), was awarded a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Health Care Innovation (CMMI) Award to expand upon their existing innovative model to implement, evaluate, and demonstrate CBPC in the United States. The objective of this article is to describe the processes and challenges of scaling and standardizing the CBPC model. Four Season's CBPC model serves patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings using an interdisciplinary team to address symptom management, psychosocial/spiritual care, advance care planning, and patient/family education. Medicare beneficiaries who are ≥65 years of age with a life-limiting illness were eligible for the CMMI project. The CBPC model was scaled across numerous counties in WNC and Upstate South Carolina. Over the first two years of the project, scaling occurred into 21 counties with the addition of 2 large hospitals, 52 nursing facilities, and 2 new clinics. To improve efficiency and effectiveness, a PC screening referral guide and a risk stratification approach were developed and implemented. Care processes, including patient referral and initial visit, were mapped. This article describes an interdisciplinary CBPC model in all care settings to individuals with life-limiting illness and offers guidance for risk stratification assessments and mapping care processes that may help PC programs as they develop and work to improve efficiencies.

  10. What is next after transfer of care from hospital to home for stroke patients? Evaluation of a community stroke care service based in a primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aznida Firzah Abdul Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Poststroke care in developing countries is inundated with poor concordance and scarce specialist stroke care providers. A primary care-driven health service is an option to ensure optimal care to poststroke patients residing at home in the community. Aims: We assessed outcomes of a pilot long-term stroke care clinic which combined secondary prevention and rehabilitation at community level. Settings and Design: A prospective observational study of stroke patients treated between 2008 and 2010 at a primary care teaching facility. Subjects and Methods: Analysis of patients was done at initial contact and at 1-year post treatment. Clinical outcomes included stroke risk factor(s control, depression according to Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9, and level of independence using Barthel Index (BI. Statistical Analysis Used: Differences in means between baseline and post treatment were compared using paired t-tests or Wilcoxon-signed rank test. Significance level was set at 0.05. Results: Ninety-one patients were analyzed. Their mean age was 62.9 [standard deviation (SD 10.9] years, mean stroke episodes were 1.30 (SD 0.5. The median interval between acute stroke and first contact with the clinic 4.0 (interquartile range 9.0 months. Mean systolic blood pressure decreased by 9.7 mmHg (t = 2.79, P = 0.007, while mean diastolic blood pressure remained unchanged at 80mmHg (z = 1.87, P = 0.06. Neurorehabilitation treatment was given to 84.6% of the patients. Median BI increased from 81 (range: 2−100 to 90.5 (range: 27−100 (Z = 2.34, P = 0.01. Median PHQ9 scores decreased from 4.0 (range: 0−22 to 3.0 (range: 0−19 though the change was not significant (Z= −0.744, P = 0.457. Conclusions: Primary care-driven long-term stroke care services yield favorable outcomes for blood pressure control and functional level.

  11. Consistency with evidence-based treatments and perceived effectiveness of children's community-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haine-Schlagel, Rachel; Fettes, Danielle L; Garcia, Antonio R; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren; Garland, Ann F

    2014-02-01

    This study examined whether delivery of psychotherapeutic strategies consistent with common elements of evidence-based (EB) treatments for child disruptive behavior problems was associated with parents' report of treatment effectiveness. The intensity of delivery of practice elements consistent with EB treatments was coded from a random sample of 538 videotaped psychotherapy sessions with 157 children/families and 75 therapists from six community-based clinics. Multilevel regression analyses tested whether intensity of EB practice elements was associated with parents' report of treatment effectiveness after 4 months, controlling for intensity of other practice elements. Results indicate parents reported greater perceived treatment effectiveness when community-based treatment included more intensive delivery of practice elements consistent with EB treatments to children. These findings may reassure providers about the acceptability of EB practice elements and may motivate efforts to integrate EB practice elements more intensively into community-based care.

  12. Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Persons with Intellectual Disability in a Vegetarian Residential Care Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Morad

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency among intellectually disabled persons in a vegetarian remedial community in Israel. In this community, 47 individuals with intellectual disability (ID live in 7 enlarged families in a kibbutz style agricultural setting. These 47 individuals and 17 of their caregivers were screened for vitamin B12 deficiency. There were 25.5% of the disabled vs. 11.8% of the caregivers found to have levels of vitamin B12 lower than 157 pg/ml. It is concluded that persons with ID in this vegetarian residential care community seemed to be at a higher risk for vitamin B12 deficiency.

  13. Importance of effective collaboration between health professionals for the facilitation of optimal community diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville-Smith, Jo; Kendall, Garth E

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes places a significant burden on the individuals concerned, their families and society as a whole. The debilitating sequelae of diabetes can be limited or prevented altogether through strict glycaemic control. Despite the seemingly uncomplicated nature of the disorder, effective management can be elusive, as the impact of having to deal with diabetes on a daily basis can be profound and appropriate professional support is not always readily available. As the roles of general practitioners (GPs) and allied health professionals have evolved, a major issue now facing all is that of developing and maintaining effective collaborative relationships for the facilitation of optimal community diabetes care. Using a simple survey methodology, the present exploratory study investigated the referral patterns of GPs to diabetic educators (DEs) working for a community health service in an Australian town, and reasons for referral and non-referral in order to identify factors that contribute to a sound and sustainable collaborative relationship. The results provide some evidence that GPs and DEs in this town do work collaboratively towards achieving client-centred goals and highlight the need to inform GPs who are new to communities, such as this one, of the available DE services. Most importantly, the study identified that there are many opportunities to strengthen collaboration so as to facilitate optimal community diabetes care. This information is valuable, because there is limited empirical evidence either nationally or internationally about the process of collaboration between health professionals in the management of chronic diseases, such as diabetes.

  14. Community participation in primary health care projects of the Muldersdrift Health and Development Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barker

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available After numerous teething problems (1974-1994, the Department of Nursing Education of WITS University took responsibility for the Muldersdrift Health and Development Programme (MHDP. The nursing science students explored and implemented an empowerment approach to community participation. The students worked with MHDP health workers to improve health through community participation, in combination with primary health care (PHC activities and the involvement of a variety of community groups. As the PHC projects evolved overtime, the need arose to evaluate the level of community participation and how much community ownership was present over decision-making and resources. This led to the question “What was the level of community participation in PHC projects of the MHDP?” Based on the question the following objectives were set, i.e. i to evaluate the community participation in PHC initiatives; ii to provide the project partners with motivational affirmation on the level of community participation criteria thus far achieved; iii to indicate to participants the mechanisms that should still be implemented if they wanted to advance to higher levels of community participation; iv to evaluate the MHDP’s implementation of a people-centred approach to community participation in PHC; and v the evaluation of the level of community participation in PHC projects in the MHDP. An evaluative, descriptive, contextual and quantitative research design was used. Ethical standards were adhered to throughout the study. The MHDP had a study population of twentythree (N=23 PHC projects. A purposive sample of seven PHC initiatives was chosen according to specific selection criteria and evaluated according to the “Criteria to evaluate community participation in PHC projects” instrument (a quantitative tool. Structured group interviews were done with PHC projects’ executive committee members. The Joint Management Committee’s data was collected through mailed

  15. Structure and characteristics of community-based multidisciplinary wound care teams in Ontario: an environmental scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamyan, Lusine; Wong, Josephine; Pham, Ba'; Trubiani, Gina; Carcone, Steven; Mitsakakis, Nicholas; Rosen, Laura; Rac, Valeria E; Krahn, Murray

    2015-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team approach is an essential component of evidence-based wound management in the community. The objective of this study was to identify and describe community-based multidisciplinary wound care teams in Ontario. For the study, a working definition of a multidisciplinary wound care team was developed, and a two-phase field evaluation was conducted. In phase I, a systematic survey with three search strategies (environmental scan) was conducted to identify all multidisciplinary wound care teams in Ontario. In phase II, the team leads were surveyed about the service models of the teams. We identified 49 wound care teams in Ontario. The highest ratio of Ontario seniors to wound team within each Ontario health planning region was 82,358:1; the lowest ratio was 14,151:1. Forty-four teams (90%) participated in the survey. The majority of teams existed for at least 5 years, were established as hospital outpatient clinics, and served patients with chronic wounds. Teams were heterogeneous in on-site capacity of specialized diagnostic testing and wound treatment, team size, and patient volume. Seventy-seven percent of teams had members from three or more disciplines. Several teams lacked essential disciplines. More research is needed to identify optimal service models leading to improved patient outcomes.

  16. Understanding the Health Needs and Barriers to Seeking Health Care of Veteran Students in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra-Hebert, Anita D; Santurri, Laura; DeChant, Richard; Watts, Brook; Rothberg, Michael; Sehgal, Ashwini R; Aron, David C

    2015-08-01

    Access to care at Veterans Affairs facilities may be limited by long wait times; however, additional barriers may prevent US military veterans from seeking help at all. We sought to understand the health needs of veterans in the community to identify possible barriers to health-seeking behavior. Focus groups were conducted with veteran students at a community college until thematic saturation was reached. Qualitative data analysis involved both an inductive content analysis approach and deductive elements. A total of 17 veteran students participated in 6 separate focus groups. Health needs affecting health-seeking behavior were identified. Themes included lack of motivation to improve health, concern about social exclusion and stigma, social interactions and behavior, limited access to affordable and convenient health care, unmet basic needs for self and family, and academics competing with health needs. Veterans face a range of personal, societal, and logistical barriers to accessing care. In addition to decreasing wait times for appointments, efforts to improve the transition to civilian life; reduce stigma; and offer assistance related to work, housing, and convenient access to health care may improve health in veteran students.

  17. Primary care provider concerns about management of chronic pain in community clinic populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upshur, Carole C; Luckmann, Roger S; Savageau, Judith A

    2006-06-01

    Chronic pain is a common patient complaint in primary care, yet providers and patients are often dissatisfied with treatment processes and outcomes. To assess provider satisfaction with their training for and current management of chronic pain in community clinic settings. To identify perceived problems with delivering chronic pain treatment and issues with opioid prescribing for chronic pain. Mailed survey to primary care providers (PCPs) at 8 community clinics. Respondents (N=111) included attendings, residents, and nurse practioners (NPs)/physician assistants (PAs). They reported 37.5% of adult appointments in a typical week involved patients with chronic pain complaints. They attributed problems with pain care and opioid prescribing more often to patient-related factors such as lack of self-management, and potential for abuse of medication than to provider or practice system factors. Nevertheless, respondents reported inadequate training for, and low satisfaction with, delivering chronic pain treatment. A substantial proportion of adult primary care appointments involve patients with chronic pain complains. Dissatisfaction with training and substantial concerns about patient self-management and about opioid prescribing suggest areas for improving medical education and postgraduate training. Emphasis on patient-centered approaches to chronic pain management, including skills for assessing risk of opioid abuse and addiction, is required.

  18. Does community care work? A model to evaluate the effectiveness of mental health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovaglio Piergiorgio

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of community Mental Health Departments in Lombardy (Italy, and analyse the eventual differences in outcome produced by different packages of care. The survey was conducted in 2000 on 4,712 patients treated in ten Mental Health Departments. Patients were assessed at least twice in a year with HoNOS (Health of the Nation Outcome Scales. Data on treatment packages were drawn from the regional mental health information system, which includes all outpatient and day-care contacts, as well as general hospital and inpatient admissions provided by Mental Health Departments. Multilevel growth models were used for outcomes statistical analysis, expressed in terms of change of the total HoNOS score. On the whole, Mental Health Departments were effective in reducing HoNOS scores. The main predictor of improvement was treatment, while length of care, gender and diagnosis were weaker predictors. After severity adjustment, some packages of care proved more effective than others. Appropriate statistical methods, comprehensive treatment descriptions and routine outcome assessment tools are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of community mental health services in clinical settings.

  19. Beyond community-based diabetes management and the COAG coordinated care trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Peter D; Harvey, Peter W

    2003-06-01

    This article describes the patient management processes developed during the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) coordinated care trial and use of health outcome measures to monitor changes in utilisation patterns and patient well-being over time for a subgroup of 398 patients with type 2 diabetes. The Eyre component of the South Australian (SA) HealthPlus coordinated care trial was a matched geographically controlled study in which the outcomes for the intervention group of 1350 patients were compared with those of a similar control group of 500 patients in another rural health region in SA. The trial was carried out on Eyre Peninsula in SA across populations in rural communities and in the main centres of Whyalla, Port Lincoln and Ceduna. Care planning was organised through general practitioner practices and services negotiated with allied health services and hospitals to meet patient needs. The SA HealthPlus trial included 1350 patients with chronic and complex illness. A subset of this group comprising 398 patients with type 2 diabetes is described in this report. Patients recruited into the three-year trial were care planned using a patient centred care planning model through which patient goals were generated along with medical management goals developed by clinicians and primary health care professionals. Relevant health services were scheduled in line with best practice and care plans were reviewed each year. Patient service utilisation, progress towards achieving health related goals and patient health outcomes were recorded and assessed to determine improvements in health and well-being along with the cost and profile of the services provided. Significant numbers of patients experienced improved health outcomes as a consequence of their involvement in the trial, and utilisation data showed reductions in hospital and medical expenditure for some patients. These results suggest that methods applied in the SA HealthPlus coordinated care trial have led

  20. Faith-Based HIV Care and Prevention in Chinese Immigrant Communities: Rhetoric or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ezer; Chin, John J; Behar, Elana

    2011-10-01

    Ethnic churches attended by first generation Chinese immigrants are uniquely positioned to address emerging HIV prevention and care needs within the Chinese community at-large. Efforts to develop faith-based HIV programs necessitate identifying how HIV intersects with the sinicization of Christianity within Chinese churches. This paper will review the process of contextualizing HIV within theological and cultural frameworks that are meaningful for ethnic Chinese church leaders and members. The authors specifically propose two points of integration between public health and ecclesial functions: (1) HIV stigma-mitigation initiatives as informed by Christo-centric teachings of compassion and justice, and (2) HIV prevention and care reframed as social responsibility and informed by the Christian tradition of evangelism. Systems and practices that hinder and promote the involvement of Chinese churches in HIV prevention, care, and stigma-reduction will be discussed.

  1. The evolving role of health care aides in the long-term care and home and community care sectors in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, Whitney; Laporte, Audrey; Deber, Raisa; Baumann, Andrea; Gamble, Brenda

    2013-06-14

    Health Care Aides (HCAs) provide up to 80% of the direct care to older Canadians living in long-term care facilities, or in their homes. They are an understudied workforce, and calls for health human resources strategies relating to these workers are, we feel, precipitous. First, we need a better understanding of the nature and scope of their work, and of the factors that shape it. Here, we discuss the evolving role of HCAs and the factors that impact how and where they work. The work of HCAs includes role-required behaviors, an increasing array of delegated acts, and extra-role behaviors like emotional support. Role boundaries, particularly instances where some workers over-invest in care beyond expected levels, are identified as one of the biggest concerns among employers of HCAs in the current cost-containment environment. A number of factors significantly impact what these workers do and where they work, including market-level differences, job mobility, and work structure. In Canada, entry into this 'profession' is increasingly constrained to the Home and Community Care sector, while market-level and work structure differences constrain job mobility to transitions of only the most experienced workers, to the long-term care sector. We note that this is in direct opposition to recent policy initiatives designed to encourage aging at home. Work structure influences what these workers do, and how they work; many HCAs work for three or four different agencies in order to sustain themselves and their families. Expectations with regard to HCA preparation have changed over the past decade in Canada, and training is emerging as a high priority health human resource issue. An increasing emphasis on improving quality of care and measuring performance, and on integrated team-based care delivery, has considerable implications for worker training. New models of care delivery foreshadow a need for management and leadership expertise--these workers have not historically been

  2. Effects of locality based community hospital care on independence in older people needing rehabilitation: randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, John; Young, John; Forster, Anne; Mallinder, Karen; Bogle, Sue; Lowson, Karin; Small, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects on independence in older people needing rehabilitation in a locality based community hospital compared with care on a ward for elderly people in a district general hospital. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Care in a community hospital and district general hospital in Bradford, England. Participants 220 patients needing rehabilitation after an acute illness that required hospital admission. Interventions Patients were randomly allocated to a locality based community hospital or to remain within a department for the care of elderly people in a district general hospital. Main outcome measures Primary outcomes were Nottingham extended activities of daily living scale and general health questionnaire 28 (carer). Secondary outcomes were activities of daily living (Barthel index), Nottingham health profile, hospital anxiety and depression scale, mortality, destination after discharge, satisfaction with services, carer strain index, and carer's satisfaction with services. Results The median length of stay was 15 days for both the community hospital and the district general hospital groups (interquartile range: community hospital 9-25 days; district general hospital 9-24 days). Independence at six months was greater in the community hospital group (adjusted mean difference 5.30, 95% confidence interval 0.64 to 9.96). Results for the secondary outcome measures, including care satisfaction and measures of carer burden, were similar for both groups. Conclusions Care in a locality based community hospital is associated with greater independence for older people than care in wards for elderly people in a district general hospital. PMID:15994660

  3. Three phases of disaster relief in Haiti--pediatric surgical care on board the United States Naval Ship Comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walk, Ryan M; Donahue, Timothy F; Sharpe, Richard P; Safford, Shawn D

    2011-10-01

    On January 12, 2010, Haiti experienced the western hemisphere's worst-ever natural disaster. Within 24 hours, the United States Naval Ship Comfort received orders to respond, and a group of more than 500 physicians, nurses, and staff undertook the largest and most rapid triage and treatment since the inception of hospital ships. These data represent pediatric surgical patients treated aboard the United States Naval Ship Comfort between January 19 and February 27, 2010. Prospective databases managed by patient administration, radiology, blood bank, laboratory services, and surgical services were combined to create an overall patient care database that was retrospectively reviewed for this analysis. Two hundred thirty-seven pediatric surgical patients were treated, representing 27% of the total patient population. These patients underwent a total of 213 operations composed of 243 unique procedures. Orthopedic procedures represented 71% of the total caseload. Patients returned to the operating room up to 11 times and required up to 28 days for completion of surgical management. This represents the largest cohort of pediatric surgical patients in an earthquake response. Our analysis provides a model for anticipating surgical caseload, injury patterns, and duration of surgical course in preparing for future disaster response missions. Moreover, we propose a 3-phased response to disaster medicine that has not been previously described. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. NCI Community Oncology Research Program Approved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    On June 24, 2013, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Board of Scientific Advisors approved the creation of the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP). NCORP will bring state-of-the art cancer prevention, control, treatment and imaging clinical trials, cancer care delivery research, and disparities studies to individuals in their own communities. |

  5. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    2011-2015 The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics Editorial Board consists of 411 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in surgery research.They are from 47 countries,including Argentina(3),Australia(13),Austria(4),Belarus(1),Belgium(3),Brazil(10),Canada(10),China(41),Czech Republic(1),Denmark

  6. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    2011-2015 The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics Editorial Board consists of 411 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in surgery research. They are from 47 countries, including Argentina (3), Australia (13), Austria (4), Belarus (1), Belgium (3), Brazil (10), Canada (10), China (41), Czech Republic (1), Denmark (1), Egypt (3), Estonia (1), Finland

  7. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    2011-2015The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology Editorial Board consists of 428 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in gastrointestinal oncology.They are from 40 countries,including Argentina(2),Australia(10),Belgium(5),Brazil(2),Canada(4),Chile(2),China(56),Czech Republic(1),Denmark(1),Finland(3),France

  8. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2009-2013 The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 523 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology. They are from 40 countries, including Argentina (1), Australia (7), Austria (3), Belgium (6), Brazil (5),

  9. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    2009-2013 The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 529 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology.They are from 40 countries,including Argentina (1),Australia (7),Austria (2),Belgium (6),Brazil (5),Bulgaria (1),Canada (18),Chile (1),China

  10. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 529 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology.They are from 40 countries,including Argentina(1),Australia(7), Austria(2),Belgium(6),Brazil(5),Bulgaria(1),Canada(18),Chile(1),China(36),Czech Republic(1),Denmark

  11. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2009-2013 The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 391 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology. They are from 38 countries, including Argentina (1), Australia (6), Austria (3), Belgium (6), Brazil (4), Bulgaria (1), Canada (15), Chile (1), China (28), Denmark (1), Finland (3), France

  12. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    2009-2013The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 529 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology.They are from 40 countries,including Argentina(1),Australia(7),Austria(2),Belgium(6),

  13. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    2011-2015The World Journal of Diabetes Editorial Board now consists of 710 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in diabetes mellitus.They are from 56 countries,including Argentina(2),Australia(27),Austria(11),Belgium(5),Brazil(13),Canada(24),Chile(3),China(40),Cuba(1),Czech Republic(3),Denmark(15),Egypt(3),

  14. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2009-2013The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 523 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology. They are from 40 countries, including Argentina (1), Australia (7), Austria (3), Belgium (6), Brazil (5), Bulgaria (1), Canada (20), Chile (1), China (36), Czech Republic (1), Denmark

  15. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    2009-2013The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 529 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology.They are from 40 countries,including Argentina(1),Australia(7),Austria(2),Belgium(6),Brazil(5),Bulgaria(1),Canada(18),Chile(1),China(36),Czech Republic(1),Denmark

  16. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    2009-2013 The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 529 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology. They are from 40 countries, including Argentina (1), Australia (7), Austria (2), Belgium (6), Brazil (5), Bulgaria (1), Canada

  17. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2009-2013 The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 523 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology.They are from 40 countries,including Argentina(1),Australia(7), Austria(3),Belgium(6),Brazil(5),Bulgaria(1),Canada(20),Chile(1),China(36),Czech Republic(1),Denmark

  18. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2009-2013The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 391 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology. They are from 38 countries, including Argentina (1), Australia (6), Austria (3), Belgium (6), Brazil (4), Bulgaria (1), Canada (15), Chile (1), China (28), Denmark (1), Finland (3), France

  19. Board news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1994-01-01

    Thanks to the hospitality and arrangements of Professor IWATSUKI, the Board could meet during the XV International Botanical Congress. At the meeting Prof. LUCAS AND DR. Roos were re-appointed, whereas Dr. BURLEY was appointed to succeed Dr. STEVENS as representative of the Harvard University. The

  20. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    2010-2013 The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics Editorial Board consists of 188 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in gastrointestinal pharmacology and therapeutics research.They are from 36 countries,including Australia(6),Austria(2),Belgium(2),Brazil(1),Canada(7),China(19),Czech Republic(1)

  1. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    2010-2013 The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics Editorial Board consists of 188 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in gastrointestinal pharmacology and therapeutics research. They are from 36 countries, including Australia (6), Austria (2), Belgium (2), Brazil (1), Canada (7), China (19),

  2. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2010-2013 The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics Editorial Board consists of 188 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in gastrointestinal pharmacology and therapeutics research.They are from 36 countries,including Australia (6),Austria (2),Belgium (2),Brazil

  3. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2010-2013 The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics Editorial Board consists of 188 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in gastrointestinal pharmacology and therapeutics research.They are from 36 countries, including Australia(6),Austria(2),Belgium

  4. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    2010-2013 The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics Editorial Board consists of 188 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in gastrointestinal pharmacology and therapeutics research.They are from 36 countries,including Australia(6),Austria(2),Belgium(2),Brazil(1),Canada(7),China(19),Czech Republic(1),

  5. TO ASSESS EFFECTIVENESS OF PLAN TEACHING PROGRAMME ON NATIONAL ACCREDITATION BOARD FOR HOSPITALS AND HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS (NABH GUIDELINES AMONG NEWLY RECRUITED STAFF NURSES AT KRISHNA HOSPITAL, KARAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The continual improvement of service quality in healthcare units has become a prime consideration to ensure patient satisfaction across the world in the modern economic scenario. In India, health sector is one of the largest and fastest growing sector in which both the private and government care providers and hospitals put much emphasis on quality improvement and patient satisfaction. National Accreditation Board of Hospitals and Healthcare Providers (NABH along with Quality Council of India provided the criteria based on which quality standard of hospitals is determined. The study was conducted on 51 newly recruited staff nurses at Krishna Hospital, Karad. An evaluator survey approach was considered. Study design was used one group pre-test, post-test design. Purposive sampling technique was used. RESULTS The study was conducted on 51 newly recruited staff nurses at Krishna Hospital, Karad. An evaluator survey approach was considered. Study design was used one group pre-test, post-test design. Purposive sampling technique was used. CONCLUSION Study concludes majority of newly recruited nursing staff having 19.38% average knowledge and 17.85% having average practice towards NABH guidelines. Knowledge and practice score of newly recruited nursing staff between the pre-test and post-test was highly significant. OBJECTIVES 1 To assess newly recruited staff nurses knowledge and practice towards NABH guidelines. 2 To find an association of knowledge and practice between pre-test and post-test of PTP programme on NABH guidelines.

  6. Hospice or community network? Choices in end-of-life care in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Roger Lee

    2017-09-01

    Now considered a subspecialty of medicine and nursing, palliative care is a critical aspect of healthcare at the end of life. National and international healthcare agencies typically attribute its slow or haphazard growth in developing countries to various resource constraints. However, this study provides evidence of the substantial and widening gap between policy advocacy and patient choices in end-of-life care. It does so by establishing the incentives and risks that underlie decision-making by patients and providers against the relative scarcity of palliative care and hospices in these countries. Jamaica offers an illustrative case. It shares the socioeconomic conditions and isolated provision of hospice and palliative care that remain prevalent in many developing countries. Empirical information was collected from all Jamaican hospices, along with agency and media reports, for comparative institutional analysis. Financial and infrastructural challenges hamper hospice expansion and integration into formal healthcare systems in developing countries. Yet, other equally vital considerations are too often neglected. These include the high transaction costs of decision-making, which account for limited hospice accessibility, affordability, and efficiency, particularly to underserved populations. Risk and payoff calculations by patients and their families as well as hospices and their providers lead to two strategic options in maximizing hospice value and/or minimizing transaction costs in end-of-life care. Policy formulation and advocacy for hospice and palliative care should match aggregate demand. The socio-cultural milieu of care is critical and should be equally considered. Otherwise, providing and expanding free or subsidized palliative care at the end-of-life stage can become cost-inefficient relative to robust family and grassroots community networks.

  7. Factors affecting recruitment and retention of community health workers in a newborn care intervention in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bari Sanwarul

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Well-trained and highly motivated community health workers (CHWs are critical for delivery of many community-based newborn care interventions. High rates of CHW attrition undermine programme effectiveness and potential for implementation at scale. We investigated reasons for high rates of CHW attrition in Sylhet District in north-eastern Bangladesh. Methods Sixty-nine semi-structured questionnaires were administered to CHWs currently working with the project, as well as to those who had left. Process documentation was also carried out to identify project strengths and weaknesses, which included in-depth interviews, focus group discussions, review of project records (i.e. recruitment and resignation, and informal discussion with key project personnel. Results Motivation for becoming a CHW appeared to stem primarily from the desire for self-development, to improve community health, and for utilization of free time. The most common factors cited for continuing as a CHW were financial incentive, feeling needed by the community, and the value of the CHW position in securing future career advancement. Factors contributing to attrition included heavy workload, night visits, working outside of one's home area, familial opposition and dissatisfaction with pay. Conclusions The framework presented illustrates the decision making process women go through when deciding to become, or continue as, a CHW. Factors such as job satisfaction, community valuation of CHW work, and fulfilment of pre-hire expectations all need to be addressed systematically by programs to reduce rates of CHW attrition.

  8. Transitions in Care: Medication Reconciliation in the Community Pharmacy Setting After Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staci M. Williams, PharmD

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the feasibility of a workflow process in which pharmacists in an independent community pharmacy group conduct medication reconciliation for patients undergoing transitions in care.Methods: Three workflow changes were made to improve the medication reconciliation process in a group of three independent community pharmacies. Analysis of the process included workflow steps performed by pharmacy staff, pharmacist barriers encountered during the medication reconciliation process, number of medication discrepancies identified, and pharmacist comfort level while performing each medication reconciliation service.Key Findings: Sixty patient medication reconciliation services met the inclusion criteria for the study. Pharmacists were involved in all steps associated with the medication reconciliation workflow, and were the sole performer in four of the steps: verifying discharge medications with the pharmacy medication profile, resolving discrepancies, contacting the prescriber, and providing patient counseling. Pharmacists were least involved in entering medications into the pharmacy management system, performing that workflow step 13% of the time. The most common barriers were the absence of a discharge medication list (24% and patient not present during consultation (11%. A total of 231 medication discrepancies were identified, with an average of 3.85 medication discrepancies per discharge. Pharmacists’ comfort level performing medication reconciliation improved through the 13 weeks of the study.Conclusions: These findings suggest that medication reconciliation for patients discharged from hospitals and long term care facilities can be successfully performed in an independent community pharmacy setting. Because many medication discrepancies were identified during this transition of care, it is highly valuable for community pharmacists to perform medication reconciliation services.

  9. Adherence to best practice guidelines in dyspepsia: a survey comparing dyspepsia experts, community gastroenterologists and primary-care providers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiegel, B.M.; Farid, M.; Oijen, M.G.H. van; Laine, L.; Howden, C.W.; Esrailian, E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although 'best practice' guidelines for dyspepsia management have been disseminated, it remains unclear whether providers adhere to these guidelines. AIM: To compare adherence to 'best practice' guidelines among dyspepsia experts, community gastroenterologists and primary-care providers

  10. An evaluation of the implementation of integrated community home-based care services in Vhembe District, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandi J Moetlo

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Community home-based caregivers are largely able to implement home-based care services but would need more support (training, financial, career structure, and health system to improve on their services.

  11. Joint working in community mental health teams: implementation of an integrated care pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Gwyneth; Huby, Guro; McDade, Lian; McKechnie, L

    2004-11-01

    Abstract Integration of community mental health services is a key policy objective that aims to increase quality and efficiency of care. Integrated care pathways (ICPs) are a mechanism designed to formalise multi-agency working at an operational level and are currently being applied to mental health services. Evidence regarding the impact of this tool to support joint working is mixed, and there is limited evidence regarding the suitability of ICPs for complex, community-based services. The present study was set in one primary care trust (PCT) in Scotland that is currently implementing an ICP for community mental health teams (CMHTs) across the region. The aim of the study was to investigate professionals' experiences and views on the implementation of an ICP within adult CMHTs in order to generate learning points for other organisations which are considering developing and implementing such systems. The study used qualitative methods which comprised of individual interviews with three CMHT leaders and two service development managers, as well as group interviews with members of four adult CMHTs. Data was analysed using the constant comparison method. Participants reported positive views regarding joint working and the role of an ICP in theory. However, in practice, teams were not implementing the ICP. Lack of integration at higher organisational levels was found to create conflicts within the teams which became explicit in response to the ICP. Implementation was also hindered by lack of resources for ongoing support, team development and change management. In conclusion, the study suggests that operational systems such as ICPs do not address and cannot overcome wider organisational barriers to integration of mental health services. Integrated care pathways need to be developed with strategic input as well as practitioner involvement and ownership. Team development, education about integration and change management are essential if ICPs are to foster and support

  12. Houston's medical disaster response to Hurricane Katrina: part 2: transitioning from emergency evacuee care to community health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas R; Gavagan, Thomas; Smart, Kieran; Weller, Nancy; Upton, Lori A; Havron, Douglas A; Fishkind, Avrim; Persse, David; Shank, Paul; Shah, Umair A; Mattox, Kenneth

    2009-04-01

    After Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, thousands of ill and injured evacuees were transported to Houston, TX. Houston's regional disaster plan was quickly implemented, leading to the activation of the Regional Hospital Preparedness Council's Catastrophic Medical Operations Center and the rapid construction of a 65-examination-room medical facility within the Reliant Center. A plan for triage of arriving evacuees was quickly developed and the Astrodome/Reliant Center Complex mega-shelter was created. Herein, we discuss major elements of the regional disaster response, including regional coordination, triage and emergency medical service transfers into the region's medical centers, medical care in population shelters, and community health challenges.

  13. [Nurse-Led Care Models in the Context of Community Elders With Chronic Disease Management: A Systematic Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Pei-Lun; Chen, Ching-Min

    2016-08-01

    Longer average life expectancies have caused the rapid growth of the elderly as a percentage of Taiwan's population and, as a result of the number of elders with chronic diseases and disability. Providing continuing-care services in community settings for elderly with multiple chronic conditions has become an urgent need. To review the nurse-led care models that are currently practiced among elders with chronic disease in the community and to further examine the effectiveness and essential components of these models using a systematic review method. Twelve original articles on chronic disease-care planning for the elderly or on nurse-led care management interventions that were published between 2000 and 2015 in any of five electronic databases: MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) Plus with Full Text, Cochrane Library, and CEPS (Chinese Electronic Periodicals Service)were selected and analyzed systematically. Four types of nurse-led community care models, including primary healthcare, secondary prevention care, cross-boundary models, and case management, were identified. Chronic disease-care planning, case management, and disease self-management were found to be the essential components of the services that were provided. The care models used systematic processes to conduct assessment, planning, implementation, coordination, and follow-up activities as well as to deliver services and to evaluate disease status. The results revealed that providing continuing-care services through the nurse-led community chronic disease-care model and cross-boundary model enhanced the ability of the elderly to self-manage their chronic diseases, improved healthcare referrals, provided holistic care, and maximized resource utilization efficacy. The present study cross-referenced all reviewed articles in terms of target clients, content, intervention, measurements, and outcome indicators. Study results may be referenced in future

  14. Family Health Care Mandailing Community (Study of Nuritional Status Among Pregnant Mother

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Zahara Nasution

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Indonesia, the Central Bureau of Statistics of North Sumatra Province (2011, estimates that in 2010 the infant mortality rate of 24.5 per 1,000 live births. This figure decreased when compared to the previous year at 26.90 per 1,000 live births. There are several factors influencing the reduction in infant mortality, among others, the availability of various facilities or accessibility factors and health services from skilled medical personnel and the willingness of people to change the traditional life to the norm of modern life in the field of health .this study  aims to explore how families with Mandailing culture care for pregnant mother in in term of nutritional support. Informants in this study are mandailing  Natal community. This study found that If there are health workers or health care in they place, pregnant mother will come to check  their condition and their nutritional status at health workers during childbirth although later they are more happy assisted by traditional birth attendants or village shaman, it can reduce the complications or problems that  the pregnant women who will ultimately reduce maternal mortality and infant mortality rate. Mandailing Natal society is a society that is not closed to new information, the community here is relatively easy in receiving information or a new thing, it's just that sometimes less precise methods of delivery that makes people not obey the things delivered. To improve community health status Mandailing Natal especially pregnant mother and childbirth it is advisable: That the government is aggressively disseminating health programs so that the public is more familiar with the health programs in a way reproduce health workers, especially midwives who will assist communities in improving the health of pregnant mothers especially in term of their nutrition and health services in Mandailing Natal to be more proactive in providing community especially related  information to the

  15. Analysis of trauma care education in the South Sudan community health worker training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunniyi, Adedamola; Clark, Melissa; Donaldson, Ross

    2015-04-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with the majority occurring in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Allied health workers are often on the front lines of caring for trauma patients; this is the case in South Sudan, where a system of community health workers (CHWs) and clinical officers (COs) form an essential part of the health care structure. However, curricula for these workers vary, and it is unclear how much these training programs include trauma education. HYPOTHESIS/METHODS: The CHW training curriculum in South Sudan was reviewed to evaluate the degree to which it incorporates trauma education, according to established guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first formal comparison of a CHW curriculum with established WHO trauma guidelines. The curriculum incorporated a number of essential components of the WHO guidelines; however, the concepts taught were limited in scope. The curriculum only covered about 50% of the content required for basic providers, with major deficiencies being in the management of head and spinal injuries, safety protocols for health care personnel, and in the management of pediatric patients. The CHW training curriculum lacks the requisite content to provide adequately a basic level of trauma care and requires amending to ensure that all South Sudan citizens receive appropriate treatment. It is recommended that other LMICs review their existing training curricula in order to improve their ability to provide adequate trauma care and to ensure they meet the basic WHO guidelines.

  16. The use of bedside ultrasound and community-based paracentesis in a palliative care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landers A

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: There is little information, particularly in New Zealand, on the use of ultrasound to enhance clinical decision-making in a specialist palliative care service. Technological advances have resulted in increasingly portable, user-friendly ultrasound machines that can be used in the home setting to offer convenient access to this treatment option. AIM: To evaluate the clinical use of portable ultrasonography in the management of abdominal ascites in a community palliative care service. METHODS: Patients referred to the Nurse Maude Hospice and Palliative Care Service requiring assessment for abdominal ascites over 12 months were scanned using a newly purchased handheld ultrasound machine. The patients had a variety of diagnoses; the most common diagnosis was ovarian cancer. RESULTS: Forty-one ultrasound scans performed for 32 patients to assess for ascites drainage were recorded. Fluid was identified in 19 assessments and drainage undertaken in 17. Over half the scans were completed at home, allowing nine procedures to be performed safely and conveniently, which reduced time spent at the local hospital. There were no major complications. DISCUSSION: Ultrasonography is a tool that has not previously been utilised in palliative care locally, but has significant potential patient benefits. This novel use of technology also highlighted potential cost savings to the patient and health system, which may be beneficial to other palliative care services in New Zealand.

  17. Engaging community health workers in maternal and newborn care in eastern Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Okuga

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community health workers (CHWs have been employed in a number of low- and middle-income countries as part of primary health care strategies, but the packages vary across and even within countries. The experiences and motivations of a multipurpose CHW in providing maternal and newborn health have not been well described. Objective: This study examined the perceptions of community members and experiences of CHWs around promoting maternal and newborn care practices, and the self-identified factors that influence the performance of CHWs so as to inform future study design and programme implementation. Design: Data were collected using in-depth interviews with six local council leaders, ten health workers/CHW supervisors, and eight mothers. We conducted four focus group discussions with CHWs. Respondents included 14 urban and 18 rural CHWs. Key themes explored included the experience of CHWs according to their various roles, and the facilitators and barriers they encounter in their work particular to provision of maternal and newborn care. Qualitative data were analysed using manifest content analysis methods. Results: CHWs were highly appreciated in the community and seen as important contributors to maternal and newborn health at grassroots level. Factors that positively influence CHWs included being selected by and trained in the community; being trained in problem-solving skills; being deployed immediately after training with participation of local leaders; frequent supervision; and having a strengthened and responsive supply of services to which families can be referred. CHWs made use of social networks to identify pregnant and newly delivered women, and were able to target men and the wider family during health education activities. Intrinsic motivators (e.g. community appreciation and the prestige of being ‘a doctor’, monetary (such as a small transport allowance, and material incentives (e.g. bicycles, bags were also important

  18. The Effect of Community-Based Prevention and Care on Ebola Transmission in Sierra Leone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Braeden; Lee, Sylvia; Bhatnagar, Aarunima; Wolman, Yaron; Monasch, Roeland; Hipgrave, David; Salama, Peter; Kucharski, Adam; Chopra, Mickey

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the acceptability, use, effects on early isolation, and contribution to Ebola virus disease (EVD) transmission of Community Care Centers (CCCs), which were rapidly deployed in Sierra Leone during an accelerated phase of the 2014–2015 EVD epidemic. Methods. Focus group discussions, triads, and key informant interviews assessed acceptability of the CCCs. Facility registers, structured questionnaires, and laboratory records documented use, admission, and case identification. We estimated transmission effects by comparing time between symptom onset and isolation at CCCs relative to other facilities with the national Viral Hemorrhagic Fever data set. Results. Between November 2014 and January 2015, 46 CCCs were operational. Over 13 epidemic weeks, 6129 patients were triaged identifying 719 (12%) EVD suspects. Community acceptance was high despite initial mistrust. Nearly all patients presented to CCCs outside the national alert system. Isolation of EVD suspects within 4 days of symptoms was higher in CCCs compared with other facilities (85% vs 49%; odds ratio = 6.0; 95% confidence interval = 4.0, 9.1), contributing to a 13% to 32% reduction in the EVD reproduction number (Ro). Conclusions. Community-based approaches to prevention and care can reduce Ebola transmission. PMID:26890176

  19. Evangelical Protestants and the ACA: An Opening for Community-Based Primary Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Berkeley; Skinner, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Evangelical Protestants make up the largest religious subgroup in the United States, and previous research has shown that Evangelical churches are disproportionately active in community engagement and efforts toward social change. Although Evangelical Protestant perspectives have been considered with regard to persistent socioeconomic stratification and racial discrimination, less focus has been given to how churches interpret poor health outcomes within the United States. In particular, this research addresses how enduring health disparities are understood within the larger discussion of healthcare reform. Due to the similarity of approaches favored by participants in this study and community-based philosophy, a suggestion is made for future health policy dialogue. Although Evangelical Protestants have been most likely to reject all aspects of the Affordable Care Act, in many ways the findings of this study suggest the potential for successful future health policy collaboration. In particular, community-based primary care might appeal to Evangelicals and health professionals in the ongoing effort to improve population health and the quality of healthcare in the United States.

  20. Fitting Community Based Newborn Care Package into the health systems of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Y V; Upreti, S R; Kc, N P; Thapa, K; Shrestha, P R; Shedain, P R; Dhakwa, J R; Aryal, D R; Aryal, S; Paudel, D C; Paudel, D; Khanal, S; Bhandari, A; Kc, A

    2011-10-01

    Community-based strategies for delivering effective newborn interventions are an essential step to avert newborn death, in settings where the health facilities are unable to effectively deliver the interventions and reach their population. Effective implementation of community-based interventions as a large scale program and within the existing health system depends on the appropriate design and planning, monitoring and support systems. This article provides an overview of implementation design of Community-Based Newborn Care Package (CB-NCP) program, its setup within the health system, and early results of the implementation from one of the pilot districts. The evaluation of CB-NCP in one of the pilot districts shows significant improvement in antenatal, intrapartum and post natal care. The implementation design of the CB-NCP has six different health system management functions: i) district planning and orientation, ii) training/human resource development, iii) monitoring and evaluation, iv) logistics and supply chain management, v) communication strategy, and vi) pay for performance. The CB-NCP program embraced the existing system of monitoring with some additional components for the pilot phase to test implementation feasibility, and aligns with existing safe motherhood and child health programs. Though CB-NCP interventions are proven independently in different local and global contexts, they are piloted in 10 districts as a "package" within the national health system settings of Nepal.

  1. Health Seeking Behavior on Child Care Among Fishermen Community of Kovalam Village, Tamil Nadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annadurai K

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available While progress has been made to reduce under-five mortality in India from 52 to 39 per thousand live births by 2015 to meet Millennium Development Goal, it is unequally distributed between regions and remains insufficient to reach by 2015. Further, fishermen community possesses unique characteristics features, and remains homogeneous in socioeconomic and cultural matters. Objectives: 1 To assess the health seeking behaviour of parents for child care in children under five years of age among the fisherman community of Kovalam. 2 To assess the factors associated with health seeking behaviour among the above mentioned population. Material and methods: This was a descriptive cross sectional study conducted among 260 parents of children under five years of age in fishermen community with six months recall period in Kovalam, India during May to October, 2014 using pretested semi-structured questionnaire. Results: Prevalence of common childhood illness in the previous six months was 93.46% for ARI, 77.69% for ADD, and 69.23% for fever. Majority of them took their sick children (90.82% immediately to health care facility especially. Conclusion: Health seeking behaviour among parents of children of this specific population was fairly adequate but the prevalence of childhood illnesses was quite high which needs further evaluation.

  2. "No One Cares about This Community More Than Us": The Role of Listening, Participation, and Trust in a Small Urban District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Katherine; McGinn, Kathryn C.

    2013-01-01

    In this research, situated in a small urban district with a state-imposed school board, we analyze participation of community members during a three-year effort to improve schools. Through a qualitative analysis of forms of community engagement, this article offers a framework for understanding participation. We present two overlapping continua of…

  3. An evidence-based health workforce model for primary and community care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach Matthew J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The delivery of best practice care can markedly improve clinical outcomes in patients with chronic disease. While the provision of a skilled, multidisciplinary team is pivotal to the delivery of best practice care, the occupational or skill mix required to deliver this care is unclear; it is also uncertain whether such a team would have the capacity to adequately address the complex needs of the clinic population. This is the role of needs-based health workforce planning. The objective of this article is to describe the development of an evidence-informed, needs-based health workforce model to support the delivery of best-practice interdisciplinary chronic disease management in the primary and community care setting using diabetes as a case exemplar. Discussion Development of the workforce model was informed by a strategic review of the literature, critical appraisal of clinical practice guidelines, and a consensus elicitation technique using expert multidisciplinary clinical panels. Twenty-four distinct patient attributes that require unique clinical competencies for the management of diabetes in the primary care setting were identified. Patient attributes were grouped into four major themes and developed into a conceptual model: the Workforce Evidence-Based (WEB planning model. The four levels of the WEB model are (1 promotion, prevention, and screening of the general or high-risk population; (2 type or stage of disease; (3 complications; and (4 threats to self-care capacity. Given the number of potential combinations of attributes, the model can account for literally millions of individual patient types, each with a distinct clinical team need, which can be used to estimate the total health workforce requirement. Summary The WEB model was developed in a way that is not only reflective of the diversity in the community and clinic populations but also parsimonious and clear to present and operationalize. A key feature of the

  4. Norovirus epidemiology in community and health care settings and association with patient age, Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Kristina T; Fonager, Jannik; Ersbøll, Annette K; Böttiger, Blenda

    2014-07-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is a major cause of gastroenteritis. NoV genotype II.4 (GII.4) is the predominant genotype in health care settings but the reason for this finding is unknown. Stool samples containing isolates with a known NoV genotype from 2,109 patients in Denmark (patients consulting a general practitioner or outpatient clinic, inpatients, and patients from foodborne outbreaks) were used to determine genotype distribution in relation to age and setting. NoV GII.4 was more prevalent among inpatients than among patients in community settings or those who became infected during foodborne outbreaks. In community and health care settings, we found an association between infection with GII.4 and increasing age. Norovirus GII.4 predominated in patients ≥ 60 years of age and in health care settings. A larger proportion of children than adults were infected with NoV GII.3 or GII.P21. Susceptibility to NoV infection might depend on patient age and infecting NoV genotype. Cohort studies are warranted to test this hypothesis.

  5. Care of the stroke patient-communication between the community pharmacist and prescribers in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grimes, Tamasine

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study sought to examine the perceptions that community pharmacists have of communication with prescribers in both primary and secondary care in Ireland, with respect to care of stroke patients. SETTING: Community pharmacies across Ireland, stratified into the four representative administrative regions. METHOD: Survey using a structured postal questionnaire. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Perceptions of communication with prescribers based in primary and secondary care; pharmacy and pharmacy premises demographics. RESULTS: A response rate of 52% (n = 314) was achieved. Community pharmacists\\' perceptions of information provision from secondary care were low, the majority (83%) never received any information from the hospital, although they would welcome it. Communication with hospital based prescribers was considered by most (93%) to be poor. The majority (greater than 75%) of respondents expressed a desire for greater information provision concerning a stroke patient\\'s medication and diagnostic information. Pharmacists\\' perceptions of interaction with general practitioners were generally regarded as good (63%) although information provision in both directions between pharmacist and general practitioner could be improved. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study indicated that community pharmacists perceive that there is room for improvement in the communication between themselves and prescribers in the primary and secondary care settings, concerning the care of the stroke patient. This highlights the need for the development of formal communication channels between community pharmacists and other members of the healthcare team involved in the care of the stroke patient. However, the challenges of communicating patient information across healthcare sectors are recognized.

  6. Prevention of Problem Behaviours among Adolescents: The Impact of the Communities That Care Strategy in the Netherlands (2008-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkman, Harrie; Aussems, Claire; Steketee, Majone; Boutellier, Hans; Cuijpers, Pim

    2015-01-01

    This study examines whether the Communities That Care (CTC) prevention system influences targeted risk and protective factors and the subsequent development of problem behaviour among adolescents (12-18 years) in the Netherlands. In this quasi-experimental study of ten communities (five experimental, five control), adolescent outcomes were…

  7. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>2014-2017 The World Journal of Hepatology Editorial Board consists of 469 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in hepatology.They are from 53 countries,including Algeria(1),Argentina(6),Armenia(1),Australia(1),Austria(4),Bangladesh(2),Belgium(3),Botswana(2),Brazil(13),Bulgaria(2),Canada(3),Chile(1),China(98),Czech Repoublic(1),Denmark(2),Egypt(12),France(6),Germany(19),Greece(11),Hungary(5),India(15),Indonesia

  8. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010-2013 The World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics Editorial Board consists of 188 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in gastrointestinal pharmacology and therapeutics research. They are from 36 countries, including Australia (6), Austria (2), Belgium (2), Brazil (1), Canada (7), China (19), Czech (1), Denmark (1), Egypt (1), Estonia (1), Finland (1), France (1), Germany (5), Greece (4), Hungary (1), India (6), Iran (1), Ireland (1), Israel (3), Italy (20),

  9. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    2014-2017 The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 473 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology.They are from 47 countries,including Argentina(1),Australia(9),Austria(4),Belgium(5),Brazil(10),Canada(12),Chile(1),China(44),Cyprus(1),Czech Repoublic(1),Egypt(3),Finland(1),France(16),Germany(12),Greece(6),Hungary(1),India(8),Iran(3),Ireland(1),Israel(7),Italy

  10. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    2010-2015 The World Journal of Stem Cells Editorial Board consists of 719 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in infectious diseases.They are from 44 countries,including Argentina(2),Australia(10),Austria(6),Belgium(3),Brazil(10),Canada(16),China(74),Cyprus(1),Czech Republic(5),Denmark(7),Egypt(2),Finland(3),France(19),Germany(36),Greece(1),Hungary(3),India(10),Iran(9),Ireland(4),Israel(10),Italy(52),Japan(55),Jordan

  11. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    2014-2017The World Journal of Cardiology Editorial Board consists of 410 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in cardiology.They are from 46 countries,including Argentina(3),Australia(7),Austria(6),Belgium(2),Brazil(8),Canada(11),China(37),Croatia(1),Cuba(1),Cyprus(1),Czech Repoublic(2),Denmark(3),Egypt(1),Finland(3),France(3),Germany(31),Greece(10),Hungary(5),India(4),Iran(2),

  12. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    <正>2014-2017The World Journal of Cardiology Editorial Board consists of 410 members,representing a team of worldwide experts in cardiology.They are from 46 countries,including Argentina(3),Australia(7),Austria(6),Belgium(2),Brazil(8),Canada(11),China(37),Croatia(1),Cuba(1),Cyprus(1),Czech Repoublic(2),Denmark(3),Egypt(1),Finland(3),France(3),Germany(31),Greece(10),Hungary(5),India(4),Iran(2),Ireland(1),Israel(4),Italy(61),Japan(32),Koso

  13. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2009-2013 The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 387 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology. They are from 38 countries, including Argentina (1), Australia (5), Austria (3), Belgium (6), Brazil (4), Bulgaria (1), Canada (15), Chile (1), China (28), Denmark (1), Finland (3), France (11), Germany (15), Greece (2), India (9), Iran (2), Israel (4), Italy (22), Japan (29), Lithuania (1), Mauritius (1),

  14. Editorial Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2009-2013 The World Journal of Biological Chemistry Editorial Board consists of 370 members, representing a team of worldwide experts in biochemistry and molecular biology. They are from 38 countries, including Argentina (1), Australia (5), Austria (3), Belgium (6), Brazil (3), Bulgaria (1), Canada (15), Chile (1), China (27), Denmark (1), Finland (3), France (10), Germany (15), Greece (2), India (8), Iran (2), Israel (3), Italy (21), Japan (28), Lithuania (1), Mauritius (1), Mexico

  15. Geographic Access to Specialty Mental Health Care Across High- and Low-Income US Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Janet R; Allen, Lindsay; Clennon, Julie; Ji, Xu; Druss, Benjamin G

    2017-05-01

    With the future of the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid program unclear, it is critical to examine the geographic availability of specialty mental health treatment resources that serve low-income populations across local communities. To examine the geographic availability of community-based specialty mental health treatment resources and how these resources are distributed by community socioeconomic status. Measures of the availability of specialty mental health treatment resources were derived using national data for 31 836 zip code tabulation areas from 2013 to 2015. Analyses examined the association between community socioeconomic status (assessed by median household income quartiles) and resource availability using logistic regressions. Models controlled for zip code tabulation area-level demographic characteristics and state indicators. Dichotomous indicators for whether a zip code tabulation area had any (1) outpatient mental health treatment facility (more than nine-tenths of which offer payment arrangements for low-income populations), (2) office-based practice of mental health specialist physician(s), (3) office-based practice of nonphysician mental health professionals (eg, therapists), and (4) mental health facility or office-based practice (ie, any community-based resource). Of the 31 836 zip code tabulation areas in the study, more than four-tenths (3382 of 7959 [42.5%]) of communities in the highest income quartile (mean income, $81 207) had any community-based mental health treatment resource vs 23.1% of communities (1841 of 7959) in the lowest income quartile (mean income, $30 534) (adjusted odds ratio, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.50-2.03). When examining the distribution of mental health professionals, 25.3% of the communities (2014 of 7959) in the highest income quartile had a mental health specialist physician practice vs 8.0% (637 of 7959) of those in the lowest income quartile (adjusted odds ratio, 3.04; 95% CI, 2.53-3.66). Similarly, 35.1% of the

  16. Buddy Board

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enggaard, Helle; Moselund, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Projekt ’BuddyBoard’ er kommet i stand via et samarbejde mellem Frederikshavn kommune, Bunker43 og Lab. X. Afdeling en ’Havly’ på Sæby Ældrecenter fungerer som living lab, hvilket betyder, at det udgør et levende laboratorium for udvikling og afprøvning af teknologi (Schultz, 2013). Projektet er....... Bunker43 har udviklet en teknologi (BuddyBoard) til hurtig formidling af billeder fra pårørende og personale til beboere på institutioner. Pårørende og personale uploader billeder via en APP eller en hjemmeside og har mulighed for at tilføje en kort forklarende tekst til hvert billede. Beboeren ser...... billederne via en tablet. Systemet bygger på et simpelt og brugervenligt design, så ældre med kognitive og/eller fysiske funktionsnedsættelser kan anvende teknologien. BuddyBoard fungerer via internettet, og billederne gemmes på en sikret server hos udbyderen, som er Bunker43. Intentionerne med BuddyBoard er...

  17. Regional variation in post-stroke multidisciplinary rehabilitation care among veteran residents in community nursing homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Huanguang; Pei, Qinglin; Sullivan, Charles T; Cowper Ripley, Diane C; Wu, Samuel S; Vogel, W Bruce; Wang, Xinping; Bidelspach, Douglas E; Hale-Gallardo, Jennifer L; Bates, Barbara E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Effective post-acute multidisciplinary rehabilitation therapy improves stroke survivors’ functional recovery and daily living activities. The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) places veterans needing post-acute institutional care in private community nursing homes (CNHs). These placements are made under the same rules and regulations across the VA health care system and through individual per diem contracts between local VA facilities and CNHs. However, there is limited information about utilization of these veterans’ health services as well as the geographic variation of the service utilization. Aim The aims of this study were to determine rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care utilization by veterans with stroke in VA-contracted CNHs and to assess risk-adjusted regional variations in the utilization of rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care. Methods This retrospective study included all veterans diagnosed with stroke residing in VA-contracted CNHs between 2006 and 2009. Minimum Dataset (a health status assessment tool for CNH residents) for the study CNHs was linked with veterans’ inpatient and outpatient data within the VA health care system. CNHs were grouped into five VA-defined geographic regions: the North Atlantic, Southeast, Midwest, Continental, and Pacific regions. A two-part model was applied estimating risk-adjusted utilization probability and average weekly utilization days. Two dependent variables were rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care utilization by veterans during their CNH stays. Results The study comprised 6,206 veterans at 2,511 CNHs. Rates for utilization of rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care were 75.7% and 30.1%, respectively. Veterans in North Atlantic and Southeast CNHs were significantly (pnursing care compared with veterans in all other regions, before and after risk adjustment. Conclusion The majority of veterans with stroke received rehabilitation

  18. Navigating the Financial Aid System in the Community College: The Lived Experience of Students Formerly in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solemsaas, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    For many low-income and disadvantaged students formerly in foster care, community colleges are the main post-secondary educational pathway to socioeconomic opportunities. However, students formerly in foster care face many barriers in accessing college as well as actually succeeding in achieving a college degree. Although considerable efforts have…

  19. The management and development of continence services within the framework of the NHS and Community Care Act (1990).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaffield, J

    1994-03-01

    The current context of community health care is described and the main issues concerning the development of continuity of care for the handicapped and elderly raised. Changes in philosophical and governmental approaches have coincided at a time of demographic changes that is resulting in increased numbers of elderly. Continence services are used as a vehicle in order to demonstrate the need for protocols, systems and evaluation measures across community care team boundaries. Current government decisions and reports are interwoven within the text with professional considerations and other requirements for decision making. The proactive approach offered in this paper for continence services, is also seen as important to other specialist services, such as stoma and diabetes care so that standards of patient care are improved--these being evaluated by approved quality care tools.

  20. [Nurse leadership: intervening element in the relationships network of the community health care agent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzoni, Gabriela Marcellino de Melo; Meirelles, Betina Hörner Schlindwein

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to understand the nurses' contributions in the network of relationships and interactions of community health workers (CHW) in a city located in the south of the country. The Grounded Theory was used and twenty individuals were interviewed, among health professionals and users of the health center, divided into three sample groups. The nurse is recognized as a key element in the network of relationships and interactions of the CHW with the community, being viewed as a leader. Although showing signs of an authoritarian leadership, the nurse promotes dialogue and acts as a facilitator of teamwork in health promotion. It was concluded that the nurses of the Family Health Strategy have a significant role in the health team, providing clinical support to organize the care, and management, to foster good relations, direct the activities and conduct the flow of information.