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Sample records for bnl reactor

  1. Experimental results from the BNL zero power reactor HITREX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitching, S.J.; Lewis, T.A.; Playle, T.S.

    1973-10-15

    This report presents experimental results obtained with the BNL reactor Hitrex. Measurements of reactivity, and of thermal and fast neutron reaction rate distributions have been made with various experimental control rod configurations.

  2. Technical aspects of boron neutron capture therapy at the BNL Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, BMRR, is a 3 MW heterogeneous, tank-type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was designed for biomedical studies. Early BNL work in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) used a beam of thermal neutrons for experimental treatment of brain tumors. Research elsewhere and at BNL indicated that higher energy neutrons would be required to treat deep seated brain tumors. Epithermal neutrons would be thermalized as they penetrated the brain and peak thermal neutron flux densities would occur at the depth of brain tumors. One of the two BMRR thermal port shutters was modified in 1988 to include plates of aluminum and aluminum oxide to provide an epithermal port. Lithium carbonate in polyethylene was added in 1991 around the bismuth port to reduce the neutron flux density coming from outside the port. To enhance the epithermal neutron flux density, the two vertical thimbles A-3 (core edge) and E-3 (in core) were replaced with fuel elements. There are now four fuel elements of 190 grams each and 28 fuel elements of 140 grams each for a total of 4.68 kg of 235U in the core. The authors have proposed replacing the epithermal shutter with a fission converter plate shutter. It is estimated that the new shutter would increase the epithermal neutron flux density by a factor of seven and the epithermal/fast neutron ratio by a factor of two. The modifications made to the BMRR in the past few years permit BNCT for brain tumors without the need to reflect scalp and bone flaps. Radiation workers are monitored via a TLD badge and a self-reading dosimeter during each experiment. An early concern was raised about whether workers would be subject to a significant dose rate from working with patients who have been irradiated. The gamma ray doses for the representative key personnel involved in the care of the first 12 patients receiving BNCT are listed. These workers did not receive unusually high exposures

  3. BWR stability analyses at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The March 9, 1988 instability at the LaSalle County-2 boiling water reactor power plant at Seneca, IL was simulated with Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL's) Engineering Plant Analyzer (EPA) for the purpose of demonstrating that the EPA is suitable for simulating large-amplitude, limit-cycle power and flow oscillations. It was shown in fall of 1988, by comparing all the available plant data from the STARTREC recording system of LaSalle-2 with EPA simulation results, that the EPA reproduces the LaSalle-2 oscillations without the use of stabilizing or destabilizing model or parameter modifications. The power vs. flow map of the LaSalle-2 plant was also reproduced at five lines of constant control rod positions. The LaSalle-2 stability boundary was established with the EPA and confirmed within ±15% accuracy by comparing the EPA results with the results of the frequency domain code LAPUR of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Comparisons of EPA simulation results with plant data from three Peach Bottom stability tests show an agreement, based on mean and standard deviation, of -10±28%, -1±40% and +28±52% (low power) in the gain of the pressure to power transfer functions. This demonstrates that the time domain code HIPA in the EPA is capable of simulating instabilities

  4. Review: BNL graphite blanket design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) minimum activity graphite blanket designs is made. Three designs are identified and discussed in the context of an experimental power reactor (EPR) and commercial power reactor. Basically, the three designs employ a thick graphite screen (typically 30 cm or greater, depending on type as well as application-experimental power reactor or commercial reactor). Bremsstrahlung energy is deposited on the graphite surface and re-radiated away as thermal radiation. Fast neutrons are slowed down in the graphite, depositing most of their energy. This energy is then either radiated to a secondary blanket with coolant tubes, as in types A and B, or is removed by intermittent direct gas cooling (type C). In types A and B, radiation damage to the structural material of the coolant tubes in the secondary blanket is reduced by one or two orders of magnitude by the graphite screen, while in type C, the blanket is only cooled when the reactor is shut down, so that coolant cannot quench the plasma, whatever the degree of radiation damage

  5. FPC conditioning cart at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 703 MHz superconducting gun for the BNL Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) prototype has two fundamental power couplers (FPCs), and each of them will deliver up to 500 kW of CW RF power. In order to prepare the couplers for high power RF service and process multipacting, the FPCs should be conditioned prior to installation into the gun cryomodule. A conditioning cart based test stand, which includes a vacuum pumping system, controllable bake-out system, diagnostics, interlocks and data log system has been designed, constructed and commissioned by collaboration of BNL and AES. This paper presents FPC conditioning cart systems and the conditioning process.

  6. Hitrex 1: an interim report on experimental and analytical work on BNL's zero power HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beynon, A.J.; Kitching, S.J.; Lewis, T.A.; Waterson, R.H.

    1972-06-15

    This report presents interim experimental and theoretical results for the BNL Hitrex reactor. Reactivity effects and thermal and fast reaction rate distributions have been measured. Preliminary analysis has been performed, and some initial comparisons between theory and experiments made. (auth)

  7. BNL heavy ion fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A principal attraction of heavy ion fusion is that existing accelerator technology and theory are sufficiently advanced to allow one to commence the design of a machine capable of igniting thermonuclear explosions. There are, however, a number of features which are not found in existing accelerators built for other purposes. The main thrust of the BNL Heavy Ion Fusion program has been to explore these features. Longitudinal beam bunching, very low velocity acceleration, and space charge neutralization are briefly discussed

  8. BNL ALARA Center: ALARA Notes, No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alara Notes includes the agenda for the Third International Workshop on ALARA and specific instructions on the use of the on-line fax-on-demand service provided by BNL. Other topics included in this issue are: (1) A discussion of low-level discharges from Canadian nuclear plants, (2) Safety issues at French nuclear plants, (3) Acoustic emission as a means of leak detection, (4) Replacement of steam generators at Doel-3, Beaznau, and North Anna-1, (5) Remote handling equipment at Bruce, (6) EPRI's low level waste program, (7) Radiation protection during concrete repairs at Savannah River, (8) Reactor vessel stud removal/repair at Comanche Peak-1, (9) Rework of reactor coolant pump motors, (10) Restoration of service water at North Anna-1 and -2, (11) Steam generator tubing problems at Mihama-1, (12) Full system decontamination at Indian Point-2, (13) Chemical decontamination at Browns Ferry-2, and (14) Inspection methodolody in France and Japan

  9. BNL flashing experiments: test facility and measurement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two objectives of the BNL light water reactor thermohydraulic development program are as follows: first, analytical expressions for the non-equilibrium vapor generation rates under circumstances of interest in accident analysis were developed; second, the experimental program consists of measuring the actual vapor generation rates in flashing flows. In order to support this effort, both global and local instruments were developed and calibrated to provide the necessary information. At the same time, suitable methods were devised for handling and analysis of the signals and data derived from the various instruments

  10. BNL Direct Wind Superconducting Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, B.; Anerella, M.; Escallier, J.; Ghosh, A.; Jain, A.; Marone, A.; Muratore, A.; Wanderer, P.

    2011-09-12

    BNL developed Direct Wind magnet technology is used to create a variety of complex multi-functional multi-layer superconducting coil structures without the need for creating custom production tooling and fixturing for each new project. Our Direct Wind process naturally integrates prestress into the coil structure so external coil collars and yokes are not needed; the final coil package transverse size can then be very compact. Direct Wind magnets are produced with very good field quality via corrections applied during the course of coil winding. The HERA-II and BEPC-II Interaction Region (IR) magnet, J-PARC corrector and Alpha antihydrogen magnetic trap magnets and our BTeV corrector magnet design are discussed here along with a full length ILC IR prototype magnet presently in production and the coils that were wound for an ATF2 upgrade at KEK. A new IR septum magnet design concept for a 6.2 T combined-function IR magnet for eRHIC, a future RHIC upgrade, is introduced here.

  11. BNL ATF II beamlines design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is currently undergoing a major upgrade (ATF-II). Together with a new location and much improved facilities, the ATF will see an upgrade in its major capabilities: electron beam energy and quality and CO2 laser power. The electron beam energy will be increased in stages, first to 100-150 MeV followed by a further increase to 500 MeV. Combined with the planned increase in CO2 laser power (from 1-100 TW), the ATF-II will be a powerful tool for Advanced Accelerator research. A high-brightness electron beam, produced by a photocathode gun, will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. Besides the energy range (up to a possible 500 MeV in the final stage) the electron beam can be tailored to each experiment with options such as: small transverse beam size (<10 um), short bunch length (<100 fsec) and, combined short and small bunch options. This report gives a detailed overview of the ATFII capabilities and beamlines configuration.

  12. BNL ATF II beamlines design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedurin, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Jing, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stratakis, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Swinson, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is currently undergoing a major upgrade (ATF-II). Together with a new location and much improved facilities, the ATF will see an upgrade in its major capabilities: electron beam energy and quality and CO2 laser power. The electron beam energy will be increased in stages, first to 100-150 MeV followed by a further increase to 500 MeV. Combined with the planned increase in CO2 laser power (from 1-100 TW), the ATF-II will be a powerful tool for Advanced Accelerator research. A high-brightness electron beam, produced by a photocathode gun, will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. Besides the energy range (up to a possible 500 MeV in the final stage) the electron beam can be tailored to each experiment with options such as: small transverse beam size (<10 um), short bunch length (<100 fsec) and, combined short and small bunch options. This report gives a detailed overview of the ATFII capabilities and beamlines configuration.

  13. 2013 BNL Site Environmental Report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratel, K.; Remien, J.; Pohlot, P.; Williams, J.; Green, T.; Paquette, P.; Dorsch, W.; Welty, T.; Burke, J.

    2014-10-01

    A summary of Brookhaven National Laboratory’s (BNL) Site Environmental Report, meant to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory’s environmental performance in the lab’s surrounding area during the calendar year. The review is comprised of multiple volumes relevant to environmental data/environmental management performance and groundwater status report.

  14. BWR stability analysis with the BNL Engineering Plant Analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March 9, 1989 instability at the LaSalle-2 Power Plant and more than ninety related BWR transients have been simulated on the BNL Engineering Plant Analyzer (EPA). Power peaks were found to be potentially seventeen times greater than the rated power, flow reversal occurs momentarily during large power oscillations, the fuel centerline temperature oscillates between 1,030 and 2,090 K, while the cladding temperature oscillates between 560 and 570 K. The Suppression Pool reaches its specified temperature limit either never or in as little as 4.3 minutes, depending on operator actions and transient scenario. Thermohydraulic oscillations occur at low core coolant flow (both Recirculation Pumps tripped), with sharp axial or redial fission power peaking and with partial loss of feedwater preheating while the feedwater is flow kept high to maintain coolant inventory in the vessel. Effects from BOP system were shown to influence reactor stability strongly through dosed-loop resonance feedback. High feedwater flow and low temperature destabilize the reactor. Low feedwater flow restabilizes the reactor, because of steam condensation and feedwater preheating in the downcomer, which reduces effectively the destabilizing core inlet subcooling. The EPA has been found to be capable of analyzing BWR stability '' shown to be effective for scoping calculations and for supporting accident management

  15. BNL Building 650 lead decontamination and treatment feasibility study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead has been used extensively at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for radiation shielding in numerous reactor, accelerator and other research programs. A large inventory of excess lead (estimated at 410,000 kg) in many shapes and sizes is currently being stored. Due to it's toxicity, lead and soluble lead compounds are considered hazardous waste by the Environmental Protection Agency. Through use at BNL, some of the lead has become radioactive, either by contamination of the surface or through activation by neutrons or deuterons. This study was conducted at BNL's Environmental and Waste Technology Center for the BNL Safety and Environmental Protection Division to evaluate feasibility of various treatment options for excess lead currently being stored. The objectives of this effort included investigating potential treatment methods by conducting a review of the literature, developing a means of screening lead waste to determine the radioactive characteristics, examining the feasibility of chemical and physical decontamination technologies, and demonstrating BNL polyethylene macro-encapsulation as a means of treating hazardous or mixed waste lead for disposal. A review and evaluation of the literature indicated that a number of physical and chemical methods are available for decontamination of lead. Many of these techniques have been applied for this purpose with varying degrees of success. Methods that apply mechanical techniques are more appropriate for lead bricks and sheet which contain large smooth surfaces amenable to physical abrasion. Lead wool, turnings, and small irregularly shaped pieces would be treated more effectively by chemical decontamination techniques. Either dry abrasion or wet chemical methods result in production of a secondary mixed waste stream that requires treatment prior to disposal

  16. BNL Building 650 lead decontamination and treatment feasibility study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalb, P.D.; Cowgill, M.G.; Milian, L.W. [and others

    1995-10-01

    Lead has been used extensively at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for radiation shielding in numerous reactor, accelerator and other research programs. A large inventory of excess lead (estimated at 410,000 kg) in many shapes and sizes is currently being stored. Due to it`s toxicity, lead and soluble lead compounds are considered hazardous waste by the Environmental Protection Agency. Through use at BNL, some of the lead has become radioactive, either by contamination of the surface or through activation by neutrons or deuterons. This study was conducted at BNL`s Environmental and Waste Technology Center for the BNL Safety and Environmental Protection Division to evaluate feasibility of various treatment options for excess lead currently being stored. The objectives of this effort included investigating potential treatment methods by conducting a review of the literature, developing a means of screening lead waste to determine the radioactive characteristics, examining the feasibility of chemical and physical decontamination technologies, and demonstrating BNL polyethylene macro-encapsulation as a means of treating hazardous or mixed waste lead for disposal. A review and evaluation of the literature indicated that a number of physical and chemical methods are available for decontamination of lead. Many of these techniques have been applied for this purpose with varying degrees of success. Methods that apply mechanical techniques are more appropriate for lead bricks and sheet which contain large smooth surfaces amenable to physical abrasion. Lead wool, turnings, and small irregularly shaped pieces would be treated more effectively by chemical decontamination techniques. Either dry abrasion or wet chemical methods result in production of a secondary mixed waste stream that requires treatment prior to disposal.

  17. Front-end electronics development at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AT BNL the monolithic front-end electronics development effort is an outgrowth of work in discrete and hybrid circuits over the past 30 years. BNL's area of specialization centers on circuits for precision amplitude measurement, with signal-to-noise ratios of 100:1 and calibration to the same level of precision. Circuits are predominantly classical, continuous-time implementation of the functions now performed by hybrids, with little or no loss of performance. Included in this category are charge and current-sensitive preamplifiers, pulse shapers, sample/hold, multiplexing, and associated calibration and control circuits. Presently integration densities are limited to 16 channels per chip. Two examples are presented to illustrate the techniques needed to adopt hybrid circuits to the constraints of monolithic CMOS technology. They are programmable pulse shapes and a charge-sensitive preamp for very low detector capacitance

  18. BNL325 - Nuclear reaction data display program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer code for the graphical display of nuclear reaction data is described. The code, which works on a computer with VMS operating system, can overlay experimental data from an EXFOR/CSISRS table-computation format with evaluated data from ENDF formatted data libraries. Originally, this code has been used at the U.S. National Nuclear Data Center to produce the well-known neutron cross-section atlas published as report BNL-325. (author). 3 tabs

  19. BNL ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN TRIENNIAL UPDATE, JANUARY 2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2003-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multi-program national laboratory operated by Brookhaven Science Associates for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and is located on a 5,265-acre site in Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. BNL has a comprehensive Environmental Management System (EMS) in place, which meets the requirements of the International Organization for Standardization 14001 EMS Standard, as described in the BNL EMS Manual. BNL's extensive environmental monitoring program is one component of the EMS, and the BNL Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) describes this program in detail. The data derived from systematically monitoring the various environmental media on site enable BNL to make informed decisions concerning the protection of human health and the environment and to be responsive to community concerns.

  20. Progress in BNL High-Temperature Hydrogen Combustion Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the BNL High-Temperature Hydrogen Combustion Research Program are discussed. The experimental facilities are described and two sets of preliminary experiments are presented. Chemical reaction time experiments have been performed to determine the length of time reactive mixtures of interest can be kept at temperature before reaction in the absence of ignition sources consumes the reactants. Preliminary observations are presented for temperatures in the range 588K--700K. Detonation experiments are described in which detonation cell width is measured as a measure of mixture sensitivity to detonation. Preliminary experiments are described which are being carried out to establish data reproducibility with previous measurements in the literature and to test out and refine experimental methods. Intensive studies of hydrogen combustion phenomena were carried out during the 1980s. Much of this effort was driven by issues related to nuclear reactor safety. The ''high-speed'' combustion phenomena of flame acceleration, deflagration-to-detonation transition, direct initiation of detonation, detonation propagation, limits of detonation in tubes and channels, transmission of detonations from confined to unconfined geometry and other related phenomena were studied using a variety of gaseous fuel-oxidant systems, including hydrogen-steam-air systems of interest in reactor safety studies. Several reviews are available which document this work [Lee, 1989; Berman, 1986

  1. BNL severe accident sequence experiments and analysis program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyses of LWR degraded core accidents require mathematical characterization of two major sources of pressure and temperature loading on the reactor containment buildings: (1) steam generation from core debris-water thermal interactions and (2) molten core-concrete interactions. Experiments are in progress at BNL in support of analytical model development related to aspects of the above containment loading mechanisms. The work supports development and evaluation of the CORCON, MARCH, CONTAIN and MEDICI computer under development at other NRC-contractor laboratories. The thermal-hydraulic behavior of hot debris located within the reactor core region upon sudden introduction of cooling water is being investigated in a joint experimental and analytical program. This work supports development and evaluation of the SCDAP computer code being developed at EG and G to characterize in-vessel severe core damage accident sequences. Progress is described in the two areas of: 1) core debris thermal-hydraulic phenomenology and 2) heat transfer in core-concrete interactions

  2. BNl 703 MHz superconducting RF cavity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BNL 5-cell, 703 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity has been installed in the high-current ERL experiment. This experiment will function as a proving ground for the development of high-current machines in general and is particularly targeted at beam development for an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). The cavity performed well in vertical tests, demonstrating gradients of 20 MV/m and a Q0 of 1e10. Here we will present its performance in the horizontal tests, and discuss technical issues involved in its implementation in the ERL.

  3. OPERATIONS ELECTRONIC LOGBOOK EXPERIENCE AT BNL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SATOGATA,T.; CAMPBELL,I.; MARR,G.; SAMPSON,P.

    2002-06-02

    A web-based system for electronic logbooks, ''elog'', developed at Fermilab (FNAL), has been adopted for use by AGS and RHIC operations and physicists at BNL for the 2001-2 fixed target and collider runs. This paper describes the main functional and technical issues encountered in the first year of electronic logbook use, including security, search and indexing, sequencer integration, archival, and graphics management. We also comment on organizational experience and planned changes for the next facility run starting in September 2002.

  4. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An engineering plant analyzer has been developed at BNL for realistically and accurately simulating transients and severe abnormal events in BWR power plants. Simulations are being carried out routinely with high fidelity, high simulation speed, at low cost and with unsurpassed user convenience. The BNL Plant Analyzer is the only operating facility which (a) simulates more than two orders-of-magnitude faster than the CDC-7600 mainframe computer, (b) is accessible and fully operational in on-line interactive mode, remotely from anywhere in the US, from Europe or the Far East (Korea), via widely available IBM-PC compatible personal computers, standard modems and telephone lines, (c) simulates both slow and rapid transients seven times faster than real-time speed in direct access, and four times faster in remote access modes, (d) achieves high simulation speed without compromising fidelity, and (e) is available to remote access users at the low cost of $160 per hour. The accomplishment of detailed and accurate simulations in complex power plants at high speed and low cost are due chiefly to two reasons. The first reason is the application of five distinct modeling principles [2] which are not employed in any other simulation code. The second, and even more important reason is the utilization of a special-purpose peripheral computer with its 13 task-specific parallel processors

  5. Highlights from BNL and RHIC 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2016-01-01

    Highlights of news from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the period July 2014-June 2015 are presented. The news this year was mostly very positive. The major event at BNL was the startup and dedication of the new NSLS II, "the World's brightest Synchrotron Light Source". The operation of RHIC was outstanding with a polarized p+p run at $\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV with integrated luminosity that exceeded the sum of all previous p+p integrated luminosity at this $\\sqrt{s}$. For the first time at RHIC asymmetric p+Au and p+Al runs were made but the p+Al run caused damage in the PHENIX forward detectors from quenches that were inadequately shielded for this first p+A run. This was also the 10th anniversary of the 2005 announcement of the Perfect Liquid Quark Gluon Plasma at RHIC and a review is presented of the discoveries leading to this claim. A new result on net-charge fluctuations (with no particle identification) from PHENIX based on previous scans ov...

  6. Latest Results from BNL and RHIC--2013

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2015-01-01

    A selection of results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) from 2012 to 2013 is presented together with a few newsworthy developments in this period. The move of the g-2 magnet from BNL to Fermilab for the "fifth muon g-2 experiment" inspired a brief discussion of the original g-2 experiments at CERN. Highlights of the past year include a change in the measurement of the suppression of large transverse momentum ($p_T$) particles in the Quark Gluon Plasma to a measure of the fractional shift in the observed $p_T$ spectrum from the expected A+A spectrum for independent collisions as an estimate of the energy loss in the medium. The p+Pb run at LHC in early 2013 spurred new or improved measurements in d+Au at RHIC which included the observation of elliptical flow in d+Au collisions and measurements of transverse energy ($E_T$) spectra in p-p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV nucleon-nucleon c.m. energy which demonstrated that constituent quarks are the fund...

  7. Computer analysis, design and construction of the BNL Mk V magnetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a program to develop a high energy neutral beam injector for fusion reactor applications, the BNL Neutral Beam Group is studying, among other options, a surface plasma source of the magnetron type. This source has been developed to the point at which a large compact model, known as the Mk V magnetron, has been designed and constructed. The source is designed to operate in the steady state mode and to produce 1-2A of H-(D-) ions at 25 kV. Under these conditions, 18 KW of heat are removed from the source by the cooling system

  8. Antineutron physics at BNL and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history of antineutron counter experiments below 1 GeV/c is rather short. Several measurements of the charge exchange total and differential cross-sections have been reported. In addition there have been a few low statistics attempts to measure the (anti np transmission and annihilation cross-sections. In 1981 at BNL, AGS Experiment 767 was proposed to simultaneously measure both the annihilation and the transmission cross-sections for anti np). The data were taken during the winter and spring of 1984 and very preliminary results were reported at Durham in July 1984. The results presented here represent a significantly more complete data analysis but some sources of systematic error are still under investigation, and as such only relative cross-sections will be quoted which should still be regarded as preliminary to some degree

  9. ν-oscillation experiment at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Construction of a 100 ton fiducial volume water Cherenkov test detector segmented with wave shifter bars is proposed. When completely instrumented, it will form one of two detectors needed for the possible experiments described. It will be located approx. 200 m from the ν target. Transitions between neutrino flavors are not ruled out in the current theories. Neither is the possibility that all or some neutrinos may carry some masses. So there are distinct possibilities that neutrinos may oscillate into each other. There is some experimental evidence for such oscillation but none is conclusive. The opportunities that exist at the AGS, BNL to explore this topical question are discussed. In the discussion, no attempt is made to optimize the experimental design or to take practical considerations into account. Detectors 1, 2, and 3 are defined to be approx. 100 tons, approx. 100 tons, approx. 1000 tons at approx. 100 m, approx. 200 m, approx. 1000 m from the ν target, respectively

  10. Nuclear Data Parameter Adjustment BNL-INL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation reports on the consistent adjustment of nuclear data parameters performed within a BNL-INL collaboration. The main advantage compared to the classical adjustment of multigroup constants is to provide final nuclear data constrained by the nuclear reaction theory and consistent with both differential and integral measurements. The feasibility of a single-isotope assimilation was tested on a few priority materials (23Na, 56Fe, 105Pd, 235,238U, 239Pu) using a selection of clean integral experiments. The multi-isotope assimilation is under study for the Big-3 (235,238U, 239Pu). This work shows that a consistent assimilation is feasible, but there are pitfalls to avoid (e.g. non-linearity, cross section fluctuations) and prerequisites (e.g. realistic covariances, good prior, realistic weighting of differential and integral experiments). Finally, only all experimental information combined with the state of the art modelling may provide a 'right' answer

  11. Emergency response training with the BNL plant analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented in the experience in the use of the BNL plant analyzer for NRC emergency response training to simulated accidents in a BWR. The unique features of the BNL Plant Analyzer that are important for the emergency response training are summarized. A closed-loop simulation of all the key systems of a power plant in question was found essential to the realism of the emergency drills conducted at NRC. The faster than real-time simulation speeds afforded by the BNL Plant Analyzer have demonstrated its usefulness for the timely conduct of the emergency response training

  12. Radionuclide production and radiopharmaceutical chemistry with BNL cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) radiopharmaceutical chemistry program focuses on production and utilization of radionuclides having a half-life of > 2 hr. However, a major portion of the BNL program is devoted to short-lived radionuclides, such as 11C and 18F. Activities encompassed in the program are classified into seven areas: cyclotron parameters, radiochemistry, design and rapid synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals and labeled compounds, radiotracer evaluation in animals, studies in humans, technology transfer, and several other areas

  13. Physics of the 1 Teraflop RIKEN-BNL-Columbia QCD project. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop: Volume 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A workshop was held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on October 16, 1998, as part of the first anniversary celebration for the center. This meeting brought together the physicists from RIKEN-BNL, BNL and Columbia who are using the QCDSP (Quantum Chromodynamics on Digital Signal Processors) computer at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for studies of QCD. Many of the talks in the workshop were devoted to domain wall fermions, a discretization of the continuum description of fermions which preserves the global symmetries of the continuum, even at finite lattice spacing. This formulation has been the subject of analytic investigation for some time and has reached the stage where large-scale simulations in QCD seem very promising. With the computational power available from the QCDSP computers, scientists are looking forward to an exciting time for numerical simulations of QCD

  14. Physics of the 1 Teraflop RIKEN-BNL-Columbia QCD project. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop: Volume 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-16

    A workshop was held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on October 16, 1998, as part of the first anniversary celebration for the center. This meeting brought together the physicists from RIKEN-BNL, BNL and Columbia who are using the QCDSP (Quantum Chromodynamics on Digital Signal Processors) computer at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for studies of QCD. Many of the talks in the workshop were devoted to domain wall fermions, a discretization of the continuum description of fermions which preserves the global symmetries of the continuum, even at finite lattice spacing. This formulation has been the subject of analytic investigation for some time and has reached the stage where large-scale simulations in QCD seem very promising. With the computational power available from the QCDSP computers, scientists are looking forward to an exciting time for numerical simulations of QCD.

  15. THE FUTURE OF SPIN PHYSICS AT BNL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ARONSON, S.; DESHPANDE, A.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL is the world's only polarized proton-proton collider. Collisions at center-of-mass energies up to 500 GeV and beam polarizations approaching 70% (longitudinal or transverse) are provided to two experiments, STAR and PHENIX, at luminosities {ge} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. Transverse polarized beam has also been provided to the BRAHMS experiment. Measurements that bear on the important question of the spin content of the nucleon are beginning to appear. Over the next 10 years, as the performance of polarized proton running at RHIC is further developed, the Spin Physics program at RHIC will provide definitive measurements of the contributions to the proton's spin of the gluon, the sea quarks and the orbital motion of the partons in the proton's wave function. We plan to extend the reach of our study of the role of spin in QCD with the development of ''eRHIC'', which will provide polarized e-p collisions to a new detector.

  16. BNL-NYSERNet ATM project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Connor, M.; Peskin, A.; Rabinowitz, G. [and others

    1997-07-01

    In 1994, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and NYSERNet, Incorporated embarked on a joint project to develop a prototype Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Regional Network testbed. This project was funded as a three-year effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Activity (CRADA) agreement between the parties, with half the funds being provided directly by the U.S. Department of Energy and the remainder as an in-kind contribution by NYSERNet. This report documents that effort as it comes to a close, providing an account of the original goals, the accomplishments of the projects, and the results as they might apply to the future. It is useful to remember that, when the collaboration discussions first began in 1993, it was far from certain that ATM would be the technology of choice for the then-next generation of the Internet. That, of course, has turned out to be the case, which in retrospect makes this experience particularly valuable. The investigators were not totally prescient, however, and the project changed during its duration to account for changes in technology, available infrastructure, and other circumstances.

  17. The new BNL partial wave analysis programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiment E852 at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a meson spectroscopy experiment which took data at the Multi-Particle Spectrometer facility of the Alternating Gradient Syncrotron. Upgrades to the spectrometer's data acquisition and trigger electronics allowed over 900 million data events, of numerous topologies, to be recorded to tape in 1995 running alone. One of the primary goals of E852 is identification of states beyond the quark model, i.e., states with gluonic degrees of freedom. Identification of such states involves the measurement of a systems spin-parity. Such a measurement is usually done using Partial Wave Analysis. Programs to perform such analyses exist, in fact, one was written at BNL and used in previous experiments by some of this group. This program, however, was optimized for a particular final state, and modification to allow analysis of the broad range of final states in E852 would have been difficult. The authors therefore decided to write a new program, with an eye towards generality that would allow analysis of a large class of reactions

  18. Highlights from BNL and RHIC 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2015-01-01

    Highlights of news from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the period July 2013-June 2014 are presented. It was a busy year for news, most notably a U. S. Government shutdown for 16 days beginning October 1, 2013 due to the lack of an approved budget for FY2014. Even with this unusual government activity, the $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV Au+Au Run14 at RHIC was the best ever with integrated luminosity exceeding the sum of all previous runs. Additionally there was a brief He$^3$+Au run to continue the study of collective flow in small systems which was reinforced by new results presented on identified particle flow in d+Au. The other scientific highlights are also mostly concerned with ``soft (low $p_T$)'' physics complemented by the first preliminary results of reconstructed jets from hard-scattered partons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC . The measurements of transverse energy ($E_T$) spectra in p-p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions, which demonstrated last ye...

  19. Performances of BNL high-intensity synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AGS proton synchrotron was completed in 1960 with initial intensity in the 10 to the 10th power proton per pulse (ppp) range. Over the years, through many upgrades and improvements, the AGS now reached an intensity record of 6.3 x 1013 ppp, the highest world intensity record for a proton synchrotron on a single pulse basis. At the same time, the Booster reached 2.2 x 1013 ppp surpassing the design goal of 1.5 x 1013 ppp due to the introduction of second harmonic cavity during injection. The intensity limitation caused by space charge tune spread and its relationship to injection energy at 50 MeV, 200 MeV, and 1,500 MeV will be presented as well as many critical accelerator manipulations. BNL currently participates in the design of an accumulator ring for the SNS project at Oak Ridge. The status on the issues of halo formation, beam losses and collimation are also presented

  20. Independent code assessment at BNL in FY 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Independent assessment of the advanced codes such as TRAC and RELAP5 has continued at BNL through the Fiscal Year 1982. The simulation tests can be grouped into the following five categories: critical flow, counter-current flow limiting (CCFL) or flooding, level swell, steam generator thermal performance, and natural circulation. TRAC-PF1 (Version 7.0) and RELAP5/MOD1 (Cycle 14) codes were assessed by simulating all of the above experiments, whereas the TRAC-BD1 (Version 12.0) code was applied only to the CCFL tests. Results and conclusions of the BNL code assessment activity of FY 1982 are summarized below

  1. Strangelet Search at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    OpenAIRE

    Abelev, B. I.

    2008-01-01

    We have searched for strangelets in a triggered sample of 61 million central (top 4percent) Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV near beam rapidities at the STAR solenoidal tracker detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We have sensitivity to metastable strangelets with lifetimes of order >_0.1 ns, in contrast to limits over ten times longer in BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) studies and longer still at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Upper limits of a few ...

  2. Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide a spray cooling structure wherein the steam phase in a bwr reactor vessel can sufficiently be cooled and the upper cap and flanges in the vessel can be cooled rapidly which kept from direct contaction with cold water. Constitution: An apertured shielding is provided in parallel spaced apart from the inner wall surface at the upper portion of a reactor vessel equipped with a spray nozzle, and the lower end of the shielding and the inner wall of the vessel are closed to each other so as to store the cooling water. Upon spray cooling, cooling water jetting out from the nozzle cools the vapor phase in the vessel and then hits against the shielding. Then the cooling water mostly falls as it is, while partially enters through the apertures to the back of the shielding plate, abuts against stoppers and falls down. The stoppers are formed in an inverted L shape so that the spray water may not in direct contaction with the inner wall of the vessel. (Horiuchi, T.)

  3. BNL hypernuclear spectrometers and instrumentation present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period 1981 to 1984 the BNL hypernuclear spectrometer system was upgraded resulting in an increase in kaon flux and an increase in solid angle and momentum acceptance. The modifications require drift chambers to be operated at rates up to 107 s-1. The performance of the spectrometer-drift chamber systems will be discussed

  4. NRC plant-analyzer development at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this program is to develop an LWR engineering plant analyzer capable of performing realistic and accurate simulations of plant transients and Small-Break Loss of Coolant Accidents at real-time and faster than real-time computing speeds and at low costs for preparing, executing and evaluating such simulations. The program is directed toward facilitating reactor safety analyses, on-line plant monitoring, on-line accident diagnosis and mitigation and toward improving reactor operator training. The AD10 of Applied Dynamics International, Ann Arbor, MI, a special-purpose peripheral processor for high-speed systems simulation, is programmed through a PDP-11/34 minicomputer and carries out digital simulations with analog hardware in the input/output loop (up to 256 channels). Analog signals from a control panel are being used now to activate or to disable valves and to trip pump drive motors or regulators without interrupting the simulation. An IBM personal computer with multicolor graphics capabilities and a CRT monitor are used to produce on-line labelled diagrams of selected plant parameters as functions of time

  5. ELECTRON COOLING AND ELECTRON-ION COLLIDERS AT BNL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEN-ZVI,I.

    2007-10-03

    Superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) have significant potential uses in various fields, including High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is pursuing some of the potential applications in this area and the technology issues that are associated with these applications. The work addressed in this paper is carried out at BNL towards applications in electron cooling of high-energy hadron beams and electron-nucleon colliders. The common issues for these applications are the generation of high currents of polarized or high-brightness unpolarized electrons, high-charge per bunch and high-current. One must address the associated issue of High-Order Modes generation and damping. Superconducting ERLs have great advantages for these applications as will be outlined in the text.

  6. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL [Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An engineering plant analyzer has been developed at BNL for realistically and accurately simulating transients and severe abnormal events in BWR power plants. Simulations are being carried out routinely with high fidelity, high simulation speed, at low cost and with unsurpassed user convenience. The BNL Plant Analyzer is the only operating facility which (a) simulates more than two orders-of-magnitude faster than the CDC-7600 mainframe computer, (b) is accessible and fully operational in on-line interactive mode, remotely from anywhere in the US, from Europe or the Far East (Korea), via widely available IBM-PC compatible personal computers, standard modems and telephone lines, (c) simulates both slow and rapid transients seven times faster than real-time in direct access, and four times faster in remote access modes, (d) achieves high simulation speed without compromising fidelity, and (e) is available to remote access users at the low cost of $160 per hour

  7. Fast ferrite tuner for the BNL synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of ferrite tuner has been tested at the BNL. The ferrite tuner uses garnet slabs partially filling a stripline. One of the important features of the tuner is that the ferrite is perpendicularly biased for operation above FMR, thus reducing the magnetic losses. A unique design was adopted to achieve the efficient cooling. The principle of operation of the tuner as well as our preliminary results on tuning a 52 MHz cavity are reported. Optimized conditions under which we demonstrated linear tunability of 80 KHz are described. The tuner's losses and its effect on higher-order modes in the cavity are discussed. 2 refs., 8 figs

  8. HERA LUMINOSITY UPGRADE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET PRODUCTION AT BNL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PARKER,B.; ANERELLA,M.; ESCALLIER,J.; GHOSH,A.; JAIN,A.; MARONE,A.; MURATORE,J.; PRODELL,A.; THOMPSON,P.; WANDERER,P.; WU,K.C.

    2000-09-17

    Production of two types of superconducting multi-function magnets, needed for the HEX4 Luminosity Upgrade is underway at BNL. Coil winding is now completed and cryostat assembly is in progress. Magnet type GO and type GG cold masses have been satisfactorily cold tested in vertical dewars and the first fully assembled GO magnet system has been horizontally cold tested and shipped to DESY. Warm measurements confirm that the coils meet challenging harmonic content targets. In this paper we discuss GO and GG magnet design and construction solutions, field harmonic measurements and quench test results.

  9. Results from the experiment E895 at the BNL AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Rai, G; Alexander, J; Anderson, M; Best, D; Brady, F P; Case, T; Caskey, W; Cebra, D A; Chance, J L; Chung, P; Cole, B; Crowe, K; Das, A; Draper, J E; Gilkes, M L; Gushue, S; Heffner, M; Hirsch, A S; Hjort, E L; Huo, L; Justice, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kintner, J; Klay, J; Krofcheck, D; Lacey, R; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Liu, Y M; McGrath, R; Milosevich, Z; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Olson, D L; Panitkin, S Y; Pinkenburg, C H; Porile, N T; Ritter, H G; Romero, J L; Scharenberg, R P; Schröder, L S; Srivastava, B K; Stone, N T B; Symons, T J M; Wang, S; Wells, R; Whitfield, J; Wienold, T; Witt, R; Wood, L; Yang, X; Zhang, W; Zhang, Y

    1999-01-01

    We present some of the latest results from the E895 experiment conducted at the BNL AGS accelerator. Au+Au collisions were recorded by the EOS Time Projection Chamber (TPC) at beam energies of 2, 4, 6, and 8 A GeV. The TPC detector permitted the reconstruction of individual collision events with almost 4 pi acceptance and good particle identification. This capability allowed E895 to study global observables and two particle correlations with respect to symmetries of the event. Flow excitation functions are examined and discussed in the context of the Nuclear Equation of State.

  10. BNL 56 MHz HOM Damper Prototype Fabrication at JLab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huque, Naeem A. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Daly, Edward F. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Clemens, William A. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); McIntyre, Gary T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Qiong [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seberg, Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bellavia, Steve [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A prototype Higher-Order Mode (HOM) Damper was fabricated at JLab for the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider's (RHIC) 56 MHz cavity at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Primarily constructed from high RRR Niobium and Sapphire, the coaxial damper presented significant challenges in electron-beam welding (EBW), brazing and machining via acid etching. The results of the prototype operation brought about changes in the damper design, due to overheating braze alloys and possible multi-pacting. Five production HOM dampers are currently being fabricated at JLab. This paper outlines the challenges faced in the fabrication process, and the solutions put in place.

  11. Rebootless Linux Kernel Patching with Ksplice Uptrack at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ksplice/Oracle Uptrack is a software tool and update subscription service which allows system administrators to apply security and bug fix patches to the Linux kernel running on servers/workstations without rebooting them. The RHIC/ATLAS Computing Facility (RACF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has deployed Uptrack on nearly 2,000 hosts running Scientific Linux and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The use of this software has minimized downtime, and increased our security posture. In this paper, we provide an overview of Ksplice's rebootless kernel patch creation/insertion mechanism, and our experiences with Uptrack.

  12. BNL 56 MHz HOM damper prototype fabrication at JLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huque, N.; McIntyre, G.; Daly, E. F.; Clemens, W.; Wu, Q.; Seberg, S.; Bellavia, S.

    2015-05-03

    A prototype Higher-Order Mode (HOM) Damper was fabricated at JLab for the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider’s (RHIC) 56 MHz cavity at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Primarily constructed from high RRR Niobium and Sapphire, the coaxial damper presented significant challenges in electron-beam welding (EBW), brazing and machining via acid etching. The results of the prototype operation brought about changes in the damper design, due to overheating braze alloys and possible multi-pacting. Five production HOM dampers are currently being fabricated at JLab. This paper outlines the challenges faced in the fabrication process, and the solutions put in place.

  13. DOE/NORA/BNL oil heat research agenda development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, R.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Batey, J. [Energy Research Center, Easton, CT (United States)

    1996-07-01

    The National Oilheat Research Alliance (NORA) has been formed and is currently working to establish a Congressionally approved oilheat check-off program to provide funding for research, education, training, safety, and marketing to benefit the US oilheat industry. NORA will be presenting this program to the Congress for its consideration and approval in the coming year. It will follow the same path as the National Propane Gas Association which is currently working on obtaining Congressional approval of a propane check off program that has already attracted over 120 cosponsors in the House of representatives. An effort to define the basis of a joint US Department of Energy (DOE) and Oilheat industry (marketers) program for future oilheat equipment research and development will be conducted during FY-1996. At the request of NORA representatives BNL will coordinate the development of a research agenda addressing three categories of activities, research appropriate for DOE support only, research appropriate for NORA support only, and research appropriate for co-funding by both organizations. This will also serve to update a prior oil-fueled research plan developed for DOE ten years ago which has been the road map for DOE`s very successful Oil Heat R&D program at BNL.

  14. Studies of material properties under irradiation at BNL Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos, N.; Kirk, H.; Ludewig, H.; /Brookhaven; Mokhov, N.; Hurh, P.; Misek, J.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    Effects of proton beams irradiating materials considered for targets in high-power accelerator experiments have been under study using the Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) 200 MeV Linac. The primary objectives of the study that includes a wide array of materials and alloys ranging between low and high-Z are to (a) observe changes in physio-mechanical properties which are important in maintaining high-power target functionality, (b) identify possible limits of proton flux or fluence above which certain material seize to maintain integrity, (c) study the role of material operating temperature in inducing or maintaining radiation damage reversal, and (d) correlate radiation damage effects of different species such as energetic protons and neutrons on materials by utilizing reactor and particle accelerator experience data. These objectives are specifically being addressed in the latest material irradiation study linked to the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE). Observations on irradiation effects on materials considered for high-power targets and other beam intercepting elements, such as collimators, from past studies and preliminary observations of the ongoing LBNE study are presented in this paper.

  15. The HANARO neutron reflectometer with horizontal sample geometry. Relocation and upgrade plans of the BNL H9-A reflectometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chong Oh; Shin, Kwanwoo; Lee, Jeong Soo; Lee, Chang-Hee; Cho, Sang Jin; Hong, Kwang Pyo

    2006-11-01

    A new neutron reflectometer with horizontal sample geometry is under construction at a thermal neutron port at HANARO, the 30 MW research reactor at KAERI. It was originally designed and operated at the H9-A beam port at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and was relocated to HANARO in 2004. It will be initially installed at the ST3 thermal-neutron port without any significant modification, and significant improvements in structure and performance are planned when the new cold source is installed in 2008. If successfully installed, it will be the first reflectometer in Korea for the study of free surfaces, which is currently lacking. For the thermal source, the feasible wavelength of incident neutron beam is 2.5 Å and this would permits the q ranges up to 0.21 Å -1.

  16. The HANARO neutron reflectometer with horizontal sample geometry. Relocation and upgrade plans of the BNL H9-A reflectometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new neutron reflectometer with horizontal sample geometry is under construction at a thermal neutron port at HANARO, the 30 MW research reactor at KAERI. It was originally designed and operated at the H9-A beam port at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and was relocated to HANARO in 2004. It will be initially installed at the ST3 thermal-neutron port without any significant modification, and significant improvements in structure and performance are planned when the new cold source is installed in 2008. If successfully installed, it will be the first reflectometer in Korea for the study of free surfaces, which is currently lacking. For the thermal source, the feasible wavelength of incident neutron beam is 2.5 A and this would permits the q ranges up to 0.21 A-1

  17. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workwhop on RHIC spin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SOFFER,J.

    1999-10-06

    This RHIC Spin Workshop is the 1999 annual meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration, and the second to be hosted at Brookhaven and sponsored by the RIKEN BNL Research Center. The previous meetings were at Brookhaven (1998), Marseille (1996), MIT in 1995, Argonne 1994, Tucson in 1991, and the Polarized Collider Workshop at Penn State in 1990. As noted last year, the Center provides a home for combined work on spin by theorists, experimenters, and accelerator physicists. This proceedings, as last year, is a compilation of 1 page summaries and 5 selected transparencies for each speaker. It is designed to be available soon after the workshop is completed. Speakers are welcome to include web or other references for additional material. The RHIC spin program and RHIC are rapidly becoming reality. RHIC has completed its first commissioning run, as described here by Steve Peggs. The first Siberian Snake for spin has been completed and is being installed in RHIC. A new polarized source from KEK and Triumf with over 1 milliampere of polarized H{sup minus} is being installed, described by Anatoli Zelenski. They have had a successful test of a new polarimeter for RHIC, described by Kazu Kurita and Haixin Huang. Spin commissioning is expected next spring (2000), and the first physics run for spin is anticipated for spring 2001. The purpose of the workshop is to get everyone together about once per year and discuss goals of the spin program, progress, problems, and new ideas. They also have many separate regular forums on spin. There are spin discussion sessions every Tuesday, now organized by Naohito Saito and Werner Vogelsang. The spin discussion schedule and copies of presentations are posted on http://riksg01.rhic.bnl.gov/rsc. Speakers and other spinners are encouraged to come to BNL and to lead a discussion on your favorite idea. They also have regular polarimeter and snake meetings on alternate Thursdays, led by Bill McGahern, the lead engineer for the accelerator spin

  18. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop on RHIC spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This RHIC Spin Workshop is the 1999 annual meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration, and the second to be hosted at Brookhaven and sponsored by the RIKEN BNL Research Center. The previous meetings were at Brookhaven (1998), Marseille (1996), MIT in 1995, Argonne 1994, Tucson in 1991, and the Polarized Collider Workshop at Penn State in 1990. As noted last year, the Center provides a home for combined work on spin by theorists, experimenters, and accelerator physicists. This proceedings, as last year, is a compilation of 1 page summaries and 5 selected transparencies for each speaker. It is designed to be available soon after the workshop is completed. Speakers are welcome to include web or other references for additional material. The RHIC spin program and RHIC are rapidly becoming reality. RHIC has completed its first commissioning run, as described here by Steve Peggs. The first Siberian Snake for spin has been completed and is being installed in RHIC. A new polarized source from KEK and Triumf with over 1 milliampere of polarized Hminus is being installed, described by Anatoli Zelenski. They have had a successful test of a new polarimeter for RHIC, described by Kazu Kurita and Haixin Huang. Spin commissioning is expected next spring (2000), and the first physics run for spin is anticipated for spring 2001. The purpose of the workshop is to get everyone together about once per year and discuss goals of the spin program, progress, problems, and new ideas. They also have many separate regular forums on spin. There are spin discussion sessions every Tuesday, now organized by Naohito Saito and Werner Vogelsang. The spin discussion schedule and copies of presentations are posted on http://riksg01.rhic.bnl.gov/rsc. Speakers and other spinners are encouraged to come to BNL and to lead a discussion on your favorite idea. They also have regular polarimeter and snake meetings on alternate Thursdays, led by Bill McGahern, the lead engineer for the accelerator spin effort

  19. Experimental results from the BNL TestEBIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory, an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) is operational and has produced charge states such as N7+, Ar16+, and Xe26+ using neutral gas injection. Ions such as Na7+ and Tl41+ have been produced using external ion injection. The BNL EBIS effort is directed at reaching intensities of interest to RHIC, approximately 3 x 109 particles/pulse which will require EBIS electron beams on the order of 10A. Pulsed electron beams up to 1.14 A have been produced using a 3mm LaB6 cathode. Ion yields corresponding to 50% of the maximum trap capacity for electron beams up to 0.5A have been obtained. The goal for the TestEBIS is to produce a uranium ion charge state distribution peaks at U45+ with 50% of the trap capacity for a 1A electron beam

  20. Proposed UV-FEL user facility at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Di Mauro, L.F.; Krinsky, S.; White, M.G.; Yu, L.H.

    1990-01-01

    The NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory is proposing the construction of a UV-FEL operating in the wavelength range from visible to 1000{angstrom}. Nano-Coulomb electron pulses will be generated at a laser photo-cathode RF gun at a repetition rate of 10 KHz. The 6 ps pulses will be accelerated to 250 MeV in a superconducting linac. The FEL consists of an exponential growth section followed by a tapered section. The amplifier input is a harmonic of a tunable visible laser generated either by nonlinear optical material or the non-linearity of the FEL itself. The FEL output in 10{sup {minus}4} bandwidth is 1 mJ per pulse, resulting in an average power of 10 watts. The availability of radiation with these characteristics would open up new opportunities in photochemistry, biology and non linear optics, as discussed in a recent workshop held at BNL. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Beam instrumentation for the BNL Heavy Ion Transfer Line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heavy Ion Transfer Line (HITL) was constructed to transport beams from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff (TVDG) to be injected into the AGS. Because the beam line is approximately 2000 feet long and the particle rigidity is so low, 20 beam monitor boxes were placed along the line. The intensity ranges from 1 to 100 nanoAmps for the dc trace beam used for line set-up, to over 100 μA for the pulsed beam to be injected into the AGS. Profiles are measured using multiwire arrays (HARPS) while Faraday cups and beam transformers monitor the intensity. The electronics stations are operated through 3 Instrumentation Controllers networked to Apollo workstations in the TVDG and AGS control rooms. Details of the detectors and electronics designs and performance will be given

  2. Field testing the prototype BNL fan-atomized oil burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, R.; Celebi, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-04-01

    BNL has developed a new oil burner design referred to as the Fan Atomized burner System. The primary objective of the field study was to evaluate and demonstrate the reliable operation of the Fan Atomized Burner. The secondary objective was to establish and validate the ability of a low firing rate burner (0.3-0.4 gph) to fully satisfy the heating and domestic hot water load demands of an average household in a climate zone with over 5,000 heating-degree-days. The field activity was also used to evaluate the practicality of side-wall venting with the Fan Atomized Burner with a low stack temperature (300F) and illustrate the potential for very high efficiency with an integrated heating system approach based on the Fan Atomized Burner.

  3. PHYSICS OF THE 1 TERAFLOP RIKEN-BNL-COLUMBIA QCD PROJECT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAWHINNEY,R.

    1998-10-16

    A workshop was held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on the afternoon of October 16, i 998, as part of the first anniversary ceremony for the center. Titled ''Workshop on Physics of the 1 Teraflop RIKEN-BNL-Columbia QCD Project'', this meeting brought together the physicists from RIKEN-BNL, BNL and Columbia who are using the QCDSP (Quantum Chromodynamics on Digital Signal Processors) computer at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for studies of QCD. In addition, Akira Ukawa, a leader of the CP-PACS project at the University of Tsukuba in Japan, attended and gave a talk on the Aoki phase. There were also others in attendance who were interested in more general properties of the QCDSP computer. The QCDSP computer and lattice QCD had been presented during the morning ceremony by Shigemi Ohta of KEK and the RIKEN-BNL Research Center. This was followed by a tour of the QCDSP machine room and a formal unveiling of the computer to the attendees of the anniversary ceremony and the press. The rapid completion of construction of the QCDSP computer was made possible through many factors: (1) the existence of a complete design and working hardware at Columbia when the RIKEN-BNL center was being set up, (2) strong support for the project from RIKEN and the center and (3) aggressive involvement of members of the Computing and Communications Division at BNL. With this powerful new resource, the members of the RIKEN-BNL-Columbia, QCD project are looking forward to advances in our understanding of QCD.

  4. PHYSICS OF THE 1 TERAFLOP RIKEN-BNL-COLUMBIA QCD PROJECT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAWHINNEY,R.

    1998-10-16

    A workshop was held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on the afternoon of October 16, 1998, as part of the first anniversary ceremony for the center. Titled ''Workshop on Physics of the 1 Teraflop RIKEN-BNL-Columbia QCD Project'', this meeting brought together the physicists from RIKEN-BNL, BNL and Columbia who are using the QCDSP (Quantum Chromodynamics on Digital Signal Processors) computer at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for studies of QCD. In addition, Akira Ukawa, a leader of the CP-PACS project at the University of Tsukuba in Japan, attended and gave a talk on the Aoki phase. There were also others in attendance who were interested in more general properties of the QCDSP computer. The QCDSP computer and lattice QCD had been presented during the morning ceremony by Shigemi Ohta of KEK and the RIKEN-BNL Research Center. This was followed by a tour of the QCDSP machine room and a formal unveiling of the computer to the attendees of the anniversary ceremony and the press. The rapid completion of construction of the QCDSP computer was made possible through many factors: (1) the existence of a complete design and working hardware at Columbia when the RIKEN-BNL center was being set up, (2) strong support for the project from RIKEN and the center and (3) aggressive involvement of members of the Computing and Communications Division at BNL. With this powerful new resource, the members of the RIKEN-BNL-Columbia, QCD project are looking forward to advances in our understanding of QCD.

  5. BNL workshop on rare K decays and CP violation, August 25-27, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: rare and forbidden K decays; CP violation in the K system; the status of current experiments at BNL, CERN, FNAL, and KEK; and future experiments and facilities.

  6. BNL workshop on rare K decays and CP violation, August 25-27, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: rare and forbidden K decays; CP violation in the K system; the status of current experiments at BNL, CERN, FNAL, and KEK; and future experiments and facilities

  7. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikin, Alexander; Alessi, James G.; Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm2 and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  8. HFBR handbook, 1992: High flux beam reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welcome to the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), one of the world premier neutron research facilities. This manual is intended primarily to acquaint outside users (and new Brookhaven staff members) with (almost) everything they need to know to work at the HFBR and to help make the stay at Brookhaven pleasant as well as profitable. Safety Training Programs to comply with US Department of Energy (DOE) mandates are in progress at BNL. There are several safety training requirements which must be met before users can obtain unescorted access to the HFBR. The Reactor Division has prepared specific safety training manuals which are to be sent to experimenters well in advance of their expected arrival at BNL to conduct experiments. Please familiarize yourself with this material and carefully pay strict attention to all the safety and security procedures that are in force at the HFBR. Not only your safety, but the continued operation of the facility, depends upon compliance

  9. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users' facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high gradient acceleration and state of the art free electron lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 to 100 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps Nd:YAG laser and a 100 mJ, 10 ps CO2 laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high brightness electron beams. The AFT's experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the High power laser will begin operation this year. 28 refs., 4 figs

  10. The BNL fan-atomized burner system prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, T.A.; Celebi, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has a continuing interest in the development of advanced oil burners which can provide new capabilities not currently available with pressure atomized, retention head burners. Specifically program goals include: the ability to operate at firing rates as low as 0.25 gph; the ability to operate with very low excess air levels for high steady state efficiency and to minimize formation of sulfuric acid and iron sulfate fouling; low emissions of smoke, CO, and NO{sub x} even at very low excess air levels; and the potential for modulation - either staged firing or continuous modulation. In addition any such advanced burner must have production costs which would be sufficiently attractive to allow commercialization. The primary motivation for all work sponsored by the US DOE is, of course, improved efficiency. With existing boiler and furnace models this can be achieved through down-firing and low excess air operation. Also, with low excess air operation fouling and efficiency degradation due to iron-sulfate scale formation are reduced.

  11. First Results from the DUV-FEL Upgrade at BNL

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xijie; Murphy, James; Pinayev, Igor; Rakowsky, George; Rose, James; Shaftan, Timur; Sheehy, Brian; Skaritka, John; Wu, Zilu; Yu Li Hua

    2005-01-01

    The DUV-FEL at BNL is the world’s only facility dedicated to laser-seeded FEL R&D and its applications. Tremendous progress was made in both HGHG FEL and its applications in the last couple years.*,** In response to the requests of many users to study chemical science at the facility, the DUV-FEL linac was upgraded from 200 to 300 MeV to enable the HGHG FEL to produce 100 uJ pulses of 100 nm light. This will establish the DUV FEL as a premier user facility for ultraviolet radiation and enable state-of-the-art gas phase photochemistry research. The upgraded facility will also make possible key R&D experiments such as higher harmonic HGHG (n>5) that would lay the groundwork for future X-ray FEL based on HGHG. The upgraded HGHG FEL will operate at the 4th harmonic with the seed laser at either 800 nm or 400nm. The increase of the electron beam energy will be accomplished by installing a 5th linac cavity and two 45 MW klystrons. New HGHG modulator and dispersion sections vacuum chambers w...

  12. Serpentine Coil Topology for BNL Direct Wind Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Brett

    2005-01-01

    BNL direct wind technology, with the conductor pattern laid out without need for extra tooling (no collars, coil presses etc.) began with RHIC corrector production. RHIC patterns were wound flat and then wrapped on cylindrical support tubes. Later for the HERA-II IR magnets we improved conductor placement precision by winding directly on a support tube. To meet HERA-II space and field quality goals took sophisticated coil patterns, (some wound on tapered tubes). We denote such patterns, topologically equivalent to RHIC flat windings, "planar patterns." Multi-layer planar patterns run into trouble because it is hard to wind across existing turns and magnet leads get trapped at poles. So we invented a new "Serpentine" winding style, which goes around 360 degrees while the conductor winds back and forth on the tube. To avoid making solenoidal fields, we wind Serpentine layers in opposite handed pairs. With a Serpentine pattern each turn can have the same projection on the coil axis and integral field harmonics t...

  13. Measurements of the radioactive inventory of the old effluent pipe line on the BNL site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When Berkeley Nuclear Laboratory (BNL) was built, a 3 inch cast iron pipe was laid to carry the radioactive effluent from the BNL effluent treatment plant to the power station for further treatment and/or discharge. In 1980/81 a new pipe line was installed and since then the old line has remained unused. As part of the refurbishment of certain parts of the BNL site currently in progress, the majority of the pipe is to be dug up in two stages, although a small length of the pipe which runs under existing foundations will be left in the ground. This report gives the radioactive inventory of the pipe based on measurements made during the first state of removal. Samples from the trench dug to expose the pipe were taken before and after the removal of the pipe and analysed to determine whether the pipe had leaked and the level of contamination caused by the pipe's removal. (author)

  14. Twenty years of space radiation physics at the BNL AGS and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J; Zeitlin, C

    2016-06-01

    Highly ionizing atomic nuclei HZE in the GCR will be a significant source of radiation exposure for humans on extended missions outside low Earth orbit. Accelerators such as the LBNL Bevalac and the BNL AGS, designed decades ago for fundamental nuclear and particle physics research, subsequently found use as sources of GCR-like particles for ground-based physics and biology research relevant to space flight. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL was constructed specifically for space radiation research. Here we review some of the space-related physics results obtained over the first 20 years of NASA-sponsored research at Brookhaven. PMID:27345198

  15. Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization - KVM-based infrastructure services at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortijo, D.

    2011-06-14

    Over the past 18 months, BNL has moved a large percentage of its Linux-based servers and services into a Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) environment. This presentation will address our approach to virtualization, critical decision points, and a discussion of our implementation. Specific topics will include an overview of hardware and software requirements, networking, and storage; discussion of the decision of Red Hat solution over competing products (VMWare, Xen, etc); details on some of the features of RHEV - both current and on their roadmap; Review of performance and reliability gains since deployment completion; path forward for RHEV at BNL and caveats and potential problems.

  16. Twenty years of space radiation physics at the BNL AGS and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.

    2016-06-01

    Highly ionizing atomic nuclei HZE in the GCR will be a significant source of radiation exposure for humans on extended missions outside low Earth orbit. Accelerators such as the LBNL Bevalac and the BNL AGS, designed decades ago for fundamental nuclear and particle physics research, subsequently found use as sources of GCR-like particles for ground-based physics and biology research relevant to space flight. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL was constructed specifically for space radiation research. Here we review some of the space-related physics results obtained over the first 20 years of NASA-sponsored research at Brookhaven.

  17. Report on IAEA-CRP on signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection (IGCAR, DDIAE, KFK, BNL - contribution)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors reliable detection of sodium boiling has been recognised as an important requirement for additional safety protection. The monitoring of acoustic noise emitted during sodium boiling is considered a promising method. However, for reliable detection, it is necessary to distinguish the boiling noise from background noise. Different methods have been developed for this purpose in several countries. An IWGFR Specialists meeting recognised the necessity for a benchmark test to make a comparative assessment of the existing signal processing techniques and identify optimum methods for a reliable on-line sodium boiling noise detection system. The IAEA accepted the recommendation of IWGFR and sponsored the project. Australia Japan, India, FRG, GDR and UK participated in the project. The data for this benchmark problem was provided by the IAEA from out-of-pile experiments performed on KNS I loop at KFK-Karlsruhe and in-pile experiments performed on BOR-60 in Russia. In this presentation, first the IGCAR work is presented. It is followed by a brief presentation of BNL (UK), Australia and FRG work. 9 figs, 3 tabs

  18. BNL severe accident sequence experiments and analysis program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major source of containment pressurization during severe accidents is the transfer of stored energy from the hot core material to available cooling water. One mode of thermal interaction involves the quench of superheated beds of debris which could be present in the reactor cavity following melt-through or failure of the reactor vessel. This work supports development of models of superheated bed quench phenomena which are to be incorporated into containment analysis computer codes such as MARCH, CONTAIN, and MEDICI. A program directed towards characterization of the behavior of superheated debris beds has been completed. This work addressed the quench of superheated debris which is postulated to exist in the reactor cavity of a PWR following melt ejection from the primary system. The debris is assumed to be cooled by a pool of water overlying the bed of hot debris. This work has led to the development of models to predict rate of steam generation during the quench process and, in addition, the ability to assess the coolability of the debris during the transient quench process. A final report on this work has been completed. This report presents a brief description of some relevant results and conclusions. 15 refs

  19. QUARKONIUM PRODUCTION IN RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KHARZEEV,D.

    1999-04-20

    The RIKEN-BNL Workshop on Quarkonium Production in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions was held September 28--October 2, 1998, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Workshop brought together about 50 invited participants from around the world and a number of Brookhaven physicists from both particle and nuclear physics communities.

  20. Multipacting-free quarter-wavelength choke joint design for BNL SRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Liaw, C. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tuozzolo, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Wang, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Weiss, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    The BNL SRF gun cavity operated well in CW mode up to 2 MV. However, its performance suffered due to multipacting in the quarter-wavelength choke joint. A new multipacting-free cathode stalk was designed and conditioned. This paper describes RF and thermal design of the new cathode stalk and its conditioning results.

  1. New result on K+ → π+ ν νbar from BNL E787

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E787 at BNL has reported evidence for the rare decay K+ → π+νbar ν, based on the observation of one candidate event. In this paper, we present the result of analyzing a new dataset of comparable sensitivity to the published result

  2. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm2 and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given

  3. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  4. Determination of maximum reactor power level consistent with the requirement that flow reversal occurs without fuel damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) operated by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) employs forced downflow for heat removal during normal operation. In the event of total loss of forced flow, the reactor will shutdown and the flow reversal valves open. When the downward core flow becomes sufficiently small then the opposing thermal buoyancy induces flow reversal leading to decay heat removal by natural convection. There is some uncertainty as to whether the natural circulation is adequate for decay heat removal after 60 MW operation. BNL- staff carried out a series of calculations to establish the adequacy of flow reversal to remove decay heat. Their calculations are based on a natural convective CHF model. The primary purpose of the present calculations is to review the accuracy and applicability of Fauske's CHF model for the HFBR, and the assumptions and methodology employed by BNL-staff to determine the heat removal limit in the HFBR during a flow reversal and natural convection situation

  5. Analysis of PIUS reactor passive shutdown using PC-based model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simplified model of the PIUS 600 Reactor System is described and results form two event simulations are discussed, and compared with ABB's predicted results. The model is based on a BWR Plant Analyzer developed by BNL, with PIUS-specific models added for the density locks. Initial results support the effectiveness of the passive reactor shutdown, although some significant power oscillations occur before the shutdown is completed

  6. Multipacting simulation and test results of BNL 704 MHz SRF gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu W.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Cullen, C. et al

    2012-05-20

    The BNL 704MHz SRF gun has a grooved choke joint to support the photo-cathode. Due to the distortion of grooves at the choke joint during the BCP for the choke joint, several multipacting barriers showed up when it was tested with Nb cathode stalk at JLab. We built a setup to use the spare large grain SRF cavity to test and condition the multipacting at BNL with various power sources up to 50kW. The test is carried out in three stages: testing the cavity performance without cathode, testing the cavity with the Nb cathode stalk that was used at Jlab, and testing the cavity with a copper cathode stalk that is based on the design for the SRF gun. This paper summarizes the results of multipacting simulation, and presents the large grain cavity test setup and the test results.

  7. PRODEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP : HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING WITH QCDOC AND BLUEGENE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHRIST,N.; DAVENPORT,J.; DENG,Y.; GARA,A.; GLIMM,J.; MAWHINNEY,R.; MCFADDEN,E.; PESKIN,A.; PULLEYBLANK,W.

    2003-03-11

    Staff of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Columbia University, IBM and the RIKEN BNL Research Center organized a one-day workshop held on February 28, 2003 at Brookhaven to promote the following goals: (1) To explore areas other than QCD applications where the QCDOC and BlueGene/L machines can be applied to good advantage, (2) To identify areas where collaboration among the sponsoring institutions can be fruitful, and (3) To expose scientists to the emerging software architecture. This workshop grew out of an informal visit last fall by BNL staff to the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center that resulted in a continuing dialog among participants on issues common to these two related supercomputers. The workshop was divided into three sessions, addressing the hardware and software status of each system, prospective applications, and future directions.

  8. A wire scanner system for characterizing the BNL energy recovery LINAC beam position monitor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michnoff R.; Biscardi, C.; Cerniglia, P.; Degen, C.; Gassner, D.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.

    2012-04-15

    A stepper motor controlled wire scanner system has recently been modified to support testing of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Collider-Accelerator department's Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) beam position monitor (BPM) system. The ERL BPM consists of four 9.33 mm diameter buttons mounted at 90 degree spacing in a cube with 1.875 inch inside diameter. The buttons were designed by BNL and fabricated by Times Microwave Systems. Libera brilliance single pass BPM electronic modules with 700 MHz bandpass filter, manufactured by Instrumentation Technologies, will be used to measure the transverse beam positions at 14 locations around the ERL. The wire scanner assembly provides the ability to measure the BPM button response to a pulsed wire, and evaluate and calibrate the Libera position measurement electronics. A description of the wire scanner system and test result data will be presented.

  9. Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Michael P [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, Scott E [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, Mary Jane [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) [http://www.arm.gov/campaigns/osc2013rwpcf] campaign was scheduled to take place from 15 July 2013 through 15 July 2015 (or until shipped for the next U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Climate Research Facility first Mobile Facility [AMF1] deployment). The campaign involved the deployment of the AMF1 Scintec 915 MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) at BNL, in conjunction with several other ARM, BNL and National Weather Service (NWS) instruments. The two main scientific foci of the campaign were: 1) To provide profiles of the horizontal wind to be used to test and validate short-term cloud advection forecasts for solar-energy applications and 2) to provide vertical profiling capabilities for the study of dynamics (i.e., vertical velocity) and hydrometeors in winter storms. This campaign was a serendipitous opportunity that arose following the deployment of the RWP at the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign in Cape Cod, Massachusetts and restriction from participation in the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 (GoAmazon 2014/15) campaign due to radio-frequency allocation restriction for international deployments. The RWP arrived at BNL in the fall of 2013, but deployment was delayed until fall of 2014 as work/safety planning and site preparation were completed. The RWP further encountered multiple electrical failures, which eventually required several shipments of instrument power supplies and the final amplifier to the vendor to complete repairs. Data collection began in late January 2015. The operational modes of the RWP were changed such that in addition to collecting traditional profiles of the horizontal wind, a vertically pointing mode was also included for the purpose of precipitation sensing and estimation of vertical velocities. The RWP operated well until the end of the campaign in July 2015 and collected observations for more than 20 precipitation

  10. A description of the BNL active surface analysis facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories has a responsibility for the assessment of radioactive specimens arising both from post irradiation examination of power reactor components and structures and experimental programmes concerned with fission and activation product transport. Existing analytical facilities have been extended with the commissioning of an active surface analysis instrument (XSAM 800pci, Kratos Analytical). Surface analysis involves the characterisation of the outer few atomic layers of a solid surface/interface whose chemical composition and electronic structure will probably be different from the bulk. The new instrument consists three interconnected chambers positioned in series; comprising of a high vacuum sample introduction chamber, an ultra-high vacuum sample treatment/fracture chamber and an ultra-high vacuum sample analysis chamber. The sample analysis chamber contains the electron, X-ray and ion-guns and the electron and ion detectors necessary for performing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning Auger microscopy and secondary-ion mass spectroscopy. The chamber also contains a high stability manipulator to enable sub-micron imaging of specimens to be achieved and provide sample heating and cooling between - 180 and 6000C. (author)

  11. SynapSense wireless environmental monitoring system of the RHIC and ATLAS computing facility at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RHIC and ATLAS Computing Facility (RACF) at BNL is a 15000 sq. ft. facility hosting the IT equipment of the BNL ATLAS WLCG Tier-1 site, offline farms for the STAR and PHENIX experiments operating at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the BNL Cloud installation, various Open Science Grid (OSG) resources, and many other small physics research oriented IT installations. The facility originated in 1990 and grew steadily up to the present configuration with 4 physically isolated IT areas with the maximum rack capacity of about 1000 racks and the total peak power consumption of 1.5 MW. In June 2012 a project was initiated with the primary goal to replace several environmental monitoring systems deployed earlier within RACF with a single commercial hardware and software solution by SynapSense Corporation based on wireless sensor groups and proprietary SynapSense™ MapSense™ software that offers a unified solution for monitoring the temperature and humidity within the rack/CRAC units as well as pressure distribution underneath the raised floor across the entire facility. The deployment was completed successfully in 2013. The new system also supports a set of additional features such as capacity planning based on measurements of total heat load, power consumption monitoring and control, CRAC unit power consumption optimization based on feedback from the temperature measurements and overall power usage efficiency estimations that are not currently implemented within RACF but may be deployed in the future.

  12. Analysis of fission-product effects in a Fast Mixed-Spectrum Reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fast Mixed-Spectrum Reactor (FMSR) concept has been proposed by BNL as a means of alleviating certain nonproliferation concerns relating to civilian nuclear power. This breeder reactor concept has been tailored to operate on natural uranium feed (after initial startup), thus eliminating the need for fuel reprocessing. The fissile material required for criticality is produced, in situ, from the fertile feed material. This process requires that large burnup and fluence levels be achievable, which, in turn, necessarily implies that large fission-product inventories will exist in the reactor. It was the purpose of this study to investigate the effects of large fission-product inventories and to analyze the effect of burnup on fission-product nuclide distributions and effective cross sections. In addition, BNL requested that a representative 50-group fission-product library be generated for use in FMSR design calculations

  13. THE BNL ASTD FIELD LAB - NEAR - REAL - TIME CHARACTERIZATION OF BNL STOCKPILED SOILS TO ACCELERATE COMPLETION OF THE EM CHEMICAL HOLES PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As of October 2001, approximately 7,000 yd3 of stockpiled soil remained at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) after the remediation of the BNL Chemical/Animal/Glass Pits disposal area. The soils were originally contaminated with radioactive materials and heavy metals, depending on what materials had been interred in the pits, and how the pits were excavated. During the 1997 removal action, the more hazardous/radioactive materials were segregated, along with, chemical liquids and solids, animal carcasses, intact gas cylinders, and a large quantity of metal and glass debris. Nearly all of these materials have been disposed of. In order to ensure that all debris was removed and to characterize the large quantity of heterogeneous soil, BNL initiated an extended sorting, segregation, and characterization project directed at the remaining soil stockpiles. The project was co-funded by the Department of Energy Environmental Management Office (DOE EM) through the BNL Environmental Restoration program and through the DOE EM Office of Science and Technology Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) program. The focus was to remove any non-conforming items, and to assure that mercury and radioactive contaminant levels were within acceptable limits for disposal as low-level radioactive waste. Soils with mercury concentrations above allowable levels would be separated for disposal as mixed waste. Sorting and segregation were conducted simultaneously. Large stockpiles (ranging from 150 to 1,200 yd3) were subdivided into manageable 20 yd3 units after powered vibratory screening. The 1/2-inch screen removed almost all non-conforming items (plus some gravel). Non-conforming items were separated for further characterization. Soil that passed through the screen was also visually inspected before being moved to a 20 yd3 ''subpile.'' Eight samples from each subpile were collected after establishing a grid of four quadrants: north, east, south and west, and two layers: top and

  14. Simulations of the recent Lasalle-2 incident with the BNL plant analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of simulations of the recent power oscillation incident at the LaSalle-2 Nuclear Power Plant using the BNL Plant Analyzer. The causes of the oscillation were investigated and the sensitivity of the oscillation to key parameters was studied. It is concluded that the observed power oscillation was caused by boiling instability (i.e., density wave oscillation) reinforced by the reactivity feedback in neutron kinetics, and that the density wave oscillation resulted from flow reduction due to recirculation pump trip and feedwater temperature reduction due to partial loss of feedwater heating capability as well as power peaking. 7 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  15. Simulations of the recent Lasalle-2 incident with the BNL plant analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.; Wulff, W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of simulations of the recent power oscillation incident at the LaSalle-2 Nuclear Power Plant using the BNL Plant Analyzer. The causes of the oscillation were investigated and the sensitivity of the oscillation to key parameters was studied. It is concluded that the observed power oscillation was caused by boiling instability (i.e., density wave oscillation) reinforced by the reactivity feedback in neutron kinetics, and that the density wave oscillation resulted from flow reduction due to recirculation pump trip and feedwater temperature reduction due to partial loss of feedwater heating capability as well as power peaking. 7 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Progress in High-pT Physics at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazilevsky, A.; Bland, L.; Vogelsang, W.

    2010-03-17

    This volume archives the presentations at the RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop 'Progress in High-PT Physics at RHIC', held at BNL in March 2010. Much has been learned from high-p{sub T} physics after 10 years of RHIC operations for heavy-ion collisions, polarized proton collisions and d+Au collisions. The workshop focused on recent progress in these areas by both theory and experiment. The first morning saw review talks on the theory of RHIC high-p{sub T} physics by G. Sterman and J. Soffer, and on the experimental results by M. Tannenbaum. One of the most exciting recent results from the RHIC spin program is the first observation of W bosons and their associated single-spin asymmetry. The new preliminary data were reported on the first day of our workshop, along with a theoretical perspective. There also were detailed discussions on the global analysis of polarized parton distributions, including the knowledge on gluon polarization and the impact of the W-data. The main topic of the second workshop day were single-transverse spin asymmetries and their analysis in terms of transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions. There is currently much interest in a future Drell-Yan program at RHIC, thanks to the exciting physics opportunities this would offer. This was addressed in some of the talks. There also were presentations on the latest results on transverse-spin physics from HERMES and BELLE. On the final day of the workshop, the focus shifted toward forward and small-x physics at RHIC, which has become a cornerstone of the whole RHIC program. Exciting new data were presented and discussed in terms of their possible implications for our understanding of strong color-field phenomena in QCD. In the afternoon, there were discussions of nuclear parton distributions and jet observables, among them fragmentation. The workshop was concluded with outlooks toward the near-term (LHC, JLab) and longer-term (EIC) future. The workshop has been a great success

  17. Target and orbit feedback simulations of a muSR beamline at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKay, W. W. [Residence, 25 Rhododendron Circle, Asheville, NC (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pile, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    Well-polarized positive surface muons are a tool to measure the magnetic properties of materials since the precession rate of the spin can be determined from the observation of the positron directions when the muons decay. The use of the AGS complex at BNL has been explored for a muSR facility previously. Here we report simulations of a beamline with a target inside a solenoidal field, and of an orbit feed-back system with single muon beam positioning monitors based on technology available today

  18. BNL ALARA Center experience with an information exchange system on dose control at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The essential elements of an international information exchange system on dose control at nuclear power plants are summarized. Information was collected from literature abstracting services, by attending technical meetings, by circulating data collection forms, and through personal contacts. Data are assembled in various databases and periodically disseminated to several hundred interested participants through a variety of publications and at technical meetings. Immediate on-line access to the data is available to participants with modems, commercially available communications software, and a password that is provided by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center to authorized users of the system. Since January 1992, rapid access also has been provided to persons with fax machines. Some information is available for ''polling'' the BNL system at any time, and other data can be installed for polling on request. Most information disseminated to data has been through publications; however, new protocols, simplified by the ALARA Center staff, and the convenience of fax machines are likely to make the earlier availability of information through these mechanisms increasingly important

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN/BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP FUTURE TRANSVERSITY MEASUREMENTS (VOLUME 29).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boer, D.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.

    2001-01-02

    The RIKEN-BNL Research Center workshop on ''Future Transversity Measurements'' was held at BNL from September 18-20, 2000. The main goal of the workshop was to explore future measurements of transversity distributions. This issue is of importance to the RHIC experiments, which will study polarized proton-proton collisions with great precision. One of the workshop's goals was to enhance interactions between the DIS community at HERA and the spin community at RHIC in this field. The workshop has been well received by the participants; the number of 69 registered participants demonstrates broad interest in the workshop's topics. The program contained 35 talks and there was ample time for lively discussions. The program covered all recent work in the field and in addition some very elucidating educational talks were given. At the workshop the present status of the field was discussed and it has succeeded in stimulating new experimental and theoretical studies (e.g. model calculations for interference fragmentation functions (IFF), IFF analysis at DELPHI). It also functioned to focus attention on the open questions that need to be resolved for near future experiments. In general, the conclusions were optimistic, i.e. measuring the transversity functions seems to be possible, although some new experimental hurdles will have to be taken.

  20. Status of the RHIC and BNL/CERN heavy ion programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the gold beam operation at the Brookhaven AGS started in 1992, and with the lead beam operation at the CERN SPS planned for 1994--1995, investigation of high nucleon density states through high energy heavy ion collisions is becoming a reality. In addition, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, which is dedicated to the study of ultra-high energy heavy ion collisions, is under construction with a target completion date in 1997. There also is a plan to run the proposed CERN LHC for a few months a year for the heavy ion program. These colliders should provide opportunities to extend our knowledge of nuclear matter to the extraordinary states of extreme high temperature and high density, thus opening the way to the creation and study of quark-gluon plasma. The lattice gauge calculation based on the theory of strong interactions (QCD) predicts that, at such states, quarks and gluons are deconfined from individual nucleons and form a hot plasma. In this paper, the status of heavy ion stationary target programs at the BNL AGS and the CERN SPS, the progress of RHIC construction, and heavy ion research potential at LHC will be presented. The status of the CERN LHC will be covered elsewhere in these Proceedings

  1. High Frequency, High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at SLAC and BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenzweig, James; /UCLA; Travish, Gil; /UCLA; Hogan, Mark; /SLAC; Muggli, Patric; /Southern California U.

    2012-07-05

    Given the recent success of >GV/m dielectric wakefield accelerator (DWA) breakdown experiments at SLAC, and follow-on coherent Cerenkov radiation production at the UCLA Neptune, a UCLA-USC-SLAC collaboration is now implementing a new set of experiments that explore various DWA scenarios. These experiments are motivated by the opportunities presented by the approval of FACET facility at SLAC, as well as unique pulse-train wakefield drivers at BNL. The SLAC experiments permit further exploration of the multi-GeV/m envelope in DWAs, and will entail investigations of novel materials (e.g. CVD diamond) and geometries (Bragg cylindrical structures, slab-symmetric DWAs), and have an over-riding goal of demonstrating >GeV acceleration in {approx}33 cm DWA tubes. In the nearer term before FACET's commissioning, we are planning measurements at the BNL ATF, in which we drive {approx}50-200 MV/m fields with single pulses or pulse trains. These experiments are of high relevance to enhancing linear collider DWA designs, as they will demonstrate potential for efficient operation with pulse trains.

  2. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN/BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP FUTURE TRANSVERSITY MEASUREMENTS (VOLUME 29)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RIKEN-BNL Research Center workshop on ''Future Transversity Measurements'' was held at BNL from September 18-20, 2000. The main goal of the workshop was to explore future measurements of transversity distributions. This issue is of importance to the RHIC experiments, which will study polarized proton-proton collisions with great precision. One of the workshop's goals was to enhance interactions between the DIS community at HERA and the spin community at RHIC in this field. The workshop has been well received by the participants; the number of 69 registered participants demonstrates broad interest in the workshop's topics. The program contained 35 talks and there was ample time for lively discussions. The program covered all recent work in the field and in addition some very elucidating educational talks were given. At the workshop the present status of the field was discussed and it has succeeded in stimulating new experimental and theoretical studies (e.g. model calculations for interference fragmentation functions (IFF), IFF analysis at DELPHI). It also functioned to focus attention on the open questions that need to be resolved for near future experiments. In general, the conclusions were optimistic, i.e. measuring the transversity functions seems to be possible, although some new experimental hurdles will have to be taken

  3. The Cornell-BNL FFAG-ERL Test Accelerator: White Paper

    CERN Document Server

    Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Hoffstaetter, Georg; Mayes, Christopher; Patterson, Ritchie; Sagan, David; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Berg, Scott; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brooks, Stephen; Brown, Kevin; Fischer, Wolfram; Hao, Yue; Meng, Wuzheng; Méot, François; Minty, Michiko; Peggs, Stephen; Ptitsin, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Thieberger, Peter; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The Cornell-BNL FFAG-ERL Test Accelerator (C$\\beta$) will comprise the first ever Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) based on a Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) lattice. In particular, we plan to use a Non Scaling FFAG (NS-FFAG) lattice that is very compact and thus space- and cost- effective, enabling multiple passes of the electron beam in a single recirculation beam line, using the superconducting RF (SRF) linac multiple times. The FFAG-ERL moves the cost optimized linac and recirculation lattice to a dramatically better optimum. The prime accelerator science motivation for C$\\beta$ is proving that the FFAG-ERL concept works. This is an important milestone for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) plans to build a major Nuclear Physics facility, eRHIC, based on producing 21 GeV electron beams to collide with the RHIC ion beams. A consequence of the C$\\beta$ work would be the availability of significantly better, cost-effective, compact CW high-brightness electron beams for a plethora of scientific inves...

  4. Design and first cold test of BNL superconducting 112 MHz QWR for electron gun applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Boulware, C.H.; Chang, X.; Grimm, T.L.; Siegel, B.; Than, R.; Winowski, M.

    2011-03-28

    Brookhaven National Laboratory and Niowave, Inc. have designed, fabricated, and performed the first cold test of a superconducting 112 MHz quarter-wave resonator (QWR) for electron gun experiments. The first cold test of the QWR cryomodule has been completed at Niowave. The paper discusses the cryomodule design, presents the cold test results, and outline plans to upgrade the cryomodule for future experiments. A quarter-wave resonator concept of superconducting RF (SRF) electron gun was proposed at BNL for electron cooling ion/proton beams at RHIC. QWRs can be made sufficiently compact even at low RF frequencies (long wavelengths). The long wavelength allows to produce long electron bunches, thus minimizing space charge effects and enabling high bunch charge. Also, such guns should be suitable for experiments requiring high average current electron beams. A 112 MHz QWR gun was designed, fabricated, and cold-tested in collaboration between BNL and Niowave. This is the lowest frequency SRF gun ever tested successfully. In this paper we describe the gun design and fabrication, present the cold test results, and outline plans for the cryomodule upgrade for future experiments.

  5. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE BROOKHAVEN GRAPHITE RESEARCH REACTOR ENGINEERED CAP, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK DCN 5098-SR-07-0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-07-15

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) Engineered Cap at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) have completed removal of affected soils and performed as-left surveys by BSA associated with the BGRR Engineered Cap. Sample results have been submitted, as required, to demonstrate that remediation efforts comply with the cleanup goal of {approx}15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years (BNL 2011a).

  6. N Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The last of Hanfordqaodmasdkwaspemas7ajkqlsmdqpakldnzsdflss nine plutonium production reactors to be built was the N Reactor.This reactor was called a dual purpose...

  7. New result on K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} from BNL E787

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REDLINGER,G.

    1999-06-21

    E787 at BNL has reported evidence for the rare decay K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, based on the observation of one candidate event. In this paper, we present the result of analyzing a new dataset of comparable sensitivity to the published result.

  8. Summary of construction details and test performance of recent series of 1.8 meter SSC dipoles at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain design features of the SSC dipole magnets are evaluated with 1.8-meter models built and tested at BNL. We report the results of recent tests of such magnets relating quench performance and field quality measurements to mechanical design and assembly features such as collar material, collared coil dimensions and fit with the yoke and coil prestress level. 9 figs., 5 tabs

  9. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, A.; Qiu, Jianwei; Vogelsang, W.; Yuan, F.

    2011-08-02

    Understanding the structure of the nucleon is of fundamental importance in sub-atomic physics. Already the experimental studies on the electro-magnetic form factors in the 1950s showed that the nucleon has a nontrivial internal structure, and the deep inelastic scattering experiments in the 1970s revealed the partonic substructure of the nucleon. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin and the gluonic structure of the nucleon. Experiments using deep inelastic scattering or polarized p-p collisions are carried out in the US at the CEBAF and RHIC facilities, respectively, and there are other experimental facilities around the world. More than twenty years ago, the European Muon Collaboration published their first experimental results on the proton spin structure as revealed in polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and concluded that quarks contribute very little to the proton's spin. With additional experimental and theoretical investigations and progress in the following years, it is now established that, contrary to naive quark model expectations, quarks and anti-quarks carry only about 30% of the total spin of the proton. Twenty years later, the discovery from the polarized hadron collider at RHIC was equally surprising. For the phase space probed by existing RHIC experiments, gluons do not seem to contribute any to the proton's spin. To find out what carries the remaining part of proton's spin is a key focus in current hadronic physics and also a major driving force for the new generation of spin experiments at RHIC and Jefferson Lab and at a future Electron Ion Collider. It is therefore very important and timely to organize a series of annual spin physics meetings to summarize the status of proton spin physics, to focus the effort, and to layout the future perspectives. This summer program on 'Nucleon Spin Physics' held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on July 14-27, 2010 [http://www.bnl.gov/spnsp/] is the

  10. Chemical aspects of the commissioning and early operation of the BNL pond water treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account is given of the chemical aspects of the work done in commissioning and setting-to-work the pond water treatment plant at BNL. The plant is designed to maintain the fuel pond within the specified chemical conditions for Magnox fuel storage. In normal operation the treatment requirements are met by anion exchange, i.e. the carbonate and other impurity anions in the pond water are replaced by hydroxide held on an anion exchange resin. This method is referred to as ''anion only''. In the commissioning tests the performance of the plant was substantiated by passing simulated pond water of the correct chemical composition through the plant and monitoring the water quality at the plant outlet. During the first phase of operation on the pond itself the plant was operated in non-standard fashion to convert the chemistry from the previous ''carbonate'' regime to the required conditions. (author)

  11. Parameters Optimization for a Novel Vacuum Laser Acceleration Test at BNL-ATF

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Lei; Zhou, Feng

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new VLA theory model which has revealed that the injection electrons with low energy and small incident angle relative to the laser beam are captured and significantly accelerated in a strong laser field. For the further step for verifying the novel-VLA mechanics, we propose to use the BNL-ATF Terawatt CO2 laser and a high-brightness electron beam to carry out a proof-of-principle beam experiment. Experiment setup including the laser injection optics and electron extraction system and beam diagnostics is presented. Extensive optimized simulation results with ATF practical parameters are also presented, which shows that even when the laser intensity is not very high, the net energy gain still can be seen obviously. This could be prospect for a new revolution of vacuum laser acceleration.

  12. Target and orbit feedback simulations of a muSR beam line at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKay, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pile, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-07-28

    Well-polarized positive surface muons are a tool to measure the magnetic properties of materials since the precession rate of the spin can be determined from the observation of the positron directions when the muons decay. For a dc beam an ideal µSR flux for surface µ+ should be about 40 kHz/mm2. In this report we show how this flux could be achieved in a beam line using the AGS complex at BNL for a source of protons. We also determined that an orbit feedback system with a pair of thin silicon position monitors and kickers would miss the desired flux by at least an order of magnitude, even with perfect time resolution and no multiple scattering.

  13. Power spectrum calculation for the Cornell Wiggler A SASE experiment at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, we showed (Yu, Phys. Rev. E 58 (1998) 4991) that the widely used simulation code TDA3D, even though a single-frequency code, can be used to determine the power spectrum in the SASE process with excellent approximation in the exponential growth regime. In this paper, we apply this method to the BNL Cornell Wiggler A SASE experiment as an example. When the gain is not very high, there are many modes in the radiation, which seems to make the analytical calculation very difficult. However, we show that the increment of the radiation due to SASE over the spontaneous radiation can be expanded in terms of guided modes with rapid convergence. Thus when the spontaneous radiation is subtracted from the SASE power during the calculation, there is a good agreement between the analytical theory and the numerical simulation

  14. Hadron spin-flip at RHIC energies: Volume 3. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    From July 21 to August 22, 1997 a working group sponsored by the RIKEN BNL Research Center was convened to consider ``Hadron Spin-Flip at RHIC Energies.`` The original motivation for this arose from the importance of understanding the hadronic part of the proton-proton spin flip amplitude in using the Coulomb-Nuclear Interference for polarimetry. This is a very difficult, non-perturbative problem and it is not possible to make a calculation with controlled approximations, so a number of approaches were followed: (1) methods to extract the necessary information from past experiments and from RHIC experiments were examined; (2) phenomenological, Regge models--some of them very old--were reviewed; (3) the predictions of several non-perturbative theoretical models were evaluated; (4) the use of nuclei for the CNI experiment was quantitatively considered; (5) alternative methods of polarimetry were critically studied. These included Primikoff effect, large-t pp scattering, and pe double spin asymmetry.

  15. Hadron spin-flip at RHIC energies: Volume 3. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From July 21 to August 22, 1997 a working group sponsored by the RIKEN BNL Research Center was convened to consider ''Hadron Spin-Flip at RHIC Energies.'' The original motivation for this arose from the importance of understanding the hadronic part of the proton-proton spin flip amplitude in using the Coulomb-Nuclear Interference for polarimetry. This is a very difficult, non-perturbative problem and it is not possible to make a calculation with controlled approximations, so a number of approaches were followed: (1) methods to extract the necessary information from past experiments and from RHIC experiments were examined; (2) phenomenological, Regge models--some of them very old--were reviewed; (3) the predictions of several non-perturbative theoretical models were evaluated; (4) the use of nuclei for the CNI experiment was quantitatively considered; (5) alternative methods of polarimetry were critically studied. These included Primikoff effect, large-t pp scattering, and pe double spin asymmetry

  16. A combined model for pseudorapidity distributions in Cu-Cu collisions at BNL-RHIC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Zhjin; Huang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The charged particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions come from leading particles and those frozen out from the hot and dense matter created in collisions. The leading particles are conventionally supposed having Gaussian rapidity distributions normalized to the number of participants. The hot and dense matter is assumed to expand according to the unified hydrodynamics, a hydro model which unifies the features of Landau and Hwa-Bjorken model, and freeze out into charged particles from a space-like hypersurface with a proper time of Tau_FO . The rapidity distribution of this part of charged particles can be derived out analytically. The combined contribution from both leading particles and unified hydrodynamics is then compared against the experimental data performed by BNL-RHIC-PHOBOS Collaboration in different centrality Cu-Cu collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 and 62.4 GeV, respectively. The model predictions are in well consistent with experimental measurements.

  17. Emittance Studies of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 Cell Photocathode RF Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, D.T.; /SLAC; Wang, X.J.; /Brookhaven; Miller, R.H.; /SLAC; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; /Brookhaven; Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA; Sheehan, J.; Skaritka, J.; /Brookhaven; Winick, H.; /SLAC; Woodle, M.; Yakimenko, V.; /Brookhaven

    2011-09-09

    The symmetrized 1.6 cell S-band photocathode gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A novel emittance compensation solenoid magnet has also been designed, built and is in operation at the ATF. These two subsystems form an emittance compensated photoinjector used for beam dynamics, advanced acceleration and free electron laser experiments at the ATF. The highest acceleration field achieved on the copper cathode is 150 MV/m, and the guns normal operating field is 130 MV/m. The maximum rf pulse length is 3 {mu}s. The transverse emittance of the photoelectron beam were measured for various injection parameters. The 1 nC emittance results are presented along with electron bunch length measurements that indicated that at above the 400 pC, space charge bunch lengthening is occurring. The thermal emittance, {epsilon}{sub o}, of the copper cathode has been measured.

  18. MEASUREMENTS AND MODELING OF EDDY CURRENT EFFECTS IN BNL'S AGS BOOSTER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN, K.A.; AHRENS, L.; GARDNER, C.; GLENN, J.W.; HARVEY, M.; MENG, W.; ZENO, K.

    2006-06-23

    Recent beam experiments at BNL's AGS Booster have enabled us to study in more detail the effects of eddy currents on the lattice structure and our control over the betatron tune. The Booster is capable of operating at ramp rates as high as 9 T/sec. At these ramp rates eddy currents in the vacuum chambers significantly alter the fields and gradients seen by the beam as it is accelerated. The Booster was designed with these effects in mind and to help control the field uniformity and linearity in the Booster Dipoles special vacuum chambers were designed with current windings to negate the affect of the induced eddy currents. In this report results from betatron tune measurements and eddy current simulations will be presented. We will then present results from modeling the accelerator using the results of the magnetic field simulations and compare these to the measurements.

  19. POWER SPECTRUM CALCULATION FOR THE CORNELL WIGGLER A SASE EXPERIMENT AT BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently the authors showed [I] that the widely used simulation code TDA3D, even though a single frequency code, can be used to determine the power spectrum in the SASE process with excellent approximation in the exponential growth regime. In this paper, they apply this method to the BNL Cornell Wiggler A SASE experiment as an example. When the gain is not very high, there are many modes in the radiation, which seems to make the analytical calculation very difficult. However, they show that the increment of the radiation due to SASE over the spontaneous radiation can be expanded in terms of guided modes with rapid convergence. Thus when the spontaneous radiation is subtracted from the SASE power during the calculation, there is a good agreement between the analytical theory and the numerical simulation

  20. PERFORMANCE RESULTS FOR THE BNL PSI DESIGNED FOR THE SNS AND ITS APPLICATION TO OTHER ACCELERATORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed a Power Supply Interface (PSI) as part of the construction of the accumulator ring and transfer lines of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) that will be located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These units have now been constructed in production quantities. This paper will be in two parts. The first part reports the results of performance testing for it's application to the SNS. But the PSI can also be used for other applications, and is currently being used for another application at BNL, the Booster Application Facility (BAF). The second part of this paper will describe how the versatile PSI can be configured for other machines, and it's performance in ramping applications

  1. Progress on the high-current 704 MHz superconducting RF cavity at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu W.; Astefanous, C.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; et al

    2012-05-20

    The 704 MHz high current superconducting cavity has been designed with consideration of both performance of fundamental mode and damping of higher order modes. A copper prototype cavity was fabricated by AES and delivered to BNL. RF measurements were carried out on this prototype cavity, including fundamental pass-band and HOM spectrum measurements, HOM studies using bead-pull setup, prototyping of antenna-type HOM couplers. The measurements show that the cavity has very good damping for the higher-order modes, which was one of the main goals for the high current cavity design. 3D cavity models were simulated with Omega3P code developed by SLAC to compare with the measurements. The paper describes the cavity design, RF measurement setups and results for the copper prototype. The progress with the niobium cavity fabrication will also be described.

  2. Performance on the low charge state laser ion source in BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, M.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Costanzo, M.; DeSanto, L.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kanesue, T.; Lambiase, R.; Lehn, D.; Liaw, C. J.; McCafferty, D.; Morris, J.; Olsen, R.; Pikin, A.; Raparia, D.; Steszyn, A.; Ikeda, S.

    2015-09-07

    On March 2014, a Laser Ion Source (LIS) was commissioned which delivers high-brightness, low-charge-state heavy ions for the hadron accelerator complex in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Since then, the LIS has provided many heavy ion species successfully. The low-charge-state (mostly singly charged) beams are injected to the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), where ions are then highly ionized to fit to the following accelerator’s Q/M acceptance, like Au32+. Recently we upgraded the LIS to be able to provide two different beams into EBIS on a pulse-to-pulse basis. Now the LIS is simultaneously providing beams for both the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL).

  3. DESIGN OF 1.2 GEV SCL AS NEW INJECTOR FOR THE BNL AGS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RUGGIERO,A.G.ALESSI,J.HARRISON,M.IAROCCI,M.NEHRING,T.RAPARIA,D.ROSER,T.TUOZZOLO,J.WENG,W.

    2003-09-08

    Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) accelerator complex at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to provide an average beam power of 1 MW at the energy of 28 GeV. The facility is to be used primarily as a proton driver for the production of intense neutrino beams [1,2]. A study of a proton Super-Conducting Linac (SCL) as the new injector to the AGS has just been completed [3] and found feasible. We are now initiating a second design phase with more emphasis on engineering considerations, namely: cryogenics, cryostat design, RF cavity design, RF power couplers and power sources, conventional engineering, and insertions for transverse focusing and other beam utilities. Some of these issues are addressed in this paper.

  4. Microwave measurements of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell photocathode rf gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The longitudinal accelerating field E. has been measured as a function of azimuthal angle in the full cell of the cold test model for the 1.6 cell BNL/SLAC/UCLA number-sign 3 S-band RF Gun using a needle rotation/frequency perturbation technique. These measurements were conducted before and after symmetrizing the full cell with a vacuum pump out port and an adjustable short. Two different waveguide to full cell coupling schemes were studied. The dipole mode of the full cell is an order of magnitude less severe before symmetrization for the 0θ-coupling scheme. The multi-pole contribution to the longitudinal field asymmetry are calculated using standard Fourier series techniques. The Panofsky-Wenzel theorem is used in estimating the transverse emittance due to the multipole components of Ex

  5. BNL NONLINEAR PRE TEST SEISMIC ANALYSIS FOR THE NUPEC ULTIMATE STRENGTH PIPING TEST PROGRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has been conducting a multi-year research program to investigate the behavior of nuclear power plant piping systems under large seismic loads. The objectives of the program are: to develop a better understanding of the elasto-plastic response and ultimate strength of nuclear piping; to ascertain the seismic safety margin of current piping design codes; and to assess new piping code allowable stress rules. Under this program, NUPEC has performed a large-scale seismic proving test of a representative nuclear power plant piping system. In support of the proving test, a series of materials tests, static and dynamic piping component tests, and seismic tests of simplified piping systems have also been performed. As part of collaborative efforts between the United States and Japan on seismic issues, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and its contractor, the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), are participating in this research program by performing pre-test and post-test analyses, and by evaluating the significance of the program results with regard to safety margins. This paper describes BNL's pre-test analysis to predict the elasto-plastic response for one of NUPEC's simplified piping system seismic tests. The capability to simulate the anticipated ratcheting response of the system was of particular interest. Analyses were performed using classical bilinear and multilinear kinematic hardening models as well as a nonlinear kinematic hardening model. Comparisons of analysis results for each plasticity model against test results for a static cycling elbow component test and for a simplified piping system seismic test are presented in the paper

  6. Nuclear data evaluation and group constant generation for reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new 69-group nuclear data library for WIMS-KAERI code was generated using the ENDF/B-V, IV, JENDL-2, and ENDL-84 data and NJOY which is nuclear data processing code. Thermal reactor benchmark problems recommended by the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group at BNL were analyzed using this new library and WIMS-KAERI code. Using 14 benchmark problems the calculated average value and standard deviation for effective multiplication factors were 1.00303 and 0.00514, respectvely.(Author)

  7. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d' %C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

    2012-05-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  8. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan - Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  9. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  10. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised

  11. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  12. Light-water-reactor coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of computer codes that model light water reactor cores with coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics. This includes codes for transient analysis and codes for steady state analysis which include fuel depletion and fission product buildup. Applications in nuclear design, reactor operations and safety analysis are given and the major codes in use in the USA are identified. The neutronic and thermal-hydraulic methodologies and other code features are outlined for three steady state codes (PDQ7, NODE-P/B and SIMULATE) and four dynamic codes (BNL-TWIGL, MEKIN, RAMONA-3B, RETRAN-02). Speculation as to future trends with such codes is also presented

  13. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  14. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  15. Status of 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long SSC dipole magnet R ampersand D program at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last year-and-a-half, several 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long dipole magnet prototypes were built by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under contract with the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory. These prototypes are the last phase of a half-decade-long R ampersand D program, carried out in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of the SSC main ring dipole magnets. They also prepare the way of the 5-cm-aperture dipole magnet program to be started soon. In this paper, we analyze the mechanical behavior of the BNL prototypes during cool-down and excitation, and we attempt to relate this behavior to the magnet features. The data reveal that the mechanical behavior is sensitive to the vertical collar-yoke interference, and that the magnets exhibited somewhat erratic changes in coil end-loading during cool-down. 9 refs., 6 figs

  16. Performance of microstrip gas chambers in BNL-E885: a search for LAMBDA LAMBDA-hypernuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Landry, M; Davis, C A; Faszer, W; Gan, L; Lee, L; Page, S A; Ramsay, W D; Salomon, M; Oers, W T H

    1999-01-01

    The performance of MicroStrip Gas Chambers (MSGC) in BNL Experiment 885, a search for LAMBDA LAMBDA-hypernuclei, is detailed. Chambers with an active area of 80x50 mm sup 2 were instrumented and operated as a vertex detector in the experiment. Furthermore, two distinct types of microstrip prints were utilized in these chambers. Prints manufactured with Integrated Circuit (IC) photolithographic technology have fine tolerances and thin minimum trace widths, but can suffer from a high rate of defects per print and are more costly. Prints constructed with Printed Circuit (PC) photolithographic technology have coarser tolerances but relatively few defects per print, and are extremely cost-effective. Results of bench and beam tests of both IC and PC based MSGCs are presented and their performance in BNL-E885 is discussed. E885 marks the first use of PC based MSGCs in an experiment.

  17. A NRC-BNL benchmark evaluation of seismic analysis methods for non-classically damped coupled systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the auspices of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) developed a comprehensive program to evaluate state-of-the-art methods and computer programs for seismic analysis of typical coupled nuclear power plant (NPP) systems with non-classical damping. In this program, four benchmark models of coupled building-piping/equipment systems with different damping characteristics were developed and analyzed by BNL for a suite of earthquakes. The BNL analysis was carried out by the Wilson-θ time domain integration method with the system-damping matrix computed using a synthesis formulation as presented in a companion paper [Nucl. Eng. Des. (2002)]. These benchmark problems were subsequently distributed to and analyzed by program participants applying their uniquely developed methods and computer programs. This paper is intended to offer a glimpse at the program, and provide a summary of major findings and principle conclusions with some representative results. The participant's analysis results established using complex modal time history methods showed good comparison with the BNL solutions, while the analyses produced with either complex-mode response spectrum methods or classical normal-mode response spectrum method, in general, produced more conservative results, when averaged over a suite of earthquakes. However, when coupling due to damping is significant, complex-mode response spectrum methods performed better than the classical normal-mode response spectrum method. Furthermore, as part of the program objectives, a parametric assessment is also presented in this paper, aimed at evaluation of the applicability of various analysis methods to problems with different dynamic characteristics unique to coupled NPP systems. It is believed that the findings and insights learned from this program will be useful in developing new acceptance criteria and providing guidance for future regulatory activities involving license

  18. Sulfur polymer stabilization/solidification (SPSS) treatment of mixed waste mercury recovered from environmental restoration activities at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 1,140 yd3 of radioactively contaminated soil containing toxic mercury (Hg) and several liters of mixed-waste elemental mercury were generated during a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Mixed Waste Focus Area (DOE MWFA) is sponsoring a comparison of several technologies that may be used to treat these wastes and similar wastes at BNL and other sites across the DOE complex. This report describes work conducted at BNL on the application and pilot-scale demonstration of the newly developed Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process for treatment of contaminated mixed-waste soils containing high concentrations (approximately 5,000 mg/L) of mercury and liquid elemental mercury. BNL's SPSS (patent pending) process chemically stabilizes the mercury to reduce vapor pressure and leachability and physically encapsulates the waste in a solid matrix to eliminate dispersion and provide long-term durability. Two 55-gallon drums of mixed-waste soil containing high concentrations of mercury and about 62 kg of radioactive contaminated elemental mercury were successfully treated. Waste loadings of 60 wt% soil were achieved without resulting in any increase in waste volume, while elemental mercury was solidified at a waste loading of 33 wt% mercury. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) analyses indicate the final waste form products pass current Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) allowable TCLP concentrations as well as the more stringent proposed Universal Treatment Standards. Mass balance measurements show that 99.7% of the mercury treated was successfully retained within the waste form, while only 0.3% was captured in the off gas system

  19. Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Frederick H. [Argonne National Laboratory; Jacobson, Norman H.

    1968-09-01

    This booklet discusses research reactors - reactors designed to provide a source of neutrons and/or gamma radiation for research, or to aid in the investigation of the effects of radiation on any type of material.

  20. Environmental radioactivity measurements at BNL during the year following the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident which destroyed Unit 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station on 26 April 1986 provided the world's scientists with an opportunity, unique in recent years, to study many of the processes which follow the release of large quantities of radioactivity into the atmosphere. BNL undertook a wide ranging programme of environmental measurements after the accident, the immediate aim being to supply HM Government with data to help assess the radiological consequences to the UK population. As it became clear that the UK dose commitment was relatively low, the thrust of the measurements began to be concentrated on airborne radioactivity and the movement of nuclides in the grass-soil system. The aim of these studies was to assess dispersion and diffusion of radioactivity in these particular compartments of the environment. The measurements have continued over the twelve month period since the Chernobyl accident. This report aims to disseminate the year's data and to offer some initial interpretations of the trends. (U.K.)

  1. Distribution and ecotoxicity of chlorotriazines in the Scheldt Estuary (B-Nl)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the Endis-Risks project, the current study describes the occurrence of the chlorotriazine pesticides atrazine, simazine and terbutylazine in water, sediment and suspended matter in the Scheldt estuary (B-Nl) from 2002 to 2005 (3 samplings a year, 8 sampling points). Atrazine was found at the highest concentrations, varying from 10 to 736 ng/l in water and from 5 up to 10 ng/g in suspended matter. Simazine and terbutylazine were detected at lower concentrations. Traces of the targeted pesticides were also detected in sediments, but these were below the limit of quantification. As part of an ecotoxicological assessment, we studied the potential effect of atrazine on molting of Neomysis integer (Crustacea:Mysidacea), a resident invertebrate of the Scheldt Estuary and a proposed test organism for the evaluation of endocrine disruption. Following chronic exposure (∼3 weeks), atrazine did not significantly affect mysid molting at environmentally relevant concentrations (up to 1 μg/l). - The water of the Scheldt estuary and its associated suspended solids are contaminated with chlorotriazines at concentrations that do not affect mysid molting

  2. SCIENTIFIC PRESENTATION. 7TH MEETING OF THE MANAGEMENT STEERING COMMITTEE OF THE RIKEN BNL COLLABORATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.D.

    2001-02-13

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho,'' (RIKEN) The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including hard QCD/spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) physics through nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The Director of RBRC is Professor T. D. Lee. The first years were dedicated to the establishment of a theory group. This has essentially been completed consisting of Fellows, Postdocs, and RHIC Physics/University Fellows, with an active group of consultants. The center also organizes an extensive series of workshops on specific topics in strong interactions with an accompanying series of published proceedings. In addition, a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor computer has been constructed and operational since August 1998. It was awarded the Supercomputer 1998 Gordon Bell Prize for price performance. An active experimental group centered around the spin physics program at RHIC has subsequently also been established at RBRC. It presently consists of five Fellows, one Postdoc and several scientific collaborators with more appointments being expected in the near future. Members and participants of RBRC on occasion will develop articles such as this one, in the nature of a status report or a general review.

  3. SCIENTIFIC PRESENTATION. 7TH MEETING OF THE MANAGEMENT STEERING COMMITTEE OF THE RIKEN BNL COLLABORATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEE,T.D.

    2001-02-13

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho,'' (RIKEN) The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong 'interactions, including hard QCD/spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) physics through nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The Director of RBRC is Professor T. D. Lee. The first years were dedicated to the establishment of a theory group. This has essentially been completed consisting of Fellows, Postdocs, and RHIC Physics/University Fellows, with an active group of consultants. The center also organizes an extensive series of workshops on specific topics in strong interactions with an accompanying series of published proceedings. In addition, a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor computer has been constructed and operational since August 1998. It was awarded the Supercomputer 1998 Gordon Bell Prize for price performance. An active experimental group centered around the spin physics program at RHIC has subsequently also been established at RBRC. It presently consists of five Fellows, one Postdoc and several scientific collaborators with more appointments being expected in the near future. Members and participants of RBRC on occasion will develop articles such as this one, in the nature of a status report or a general review.

  4. Investigation of a plant and fish kill downstream from BNL sewage treatment outfall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period May 13 to May 17, 1974, a plant and fish kill occurred in a headwater of the Peconic River, which originates on the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) site. Although the stream itself, and hence the magnitude of the mortality, was small, the fish kill was near total in the impacted reach, and therefore received more attention than the numbers alone would warrant. The Laboratory has utilized the stream for the past 25 years for the discharge of treated sanitary wastes containing low levels of radioactivity, without perceptible effect up to the time of this incident. Although an investigation during the following several months has not disclosed a completely satisfactory explanation, it has pointed out weaknesses in the Laboratory's knowledge of the on site amounts and locations of environmentally toxic agents, as well as of the accountability for their use. The investigation also suggested the need for additional monitoring to detect unusual agents in the sanitary treatment plant influent for prompt analyses of suspect samples, and for a means of holding up the effluent until such analyses can be accomplished. Additionally, the investigation led to the identification of supporting analytical capabilities of other government agencies, without which a competent investigation would have been difficult. It also revealed the desirability for the prompt submission of relevant samples to them, in the event of a recurrence

  5. Scientific presentation. 7th meeting of the management steering committee of the RIKEN BNL Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho,'' (RIKEN) The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including hard QCD/spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) physics through nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The Director of RBRC is Professor T. D. Lee. The first years were dedicated to the establishment of a theory group. This has essentially been completed consisting of Fellows, Postdocs, and RHIC Physics/University Fellows, with an active group of consultants. The center also organizes an extensive series of workshops on specific topics in strong interactions with an accompanying series of published proceedings. In addition, a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor computer has been constructed and operational since August 1998. It was awarded the Supercomputer 1998 Gordon Bell Prize for price performance. An active experimental group centered around the spin physics program at RHIC has subsequently also been established at RBRC. It presently consists of five Fellows, one Postdoc and several scientific collaborators with more appointments being expected in the near future. Members and participants of RBRC on occasion will develop articles such as this one, in the nature of a status report or a general review

  6. The Upgrade of the DUV-FEL Facility at the BNL

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xijie; Murphy, James; Rakowsky, George; Rose, James; Sheehy, Brian; Shen, Yuzhen; Skaritka, John; Wu, Zilu; Yu Li Hua

    2004-01-01

    The DUV-FEL at BNL, is the world's only facility dedicated to laser-seeded FEL R&D and its applications. The HGHG at the DUV-FEL reached saturation at 266 nm with 800 nm seeding [1] in 2002. Since then, the first chemical science experiment ? ion pair imaging, was successfully completed [2].The DUV-FEL linac is being upgraded from 200 to 300 MeV to enable the HGHG FEL to produce 100 μJ pulses of 100 nm light. This will establish the DUV FEL as a premier user facility for XUV radiation. The upgraded facility will also enable several critical R&Ds for a future X-ray FEL based on HGHG, such as cascaded HGHG and higher harmonic HGHG (n>5). The upgraded HGHG will operate at the 4th harmonic with the seed laser at 400nm. The increase of the electron beam energy will be accomplished by installing a 5th linac cavity and two 45 MW klystrons. New modulator and dispersion sections vacuum chambers will be manufactured to accommodate new matching optics and 8th harmonic HGHG. The status of the DUV-FEL upgra...

  7. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop, Volume 91, RBRC Scientific Review Committee Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samios,N.P.

    2008-11-17

    The ninth evaluation of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) took place on Nov. 17-18, 2008, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The members of the Scientific Review Committee (SRC) were Dr. Dr. Wit Busza (Chair), Dr. Miklos Gyulassy, Dr. Akira Masaike, Dr. Richard Milner, Dr. Alfred Mueller, and Dr. Akira Ukawa. We are pleased that Dr. Yasushige Yano, the Director of the Nishina Institute of RIKEN, Japan participated in this meeting both in informing the committee of the activities of the Nishina Institute and the role of RBRC and as an observer of this review. In order to illustrate the breadth and scope of the RBRC program, each member of the Center made a presentation on his/her research efforts. This encompassed three major areas of investigation, theoretical, experimental and computational physics. In addition the committee met privately with the fellows and postdocs to ascertain their opinions and concerns. Although the main purpose of this review is a report to RIKEN Management (Dr. Ryoji Noyori, RIKEN President) on the health, scientific value, management and future prospects of the Center, the RBRC management felt that a compendium of the scientific presentations are of sufficient quality and interest that they warrant a wider distribution. Therefore we have made this compilation and present it to the community for its information and enlightenment.

  8. A FIVE-WATTS G-M/J-T REFRIGERATOR FOR THE TARGET AT BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A five-watts G-M/J-T refrigerator was built and installed for the high-energy physics research at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2001. A liquid helium target of 8.25 liters was required for an experiment in the proton beam line at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of BNL. The large radiation heat load towards the target requires a five-watts refrigerator at 4.2 K to support a liquid helium flask of 0.2 meter in diameter and 0.3 meter in length which is made of Mylar film of 0.35 mm in thickness. The liquid helium flask is thermally exposed to the vacuum windows that are also made of 0.35 mm thickness Mylar film at room temperature. The refrigerator uses a two-stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler for precooling the Joule-Thomson circuit that consists of five Linde-type heat exchangers. A mass flow rate of 0.8(approx) 1.0 grams per second at 17.7 atm is applied to the refrigerator cold box. The two-phase helium flows between the liquid target and liquid/gas separator by means of thermosyphon. The paper presents the system design as well as the test results including the control of thermal oscillation

  9. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Physics of W and Z Bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, S.; Okada, K.; Patwa, A.; Qiu, J.; Surrow, B.

    2010-06-24

    A two-day workshop on 'The Physics of Wand Z Bosons' Was held at the RIKEN BNL Research Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory on June 24-25, 2010. With the recent release of the first measurement of W bosons in proton-proton collisions at RHIC and the first observation of W events at the LHC, the workshop was a timely opportunity to bring together experts from both the high energy particle and nuclear physics communities to share their ideas and expertise on the physics of Wand Z bosons, with the aim of fully exploring the potential of the W/Z physics programs at RHIC and the LHC. The focus was on the production and measurement of W/Z bosons in both polarized and unpolarized proton-proton collisions, and the role of W/Z production in probing the parton flavor and helicity structure of the colliding proton and in the search for new physics. There were lively discussions about the potential and future prospects of W/Z programs at RHIC, Tevatron, and the LHC.

  10. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  11. Reactor physics and reactor computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathematical methods and computer calculations for nuclear and thermonuclear reactor kinetics, reactor physics, neutron transport theory, core lattice parameters, waste treatment by transmutation, breeding, nuclear and thermonuclear fuels are the main interests of the conference

  12. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are currently 284 research reactors in operation, and 12 under construction around the world. Of the operating reactors, nearly two-thirds are used exclusively for research, and the rest for a variety of purposes, including training, testing, and critical assembly. For more than 50 years, research reactor programs have contributed greatly to the scientific and educational communities. Today, six of the world's research reactors are being shut down, three of which are in the USA. With government budget constraints and the growing proliferation concerns surrounding the use of highly enriched uranium in some of these reactors, the future of nuclear research could be impacted

  13. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Object: To provide a jet and missile protective wall of a configuration being inflated toward the center of a reactor container on the inside of a body of the reactor container disposed within a biological shield wall to thereby increase safety of the reactor container. Structure: A jet and missile protective wall comprised of curved surfaces internally formed with a plurality of arch inflations filled with concrete between inner and outer iron plates and shape steel beam is provided between a reactor container surrounded by a biological shield wall and a thermal shield wall surrounding the reactor pressure vessel, and an adiabatic heat insulating material is filled in space therebetween. (Yoshino, Y.)

  14. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schenter, R.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

  15. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted

  16. Analysis of the BNL ThO2-233U exponential experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BNL ThO2--3 w/o 233U light-water-moderated exponential experiments were analyzed to evaluate (1) cross section library sets for 233U and 232Th, and (2) correlations with measured ThO2 resonance integral data. A total of six cross section library sets were evaluated, including ENDF/B-2 and ENDF/B-3 libraries for 232Th, ENDF/B-2 library for 233U, and ThO2 resonance integral correlations based on data by Weitman and Pettus, Hardy and Palowitch, and corrections to the latter data by Steen. A modified version of the LEOPARD code was used throughout this analysis. The principle results of this work are as follows: (1) The library set containing ENDF/B-2 data for 233U and ENDF/B-3 data for 232Th, together with ThO2 resonance integral correlation based on Steen's corrections to the Hardy and Palowitch data, yields the best agreement with measurements, giving an average k/sub eff/ of 0.9975 with a standard deviation of 0.0067 for the 21 analyzed configurations. (2) With respect to this ''best'' set, the ENDF/B-2 232Th data is less reactive than the corresponding ENDF/B-3 data by approximately 0.1 percent Δk. (3) The ThO2 resonance integral correlation based on data by Weitman and Pettus yields resonance integrals that are consistently higher than those produced by the correlation with Steen's values, even though the latter is normalized to an infinitely dilute resonance integral of 85.9 barns (0.5 ev cutoff), while the former is normalized to a corresponding value of 80 barns. Thus, with respect to the ''best'' set, the ThO2 resonance integral correlation based on the Weitman and Pettus data is less reactive by approximately 0.7 percent Δk

  17. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED - DOMAIN WALL FERMIONS AT TEN YEARS (VOLUME 84)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop was held to mark the 10th anniversary of the first numerical simulations of QCD using domain wall fermions initiated at BNL. It is very gratifying that in the intervening decade widespread use of domain wall and overlap fermions is being made. It therefore seemed appropriate at this stage for some ''communal introspection'' of the progress that has been made, hurdles that need to be overcome, and physics that can and should be done with chiral fermions. The meeting was very well attended, drawing about 60 registered participants primarily from Europe, Japan and the US. It was quite remarkable that pioneers David Kaplan, Herbert Neuberger, Rajamani Narayanan, Yigal Shamir, Sinya Aoki, and Pavlos Vranas all attended the workshop. Comparisons between domain wall and overlap formulations, with their respective advantages and limitations, were discussed at length, and a broad physics program including pion and kaon physics, the epsilon regime, nucleon structure, and topology, among others, emerged. New machines and improved algorithms have played a key role in realizing realistic dynamical fermion lattice simulations (small quark mass, large volume, and so on), so much in fact that measurements are now as costly. Consequently, ways to make the measurements more efficient were also discussed. We were very pleased to see the keen and ever growing interest in chiral fermions in our community and the significant strides our colleagues have made in bringing chiral fermions to the fore of lattice QCD calculations. Their contributions made the workshop a success, and we thank them deeply for sharing their time and ideas. Finally, we must especially acknowledge Norman Christ and Bob Mawhinney for their early and continued collaboration without which the success of domain wall fermions would not have been possible

  18. Establishment of a Photon Data Section of the BNL National Nuclear Data Center: A preliminary proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is proposed to establish a Photon Data Section (PDS) of the BNL National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). This would be a total program encompassing both photon-atom and photon-nucleus interactions. By utilizing the existing NNDC data base management expertise and on-line access capabilities, the implementation of photon interaction data activities within the existing NNDC nuclear structure and nuclear-reaction activities can reestablish a viable photon interaction data program at minimum cost. By taking advantage of the on-line capabilities, the x-ray users' community will have access to a dynamic, state-of-the-art data base of interaction information. The proposed information base would include data that presently are scattered throughout the literature usually in tabulated form. It is expected that the data bases would include at least the most precise data available in photoelectric cross sections, atomic form factors and incoherent scattering functions, anomalous scattering factors, oscillator strengths and oscillator densities, fluorescence yields, Auger electron yields, etc. It could also include information not presently available in tabulations or in existing data bases such as EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) reference spectra, chemical bonding induced shifts in the photoelectric absorption edge, matrix corrections, x-ray Raman, and x-ray resonant Raman cross sections. The data base will also include the best estimates of the accuracy of the interaction data as it exists in the data base. It is proposed that the PDS would support computer programs written for calculating scattering cross sections for given solid angles, sample geometries, and polarization of incident x-rays, for calculating Compton profiles, and for analyzing data as in EXAFS and x-ray fluorescence

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED: ''PARTON ORBITAL ANGULAR MOMENTUM'' VOLUME 81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The joint UNM/RBRC 'Workshop on Parton Orbital Angular Momentum' was held on February 24th through 26th at the University of New Mexico Department of Physics and Astronomy in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and was sponsored by The University of New Mexico (Physics Department, New Mexico Center for Particle Physics, Dean of Arts and Sciences, and Office of the Vice Provost for Research and Economic Development) and the NUN-BNL Research Center. The workshop was motivated by recent and upcoming experimental data based on methods which have been proposed to access partonic angular momenta, including Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering, measuring the Sivers functions, and measuring helicity dependent kt in jets. Our desire was to clarify the state of the art in the theoretical understanding in this area, and to help define what might be learned about partonic orbital angular momenta Erom present and upcoming high precision data, particularly at RHIC, Jlab, COMPASS and HERMES. The workshop filled two rather full days of talks fiom both theorists and experimentalists, with a good deal of discussion during, and in between talks focusing on the relationship between the intrinsic transverse momentum, orbital angular momentum, and observables such as the Sivers Function. These talks and discussions were particularly illuminating and the organizers wish to express their sincere thanks to everyone for contributing to this workshop. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select a few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. To date there are eighty proceeding volumes available

  20. Search for neutrino oscillations in the BNL E8-16 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiment PS 191 at CERN was looking for decays of hypothetical heavy neutrinos in a low energy upsilon/sub μ/ beam. It found an apparent excess of neutrino interactions showing an electron, about 3 times the number expected from the fluxes of upsilon/sub e/ calculated with standard programs. The result was limited by statistics and not optimized for this search. If the events seen were indeed upsilon/sub e/ interactions and if the flux calculations were reliable, then the signal could be an indication of the oscillation upsilon/sub μ/ → upsilon/sub e/. To investigate further this result the detector was moved to BNL where the neutrino beam is about 5 times more intense. The experiment was rerun in better conditions with an unbiased trigger and more matter for shower containment. A total of 10/sup 19/ protons on target were accumulated both for neutrinos and antineutrinos. This represents more than an order of magnitude gain with respect to the CERN experiment. The detector, although light (upsilon 7 tons of fiducial mass) has the advantage of being very fine grain. It is constructed of 3 mm thick iron plates and flash tube chambers. The tubes have transverse dimensions 5 x 5 mm/sup 2/ and cover 3 x 6 m/sup 2/ for a total of 35,000 channels. The granularity for electromagnetic showers is 17% of a radiation length. The search for oscillation is a relative measurement of the number of events showing 2 branches, either with or without and electromagnetic shower. This is a direct estimate of the ratio upsilon/sub e//upsilonμ

  1. Tests of an environmental and personnel safe cleaning process for BNL accelerator and storage ring components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large measure of the successful operation of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for over a decade can be attributed to the cleaning of its UHV components during and after construction. A new UHV cleaning process, which had to be environmentally and personnel safe, was needed to replace the harsh, unfriendly process which was still in use. Dow Advanced Cleaning Systems was contracted to develop a replacement process without the use of harsh chemicals and which must clean vacuum surfaces as well as the existing process. Acceptance of the replacement process was primarily based on Photon Stimulated Desorption (PSD) measurements of beam tube samples run on NSLS beam line U10B. One meter long beam tube samples were fabricated from aluminum, 304 stainless steel and oxygen free copper. Initially, coupon samples were cleaned and passed preliminary testing for the proposed process. Next, beam tube samples of each material were cleaned, and the PSD measured on beam line U10B using white light with a critical energy of 487 ev. Prior to cleaning, the samples were contaminated with a mixture of cutting oils, lubricants, vacuum oils and vacuum grease. The contaminated samples were then baked. Samples of each material were also cleaned with the existing process after the same preparation. Beam tube samples were exposed to between 1022 and 1023 photons per meter for a PSD measurement. Desorption yields for H2, CO, CO2, CH4 and H2O are reported for both the existing cleaning and for the replacement cleaning process. Preliminary data, residual gas scans, and PSD results are given and discussed. The new process is also compared with new cleaning methods developed in other laboratories

  2. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED - DOMAIN WALL FERMIONS AT TEN YEARS (VOLUME 84)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLUM,T.; SONI,A.

    2007-03-15

    The workshop was held to mark the 10th anniversary of the first numerical simulations of QCD using domain wall fermions initiated at BNL. It is very gratifying that in the intervening decade widespread use of domain wall and overlap fermions is being made. It therefore seemed appropriate at this stage for some ''communal introspection'' of the progress that has been made, hurdles that need to be overcome, and physics that can and should be done with chiral fermions. The meeting was very well attended, drawing about 60 registered participants primarily from Europe, Japan and the US. It was quite remarkable that pioneers David Kaplan, Herbert Neuberger, Rajamani Narayanan, Yigal Shamir, Sinya Aoki, and Pavlos Vranas all attended the workshop. Comparisons between domain wall and overlap formulations, with their respective advantages and limitations, were discussed at length, and a broad physics program including pion and kaon physics, the epsilon regime, nucleon structure, and topology, among others, emerged. New machines and improved algorithms have played a key role in realizing realistic dynamical fermion lattice simulations (small quark mass, large volume, and so on), so much in fact that measurements are now as costly. Consequently, ways to make the measurements more efficient were also discussed. We were very pleased to see the keen and ever growing interest in chiral fermions in our community and the significant strides our colleagues have made in bringing chiral fermions to the fore of lattice QCD calculations. Their contributions made the workshop a success, and we thank them deeply for sharing their time and ideas. Finally, we must especially acknowledge Norman Christ and Bob Mawhinney for their early and continued collaboration without which the success of domain wall fermions would not have been possible.

  3. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, RHIC SPIN PHYSICS V, VOLUME 32, FEBRUARY 21, 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUNCE,G.; SAITO,N.; VIGDOR,S.; ROSER,T.; SPINKA,H.; ENYO,H.; BLAND,L.C.; GURYN,W.

    2001-02-21

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. During the fast year, the Center had only a Theory Group. In the second year, an Experimental Group was also established at the Center. At present, there are seven Fellows and nine post dots in these two groups. During the third year, we started a new Tenure Track Strong Interaction Theory RHIC Physics Fellow Program, with six positions in the academic year 1999-2000; this program will increase to include eleven theorists in the next academic year, and, in the year after, also be extended to experimental physics. In addition, the Center has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics, about ten workshops a year, with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. The construction of a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor, which was begun at the Center on February 19, 1998, was completed on August 28, 1998.

  4. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP (VOLUME 55) COLLECTIVE FLOW AND QGP PROPERTIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first three years of RHIC physics, with Au/Au collisions induced at 65, 130 and 200 GeV per nucleon pair, produced dramatic results, particularly with respect to collective observables such as transverse flow and anisotropies in transverse momentum spectra. It has become clear that the data show very strong rescattering at very early times of the reaction, strong enough in fact to be described by the hydrodynamic limit. Therefore, with today's experiments, we are able to investigate the equation of state of hot quark gluon matter, discuss its thermodynamic properties and relate them to experimental observables. At this workshop we came together to discuss our latest efforts both in the theoretical description of heavy ion collisions as well as most recent experimental results that ultimately allow us to extract information on the properties of RHIC matter. About 50 participants registered for the workshop, but many more dropped in from the offices at BNL. The workshop lasted for three days, of which each day was assigned a special topic on which the talks focused. On the first day we dealt with the more general question what the strong collective phenomena observed in RHIC collisions tell us about the properties and the dynamics of RHIC matter. The second day covered all different aspects of momentum anisotropies, and interesting new experimental results were presented for the first time. On the third day, we focused on the late fireball dynamics and the breakdown of the assumption of thermalization. New experimental observables were discussed, which will deliver more information of how the expanding fireball breaks up, once the frequent interaction ceases

  5. Establishment of a Photon Data Section of the BNL National Nuclear Data Center: A preliminary proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, A.L.; Pearlstein, S.

    1992-05-01

    It is proposed to establish a Photon Data Section (PDS) of the BNL National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). This would be a total program encompassing both photon-atom and photon-nucleus interactions. By utilizing the existing NNDC data base management expertise and on-line access capabilities, the implementation of photon interaction data activities within the existing NNDC nuclear structure and nuclear-reaction activities can reestablish a viable photon interaction data program at minimum cost. By taking advantage of the on-line capabilities, the x-ray users' community will have access to a dynamic, state-of-the-art data base of interaction information. The proposed information base would include data that presently are scattered throughout the literature usually in tabulated form. It is expected that the data bases would include at least the most precise data available in photoelectric cross sections, atomic form factors and incoherent scattering functions, anomalous scattering factors, oscillator strengths and oscillator densities, fluorescence yields, Auger electron yields, etc. It could also include information not presently available in tabulations or in existing data bases such as EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) reference spectra, chemical bonding induced shifts in the photoelectric absorption edge, matrix corrections, x-ray Raman, and x-ray resonant Raman cross sections. The data base will also include the best estimates of the accuracy of the interaction data as it exists in the data base. It is proposed that the PDS would support computer programs written for calculating scattering cross sections for given solid angles, sample geometries, and polarization of incident x-rays, for calculating Compton profiles, and for analyzing data as in EXAFS and x-ray fluorescence.

  6. Establishment of a Photon Data Section of the BNL National Nuclear Data Center: A preliminary proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, A.L.; Pearlstein, S.

    1992-05-01

    It is proposed to establish a Photon Data Section (PDS) of the BNL National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). This would be a total program encompassing both photon-atom and photon-nucleus interactions. By utilizing the existing NNDC data base management expertise and on-line access capabilities, the implementation of photon interaction data activities within the existing NNDC nuclear structure and nuclear-reaction activities can reestablish a viable photon interaction data program at minimum cost. By taking advantage of the on-line capabilities, the x-ray users` community will have access to a dynamic, state-of-the-art data base of interaction information. The proposed information base would include data that presently are scattered throughout the literature usually in tabulated form. It is expected that the data bases would include at least the most precise data available in photoelectric cross sections, atomic form factors and incoherent scattering functions, anomalous scattering factors, oscillator strengths and oscillator densities, fluorescence yields, Auger electron yields, etc. It could also include information not presently available in tabulations or in existing data bases such as EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) reference spectra, chemical bonding induced shifts in the photoelectric absorption edge, matrix corrections, x-ray Raman, and x-ray resonant Raman cross sections. The data base will also include the best estimates of the accuracy of the interaction data as it exists in the data base. It is proposed that the PDS would support computer programs written for calculating scattering cross sections for given solid angles, sample geometries, and polarization of incident x-rays, for calculating Compton profiles, and for analyzing data as in EXAFS and x-ray fluorescence.

  7. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The whole reactor building is accommodated in a shaft and is sealed level with the earth's surface by a building ceiling, which provides protection against penetration due to external effects. The building ceiling is supported on walls of the reactor building, which line the shaft and transfer the vertical components of forces to the foundations. The thickness of the walls is designed to withstand horizontal pressure waves in the floor. The building ceiling has an opening above the reactor, which must be closed by cover plates. Operating equipment for the reactor can be situated above the building ceiling. (orig./HP)

  8. Heterogeneous reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microscopic study of a cell is meant for the determination of the infinite multiplication factor of the cell, which is given by the four factor formula: K(infinite) = n(epsilon)pf. The analysis of an homogeneous reactor is similar to that of an heterogeneous reactor, but each factor of the four factor formula can not be calculated by the formulas developed in the case of an homogeneous reactor. A great number of methods was developed for the calculation of heterogeneous reactors and some of them are discussed. (Author)

  9. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 77, RBRC SCIENTIFIC REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING, OCTOBER 10-12, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SAMIOS, N.P.

    2005-10-10

    The eighth evaluation of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) took place on October 10-12, 2005, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The members of the Scientific Review Committee (SRC) were Dr. Jean-Paul Blaizot, Professor Makoto Kobayashi, Dr. Akira Masaike, Professor Charles Young Prescott (Chair), Professor Stephen Sharpe (absent), and Professor Jack Sandweiss. We are grateful to Professor Akira Ukawa who was appointed to the SRC to cover Professor Sharpe's area of expertise. In addition to reviewing this year's program, the committee, augmented by Professor Kozi Nakai, evaluated the RBRC proposal for a five-year extension of the RIKEN BNL Collaboration MOU beyond 2007. Dr. Koji Kaya, Director of the Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, Japan, presided over the session on the extension proposal. In order to illustrate the breadth and scope of the RBRC program, each member of the Center made a presentation on higher research efforts. In addition, a special session was held in connection with the RBRC QCDSP and QCDOC supercomputers. Professor Norman H. Christ, a collaborator from Columbia University, gave a presentation on the progress and status of the project, and Professor Frithjof Karsch of BNL presented the first physics results from QCDOC. Although the main purpose of this review is a report to RIKEN Management (Dr. Ryoji Noyori, RIKEN President) on the health, scientific value, management and future prospects of the Center, the RBRC management felt that a compendium of the scientific presentations are of sufficient quality and interest that they warrant a wider distribution. Therefore we have made this compilation and present it to the community for its information and enlightenment.

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 77, RBRC SCIENTIFIC REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING, OCTOBER 10-12, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The eighth evaluation of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) took place on October 10-12, 2005, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The members of the Scientific Review Committee (SRC) were Dr. Jean-Paul Blaizot, Professor Makoto Kobayashi, Dr. Akira Masaike, Professor Charles Young Prescott (Chair), Professor Stephen Sharpe (absent), and Professor Jack Sandweiss. We are grateful to Professor Akira Ukawa who was appointed to the SRC to cover Professor Sharpe's area of expertise. In addition to reviewing this year's program, the committee, augmented by Professor Kozi Nakai, evaluated the RBRC proposal for a five-year extension of the RIKEN BNL Collaboration MOU beyond 2007. Dr. Koji Kaya, Director of the Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, Japan, presided over the session on the extension proposal. In order to illustrate the breadth and scope of the RBRC program, each member of the Center made a presentation on higher research efforts. In addition, a special session was held in connection with the RBRC QCDSP and QCDOC supercomputers. Professor Norman H. Christ, a collaborator from Columbia University, gave a presentation on the progress and status of the project, and Professor Frithjof Karsch of BNL presented the first physics results from QCDOC. Although the main purpose of this review is a report to RIKEN Management (Dr. Ryoji Noyori, RIKEN President) on the health, scientific value, management and future prospects of the Center, the RBRC management felt that a compendium of the scientific presentations are of sufficient quality and interest that they warrant a wider distribution. Therefore we have made this compilation and present it to the community for its information and enlightenment

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETINGS XII AND XIII, SEPTEMBER 16, 2002, OCTOBER 22, 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,B.

    2003-03-06

    Since its inception, the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) has held semi-regular meetings each year to discuss the physics possibilities and the operational details of the program. Having collected our first data sample of polarized proton-proton collisions in Run02 of RHIC, we are now in the process of examining the performance of both the accelerator and the experiments. During the PAC meeting on August 29, 2002, the beam use proposal with a four week, polarized proton physics run was approved as part of the plan for Run-03. So, we meet at BNL on September 16, 2002 to discuss the concrete plans for this proton-proton run.

  12. Development of a practical training program based on BNL`s input to new NFPA Lined Masonary Chimney Venting Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, G. [Agway Energy Products, Tully, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes how we developed a practical training program for technicians and sales personnel from the BNL studies that evolved into the Lined Chimney Venting Tables. One of the topics discussed is our search for solutions to the reoccurring problems associated with flue gas condensation on newly installed oil fired appliances. The paper will also discuss our own experiences in applying the new venting tables and working through the questions that arise when we encounter installations beyond the scope of the present tables.

  13. Construction and testing of arc dipoles and quadrupoles for the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production run of superconducting magnets for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) project at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is well underway. Of the 288 arc dipoles needed for the collider, more than 120 have been delivered. More than 150 arc quadrupoles have been delivered. All of these magnets have been accepted for RHIC. This paper reports the construction and performance of these magnets. Novel features of design and test, introduced to enhance technical performance and control costs, are also discussed. Other papers submitted to this Conference summarize work on the sextupoles and tuning quads, arc correctors, and combined corrector-quadrupole-sextupole assemblies (CQS)

  14. Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harpeneau, Evan M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2011-06-24

    On May 9, 2011, ORISE conducted verification survey activities including scans, sampling, and the collection of smears of the remaining soils and off-gas pipe associated with the 802 Fan House within the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) Complex at BNL. ORISE is of the opinion, based on independent scan and sample results obtained during verification activities at the HFBR 802 Fan House, that the FSS (final status survey) unit meets the applicable site cleanup objectives established for as left radiological conditions.

  15. Final Report - Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On May 9, 2011, ORISE conducted verification survey activities including scans, sampling, and the collection of smears of the remaining soils and off-gas pipe associated with the 802 Fan House within the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) Complex at BNL. ORISE is of the opinion, based on independent scan and sample results obtained during verification activities at the HFBR 802 Fan House, that the FSS (final status survey) unit meets the applicable site cleanup objectives established for as left radiological conditions

  16. Plasma reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Molina Mansilla, Ricardo; Erra Serrabasa, Pilar; Bertrán Serra, Enric

    2008-01-01

    [EN] A plasma reactor that can operate in a wide pressure range, from vacuum and low pressures to atmospheric pressure and higher pressures. The plasma reactor is also able to regulate other important settings and can be used for processing a wide range of different samples, such as relatively large samples or samples with rough surfaces.

  17. Reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress in research on reactor physics in 1997 at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN is described. Activities in the following four domains are discussed: core physics, ex-core neutron transport, experiments in Materials Testing Reactors, international benchmarks

  18. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 72, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETINGS XXXI, XXXII, XXXIII.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OGAWA, A.

    2005-04-11

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has both a theory and experimental component. At present the theoretical group has 4 Fellows and 3 Research Associates as well as 11 RHIC Physics/University Fellows (academic year 2003-2004). To date there are approximately 30 graduates from the program of which 13 have attained tenure positions at major institutions worldwide. The experimental group is smaller and has 2 Fellows and 3 RHIC Physics/University Fellows and 3 Research Associates, and historically 6 individuals have attained permanent positions. Beginning in 2001 a new RIKEN Spin Program (RSP) category was implemented at RBRC. These appointments are joint positions of RBRC and RIKEN and include the following positions in theory and experiment: RSP Researchers, RSP Research Associates, and Young Researchers, who are mentored by senior RBRC Scientists. A number of RIKEN Jr. Research Associates and Visiting Scientists also contribute to the physics program at the Center. RBRC has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select a few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. To date there are seventy-two proceeding volumes available. The construction of a 0.6 teraflops parallel processor, dedicated to lattice QCD, begun at the Center on February 19, 1998, was completed on August

  19. PROCEEDINGS FROM RIKEN-BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP: PARITY-VIOLATING SPIN ASYMMETRIES AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VOGELSANG,W.; PERDEKAMP, M.; SURROW, B.

    2007-04-26

    . Also, new observables, such as jet and W+charrn final states and spin asymmetries in Z production, were proposed and discussed. All of the talks attracted much interest and initiated active discussions. This was a very successful workshop. It stimulated many discussions and new collaborations. We are grateful to all participants and speakers for coming to the Center, and for their excellent work. The support provided for this workshop by Dr. N. Samios and his RIKEN-BNL Research Center has been magnificent, and we are very grateful for it. We thank Brookhaven National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy for providing the facilities to hold the workshop. Finally, sincere thanks go to Jane Lysik for her efficient work on organizing and running the workshop.

  20. Status of 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long SSC dipole magnet R ampersand D program at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last year, several 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long dipole magnet prototypes were built by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under contract with the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory. These prototypes are the last phase of a half-decade-long R ampersand D program, carried out in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of the SSC main ring magnets. They also lay the ground for the 5-cm aperture dipole magnet program to be started soon. After reviewing the design features of the BNL 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long dipole magnets, we describe in detail the various steps of their fabrication. For each step, we discuss the parameters that need to be mastered, and we compare the values that were achieved for the five most recent prototypes. The data appear coherent and reproducible, demonstrating that the assembly process in under control. 23 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Compact Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date

  2. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H.L.

    1960-09-20

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising fissionable material dispersed in graphite blocks, helium filling the voids of the blocks and the spaces therebetween, and means other than the helium in thermal conductive contact with the graphite for removing heat.

  3. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  4. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This draft chart contains graphical symbols from which the type of (nuclear) reactor can be seen. They will serve as illustrations for graphical sketches. Important features of the individual reactor types are marked out graphically. The user can combine these symbols to characterize a specific reactor type. The basic graphical symbol is a square with a point in the centre. Functional groups can be depicted for closer specification. If two functional groups are not clearly separated, this is symbolized by a dotted line or a channel. Supply and discharge lines for coolant, moderator and fuel are specified in accordance with DIN 2481 and can be further specified by additional symbols if necessary. The examples in the paper show several different reactor types. (orig./AK)

  5. Multifunctional reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Multifunctional reactors are single pieces of equipment in which, besides the reaction, other functions are carried out simultaneously. The other functions can be a heat, mass or momentum transfer operation and even another reaction. Multifunctional reactors are not new, but they have received much emphasis in research in the last decade. A survey is given of modern developments and the first successful applications on a large scale. It is explained why their application in many instances is ...

  6. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  7. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reduce neutron embrittlement of the pressue vessel of an LWR, blanked off elements are fitted at the edge of the reactor core, with the same dimensions as the fuel elements. They are parallel to each other, and to the edge of the reactor taking the place of fuel rods, and are plates of neutron-absorbing material (stainless steel, boron steel, borated Al). (HP)

  8. Breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reasons for the development of fast reactors are briefly reviewed (a propitious neutron balance oriented towards a maximum uranium burnup) and its special requirements (cooling, fissile material density and reprocessing) discussed. The three stages in the French program of fast reactor development are outlined with Rapsodie at Cadarache, Phenix at Marcoule, and Super Phenix at Creys-Malville. The more specific features of the program of research and development are emphasized: kinetics and the core, the fuel and the components

  9. Standard reference and other important nuclear data. Supplement 1 to the report BNL-NCS-51123 (Dec. 1979) = ENDF-300 = IAEA-NDS-15/300 (microfiche)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document contains inserts to be added to the report 'Standard Reference and Other Important Nuclear Data' (BNL-NCS-51123, ENDF-300), including the following two articles: Fast Neutron Capture in 238U and 232Th by W.P. Poentiz (ANL), and 239Pu Decay Power Discrepancy by T.R. England and P.G. Young (LANL)

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 57, HIGH PT PHYSICS AT RHIC, DECEMBER 2-6, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretzer, Stefan; Venugopalan, Raju; Vogelsang, Werner

    2004-02-18

    The AuAu, dAu, and pp collision modes of the RHIC collider at BNL have led to the publication of exciting high p{perpendicular} particle production data. There have also been two physics runs with polarized protons, and preliminary results on the double-spin asymmetry for pion production had been presented very recently. The ontological questions behind these measurements are fascinating: Did RHIC collisions create a Quark-Gluon-Plasma phase and did they verify the Color Glass Condensate as the high energy limit of QCD? Will the Spin Crisis finally be resolved in terms of gluon polarization and what new surprises are we yet to meet for Transverse Spin? Phenomena related to sub-microscopic questions as important as these call for interpretations that are footed in solid theory. At large p{perpendicular}, perturbative concepts are legitimately expected to provide useful approaches. The corresponding hard parton dynamics are, in several ways, key to unraveling the initial or final state and collisional phase of hard scattering events in vacuum as well as in hot or cold nuclear matter. Before the advent of RHIC data, a RIKEN-BNL workshop had been held at BNL in March 1999 on ''Hard Parton Physics in High Energy Nuclear Collisions''. The 2003 workshop on ''High p{perpendicular} Physics at RHIC'' was a logical continuation of this previous workshop. It gave the opportunity to revisit the 1999 expectations in the light of what has been found in the meantime and, at the same time, to critically discuss the underlying theoretical concepts. We brought together theorists who have done seminal work on the foundations of parton phenomenology in field theory, with theorists and experimentalists who are presently working on RHIC phenomenology. The participants were both from a high-energy physics and nuclear physics background and it remains only to be said here that this chemistry worked perfectly and the workshop was a great success.

  11. Research reactors - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. The operation of the BNL/ATF gun-IV photocathode RF gun at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), a free-electron laser (FEL) based on the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process is nearing completion. Recently, an rf photoinjector gun system was made available to the APS by Brookhaven National Laboratory/Accelerator Test Facility (BNL/ATF). It will be used to provide the high-brightness, low-emittance, and low-energy spread electron beam required by the SASE FEL theory. A Nd:Glass laser system, capable of producing a maximum of 500 microJ of UV in a 1-10 ps pulse at up to a 10-Hz repetition rate, serves as the photoinjector's drive laser. Here, the design, commissioning, and integration of this gun with the APS is discussed

  13. The Unified Hydrodynamics and the Pseudorapidity Distributions in Heavy Ion Collisions at BNL-RHIC and CERN-LHC Energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. J. Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The charged particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions are divided into two parts. One is from the hot and dense matter created in collisions. The other is from leading particles. The hot and dense matter is assumed to expand according to unified hydrodynamics and freezes out into charged particles from a space-like hypersurface with a fixed proper time of τFO. The leading particles are conventionally taken as the particles which inherit the quantum numbers of colliding nucleons and carry off most of incident energy. The rapidity distributions of the charged particles from these two parts are formulated analytically, and a comparison is made between the theoretical results and the experimental measurements performed in Au-Au and Pb-Pb collisions at the respective BNL-RHIC and CERN-LHC energies. The theoretical results are well consistent with experimental data.

  14. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Thermal Photons and Dileptons in Heavy-Ion Collisions. Volume 119

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rapp, R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ruan, L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yee, H-U. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-09-11

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan and the U. S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The RBRC is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has theory, lattice gauge computing and experimental components. It is presently exploring the possibility of an astrophysics component being added to the program. The primary theme for this workshop related to sharing the latest experimental and theoretical developments in area of low transverse momentum (pT) dielectron and photons. All the presentations given at the workshop are included in this proceedings, primarily as PowerPoint presentations.

  15. Prospects for measuring K+ -> π+ ν νbar and KL0 -> π0 ν νbar at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rare kaon decay experiments underway or planned for the BNL AGS will yield new and independent determinations of V*tsVtd. A measurement of B(KL0 rarrow π0 νbar ν) allows a determination of the imaginary part of this quantity, which is the fundamental CP-violating parameter of the Standard Model, in a uniquely clean manner. Since the measurement of B(K+ rarrow π+ νbar ν) determines vertbarV*tsVtd, a complete derivation of the unitarity triangle is facilitated. These results can be compared to high precision data expected to come from the B sector in a number of ways, allowing for unique tests of new physics

  16. Proton and pion transverse spectra at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider from radial flow and finite size effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the proton and pion transverse momentum distributions measured at BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), for all collision centralities for pions and most of the collision centralities for protons, can be simultaneously described in terms of a thermal model with common values for the radial flow and temperature, when accounting for the finite size of the interaction region at the time of decoupling. We show that this description is obtained in terms of a simple scaling law of the size of the interaction region with the number of participants in the collision. The behavior of the proton to pion ratio at mid-rapidity can also be understood as a consequence of the strength of the radial flow and system size reached at RHIC energies

  17. Perturbative QCD as a probe of hadron structure: Volume 2. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop brought together about thirty invited participants from around the world, and an almost equal number of Brookhaven users and staff, to discuss recent developments and future prospects for hadronic strong interaction studies at high energy, particularly relating to the RHIC project at Brookhaven. RIKEN and Brookhaven have long traditions in and commitments to the study of the strong interactions, and the advent of the RHIC collider will open new opportunities both for relativistic heavy ion and polarized proton-proton studies. Activities at the RIKEN BNL Research Center are intended to focus on physics opportunities stimulated by this new facility. Thus, one of the purposes of the center is to provide a forum where workers in the field can gather to share and develop their ideas in a stimulating environment. The purpose of the workshop was both to delineate theoretical problems and stimulate collaborations to address them. The workshop focused primarily, but not exclusively, on spin and small-x physics

  18. A very thin havar film vacuum window for heavy ions to perform radiobiology studies at the BNL Tandem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy ion beams from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will be made available for radiobiology studies on cell cultures. Beam energy losses need to be minimized both in the vacuum window and in the air in order to achieve the ranges required for the cells to be studied. This is particularly challenging for ions heavier than iron. The design is presented of a 0.4-inch diameter Havar film window that will satisfy these requirements. Films as thin as 80 microinches were successfully pressure tested. The final thickness to be used may be slightly larger to help in achieving pin hole free windows. We discuss design considerations and present pressure and vacuum test results as well as tests with heavy ion beams.

  19. HARD PARTON PHYSICS IN HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARROLL,J.

    1999-09-10

    The RIKEN-BNL center workshop on ''Hard parton physics in high energy nuclear collisions'' was held at BNL from March 1st-5th! 1999. The focus of the workshop was on hard probes of nucleus-nucleus collisions that will be measured at RHIC with the PHENIX and STAR detectors. There were about 45 speakers and over 70 registered participants at the workshop, with roughly a quarter of the speakers from overseas. About 60% of the talks were theory talks. A nice overview of theory for RHIC was provided by George Sterman. The theoretical talks were on a wide range of topics in QCD which can be classified under the following: (a) energy loss and the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect; (b) minijet production and equilibration; (c) small x physics and initial conditions; (d) nuclear parton distributions and shadowing; (e) spin physics; (f) photon, di-lepton, and charm production; and (g) hadronization, and simulations of high pt physics in event generators. Several of the experimental talks discussed the capabilities of the PHENIX and STAR detectors at RHIC in measuring high pt particles in heavy ion collisions. In general, these talks were included in the relevant theory sessions. A session was set aside to discuss the spin program at RHIC with polarized proton beams. In addition, there were speakers from 08, HERA, the fixed target experiments at Fermilab, and the CERN fixed target Pb+Pb program, who provided additional perspective on a range of issues of relevance to RHIC; from jets at the Tevatron, to saturation of parton distributions at HERA, and recent puzzling data on direct photon production in fixed target experiments, among others.

  20. HARD PARTON PHYSICS IN HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RIKEN-BNL center workshop on ''Hard parton physics in high energy nuclear collisions'' was held at BNL from March 1st-5th, 1999. The focus of the workshop was on hard probes of nucleus-nucleus collisions that will be measured at RHIC with the PHENIX and STAR detectors. There were about 45 speakers and over 70 registered participants at the workshop, with roughly a quarter of the speakers from overseas. About 60% of the talks were theory talks. A nice overview of theory for RHIC was provided by George Sterman. The theoretical talks were on a wide range of topics in QCD which can be classified under the following: (a) energy loss and the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect; (b) minijet production and equilibration; (c) small x physics and initial conditions; (d) nuclear parton distributions and shadowing; (e) spin physics; (f) photon, di-lepton, and charm production; and (g) hadronization, and simulations of high pt physics in event generators. Several of the experimental talks discussed the capabilities of the PHENIX and STAR detectors at RHIC in measuring high pt particles in heavy ion collisions. In general, these talks were included in the relevant theory sessions. A session was set aside to discuss the spin program at RHIC with polarized proton beams. In addition, there were speakers from 08, HERA, the fixed target experiments at Fermilab, and the CERN fixed target Pb+Pb program, who provided additional perspective on a range of issues of relevance to RHIC; from jets at the Tevatron, to saturation of parton distributions at HERA, and recent puzzling data on direct photon production in fixed target experiments, among others

  1. Reactor utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1962, the RA reactor was operated almost three times more than in 1961, producing total of 25 555 MWh. Diagram containing comparative data about reactor operation for 1960, 1961, and 1962, percent of fuel used and U-235 burnup shows increase in reactor operation. Number of samples irradiated was 659, number of experiments done was 16. mean powered level was 5.93 MW. Fuel was added into the core twice during the reporting year. In fact the core was increased from 56 to 68 fuel channels and later to 84 fuel channels. Fuel was added to the core when the reactivity worth decreased to the minimum operation level due to burnup. In addition to this 5 central fuel channels were exchanged with fresh fuel in february for the purpose of irradiation in the VISA-2 channel

  2. Reactor Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Lasserre, T; Lasserre, Thierry; Sobel, Henry W.

    2005-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments, that toe the cutting edge of neutrino research. Short baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and are still searching for important phenomena such as the neutrino magnetic moment. They could open the door to the measurement of coherent neutrino scattering in a near future. Middle and long baseline oscillation experiments at Chooz and KamLAND have played a relevant role in neutrino oscillation physics in the last years. It is now widely accepted that a new middle baseline disappearance reactor neutrino experiment with multiple detectors could provide a clean measurement of the last undetermined neutrino mixing angle theta13. We conclude by opening on possible use of neutrinos for Society: NonProliferation of Nuclear materials and Geophysics.

  3. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor has a large prompt negative temperature coefficient of reactivity. A reactor core assembly of a plurality of fluid-tight fuel elements is located within a water-filled tank. Each fuel element contains a solid homogeneous mixture of 50-79 w/o zirconium hydride, 20-50 w/o uranium and 0.5-1.5 W erbium. The uranium is not more than 20 percent enriched, and the ratio of hydrogen atoms to zirconium atoms is between 1.5:1 and 7:1. The core has a long lifetime, E.G., at least about 1200 days

  4. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a liquid cooled nuclear reactor, the combination is described for a single-walled vessel containing liquid coolant in which the reactor core is submerged, and a containment structure, primarily of material for shielding against radioactivity, surrounding at least the liquid-containing part of the vessel with clearance therebetween and having that surface thereof which faces the vessel make compatible with the liquid, thereby providing a leak jacket for the vessel. The structure is preferably a metal-lined concrete vault, and cooling means are provided for protecting the concrete against reaching a temperature at which damage would occur. (U.S.)

  5. Lysimeter study of commercial reactor waste forms: waste form acquisition characterization and full-scale leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes work conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) as part of a joint program with Savannah River Laboratory. Typical full-scale (55-gallon drum size) waste forms were acquired by BNL from a boiling water reactor (BWR) and a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Liquid waste stream activity concentrations were analyzed by gamma spectroscopy. This information was used to determine the waste from activity inventory, providing the necessary source term for lysimeter and leaching experiments. Predominant radionuclides of interest include 60Co, 137Cs, 134Cs, and 54Mn. A full-scale leaching experiment was initiated by BNL encompassing four representative waste stream-solidification agent combinations. Waste streams tested include PWR evaporator concentrate (boric acid waste), BWR evaporator concentrate (sodium sulfate waste) and BWR evaporator concentrate plus ion exchange resins. Solidification agents include masonry cement, portland type III cement, and vinyl ester-styrene (Dow polymer). Analyses of leachates indicate measurable leach rates of 137Cs, 134Cs, and 60Co from both BWR and PWR cement waste forms. The leach rates for both cesium isotopes in cement are at least two orders of magnitude greater than those for cobalt. Leachates from the BWR Dow polymer waste form include the same isotopes present in cement leachates, with the addition of 54Mn. Cesium leach rates from the Dow polymer waste form are approximately one order of magnitude lower than from an equivalent cement waste form. The 60Co cumulative fraction release, however, is approximately three times greater for the Dow polymer waste form

  6. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an improved reactor core for a high conversion BWR reactor, Pu-breeding type BWR type reactor, Pu-breeding type BWR type rector, FEBR type reactor, etc., two types of fuel assemblies are loaded such that fuel assemblies using a channel box of a smaller irradiation deformation ratio are loaded in a high conversion region, while other fuel assemblies are loaded in a burner region. This enables to suppress the irradiation deformation within an allowable limit in the high conversion region where the fast neutron flux is high and the load weight from the inside of the channel box due to the pressure loss is large. At the same time, the irradiation deformation can be restricted within an allowable limit without deteriorating the neutron economy in the burner region in which fast neutron flux is low and the load weight from the inside of the channel box is small since a channel box with smaller neutron absorption cross section or reduced wall thickness is charged. As a result, it is possible to prevent structural deformations such as swelling of the channel box, bending of the entire assemblies, bending of fuel rods, etc. (K.M.)

  7. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reactor container has a suppression chamber partitioned by concrete side walls, a reactor pedestal and a diaphragm floor. A plurality of partitioning walls are disposed in circumferential direction each at an interval inside the suppression chamber, so that independent chambers in a state being divided into plurality are formed inside the suppression chamber. The partition walls are formed from the bottom portion of the suppression chamber up to the diaphragm floor to isolate pool water in a divided state. Operation platforms are formed above the suppression chamber and connected to an access port. Upon conducting maintenance, inspection or repairing, a pump is disposed in the independent chamber to transfer pool water therein to one or a plurality of other independent chambers to make it vacant. (I.N.)

  8. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a structure of ABWR-type reactor buildings, which can increase the capacity of a spent fuel storage area at a low cost and improved earthquake proofness. In the reactor building, the floor of a spent fuel pool is made flat, and a depth of the pool water satisfying requirement for shielding is ensured. In addition, a depth of pool water is also maintained for a equipment provisionally storing pool for storing spent fuels, and a capacity for a spent fuel storage area is increased by utilizing surplus space of the equipment provisionally storing pool. Since the flattened floor of the spent fuel pool is flushed with the floor of the equipment provisionally storing pool, transfer of horizontal loads applied to the building upon occurrence of earthquakes is made smooth, to improve earthquake proofness of the building. (T.M.)

  9. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor cooled by a freezable liquid has a vessel for containing said liquid and comprising a structure shaped as a container, and cooling means in the region of the surface of said structure for effecting freezing of said liquid coolant at and for a finite distance from said surface for providing a layer of frozen coolant on and supported by said surface for containing said liquid coolant. In a specific example, where the reactor is sodium-cooled, the said structure is a metal-lined concrete vault, cooling is effected by closed cooling loops containing NaK, the loops extending over the lined surface of the concrete vault with outward and reverse pipe runs of each loop separated by thermal insulation, and air is flowed through cooling pipes embedded in the concrete behind the metal lining. 7 claims, 3 figures

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J.B.

    1960-01-01

    A reactor is described which comprises a tank, a plurality of coaxial steel sleeves in the tank, a mass of water in the tank, and wire grids in abutting relationship within a plurality of elongated parallel channels within the steel sleeves, the wire being provided with a plurality of bends in the same plane forming adjacent parallel sections between bends, and the sections of adjacent grids being normally disposed relative to each other.

  11. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactor has got fuel subassemblies which are bundled and enclosed by a common can. In order to reduce bending of the sides of the can because of the load caused by the coolant pressure the can has got a dodecagon-shaped crosssection. The surfaces of the can may be of equal width. One out of two surfaces may also be convex towards the center. (RW)

  12. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detector having high sensitivity to fast neutrons and having low sensitivity to thermal neutrons is disposed for reducing influences of neutron detector signals on detection values of neutron fluxes when the upper end of control rod pass in the vicinity of the neutron flux detector. Namely, the change of the neutron fluxes is greater in the thermal neutron energy region while it is smaller in the fast neutron energy region. This is because the neutron absorbing cross section of B-10 used as neutron absorbers of control rods is greater in the thermal neutron region and it is smaller in the fast neutron region. As a result, increase of the neutron detection signals along with the local neutron flux change can be reduced, and detection signals corresponding to the reactor power can be obtained. Even when gang withdrawal of operating a plurality of control rods at the same time is performed, the reactor operation cycle can be measured accurately, thereby enabling to shorten the reactor startup time. (N.H.)

  13. Status of 4-cm aperture, 17-m-long SSC dipole magnet R and D program at BNL. Part 1: Magnet assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last year, several 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long dipole magnet prototypes were built by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under contract with the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory. These prototypes are the last phase of a half-decade-long R and D program, carried out in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of the SSC main ring magnets. They also lay the ground for the 5-cm aperture dipole magnet program to be started soon. After reviewing the design features of the BNL 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long dipole magnets, the authors describe in detail the various steps of their fabrication. For each step, they discuss the parameters that need to be mastered, and they compare the values that were achieved for the five most recent prototypes. The data appear coherent and reproducible, demonstrating that the assembly process is under control

  14. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Understanding QGP through Spectral Functions and Euclidean Correlators (Volume 89)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocsy,A.; Petreczky, P.

    2008-06-27

    In the past two decades, one of the most important goals of the nuclear physics community has been the production and characterization of the new state of matter--Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Understanding how properties of hadrons change in medium, particularly, the bound state of a very heavy quark and its antiquark, known as quarkonium, as well as determining the transport coefficients is crucial for identifying the properties of QGP and for the understanding of the experimental data from RHIC. On April 23rd, more than sixty physicists from twenty-seven institutions gathered for this three-day topical workshop held at BNL to discuss how to understand the properties of the new state of matter obtained in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions (particularly at RHIC-BNL) through spectral functions. In-medium properties of the different particle species and the transport properties of the medium are encoded in spectral functions. The former could yield important signatures of deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration at high temperatures and densities, while the later are crucial for the understanding of the dynamics of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Participants at the workshop are experts in various areas of spectral function studies. The workshop encouraged direct exchange of scientific information among experts, as well as between the younger and the more established scientists. The workshops success is evident from the coherent picture that developed of the current understanding of transport properties and in-medium particle properties, illustrated in the current proceedings. The following pages show calculations of meson spectral functions in lattice QCD, as well as implications of these for quarkonia melting/survival in the quark gluon plasma; Lattice calculations of the transport coefficients (shear and bulk viscosities, electric conductivity); Calculation of spectral functions and transport coefficients in field theories using weak coupling

  15. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Understanding QGP through Spectral Functions and Euclidean Correlators (Volume 89)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past two decades, one of the most important goals of the nuclear physics community has been the production and characterization of the new state of matter--Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Understanding how properties of hadrons change in medium, particularly, the bound state of a very heavy quark and its antiquark, known as quarkonium, as well as determining the transport coefficients is crucial for identifying the properties of QGP and for the understanding of the experimental data from RHIC. On April 23rd, more than sixty physicists from twenty-seven institutions gathered for this three-day topical workshop held at BNL to discuss how to understand the properties of the new state of matter obtained in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions (particularly at RHIC-BNL) through spectral functions. In-medium properties of the different particle species and the transport properties of the medium are encoded in spectral functions. The former could yield important signatures of deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration at high temperatures and densities, while the later are crucial for the understanding of the dynamics of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Participants at the workshop are experts in various areas of spectral function studies. The workshop encouraged direct exchange of scientific information among experts, as well as between the younger and the more established scientists. The workshops success is evident from the coherent picture that developed of the current understanding of transport properties and in-medium particle properties, illustrated in the current proceedings. The following pages show calculations of meson spectral functions in lattice QCD, as well as implications of these for quarkonia melting/survival in the quark gluon plasma; Lattice calculations of the transport coefficients (shear and bulk viscosities, electric conductivity); Calculation of spectral functions and transport coefficients in field theories using weak coupling

  16. Wake-field and space charge effects on high brightness beams calculations and measured results for the laser driven photoelectrons at BNL-ATF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the formalism used to study the effects of the interactions between the highly charged particles and the fields in the accelerating structure, including space charge and wake fields. Some of our calculations and numerical simulation results obtained for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) high-brightness photoelectron beam at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) and the measured data at ATF are also included

  17. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a BWR type nuclear reactor, the number of first fuel assemblies (uranium) loaded in a reactor core is smaller than that of second fuel assemblies (mixed oxide), the average burnup degree upon take-out of the first fuel assemblies is reduced to less than that of the second fuel assemblies, and the number of the kinds of the fuel rods constituting the first fuel assemblies is made smaller than that of the fuel rods constituting the second fuel assemblies. As a result, the variety of the plutonium enrichment degree is reduced to make the distribution of the axial enrichment degree uniform, thereby enabling to simplify the distribution of the enrichment degree. Then the number of molding fabrication steps for MOX fuel assemblies can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce the cost for molding and fabrication. (N.H.)

  18. Types of Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation is based on the following areas: Types of Nuclear Reactors, coolant, moderator, neutron spectrum, fuel type, pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR) reactor pressurized heavy water (PHWR), gas-cooled reactor, RBMK , Nuclear Electricity Generation,Challenges in Nuclear Technology Deployment,EPR, APR1400, A P 1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER-1000, A PWR, VVER 1200, Boiling Water Reactor, A BWR, A BWR -II, ESBUR, Ke ren, AREVA, Heavy Water Reactor, Candu 6, Acr-1000, HWR, Bw, Iris, CAREM NuCcale, Smart, KLT-HOS, Westinghouse small modular Reactor, Gas Cooled Reactors, PBMR.

  19. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assemblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters in the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters in the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance

  20. NUMERICAL ALGORITHMS AT NON-ZERO CHEMICAL POTENTIAL. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLUM,T.

    1999-09-14

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center hosted its 19th workshop April 27th through May 1, 1999. The topic was Numerical Algorithms at Non-Zero Chemical Potential. QCD at a non-zero chemical potential (non-zero density) poses a long-standing unsolved challenge for lattice gauge theory. Indeed, it is the primary unresolved issue in the fundamental formulation of lattice gauge theory. The chemical potential renders conventional lattice actions complex, practically excluding the usual Monte Carlo techniques which rely on a positive definite measure for the partition function. This ''sign'' problem appears in a wide range of physical systems, ranging from strongly coupled electronic systems to QCD. The lack of a viable numerical technique at non-zero density is particularly acute since new exotic ''color superconducting'' phases of quark matter have recently been predicted in model calculations. A first principles confirmation of the phase diagram is desirable since experimental verification is not expected soon. At the workshop several proposals for new algorithms were made: cluster algorithms, direct simulation of Grassman variables, and a bosonization of the fermion determinant. All generated considerable discussion and seem worthy of continued investigation. Several interesting results using conventional algorithms were also presented: condensates in four fermion models, SU(2) gauge theory in fundamental and adjoint representations, and lessons learned from strong; coupling, non-zero temperature and heavy quarks applied to non-zero density simulations.

  1. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Approach to Equilibrium in Strongly Interacting Matter. Volume 118

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Venugopalan, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berges, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaizot, J. -P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gelis, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-04-09

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory*. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan and the U. S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The RBRC is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has theory, lattice gauge computing and experimental components. It is presently exploring the possibility of an astrophysics component being added to the program. The purpose of this Workshop is to critically review the recent progress on the theory and phenomenology of early time dynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions from RHIC to LHC energies, to examine the various approaches on thermalization and existing issues, and to formulate new research efforts for the future. Topics slated to be covered include Experimental evidence for equilibration/isotropization, comparison of various approaches, dependence on the initial conditions and couplings, and turbulent cascades and Bose-Einstein condensation.

  2. Effects of varying doses of gamma radiation on locally adapted Tradescantia clone 02 (BNL) (Brookhaven National Laboratory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study determined the effects of gamma radiation on the meiotic cells of Tradescantia bracteata clone 02 (BNL). The flower buds collected were exposed through dosages ranging from 1 Gy to 5 Gy using gamma cell 220 machine (AECL) in a central axis position (c/a) and grown in Peralta's solution for three days. Out of the twenty buds designated for each dosages, ten buds were treated with 0.05% colchicine solution. The occurrence of micronuclei among the irradiated pollen mother cells suggested a linear relation with the quantity of radiation dose. The occurrence of MN among cells increased linearly from 1 Gy until it reached 3 Gy and 4 Gy. Beyond this maximum dose, cells were less responsive to the dose caused by inhibition of cell division, as demonstrated in the buds exposed to 5 Gy. This result was validated through the kruskal-Wallis test, where the computed h value was 3.44 (critical region of X20.05 = 9.49) Experimental results also showed chromosomal breaks, sticky chromosomes, and anaphase bridges in the pollen mother cells of irradiated buds. A significant numbers of cells were also found to have micronuclei, which may vary from 1 to 6 per pollen mother cell, and this showed no relationship with radiation dose. (Author)

  3. Mutagenic synergism detected between 1,2-dibromoethane and X rays in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone BNL 4430

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutagenic interaction between 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) and X rays was studied in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone BNL 4430, a blue/pink heterozygote. The young inflorescence-bearing shoots with roots of this clone cultivated in a nutrient solution circulating growth chamber were used as the tester plants. EDB is a promutagen and also a bifunctional alkylating agent with a high Swain-Scott substrate constant, but is thought to react probably via SN1 mechanism. After confirming the dose-dependent mutagenicities of aqueous solutions of EDB for the first time in Tradescantia stamen hairs, a combined treatment with EDB and X rays was conducted, exposing acutely to 578 mGy X rays at the midpoint of 66.5 mM EDB treatment for 4 h. The induced somatic mutation frequency determined after the combined treatment was significantly higher (at 0.1% level) than that expected from the additive effects of EDB and X rays, showing that EDB and X rays acted obviously synergistically. The confirmation of the mutagenic synergism between EDB and X rays is reported here for the first time, although a likelihood of synergistic effects of EDB with 3H beta rays has been suggested earlier. (author)

  4. Mutagenic interactions between maleic hydrazide and X rays in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone BNL 4430

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutagenic interactions between maleic hydrazide (MH; a promutagen known to be activated into a mutagen in plant cells) and X rays were studied in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone BNL 4430, a blue/pink heterozygote. The young inflorescence-bearing shoots with roots cultivated in the nutrient solution circulating growth chamber were used as tester plants. After determining dose-response curves for X rays and for MH, nine combined treatments with MH (0.5 and 1 mM) and X rays (292 to 1,240 mGy) were conducted, exposing to X rays either 20 or 44 h before, at the midpoint of, or 2 or 44 h after the MH treatments for 4h. Clear synergistic effects in inducing somatic pink mutations were detected when X rays were given before the MH treatments. On the contrary, however, antagonistic effects were often observed when X-ray treatments were carried out during or after the MH treatments. The synergistic effects detected were thought to be the results of interactions between DNA strand breaks (and the resultant chromosomal breaks) induced by X rays and those by MH, whereas the antagonistic effects observed were presumed to have resulted from X-ray-caused inhibition of the activation of MH in the stamen-hair cells. (author)

  5. Summary of the Mini BNL/LARP/CARE-HHH Workshop on Crab Cavities for the LHC (LHC-CC08)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first mini-workshop on crab compensation for the LHC luminosity upgrade (LHC-CC08) was held February 24-25, 2008 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A total of 35 participants from 3 continents and 15 institutions from around the world participated to discuss the exciting prospect of a crab scheme for the LHC. If realized it will be the first demonstration in hadron colliders. The workshop is organized by joint collaboration of BNL, US-LARP and CARE-HHH. The enormous interest in the subject of crab cavities for the international linear collider and future light sources has resulted in a large international collaboration to exchange aspects of synergy and expertise. A central repository for this exchange of information documenting the latest design effort for LHC crab cavities is consolidated in a wiki page: https://twiki.cern.ch/twiki/bin/view/Main/LHCCrabCavities. The main goal of this workshop was to define a road-map for a prototype crab cavity to be installed in the LHC and to discuss the associated R and D and beam dynamics challenges. The diverse subject of implementing the crab scheme resulted in a scientific program with a wide range of subtopics which were divided into 8 sessions. Each session was given a list of fundamental questions to be addressed and used as a guideline to steer the discussions

  6. Independent assessment of TRAC-PD2 and RELAP5/MOD1 codes at BNL in FY 1981. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, P; Jo, J H; Neymotin, L; Rohatgi, U S; Slovik, G

    1982-12-01

    This report documents the independent assessment calculations performed with the TRAC-PD2 and RELAP/MOD1 codes at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) during Fiscal Year 1981. A large variety of separate-effects experiments dealing with (1) steady-state and transient critical flow, (2) level swell, (3) flooding and entrainment, (4) steady-state flow boiling, (5) integral economizer once-through steam generator (IEOTSG) performance, (6) bottom reflood, and (7) two-dimensional phase separation of two-phase mixtures were simulated with TRAC-PD2. In addition, the early part of an overcooling transient which occurred at the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant on March 20, 1978 was also computed with an updated version of TRAC-PD2. Three separate-effects tests dealing with (1) transient critical flow, (2) steady-state flow boiling, and (3) IEOTSG performance were also simulated with RELAP5/MOD1 code. Comparisons between the code predictions and the test data are presented.

  7. Development of brazing technique for a 1.6 cell BNL/SLAC/UCLA type photocathode guns by hydrogen brazing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two prototypes of a 1.6 cell BNL/SLAC/UCLA type RF photocathode gun, a precision machined RF structure capable of supporting gradients in excess of 80 MV/m, have been successfully brazed and leak rates of 10-10 mbar l/s have been achieved. Brazing, is carried out in two steps in a hydrogen furnace, it involves joining of two RF cavities, 6 cylindrical ports, one rectangular waveguide and one seal plate. The cavities and waveguide are made of copper and the ports and seal plate are of stainless steel. Fixtures were designed and fabricated indigenously to maintain the required assembly tolerances during brazing. This was important for brazing of ports, two of which are brazed to one cavity at an angle of 22.50 at diametrically opposite locations, and the remaining four are brazed to the other cavity in mutually perpendicular orientations. All joints were brazed using copper-silver eutectic (72-28) alloy in foil and wire forms. This paper discusses the brazing requirement, design of fixtures, and the procedure adopted for brazing of the photocathode gun. The paper also discusses results of the tests carried out to qualify the brazed joints. (author)

  8. Independent assessment of TRAC-PD2 and RELAP5/MOD1 codes at BNL in FY 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the independent assessment calculations performed with the TRAC-PD2 and RELAP/MOD1 codes at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) during Fiscal Year 1981. A large variety of separate-effects experiments dealing with (1) steady-state and transient critical flow, (2) level swell, (3) flooding and entrainment, (4) steady-state flow boiling, (5) integral economizer once-through steam generator (IEOTSG) performance, (6) bottom reflood, and (7) two-dimensional phase separation of two-phase mixtures were simulated with TRAC-PD2. In addition, the early part of an overcooling transient which occurred at the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant on March 20, 1978 was also computed with an updated version of TRAC-PD2. Three separate-effects tests dealing with (1) transient critical flow, (2) steady-state flow boiling, and (3) IEOTSG performance were also simulated with RELAP5/MOD1 code. Comparisons between the code predictions and the test data are presented

  9. Neutral current quasielastic (anti)neutrino scattering beyond the Fermi gas model at MiniBooNE and BNL kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, M V; Barbaro, M B; Giusti, C; Meucci, A; Caballero, J A; Gonzalez-Jimenez, R; de Guerra, E Moya; Udias, J M

    2015-01-01

    Neutral current quasielastic (anti)neutrino scattering cross sections on a $^{12}$C target are analyzed using a realistic spectral function $S(p,E)$ that gives a scaling function in accordance with the ($e,e'$) scattering data. The spectral function accounts for the nucleon-nucleon (NN) correlations by using natural orbitals (NOs) from the Jastrow correlation method and has a realistic energy dependence. The standard value of the axial mass $M_A= 1.032$ GeV is used in all calculations. The role of the final-state interaction (FSI) on the spectral and scaling functions, as well as on the cross sections is accounted for. A comparison of the calculations with the empirical data of the MiniBooNE and BNL experiments is performed. Our results are analyzed in comparison with those when NN correlations are not included, and also with results from other theoretical approaches, such as the relativistic Fermi gas (RFG), the relativistic mean field (RMF), the relativistic Green's function (RGF), as well as with the Super...

  10. New dynamics information from experimental results obtained in d-Au collisions at RHIC-BNL energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last runs d-Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV have been investigated at RHIC-BNL using the BRAHMS Experiment. Some interesting experimental results on charged particle multiplicities, rapidity distributions, transverse momentum spectra, antiparticle to particle ratios, participant spectator evolution have been obtained. In this work the most interesting results are presented for different rapidity and collision centrality ranges. Taking into account the importance of the collision geometry and collision symmetry in the collision dynamics, comparisons with the similar experimental results obtained in Au-Au collisions have been done. New interesting results can be reported. The most significant are related to the evolution of the nuclear modification factor with rapidity and collision centrality. The high transverse momentum suppression and the behaviours in different rapidity and centrality ranges suggest strong initial state effects. These effects could be related to the gluonic structure of the colliding nuclei. Some insights on the Color Glass Condensate formation are possible. (author)

  11. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.)

  12. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  13. Sodium fast reactor gaps analysis of computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbajo, Juan (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Ludewig, Hans (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d' %C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache %3CU%2B2013%3E CEA, France)

    2011-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of an expert-opinion elicitation activity designed to qualitatively assess the status and capabilities of currently available computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety calculations of advanced sodium fast reactors, and identify important gaps. The twelve-member panel consisted of representatives from five U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, and BNL), the University of Wisconsin, the KAERI, the JAEA, and the CEA. The major portion of this elicitation activity occurred during a two-day meeting held on Aug. 10-11, 2010 at Argonne National Laboratory. There were two primary objectives of this work: (1) Identify computer codes currently available for SFR accident analysis and reactor safety calculations; and (2) Assess the status and capability of current US computer codes to adequately model the required accident scenarios and associated phenomena, and identify important gaps. During the review, panel members identified over 60 computer codes that are currently available in the international community to perform different aspects of SFR safety analysis for various event scenarios and accident categories. A brief description of each of these codes together with references (when available) is provided. An adaptation of the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) for computational modeling and simulation is described for use in this work. The panel's assessment of the available US codes is presented in the form of nine tables, organized into groups of three for each of three risk categories considered: anticipated operational occurrences (AOOs), design basis accidents (DBA), and beyond design basis accidents (BDBA). A set of summary conclusions are drawn from the results obtained. At the highest level, the panel judged that current US code capabilities are adequate for licensing given reasonable margins, but expressed concern that US code development activities had stagnated and that the

  14. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cover gas spaces for primary coolant vessel, such as a reactor container, a pump vessel and an intermediate heat exchanger vessel are in communication with each other by an inverted U-shaped pressure conduit. A transmitter and a receiver are disposed to the pressure conduit at appropriate positions. If vibration frequencies (pressure vibration) from low frequency to high frequency are generated continuously from the transmitter to the inside of the communication pipe, a resonance phenomenon (air-column resonance oscillation) is caused by the inherent frequency or the like of the communication pipe. The frequency of the air-column resonance oscillation is changed by the inner diameter and the clogged state of the pipelines. Accordingly, by detecting the change of the air-column oscillation characteristics by the receiver, the clogged state of the flow channels in the pipelines can be detected even during the reactor operation. With such procedures, steams of coolants flowing entrained by the cover gases can be prevented from condensation and coagulation at a low temperature portion of the pipelines, otherwise it would lead clogging in the pipelines. (I.N.)

  15. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  16. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  17. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent shocks exerted on a vent head due to pool-swell caused within a pressure suppression chamber (disposed in a torus configuration around the dry well) upon loss of coolant accident in BWR type reactors. Constitution: The following relationship is established between the volume V (m3) of a dry well and the ruptured opening area A (m2) at the boundary expected upon loss of coolant accident: V >= 30340 (m) x A Then, the volume of the dry well is made larger than the ruptured open area, that is, the steam flow rate of leaking coolants upon loss of coolant accident to decrease the pressure rise in the dry well at the initial state where loss of coolant accident is resulted. Accordingly, the pressure of non-compressive gases jetted out from the lower end of the downcomer to the pool water is decreased to suppress the pool-swell. (Ikeda, J.)

  18. Measurements of ϕ meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Silva, C. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Souza, R. Derradi De; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; Toledo, A. Szanto De; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; Leeuwen, M. Van; Molen, A. M. Vander; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R., Jr.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J. X.

    2009-06-01

    We present results for the measurement of ϕ meson production via its charged kaon decay channel ϕ→K+K- in Au+Au collisions at sNN=62.4,130, and 200 GeV, and in p+p and d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV from the STAR experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The midrapidity (|y|<0.5) ϕ meson transverse momentum (pT) spectra in central Au+Au collisions are found to be well described by a single exponential distribution. On the other hand, the pT spectra from p+p, d+Au, and peripheral Au+Au collisions show power-law tails at intermediate and high pT and are described better by Levy distributions. The constant ϕ/K- yield ratio vs beam species, collision centrality, and colliding energy is in contradiction with expectations from models having kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for ϕ production at RHIC. The Ω/ϕ yield ratio as a function of pT is consistent with a model based on the recombination of thermal s quarks up to pT~4 GeV/c, but disagrees at higher transverse momenta. The measured nuclear modification factor, RdAu, for the ϕ meson increases above unity at intermediate pT, similar to that for pions and protons, while RAA is suppressed due to the energy loss effect in central Au+Au collisions. Number of constituent quark scaling of both Rcp and v2 for the ϕ meson with respect to other hadrons in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV at intermediate pT is observed. These observations support quark coalescence as being the dominant mechanism of hadronization in the intermediate pT region at RHIC.

  19. Survey of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of reasearch reactors based on the IAEA Nuclear Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) was done. This database includes information on 273 operating research reactors ranging in power from zero to several hundred MW. From these 273 operating research reactors 205 reactors have a power level below 5 MW, the remaining 68 reactors range from 5 MW up to several 100 MW thermal power. The major reactor types with common design are: Siemens Unterrichtsreaktors, 1.2 Argonaut reactors, Slowpoke reactors, the miniature neutron source reactors, TRIGA reactors, material testing reactors and high flux reactors. Technical data such as: power, fuel material, fuel type, enrichment, maximum neutron flux density and experimental facilities for each reactor type as well as a description of their utilization in physics and chemistry, medicine and biology, academic research and teaching, training purposes (students and physicists, operating personnel), industrial application (neutron radiography, silicon neutron transmutation doping facilities) are provided. The geographically distribution of these reactors is also shown. As conclusions the author discussed the advantages (low capital cost, low operating cost, low burn up, simple to operate, safe, less restrictive containment and sitting requirements, versatility) and disadvantages (lower sensitivity for NAA, limited radioisotope production, limited use of neutron beams, limited access to the core, licensing) of low power research reactors. 24 figs., refs. 15, Tab. 1 (nevyjel)

  20. Department of reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risoe during 1979 are described. The work is presented in five chapters: Reactor Engineering, Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Heat Transfer and Hydraulics, The DR 1 Reactor, and Non-Nuclear Activities. A list of the staff and of publications is included. (author)

  1. RB reactor noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistical fluctuations of reactivity represent reactor noise. Analysis of reactor noise enables determining a series of reactor kinetic parameters. Fluctuations of power was measured by ionization chamber placed next to the tank of the RB reactor. The signal was digitized by an analog-digital converter. After calculation of the mean power, 3000 data obtained by sampling were analysed

  2. Plant-originated glycoprotein (24 kDa) has an inhibitory effect on proliferation of BNL CL.2 cells in response to di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2011-08-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is one of the many environmental chemicals that are widely used in polyvinyl chloride products, vinyl flooring, food packaging and infant toys. They cause cell proliferation or dysfunction of human liver. The purpose of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effect of a glycoprotein (24 kDa) isolated from Zanthoxylum piperitum DC (ZPDC) on proliferation of liver cell in the DEHP-induced BNL CL. 2 cells. [³H]-thymidine incorporation, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), intracellular Ca²⁺ mobilization and activity of protein kinase C (PKC) were measured using radioactivity and fluorescence method respectively. The expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases [extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)], activator protein (AP)-1 (c-Jun and c-Fos), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cell cycle-related factors (cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase [CDK] 4) were evaluated using Western blotting or electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The results in this study showed that the levels of [³H]-thymidine incorporation, intracellular ROS, intracellular Ca²⁺ mobilization and activity of PKCα were inhibited by ZPDC glycoprotein (100 µg/ml) in the DEHP-induced BNL CL. 2 cells. Also, activities of ERK, JNK and AP-1 were reduced by ZPDC glycoprotein (100 µg/ml). With regard to cell proliferation, activities of PCNA and cyclin D1/CDK4 were significantly suppressed at treatment with ZPDC glycoprotein (100 µg/ml) in the presence of DEHP. Taken together, these findings suggest that ZPDC glycoprotein significantly normalized activities of PCNA and cyclin D1/CDK4, which relate to cell proliferation factors. Thus, ZPDC glycoprotein appears to be one of the compounds derived from natural products that are able to inhibit cell proliferation in the phthalate-induced BNL CL. 2 cells. PMID:21721021

  3. Review and Assessment of Neutron Cross Section and Nubar Covariances for Advanced Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslov,V.M.; Oblozinsky, P.; Herman, M.

    2008-12-01

    In January 2007, the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) produced a set of preliminary neutron covariance data for the international project 'Nuclear Data Needs for Advanced Reactor Systems'. The project was sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Paris, under the Subgroup 26 of the International Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC). These preliminary covariances are described in two recent BNL reports. The NNDC used a simplified version of the method developed by BNL and LANL that combines the recent Atlas of Neutron Resonances, the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE and the Bayesian code KALMAN with the experimental data used as guidance. There are numerous issues involved in these estimates of covariances and it was decided to perform an independent review and assessment of these results so that better covariances can be produced for the revised version in future. Reviewed and assessed are uncertainties for fission, capture, elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and (n,2n) cross sections as well as prompt nubars for 15 minor actinides ({sup 233,234,236}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,240,241,242}Pu, {sup 241,242m,243}Am and {sup 242,243,244,245}Cm) and 4 major actinides ({sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U and {sup 239}Pu). We examined available evaluations, performed comparison with experimental data, taken into account uncertainties in model parameterization and made use state-of-the-art nuclear reaction theory to produce the uncertainty assessment.

  4. Fast-Mixed Spectrum Reactor progress report. Results of the FMSR Benchmark calculations and an assessment of current fission product libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the Initial Feasibility Study of the Fast Mixed Spectrum Reactor, a series of benchmark calculations were made to determine the sensitivity of the physics analysis to differences in methods and data. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were invited to participate with Brookhaven National Laboratory in the analysis of a FMSR model prescribed by BNL. Detailed comparisons are made including a comprehensive study on the adequacy of the fission product treatments

  5. Energy Dependence of Directed Flow over a Wide Range of Pseudorapidity in Au+Au Collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Hauer, M.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2006-07-01

    We report on measurements of directed flow as a function of pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at energies of sNN=19.6, 62.4, 130 and 200 GeV as measured by the PHOBOS detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. These results are particularly valuable because of the extensive, continuous pseudorapidity coverage of the PHOBOS detector. There is no significant indication of structure near midrapidity and the data surprisingly exhibit extended longitudinal scaling similar to that seen for elliptic flow and charged particle pseudorapidity density.

  6. Research Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published in English and in French, this large report first proposes an overview of the use and history of research nuclear reactors. It discusses their definition, and presents the various types of research reactors which can be either related to nuclear power (critical mock-ups, material test reactors, safety test reactors, training reactors, prototypes), or to research (basic research, industry, health), or to specific particle physics phenomena (neutron diffraction, isotope production, neutron activation, neutron radiography, semiconductor doping). It reports the history of the French research reactors by distinguishing the first atomic pile (ZOE), and the activities and achievements during the fifties, the sixties and the seventies. It also addresses the development of instrumentation for research reactors (neutron, thermal, mechanical and fission gas release measurements). The other parts of the report concern the validation of neutronics calculations for different reactors (the EOLE water critical mock-up, the MASURCA air critical mock-up dedicated to fast neutron reactor study, the MINERVE water critical mock-up, the CALIBAN pulsed research reactor), the testing of materials under irradiation (OSIRIS reactor, laboratories associated with research reactors, the Jules Horowitz reactor and its experimental programs and related devices, irradiation of materials with ion beams), the investigation of accident situations (on the CABRI, Phebus, Silene and Jules Horowitz reactors). The last part proposes a worldwide overview of research reactors

  7. Technical Safety Requirement Violation at the High Flux Beam Reactor Decommissioning Project, Brookhaven, United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on 6 July 2009, a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation was declared at the high flux beam reactor (HFBR) project, which was a limited scope decontamination and decommissioning project associated with the permanently shutdown reactor. The violation extended from performing decommissioning activities within the facility under the incorrect mode. The draining of the spent fuel pool was performed in the warm standby mode when it should have been in the operation mode. The TSR was developed contrary to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) TSR guidance, which recommends that facility operations should only be carried out in the operation mode. The facility TSR allowed operations to be carried out in both modes. The HFBR operation mode focused on the removal of a small number of highly irradiated components with associated limited conditions of operation (LCO), while the warm standby mode focused on all other tasks in the facility and did not require entry into the LCO

  8. Reactor Physics Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  9. Introduction of Nuclear Reactor Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book introduces development, status, supply and demand and resource of nuclear reactor. It deals with basic knowledge of nuclear reactor, which are reactor system, heat recovery in reactor core, structural feature in reactor, materials of structure in reactor, shielding of gamma ray, shielding of reactor, safety and environmental problem of nuclear power plant, nuclear fuel and economical efficiency of nuclear energy.

  10. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: P- and CP-odd Effects in Hot and Dense Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the proceedings of the RBRC/CATHIE workshop on 'P- and CP-odd Effects in Hot and Dense Matter' held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on April 26-30, 2010. The workshop was triggered by the experimental observation of charge correlations in heavy ion collisions at RHIC, which were predicted to occur due to local parity violation (P- and CP-odd fluctuations) in hot and dense QCD matter. This experimental result excited a significant interest in the broad physics community, inspired a few alternative interpretations, and emphasized the need for a deeper understanding of the role of topology in QCD vacuum and in hot and dense quark-gluon matter. Topological effects in QCD are also closely related to a number of intriguing problems in condensed matter physics, cosmology and astrophysics. We therefore felt that a broad cross-disciplinary discussion of topological P- and CP-odd effects in various kinds of matter was urgently needed. Such a discussion became the subject of the workshop. Specific topics discussed at the workshop include the following: (1) The current experimental results on charge asymmetries at RHIC and the physical interpretations of the data; (2) Quantitative characterization of topological effects in QCD matter including both analytical (perturbative and non-perturbative using gauge/gravity duality) and numerical (lattice-QCD) calculations; (3) Topological effects in cosmology of the Early Universe (including baryogenesis and dark energy); (4) Topological effects in condensed matter physics (including graphene and superfiuids); and (5) Directions for the future experimental studies of P- and CP-odd effects at RHIC and elsewhere. We feel that the talks and intense discussions during the workshop were extremely useful, and resulted in new ideas in both theory and experiment. We hope that the workshop has contributed to the progress in understanding the role of topology in QCD and related fields. We thank all the speakers and

  11. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Quarkonium Production in Elementary and Heavy Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumitru, A.; Lourenco, C.; Petreczky, P.; Qiu, J., Ruan, L.

    2011-08-03

    Understanding the structure of the hadron is of fundamental importance in subatomic physics. Production of heavy quarkonia is arguably one of the most fascinating subjects in strong interaction physics. It offers unique perspectives into the formation of QCD bound states. Heavy quarkonia are among the most studied particles both theoretically and experimentally. They have been, and continue to be, the focus of measurements in all high energy colliders around the world. Because of their distinct multiple mass scales, heavy quarkonia were suggested as a probe of the hot quark-gluon matter produced in heavy-ion collisions; and their production has been one of the main subjects of the experimental heavy-ion programs at the SPS and RHIC. However, since the discovery of J/psi at Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory over 36 years ago, theorists still have not been able to fully understand the production mechanism of heavy quarkonia, although major progresses have been made in recent years. With this in mind, a two-week program on quarkonium production was organized at BNL on June 6-17, 2011. Many new experimental data from LHC and from RHIC were presented during the program, including results from the LHC heavy ion run. To analyze and correctly interpret these measurements, and in order to quantify properties of the hot matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, it is necessary to improve our theoretical understanding of quarkonium production. Therefore, a wide range of theoretical aspects on the production mechanism in the vacuum as well as in cold nuclear and hot quark-gluon medium were discussed during the program from the controlled calculations in QCD and its effective theories such as NRQCD to various models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. The scientific program was divided into three major scientific parts: basic production mechanism for heavy quarkonium in vacuum or in high energy elementary collisions; the

  12. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: P- and CP-odd Effects in Hot and Dense Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, A.; Fukushima, K.; Kharzeev, D.; Warringa, H.; Voloshin, S.

    2010-04-26

    This volume contains the proceedings of the RBRC/CATHIE workshop on 'P- and CP-odd Effects in Hot and Dense Matter' held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on April 26-30, 2010. The workshop was triggered by the experimental observation of charge correlations in heavy ion collisions at RHIC, which were predicted to occur due to local parity violation (P- and CP-odd fluctuations) in hot and dense QCD matter. This experimental result excited a significant interest in the broad physics community, inspired a few alternative interpretations, and emphasized the need for a deeper understanding of the role of topology in QCD vacuum and in hot and dense quark-gluon matter. Topological effects in QCD are also closely related to a number of intriguing problems in condensed matter physics, cosmology and astrophysics. We therefore felt that a broad cross-disciplinary discussion of topological P- and CP-odd effects in various kinds of matter was urgently needed. Such a discussion became the subject of the workshop. Specific topics discussed at the workshop include the following: (1) The current experimental results on charge asymmetries at RHIC and the physical interpretations of the data; (2) Quantitative characterization of topological effects in QCD matter including both analytical (perturbative and non-perturbative using gauge/gravity duality) and numerical (lattice-QCD) calculations; (3) Topological effects in cosmology of the Early Universe (including baryogenesis and dark energy); (4) Topological effects in condensed matter physics (including graphene and superfiuids); and (5) Directions for the future experimental studies of P- and CP-odd effects at RHIC and elsewhere. We feel that the talks and intense discussions during the workshop were extremely useful, and resulted in new ideas in both theory and experiment. We hope that the workshop has contributed to the progress in understanding the role of topology in QCD and related fields. We thank all the speakers and

  13. Safeguarding research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is organized in four sections, including the introduction. The second section contains a discussion of the characteristics and attributes of research reactors important to safeguards. In this section, research reactors are described according to their power level, if greater than 25 thermal megawatts, or according to each fuel type. This descriptive discussion includes both reactor and reactor fuel information of a generic nature, according to the following categories. 1. Research reactors with more than 25 megawatts thermal power, 2. Plate fuelled reactors, 3. Assembly fuelled reactors. 4. Research reactors fuelled with individual rods. 5. Disk fuelled reactors, and 6. Research reactors fuelled with aqueous homogeneous fuel. The third section consists of a brief discussion of general IAEA safeguards as they apply to research reactors. This section is based on IAEA safeguards implementation documents and technical reports that are used to establish Agency-State agreements and facility attachments. The fourth and last section describes inspection activities at research reactors necessary to meet Agency objectives. The scope of the activities extends to both pre and post inspection as well as the on-site inspection and includes the examination of records and reports relative to reactor operation and to receipts, shipments and certain internal transfers, periodic verification of fresh fuel, spent fuel and core fuel, activities related to containment and surveillance, and other selected activities, depending on the reactor

  14. Research nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the divergence of the first nuclear reactor in 1942, about 600 research or test reactors have been built throughout the world. Today 255 research reactors are operating in 57 countries and about 70% are over 25 years old. Whereas there are very few reactor types for power plants because of rationalization and standardisation, there is a great diversity of research reactors. We can divide them into 2 groups: heavy water cooled reactors and light water moderated reactors. Heavy water cooled reactors are dedicated to the production of high flux of thermal neutrons which are extracted from the core by means of neutronic channels. Light water moderated reactors involved pool reactors and slightly pressurized closed reactors, they are polyvalent but their main purposes are material testing, technological irradiations, radionuclide production and neutron radiography. At the moment 8 research reactors are being built in Canada, Germany, Iran, Japan, Kazakhstan, Morocco, Russia and Slovakia and 8 others are planned in 7 countries (France, Indonesia, Nigeria, Russia, Slovakia, Thailand and Tunisia. Different research reactors are described: Phebus, Masurca, Phenix and Petten HFR. The general principles of nuclear safety applied to test reactors are presented. (A.C.)

  15. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Underground Utilities removal Phase 3; Trench 5 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Survey Group (BSG) has completed removal and performed Final Status Survey (FSS) of the concrete duct from Trench 5 from Building 801 to the Stack. Sample results have been submitted as required to demonstrate that the cleanup goal of (le)15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years has been met. Four rounds of sampling, from pre-excavation to FSS, were performed as specified in the Field Sampling Plan (FSP) (BNL 2010a). It is the policy of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to perform independent verifications of decontamination and decommissioning activities conducted at DOE facilities. ORISE has been designated as the organization responsible for this task for the HFBR Underground Utilities. ORISE, together with DOE, determined that a Type A verification of Trench 5 was appropriate based on recent verification results from Trenches 2, 3, and 4, and the minimal potential for residual radioactivity in the area. The removal of underground utilities is being performed in three stages to decommission the HFBR facility and support structures. Phase 3 of this project included the removal of at least 200 feet of 36-inch to 42-inch pipe from the west side to the south side of Building 801, and the 14-inch diameter Acid Waste Line that spanned from 801 to the Stack within Trench 5. Based on the pre-excavation sample results of the soil overburden the potential for contamination of the soil surrounding the pipe is minimal (BNL 2010a). ORISE reviewed the BNL FSP and identified comments for consideration (ORISE 2010). BNL prepared a revised FSP that resolved each ORISE comment adequately (BNL 2010a). ORISE referred to the revised HFBR Underground Utilities FSP FSS data to conduct the Type A verification

  16. Nuclear reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent seismic vibrations of external buildings from transmitting to the side walls of a reactor container in a tank type FBR reactor building. Constitution: The reactor building is structured such that the base mat for a reactor container chamber and a reactor container is separated from the base mat for the walls of building, and gas-tight material such as silicon rubber is filled in the gap therebetween. With such a constitution, even if the crane-supporting wall vibrates violently upon occurrence of earthqualkes, the seismic vibrations do not transmit toward the reactor container chamber. (Horiuchi, T.)

  17. BNL status and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status and future plans for the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron are presented. The operating modes, accelerator improvement program, Booster synchrotron status, Stretcher ring proposal, and higher intensity options are described

  18. BNL future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littenberg, L.

    1998-01-01

    In 1999, after almost 40 years of independent existence, the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) is scheduled to be pressed into service as an injector to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Although at first sight this seems like the end of an era, in actuality, it represents a very attractive new opportunity. For the AGS is actually needed by RHIC for only a few hours per day. The balance of the time it is available for extracted proton beam work at a very small incremental cost. This represents the reverse of the current situation in which the nuclear physics program gets access to the AGS (for fixed target heavy ion experiments) at incremental cost, while the base cost of maintaining the accelerator is borne by the high energy physics program. Retaining the AGS for particle physics work would broaden the US HEP program considerably, allowing continued exploitation of the world`s most intense source of medium energy protons. High energy possibilities include incisive probes of Standard Model and non-SM CP-violation, and of low energy manifestations of supersymmetry.

  19. Spin physics at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spin Physics at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory is the most recent of new capabilities being explored at this facility. During the summer of 1984 the AGS accelerated beams of polarized protons to 16.5 GeV/c at 40% polarization to two experiments (E782, E785). These experiments; single spin asymmetry in inclusive polarized pp interactions; and spin-spin effects in polarized pp elastic scattering, operated at the highest polarized proton energy ever achieved by any accelerator in the world. These experiments are reviewed after the complementary spin physics program with unpolarized protons, and the future possibilities with a booster injector for the AGS and the secondary benefits of a Relativisitic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), are placed within the context of the present physics program

  20. BNL multiparticle spectrometer software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses some solutions to problems common to the design, management and maintenance of a large high energy physics spectrometer software system. The experience of dealing with a large, complex program and the necessity of having the program controlled by various people at different levels of computer experience has led us to design a program control structure of mnemonic and self-explanatory nature. The use of this control language in both on-line and off-line operation of the program will be discussed. The solution of structuring a large program for modularity so that substantial changes to the program can be made easily for a wide variety of high energy physics experiments is discussed. Specialized tools for this type of large program management are also discussed

  1. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 D/F WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Underground Utilities removal Phase 2; the D/F Waste Line removal at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Survey Group (BSG) has completed removal and performed the final status survey (FSS) of the D/F Waste Line that provided the conduit for pumping waste from Building 750 to Building 801. Sample results have been submitted as required to demonstrate that the cleanup goals of 15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years have been met. Four rounds of sampling, from pre-excavation to final status survey (FSS), were performed as specified in the Field Sampling Plan (FSP) (BNL 2010a). It is the policy of the US Departmental of Energy (DOE) to perform independent verifications of decontamination and decomissioning activities conducted at DOE facilities. ORISE has been designated as the organization responsible for this task at the HFBR. ORISE together with DOE determined that a Type A verification of the D/F Waste Line was appropriate based on its method of construction and upon the minimal potential for residual radioactivity in the area. The removal of underground utilities is being performed in three stages in the process to decommission the HFBR facility and support structures. Phase 2 of this project included the grouting and removal of 1100 feet of 2-inch pipe and 640 feet of 4-inch pipe that served as the D/F Waste Line. Based on the pre-excavation sample results of the soil overburden, the potential for contamination of the soil surrounding the pipe is minimal (BNL 2010a). ORISE reviewed the BNL FSP and identified comments for consideration (ORISE 2010). BNL prepared a revised FSP that addressed each ORISE comment adequately (BNL 2010a). ORISE referred to the revised Phase 2 D/F Waste Line removal FSP FSS data to conduct the Type A verification and determine whether the intent odf

  2. Reactor Physics Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies

  3. Ship propulsion reactors technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper takes the state of the art on ship propulsion reactors technology. The french research programs with the corresponding technological stakes, the reactors specifications and advantages are detailed. (A.L.B.)

  4. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise

  5. Process heat reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consumption of heat, for industrial and domestic needs, takes up half of the national energy supply; direct utilization of the heat produced by nuclear reactors could therefore contribute to reduce the deficit in the energetic results. The restraints proper to heat consumption (dispersal and variety of consumers, irregular demand) involve the development of the heat transport system structures and adequate nuclear reactors. With this in view, the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique and Technicatome are developing the CAS reactor series, pressurized water reactors (PWR), (CAS 3G reactor with a power of 420 MW.th.), and the Thermos reactor (100 MW.th.), directly conceived to produce heat at 1200C and whose technology derives from the experimental pool reactors type. In order to prove the value of the Thermos design, an experimental reactor should soon be constructed in the Saclay nuclear research centre

  6. Reactor System Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMART NPP(Nuclear Power Plant) has been developed for duel purpose, electricity generation and energy supply for seawater desalination. The objective of this project IS to design the reactor system of SMART pilot plant(SMART-P) which will be built and operated for the integrated technology verification of SMART. SMART-P is an integral reactor in which primary components of reactor coolant system are enclosed in single pressure vessel without connecting pipes. The major components installed within a vessel includes a core, twelve steam generator cassettes, a low-temperature self pressurizer, twelve control rod drives, and two main coolant pumps. SMART-P reactor system design was categorized to the reactor coe design, fluid system design, reactor mechanical design, major component design and MMIS design. Reactor safety -analysis and performance analysis were performed for developed SMART=P reactor system. Also, the preparation of safety analysis report, and the technical support for licensing acquisition are performed

  7. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 11, Reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume includes the following chapters describing: Organisation of reactor operation (including operational safety, fuel management, and regulatory rules for RA reactor operation); Control and maintenance of reactor components (reactor core, nuclear fuel, heavy water and cover gas systems, mechanical structures, electric power supply system, reactor instrumentation); Quality assurance and Training of the reactor personnel

  8. The Chernobylsk reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction, the safety philosophy, the major reactor physical parameters of RBMK-1000 type reactor units and the detailed description of the Chernobylsk-4 reactor accident, its causes and conclusions, the efforts to reduce the consequences on the reactor site and in the surroundings are discussed based on different types of Soviet documents including the report presented to the IAEA by the Soviet Atomic Energy Agency in August 1986. (V.N.)

  9. Zero energy reactor 'RB'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1958 the zero energy reactor RB was built with the purpose of enabling critical experiments with various reactor systems to be carried out. The first core assembly built in this reactor consists of heavy water as moderator and natural uranium metal as fuel. In order to be able to obtain very accurate results when measuring the main characteristics of the assembly the reactor was built as a completely bare system. (author)

  10. High solids fermentation reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  11. Fossil nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurette, M.

    1976-01-01

    The discussion of fossil nuclear reactors (the Oklo phenomenon) covers the earth science background, neutron-induced isotopes and reactor operating conditions, radiation-damage studies, and reactor modeling. In conclusion possible future studies are suggested and the significance of the data obtained in past studies is summarized. (JSR)

  12. Fusion reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of fusion reactor systems studies, the objectives of these studies are outlined and some recent conceptual reactor designs are described. The need for further studies in greater depth is indicated so that progress towards a commercial fusion reactor may be consolidated. (U.K.)

  13. Reactor power measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a self-powered long detector having a sensitivity over the entire length of a reactor core as an entire control rod withdrawal range of a BWR type reactor, and a reactor power measuring device using a gamma ray thermometer which scarcely causes sensitivity degradation. That is, a hollow protection pipe is disposed passing through the reactor core from the outside of a reactor pressure vessel. The self-powered long detectors and the gamma ray thermometers are inserted and installed in the protection pipe. An average reactor power in an axial direction of the reactor relative to a certain position in the horizontal cross section of the reactor core is determined based on the power of the self-powered long detector over the entire length of the reactor core. Since the response of the self-powered detector relative to a local power change is rapid, the output is used as an input signal to a safety protection device of the reactor core. Further, a gamma ray thermometer secured in the reactor and having scarce sensitivity degradation is used instead of an incore travelling neutron monitor used for relative calibration of an existent neutron monitor secured in the reactor. (I.S.)

  14. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 65, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETINGS XXVII, XXVIII, and XXX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RSRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the 'Rikagaku Kenkyusho' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has both a theory and experimental component. At present the theoretical group has 4 Fellows and 3 Research Associates as well as 11 RHIC Physics/University Fellows (academic year 2003-2004). To date there are approximately 30 graduates from the program of which 13 have attained tenure positions at major institutions worldwide. The experimental group is smaller and has 2 Fellows and 3 RHIC Physics/University Fellows and 3 Research Associates, and historically 6 individuals have attained permanent positions. Beginning in 2001 a new RIKEN Spin Program (RSP) category was implemented at RBRC. These appointments are joint positions of RBRC and RIKEN and include the following positions in theory and experiment: RSP Researchers, RSP Research Associates, and Young Researchers, who are mentored by senior RBRC Scientists, A number of RIKEN Jr. Research Associates and Visiting Scientists also contribute to the physics program at the Center. RBRC has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select a few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. To date there are sixty nine proceedings volumes available. The construction of a 0.6 teraflops parallel processor, dedicated to lattice QCD, begun at the Center on February 19, 1998, was completed on August 28, 1998 and is still

  15. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  16. Nuclear reactor repairing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable free repairing of an arbitrary position in an LMFBR reactor. Constitution: A laser light emitted from a laser oscillator installed out of a nuclear reactor is guided into a portion to be repaired in the reactor by using a reflecting mirror, thereby welding or cutting it. The guidance of the laser out of the reactor into the reactor is performed by an extension tube depending into a through hole of a rotary plug, and the guidance of the laser light into a portion to be repaired is performed by the transmitting and condensing action of the reflecting mirror. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. Fundamentals of reactor chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI, many courses are presented for the people working in and around the nuclear reactors. The curricula of the courses contain also the subject material of chemistry. With reference to the foreign curricula, a plan of educational subject material of chemistry in the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI was considered, and the fundamental part of reactor chemistry was reviewed in this report. Since the students of the Nuclear Engineering School are not chemists, the knowledge necessary in and around the nuclear reactors was emphasized in order to familiarize the students with the reactor chemistry. The teaching experience of the fundamentals of reactor chemistry is also given. (author)

  18. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  19. Generation III+ Reactor Portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the power generation needs of utilities are unique and diverse, they are all faced with the double challenge of meeting growing electricity needs while curbing CO2 emissions. To answer these diverse needs and help tackle this challenge, AREVA has developed several reactor models which are briefly described in this document: The EPRTM Reactor: designed on the basis of the Konvoi (Germany) and N4 (France) reactors, the EPRTM reactor is an evolutionary model designed to achieve best-in-class safety and operational performance levels. The ATMEA1TM reactor: jointly designed by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and AREVA through ATMEA, their common company. This reactor design benefits from the competencies and expertise of the two mother companies, which have commissioned close to 130 reactor units. The KERENATM reactor: Designed on the basis of the most recent German BWR reactors (Gundremmingen) the KERENATM reactor relies on proven technology while also including innovative, yet thoroughly tested, features. The optimal combination of active and passive safety systems for a boiling water reactor achieves a very low probability of severe accident

  20. The Maple reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MDS Nordion supplies the majority of the world's reactor-produced medical isotopes. These isotopes are currently produced in the NRU reactor at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). Medical isotopes and related technology are relied upon around the world to prevent, diagnose and treat disease. The NRU reactor, which has played a key role in supplying medical isotopes to date, has been in operation for over 40 years. Replacing this aging reactor has been a priority for MDS Nordion to assure the global nuclear medicine community that Canada will continue to be a dependable supplier of medical isotopes. MDS Nordion contracted AECL to construct two MAPLE reactors dedicated to the production of medical isotopes. The MDS Nordion Medical Isotope Reactor (MMIR) project started in September 1996. This paper describes the MAPLE reactors that AECL has built at its CRL site, and will operate for MDS Nordion. (author)

  1. High temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advent of high temperature reactors, nuclear energy, in addition to producing electricity, has shown enormous potential for the production of alternate transport energy carrier such as hydrogen. High efficiency hydrogen production processes need process heat at temperatures around 1173-1223 K. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), is currently developing concepts of high temperature reactors capable of supplying process heat around 1273 K. These reactors would provide energy to facilitate combined production of hydrogen, electricity, and drinking water. Compact high temperature reactor is being developed as a technology demonstrator for associated technologies. Design has been also initiated for a 600 MWth innovative high temperature reactor. High temperature reactor development programme has opened new avenues for research in areas like advanced nuclear fuels, high temperature and corrosion resistant materials and protective coatings, heavy liquid metal coolant technologies, etc. The paper highlights design of these reactors and their material related requirements

  2. Spinning fluids reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  3. Reactor Safety: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The programme of the Reactor Safety Division focuses on the development of expertise on materials behaviour under irradiation for fission and fusion oriented applications. Furthermore, as nuclear energy needs international public acceptance with respect to safety and efficient management of natural resources and wants to reduce the burden of nuclear waste, the Reactor Safety Division enhanced its efforts to develop the MYRRHA project. MYRRHA, an accelerator driven sub-critical system, might have the potential to cope in Europe with the above mentioned constraints on acceptability and might serve as a technological platform for GEN IV reactor development, in particular the Liquid Metal Fast Reactor.The Reactor Safety Division gathers three research entities that are internationally recognised: the Reactor Materials Research department, the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA department and the Instrumentation department.The objectives of Reactor Materials Research are: to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials and nuclear fuels used in present and future nuclear power industry; to perform research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material and fuel behaviour under or after irradiation; to contribute to the interpretation and modelling of the materials and fuels behaviour in order to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the Reactor Materials Research department concentrate on four distinct disciplines: Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel embrittlement Stress corrosion cracking in reactor coolant environment, including Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking; Nuclear Fuel characterisation and development of new fuel types for commercial and test reactors. Development of materials for Fusion and advanced nuclear fission reactors. The safe operation of present nuclear power plants relies primarily on the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel

  4. Beam dynamics enhancement due to accelerating field symmetrization in the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell S-band photocathode RF gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 1.6 cell photocathode S-Band gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is now in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). One of the main features of this RF gun is the symmetrization of the RF coupling iris with an identical vacuum pumping port located in the full cell. The effects of the asymmetry caused by the RF coupling iris were experimentally investigated by positioning a metallic plunger at the back wall of the vacuum port iris. The higher order modes produced were studied using electron beamlets with 8-fold symmetry. The 8-fold beamlets were produced by masking the laser beam. These experimental results indicate that the integrated electrical center and the geometrical center of the gun are within 175 microm. Which is within the laser alignment tolerance of 250 microm

  5. New experimental results obtained in Au-Au collisions at the energies available to the RHIC-BNL using BRAHMS experimental setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many experimental data for Au-Au collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV and √sNN = 200 GeV have been obtained in the last two years at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, USA. The experimental setup BRAHMS is one of the five experimental setups used at RHIC-BNL. Interesting experimental results on many physical quantities with dynamic signification have been obtained. In the present work we report the new results on charged particle multiplicities, pseudorapidities, rapidities, transverse, momentum spectra, and particle to antiparticle ratios. These experimental results lead to nuclear temperatures and nuclear densities at different collision centralities and rapidities. Some interesting results on collective flow velocities of the nuclear matter are also obtained. Dependencies on the collision centrality, pseudorapidity and beam energy, in the center-of-mass system, are included in the work. The highest multiplicities (more than 5000 charged particles per event) and the highest pionic, kaonic and protonic temperatures obtained up to now are reported for the most central collisions (0-6%). The Coulomb effects are very low at very small velocities. A significant increase of the negative kaon to positive kaon ratio appears at rapidities around y = 0.0. Similar results are obtained for antiproton to proton ratio. The stopping of the nuclear matter is reflected by the high collective velocities obtained in the same rapidity range (up to 0.6 c). All these experimental results, as well as the experimental results obtained in the frame of other collaborations, including the RHIC-BNL collaboration, will be used to obtain new information on the behaviour of the highly excited and dense nuclear matter and the formation conditions for the quark-gluon plasma. Interesting information on the Universe behaviour in the first microsecond after Big Bang can also be obtained. (authors)

  6. Research reactors in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argentine Nuclear Development started in early fifties. In 1957, it was decided to built the first a research reactor. RA-1 reactor (120 kw, today licensed to work at 40 kW) started operation in January 1958. Originally RA-1 was an Argonaut (American design) reactor. In early sixties, the RA-1 core was changed. Fuel rods (20% enrichment) was introduced instead the old Argonaut core design. For that reason, a critical facility named RA-0 was built. After that, the RA-3 project started, to build a multipurpose 5 MW nuclear reactor MTR pool type, to produce radioisotopes and research. For that reason and to define the characteristics of the RA-3 core, another critical facility was built, RA-2. Initially RA-3 was a 90 % enriched fuel reactor, and started operation in 1967. When Atucha I NPP project started, a German design Power Reactor, a small homogeneous reactor was donated by the German Government to Argentina (1969). This was RA-4 reactor (20% enrichment, 1W). In 1982, RA-6 pool reactor achieved criticality. This is a 500 kW reactor with 90% enriched MTR fuel elements. In 1990, RA-3 started to operate fueled by 20% enriched fuel. In 1997, the RA-8 (multipurpose critical facility located at Pilcaniyeu) started to operate. RA-3 reactor is the most important CNEA reactor for Argentine Research Reactors development. It is the first in a succession of Argentine MTR reactors built by CNEA (and INVAP SE ) in Argentina and other countries: RA-6 (500 kW, Bariloche-Argentina), RP-10 (10MW, Peru), NUR (500 kW, Algeria), MPR (22 MW, Egypt). The experience of Argentinian industry permits to compete with foreign developed countries as supplier of research reactors. Today, CNEA has six research reactors whose activities have a range from education and promotion of nuclear activity, to radioisotope production. For more than forty years, Argentine Research Reactors are working. The experience of Argentine is important, and argentine firms are able to compete in the design and

  7. Thai research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) was established in 1962, as a reactor center, by the virtue of the Atomic Energy for Peace Act, under operational policy and authority of the Thai Atomic Energy for Peace Commission (TAEPC); and under administration of Ministry of Science, Technology and Energy. It owns and operates the only Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1). The TRR-1/M1 is a mixed reactor system constituting of the old MTR type swimming pool, irradiation facilities and cooling system; and TRIGA Mark III core and control instrumentation. The general performance of TRR-1/M1 is summarized in Table I. The safe operation of TRR-1/M1 is regulated by Reactor Safety Committee (RSC), established under TAEPC, and Health Physics Group of OAEP. The RCS has responsibility and duty to review of and make recommendations on Reactor Standing Orders, Reactor Operation Procedures, Reactor Core Loading and Requests for Reactor Experiments. In addition,there also exist of Emergency Procedures which is administered by OAEP. The Reactor Operation Procedures constitute of reactor operating procedures, system operating procedures and reactor maintenance procedures. At the level of reactor routine operating procedures, there is a set of Specifications on Safety and Operation Limits and Code of Practice from which reactor shift supervisor and operators must follow in order to assure the safe operation of TRR-1/M1. Table II is the summary of such specifications. The OAEP is now upgrading certain major components of the TRR-1/M1 such as the cooling system, the ventilation system and monitoring equipment to ensure their adequately safe and reliable performance under normal and emergency conditions. Furthermore, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing assistance in areas of operation and maintenance and safety analysis. (author)

  8. Nuclear Reactor Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2001-02-01

    An authoritative textbook and up-to-date professional's guide to basic and advanced principles and practices Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering, and as the first comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics to appear in a quarter century, this book fills a large gap in the professional literature. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a textbook for students new to the subject, for others who need a basic understanding of how nuclear reactors work, as well as for those who are, or wish to become, specialists in nuclear reactor physics and reactor physics computations. It is also a valuable resource for engineers responsible for the operation of nuclear reactors. Dr. Weston Stacey begins with clear presentations of the basic physical principles, nuclear data, and computational methodology needed to understand both the static and dynamic behaviors of nuclear reactors. This is followed by in-depth discussions of advanced concepts, including extensive treatment of neutron transport computational methods. As an aid to comprehension and quick mastery of computational skills, he provides numerous examples illustrating step-by-step procedures for performing the calculations described and chapter-end problems. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a useful textbook and working reference. It is an excellent self-teaching guide for research scientists, engineers, and technicians involved in industrial, research, and military applications of nuclear reactors, as well as government regulators who wish to increase their understanding of nuclear reactors.

  9. The Evolution of Neutronic Parameters Versus Burnup for the Moroccan TRIGA Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This work presents the results of the burn up calculation of the Moroccan TRIGA Mark II research reactor at Centre d'Etudes Nucleaire de la Maamora (CENM). The fuel cycle length and the changes in several core parameters such as core reactivity, flux, control rods position, depletion of 235U and production of 239Pu and other parameters are estimated. Burn up calculations were done using BUCAL1 computer code based on MCNP5 code. For this purpose, we have used the ENDF/B-VII evaluated neutron reaction data recently released from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The processing of the ENDF/B-VII evaluation into library suitable for use with the MCNP code was done using the modular system NJOY99. Besides, the study gives valuable insight into the behavior of the reactor and will ensure better utilization and operation of the reactor, also it will allow planning of strategies for fuel reshuffling and/or reloading schemes and its safe implementation. (author)

  10. Spent fuel working group report on inventory and storage of the Department's spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a memo dated 19 August 1993, Secretary O'Leary assigned the Office of Environment, Safety and Health the primary responsibility to identify, characterize, and assess the safety, health, and environmental vulnerabilities of the DOE's existing storage conditions and facilities for the storage of irradiated reactor fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. This volume is divided into three major sections. Section 1 contains the Working Group Assessment Team reports on the following facilities: Hanford Site, INEL, SRS, Oak Ridge Site, West Valley Site, LANL, BNL, Sandia, General Atomics (San Diego), Babcock ampersand Wilcox (Lynchburg Technology Center), and ANL. Section 2 contains the Vulnerability Development Forms from most of these sites. Section 3 contains the documents used by the Working Group in implementing this initiative

  11. Reactor containment and reactor safety in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor safety systems of two reactors are studied aiming at the reactor containment integrity. The first is a BWR type reactor and is called Peachbottom 2, and the second is a PWR type reactor, and is called surry. (E.G.)

  12. TRIGA reactor main systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This module describes the main systems of low power (<2 MW) and higher power (≥2 MW) TRIGA reactors. The most significant difference between the two is that forced reactor cooling and an emergency core cooling system are generally required for the higher power TRIGA reactors. However, those TRIGA reactors that are designed to be operated above 3 MW also use a TRIGA fuel that is specifically designed for those higher power outputs (3 to 14 MW). Typical values are given for the respective systems although each TRIGA facility will have unique characteristics that may only be determined by the experienced facility operators. Due to the inherent wide scope of these research reactor facilities construction and missions, this training module covers those systems found at most operating TRIGA reactor facilities but may also discuss non-standard equipment that was found to be operationally useful although not necessarily required. (author)

  13. Evaluation of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of research reactors with highly enriched (93%) uranium fuel at JAERI, JRR-2 and JMTR is described. JRR-2 is a heterogeneous type of reactor, using heavy water as moderator and coolant. It uses both MTR type and cylindrical type of fuel elements. The maximum thermal power and the thermal neutron flux are 10 MW and 2x1014 n/cm2 see respectively. The reactor has been used for various experiments such as solid state physics, material irradiation, reactor fuel irradiation and radioisotope production. The JMTR is a multi-purpose tank type material testing reactor, and light water moderator and coolant, operated at 50 MW. The evaluation of lower enriched fuel and its consequences for both reactors is considered more especially

  14. Multipurpose research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international symposium on the utilization of multipurpose research reactors and related international co-operation was organized by the IAEA to provide for information exchange on current uses of research reactors and international co-operative projects. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants from 36 countries and two international organizations. There were 49 oral presentations of papers and 24 poster presentations. The presentations were divided into 7 sessions devoted to the following topics: neutron beam research and applications of neutron scattering (6 papers and 1 poster), reactor engineering (6 papers and 5 posters), irradiation testing of fuel and material for fission and fusion reactors (6 papers and 10 posters), research reactor utilization programmes (13 papers and 4 posters), neutron capture therapy (4 papers), neutron activation analysis (3 papers and 4 posters), application of small reactors in research and training (11 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. The nuclear soliton reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic reactor physics of a completely novel nuclear fission reactor design - the soliton-reactor - is presented on the basis of a simple model. In such a reactor, the neutrons in the critical region convert either fertile material in the adjacent layers into fissile material or reduce the poisoning of fissile material in such a manner that successively new critical regions emerge. The result is an autocatalytically driven burn-up wave which propagates throughout the reactor. Thereby, the relevant characteristic spatial distributions (neutron flux, specific power density and the associated particle densities) are solitons - wave phenomena resulting from non-linear partial differential equations which do not change their shape during propagation. A qualitativley new kind of harnessing nuclear fission energy may become possible with fuel residence times comparable with the useful lifetime of the reactor system. In the long run, fast breeder systems which exploit the natural uranium and thorium resources, without any reprocessing capacity are imaginable. (orig.)

  16. Fast Spectrum Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Donald; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Fast Spectrum Reactors presents a detailed overview of world-wide technology contributing to the development of fast spectrum reactors. With a unique focus on the capabilities of fast spectrum reactors to address nuclear waste transmutation issues, in addition to the well-known capabilities of breeding new fuel, this volume describes how fast spectrum reactors contribute to the wide application of nuclear power systems to serve the global nuclear renaissance while minimizing nuclear proliferation concerns. Readers will find an introduction to the sustainable development of nuclear energy and the role of fast reactors, in addition to an economic analysis of nuclear reactors. A section devoted to neutronics offers the current trends in nuclear design, such as performance parameters and the optimization of advanced power systems. The latest findings on fuel management, partitioning and transmutation include the physics, efficiency and strategies of transmutation, homogeneous and heterogeneous recycling, in addit...

  17. Fusion reactor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work covers four separate areas: (1) development of technology for processing liquid lithium from blankets, (2) investigation of hydrogen isotope permeation in candidate structural metals and alloys for near-term fusion reactors, (3) analytical studies encompassing fusion reactor thermal hydraulics, tritium facility design, and fusion reactor safety, and (4) studies involving dosimetry and damage analysis. Recent accomplishments in each of these areas are summarized

  18. The Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. This paper describes the key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, with emphasis on its safety characteristics. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  19. The replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a consequences of the government decision in September 1997. ANSTO established a replacement research reactor project to manage the procurement of the replacement reactor through the necessary approval, tendering and contract management stages This paper provides an update of the status of the project including the completion of the Environmental Impact Statement. Prequalification and Public Works Committee processes. The aims of the project, management organisation, reactor type and expected capabilities are also described

  20. PFBR reactor protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design philosophy adopted for Prototype Fast breeder Reactor (PFBR) is a classical one and has the following features: triplicated sensors for measuring important safety parameters; two independent reactor protection Logic Systems based on solid state devices; reactivity control achieved by control rods; gas equipped modules at the core blanket interface providing negative reactivity. Design verification of these features showed that safety of the reactor can be achieved by a traditional approach since the inherent features of LMFBR make this easy

  1. Reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BR2 reactor is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. Various aspects concerning the operation of the BR2 Reactor, the utilisation of the CALLISTO loop and the irradiation programme, the BR2 R and D programme and the production of isotopes and of NTD-silicon are discussed. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported

  2. TRIGA reactor characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This module describes the general design, characteristics and parameters of TRIGA reactors and fuels. It is recommended that most of this information should be incorporated into any reactor operator training program and, in many cases, the facility Safety Analysis Report. It is oriented to teach the basics of the physics and mechanical design of the TRIGA fuel as well as its unique operational characteristics and the differences between TRIGA fuels and others more traditional reactor fuels. (nevyjel)

  3. Reactor Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on reactor safety is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The research programme consists of four main activities, in particular the development of software for reliability analysis of large systems and participation in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents, the development of an expert system for the aid to diagnosis; the development and application of a probabilistic reactor dynamics method. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  4. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1984 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, reactor physics experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  5. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1981 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  6. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1979 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committees on Reactor Physics and on Decomissioning of Nuclear Facilities. (author)

  7. New reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document gives a summary of new nuclear reactor concepts from a technological point of view. Belgium supports the development of the European Pressurized-Water Reactor, which is an evolutionary concept based on the European experience in Pressurized-Water Reactors. A reorientation of the Belgian choice for this evolutionary concept may be required in case that a decision is taken to burn plutonium, when the need for flexible nuclear power plants arises or when new reactor concepts can demonstrate proved benefits in terms of safety and cost

  8. Reactor construction steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic functions of light water reactor components are shown on the example of a pressurized water reactor and the requirements resulting therefrom for steel, the basic structural material, are derived. A detailed analysis of three main groups of reactor steels is presented and the applications are indicated of low-alloyed steels, high-alloyed austenitic steels, and steels with a high content of Ni and of alloying additions for steam generator pipes. An outline is given of prospective fast breeder reactor steels. (J.K.)

  9. Commercialization of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative analysis has been performed of capital and fuel cycle costs for fast BN-type and pressurized light water VVER-type reactors. As a result of materials demand and components costs comparison of NPPs with VVER-1000 and BN-600 reactors, respectively, conclusion was made, that under equal conditions of the comparison, NPP with fast reactor had surpassed the specific capital cost of NPP with VVER by about 30 - 40 %. Ways were determined for further decrease of this difference, as well as for the fuel cycle cost reduction, because at present it is higher than that of VVER-type reactors. (author)

  10. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceptual design studies were made of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror-confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid and a small pilot-plant hybrid based on standard mirror confinement. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000-MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single-cell pilot plant

  11. Natural convection type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a natural convection type nuclear reactor, a reactor core is disposed such that the top of the reactor core is always situated in a flooded position even if pipelines connected to the pressure vessel are ruptured and the level at the inside of the reactor vessel is reduced due to flashing. Further, a lower dry well situated below the pressure vessel is disposed such that it is in communication with a through hole to a pressure suppression chamber situated therearound and the reactor core is situated at the level lower than that of the through hole. If pipelines connected to the pressure vessel are ruptured to cause loss of water, although the water level is lowered after the end of the flashing, the reactor core is always flooded till the operation of a pressure accummulation water injection system to prevent the top of the reactor core even from temporary exposure. Further, injected water is discharged to the outside of the pressure vessel, transferred to the lower dry well, and flows through the through hole to the pressure control chamber and cools the surface of the reactor pressure vessel from the outside. Accordingly, the reactor core is cooled to surely and efficiently remove the after-heat. (N.H.)

  12. INVAP's Research Reactor Designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INVAP, an Argentine company founded more than three decades ago, is today recognized as one of the leaders within the research reactor industry. INVAP has participated in several projects covering a wide range of facilities, designed in accordance with the requirements of our different clients. For complying with these requirements, INVAP developed special skills and capabilities to deal with different fuel assemblies, different core cooling systems, and different reactor layouts. This paper summarizes the general features and utilization of several INVAP research reactor designs, from subcritical and critical assemblies to high-power reactors IAEA safety

  13. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a control device which can conduct scram and avoid lowering of the power of a nuclear power plant upon occurrence of earthquakes. Namely, the device of the present invention comprises, in addition to an existent power control device, (1) an earthquake detector for detecting occurrence and annihilation of earthquakes and (2) a reactor control device for outputting control rod operation signals and reactor core flow rate control signals depending on the earthquake detection signals from the detector, and reactor and plant information. With such a constitution, although the reactor is vibrated by earthquakes, the detector detects slight oscillations of the reactor by initial fine vibration waves as premonitory symptoms of serious earthquakes. The earthquake occurrence signals are outputted to the reactor control device. The reactor control device, receiving the signals, changes the position of control rods by way of control rod driving mechanisms to make the axial power distribution in the reactor core to a top peak type. As a result, even if the void amount in the reactor core is reduced by the subsequent actual earthquakes, since the void amount is moved, effects on the increase of neutron fluxes by the actual earthquakes is small. (I.S.)

  14. Nuclear reactor internals arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor internals arrangement is disclosed which facilitates reactor refueling. A reactor vessel and a nuclear core is utilized in conjunction with an upper core support arrangement having means for storing withdrawn control rods therein. The upper core support is mounted to the underside of the reactor vessel closure head so that upon withdrawal of the control rods into the upper core support, the closure head, the upper core support and the control rods are removed as a single unit thereby directly exposing the core for purposes of refueling

  15. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed

  16. The research reactors their contribution to the reactors physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 19 october 2000, the french society of nuclear energy organized a day on the research reactors. This associated report of the technical session, reactors physics, is presented in two parts. The first part deals with the annual meeting and groups general papers on the pressurized water reactors, the fast neutrons reactors and the fusion reactors industry. The second part presents more technical papers about the research programs, critical models, irradiation reactors (OSIRIS and Jules Horowitz) and computing tools. (A.L.B.)

  17. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Underground Utilities removal Phase 3; Trench 1 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Survey Group (BSG) has completed removal and performed Final Status Survey (FSS) of the 42-inch duct and 14-inch line in Trench 1 from Building 801 to the Stack. Sample results have been submitted as required to demonstrate that the cleanup goal of (le)15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years has been met. Four rounds of sampling, from pre-excavation to FSS, were performed as specified in the Field Sampling Plan (FSP) (BNL 2010a). It is the policy of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to perform independent verifications of decontamination and decommissioning activities conducted at DOE facilities. ORISE has been designated as the organization responsible for this task for the HFBR Underground Utilities. ORISE, together with DOE, determined that a Type A verification of Trench 1 was appropriate based on recent verification results from Trenches 2, 3, 4, and 5, and the minimal potential for residual radioactivity in the area. The removal of underground utilities has been performed in three stages to decommission the HFBR facility and support structures. Phase 3 of this project included the removal of at least 200 feet of 36-inch to 42-inch duct from the west side to the south side of Building 801, and the 14-inch diameter Acid Waste Line that spanned from 801 to the Stack within Trench 1. Based on the pre-excavation sample results of the soil overburden, the potential for contamination of the soil surrounding the pipe is minimal (BNL 2010a). ORISE reviewed the gamma spectroscopy results for 14 FSS soil samples, four core samples, and one duplicate sample collected from Trench 1. Sample results for the radionuclides of concern were below the established cleanup goals. However, in sample PH-3

  18. One piece reactor removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Research Reactor No.3 (JRR-3) was the first reactor consisting of 'Japanese-made' components alone except for fuel and heavy water. After reaching its initial critical state in September 1962, JRR-3 had been in operation for 21 years until March 1983. It was decided that the reactor be removed en-bloc in view of the work schedule, cost and management of the reactor following the removal. In the special method developed jointly by the Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute and Shimizu Construction Co., Ltd., the reactor main unit was cut off from the building by continuous core boring, with its major components bound in the block with biological shield material (heavy concrete), and then conveyed and stored in a large waste store building constructed near the reactor building. Major work processes described in this report include the cutting off, lifting, horizontal conveyance and lowering of the reactor main unit. The removal of the JRR-3 reactor main unit was successfully carried out safely and quickly by the en-block removal method with radiation exposure dose of the workers being kept at a minimum. Thus the high performance of the en-bloc removal method was demonstrated and, in addition, valuable knowhow and other data were obtained from the work. (Nogami, K.)

  19. Reactor Materials Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  20. The fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic principles of the fusion reactor are outlined. Plasma heating and confinement schemes are described. These confinement systems include the linear Z pinch, magnetic mirrors and Tokamaks. A fusion reactor is described and a discussion is given of its environmental impact and its fuel situation. (R.L.)

  1. Polymerization Reactor Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaates, J. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Describes a polymerization reactor engineering course offered at Michigan Technological University which focuses on the design and operation of industrial polymerization reactors to achieve a desired degree of polymerization and molecular weight distribution. Provides a list of the course topics and assigned readings. (TW)

  2. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2001-04-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  3. Gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study is the second part of a general survey of Gas Cooled Reactors (GCRs). In this part, the course of development, overall performance and present development status of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTCRs) and advances of HTGR systems are reviewed. (author)

  4. Light water reactor program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franks, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Light Water Reactor Program is outlined. The scope of the program consists of: design certification of evolutionary plants; design, development, and design certification of simplified passive plants; first-of-a-kind engineering to achieve commercial standardization; plant lifetime improvement; and advanced reactor severe accident program. These program activities of the Office of Nuclear Energy are discussed.

  5. Reactor Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on reactor safety is to develop expertise in probabilistic and deterministic reactor safety analysis. The research programme consists of two main activities, in particular the development of software for reliability analysis of large systems and participation in the international PHEBUS-FP programme for severe accidents. Main achievements in 1999 are reported

  6. Light water type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear reactor of the present invention prevents disruption of a reactor core even in a case of occurrence of entire AC power loss event, and even if a reactor core disruption should occur, it prevents a rupture of the reactor container due to excess heating. That is, a high pressure water injection system and a low pressure water injection system operated by a diesel engine are disposed in the reactor building in addition to an emergency core cooling system. With such a constitution, even if an entire AC power loss event should occur, water can surely be injected to the reactor thereby enabling to prevent the rupture of the reactor core. Even if it should be ruptured, water can be sprayed to the reactor container by the low pressure water injection system. Further, if each of water injection pumps of the high pressure water injection system and the low pressure water injection system can be driven also by motors in addition to the diesel engine, the pump operation can be conducted more certainly and integrally. (I.S.)

  7. Naval propulsion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article deals with the design and exploitation of naval propulsion reactors, mainly of PWR-type. The other existing or conceivable types of reactors are also presented: 1 - specificities of nuclear propulsion (integration in the ship, marine environment, maneuverability, instantaneous availability, conditions of exploitation-isolation, nuclear safety, safety authority); 2 - PWR-type reactor (stable operation, mastered technology, general design, radiation protection); 3 - other reactor types; 4 - compact or integrated loops architecture; 5 - radiation protection; 6 - reactor core; 7 - reactivity control (core lifetime, control means and mechanisms); 8 - core cooling (natural circulation, forced circulation, primary flow-rate program); 9 - primary loop; 10 - pressurizer; 11 - steam generators and water-steam secondary loop; 12 - auxiliary and safety loops; 13 - control instrumentation; 14 - operation; 15 - nuclear wastes and dismantling. (J.S.)

  8. Iris reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a modular, integral, light water cooled, low-to-medium power (100-350 MWe) reactor which addresses the requirements defined by the US DOE for Generation IV reactors, i.e., proliferation resistance, enhanced safety, improved economics and fuel cycle sustainability. It relies on the proven technology of light water reactors and features innovative engineering, but it does not require new technology development. This paper discusses the current reference IRIS design, which features a 1000 MWt thermal core with proven 5%-enriched uranium oxide fuel and five-year long straight burn fuel cycle, integral reactor vessel housing helical tube steam generators and immersed spool pumps. Other major contributors to the high level of safety and economic attractiveness are the safety by design and optimized maintenance approaches, which allow elimination of some classes of accidents, lower capital cost, long operating cycle, and high capacity factors. (author)

  9. Research reactor DHRUVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DHRUVA, a 100 MWt research reactor located at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, attained first criticality during August, 1985. The reactor is fuelled with natural uranium and is cooled, moderated and reflected by heavy water. Maximum thermal neutron flux obtained in the reactor is 1.8 X 1014 n/cm2/sec. Some of the salient design features of the reactor are discussed in this paper. Some important features of the reactor coolant system, regulation and protection systems and experimental facilities are presented. A short account of the engineered safety features is provided. Some of the problems that were faced during commissioning and the initial phase of power operation are also dealt upon

  10. Reactor core monitoring method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Michitsugu [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan); Kanemoto, Shigeru; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Ebata, Shigeo

    1998-05-06

    The present invention provides a method of monitoring the state of coolant flow in a reactor of a BWR power plant. Namely, a plurality of local power region monitors (LPRM) are disposed to the inside of the reactor core for monitoring a power distribution. Signals of at least two optional LPRM detectors situated at positions different in axial or radial positions of the reactor core are obtained. General fluctuation components which nuclear hydrothermally fluctuate in overall reactor core are removed from the components of the signals. Then, correlational functions between these signals are determined. The state of coolant flow in the reactor is monitored based on the correlational function. When the axial flowing rate and radial flow interference are monitored, the accuracy upon monitoring axial and radial local behaviors of coolants can be improved by thus previously removing the general fluctuation components from signals of LPRM detectors and extracting local void information near to LPRM detectors at high accuracy. (I.S.)

  11. Physics of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual covers all the aspects of the science of neutron transport in nuclear reactors and can be used with great advantage by students, engineers or even reactor experts. It is composed of 18 chapters: 1) basis of nuclear physics, 2) the interactions of neutrons with matter, 3) the interactions of electromagnetic radiations and charged-particles with matter, 4) neutron slowing-down, 5) resonant absorption, 6) Doppler effect, 7) neutron thermalization, 8) Boltzmann equation, 9) calculation methods in neutron transport theory, 10) neutron scattering, 11) reactor reactivity, 12) theory of the critical homogenous pile, 13) the neutron reflector, 14) the heterogeneous reactor, 15) the equations of the fuel cycle, 16) neutron counter-reactions, 17) reactor kinetics, and 18) calculation methods in neutron scattering

  12. Mirror reactor surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included

  13. FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A circular neutron reflector is disposed vertically movably so as to surround the outer circumference of a reactor core barrel. A reflector driving device comprises a driving device main body attracted to the outer wall surface of the reactor barrel by electromagnetic attraction force and an inertia body disposed above the driving device main body vertically movably. A reflector is connected below the reactor driving device. At the initial stage, a spontaneous large current is supplied to upper electromagnetic repulsion coils of the reflector driving device, impact electromagnetic repulsion force is caused between the inertia body and the reflector driving device, so that the driving device main body moves downwardly by a predetermined distance and stopped. The reflector driving device can be lowered in a step-like manner to an appropriate position suitable to restart the reactor during stoppage of the reactor core by conducting spontaneous supply of current repeatedly to the upper electromagnetic repulsion coils. (I.N.)

  14. TRIGA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope production, General-Atomic) has become the most used research reactor in the world with 65 units operating in 24 countries. The original patent for TRIGA reactors was registered in 1958. The success of this reactor is due to its inherent level of safety that results from a prompt negative temperature coefficient. Most of the neutron moderation occurs in the nuclear fuel (UZrH) because of the presence of hydrogen atoms, so in case of an increase of fuel temperature, the neutron spectrum becomes harder and neutrons are less likely to fission uranium nuclei and as a consequence the power released decreases. This inherent level of safety has made this reactor fit for training tool in university laboratories. Some recent versions of TRIGA reactors have been designed for medicine and industrial isotope production, for neutron therapy of cancers and for providing a neutron source. (A.C.)

  15. Status of French reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballagny, A. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Saclay (France)

    1997-08-01

    The status of French reactors is reviewed. The ORPHEE and RHF reactors can not be operated with a LEU fuel which would be limited to 4.8 g U/cm{sup 3}. The OSIRIS reactor has already been converted to LEU. It will use U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} as soon as its present stock of UO{sub 2} fuel is used up, at the end of 1994. The decision to close down the SILOE reactor in the near future is not propitious for the start of a conversion process. The REX 2000 reactor, which is expected to be commissioned in 2005, will use LEU (except if the fast neutrons core option is selected). Concerning the end of the HEU fuel cycle, the best option is reprocessing followed by conversion of the reprocessed uranium to LEU.

  16. Nuclear reactor design

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  17. Compact torsatron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R0 = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R0 ≅ 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  18. Multi-purpose reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Multi-Purpose-Reactor (MPR), is a pool-type reactor with an open water surface and variable core arrangement. Its main feature is plant safety and reliability. Its power is 22MWth, cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium. It has platetype fuel elements (MTR type, approx. 20%. enriched uranium) clad in aluminium. Its cobalt (Co60) production capacity is 50000 Ci/yr, 200Ci/gr. The distribution of the reactor core and associated control and safety systems is essentially based on the following design criteria: - upwards cooling flow, to waive the need for cooling flow inversion in case the reactor is cooled by natural convection if confronted with a loss of pumping power, and in order to establish a superior heat transfer potential (a higher coolant saturation temperature); - easy access to the reactor core from top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power, in order to facilitate actual implementation of experiments. Consequently, mechanisms associated to control and safety rods s,re located underneath the reactor tank; - free access of reactor personnel to top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power. This aids in the training of personnel and the actual carrying out of experiments, hence: - a vast water column was placed over the core to act as radiation shielding; - the core's external area is cooled by a downwards flow which leads to a decay tank beyond the pool (for N16 to decay); - a small downwards flow was directed to stream downwards from above the reactor core in order to drag along any possibly active element; and - a stagnant hot layer system was placed at top of pool level so as to minimize the upwards coolant flow rising towards pool level

  19. The CAREM reactor and present currents in reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INVAP has been working on the CAREM project since 1983. It concerns a very low power reactor for electrical energy generation. The design of the reactor and the basic criteria used were described in 1984. Since then, a series of designs have been presented for reactors which are similar to CAREM regarding the solutions presented to reduce the chance of major nuclear accidents. These designs have been grouped under different names: Advanced Reactors, Second Generation Reactors, Inherently Safe Reactors, or even, Revolutionary Reactors. Every reactor fabrication firm has, at least, one project which can be placed in this category. Presently, there are two main currents of Reactor Design; Evolutionary and Revolutionary. The present work discusses characteristics of these two types of reactors, some revolutionary designs and common criteria to both types. After, these criteria are compared with CAREM reactor design. (Author)

  20. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1977 are described. Works of the Division are development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, fusion reactor engineering, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor for Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology, and Committee on Reactor Physics. (Author)

  1. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1983 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  2. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities conducted in Reactor Engineering Division in fiscal 1975 are summarized in this report. Works in the division are closely related to the development of multi-purpose High-temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, the development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and engineering research of thermonuclear fusion reactor. Many achievements are described concerning nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (auth.)

  3. Tropical Ocean Climate Study (TOCS) and Japan-United States Tropical Ocean Study (JUSTOS) on the R/V KAIYO, 25 Jan to 2 March 1997, to the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean BNL component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, R.M.; Smith, S.

    1997-04-11

    The Japanese U.S. Tropical Ocean Study (JUSTOS) cruise on the R/V KAIYO in the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean was a collaborative effort with participants from the Japanese Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and Brookhaven National Laboratory BNL. This report is a summary of the instruments, measurements, and initial analysis of the BNL portion of the cruise only. It includes a brief description of the instrument system, calibration procedures, problems and resolutions, data collection, processing and data file descriptions. This is a working document, which is meant to provide both a good description of the work and as much information as possible in one place for future analysis.

  4. Reactor performance calculations for water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of nuclear, thermal and hydraulic performance calculations for water cooled reactors are discussed. The principles are illustrated by describing their implementation in the UKAEA PATRIARCH scheme of computer codes. This material was originally delivered as a course of lectures at the Technical University of Helsinki in Summer of 1969.

  5. Fourth Generation Reactor Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concerns over energy resources availability, climate changes and energy supply security suggest an important role for nuclear energy in future energy supplies. So far nuclear energy evolved through three generations and is still evolving into new generation that is now being extensively studied. Nuclear Power Plants are producing 16% of the world's electricity. Today the world is moving towards hydrogen economy. Nuclear technologies can provide energy to dissociate water into oxygen and hydrogen and to production of synthetic fuel from coal gasification. The introduction of breeder reactors would turn nuclear energy from depletable energy supply into an unlimited supply. From the early beginnings of nuclear energy in the 1940s to the present, three generations of nuclear power reactors have been developed: First generation reactors: introduced during the period 1950-1970. Second generation: includes commercial power reactors built during 1970-1990 (PWR, BWR, Candu, Russian RBMK and VVER). Third generation: started being deployed in the 1990s and is composed of Advanced LWR (ALWR), Advanced BWR (ABWR) and Passive AP600 to be deployed in 2010-2030. Future advances of the nuclear technology designs can broaden opportunities for use of nuclear energy. The fourth generation reactors are expected to be deployed by 2030 in time to replace ageing reactors built in the 1970s and 1980s. The new reactors are to be designed with a view of the following objectives: economic competitiveness, enhanced safety, minimal radioactive waste production, proliferation resistance. The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) was established in January 2000 to investigate innovative nuclear energy system concepts. GIF members include Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Euratom, France Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, United Kingdom and United States with the IAEA and OECD's NEA as permanent observers. China and Russia are expected to join the GIF initiative. The following six systems

  6. Safety of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of research reactors that have been constructed worldwide for civilian applications is about 651. Of the reactors constructed, 284 are currently in operation, 258 are shut down and 109 have been decommissioned. More than half of all operating research reactors worldwide are over thirty years old. During this long period of time national priorities have changed. Facility ageing, if not properly managed, has a natural degrading effect. Many research reactors face concerns with the obsolescence of equipment, lack of experimental programmes, lack of funding for operation and maintenance and loss of expertise through ageing and retirement of the staff. Other reactors of the same vintage maintain effective ageing management programmes, conduct active research programmes, develop and retain high calibre personnel and make important contributions to society. Many countries that operate research reactors neither operate nor plan to operate power reactors. In most of these countries there is a tendency not to create a formal regulatory body. A safety committee, not always independent of the operating organization, may be responsible for regulatory oversight. Even in countries with nuclear power plants, a regulatory regime differing from the one used for the power plants may exist. Concern is therefore focused on one tail of a continuous spectrum of operational performance. The IAEA has been sending missions to review the safety of research reactors in Member States since 1972. Some of the reviews have been conducted pursuant to the IAEA' functions and responsibilities regarding research reactors that are operated within the framework of Project and Supply Agreements between Member States and the IAEA. Other reviews have been conducted upon request. All these reviews are conducted following procedures for Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) missions. The prime objective of these missions has been to conduct a comprehensive operational safety

  7. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1992 (April 1, 1992-March 31, 1993). The major Department's programs promoted in the year are the assessment of the high conversion light water reactor, the design activities of advanced reactor system and development of a high energy proton linear accelerator for the engineering applications including TRU incineration. Other major tasks of the Department are various basic researches on the nuclear data and group constants, the developments of theoretical methods and codes, the reactor physics experiments and their analyses, fusion neutronics, radiation shielding, reactor instrumentation, reactor control/diagnosis, thermohydraulics and technology developments related to the reactor physics facilities. The cooperative works to JAERI's major projects such as the high temperature gas cooled reactor or the fusion reactor and to PNC's fast reactor project were also progressed. The activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics are also summarized. (author)

  8. Reactor engineering department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1989 (April 1, 1989 - March 31, 1990). One of major Department's programs is the assessment of the high conversion light water reactor and the design activities of advanced reactor system. Development of a high energy proton linear accelerator for the nuclear engineering including is also TRU incineration promoted. Other major tasks of the Department are various basic researches on nuclear data and group constants, theoretical methods and code development, on reactor physics experiments and analyses, fusion neutronics, radiation shielding, reactor instrumentation, reactor control/diagnosis, thermohydraulics, technology assessment of nuclear energy and technology developments related to the reactor physics facilities. The cooperative works to JAERI's major projects such as the high temperature gas cooled reactor or the fusion reactor and to PNC's fast reactor project also progressed. The activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics are also summarized. (author)

  9. Slurry reactor design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Akgerman, A. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Smith, J.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  10. FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides an FBR type reactor in which the combustion of reactor core fuels is controlled by reflectors, and the position of a reflector driving device can be controlled even during shut down of the reactor. Namely, the reflector driving device is attracted to the outer wall surface of a reactor core barrel by electromagnetic attraction force. An inertia body is disposed vertically movably to the upper portion of the reflector driving device. Magnetic repulsive coils generate instantaneous magnetic repulsive force between the inertia body and the reflector driving device. With such a constitution, the reflector driving device can be driven by using magnetic repulsion of the electromagnetic repulsive coils and inertia of the inertia body. As a result, not only the reflectors can be elevated at an ultraslow speed during normal reactor operation, but also fine position adjustment for the reflector driving device, as well as fine position adjustment of the reflectors required upon restart of the reactor can be conducted by lowering the reflector driving device during shut down of the reactor. (I.S.)

  11. Reactor water sampling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a reactor water sampling device for sampling reactor water in an in-core monitor (neutron measuring tube) housing in a BWR type reactor. The upper end portion of a drain pipe of the reactor water sampling device is attached detachably to an in-core monitor flange. A push-up rod is inserted in the drain pipe vertically movably. A sampling vessel and a vacuum pump are connected to the lower end of the drain pipe. A vacuum pump is operated to depressurize the inside of the device and move the push-up rod upwardly. Reactor water in the in-core monitor housing flows between the drain pipe and the push-up rod and flows into the sampling vessel. With such a constitution, reactor water in the in-core monitor housing can be sampled rapidly with neither opening the lid of the reactor pressure vessel nor being in contact with air. Accordingly, operator's exposure dose can be reduced. (I.N.)

  12. Test reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Development Program created a need for engineering testing of fuels and materials. The Engineering Test Reactors were developed around the world in response to this demand. The design of the test reactors proved to be different from that of power reactors, carrying the fuel elements closer to the threshold of failure, requiring more responsive instrumentation, more rapid control element action, and inherent self-limiting behavior under accident conditions. The design of the experimental facilities to exploit these reactors evolved a new, specialized, branch of engineering, requiring a very high-lvel scientific and engineering team, established a meticulous concern with reliability, the provision for recovery from their own failures, and detailed attention to possible interactions with the test reactors. This paper presents this technology commencing with the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR) through the Fast Flux Test Facility, some of the unique experimental facilities developed to exploit them, but discusses only cursorily the experiments performed, since sample preparation and sample analyses were, and to some extent still are, either classified or proprietary. The Nuclear Engineering literature is filled with this information

  13. Advanced reactor licensing issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In July 1986 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a Policy Statement on the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants. As part of this policy advanced reactor designers were encouraged to interact with NRC early in the design process to obtain feedback regarding licensing requirements for advanced reactors. Accordingly, the staff has been interacting with the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors on the review of three advanced reactor conceptual designs: one modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) and two Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). As a result of these interactions certain safety issues associated with these advanced reactor designs have been identified as key to the licensability of the designs as proposed by DOE. The major issues in this regard are: (1) selection and treatment of accident scenarios; (2) selection of siting source term; (3) performance and reliability of reactor shutdown and decay heat removal systems; (4) need for conventional containment; (5) need for conventional emergency evacuation; (6) role of the operator; (7) treatment of balance of plant; and (8) modular approach. This paper provides a status of the NRC review effort, describes the above issues in more detail and provides the current status and approach to the development of licensing guidance on each

  14. Nuclear reactor power monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device of the present invention monitors phenomena occurred in a nuclear reactor more accurately than usual case. that is, the device monitors a reactor power by signals sent from a great number of neutron monitors disposed in the reactor. The device has a means for estimating a phenomenon occurred in the reactor based on the relationship of a difference of signals between each of the great number of neutron monitors to the positions of the neutron monitors disposed in the reactor. The estimation of the phenomena is conducted by, for example, conversion of signals sent from the neutron monitors to a code train. Then, a phenomenon is estimated rapidly by matching the code train described above with a code train contained in a data base. Further. signals sent from the neutron monitors are processed statistically to estimate long term and periodical phenomena. As a result, phenomena occurred in the reactor are monitored more accurately than usual case, thereby enabling to improve reactor safety and operationability. (I.S.)

  15. Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Support utilization of the RINSC reactor for student and faculty instructions and research. The Department of Energy award has provided financial assistance during the period 9/29/1995 to 5/31/2001 to support the utilization of the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) reactor for student and faculty instruction and research by non-reactor owning educational institutions within approximately 300 miles of Narragansett, Rhode Island. Through the reactor sharing program, the RINSC (including the reactor and analytical laboratories) provided reactor services and laboratory space that were not available to the other universities and colleges in the region. As an example of services provided to the users: Counting equipment, laboratory space, pneumatic and in-pool irradiations, demonstrations of sample counting and analysis, reactor tours and lectures. Funding from the Reactor Sharing Program has provided the RINSC to expand student tours and demonstration programs that emphasized our long history of providing these types of services to the universities and colleges in the area. The funding have also helped defray the cost of the technical assistance that the staff has routinely provided to schools, individuals and researchers who have called on the RINSC for resolution of problems relating to nuclear science. The reactor has been featured in a Public Broadcasting System documentary on Pollution in the Arctic and how a University of Rhode Island Professor used Neutron Activation Analysis conducted at the RINSC to discover the sources of the ''Arctic Haze''. The RINSC was also featured by local television on Earth Day for its role in environmental monitoring

  16. Determination of research reactor safety parameters by reactor calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main research reactor safety parameters such as power density peaking factors, shutdown margin and temperature reactivity coefficients are treated. Reactor physics explanation of the parameters is given together with their application in safety evaluation performed as part of research reactor operation. Reactor calculations are presented as a method for their determination assuming use of widely available computer codes. (author)

  17. Reactor de plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Erra Serrabasa, Pilar; Molina Mansilla, Ricardo; Beltrán Serra, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Reactor de plasma. Se trata de un reactor de plasma que puede trabajar en un amplio rango de presión, desde el vacío y presiones reducidas hasta la presión atmosférica y presiones superiores. Adicionalmente el reactor de plasma tiene la capacidad de regular otros parámetros importantes y permite su uso para el tratamiento de muestras de tipología muy diversa, como por ejemplo las de tamaño relativamente grande o de superficie rugosa.

  18. Integral nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention deals with an inprovement of the design of an integral pressurized water nuclear reactor. A typical embodyment of the invention includes a generally cylindrical pressure vessel that is assembled from three segments which are bolted together at transverse joints to form a pressure tight unit that encloses the steam generator and the reactor. The new construction permits primary to secondary coolant heat exchange and improved control rod drive mecanisms which can be exposed for full service access during reactor core refueling, maintenance and inspection

  19. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Mitrovski, Svetlana M.

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  20. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Operating Units Status Report --- Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff on NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non- power reactors in the US

  1. First Algerian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1985, both the Algerian Commissariat of New Energies and the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission plus the firm INVAP S.E., started a series of mutual visits aimed at defining the mechanisms for cooperation in the nuclear field. Within this framework, a commercial contract was undersigned covering the supply of a low-power reactor (RUN), designed for basic and applied research in the fields of reactor physics and nuclear engineering. The reactor may also be used for performing experiences with neutron beams, for the irradiation of several materials and for the training of technicians, scientists and operators

  2. Course on reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Germany only few students graduate in nuclear technology, therefore the NPP operating companies are forced to develop their own education and training concepts. AREVA NP has started together with the Technical University of Dresden a one-week course ''reactor physics'' that includes the know-how of the nuclear power plant construction company. The Technical University of Dresden has the training reactor AKR-2 that is retrofitted by modern digital instrumentation and control technology that allows the practical training of reactor control.

  3. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts

  4. Nuclear reactor theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This textbook is composed of two parts. Part 1 'Elements of Nuclear Reactor Theory' is composed of only elements but the main resource for the lecture of nuclear reactor theory, and should be studied as common knowledge. Much space is therefore devoted to the history of nuclear energy production and to nuclear physics, and the material focuses on the principles of energy production in nuclear reactors. However, considering the heavy workload of students, these subjects are presented concisely, allowing students to read quickly through this textbook. (J.P.N.)

  5. PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a PWR with a primary circuit, consisting of a reactor pressure vessel, a steam generator and a reactor coolant pump, hot coolant is removed by means of an auxiliary system containing h.p. pumps for feeding water into the primary circuit and being connected with a pipe, originating at the upper part, which has got at least one isolating value. This is done by opening an outlet in a part of the auxiliary system that has got a lower pressure than the reactor vessel. Preferably a water jet pump is used for mixing with the water of the auxiliary system. (orig.)

  6. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components during and after irradiation. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; and the study of dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are discussed

  7. International tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1978, the US, the European Communities, Japan, and the Soviet Union have collaborated on the definition, conceptual design, data base assessment, and analysis of critical technical issues for a tokamak engineering test reactor, called the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). During 1985-1986, this activity has been expanded in scope to include evaluation of concept innovations that could significantly improve the tokamak as a commercial reactor. The purposes of this paper are to summarize the present INTOR design concept and to summarize the work on concept innovations

  8. Joyo experimental reactor tour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAEA cooperation in remote monitoring focuses on the Joyo Experimental Reactor at the O'arai Research and Development Center. Joyo performs irradiation of test fuels to support development of the fast reactor cycle in Japan, both in international cooperation and in support of the Monju fast reactor, which is now undergoing reconstruction. The tour included an introduction at the model, a visit to the control room, entry into the containment vessel, and viewing of remote monitoring equipment in the Fresh Fuel Storage and at one of the Spent Fuel Ponds. (author)

  9. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  10. nuclear reactor design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work , the sensitivity of different reactor calculation methods, and the effect of different assumptions and/or approximation are evaluated . A new concept named error map is developed to determine the relative importance of different factors affecting the accuracy of calculations. To achieve this goal a generalized, multigroup, multi dimension code UAR-DEPLETION is developed to calculate the spatial distribution of neutron flux, effective multiplication factor and the spatial composition of a reactor core for a period of time and for specified reactor operating conditions. The code also investigates the fuel management strategies and policies for the entire fuel cycle to meet the constraints of material and operating limitations

  11. Nuclear reactor internal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The upper internal structures of the reactor are connected to the closing head so as to be readily removed with the latter and a skirt connected to the lower portion of said upper structures so as to surround the latter, extends under the control rods when they are removed from the reactor core. Through such an arrangement the skirt protects the control rods and supports the vessel closing-head and the core upper structures, whenever the head is severed from the vessel and put beside the latter in order to discharge the reactor

  12. Reactor monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a device for monitoring the inside of an FBR type reactor which can not be monitored by a usual optical camera. An ultrasonic camera having an excellent propagating property in a liquid metal sodium is scanned, and reflected waves of the ultrasonic waves are received as signals. The signals are processed by using a virtual realistic feeling (VR) technique such as a head mounting type image display (HMD) and a three dimensional pointing device. With such procedures, the inside of the FBR type reactor can be observed with such a realistic feeling that the inside of the FBR type reactor were seen directly. (I.S.)

  13. Research reactor support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactors (RRs) have been used in a wide range of applications including nuclear power development, basic physics research, education and training, medical isotope production, geology, industry and other fields. However, many research reactors are fuelled with High Enriched Uranium (HEU), are underutilized and aging, and have significant quantities of spent fuel. HEU inventories (fresh and spent) pose security risks Unavailability of a high-density-reprocessable fuel hinders conversion and limits back-end options and represents a survival dilemma for many RRs. Improvement of interim spent fuel storage is required at some RRs. Many RRs are under-utilized and/or inadequately funded and need to find users for their services, or permanently shut down and eventually decommission. Reluctance to decommission affect both cost and safety (loss of experienced staff ) and many shut down but not decommissioned RR with fresh and/or spent fuel at the sites invoke serious concern. The IAEA's research reactor support helps to ensure that research reactors can be operated efficiently with fuels and targets of lower proliferation and security concern and that operators have appropriate technology and options to manage RR fuel cycle issues, especially on long term interim storage of spent research reactor fuel. Availability of a high-density-reprocessable fuel would expand and improve back end options. The International Atomic Energy Agency provides assistance to Member States to convert research reactors from High Enriched Uranium fuel and targets (for medical isotope production) to qualified Low Enriched Uranium fuel and targets while maintaining reactor performance levels. The assistance includes provision of handbooks and training in the performance of core conversion studies, advice for the procurement of LEU fuel, and expert services for LEU fuel acceptance. The IAEA further provides technical and administrative support for countries considering repatriation of its

  14. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETINGS VIII, IX, X, XI, APRIL 12, MAY, 22, JUNE 17, JULY 29, 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,B.

    2003-03-06

    Since its inception, the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) has held semi-regular meetings each year to discuss the physics possibilities and the operational details of the program. Having collected our first data sample of polarized proton-proton collisions in Run02 of RHIC, we are now in the process of examining the performance of both the accelerator and the experiments. From this evaluation, we not only aim to formulate a consensus plan for polarized proton-proton during Run03 of RHIC but also to look more forward into the future to ensure the success of the spin program. In the second meeting of this series (which took place at BNL on April 12, 2002), we focused on Run02 polarization issues. This meeting opened with a presentation by Thomas Roser about his reflections on the outcome from the RHIC retreat during which the Run02 performance was evaluated. Of particular importance, Thomas pointed out that, with the expected beam time and his estimates for machine-tuning requirements, the experiments should limit their beam requests to two or three programs.

  15. Study of νd→μ-pps and νd→μ-Δ++(1232)ns using the BNL 7-foot deuterium-filled bubble chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The weak nucleon axial-vector (FA) and vector (FV) form factors are determined from the momentum-transfer-squared (Q2) distributions using 2538 μ- p and 1384 μ-Δ++ events. The data were obtained from 1 800 000 pictures taken in the BNL 7-foot deuterium-filled bubble chamber exposed to a wide-band neutrino beam with a mean energy Eν=1.6 GeV. In the framework of the conventional V-A theory with standard assumptions, the value obtained from the μ-p events for the axial-vector mass MA in the pure dipole parameterization is 1.070-0.045+0.040 GeV and from the μ-Δ++ events is 1.28-0.10+0.08 GeV. These results are in good agreement with an earlier measurement from this experiment and other recent results. The reaction mechanisms for both processes are compared and found to be very similar. A two-parameter fit for the quasielastic reaction, using dipole forms for FV and FA, yields MA=0.97-0.11+0.14 GeV and MV=0.89-0.07+0.04 GeV, which is in good agreement with the conserved-vector-current value of MV=0.84 GeV. Possible deviations from the standard assumptions are also discussed

  16. Hadronic resonance production in d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangaharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; Detoledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J. X.

    2008-10-01

    We present the first measurements of the ρ(770)0,K*(892),Δ(1232)++,Σ(1385), and Λ(1520) resonances in d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV, reconstructed via their hadronic decay channels using the STAR detector (the solenoidal tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider). The masses and widths of these resonances are studied as a function of transverse momentum pT. We observe that the resonance spectra follow a generalized scaling law with the transverse mass mT. The of resonances in minimum bias collisions are compared with the of π,K, and pmacr . The ρ0/π-,K*/K-,Δ++/p,Σ(1385)/Λ, and Λ(1520)/Λ ratios in d+Au collisions are compared with the measurements in minimum bias p+p interactions, where we observe that both measurements are comparable. The nuclear modification factors (RdAu) of the ρ0,K*, and Σ* scale with the number of binary collisions (Nbin) for pT> 1.2 GeV/c.

  17. Evolution-dominated Hydrodynamic Model and the Pseudorapidity Distributions of the Charged Particles Pro duced in Cu-Cu Collisions at BNL-RHIC Energies%演化过程主导的流体力学模型与Cu-Cu在BNL-RHIC能量碰撞中带电粒子的赝快度分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜志进; 王杰; 张海丽; 马可

    2014-01-01

    The charged particles resulting in high energy heavy ion collisions consist of two parts: One is from the hot and dense matter produced in collisions. The other is the leading particles. We suppose that the hot and dense matter expands and freezes out into the charged particles according to the evolution-dominated hydrodynamics, and the leading particles are from participants with approximately the same energy. On the basis of this assumption, we get the pseudorapidity distributions of the charged particles produced in high energy heavy ion collisions, and make a comparison with the experimental data presented by PHOBOS Collaboration at BNL-RHIC in Cu-Cu collisions at√sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV. The theoretical predictions are in good accordance with experimental measurements.%高能重离子碰撞产生的带电粒子由两部分组成:一部分来源于碰撞产生的高温高密度物质,另一部分是带头粒子。假设高温高密度物质按照由演化过程主导的流体力学的规律膨胀并冻析为带电粒子,带头粒子来源于参与者且具有大致相同的能量。基于该假设,得到了高能重离子碰撞带电粒子的赝快度分布,并与BNL-RHIC上的PHOBOS合作组在√sNN=62.4与200 GeV的Cu-Cu碰撞中给出的实验结果相比较,理论与实验测量符合得很好。

  18. 演化过程主导的流体力学模型与Cu-Cu在BNL-RHIC能量碰撞中带电粒子的赝快度分布%Evolution-dominated Hydrodynamic Model and the Pseudorapidity Distributions of the Charged Particles Pro duced in Cu-Cu Collisions at BNL-RHIC Energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜志进; 王杰; 张海丽; 马可

    2014-01-01

    The charged particles resulting in high energy heavy ion collisions consist of two parts: One is from the hot and dense matter produced in collisions. The other is the leading particles. We suppose that the hot and dense matter expands and freezes out into the charged particles according to the evolution-dominated hydrodynamics, and the leading particles are from participants with approximately the same energy. On the basis of this assumption, we get the pseudorapidity distributions of the charged particles produced in high energy heavy ion collisions, and make a comparison with the experimental data presented by PHOBOS Collaboration at BNL-RHIC in Cu-Cu collisions at√sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV. The theoretical predictions are in good accordance with experimental measurements.%高能重离子碰撞产生的带电粒子由两部分组成:一部分来源于碰撞产生的高温高密度物质,另一部分是带头粒子。假设高温高密度物质按照由演化过程主导的流体力学的规律膨胀并冻析为带电粒子,带头粒子来源于参与者且具有大致相同的能量。基于该假设,得到了高能重离子碰撞带电粒子的赝快度分布,并与BNL-RHIC上的PHOBOS合作组在√sNN=62.4与200 GeV的Cu-Cu碰撞中给出的实验结果相比较,理论与实验测量符合得很好。

  19. Study of power reactor dynamics by stochastic reactor oscillator method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stochastic reactor oscillator and cross correlation method were used for determining reactor dynamics characteristics. Experimental equipment, fast reactor oscillator (BOR-1) was activated by random pulses from the GBS-16 generator. Tape recorder AMPEX-SF-300 and data acquisition tool registered reactor response to perturbations having different frequencies. Reactor response and activation signals were cross correlated by digital computer for different positions of stochastic oscillator and ionization chamber

  20. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved nuclear power reactor fuel element is described which consists of fuel rods, rod guide tubes and an end plate. The system allows direct access to an end of each fuel rod for inspection purposes. (U.K.)

  1. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a method of controlling reactor power to shift it into a partial power operation upon occurrence of recycling pump tripping or loss of generator load. Operation state of a reactor is classified into a plurality of operation states based on values of the reactor core flow rate and the reactor power. Different insertion patterns for selected control rods are determined on every classified operation states. Then, an insertion pattern corresponding to the operation state upon occurrence of recycling pump tripping or loss of power generator load is carried out to shift into partial power operation. The operation is shifted to a load operation solely in the station while avoiding risks such as TPM scram. Then neutron fluxes are suppressed upon transient to increase margin of fuel integrity. Selected control rod pattern of the optimum reactivity is set to each of operation regions, thereby enabling to conduct flexible countermeasure so as to attain optimum operationability. (N.H.)

  2. Reactor pressure boundary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a long-term operation of nuclear power plants, the component materials are degraded under severe reactor conditions such as neutron irradiation, high temperature, high pressure and corrosive environment. It is necessary to establish the reliable and practical technologies for improving and developing the component materials and for evaluating the mechanical properties. Especially, it is very important to investigate the technologies for reactor pressure boundary materials such as reactor vessel and pipings in accordance with their critical roles. Therefore, this study was focused on developing and advancing the microstructural/micro-mechanical evaluation technologies, and on evaluating the neutron irradiation characteristics and radiation effects analysis technology of the reactor pressure boundary materials, and also on establishing a basis of nuclear material property database

  3. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2001-04-01

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is still one of SCK-CEN's important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. During the last three years, the availability of the installation was maintained at an average level of 97.6 percent. In the year 2000, the reactor was operated for a total of 104 days at a mean power of 56 MW. In 2000, most irradiation experiments were performed in the CALLISTO PWR loop. The report describes irradiations achieved or under preparation in 2000, including the development of advanced facilities and concept studies for new programmes. An overview of the scientific irradiation programmes as well as of the R and D programme of the BR2 reactor in 2000 is given.

  4. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2002-04-01

    The BR2 materials testing reactor is one of SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. In 2001, the reactor was operated for a total of 123 days at a mean power of 59 MW in order to satisfy the irradiation conditions of the internal and external programmes using mainly the CALLISTO PWR loop. The mean consumption of fresh fuel elements was 5.26 per 1000 MWd. Main achievements in 2001 included the development of a three-dimensional full-scale model of the BR2 reactor for simulation and prediction of irradiation conditions for various experiments; the construction of the FUTURE-MT device designed for the irradiation of fuel plates under representative conditions of geometry, neutron spectrum, heat flux and thermal-hydraulic conditions and the development of in-pile instrumentation and a data acquisition system.

  5. Reactor parameter simulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reactor parameter simulation system (RPSS) has been built with the capability of analyzing any reactor signals, decomposing those signals into their deterministic and stochastic components, then reconstructing new, simulated signals that possess the same statistical and correlation structure as the original plant variables. Important uses of the RPSS are for integration with reactor simulation software to provide tools for plant control strategy development, and for safety-study investigations of scenarios that can arise involving signal faults generated from degraded sensors. A third use of the RPSS is for frequency-domain filtering of reactor process variables contaminated with serially correlated noise, which is important for our ongoing development of expert systems for sensor-operability surveillance. 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed.

  7. New reactor type proposed

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Russian scientists at the Research Institute of Nuclear Power Engineering in Moscow are hoping to develop a new reactor that will use lead and bismuth as fuel instead of uranium and plutonium" (1/2 page).

  8. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly construction for liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors is described in which the sub-assemblies carry a smaller proportion of parasitic material than do conventional sub-assemblies. (U.K.)

  9. Ageing of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historically, many of the research institutions were centred on a research reactor facility as main technological asset and major source of neutrons for research. Important achievements were made in time in these research institutions for development of nuclear materials technology and nuclear safety for nuclear energy. At present, ageing of nuclear research facilities among these research reactors and ageing of staff are considerable factors of reduction of competence in research centres. The safe way of mitigation of this trend deals with ageing management by so called, for power reactors, Plant Life Management and new investments in staff as investments in research, or in future resources of competence. A programmatic approach of ageing of research reactors in correlation with their actual and future utilisation, will be used as a basis for safety evaluation and future spending. (author)

  10. Experience with Kamini reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamini is a 233U fuelled, 30 kW(th) research reactor. It is one of the best neutron source facility with a core average flux of 1012 n/cm2/s in IGCAR used for neutron radiography of active and nonradioactive objects, activation analysis and radiation physics research. The core consists of nine plate type fuel elements with a total fuel inventory of 590 g of 233U. Two safety control plates made of cadmium are used for start up and shutdown of the reactor. Three beam tubes, two-thimble irradiation site outside reflector and one irradiation site nearer to the core constitute the testing facilities of Kamini. Kamini attained first criticality on 29th October 96 and nominal power of 30 kW in September 1997. This paper covers the design features of the reactor, irradiation facilities and their utilities and operating experience of the reactor. (author)

  11. Dossier: research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactors are used at the CEA (the French atomic energy commission) since many years. Their number has been reduced but they remain unique tools that CEA valorize continuously. The results of the programs involving such reactors are of prime importance for the operation of Electricite de France (EdF) park of existing power plants but also for the design of future nuclear power plants and future research reactors. This dossier presents three examples of research reactors in use at the CEA: Osiris and Orphee (CEA-Saclay), devoted to nuclear energy and fundamental research, respectively, and the critical mockups Eole, Minerve and Masurca (CEA-Cadarache) devoted to nuclear data libraries and neutronic calculation. (J.S.)

  12. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method for sealing the cold leg nozzles of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location during maintenance and inspection of associated steam generators and pumps while the pressure vessel and refueling canal are filled with water. The apparatus includes a sealing plug for mechanically sealing the cold leg nozzle from the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plugs include a primary and a secondary O-ring. An installation tool is suspended within the reactor vessel and carries the sealing plug. The tool telescopes to insert the sealing plug within the cold leg nozzle, and to subsequently remove the plug. Hydraulic means are used to activate the sealing plug, and support means serve to suspend the installation tool within the reactor vessel during installation and removal of the sealing plug

  13. Future Reactor Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    He, Miao

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ opens a gateway for the next generation experiments to measure the neutrino mass hierarchy and the leptonic CP-violating phase. Future reactor experiments will focus on mass hierarchy determination and the precision measurement of mixing parameters. Mass hierarchy can be determined from the disappearance of reactor electron antineutrinos based on the interference effect of two separated oscillation modes. Relative and absolute measurement techniques have been explored. A proposed experiment JUNO, with a 20 kton liquid scintillator detector of $3%/$$\\sqrt{E(MeV)}$ energy resolution, $\\sim$ 53 km far from reactors of $\\sim$ 36 GW total thermal power, can reach to a sensitivity of $\\Delta\\chi^{2}>16$ considering the spread of reactor cores and uncertainties of the detector response. Three of mixing parameters are expected to be measured to better than 1% precision. There are multiple detector options for JUNO under investigation. The technical challenges...

  14. Reactor hot spot analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilim, R.B.

    1985-08-01

    The principle methods for performing reactor hot spot analysis are reviewed and examined for potential use in the Applied Physics Division. The semistatistical horizontal method is recommended for future work and is now available as an option in the SE2-ANL core thermal hydraulic code. The semistatistical horizontal method is applied to a small LMR to illustrate the calculation of cladding midwall and fuel centerline hot spot temperatures. The example includes a listing of uncertainties, estimates for their magnitudes, computation of hot spot subfactor values and calculation of two sigma temperatures. A review of the uncertainties that affect liquid metal fast reactors is also presented. It was found that hot spot subfactor magnitudes are strongly dependent on the reactor design and therefore reactor specific details must be carefully studied. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  15. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is still one of SCK-CEN's important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. During the last three years, the availability of the installation was maintained at an average level of 97.6 percent. In the year 2000, the reactor was operated for a total of 104 days at a mean power of 56 MW. In 2000, most irradiation experiments were performed in the CALLISTO PWR loop. The report describes irradiations achieved or under preparation in 2000, including the development of advanced facilities and concept studies for new programmes. An overview of the scientific irradiation programmes as well as of the R and D programme of the BR2 reactor in 2000 is given

  16. Research Reactor Benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A criticality benchmark experiment performed at the Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA Mark II research reactor is described. This experiment and its evaluation are given as examples of benchmark experiments at research reactors. For this reason the differences and possible problems compared to other benchmark experiments are particularly emphasized. General guidelines for performing criticality benchmarks in research reactors are given. The criticality benchmark experiment was performed in a normal operating reactor core using commercially available fresh 20% enriched fuel elements containing 12 wt% uranium in uranium-zirconium hydride fuel material. Experimental conditions to minimize experimental errors and to enhance computer modeling accuracy are described. Uncertainties in multiplication factor due to fuel composition and geometry data are analyzed by sensitivity analysis. The simplifications in the benchmark model compared to the actual geometry are evaluated. Sample benchmark calculations with the MCNP and KENO Monte Carlo codes are given

  17. Nuclear reactor (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first French plutonium-making reactors G1, G2 and G3 built at Marcoule research center are linked to a power plant. The G1 electrical output does not offset the energy needed for operating this reactor. On the contrary, reactors G2 and G3 will each generate a net power of 25 to 30 MW, which will go into the EDF grid. This power is relatively small, but the information obtained from operation is great and will be helpful for starting up the power reactor EDF1, EDF2 and EDF3. The paper describes how, previous to any starting-up operation, the tests performed, especially those concerned with the power plant and the pressure vessel, have helped to bring the commissioning date closer. (author)

  18. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, A C

    2016-01-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these and their associated uncertainties are crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to-date have been determined by either conversion of measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that makeup the spectra using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to beta-decay plague both methods, and we provide estimates of these uncertainties. Improving on current knowledge of the antineutrino spectra from reactors will require new experiments. Such experiments would also address the so-called reactor neutrino anomaly and the possible origin of the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra measured in recent high-statistics reactor neutrino experiments.

  19. Pulsed fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This summer school specialized in examining specific fusion center systems. Papers on scientific feasibility are first presented: confinement of high-beta plasma, liners, plasma focus, compression and heating and the use of high power electron beams for thermonuclear reactors. As for technological feasibility, lectures were on the theta-pinch toroidal reactors, toroidal diffuse pinch, electrical engineering problems in pulsed magnetically confined reactors, neutral gas layer for heat removal, the conceptual design of a series of laser fusion power plants with ''Saturn'', implosion experiments and the problem of the targets, the high brightness lasers for plasma generation, and topping and bottoming cycles. Some problems common to pulsed reactors were examined: energy storage and transfer, thermomechanical and erosion effects in the first wall and blanket, the problems of tritium production, radiation damage and neutron activation in blankets, and the magnetic and inertial confinement

  20. Reactor fueling of BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable the pattern exchange for control rods during burning in Control Cell Core type BWR reactors. Constitution: A plurality of control cells are divided into a plurality of groups such that the control cells is aparted from each other by way of at least two fuel assemblies other than the control cells with respect to the vertical and lateral directions of the reactor core cross section, as well as they are in adjacent with control cells of other groups with respect to the orthogonal direction. This enables to perform the pattern exchange for the control rods during burning in the control cell core with ease, and the control blade and the story effect harmful to the mechanical soundness of fuels can thus be suppressed. (Moriyama, K.)

  1. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in fiscal 1974 in Reactor Engineering Division of eight laboratories and computing center are described. Works in the division are closely related with the development of a multi-purpose High-temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, the development of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and engineering of thermonuclear fusion reactors. They cover nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and aspects of the computing center. (auth.)

  2. Special lecture on nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book gives a special lecture on nuclear reactor, which is divided into two parts. The first part has explanation on nuclear design of nuclear reactor and analysis of core with theories of integral transports, diffusion Nodal, transports Nodal and Monte Carlo skill parallel computer and nuclear calculation and speciality of transmutation reactor. The second part deals with speciality of nuclear reactor and control with nonlinear stabilization of nuclear reactor, nonlinear control of nuclear reactor, neural network and control of nuclear reactor, control theory of observer and analysis method of Adomian.

  3. Spectral characterization of the epithermal-neutron beam at the Brookhaven medical research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power burst facility boron neutron capture therapy (PBF/BNCT) program schedule required the use of an epithermal-neutron beam before the PBF would be available. The beam was needed to carry out the acute, dose-tolerance study on healthy canines and the treatment protocol on spontaneous tumor canines. Calculations on available U.S. test reactors confirmed that the Brookhaven medical research reactor (BMRR) would be capable of providing an epithermal-neutron beam with sufficient intensity while limiting the fast-neutron and gamma dose contamination to acceptable levels for the canine irradiation studies. A joint Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)/Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) program was instituted to design, construct, install, and measure the performance of an epithermal-neutron beam filter for the BMRR. Aluminum oxide was selected as the filter material because it provided the desired neutron spectrum characteristics given the physical constraints of the available BMRR irradiation beam port. Neutron spectrum measurements of the exit beam were undertaken by INEL as a means to evaluate the performance of the new filter and the validity of neutron transport calculations. The preliminary data from activation measurements were presented at the Neutron Beam Design Workshop at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in March 1989. The updated activation results and the proton-recoil measurements are presented in this paper and are compared with predictions derived from a two-dimensional transport calculation

  4. The replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contract for the design, construction and commissioning of the Replacement Research Reactor was signed in July 2000. This was followed by the completion of the detailed design and an application for a construction licence was made in May 2001. This paper will describe the main elements of the design and their relation to the proposed applications of the reactor. The future stages in the project leading to full operation are also described

  5. OECD Halden reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the activities of the OECD Halden Reactor Project for the year 1976. The main items reported on are: a) the process supervision and control which have focused on core monitoring and control, and operator-process communication; b) the fuel performance and safety behavior which have provided data and analytical descriptions of the thermal, mechanical and chemical behavior of fuel under various operating conditions; c) the reactor operations and d) the administration and finance

  6. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising a column of vibration compacted fuel which is retained in consolidated condition by a thimble shaped plug. The plug is wedged into gripping engagement with the wall of the sheath by a wedge. The wedge material has a lower coefficient of expansion than the sheath material so that at reactor operating temperature the retainer can relax sufficient to accommodate thermal expansion of the column of fuel. (author)

  7. Small reactor return

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current state of the development of present-day small reactors in different countries is performed. Various designs of low and middle power reactors, among which are CAREM (25 MW, PWR), KLT-40 (40 MW, PWR), MRX (30 MW, PWR), IRIS (50 MW, PWR), SMART (1000 MW, PWR), Modular SBWR (50 MW, BWR), PBMR (120 MW, HTGR), GT-HMR (285 MW, HTGR), are discussed

  8. Reactor lattice transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present lecture is a continuation of the lecture on Introduction to the Neutron Transport Phenomena. It comprises three aspects of lattice calculations. First the idea of a reactor lattice is introduced. Then the main definitions used in reactor lattice analysis are given, and finally two basic methods applied for solution of the transport equations are defined. Several remarks on secondary results from lattice transport calculations are added. (author)

  9. Thermal or epithermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a thermal or epithermal heavy-water reactor of the pressure tube design the reactivity is to be increased by different means: replacement of the moderator by additional rods with heavy metal in the core or in the reflector; separation of the moderator (heavy water) from the coolant (light water) by means of shroud tubes. In light-water reactor types neutron losses are to be influenced by using the heavy elements in different configurations. (orig./PW)

  10. Future reactor experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The non-zero neutrino mixing angle θ13 has been discovered and precisely measured by the current generation short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments. It opens the gate of measuring the leptonic CP-violating phase and enables the neutrino mass ordering. The JUNO and RENO-50 proposals aim at resolving the neutrino mass ordering using reactors. The experiment design, physics sensitivity, technical challenges as well as the progresses of those two proposed experiments are reviewed in this paper

  11. Water cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The description is given of a water cooled nuclear reactor comprising a core, cooling water that rises through the core, vertical guide tubes located inside the core and control rods vertically mobile in the guide tubes. In this reactor the cooling water is divided into a first part introduced at the bottom end of the core and rising through it and a second part introduced at the top end of the guide tubes so as to drop in them

  12. Jet-Stirred Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Herbinet, Olivier; Guillaume, Dayma

    2013-01-01

    The jet-stirred reactor is a type of ideal continuously stirred-tank reactor which is well suited for gas phase kinetic studies. It is mainly used to study the oxidation and the pyrolysis of hydrocarbon and oxygenated fuels. These studies consist in recording the evolution of the conversion of the reactants and of the mole fractions of reaction products as a function of different parameters such as reaction temperature, residence time, pressure and composition of the inlet gas. Gas chromatogr...

  13. Generation IV reactors: economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operating nuclear reactors were built over a short period: no more than 10 years and today their average age rounds 18 years. EDF (French electricity company) plans to renew its reactor park over a far longer period : 30 years from 2020 to 2050. According to EDF this objective implies 3 constraints: 1) a service life of 50 to 60 years for a significant part of the present operating reactors, 2) to be ready to built a generation 3+ unit in 2020 which infers the third constraint: 3) to launch the construction of an EPR (European pressurized reactor) prototype as soon as possible in order to have it operating in 2010. In this scheme, generation 4 reactor will benefit the feedback experience of generation 3 and will take over in 2030. Economic analysis is an important tool that has been used by the generation 4 international forum to select the likely future reactor systems. This analysis is based on 4 independent criteria: the basic construction cost, the construction time, the operation and maintenance costs and the fuel cycle cost. This analysis leads to the evaluation of the global cost of electricity generation and of the total investment required for each of the reactor system. The former defines the economic competitiveness in a de-regulated energy market while the latter is linked to the financial risk taken by the investor. It appears, within the limits of the assumptions and models used, that generation 4 reactors will be characterized by a better competitiveness and an equivalent financial risk when compared with the previous generation. (A.C.)

  14. Future reactor experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Liangjian

    2015-07-01

    The non-zero neutrino mixing angle θ13 has been discovered and precisely measured by the current generation short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments. It opens the gate of measuring the leptonic CP-violating phase and enables the neutrino mass ordering. The JUNO and RENO-50 proposals aim at resolving the neutrino mass ordering using reactors. The experiment design, physics sensitivity, technical challenges as well as the progresses of those two proposed experiments are reviewed in this paper.

  15. Department of Reactor Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included.......The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included....

  16. AVR reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for reactivity control was developed and used for fuelling the AVR reactor core, which is largely based on experimentally determined values. By adding fuel elements with different quantities of heavy metals paired with various experimental requirements, great demands were made of reactivity control. Although only a small range of control was available, this was sufficient to operate the reactor and to shut it down safely in the required power and temperature range. (orig.)

  17. Moon base reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, H.; Flores, J.; Nguyen, M.; Carsen, K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of our reactor design is to supply a lunar-based research facility with 20 MW(e). The fundamental layout of this lunar-based system includes the reactor, power conversion devices, and a radiator. The additional aim of this reactor is a longevity of 12 to 15 years. The reactor is a liquid metal fast breeder that has a breeding ratio very close to 1.0. The geometry of the core is cylindrical. The metallic fuel rods are of beryllium oxide enriched with varying degrees of uranium, with a beryllium core reflector. The liquid metal coolant chosen was natural lithium. After the liquid metal coolant leaves the reactor, it goes directly into the power conversion devices. The power conversion devices are Stirling engines. The heated coolant acts as a hot reservoir to the device. It then enters the radiator to be cooled and reenters the Stirling engine acting as a cold reservoir. The engines' operating fluid is helium, a highly conductive gas. These Stirling engines are hermetically sealed. Although natural lithium produces a lower breeding ratio, it does have a larger temperature range than sodium. It is also corrosive to steel. This is why the container material must be carefully chosen. One option is to use an expensive alloy of cerbium and zirconium. The radiator must be made of a highly conductive material whose melting point temperature is not exceeded in the reactor and whose structural strength can withstand meteor showers.

  18. BWR type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To simplify the structure of an emergency core cooling system while suppressing the flow out of coolants upon rapture accidents in a coolant recycling device of BWR type reactors. Constitution: Recirculation pumps are located at a position higher than the reactor core in a pressure vessel, and the lower plenum is bisected vertically by a partition plate. Further, a gas-liquid separator is surrounded with a wall and the water level at the outer side of the wall is made higher than the water level in the inside of the wall. In this structure, coolants are introduced from the upper chamber in the lower plenum into the reactor core, and the steams generated in the reactor core are separated in the gas-liquid separator, whereby the separated liquid is introduced as coolants by way of the inner chamber into the lower chamber of the lower plenum and further sent by way of the outer chamber into the reactor core. Consequently, idle rotation of the recycling pumps due to the flow-in of saturated water is prevented and loss of coolants in the reactor core can also be prevented upon raptures in the pipeway and the driving section of the pump connected to the pressure vessel and in the bottom of the pressure vessel. (Horiuchi, T.)

  19. Emergency reactor scram system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides an emergency reactor scram system capable of shut down a reactor safely upon occurrence of pump trip by improving a passive scram performance for an FBR-type reactor. Namely, a driving motor and an electric generator are connected to a main pump of a primary system. An AC/DC convertor is connected to the electric generator. A shielding plug is disposed to the upper end opening of a reactor container, a control rod drive mechanism is erected on the shielding plug, and an extension pipe is attached to scram magnets of the control rod drive mechanism. The extension pipe is connected to a control rod. The rotation of the shaft of the pump is used as a direct rotator to provide an integrated-type electric generator. The electric generator is electrically connected with the power source of a scram magnet of the emergency scram system. Accordingly, the control rod of the emergency scram system is automatically and rapidly inserted to the reactor core using the power source of the electric generator upon trip of the main pump thereby enabling to scram the reactor safely. (I.S.)

  20. A modular reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a new concept in liquid metal reactors that is being developed by General Electric under contract to the Department of Energy. This concept is called the Modular Reactor Plant. While this effort is not expected to have a near-term impact, it is directed toward three principal issues currently affecting nuclear power in the United States. First, plant costs have escalated to the point where the startup of new plants require large electric rate increases. Second, the cost of new plants coming on-line today vary by as much as a factor of three. And, third, nuclear construction times often exceed the utilities prudent planning cycle. This paper describes how General Electric's Modular Reactor Plant addreses these issues through shop fabrication and assembly, rail shipment to the site for rapid installation of nuclear components and inherent reactor protection. In addition, it is expected the modular reactor plant will reduce the current cost of development and demonstration of liquid metal reactors to an affordable level

  1. New fission reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of critical challenges to the expanded or continued use of nuclear power have developed. These can be categorized as: regulatory restrictions and complications; negative public attitudes; plant complexity; plant life, operations, and maintenance; uncertain load growth, financing; waste management. Solutions to these challenges through advanced reactor design centre around four key technical responses. Passive safety systems are being introduced which use the laws of physics to provide emergency reactor coding, control and shutdown thus eliminating the possibility of human error. Modular construction promises cuts in costs and construction time by shifting the major part of component manufacture from the site to the factory. Standardization also cuts capital costs and in addition operations and repair costs and expedites reactor licensing. Improvements to the fuel cycle include improved fuel types, designs and fabrication, and the reprocessing of and recycling spent fuel back into energy production, thus extending uranium resources and offering a partial solution to the problem of waste disposal. Examples of evolutionary and advanced water-cooled reactors, modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and advanced liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors which are being developed round the world are presented. (author)

  2. OECD Halden reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the nineteenth annual Report on the OECD Halden Reactor Project, describing activities at the Project during 1978, the last year of the 1976-1978 Halden Agreement. Work continued in two main fields: test fuel irradiation and fuel research, and computer-based process supervision and control. Project research on water reactor fuel focusses on various aspects of fuel behavior under normal, and off-normal transient conditions. In 1978, participating organisations continued to submit test fuel for irradiation in the Halden boiling heavy-water reactor, in instrumented test assemblies designed and manufactured by the Project. Work included analysis of the impact of fuel design and reactor operating conditions on fuel cladding behavior. Fuel performance modelling included characterization of thermal and mechanical behavior at high burn-up, of fuel failure modes, and improvement of data qualification procedures to reduce and quantify error bands on in-reactor measurements. Instrument development yielded new or improved designs for measuring rod temperature, internal pressure, axial neutron flux shape determination, and for detecting cladding defects. Work on computer-based methods of reactor supervision and control included continued development of a system for predictive core surveillance, and of special mathematical methods for core power distribution control

  3. Reactor power measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device of the present invention efficiently calibrates a fixed type gamma ray thermometer of a reactor power measuring device of a BWR type reactor. Namely, the device of the present invention calculates peripheral fuel rod power distribution by calibrating the reactor power distribution by heat generation amount, the reactor power distribution being obtained by a calculation based on a reactor model for converting the signals of a plurality of the gamma ray thermometers in the reactor core based on a conversion formula. In this case, the conversion formula is a relational formula between the power of a thermocouple of the gamma ray thermometer, gamma ray heat generation amount, thermocouple zero power sensitivity relative to a temperature coefficient. A conversion efficient calculation means makes a calibration heater to generate heat at a predetermined power, and the thermocouple zero power sensitivity and the temperature coefficient are obtained based on the output of the gamma ray thermometer in this case. The calibration means updates to conversion type thermocouple zero power sensitivity and temperature coefficient. A calibration execution means executes the operations described above successively, and when the thermocouple zero power sensitivity and the temperature coefficient are out of an allowable range, the means informs it and eliminates the corresponding gamma ray thermometer from the measuring meters. (I.S.)

  4. Reactor safety engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of the work is such that the basic safety philosophy for nuclear power plants as well as the safety features of both types of light water reactors, pressurized and boiling water reactors, and of the fast breeder reactor are dealt with. With the pressurized and boiling water reactors also variations, due to different supplies are mentioned. The state of development considered is characterized by the results of the American reactor safety study having very much influenced the way of presentation and the validity of the information contained. In the introduction the attentive reader is made familiar with the basic traits of safety engineering, the traditional deterministic way of proceeding being supplemented by a detailed illustration of probabilistic means used in the safety analysis. Added to this are comparative descriptions of the individual safety features, their design and mode of operation. There are, e.g., detailed discussion of the emergency core cooling systems, the power supply systems, the reactor protection system, and the containment. Special chapters are attributed to transients with and without the fast shutdown system working and to loss of coolant. The so-called external events are treated somewhat shortly whereas much space is given to core melting problems. The treatment of important events from the safety point of view, including the section on Harrisburg added for reasons of immediate interest, is limited to phenomenological description. (orig.)

  5. Regulations for RA reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulations for RA reactor operation are written in accordance with the legal regulations defined by the Law about radiation protection and related legal acts, as well as technical standards according to the IAEA recommendations. The contents of this book include: fundamental data about the reactor; legal regulations for reactor operation; organizational scheme for reactor operation; general and detailed instructions for operation, behaviour in the reactor building, performing experiments; operating rules for operation under steady state and accidental conditions

  6. The reactor Cabri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has become necessary to construct in France a reactor which would permit the investigation of the conditions of functioning of future installations, the choice, the testing and the development of safety devices to be adopted. A water reactor of a type corresponding to the latest CEA constructions in the field of laboratory or university reactors was decided upon: it appeared important to be able to evaluate the risks entailed and to study the possibilities of increasing the power, always demanded by the users; on the other hand, it is particularly interesting to clarify the phenomena of power oscillation and the risks of burn out. The work programme for CABRI will be associated with the work carried out on the American Sperts of the same type, during its construction, very useful contacts were made with the American specialists who designed the se reactors. A brief description of the reactor is given in the communication as well as the work programme for the first years with respect to the objectives up to now envisaged. Rough description of the reactor. CABRI is an open core swimming-pool reactor without any lateral protection, housed in a reinforced building with controlled leakage, in the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache. It lies alone in the middle of an area whose radius is 300 meters long. Control and measurements equipment stand out on the edge of that zone. It consumes MTR fuel elements. The control-safety rods are propelled by compressed air. The maximum flow rate of cooling circuit is 1500 m3/h. Transient measurements are recorded in a RW330 unit. Aims and work programme. CABRI is meant for: - studies on the safety of water reactors - for the definition of the safety margins under working conditions: research of maximum power at which a swimming-pool reactor may operate with respect to a cooling accident, of local boiling effect on the nuclear behaviour of the reactor, performances of the control and safety instruments under exceptional

  7. REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

    2011-01-28

    Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

  8. Materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The improved performance of present generation nuclear reactors and the realization of advanced reactor concepts, both, require development of better materials. Physical metallurgy/materials science principles which have been exploited in meeting the exacting requirements of nuclear reactor materials (fuels and structural materials), are outlined citing a few specific examples. While the incentive for improvement of traditional fuels (e.g., UO2 fuel) is primarily for increasing the average core burn up, the development of advanced fuels (e.g., MOX, mixed carbide, nitride, silicide and dispersion fuels) are directed towards better utilization of fissile and fertile inventories through adaptation of innovative fuel cycles. As the burn up of UO2 fuel reaches higher levels, a more detailed and quantitative understanding of the phenomena such as fission gas release, fuel restructuring induced by radiation and thermal gradients and pellet-clad interaction is being achieved. Development of zirconium based alloys for both cladding and pressure tube applications is discussed with reference to their physical metallurgy, fabrication techniques and in-reactor degradation mechanisms. The issue of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is covered drawing a comparison between the western and eastern specifications of RPV steels. The search for new materials which can stand higher rates of atomic displacement due to radiation has led to the development of swelling resistant austenitic and ferritic stainless steels for fast reactor applications as exemplified by the development of the D-9 steel for Indian fast breeder reactor. The presentation will conclude by listing various materials related phenomena, which have a strong bearing on the successful development of future nuclear energy systems. (author)

  9. Reactor physics and economic aspects of the CANDU reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A history of the development of the CANDU system is given along with a fairly detailed description of the 600 MW(e) CANDU reactor. Reactor physics calculation methods are described, as well as comparisons between calculated reactor physics parameters and those measured in research and power reactors. An examination of the economics of CANDU in the Ontario Hydro system and a comparison between fossil fuelled and light water reactors is presented. Some physics, economics and resources aspects are given for both low enriched uranium and thorium-fuelled CANDU reactors. Finally the RβD program in Advanced Fuel Cycles is briefly described

  10. Reactor Safety Planning for Prometheus Project, for Naval Reactors Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Delmolino

    2005-05-06

    The purpose of this letter is to submit to Naval Reactors the initial plan for the Prometheus project Reactor Safety work. The Prometheus project is currently developing plans for cold physics experiments and reactor prototype tests. These tests and facilities may require safety analysis and siting support. In addition to the ground facilities, the flight reactor units will require unique analyses to evaluate the risk to the public from normal operations and credible accident conditions. This letter outlines major safety documents that will be submitted with estimated deliverable dates. Included in this planning is the reactor servicing documentation and shipping analysis that will be submitted to Naval Reactors.

  11. Fast breeder reactor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The meeting was attended by 15 participants from seven countries and two international organizations. The Eighth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) was attended by representatives from France, Fed. Rep. Germany, Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the United States of America - countries that have made significant progress in developing the technology and physics of sodium cooled fast reactors and have extensive national programmes in this field - as well as by representatives of the Commission of the European Communities and the IAEA. The design of fast-reactor power plants is a more difficult task than developing facilities with thermal reactors. Different reactor kinetics and dynamics, a hard neutron spectrum, larger integral doses of fuel and structural material irradiation, higher core temperatures, the use of an essentially novel coolant, and, as a result of all these factors, the additional reliability and safety requirements that are imposed on the planning and operation of sodium cooled fast reactors - all these factors pose problems that can be solved comprehensively only by countries with a high level of scientific and technical development. The exchange of experience between these countries and their combined efforts in solving the fundamental problems that arise in planning, constructing and operating fast reactors are promoting technical progress and reducing the relative expenditure required for various studies on developing and introducing commercial fast reactors. For this reason, the meeting concentrated on reviewing and discussing national fast reactor programmes. The situation with regard to planning, constructing and operating fast experimental and demonstration reactors in the countries concerned, the experience accumulated in operating them, the difficulties arising during operation and ways of over-coming them, the search for optimal designs for the power

  12. BR2 Reactor: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiations in the BR2 reactor are in collaboration with or at the request of third parties such as the European Commission, the IAEA, research centres and utilities, reactor vendors or fuel manufacturers. The reactor also contributes significantly to the production of radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications, to neutron silicon doping for the semiconductor industry and to scientific irradiations for universities. Along the ongoing programmes on fuel and materials development, several new irradiation devices are in use or in design. Amongst others a loop providing enhanced cooling for novel materials testing reactor fuel, a device for high temperature gas cooled fuel as well as a rig for the irradiation of metallurgical samples in a Pb-Bi environment. A full scale 3-D heterogeneous model of BR2 is available. The model describes the real hyperbolic arrangement of the reactor and includes the detailed 3-D space dependent distribution of the isotopic fuel depletion in the fuel elements. The model is validated on the reactivity measurements of several tens of BR2 operation cycles. The accurate calculations of the axial and radial distributions of the poisoning of the beryllium matrix by 3He, 6Li and 3T are verified on the measured reactivity losses used to predict the reactivity behavior for the coming decades. The model calculates the main functionals in reactor physics like: conventional thermal and equivalent fission neutron fluxes, number of displacements per atom, fission rate, thermal power characteristics as heat flux and linear power density, neutron/gamma heating, determination of the fission energy deposited in fuel plates/rods, neutron multiplication factor and fuel burn-up. For each reactor irradiation project, a detailed geometry model of the experimental device and of its neighborhood is developed. Neutron fluxes are predicted within approximately 10 percent in comparison with the dosimetry measurements. Fission rate, heat flux and

  13. Reactor coolant cleanup facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A depressurization device is disposed in pipelines upstream of recycling pumps of a reactor coolant cleanup facility to reduce a pressure between the pressurization device and the recycling pump at the downstream, thereby enabling high pressure coolant injection from other systems by way of the recycling pumps. Upon emergency, the recycling pumps of the coolant cleanup facility can be used in common to an emergency reactor core cooling facility and a reactor shutdown facility. Since existent pumps of the emergency reactor core cooling facility and the reactor shutdown facility which are usually in a stand-by state can be removed, operation confirmation test and maintenance for equipments in both of facilities can be saved, so that maintenance and reliability of the plant are improved and burdens on operators can also be mitigated. Moreover, low pressure design can be adopted for a non-regenerative heat exchanger and recycling coolant pumps, which enables to improve the reliability and economical property due to reduction of possibility of leakage. (N.H.)

  14. HTGR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reactor core is disposed at the center of a reactor container, a reflector is disposed on the outer side thereof, a steam generator is disposed further outer side thereof coaxially, and they are constituted as an integrated one container. A gas circulator and control rod drives are protruded at the outer side of the lower portion of the integrated container. Heat insulators are disposed on the inner side of the container wall in the upper portion of the reactor container. Helium gas risen in the reactor core and heated to a high temperature descends in a circular steam generator and undergoes heat exchange with water, and is then pressurized in the gas circulator after the lowering of the temperature, and returned to the inlet of the reactor core from the lower central portion of the container. With such procedures, the helium gas as primary coolants circulates only in the container to improve confinement. The device can be reduced in the size and the cost. (I.N.)

  15. Reactor container spray device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable decrease in the heat and the concentration of radioactive iodine released from the reactor vessel into the reactor container in the spray device of BWR type reactors. Constitution: A plurality of water receiving trays are disposed below the spray nozzle in the dry well and communicated to a pressure suppression chamber by way of drain pipeways passing through a diaphragm floor. When the recycling system is ruptured and coolants in the reactor vessel and radioactive iodine in the reactor core are released into the dry well, spray water is discharged from the spray nozzle to eliminate the heat and the radioactive iodine in the dry well. In this case, the receiving trays collect the portions of spray water whose absorption power for the heat and radioactive iodine is nearly saturated and falls them into the pool water of the pressure suppression chamber. Consequently, other portions of the spray water that still possess absorption power can be jetted with no hindrance, to increase the efficiency for the removal of the heat and iodine of the spray droplets. (Horiuchi, T.)

  16. PROTEUS research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PROTEUS zero power reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland achieved first criticality in 1968 and since then has been operated as an experimental tool for reactor physics research on test lattices representative of a wide range of reactor concepts. Reactor design codes and their associated data libraries are validated on the basis of the experimental results obtained. PROTEUS is normally configured as a driven system, in which a subcritical test zone is made critical by the surrounding driver zones. The advantages of driven systems can be summarized as follows: - Smaller amount of test fuel is required; - Large range of test zone conditions (including k∞ < 1 states) can be investigated by changes in the driver loading alone, thus avoiding undesirable perturbations to the test zone which would influence the measurement conditions and thus affect the interpretability of the results; - Necessary reactor control and instrumentation equipment (usually perturbing from the experimental viewpoint) can be located in the outer driver regions, thereby avoiding disturbance of the test lattice

  17. Generalities about nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From Zoe, the first nuclear reactor, till the current EPR, the French nuclear industry has always advanced by profiting from the feedback from dozens of years of experience and operations, in particular by drawing lessons from the most significant events in its history, such as the Fukushima accident. The new generations of reactors must improve safety and economic performance so that the industry maintain its legitimacy and its share in the production of electricity. This article draws the history of nuclear power in France, gives a brief description of the pressurized water reactor design, lists the technical features of the different versions of PWR that operate in France and compares them with other types of reactors. The feedback experience concerning safety, learnt from the major nuclear accidents Three Miles Island (1979), Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011) is also detailed. Today there are 26 third generation reactors being built in the world: 4 EPR (1 in Finland, 1 in France and 2 in China); 2 VVER-1200 in Russia, 8 AP-1000 (4 in China and 4 in the Usa), 8 APR-1400 (4 in Korea and 4 in UAE), and 4 ABWR (2 in Japan and 2 in Taiwan)

  18. China experimental fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chinese experimental fast reactor (CEFR) is a pool-type sodium-cooled fast reactor whose short term purposes are: -) the validation of computer codes, -) the check of the relevance of standards, and -) the gathering of experimental data on fast reactors. On the long term the expectations will focus on: -) gaining experience in fast reactor operations, -) the testing of nuclear fuels and materials, and -) the study of sodium compounds. The main technical features of CEFR are: -) thermal power output: 65 MW (electrical power output: 20 MW), -) size of the core: height: 45 cm, diameter: 60 cm, -) maximal linear output: 430 W/cm, -) neutron flux: 3.7*1015 n/cm2/s, -) input/output sodium temperature: 360 / 530 Celsius degrees, -) 2 loops for the primary system and 2 loops for the secondary system. The temperature coefficient and the power coefficient are settled to stay negative for any change in the values of the core parameters. The installation of the reactor vessel will be completed by mid 2007. The first criticality of CEFR is expected during the first semester of 2010. (A.C.)

  19. EBT reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of a recent ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) reactor study that includes ring and core plasma properties with consistent treatment of coupled ring-core stability criteria and power balance requirements. The principal finding is that constraints imposed by these coupling and other physics and technology considerations permit a broad operating window for reactor design optimization. Within this operating window, physics and engineering systems analysis and cost sensitivity studies indicate that reactors with approx. 6 to 10%, P approx. 1200 to 1700 MW(e), wall loading approx. 1.0 to 2.5 MW/m2, and recirculating power fraction (including ring-sustaining power and all other reactors auxiliaries) approx. 10 to 15% are possible. A number of concept improvements are also proposed that are found to offer the potential for further improvement of the reactor size and parameters. These include, but are not limited to, the use of: (1) supplementary coils or noncircular mirror coils to improve magnetic geometry and reduce size, (2) energetic ion rings to improve ring power requirements, (3) positive potential to enhance confinement and reduce size, and (4) profile control to improve stability and overall fusion power density

  20. Modern research reactors in the world and RA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper covers the following topics: fundamentals of research reactors, thermal neutron flux density, classification of research reactors in the world, properties of research reactors of higher power in the world according to IAEA data for 1995, their application, and trend of development, experimental feasibility and status of RA reactor. Trend of research reactors development in the world (after 1980) is directed towards increasing the neutron production quality factor, i.e. ratio between thermal neutron flux density and reactor power, which is achieved by designing compact reactor cores. With the aim of renewal of RA reactor (without analysis of reactor components and staff aging, possibility of restart and commercialization), according to the analysis in this paper, it can be concluded: there is very few reactors under construction in the world, all the important countries in Europe have research reactors; RA reactor is not very interesting for development of reactor physics; nowadays RA reactor is in the group of reactors which are 30-40 years old; its inventories of fuel and heavy water are enough for about 20 years of operation; it has achieved high quality factor of neutron production with low and highly enriched fuel; core transfer from low highly enriched to low enriched fuel should be carefully studies from operation, experimental and economical point of view; it is necessary to use the advantages of RA reactor (minimum investment): volume of the core and reflector which enables availability of neutron flux for the users (numerous experimental loops), fuel in shape of slugs enabling efficient fuel management and flexible neutron flux distribution in the core in the reflector, reactor operation should be directed towards commercial applications. Bibliography of more than 140 relevant papers used is included in this paper

  1. Sodium-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book first explains the choice of sodium-cooled reactors by outlining the reasons of the choice of fast neutron reactors (fast neutrons instead of thermal neutrons, recycling opportunity for plutonium, full use of natural uranium, nuclear waste optimization, flexibility of fast neutron reactors in nuclear material management, fast neutron reactors as complements of water-cooled reactors), and by outlining the reasons for the choice of sodium as heat-transfer material. Physical, chemical, and neutron properties of sodium are presented. The second part of the book first presents the main design principles for sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors and their core. The third part proposes an historical overview and an assessment of previously operated sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors (French reactors from Rapsodie to Superphenix, other reactors in the world), and an assessment of the main incidents which occurred in these reactors. It also reports the experience and lessons learned from the dismantling of various sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors in the world. The next chapter addresses safety issues (technical and safety aspects related to the use of sodium) and environmental issues (dosimetry, gaseous and liquid releases, solid wastes, and cooling water). Then, various technological aspects of these reactors are addressed: the energy conversion system, main components, sodium chemistry, sodium-related technology, advances in in-service inspection, materials used in reactors and their behaviour, and fuel system. The next chapter addresses the fuel cycle in these reactors: its integrated specific character, report of the French experience in fast neutron reactor fuel processing, description of the transmutation of minor actinides in these reactors. The last chapter proposes an overview of reactors currently projected or under construction in the world, presents the Astrid project, and gives an assessment of the economy of these reactors. A glossary and an index

  2. Scaleable, High Efficiency Microchannel Sabatier Reactor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Microchannel Sabatier Reactor System (MSRS) consisting of cross connected arrays of isothermal or graded temperature reactors is proposed. The reactor array...

  3. Methanation assembly using multiple reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Fred C.; Parab, Sanjay C.

    2007-07-24

    A methanation assembly for use with a water supply and a gas supply containing gas to be methanated in which a reactor assembly has a plurality of methanation reactors each for methanating gas input to the assembly and a gas delivery and cooling assembly adapted to deliver gas from the gas supply to each of said methanation reactors and to combine water from the water supply with the output of each methanation reactor being conveyed to a next methanation reactor and carry the mixture to such next methanation reactor.

  4. Mimic of OSU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ohio State University research reactor (OSURR) is undergoing improvements in its research and educational capabilities. A computer-based digital data acquisition system, including a reactor system mimic, will be installed as part of these improvements. The system will monitor the reactor system parameters available to the reactor operator either in digital parameters available to the reactor operator either in digital or analog form. The system includes two computers. All the signals are sent to computer 1, which processes the data and sends the data through a serial port to computer 2 with a video graphics array VGA monitor, which is utilized to display the mimic system of the reactor

  5. MINT research reactor safety program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamad Idris bin Taib [Division of Special Project, Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi (Malaysia)

    2000-11-01

    Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) Research Reactor Safety Program has been done along with Reactor Power Upgrading Project, Reactor Safety Upgrading Project and Development of Expert System for On-Line Nuclear Process Control Project. From 1993 up to date, Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulics analysis, Probabilistic Safety Assessment as well as installation of New 2 MW Secondary Cooling System were done. Installations of New Reactor Building Ventilation System, Reactor Monitoring System, Updating of Safety Analysis Report and Upgrading Primary Cooling System are in progress. For future activities, Reactor Modeling will be included to add present activities. (author)

  6. RB research reactor Safety Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This RB reactor safety report is a revised and improved version of the Safety report written in 1962. It contains descriptions of: reactor building, reactor hall, control room, laboratories, reactor components, reactor control system, heavy water loop, neutron source, safety system, dosimetry system, alarm system, neutron converter, experimental channels. Safety aspects of the reactor operation include analyses of accident causes, errors during operation, measures for preventing uncontrolled activity changes, analysis of the maximum possible accident in case of different core configurations with natural uranium, slightly and highly enriched fuel; influence of possible seismic events

  7. Some comments on the phase diagram parameters for the nuclear matter formed in Au-Au collisions at RHIC-BNL energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of highly excited dense nuclear matter in laboratory, with the possibility to evidence a phase transition to deconfined quark-gluon plasma, can be analysed in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. The rapidity density and pseudorapidity density, respectively, are used to estimate energy density in Au-Au collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV and √sNN = 200 GeV. From transverse mass spectra and transverse momentum spectra - obtained in the same collision - pion, kaon, proton and antiproton temperatures are extracted. These quantities are important parameters of the phase diagram of the nuclear matter formed in such collisions. The mass dependence of the slope parameters provides evidence of collective transverse flow. Comparisons with the predictions with UrQMD and HIJING codes are included in this paper. Taking into account the fact that some information on the dynamics of high-energy Au-Au collisions is obtained from the analysis of the antiparticles to particles ratios, we calculated these ratios for different rapidities. We investigate the Coulomb interaction through the ratio of negative to positive pions produced in very high-energy heavy ion collisions at BRAHMS experiment. The study of Coulomb interaction could also provide information on the collision dynamics, such as collective expansion and the charge of the system produced in the central region of the collisions because the effect of the nuclear medium is not evident for particles related to the later collision stages. They can affect the phase diagram parameters. The values of the energy and baryonic densities - over 10 normal values - as well as the agreement between the experimental values on participants and phenomenological model estimations, represent a support for the estimated thermodynamic parameters of the nuclear matter in Au-Au collisions at RHIC-BNL energies. This information can be used to study the formation of the quark plasma and quark-gluon plasma in these collisions

  8. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  9. Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On April 26, 1986, an explosion occurred at the newest of four operating nuclear reactors at the Chernobyl site in the USSR. The accident initiated an international technical exchange of almost unprecedented magnitude; this exchange was climaxed with a meeting at the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna during the week of August 25, 1986. The meeting was attended by more than 540 official representatives from 51 countries and 20 international organizations. Information gleaned from that technical exchange is presented in this report. A description of the Chernobyl reactor, which differs significantly from commercial US reactors, is presented, the accident scenario advanced by the Russian delegation is discussed, and observations that have been made concerning fission product release are described

  10. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international design team comprised of members from Canada, Europe, Japan, the Soviet Union, and the United States of America, are designing an experimental fusion test reactor. The engineering and testing objectives of this International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are to validate the design and to demonstrate controlled ignition, extended burn of a deuterium and tritium plasma, and achieve steady state using technology expected to be available by 1990. The concept maximizes flexibility while allowing for a variety of plasma configurations and operating scenarios. During physics phase operation, the machine produces a 22 MA plasma current. In the technology phase, the machine can be reconfigured with a thicker shield and a breeding blanket to operate with an 18 MA plasma current at a major radius of 5.5 meters. Canada's involvement in the areas of safety, facility design, reactor configuration and maintenance builds on our internationally recognized design and operational expertise in developing tritium processes and CANDU related technologies

  11. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  12. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    THE OPERATING UNITS STATUS REPORT - LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US

  13. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  14. Colliding Beam Fusion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostoker, Norman; Qerushi, Artan; Binderbauer, Michl

    2003-06-01

    The recirculating power for virtually all types of fusion reactors has previously been calculated [1] with the Fokker-Planck equation. The reactors involve non-Maxwellian plasmas. The calculations are generic in that they do not relate to specific confinement devices. In all cases except for a Tokamak with D-T fuel the recirculating power was found to exceed the fusion power by a large factor. In this paper we criticize the generality claimed for this calculation. The ratio of circulating power to fusion power is calculated for the Colliding Beam Reactor with fuels D-T, D-He3 and p-B11. The results are respectively, 0.070, 0.141 and 0.493.

  15. The MNSR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This tank-in-pool reactor is based on the same design concept as the Canadian Slowpoke. The core is a right circular cylinder, 24 cm diameter by 25 cm long, containing 411 fuel pin positions. The pins are HEU-Aluminium alloy, 0.5 cm in diameter. Critical mass is about 900 g. The reactor has a single cadmium control rod. The back-up shutdown system is the insertion of a cadmium capsule in a core position. Excess reactivity is limited to 3.5mk. In both the MNSR and Slowpoke, the insertion of the maximum excess reactivity results in a power transient limited by the coolant/moderator temperature to safe values, independent of any operator action. This reactor is used primarily in training and neutron activation analysis. Up to 64 elements have been analyzed in a great variety of different disciplines. (author)

  16. Welding and reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high safety requirements which must be demanded of the quality of the welded joints in reactor technique have so far not been fulfilled in all cases. The errors occuring have caused considerable loss of availability and high material costs. They were not, however, so serious that one need have feared any immediate danger to the personnel or to the environment. The safety devices of reactor plants were only called upon in a few cases and to these they responded perfectly. The intensive efforts to complete and improve the specifications are to contribute to that in future, the reactor plants can be counted even more so as one of the safest technical plants ever. (orig./LH)

  17. Reactor operation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the TRIGA Users Conference in Helsinki 1970 the TRIGA reactor Vienna was in operation without any larger undesired shutdown. The integrated thermal power production by August 15 1972 accumulated to 110 MWd. The TRIGA reactor is manly used for training of students, for scientific courses and research work. Cooperation with industry increased in the last two years either in form of research or in performing training courses. Close cooperation is also maintained with the IAEA, samples are irradiated and courses on various fields are arranged. Maintenance work was performed on the heat exchanger and to replace the shim rod magnet. With the view on the future power upgrading nine fuel elements type 110 have been ordered recently. Experiments, performed currently on the reactor are presented in details

  18. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  19. Reactor accidents in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In each of the three major reactor accidents which have led to significant releases to the environment, and discussed in outline in this note, the reactor has been essentially destroyed - certainly Windscale and Chernobyl reactors will never operate and the cleanup operation for Three Mile Island is currently estimated to have cost in excess of US Pound 500 000 000. In each of the accidents there has not been any fatality off site in the short term and any long-term health detriment is unlikely to be seen in comparison with the natural cancer incidence rate. At Chernobyl, early fatalities did occur amongst those concerned with fighting the incident on site and late effects are to be expected. The assumption of a linear non-threshold risk, and hence no level of zero risk is the main problem in communication with the public, and the author calls for simplification of the presentation of the concepts of radiological protection. (U.K.)

  20. Reactor safety equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To positively recover radioactive substances discharged in a dry well at the time of failure of a reactor. Constitution: In addition to the emergency gas treating system fitted to a reactor building, a purification system connected through a pipeline to the dry well is arranged in the reactor building. This purification system is connected through pipes fitted to the dry well to forced circulation device, heat exchanger, and purification device. The atmosphere of high pressure steam gases in the dry well is derived to the heat exchanger for cooling, and then radioactive substances which are contained in the gases are removed by filter sets charged with the HEPA filters and the HECA filters. At last, there gases are returned to dry well by circulation pump, repeat this process. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  2. Reactor protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the reactor protection system (RPS-II) designed for use on Babcock and Wilcox 145-, later 177-, and 205-fuel assembly pressurized water reactors. In this system, relays in the trip logic have been replaced by solid state devices. A calculating module for the low DNBR, pump status, and offset trip functions has replaced the overpower trip (based on flow and imbalance), the power/RC pump trip, and the variable low-pressure trip. Included is a description of the changes from the present Oconee-type reactor protection system (RPS-I), a functional and hardware description of the calculating module, a description of the software programmed in the calculating module, and a discussion of the qualification program conducted to ensure that the degree of protection provided by RPS-II is not less than that provided by previously licensed systems supplied by B and W

  3. Backfitting swimming pool reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations based on measurements in a critical assembly, and experiments to disclose fuel element surface temperatures in case of accidents like stopping of primary coolant flow during full power operation, have shown that the power of the swimming pool type research reactor FRG-2 (15 MW, operating since 1967) might be raised to 21 MW within the present rules of science and technology, without major alterations of the pool buildings and the cooling systems. A backfitting program is carried through to adjust the reactor control systems of FRG-2 and FRG-1 (5 MW, housed in the same reactor hall) to the present safety rules and recommendations, to ensure FRG-2 operation at 21 MW for the next decade. (author)

  4. MERCHANT MARINE SHIP REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, J.F.; North, D.C. Jr.; Rock, H.R.; Geston, D.K.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear reactor is described for use in a merchant marine ship. The reactor is of pressurized light water cooled and moderated design in which three passes of the water through the core in successive regions of low, intermediate, and high heat generation and downflow in a fuel region are made. The foregoing design makes a compact reactor construction with extended core life. The core has an egg-crate lattice containing the fuel elements confined between a lower flow baffle and upper grid plate, with the latter serving also as part of a turn- around manifold from which the entire coolant is distributed into the outer fuel elements for the second pass through the core. The inner fuel elements are cooled in the third pass.

  5. Safety systems of heavy water reactors and small power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After introductional descriptions of heavy water reactors and natural circulation boiling water reactors the safety philosophy and safety systems like ECCS, residual heat removal, protection systems etc., are described. (RW)

  6. Study of future reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, more than 420 large reactors with a gross output of close to 350 GWe supply 20 percent of world electricity needs, accounting for less than 5 percent of primary energy consumption. These figures are not expected to change in the near future, due to suspended reactor construction in many countries. Nevertheless, world energy needs continue to grow: the planet's population already exceeds five billion and is forecast to reach ten billion by the middle of the next century. Most less developed countries have a very low rate of energy consumption and, even though some savings can be made in industrialized countries, it will become increasingly difficult to satisfy needs using fossil fuels only. Furthermore, there has been no recent breakthrough in the energy landscape. The physical feasibility of the other great hope of nuclear energy, fusion, has yet to be proved; once this has been done, it will be necessary to solve technological problems and to assess economic viability. Although it is more ever necessary to pursue fusion programs, there is little likelihood of industrial applications being achieved in the coming decades. Coal and fission are the only ways to produce massive amounts of energy for the next century. Coal must overcome the pollution problems inherent in its use; fission nuclear power has to gain better public acceptance, which is obviously colored by safety and waste concerns. Most existing reactors were commissioned in the 1970s; reactor lifetime is a parameter that has not been clearly established. It will certainly be possible to refurbish some to extend their operation beyond the initial target of 30 or 40 years. But normal advances in technology and safety requirements will make the operation of the oldest reactors increasingly difficult. It becomes necessary to develop new generations of nuclear reactors, both to replace older ones and to revive plant construction in their countries that are not yet equipped or that have halted their

  7. AREVA's nuclear reactors portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reasonable assumption for the estimated new build market for the next 25 years is over 340 GWe net. The number of prospect countries is growing almost each day. To address this new build market, AREVA is developing a comprehensive portfolio of reactors intended to meet a wide range of power requirements and of technology choices. The EPR reactor is the flagship of the fleet. Intended for large power requirements, the four first EPRs are being built in Finland, France and China. Other countries and customers are in view, citing just two examples: the Usa where the U.S. EPR has been selected as the technology of choice by several U.S utilities; and the United Kingdom where the Generic Design Acceptance process of the EPR design submitted by AREVA and EDF is well under way, and where there is a strong will to have a plant on line in 2017. For medium power ranges, the AREVA portfolio includes a boiling water reactor and a pressurized water reactor which both offer all of the advantages of an advanced plant design, with excellent safety performance and competitive power generation cost: -) KERENA (1250+ MWe), developed in collaboration with several European utilities, and in particular with Eon; -) ATMEA 1 (1100+ MWe), a 3-loop evolutionary PWR which is being developed by AREVA and Mitsubishi. AREVA is also preparing the future and is deeply involved into Gen IV concepts. It has developed the ANTARES modular HTR reactor (pre-conceptual design completed) and is building upon its vast Sodium Fast Reactor experience to take part into the development of the next prototype. (author)

  8. Operating US power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This update, which appears regularly in each issue of Nuclear Safety, surveys the operations of those power reactors in the US which have been issued operating licenses. Table 1 shows the number of such reactors and their net capacities as of Dec. 31, 1986, the end of the three-month period covered in this report. Table 2 lists the unit capacity and forced outage rate for each licensed reactor for each of the three months (October, November, and December 1986) covered in this report and the cumulative values of these parameters since the beginning of commercial operation. They are defined as follows: In addition to the tabular data, this article discusses significant occurrences and developments that affected licensed US power reactors during this reporting period. It includes, but is not limited to, changes in operating status, regulatory actions and decisions, and legal actions involving the status of power reactors. We do not have space here for routine problems of operation and maintenance, but such information is available at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Public Document Room, 1717 H Street, NW, Washington, DC 20555. Some significant operating events are summarized elsewhere in this section in the article ''Selected Safety-Related Events,'' and a report on activities relating to facilities still in the construction process is given in the article ''Status of Power-Reactor Projects Undergoing Licensing Review'' in the last section of each issue of this journal. The reader's attention is also called to the regular feature ''General Administrative Activities,'' which deals with more general aspects of regulatory and legal matters that are not covered elsewhere in the journal

  9. Oscillatory flow chemical reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavnić Danijela S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global market competition, increase in energy and other production costs, demands for high quality products and reduction of waste are forcing pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and biochemical industries, to search for radical solutions. One of the most effective ways to improve the overall production (cost reduction and better control of reactions is a transition from batch to continuous processes. However, the reactions of interests for the mentioned industry sectors are often slow, thus continuous tubular reactors would be impractically long for flow regimes which provide sufficient heat and mass transfer and narrow residence time distribution. The oscillatory flow reactors (OFR are newer type of tube reactors which can offer solution by providing continuous operation with approximately plug flow pattern, low shear stress rates and enhanced mass and heat transfer. These benefits are the result of very good mixing in OFR achieved by vortex generation. OFR consists of cylindrical tube containing equally spaced orifice baffles. Fluid oscillations are superimposed on a net (laminar flow. Eddies are generated when oscillating fluid collides with baffles and passes through orifices. Generation and propagation of vortices create uniform mixing in each reactor cavity (between baffles, providing an overall flow pattern which is close to plug flow. Oscillations can be created by direct action of a piston or a diaphragm on fluid (or alternatively on baffles. This article provides an overview of oscillatory flow reactor technology, its operating principles and basic design and scale - up characteristics. Further, the article reviews the key research findings in heat and mass transfer, shear stress, residence time distribution in OFR, presenting their advantages over the conventional reactors. Finally, relevant process intensification examples from pharmaceutical, polymer and biofuels industries are presented.

  10. Nuclear reactor simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Reactor Simulator was projected to help the basic training in the formation of the Nuclear Power Plants operators. It gives the trainee the opportunity to see the nuclear reactor dynamics. It's specially indicated to be used as the support tool to NPPT (Nuclear Power Preparatory Training) from NUS Corporation. The software was developed to Intel platform (80 x 86, Pentium and compatible ones) working under the Windows operational system from Microsoft. The program language used in development was Object Pascal and the compiler used was Delphi from Borland. During the development, computer algorithms were used, based in numeric methods, to the resolution of the differential equations involved in the process. (author)

  11. Experimental reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutronic experiments in moderators, subcritical assemblies, critical assemblies, and nuclear reactors are described, as well as the techniques of radiation measurements necessary to perform these experiments. Previously dispersed data from government reports, journal articles, and specialized monographs are codified. Original information drawn from the author's experience is included, especially on the pulsed source technique, spectrum measurements, research reactors, and exponential assemblies. The book provides the essential information for carrying out, analyzing, and understanding the experiments. Theory is kept to a minimum. Emphasis is placed on the physics of the situation, and the importance of estimating error as well as the mean value of a measured quantity

  12. Diagnostics for hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hybrid Reactor(HR) can be considered an attractive actinide-burner or a fusion assisted transmutation for destruction of transuranic(TRU) nuclear waste. The hybrid reactor has two important subsystems: the tokamak neutron source and the blanket which includes a fuel zone where the TRU are placed and a tritium breeding zone. The diagnostic system for a HR must be as simple and robust as possible to monitor and control the plasma scenario, guarantee the protection of the machine and monitor the transmutation.

  13. Perspectives on reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor, safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) historical perspective; (2) accident sequences; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course

  14. Clinch River Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mr. Baron says the administration's effort to terminate the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) project is symptomatic; they have also placed restrictions on fusion, coal, solar, and other areas of energy development in which technological advances are held back in order to force conservation. Because the breeder reactor, unlike solar and fusion energy, is both economically and technically feasible, a demonstration plant is needed. The contentions that the CRBR design is obsolete, that its proposed size is inappropriate, or that plutonium can be diverted for weapons proliferation are argued to be invalid. Failure to complete the CRBR will have both economic and national security repercussions

  15. Netherlands Interuniversity Reactor Institut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the annual report of the Interuniversity Reactor Institute in the Netherlands for the Academic Year 1977-78. Activities of the general committee, the daily committee and the scientific advice board are presented. Detailed reports of the scientific studies performed are given under five subjects - radiation physics, reactor physics, radiation chemistry, radiochemistry and radiation hygiene and dosimetry. Summarised reports of the various industrial groups are also presented. Training and education, publications and reports, courses, visits and cooperation with other institutes in the area of scientific research are mentioned. (C.F.)

  16. Reactor Materials Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of SCK-CEN's Reactor Materials Research Department for 2001 are summarised. The objectives of the department are: (1) to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials used in nuclear power industry; (2) to conduct research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material behaviour under or after irradiation; (3) to contribute to the interpretation, the modelling of the material behaviour and to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (2) nuclear fuel; and (3) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel

  17. Perspectives on reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskin, F.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Camp, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor, safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) historical perspective; (2) accident sequences; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course.

  18. Reactor neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of requirements and possibilities for experimental neutron spectrum determination during the reactor pressure vessel surveil lance programme is given. Fast neutron spectrum and neutron dose rate were measured in the Fast neutron irradiation facility of our TRIGA reactor. It was shown that the facility can be used for calibration of neutron dosimeters and for irradiation of samples sensitive to neutron radiation. The investigation of the unfolding algorithm ITER was continued. Based on this investigations are two specialized unfolding program packages ITERAD and ITERGS written this year. They are able to unfold data from activation detectors and NaI(T1) gamma spectrometer respectively

  19. Decay of reactor neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, P.

    1984-01-01

    We consider the decay of massive neutrinos which couple to electrons and are, therefore, produced in nuclear reactors. Lifetime limits for the γ and electron-positron decay modes of these neutrinos are deduced from the experimental limit on the singles count rate in the detector used to study neutrino oscillations at the Gösgen reactor. The dominantly coupled neutrinos are light, and their invariant-lifetime limit tc.m. / mν is 1-3 sec/eV. The subdominantly coupled heavy neutrinos with mass 1...

  20. Small mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic requirements for the pilot plants are that they produce a net product and that they have a potential for commercial upgrade. We have investigated a small standard mirror fusion-fission hybrid, a two-component tandem mirror hybrid, and two versions of a field-reversed mirror fusion reactor--one a steady state, single cell reactor with a neutral beam-sustained plasma, the other a moving ring field-reversed mirror where the plasma passes through a reaction chamber with no energy addition

  1. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2002-04-01

    The activities of SCK-CEN's Reactor Materials Research Department for 2001 are summarised. The objectives of the department are: (1) to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials used in nuclear power industry; (2) to conduct research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material behaviour under or after irradiation; (3) to contribute to the interpretation, the modelling of the material behaviour and to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (2) nuclear fuel; and (3) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel.

  2. Nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor construction comprising a reactor core submerged in a pool of liquid metal coolant in a primary vessel which is suspended from the roof structure of a containment vault. Control rods supported from the roof structure are insertable in the core which is carried on a support structure from the wall of the primary vessel. To prevent excessive relaxation of the support structure whereby the control rods would be displaced relative to the core, the support structure incorporates a normally inactive secondary structure designed to become effective in bracing the primary structure against further relaxation beyond a predetermined limit. (author)

  3. Reactor PIK construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction work at the 100 MW researches reactor PIK in year 2002 was in progress. The main activity was concentrated on mechanical, ventilation and electrical equipment. Some systems and subsystems are under adjustment. Hydraulic driving gear for beam shutters are finished in installation, rinsing, and adjusting. Regulating rods test assembling was done. On the critical assembly the first reactor fueling was tested to evaluate the starting neutron source intensity and a sufficiency of existing control and instrument board. Mainline of the PIK facility design and neutron parameters are presented. (author)

  4. Reactor pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. Chapter 3 offers a detailed treatment of the selection criteria and properties of reactor pressure vessel materials. The main attention is directed towards steel and ingot making and the subsequent material processing

  5. Reactor gamma spectrometry: status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current work is described for Compton Recoil Gamma-Ray Spectrometry including developments in experimental technique as well as recent reactor spectrometry measurements. The current status of the method is described concerning gamma spectromoetry probe design and response characteristics. Emphasis is given to gamma spectrometry work in US LWR and BR programs. Gamma spectrometry in BR environments are outlined by focussing on start-up plans for the Fast Test Reactor (FTR). Gamma spectrometry results are presented for a LWR pressure vessel mockup in the Poolside Critical Assembly (PCA) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  6. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on fusion reactor materials includes: (1) the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation (including steels, inconel, molybdenum, chromium); (2) the determination and modelling of the characteristics of irradiated first wall materials such as beryllium; (3) the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; (4) the study of the dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors.; (5) a feasibility study for the testing of blanket modules under neutron radiation. Main achievements in these topical areas in the year 1999 are summarised

  7. Space-time reactor kinetics for heterogeneous reactor structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to formulate time dependent diffusion equation based on Feinberg-Galanin theory in the from analogue to the classical reactor kinetic equation. Parameters of these equations could be calculated using the existing codes for static reactor calculation based on the heterogeneous reactor theory. The obtained kinetic equation could be analogues in form to the nodal kinetic equation. Space-time distribution of neutron flux in the reactor can be obtained by solving these equations using standard methods

  8. Type A Verification Report For The High Flux Beam Reactor Stack And Grounds, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York DCN: 5098-SR-08-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 requires independent verification (IV) of DOE cleanup projects (DOE 2011). The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has been designated as the responsible organization for IV of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Stack and Grounds area at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The IV evaluation may consist of an in-process inspection with document and data reviews (Type A Verification) or a confirmatory survey of the site (Type B Verification). DOE and ORISE determined that a Type A verification of the documents and data for the HFBR Stack and Grounds: Survey Units (SU) 6, 7, and 8 was appropriate based on the initial survey unit classification, the walkover surveys, and the final analytical results provided by the Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA).

  9. Risk prevention during reactor shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During reactor shutdown potential risks are issued of a number of maintenance operations. In this text we analyse these operations and give the modifications of technical specifications to ameliorate the reactor safety. 4 figs

  10. New fast-reactor approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design parameters for a 1000 MW LMFBR type reactor are presented. The design requires the multiple primary coolant pumps and heat exchangers to be located around the core within the reactor vessel

  11. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1982 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Since fiscal 1982, Systematic research and development work on safeguards technology has been added to the activities of the Department. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  12. Reactor operation environmental information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haselow, J.S.; Price, V.; Stephenson, D.E.; Bledsoe, H.W.; Looney, B.B.

    1989-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) produces nuclear materials, primarily plutonium and tritium, to meet the requirements of the Department of Defense. These products have been formed in nuclear reactors that were built during 1950--1955 at the SRS. K, L, and P reactors are three of five reactors that have been used in the past to produce the nuclear materials. All three of these reactors discontinued operation in 1988. Currently, intense efforts are being extended to prepare these three reactors for restart in a manner that protects human health and the environment. To document that restarting the reactors will have minimal impacts to human health and the environment, a three-volume Reactor Operations Environmental Impact Document has been prepared. The document focuses on the impacts of restarting the K, L, and P reactors on both the SRS and surrounding areas. This volume discusses the geology, seismology, and subsurface hydrology. 195 refs., 101 figs., 16 tabs.

  13. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors

  14. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HFIR at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a light-water cooled and moderated reactor that is the United States’ highest flux reactor-based neutron source. HFIR...

  15. The IR-8 reactor operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryazantsev, E.P.; Egorenkov, P.M.; Yashin, A.F. [Reactor Technology and Materials Research Inst. of RRC ' KI' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-07-01

    At the Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (RRC 'KI') the IR-8 reactor commissioning was carried out in 1981. The reactor was developed in return for earlier existing at RRC 'KI' of the IRT-M reactor (modernized IRT reactor, constructed in 1957). The IRT-M reactor was used for investigations in nuclear physics, solid state physics, radiation chemistry, biology as well as to produce isotopes. Under developing the IR-8 reactor the IRT biological shielding with beam tubes and its process systems were used. The IR-8 reactor creation was founded on application developed by then new fuel assemblies (FA) of IRT-3M type, having two times as great surface of heat transfer and 1.75 times higher U-235 load than the FA of the IRT-2M type, which were used in IRT-M reactor. (author)

  16. Power calibrations for TRIGA reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to establish a framework for the calorimetric power calibration of TRIGA reactors so that reliable results can be obtained with a precision better than ± 5%. Careful application of the same procedures has produced power calibration results that have been reproducible to ± 1.5%. The procedures are equally applicable to the Mark I, Mark II and Mark III reactors as well as to reactors having much larger reactor tanks and to TRIGA reactors capable of forced cooling up to 3 MW in some cases and 15 MW in another case. In the case of forced cooled TRIGA reactors, the calorimetric power calibration is applicable in the natural convection mode for these reactors using exactly the same procedures as are discussed below for the smaller TRIGA reactors (< 2 MW)

  17. Reactor operation safety information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The report contains a reactor facility description which includes K, P, and L reactor sites, structures, operating systems, engineered safety systems, support systems, and process and effluent monitoring systems; an accident analysis section which includes cooling system anomalies, radioactive materials releases, and anticipated transients without scram; a summary of onsite doses from design basis accidents; severe accident analysis (reactor core disruption); a description of operating contractor organization and emergency planning; and a summary of reactor safety evolution. (MB)

  18. Reactor safety in Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers presented to the GRS colloquium refer to the cooperative activities for reactor accident analysis and modification of the GRS computer codes for their application to reactors of the Russian design types of WWER or RBMK. Another topic is the safety of RBMK reactors in particular, and the current status of investigations and studies addressing the containment of unit 4 of the Chernobyl reactor station. All papers are indexed separately in report GRS--117. (HP)

  19. VVER and RBMK reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety of VVER and RBMK reactors has been discussed a lot after Chernobyl accident. Some improvements have been performed since that especially in RBMK-reactors and extensive programmes for backfitting have been planned and are partly underway. There are two different sizes of VVER reactors, 440 MW and 1000 MW. The design bases and designs itself vary inside the family of two size classes depending on the age of the plant. The oldest VVER-440 is called model 230 and the newest model 213. The oldest VVER-1000 units (two units) are prototypes that have some unique, nonfavorable features. The next stage of VVER-1000 developement (three units) is model V-302 and the remaining 15 plants in operation are model V-320, but even within this latest model there are some differences. The design bases and designs vary also inside the family of the RBMK reactors exactly the same way as in VVERs. The most important design bases of nuclear power plants designed in the former Soviet Union is presented in this paper. Also some safety advantages and disadvantages of these NPPs are discussed. (au). (5 figs.)

  20. Thermal Reactor Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.