WorldWideScience

Sample records for bnl collaboration rbrc

  1. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 77, RBRC SCIENTIFIC REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING, OCTOBER 10-12, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SAMIOS, N.P.

    2005-10-10

    The eighth evaluation of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) took place on October 10-12, 2005, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The members of the Scientific Review Committee (SRC) were Dr. Jean-Paul Blaizot, Professor Makoto Kobayashi, Dr. Akira Masaike, Professor Charles Young Prescott (Chair), Professor Stephen Sharpe (absent), and Professor Jack Sandweiss. We are grateful to Professor Akira Ukawa who was appointed to the SRC to cover Professor Sharpe's area of expertise. In addition to reviewing this year's program, the committee, augmented by Professor Kozi Nakai, evaluated the RBRC proposal for a five-year extension of the RIKEN BNL Collaboration MOU beyond 2007. Dr. Koji Kaya, Director of the Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, Japan, presided over the session on the extension proposal. In order to illustrate the breadth and scope of the RBRC program, each member of the Center made a presentation on higher research efforts. In addition, a special session was held in connection with the RBRC QCDSP and QCDOC supercomputers. Professor Norman H. Christ, a collaborator from Columbia University, gave a presentation on the progress and status of the project, and Professor Frithjof Karsch of BNL presented the first physics results from QCDOC. Although the main purpose of this review is a report to RIKEN Management (Dr. Ryoji Noyori, RIKEN President) on the health, scientific value, management and future prospects of the Center, the RBRC management felt that a compendium of the scientific presentations are of sufficient quality and interest that they warrant a wider distribution. Therefore we have made this compilation and present it to the community for its information and enlightenment.

  2. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop, Volume 91, RBRC Scientific Review Committee Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samios,N.P.

    2008-11-17

    The ninth evaluation of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) took place on Nov. 17-18, 2008, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The members of the Scientific Review Committee (SRC) were Dr. Dr. Wit Busza (Chair), Dr. Miklos Gyulassy, Dr. Akira Masaike, Dr. Richard Milner, Dr. Alfred Mueller, and Dr. Akira Ukawa. We are pleased that Dr. Yasushige Yano, the Director of the Nishina Institute of RIKEN, Japan participated in this meeting both in informing the committee of the activities of the Nishina Institute and the role of RBRC and as an observer of this review. In order to illustrate the breadth and scope of the RBRC program, each member of the Center made a presentation on his/her research efforts. This encompassed three major areas of investigation, theoretical, experimental and computational physics. In addition the committee met privately with the fellows and postdocs to ascertain their opinions and concerns. Although the main purpose of this review is a report to RIKEN Management (Dr. Ryoji Noyori, RIKEN President) on the health, scientific value, management and future prospects of the Center, the RBRC management felt that a compendium of the scientific presentations are of sufficient quality and interest that they warrant a wider distribution. Therefore we have made this compilation and present it to the community for its information and enlightenment.

  3. SCIENTIFIC PRESENTATION. 7TH MEETING OF THE MANAGEMENT STEERING COMMITTEE OF THE RIKEN BNL COLLABORATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.D.

    2001-02-13

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho,'' (RIKEN) The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including hard QCD/spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) physics through nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The Director of RBRC is Professor T. D. Lee. The first years were dedicated to the establishment of a theory group. This has essentially been completed consisting of Fellows, Postdocs, and RHIC Physics/University Fellows, with an active group of consultants. The center also organizes an extensive series of workshops on specific topics in strong interactions with an accompanying series of published proceedings. In addition, a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor computer has been constructed and operational since August 1998. It was awarded the Supercomputer 1998 Gordon Bell Prize for price performance. An active experimental group centered around the spin physics program at RHIC has subsequently also been established at RBRC. It presently consists of five Fellows, one Postdoc and several scientific collaborators with more appointments being expected in the near future. Members and participants of RBRC on occasion will develop articles such as this one, in the nature of a status report or a general review.

  4. SCIENTIFIC PRESENTATION. 7TH MEETING OF THE MANAGEMENT STEERING COMMITTEE OF THE RIKEN BNL COLLABORATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEE,T.D.

    2001-02-13

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho,'' (RIKEN) The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong 'interactions, including hard QCD/spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) physics through nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The Director of RBRC is Professor T. D. Lee. The first years were dedicated to the establishment of a theory group. This has essentially been completed consisting of Fellows, Postdocs, and RHIC Physics/University Fellows, with an active group of consultants. The center also organizes an extensive series of workshops on specific topics in strong interactions with an accompanying series of published proceedings. In addition, a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor computer has been constructed and operational since August 1998. It was awarded the Supercomputer 1998 Gordon Bell Prize for price performance. An active experimental group centered around the spin physics program at RHIC has subsequently also been established at RBRC. It presently consists of five Fellows, one Postdoc and several scientific collaborators with more appointments being expected in the near future. Members and participants of RBRC on occasion will develop articles such as this one, in the nature of a status report or a general review.

  5. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 72, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETINGS XXXI, XXXII, XXXIII.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OGAWA, A.

    2005-04-11

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has both a theory and experimental component. At present the theoretical group has 4 Fellows and 3 Research Associates as well as 11 RHIC Physics/University Fellows (academic year 2003-2004). To date there are approximately 30 graduates from the program of which 13 have attained tenure positions at major institutions worldwide. The experimental group is smaller and has 2 Fellows and 3 RHIC Physics/University Fellows and 3 Research Associates, and historically 6 individuals have attained permanent positions. Beginning in 2001 a new RIKEN Spin Program (RSP) category was implemented at RBRC. These appointments are joint positions of RBRC and RIKEN and include the following positions in theory and experiment: RSP Researchers, RSP Research Associates, and Young Researchers, who are mentored by senior RBRC Scientists. A number of RIKEN Jr. Research Associates and Visiting Scientists also contribute to the physics program at the Center. RBRC has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select a few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. To date there are seventy-two proceeding volumes available. The construction of a 0.6 teraflops parallel processor, dedicated to lattice QCD, begun at the Center on February 19, 1998, was completed on August

  6. PHENIX Spinfest School 2009 at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster,S.P.; Foster,S.; Seidl, R.; Goto, Y.; Okada, K.

    2009-08-07

    Since 2005, the PHENIX Spin Physics Working Group has set aside several weeks each summer for the purposes of training and integrating recent members of the working group as well as coordinating and making rapid progress on support tasks and data analysis. One week is dedicated to more formal didactic lectures by outside speakers. The location has so far alternated between BNL and the RIKEN campus in Wako, Japan, with support provided by RBRC and LANL.

  7. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETINGS XII AND XIII, SEPTEMBER 16, 2002, OCTOBER 22, 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,B.

    2003-03-06

    Since its inception, the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) has held semi-regular meetings each year to discuss the physics possibilities and the operational details of the program. Having collected our first data sample of polarized proton-proton collisions in Run02 of RHIC, we are now in the process of examining the performance of both the accelerator and the experiments. During the PAC meeting on August 29, 2002, the beam use proposal with a four week, polarized proton physics run was approved as part of the plan for Run-03. So, we meet at BNL on September 16, 2002 to discuss the concrete plans for this proton-proton run.

  8. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER, VOLUME 39, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING, VII.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX, B.

    2002-04-22

    In the first meeting of this series (which took place at BNL on February 22, 2002), we focused on the upgrades which are expected to be completed prior to the end of this year and thus available for the next run. The two main items are the Spin Rotators in RHIC and the CNI polarimeter for the AGS. In addition, because of the progress on technical issues related to the design of partial snake in the AGS, we also had a presentation on this topic. And, finally, in keeping with a tradition of having some theoretical presentations to accompany the experimental and machine presentations, we had presentations on single spin transverse asymmetries in proton-proton reactions and Coulomb-Nuclear Interference analyzing powers in proton-carbon elastic scattering.

  9. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Thermal Photons and Dileptons in Heavy-Ion Collisions. Volume 119

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rapp, R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ruan, L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yee, H-U. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-09-11

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan and the U. S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The RBRC is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has theory, lattice gauge computing and experimental components. It is presently exploring the possibility of an astrophysics component being added to the program. The primary theme for this workshop related to sharing the latest experimental and theoretical developments in area of low transverse momentum (pT) dielectron and photons. All the presentations given at the workshop are included in this proceedings, primarily as PowerPoint presentations.

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER, VOLUME 37, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI (PART 2).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLAND, L.; SAITO, N.

    2001-11-15

    The second part of the sixth RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) meeting was held on November 15, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Previous meetings have elaborated on the new generation of proton spin-structure studies (e.g. gluon polarization and flavor separation of q and {bar q} polarizations via real W{sup {+-}} production) enabled by studying polarized proton collisions at energies and momentum transfers where perturbative QCD models are expected to be applicable. The focus of this meeting was on many of the experimental issues that must be resolved to achieve these physics goals. This summary is written with the benefit of hindsight following the completion of the first-ever run of a polarized proton collider. This first run can be considered as a successfully completed milestone of the RHIC Spin Collaboration. Other milestones remain important. Long term machine items were identified in Waldo Mackay's talk, the most important being the completion of the spin rotator magnets that will be installed in 2002 to allow the flexible orientation of the proton beam polarization at the PHENM and STAR experiments. At the meeting Waldo discussed a stronger partial snake magnet for the AGS as a means of producing highly polarized proton beams to inject into RHIC. Developments subsequent to this meeting suggest that a superconducting helical dipole magnet may be feasible for the AGS, and is likely to be needed to achieve the 70% beam polarization in RHIC. Longer term items were also presented, including potential increases in luminosity by the addition of electron cooling to RHIC and the possibility of increasing the collision energy by {approx}20% by replacement of the DX magnets. These items could be considered for a second generation of RHIC spin experiments. The other topics covered at the meeting were related to polarimetry and to the absolute calibration of the proton beam polarization in RHIC. These topics were divided into short- and long-term solutions to

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI, VOLUME 36.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLAND,L.; SAITO,N.

    2001-10-10

    The sixth meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) took place on October 1, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. RHIC is now in its second year of operation for physics production and the first polarized proton collision run at {radical}s=200 GeV is expected to start in eight weeks. The RSC has developed a plan for this coming run through two previous meetings, RHIC Spin Physics III (August 3, 2000) and IV (October 13-14, 2000). We requested the following: two weeks of polarized proton studies in AGS, three weeks of polarized collider commissioning, and five weeks of polarized proton physics run. As a result, we have obtained all we asked and the above plans are implemented in the current operation schedule. The focus of the present meeting was to bring all involved in the RHIC Spin activities up-to-date on the progress of machine development, theory issues, and experimental issues. This meeting was right after the Program Advisory Committee (PAC) meeting and it started with the comments on the PAC discussion by Gerry Bunce, who was informed about the PAC deliberations by Tom Kirk. The PAC was fully supportive to complete the proposed spin program within the currently available budget for RHIC run 2 operations. Gerry further explained the expected luminosity to be {integral} Ldt = 0.5 pb{sup -1} per week, reflecting the current machine status. The introductory session also had a talk from Werner Vogelsang that reviewed the progress in perturbative QCD theory focused on spin effects.

  12. NGSPN @ BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper, S. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bachner, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gomera, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-10-05

    Brookhaven National Laboratory’s (BNL’s) Nonproliferation and National Security Department hosted the Next Generation Safeguards Professional Network (NGSPN) at BNL September 6-9, 2016. Thirteen representatives from seven Department of Energy National Laboratories, including two from BNL, participated in the four-day meeting. The NGSPN meeting was sponsored by the Office of International Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) of the National Nuclear Security Administration, which provided funding for BNL’s development and conduct of the meeting program and the participant’s labor and travel. NGSPN meetings were previously held at Savannah River National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The purpose of NGSPN is to provide a forum for early-career international safeguards practitioners to network with their peers, to meet international safeguards experts from other institutions and to learn about organizations other than their employers who contribute to international safeguards.

  13. FPC conditioning cart at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, W.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Altinbas, F.Z.; Belomestnykh, S.; Burrill, A.; Cole, M.; Deonarine, J.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Laloudakis, N.; Masi Jr, L.; McIntyre, G.; Pate, D.; Philips, D.; Seda, T.; Steszyn, A.; Tallerico, T.; Todd, R.; Weiss, D.; White, G.; Zaltsman, A.

    2011-03-28

    The 703 MHz superconducting gun for the BNL Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) prototype has two fundamental power couplers (FPCs), and each of them will deliver up to 500 kW of CW RF power. In order to prepare the couplers for high power RF service and process multipacting, the FPCs should be conditioned prior to installation into the gun cryomodule. A conditioning cart based test stand, which includes a vacuum pumping system, controllable bake-out system, diagnostics, interlocks and data log system has been designed, constructed and commissioned by collaboration of BNL and AES. This paper presents FPC conditioning cart systems and the conditioning process.

  14. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETINGS VIII, IX, X, XI, APRIL 12, MAY, 22, JUNE 17, JULY 29, 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,B.

    2003-03-06

    Since its inception, the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) has held semi-regular meetings each year to discuss the physics possibilities and the operational details of the program. Having collected our first data sample of polarized proton-proton collisions in Run02 of RHIC, we are now in the process of examining the performance of both the accelerator and the experiments. From this evaluation, we not only aim to formulate a consensus plan for polarized proton-proton during Run03 of RHIC but also to look more forward into the future to ensure the success of the spin program. In the second meeting of this series (which took place at BNL on April 12, 2002), we focused on Run02 polarization issues. This meeting opened with a presentation by Thomas Roser about his reflections on the outcome from the RHIC retreat during which the Run02 performance was evaluated. Of particular importance, Thomas pointed out that, with the expected beam time and his estimates for machine-tuning requirements, the experiments should limit their beam requests to two or three programs.

  15. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Approach to Equilibrium in Strongly Interacting Matter. Volume 118

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Venugopalan, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berges, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaizot, J. -P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gelis, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-04-09

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory*. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan and the U. S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The RBRC is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has theory, lattice gauge computing and experimental components. It is presently exploring the possibility of an astrophysics component being added to the program. The purpose of this Workshop is to critically review the recent progress on the theory and phenomenology of early time dynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions from RHIC to LHC energies, to examine the various approaches on thermalization and existing issues, and to formulate new research efforts for the future. Topics slated to be covered include Experimental evidence for equilibration/isotropization, comparison of various approaches, dependence on the initial conditions and couplings, and turbulent cascades and Bose-Einstein condensation.

  16. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikin, Alexander; Alessi, James G.; Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm2 and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  17. BNL ACTIVITIES IN ADVANCED NEUTRON SOURCE DEVELOPMENT: PAST AND PRESENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HASTINGS,J.B.; LUDEWIG,H.; MONTANEZ,P.; TODOSOW,M.; SMITH,G.C.; LARESE,J.Z.

    1998-06-14

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has been involved in advanced neutron sources almost from its inception in 1947. These efforts have mainly focused on steady state reactors beginning with the construction of the first research reactor for neutron beams, the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor. This was followed by the High Flux Beam Reactor that has served as the design standard for all the subsequent high flux reactors constructed worldwide. In parallel with the reactor developments BNL has focused on the construction and use of high energy proton accelerators. The first machine to operate over 1 GeV in the world was the Cosmotron. The machine that followed this, the AGS, is still operating and is the highest intensity proton machine in the world and has nucleated an international collaboration investigating liquid metal targets for next generation pulsed spallation sources. Early work using the Cosmotron focused on spallation product studies for both light and heavy elements into the several GeV proton energy region. These original studies are still important today. In the sections below the authors discuss the facilities and activities at BNL focused on advanced neutron sources. BNL is involved in the proton source for the Spallation Neutron source, spectrometer development at LANSCE, target studies using the AGS and state-of-the-art neutron detector development.

  18. BNL Activities in Advanced Neutron Source Development: Past and Present

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastings, J.B.; Ludewig, H.; Montanez, P.; Todosow, M.; Smith, G.C.; Larese, J.Z.

    1998-06-14

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has been involved in advanced neutron sources almost from its inception in 1947. These efforts have mainly focused on steady state reactors beginning with the construction of the first research reactor for neutron beams, the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor. This was followed by the High Flux Beam Reactor that has served as the design standard for all the subsequent high flux reactors constructed worldwide. In parallel with the reactor developments BNL has focused on the construction and use of high energy proton accelerators. The first machine to operate over 1 GeV in the world was the Cosmotron. The machine that followed this, the AGS, is still operating and is the highest intensity proton machine in the world and has nucleated an international collaboration investigating liquid metal targets for next generation pulsed spallation sources. Early work using the Cosmotron focused on spallation product studies for both light and heavy elements into the several GeV proton energy region. These original studies are still important today. In this report we discuss the facilities and activities at BNL focused on advanced neutron sources. BNL is involved in the proton source for the Spallation Neutron source, spectrometer development at LANSCE, target studies using the AGS and state-of-the-art neutron detector development.

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, RHIC SPIN PHYSICS V, VOLUME 32, FEBRUARY 21, 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUNCE,G.; SAITO,N.; VIGDOR,S.; ROSER,T.; SPINKA,H.; ENYO,H.; BLAND,L.C.; GURYN,W.

    2001-02-21

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. During the fast year, the Center had only a Theory Group. In the second year, an Experimental Group was also established at the Center. At present, there are seven Fellows and nine post dots in these two groups. During the third year, we started a new Tenure Track Strong Interaction Theory RHIC Physics Fellow Program, with six positions in the academic year 1999-2000; this program will increase to include eleven theorists in the next academic year, and, in the year after, also be extended to experimental physics. In addition, the Center has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics, about ten workshops a year, with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. The construction of a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor, which was begun at the Center on February 19, 1998, was completed on August 28, 1998.

  20. BNL ATF II beamlines design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedurin, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Jing, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stratakis, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Swinson, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is currently undergoing a major upgrade (ATF-II). Together with a new location and much improved facilities, the ATF will see an upgrade in its major capabilities: electron beam energy and quality and CO2 laser power. The electron beam energy will be increased in stages, first to 100-150 MeV followed by a further increase to 500 MeV. Combined with the planned increase in CO2 laser power (from 1-100 TW), the ATF-II will be a powerful tool for Advanced Accelerator research. A high-brightness electron beam, produced by a photocathode gun, will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. Besides the energy range (up to a possible 500 MeV in the final stage) the electron beam can be tailored to each experiment with options such as: small transverse beam size (<10 um), short bunch length (<100 fsec) and, combined short and small bunch options. This report gives a detailed overview of the ATFII capabilities and beamlines configuration.

  1. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP (VOLUME 70)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JACAK, B.; SHURYAK, E.; HALLMAN, T.; BASS, S.; DAVIDSON, R.

    2005-01-14

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was commissioned for heavy ion collisions and for polarized pp collisions in 2001. All principal components of the accelerator chain were operational by the 2003 RHIC run. Approximately 50 papers on RHIC experimental results have been published in refereed journals to date. This is a testament to the vast amount of exciting new information and the unprecedented analysis and publication rate from RHIC. A number of signals of creation of matter at extreme energy density, and of new physics in that matter, have been observed. The RHIC community has been heavily engaged in discussion about these signals, and about the appropriate level of proof for Quark Gluon Plasma discovery at the RHIC. In fact, such discussions were the subject of an earlier RBRC Workshop. One of the striking results from heavy ion collisions at RHIC is that the quark gluon plasma accessible appears to be strongly coupled. The properties of strongly coupled plasmas are of intense interest in the traditional Plasma Physics community, who have been developing tools to study such matter theoretically and experimentally. Despite the fact that one plasma interacts electromagnetically and the other through the strong interaction, there is tremendous commonality in the intellectual approach and even the theoretical and experimental tools. It is important to broaden the discussion of Quark Gluon Plasma discovery beyond possible signals of deconfinement to also encompass signals of plasma phenomena in heavy ion collisions. Thus it is imperative establish more direct contact among Nuclear, Plasma and Atomic physicists to share techniques and ideas. RHIC physicists will benefit from familiarity with typical plasma diagnostics and theoretical methods to study strongly coupled plasmas. Plasma and Atomic physicists may fmd new techniques parallel to the multi-particle correlations used in RHIC data analysis, and theoretical tools to study high energy density matter

  2. Cooling Scheme for BNL-Built LHC Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Ostojic, R; Van Weelderen, R; Willen, E H; Wu, K C

    1999-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) will provide four types of magnets, identified as D1, D2, D3 and D4, for the Insertion Regions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) as part of an international collaboration. These magnets utilize the dipole coil design of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, for performance, reliability and cost reasons. The magnet cold mass and cryostat have been designed to ensure that these magnets meet all performance requirements in the LHC sloped tunnel using its cryogenic distribution system. D1 is a RHIC arc dipole magnet. D2 and D4 are 2-in-1 magnets, two coils in one cold mass, in a cryostat. D3 is a 1-in-1 magnet, one coil in one cold mass, with two cold masses side by side in a cryostat. D1 and D4 will be cooled by helium II at 1.9 K using a bayonet heat exchanger similar to the main cooling system of LHC. D2 and D3 will be cooled by liquid helium at 4.5 K using a Two-Feed scheme. A detailed description of the cooling scheme for these magnets, their cryostats, spec...

  3. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workwhop on RHIC spin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SOFFER,J.

    1999-10-06

    This RHIC Spin Workshop is the 1999 annual meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration, and the second to be hosted at Brookhaven and sponsored by the RIKEN BNL Research Center. The previous meetings were at Brookhaven (1998), Marseille (1996), MIT in 1995, Argonne 1994, Tucson in 1991, and the Polarized Collider Workshop at Penn State in 1990. As noted last year, the Center provides a home for combined work on spin by theorists, experimenters, and accelerator physicists. This proceedings, as last year, is a compilation of 1 page summaries and 5 selected transparencies for each speaker. It is designed to be available soon after the workshop is completed. Speakers are welcome to include web or other references for additional material. The RHIC spin program and RHIC are rapidly becoming reality. RHIC has completed its first commissioning run, as described here by Steve Peggs. The first Siberian Snake for spin has been completed and is being installed in RHIC. A new polarized source from KEK and Triumf with over 1 milliampere of polarized H{sup minus} is being installed, described by Anatoli Zelenski. They have had a successful test of a new polarimeter for RHIC, described by Kazu Kurita and Haixin Huang. Spin commissioning is expected next spring (2000), and the first physics run for spin is anticipated for spring 2001. The purpose of the workshop is to get everyone together about once per year and discuss goals of the spin program, progress, problems, and new ideas. They also have many separate regular forums on spin. There are spin discussion sessions every Tuesday, now organized by Naohito Saito and Werner Vogelsang. The spin discussion schedule and copies of presentations are posted on http://riksg01.rhic.bnl.gov/rsc. Speakers and other spinners are encouraged to come to BNL and to lead a discussion on your favorite idea. They also have regular polarimeter and snake meetings on alternate Thursdays, led by Bill McGahern, the lead engineer for the accelerator spin

  4. 2013 BNL Site Environmental Report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratel, K.; Remien, J.; Pohlot, P.; Williams, J.; Green, T.; Paquette, P.; Dorsch, W.; Welty, T.; Burke, J.

    2014-10-01

    A summary of Brookhaven National Laboratory’s (BNL) Site Environmental Report, meant to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory’s environmental performance in the lab’s surrounding area during the calendar year. The review is comprised of multiple volumes relevant to environmental data/environmental management performance and groundwater status report.

  5. Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores collaboration between library media educators and regular classroom teachers. The article focuses on the context of the issue, positions on the issue, the impact of collaboration, and how to implement effective collaboration into the school system. Various books and professional journals are used to support conclusions…

  6. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikin, Alexander, E-mail: pikin@bnl.gov; Alessi, James G., E-mail: pikin@bnl.gov; Beebe, Edward N., E-mail: pikin@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2015-01-09

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  7. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP (VOLUME 64)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KHARZEEV,D.; KRETZER,S.; TEANEY,D.; VENUGOPALAN,R.; VOGELSANG,W.

    2004-09-28

    We are presently in a very exciting and important phase of the RHIC era. A huge body of data. has been gathered in heavy-ion collisions that provides very convincing evidence for the formation of a quark. gluon plasma in central collisions. Recently, studies of nuclear modification factors in forward dAu collisions have shown tantalizing signatures that may be understood most naturally in terms of a, universal form of matter controlling the high energy limit of strong interactions, the Color Glass Condensate. Finally, important advances have also been made in spin physics, where first measurements of single-transverse and double-longitudinal spin asymmetries have been presented, marking a qualitatively new era in this field. The wealth of the new experimental data called for a workshop in which theorists took stock and reviewed in depth what has been achieved, in order to give guidance as to what avenues should be taken from here. This was the idea behind the workshop ''Theory Summer Program on RHIC Physics''. We decided to invite a fairly small number of participants--some world leaders in their field, others only at the beginning of their careers, but all actively involved in RHIC physics. Each one of them stayed over an extended period of time from two to six weeks. Such long-terms stays led to particularly fruitful interactions and collaborations with many members of the BNL theory groups, as well as with experimentalists at BNL. They also were most beneficial for achieving the main goal of this workshop, namely to perform detailed studies.

  8. BNL ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN TRIENNIAL UPDATE, JANUARY 2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2003-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multi-program national laboratory operated by Brookhaven Science Associates for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and is located on a 5,265-acre site in Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. BNL has a comprehensive Environmental Management System (EMS) in place, which meets the requirements of the International Organization for Standardization 14001 EMS Standard, as described in the BNL EMS Manual. BNL's extensive environmental monitoring program is one component of the EMS, and the BNL Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) describes this program in detail. The data derived from systematically monitoring the various environmental media on site enable BNL to make informed decisions concerning the protection of human health and the environment and to be responsive to community concerns.

  9. PRODEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP : HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING WITH QCDOC AND BLUEGENE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHRIST,N.; DAVENPORT,J.; DENG,Y.; GARA,A.; GLIMM,J.; MAWHINNEY,R.; MCFADDEN,E.; PESKIN,A.; PULLEYBLANK,W.

    2003-03-11

    Staff of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Columbia University, IBM and the RIKEN BNL Research Center organized a one-day workshop held on February 28, 2003 at Brookhaven to promote the following goals: (1) To explore areas other than QCD applications where the QCDOC and BlueGene/L machines can be applied to good advantage, (2) To identify areas where collaboration among the sponsoring institutions can be fruitful, and (3) To expose scientists to the emerging software architecture. This workshop grew out of an informal visit last fall by BNL staff to the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center that resulted in a continuing dialog among participants on issues common to these two related supercomputers. The workshop was divided into three sessions, addressing the hardware and software status of each system, prospective applications, and future directions.

  10. Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Meme; Pryor, Boori Monty

    2000-01-01

    Describes, in the words of two Australian authors (one Aboriginal and one European-Australian), how they work together when they write books together, and how their collaboration goes beyond the two of them. (SR)

  11. BNl 703 MHz superconducting RF cavity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehy, B.; Altinbas, Z.; Burrill, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Gassner, D.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Laloudakis, N.; Lederle, D.; Litvinenko, V.; McIntyre, G.; Pate, D.; Phillips, D.; Schultheiss, C.; Seda,T.; Than, R.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.; Schultheiss, T.

    2011-03-28

    The BNL 5-cell, 703 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity has been installed in the high-current ERL experiment. This experiment will function as a proving ground for the development of high-current machines in general and is particularly targeted at beam development for an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). The cavity performed well in vertical tests, demonstrating gradients of 20 MV/m and a Q{sub 0} of 1e10. Here we will present its performance in the horizontal tests, and discuss technical issues involved in its implementation in the ERL.

  12. Highlights from BNL and RHIC 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2016-01-01

    Highlights of news from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the period July 2014-June 2015 are presented. The news this year was mostly very positive. The major event at BNL was the startup and dedication of the new NSLS II, "the World's brightest Synchrotron Light Source". The operation of RHIC was outstanding with a polarized p+p run at $\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV with integrated luminosity that exceeded the sum of all previous p+p integrated luminosity at this $\\sqrt{s}$. For the first time at RHIC asymmetric p+Au and p+Al runs were made but the p+Al run caused damage in the PHENIX forward detectors from quenches that were inadequately shielded for this first p+A run. This was also the 10th anniversary of the 2005 announcement of the Perfect Liquid Quark Gluon Plasma at RHIC and a review is presented of the discoveries leading to this claim. A new result on net-charge fluctuations (with no particle identification) from PHENIX based on previous scans ov...

  13. Heavy Ion results from RHIC-BNL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esumi Shinlchi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent results from heavy ion collision experiments from RHIC at BNL are presented and discussed in terms of Quark Gluon Plasm properties, such as partonic collectivity and partonic energy loss. The experimental results with direct photons and heavy quarks have given important additional insights of the plasma on top of what has been known with light hadrons. Higher order event anisotropies and the related results have provided the geometrical, temporal and dynamical information of the plasma. The beam energy dependence of the various measurements could reveal the structure of QCD phase diagram and possibly the critical point in the diagram, where the properties of phase transition are expected to change drastically.

  14. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: P- and CP-odd Effects in Hot and Dense Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, A.; Fukushima, K.; Kharzeev, D.; Warringa, H.; Voloshin, S.

    2010-04-26

    This volume contains the proceedings of the RBRC/CATHIE workshop on 'P- and CP-odd Effects in Hot and Dense Matter' held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on April 26-30, 2010. The workshop was triggered by the experimental observation of charge correlations in heavy ion collisions at RHIC, which were predicted to occur due to local parity violation (P- and CP-odd fluctuations) in hot and dense QCD matter. This experimental result excited a significant interest in the broad physics community, inspired a few alternative interpretations, and emphasized the need for a deeper understanding of the role of topology in QCD vacuum and in hot and dense quark-gluon matter. Topological effects in QCD are also closely related to a number of intriguing problems in condensed matter physics, cosmology and astrophysics. We therefore felt that a broad cross-disciplinary discussion of topological P- and CP-odd effects in various kinds of matter was urgently needed. Such a discussion became the subject of the workshop. Specific topics discussed at the workshop include the following: (1) The current experimental results on charge asymmetries at RHIC and the physical interpretations of the data; (2) Quantitative characterization of topological effects in QCD matter including both analytical (perturbative and non-perturbative using gauge/gravity duality) and numerical (lattice-QCD) calculations; (3) Topological effects in cosmology of the Early Universe (including baryogenesis and dark energy); (4) Topological effects in condensed matter physics (including graphene and superfiuids); and (5) Directions for the future experimental studies of P- and CP-odd effects at RHIC and elsewhere. We feel that the talks and intense discussions during the workshop were extremely useful, and resulted in new ideas in both theory and experiment. We hope that the workshop has contributed to the progress in understanding the role of topology in QCD and related fields. We thank all the speakers and

  15. Physics of the 1 Teraflop RIKEN-BNL-Columbia QCD project. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop: Volume 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-16

    A workshop was held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on October 16, 1998, as part of the first anniversary celebration for the center. This meeting brought together the physicists from RIKEN-BNL, BNL and Columbia who are using the QCDSP (Quantum Chromodynamics on Digital Signal Processors) computer at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for studies of QCD. Many of the talks in the workshop were devoted to domain wall fermions, a discretization of the continuum description of fermions which preserves the global symmetries of the continuum, even at finite lattice spacing. This formulation has been the subject of analytic investigation for some time and has reached the stage where large-scale simulations in QCD seem very promising. With the computational power available from the QCDSP computers, scientists are looking forward to an exciting time for numerical simulations of QCD.

  16. Review: BNL graphite blanket design concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.

    1976-03-01

    A review of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) minimum activity graphite blanket designs is made. Three designs are identified and discussed in the context of an experimental power reactor (EPR) and commercial power reactor. Basically, the three designs employ a thick graphite screen (typically 30 cm or greater, depending on type as well as application-experimental power reactor or commercial reactor). Bremsstrahlung energy is deposited on the graphite surface and re-radiated away as thermal radiation. Fast neutrons are slowed down in the graphite, depositing most of their energy. This energy is then either radiated to a secondary blanket with coolant tubes, as in types A and B, or is removed by intermittent direct gas cooling (type C). In types A and B, radiation damage to the structural material of the coolant tubes in the secondary blanket is reduced by one or two orders of magnitude by the graphite screen, while in type C, the blanket is only cooled when the reactor is shut down, so that coolant cannot quench the plasma, whatever the degree of radiation damage.

  17. The Future Of Spin Physics At BNL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Samuel; Deshpande, Abhay

    2007-06-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL is the world's only polarized proton-proton collider. Collisions at center-of-mass energies up to 500 GeV and beam polarizations approaching 70% (longitudinal or transverse) are provided to two experiments, STAR and PHENIX, at luminosities ⩾ 1032/cm2/sec. Transverse polarized beam has also been provided to the BRAHMS experiment. Measurements that bear on the important question of the spin content of the nucleon are beginning to appear. Over the next 10 years, as the performance of polarized proton running at RHIC is farmer developed, the Spin Physics program at RHIC will provide definitive measurements of the contributions to the proton's spin of the gluon, the sea quarks and the orbital motion of the partons in the proton's wave function. We plan to extend the reach of our study of the role of spin in QCD with the development of "eRHIC," which will provide polarized e-p collisions to a new detector.

  18. Highlights from BNL and RHIC 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2015-01-01

    Highlights of news from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the period July 2013-June 2014 are presented. It was a busy year for news, most notably a U. S. Government shutdown for 16 days beginning October 1, 2013 due to the lack of an approved budget for FY2014. Even with this unusual government activity, the $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV Au+Au Run14 at RHIC was the best ever with integrated luminosity exceeding the sum of all previous runs. Additionally there was a brief He$^3$+Au run to continue the study of collective flow in small systems which was reinforced by new results presented on identified particle flow in d+Au. The other scientific highlights are also mostly concerned with ``soft (low $p_T$)'' physics complemented by the first preliminary results of reconstructed jets from hard-scattered partons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC . The measurements of transverse energy ($E_T$) spectra in p-p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions, which demonstrated last ye...

  19. BNL ALARA Center: ALARA Notes, No. 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W.; Beckman, M.C. [eds.] [and others

    1994-02-01

    This issue of the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Alara Notes includes the agenda for the Third International Workshop on ALARA and specific instructions on the use of the on-line fax-on-demand service provided by BNL. Other topics included in this issue are: (1) A discussion of low-level discharges from Canadian nuclear plants, (2) Safety issues at French nuclear plants, (3) Acoustic emission as a means of leak detection, (4) Replacement of steam generators at Doel-3, Beaznau, and North Anna-1, (5) Remote handling equipment at Bruce, (6) EPRI`s low level waste program, (7) Radiation protection during concrete repairs at Savannah River, (8) Reactor vessel stud removal/repair at Comanche Peak-1, (9) Rework of reactor coolant pump motors, (10) Restoration of service water at North Anna-1 and -2, (11) Steam generator tubing problems at Mihama-1, (12) Full system decontamination at Indian Point-2, (13) Chemical decontamination at Browns Ferry-2, and (14) Inspection methodolody in France and Japan.

  20. Data Model of the BNL Archive and Dissemination System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, J; Osterer, L

    1977-02-01

    The Data Model, i.e., the information content of the data base as it is viewed by the users, of the BNL Archive and Dissemination System is presented. The syntax of the data model is stated in BNF form, and the semantic meaning is discussed. Examples of the use of the data model are given. 3 figs.

  1. The superconducting inflector for the BNL g-2 experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamamoto, A; Makida, Y; Tanaka, K; Krieman, F; Roberts, BL; Brown, HN; Bunce, G; Danby, GT; G-Perdekamp, M; Hseuh, H; Jia, L.; Lee, YY; Mapes, M; Meng, W; Morse, W; Pai, C; Prigl, R; Sampson, W; Sandberg, J; Suenaga, M; Tallerico, T; Toldo, F; Woodle, K; Green, MA; Itoh, I.; Otsuka, H.; Saito, Y; Ozawa, T; Tachiya, Y; Tanaka, H; Grossmann, A; Jungmann, K; Putlitz, GZ; Deng, H; Dhawan, S; Hughes, Robert E; Kawall, D; Pretz, J; Redin, S; Sichtermann, E; Steinmetz, A

    2002-01-01

    The muon g-2 experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has the goal of determining the muon anomalous magnetic moment, a(mu) (= (g-2)/2), to the very high precision of 0.35 parts per million and thus requires a storage ring magnet with great stability and homogeneity. A super-ferric storage

  2. A combined model for pseudorapidity distributions in Cu-Cu collisions at BNL-RHIC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Zhjin; Huang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The charged particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions come from leading particles and those frozen out from the hot and dense matter created in collisions. The leading particles are conventionally supposed having Gaussian rapidity distributions normalized to the number of participants. The hot and dense matter is assumed to expand according to the unified hydrodynamics, a hydro model which unifies the features of Landau and Hwa-Bjorken model, and freeze out into charged particles from a space-like hypersurface with a proper time of Tau_FO . The rapidity distribution of this part of charged particles can be derived out analytically. The combined contribution from both leading particles and unified hydrodynamics is then compared against the experimental data performed by BNL-RHIC-PHOBOS Collaboration in different centrality Cu-Cu collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 and 62.4 GeV, respectively. The model predictions are in well consistent with experimental measurements.

  3. Lessons learned from E871, a search for rare Kaon decays at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, California 92697-4575 (United States)

    1998-08-01

    E871 at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (BNL AGS) searched for the rare decays of the neutral Kaon, K{sub L}{r_arrow}{mu}{mu}, K{sub L}{r_arrow}ee, K{sub L}{r_arrow}{mu}e. Data were taken during two run periods in 1995 and 1996 resulting in an expected single event sensitivity of {approximately}10{sup {minus}12}. Over 6,000 K{sub L}{r_arrow}{mu}{mu} events have been seen in the data. The E871 collaboration is currently concluding its analysis of these decays and results are expected to be published shortly. Experimental technique, as well as problems associated with the measurement of these rare processes in a high rate environment is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. The hydrodynamic description of pseudorapidity distributions at lower energies at BNL-RHIC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ZHI-JIN JIANG; YAN HUANG; HAI-LI ZHANG; YU ZHANG

    2017-04-01

    The hot and dense matter produced in nucleus–nucleus collisions is supposed to expand accordingto unified hydrodynamics, one of the few theoretical models that can be worked out exactly. The solutionis then used to formulate the rapidity distribution of charged particles frozen out from the fluid on thespace-like hypersurface with a fixed temperature, $T_{FO}$. A comparison is made between the theoretical predictions and the experimental measurements carried out by PHOBOS Collaboration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in different centrality Au–Au and Cu–Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=19.6 and 22.4 GeV, respectively. The theoretical results are in good accordance with experimental data.

  5. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, A.; Qiu, Jianwei; Vogelsang, W.; Yuan, F.

    2011-08-02

    Understanding the structure of the nucleon is of fundamental importance in sub-atomic physics. Already the experimental studies on the electro-magnetic form factors in the 1950s showed that the nucleon has a nontrivial internal structure, and the deep inelastic scattering experiments in the 1970s revealed the partonic substructure of the nucleon. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin and the gluonic structure of the nucleon. Experiments using deep inelastic scattering or polarized p-p collisions are carried out in the US at the CEBAF and RHIC facilities, respectively, and there are other experimental facilities around the world. More than twenty years ago, the European Muon Collaboration published their first experimental results on the proton spin structure as revealed in polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and concluded that quarks contribute very little to the proton's spin. With additional experimental and theoretical investigations and progress in the following years, it is now established that, contrary to naive quark model expectations, quarks and anti-quarks carry only about 30% of the total spin of the proton. Twenty years later, the discovery from the polarized hadron collider at RHIC was equally surprising. For the phase space probed by existing RHIC experiments, gluons do not seem to contribute any to the proton's spin. To find out what carries the remaining part of proton's spin is a key focus in current hadronic physics and also a major driving force for the new generation of spin experiments at RHIC and Jefferson Lab and at a future Electron Ion Collider. It is therefore very important and timely to organize a series of annual spin physics meetings to summarize the status of proton spin physics, to focus the effort, and to layout the future perspectives. This summer program on 'Nucleon Spin Physics' held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on July 14-27, 2010 [http://www.bnl.gov/spnsp/] is the

  6. PROCEEDINGS OF THE RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON LARGE SCALE COMPUTATIONS IN NUCLEAR PHYSICS USING THE QCDOC, SEPTEMBER 26 - 28, 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AOKI,Y.; BALTZ,A.; CREUTZ,M.; GYULASSY,M.; OHTA,S.

    2002-09-26

    The massively parallel computer QCDOC (QCD On a Chip) of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RI3RC) will provide ten-teraflop peak performance for lattice gauge calculations. Lattice groups from both Columbia University and RBRC, along with assistance from IBM, jointly handled the design of the QCDOC. RIKEN has provided $5 million in funding to complete the machine in 2003. Some fraction of this computer (perhaps as much as 10%) might be made available for large-scale computations in areas of theoretical nuclear physics other than lattice gauge theory. The purpose of this workshop was to investigate the feasibility and possibility of using a supercomputer such as the QCDOC for lattice, general nuclear theory, and other calculations. The lattice applications to nuclear physics that can be investigated with the QCDOC are varied: for example, the light hadron spectrum, finite temperature QCD, and kaon ({Delta}I = 1/2 and CP violation), and nucleon (the structure of the proton) matrix elements, to name a few. There are also other topics in theoretical nuclear physics that are currently limited by computer resources. Among these are ab initio calculations of nuclear structure for light nuclei (e.g. up to {approx}A = 8 nuclei), nuclear shell model calculations, nuclear hydrodynamics, heavy ion cascade and other transport calculations for RHIC, and nuclear astrophysics topics such as exploding supernovae. The physics topics were quite varied, ranging from simulations of stellar collapse by Douglas Swesty to detailed shell model calculations by David Dean, Takaharu Otsuka, and Noritaka Shimizu. Going outside traditional nuclear physics, James Davenport discussed molecular dynamics simulations and Shailesh Chandrasekharan presented a class of algorithms for simulating a wide variety of femionic problems. Four speakers addressed various aspects of theory and computational modeling for relativistic heavy ion reactions at RHIC. Scott Pratt and Steffen Bass gave general overviews of

  7. ELECTRON COOLING AND ELECTRON-ION COLLIDERS AT BNL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEN-ZVI,I.

    2007-10-03

    Superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) have significant potential uses in various fields, including High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is pursuing some of the potential applications in this area and the technology issues that are associated with these applications. The work addressed in this paper is carried out at BNL towards applications in electron cooling of high-energy hadron beams and electron-nucleon colliders. The common issues for these applications are the generation of high currents of polarized or high-brightness unpolarized electrons, high-charge per bunch and high-current. One must address the associated issue of High-Order Modes generation and damping. Superconducting ERLs have great advantages for these applications as will be outlined in the text.

  8. BNL 56 MHz HOM Damper Prototype Fabrication at JLab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huque, Naeem A. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Daly, Edward F. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Clemens, William A. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); McIntyre, Gary T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Qiong [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seberg, Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bellavia, Steve [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A prototype Higher-Order Mode (HOM) Damper was fabricated at JLab for the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider's (RHIC) 56 MHz cavity at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Primarily constructed from high RRR Niobium and Sapphire, the coaxial damper presented significant challenges in electron-beam welding (EBW), brazing and machining via acid etching. The results of the prototype operation brought about changes in the damper design, due to overheating braze alloys and possible multi-pacting. Five production HOM dampers are currently being fabricated at JLab. This paper outlines the challenges faced in the fabrication process, and the solutions put in place.

  9. SERPENTINE COIL TOPOLOGY FOR BNL DIRECT WIND SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PARKER, B.; ESCALLIER, J.

    2005-05-16

    Serpentine winding, a recent innovation developed at BNL for direct winding superconducting magnets, allows winding a coil layer of arbitrary multipolarity in one continuous winding process and greatly simplifies magnet design and production compared to the planar patterns used before. Serpentine windings were used for the BEPC-II Upgrade and JPARC magnets and are proposed to make compact final focus magnets for the EC. Serpentine patterns exhibit a direct connection between 2D body harmonics and harmonics derived from the integral fields. Straightforward 2D optimization yields good integral field quality with uniformly spaced (natural) coil ends. This and other surprising features of Serpentine windings are addressed in this paper.

  10. BNL 56 MHz HOM damper prototype fabrication at JLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huque, N.; McIntyre, G.; Daly, E. F.; Clemens, W.; Wu, Q.; Seberg, S.; Bellavia, S.

    2015-05-03

    A prototype Higher-Order Mode (HOM) Damper was fabricated at JLab for the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider’s (RHIC) 56 MHz cavity at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Primarily constructed from high RRR Niobium and Sapphire, the coaxial damper presented significant challenges in electron-beam welding (EBW), brazing and machining via acid etching. The results of the prototype operation brought about changes in the damper design, due to overheating braze alloys and possible multi-pacting. Five production HOM dampers are currently being fabricated at JLab. This paper outlines the challenges faced in the fabrication process, and the solutions put in place.

  11. Results from the experiment E895 at the BNL AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Rai, G; Alexander, J; Anderson, M; Best, D; Brady, F P; Case, T; Caskey, W; Cebra, D A; Chance, J L; Chung, P; Cole, B; Crowe, K; Das, A; Draper, J E; Gilkes, M L; Gushue, S; Heffner, M; Hirsch, A S; Hjort, E L; Huo, L; Justice, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kintner, J; Klay, J; Krofcheck, D; Lacey, R; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Liu, Y M; McGrath, R; Milosevich, Z; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Olson, D L; Panitkin, S Y; Pinkenburg, C H; Porile, N T; Ritter, H G; Romero, J L; Scharenberg, R P; Schröder, L S; Srivastava, B K; Stone, N T B; Symons, T J M; Wang, S; Wells, R; Whitfield, J; Wienold, T; Witt, R; Wood, L; Yang, X; Zhang, W; Zhang, Y

    1999-01-01

    We present some of the latest results from the E895 experiment conducted at the BNL AGS accelerator. Au+Au collisions were recorded by the EOS Time Projection Chamber (TPC) at beam energies of 2, 4, 6, and 8 A GeV. The TPC detector permitted the reconstruction of individual collision events with almost 4 pi acceptance and good particle identification. This capability allowed E895 to study global observables and two particle correlations with respect to symmetries of the event. Flow excitation functions are examined and discussed in the context of the Nuclear Equation of State.

  12. DOE/NORA/BNL oil heat research agenda development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, R.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Batey, J. [Energy Research Center, Easton, CT (United States)

    1996-07-01

    The National Oilheat Research Alliance (NORA) has been formed and is currently working to establish a Congressionally approved oilheat check-off program to provide funding for research, education, training, safety, and marketing to benefit the US oilheat industry. NORA will be presenting this program to the Congress for its consideration and approval in the coming year. It will follow the same path as the National Propane Gas Association which is currently working on obtaining Congressional approval of a propane check off program that has already attracted over 120 cosponsors in the House of representatives. An effort to define the basis of a joint US Department of Energy (DOE) and Oilheat industry (marketers) program for future oilheat equipment research and development will be conducted during FY-1996. At the request of NORA representatives BNL will coordinate the development of a research agenda addressing three categories of activities, research appropriate for DOE support only, research appropriate for NORA support only, and research appropriate for co-funding by both organizations. This will also serve to update a prior oil-fueled research plan developed for DOE ten years ago which has been the road map for DOE`s very successful Oil Heat R&D program at BNL.

  13. Measuring The Electric-dipole Moment Of The Muon At Bnl E821

    CERN Document Server

    Giron, S O

    2004-01-01

    The muon g − 2 experiment at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL E821) improved the measurement of anomalous magnetic moment of the muon (aμ = g-22 ) by an order of magnitude over the previous measurement made by the CERN collaboration. The experiment used segmented detectors in order to also improve the measurement of the muon electric-dipole moment (EDM) by an order of magnitude. There are several methods available for making such an EDM measurement. Three methods were studied for their sensitivities to an EDM and to systematic biases. The g2geant Monte Carlo program was used to generate over 200 million simulated events so that the studies were not limited by statistical uncertainties. Each method was also used to analyze the 1999 E821 data set which contains 20 million events. It was found that one method had the least susceptibility to systematic biases with the greatest resolution of the effects of an EDM, and could best discriminate between the effects of a true EDM and those of systematic ...

  14. Perturbative QCD as a probe of hadron structure: Volume 2. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The workshop brought together about thirty invited participants from around the world, and an almost equal number of Brookhaven users and staff, to discuss recent developments and future prospects for hadronic strong interaction studies at high energy, particularly relating to the RHIC project at Brookhaven. RIKEN and Brookhaven have long traditions in and commitments to the study of the strong interactions, and the advent of the RHIC collider will open new opportunities both for relativistic heavy ion and polarized proton-proton studies. Activities at the RIKEN BNL Research Center are intended to focus on physics opportunities stimulated by this new facility. Thus, one of the purposes of the center is to provide a forum where workers in the field can gather to share and develop their ideas in a stimulating environment. The purpose of the workshop was both to delineate theoretical problems and stimulate collaborations to address them. The workshop focused primarily, but not exclusively, on spin and small-x physics.

  15. EVENT DRIVEN AUTOMATIC STATE MODIFICATION OF BNL'S BOOSTER FOR NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY SOLAR PARTICLE SIMULATOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN, D.; BINELLO, S.; HARVEY, M.; MORRIS, J.; RUSEK, A.; TSOUPAS, N.

    2005-05-16

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. The NSRL makes use of heavy ions in the range of 0.05 to 3 GeV/n slow extracted from BNL's AGS Booster. NASA is interested in reproducing the energy spectrum from a solar flare in the space environment for a single ion species. To do this we have built and tested a set of software tools which allow the state of the Booster and the NSRL beam line to be changed automatically. In this report we will describe the system and present results of beam tests.

  16. Injection and acceleration of Au31+ in the BNL AGS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer,W.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, W.; Huang, H.; Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Thieberger, P.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, S.Y.; Zeno, K.; Omet, C.; Spiller, P.

    2008-06-23

    Injection and acceleration of ions in a lower charge state reduces space charge effects, and, if further elcctron stripping is needed, may allow elimination of a stripping stage and the associated beam losses. The former is of interest to the accelerators in the GSI FAIR complex, the latter for BNL RHIC collider operation at energies lower than the current injection energy. Lower charge state ions, however, have a higher likelihood of electron stripping which can lead to dynamic pressures rises and subsequent beam losses. We report on experiments in the AGS where Au{sup 31+} ions were injected and accelerated instead of the normally used Au{sup 77+} ions. Beam intensities and the average pressure in the AGS ring are recorded, and compared with calculations for dynamic pressures and beam losses. The experimental results will be used to benchmark the StrahlSim dynamic vacuum code and will be incorporated in the GSI FAIR SIS100 design.

  17. Field testing the prototype BNL fan-atomized oil burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, R.; Celebi, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-04-01

    BNL has developed a new oil burner design referred to as the Fan Atomized burner System. The primary objective of the field study was to evaluate and demonstrate the reliable operation of the Fan Atomized Burner. The secondary objective was to establish and validate the ability of a low firing rate burner (0.3-0.4 gph) to fully satisfy the heating and domestic hot water load demands of an average household in a climate zone with over 5,000 heating-degree-days. The field activity was also used to evaluate the practicality of side-wall venting with the Fan Atomized Burner with a low stack temperature (300F) and illustrate the potential for very high efficiency with an integrated heating system approach based on the Fan Atomized Burner.

  18. Beam Loss Estimates and Control for the BNL Neutrino Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Weng, Wu-Tsung; Raparia, Deepak; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Wei, Jie; Yung Lee, Yong; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    BNL plans to upgrade the AGS proton beam from the current 0.14 MW to higher than 1.0 MW for a very long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. This increase in beam power is mainly due to the faster repetition rate of the AGS by a new 1.5 GeV superconductiong linac as injector, replacing the existing booster. The requirement for low beam loss is very important both to protect the beam component, and to make the hands-on maintenance possible. In this report, the design considerations for achieving high intensity and low loss will be presented. We start by specifying the beam loss limit at every physical process followed by the proper design and parameters for realising the required goals. The process considered in this paper include the emittance growth in the linac, the H-

  19. PHYSICS OF THE 1 TERAFLOP RIKEN-BNL-COLUMBIA QCD PROJECT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAWHINNEY,R.

    1998-10-16

    A workshop was held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on the afternoon of October 16, 1998, as part of the first anniversary ceremony for the center. Titled ''Workshop on Physics of the 1 Teraflop RIKEN-BNL-Columbia QCD Project'', this meeting brought together the physicists from RIKEN-BNL, BNL and Columbia who are using the QCDSP (Quantum Chromodynamics on Digital Signal Processors) computer at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for studies of QCD. In addition, Akira Ukawa, a leader of the CP-PACS project at the University of Tsukuba in Japan, attended and gave a talk on the Aoki phase. There were also others in attendance who were interested in more general properties of the QCDSP computer. The QCDSP computer and lattice QCD had been presented during the morning ceremony by Shigemi Ohta of KEK and the RIKEN-BNL Research Center. This was followed by a tour of the QCDSP machine room and a formal unveiling of the computer to the attendees of the anniversary ceremony and the press. The rapid completion of construction of the QCDSP computer was made possible through many factors: (1) the existence of a complete design and working hardware at Columbia when the RIKEN-BNL center was being set up, (2) strong support for the project from RIKEN and the center and (3) aggressive involvement of members of the Computing and Communications Division at BNL. With this powerful new resource, the members of the RIKEN-BNL-Columbia, QCD project are looking forward to advances in our understanding of QCD.

  20. PHYSICS OF THE 1 TERAFLOP RIKEN-BNL-COLUMBIA QCD PROJECT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAWHINNEY,R.

    1998-10-16

    A workshop was held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on the afternoon of October 16, i 998, as part of the first anniversary ceremony for the center. Titled ''Workshop on Physics of the 1 Teraflop RIKEN-BNL-Columbia QCD Project'', this meeting brought together the physicists from RIKEN-BNL, BNL and Columbia who are using the QCDSP (Quantum Chromodynamics on Digital Signal Processors) computer at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for studies of QCD. In addition, Akira Ukawa, a leader of the CP-PACS project at the University of Tsukuba in Japan, attended and gave a talk on the Aoki phase. There were also others in attendance who were interested in more general properties of the QCDSP computer. The QCDSP computer and lattice QCD had been presented during the morning ceremony by Shigemi Ohta of KEK and the RIKEN-BNL Research Center. This was followed by a tour of the QCDSP machine room and a formal unveiling of the computer to the attendees of the anniversary ceremony and the press. The rapid completion of construction of the QCDSP computer was made possible through many factors: (1) the existence of a complete design and working hardware at Columbia when the RIKEN-BNL center was being set up, (2) strong support for the project from RIKEN and the center and (3) aggressive involvement of members of the Computing and Communications Division at BNL. With this powerful new resource, the members of the RIKEN-BNL-Columbia, QCD project are looking forward to advances in our understanding of QCD.

  1. PKU-RBRC Workshop on Transverse Spin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakian,H.; Bunce, G.; Yuan, F.

    2008-06-30

    Understanding the structure of the nucleon is a fundamental question in subatomic physics, and it has been under intensive investigation for the last several years. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin structure of the nucleon. Experimental and theoretical investigations worldwide over the last few decades have established that, contrary to nave quark model expectations, quarks carry only about 30% of the totd spin of the proton. The origin of the remaining spin is the key question in current hadronic physics and also the major driving forces for the current and future experiments, such as RHIC and CEBAF in US, JPARC in Japan, COMPASS at CERN in Europe, FAIR at GSI in Germany. Among these studies, the transverse-spin physics develops actively and rapidly in the last few years. Recent studies reveal that transverse-spin physics is closely related to many fundamental properties of the QCD dynamics such as the factorization, the non-trivial universality of the parton distribution and fragmentation functions. It was very timely to bring together the theorists and experimentalists in this field at this workshop to review and discuss the latest developments and future perspective in hadronic spin physics. This workshop was very success iu many aspects. First of all, it attracted almost every expert working in this field. We had more than eighty participants in total, among them 27 came from the US institutes, 13 from Europe, 3 from Korea, and 2 from Japan. The rest participants came from local institutes in China. Second, we arranged plenty physics presentations, and the program covers all recent progresses made in the last few years. In total, we had 47 physics presentations, and two round table discussions. The discussion sessions were especially very useful and very much appreciated by all participants. In addition, we also scheduled plenty time for discussion in each presentation, and the living discussions impressed and benefited all participants.

  2. First Results from the DUV-FEL Upgrade at BNL

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xijie; Murphy, James; Pinayev, Igor; Rakowsky, George; Rose, James; Shaftan, Timur; Sheehy, Brian; Skaritka, John; Wu, Zilu; Yu Li Hua

    2005-01-01

    The DUV-FEL at BNL is the world’s only facility dedicated to laser-seeded FEL R&D and its applications. Tremendous progress was made in both HGHG FEL and its applications in the last couple years.*,** In response to the requests of many users to study chemical science at the facility, the DUV-FEL linac was upgraded from 200 to 300 MeV to enable the HGHG FEL to produce 100 uJ pulses of 100 nm light. This will establish the DUV FEL as a premier user facility for ultraviolet radiation and enable state-of-the-art gas phase photochemistry research. The upgraded facility will also make possible key R&D experiments such as higher harmonic HGHG (n>5) that would lay the groundwork for future X-ray FEL based on HGHG. The upgraded HGHG FEL will operate at the 4th harmonic with the seed laser at either 800 nm or 400nm. The increase of the electron beam energy will be accomplished by installing a 5th linac cavity and two 45 MW klystrons. New HGHG modulator and dispersion sections vacuum chambers w...

  3. Serpentine Coil Topology for BNL Direct Wind Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Brett

    2005-01-01

    BNL direct wind technology, with the conductor pattern laid out without need for extra tooling (no collars, coil presses etc.) began with RHIC corrector production. RHIC patterns were wound flat and then wrapped on cylindrical support tubes. Later for the HERA-II IR magnets we improved conductor placement precision by winding directly on a support tube. To meet HERA-II space and field quality goals took sophisticated coil patterns, (some wound on tapered tubes). We denote such patterns, topologically equivalent to RHIC flat windings, "planar patterns." Multi-layer planar patterns run into trouble because it is hard to wind across existing turns and magnet leads get trapped at poles. So we invented a new "Serpentine" winding style, which goes around 360 degrees while the conductor winds back and forth on the tube. To avoid making solenoidal fields, we wind Serpentine layers in opposite handed pairs. With a Serpentine pattern each turn can have the same projection on the coil axis and integral field harmonics t...

  4. The BNL fan-atomized burner system prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, T.A.; Celebi, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has a continuing interest in the development of advanced oil burners which can provide new capabilities not currently available with pressure atomized, retention head burners. Specifically program goals include: the ability to operate at firing rates as low as 0.25 gph; the ability to operate with very low excess air levels for high steady state efficiency and to minimize formation of sulfuric acid and iron sulfate fouling; low emissions of smoke, CO, and NO{sub x} even at very low excess air levels; and the potential for modulation - either staged firing or continuous modulation. In addition any such advanced burner must have production costs which would be sufficiently attractive to allow commercialization. The primary motivation for all work sponsored by the US DOE is, of course, improved efficiency. With existing boiler and furnace models this can be achieved through down-firing and low excess air operation. Also, with low excess air operation fouling and efficiency degradation due to iron-sulfate scale formation are reduced.

  5. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States) State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users' facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high gradient acceleration and state of the art free electron lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 to 100 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps Nd:YAG laser and a 100 mJ, 10 ps CO{sub 2} laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high brightness electron beams. The AFT's experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the High power laser will begin operation this year. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  6. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-09-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users` facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high-power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high-gradient acceleration and state-of-the-art Free-Electron Lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps ND:YAG laser and a 500 mJ, 10 to 100 ps C0{sub 2} laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various laser acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high-brightness electron beams. The ATF`s experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the high-power laser will begin operation this year.

  7. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States) State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users' facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high-power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high-gradient acceleration and state-of-the-art Free-Electron Lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps ND:YAG laser and a 500 mJ, 10 to 100 ps C0{sub 2} laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various laser acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high-brightness electron beams. The ATF's experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the high-power laser will begin operation this year.

  8. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED - DOMAIN WALL FERMIONS AT TEN YEARS (VOLUME 84)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLUM,T.; SONI,A.

    2007-03-15

    The workshop was held to mark the 10th anniversary of the first numerical simulations of QCD using domain wall fermions initiated at BNL. It is very gratifying that in the intervening decade widespread use of domain wall and overlap fermions is being made. It therefore seemed appropriate at this stage for some ''communal introspection'' of the progress that has been made, hurdles that need to be overcome, and physics that can and should be done with chiral fermions. The meeting was very well attended, drawing about 60 registered participants primarily from Europe, Japan and the US. It was quite remarkable that pioneers David Kaplan, Herbert Neuberger, Rajamani Narayanan, Yigal Shamir, Sinya Aoki, and Pavlos Vranas all attended the workshop. Comparisons between domain wall and overlap formulations, with their respective advantages and limitations, were discussed at length, and a broad physics program including pion and kaon physics, the epsilon regime, nucleon structure, and topology, among others, emerged. New machines and improved algorithms have played a key role in realizing realistic dynamical fermion lattice simulations (small quark mass, large volume, and so on), so much in fact that measurements are now as costly. Consequently, ways to make the measurements more efficient were also discussed. We were very pleased to see the keen and ever growing interest in chiral fermions in our community and the significant strides our colleagues have made in bringing chiral fermions to the fore of lattice QCD calculations. Their contributions made the workshop a success, and we thank them deeply for sharing their time and ideas. Finally, we must especially acknowledge Norman Christ and Bob Mawhinney for their early and continued collaboration without which the success of domain wall fermions would not have been possible.

  9. Tropical Ocean Climate Study (TOCS) and Japan-United States Tropical Ocean Study (JUSTOS) on the R/V KAIYO, 25 Jan to 2 March 1997, to the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean BNL component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, R.M.; Smith, S.

    1997-04-11

    The Japanese U.S. Tropical Ocean Study (JUSTOS) cruise on the R/V KAIYO in the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean was a collaborative effort with participants from the Japanese Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and Brookhaven National Laboratory BNL. This report is a summary of the instruments, measurements, and initial analysis of the BNL portion of the cruise only. It includes a brief description of the instrument system, calibration procedures, problems and resolutions, data collection, processing and data file descriptions. This is a working document, which is meant to provide both a good description of the work and as much information as possible in one place for future analysis.

  10. Summary of the Mini BNL/LARP/CARE-HHH Workshop on Crab Cavities for the LHC (LHC-CC08)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi,I.; Calaga, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2008-05-01

    The first mini-workshop on crab compensation for the LHC luminosity upgrade (LHC-CC08) was held February 24-25, 2008 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A total of 35 participants from 3 continents and 15 institutions from around the world participated to discuss the exciting prospect of a crab scheme for the LHC. If realized it will be the first demonstration in hadron colliders. The workshop is organized by joint collaboration of BNL, US-LARP and CARE-HHH. The enormous interest in the subject of crab cavities for the international linear collider and future light sources has resulted in a large international collaboration to exchange aspects of synergy and expertise. A central repository for this exchange of information documenting the latest design effort for LHC crab cavities is consolidated in a wiki page: https://twiki.cern.ch/twiki/bin/view/Main/LHCCrabCavities. The main goal of this workshop was to define a road-map for a prototype crab cavity to be installed in the LHC and to discuss the associated R&D and beam dynamics challenges. The diverse subject of implementing the crab scheme resulted in a scientific program with a wide range of subtopics which were divided into 8 sessions. Each session was given a list of fundamental questions to be addressed and used as a guideline to steer the discussions.

  11. Pion-nucleus total cross-section data from LAMPF and BNL. [Neutron and proton radii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    New measurements of pion-nucleus total cross sections were made at LAMPF and BNL. The results from LAMPF include measurement of the difference of the rms neutron and proton radii of /sup 48/Ca to be 0.08 +- 0.02 and that of /sup 18/O to be 0.19 +- 0.02. The BNL measurements provide a new phenomenology on the downshift and spreading of the (3-3) resonance in nuclei from the first data on heavy nuclei. A new technique for handling the Coulomb effects in total cross section measurements is discussed.

  12. Twenty years of space radiation physics at the BNL AGS and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J; Zeitlin, C

    2016-06-01

    Highly ionizing atomic nuclei HZE in the GCR will be a significant source of radiation exposure for humans on extended missions outside low Earth orbit. Accelerators such as the LBNL Bevalac and the BNL AGS, designed decades ago for fundamental nuclear and particle physics research, subsequently found use as sources of GCR-like particles for ground-based physics and biology research relevant to space flight. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL was constructed specifically for space radiation research. Here we review some of the space-related physics results obtained over the first 20 years of NASA-sponsored research at Brookhaven.

  13. Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization - KVM-based infrastructure services at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortijo, D.

    2011-06-14

    Over the past 18 months, BNL has moved a large percentage of its Linux-based servers and services into a Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) environment. This presentation will address our approach to virtualization, critical decision points, and a discussion of our implementation. Specific topics will include an overview of hardware and software requirements, networking, and storage; discussion of the decision of Red Hat solution over competing products (VMWare, Xen, etc); details on some of the features of RHEV - both current and on their roadmap; Review of performance and reliability gains since deployment completion; path forward for RHEV at BNL and caveats and potential problems.

  14. PROCEEDINGS FROM RIKEN-BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP: PARITY-VIOLATING SPIN ASYMMETRIES AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VOGELSANG,W.; PERDEKAMP, M.; SURROW, B.

    2007-04-26

    . Also, new observables, such as jet and W+charrn final states and spin asymmetries in Z production, were proposed and discussed. All of the talks attracted much interest and initiated active discussions. This was a very successful workshop. It stimulated many discussions and new collaborations. We are grateful to all participants and speakers for coming to the Center, and for their excellent work. The support provided for this workshop by Dr. N. Samios and his RIKEN-BNL Research Center has been magnificent, and we are very grateful for it. We thank Brookhaven National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy for providing the facilities to hold the workshop. Finally, sincere thanks go to Jane Lysik for her efficient work on organizing and running the workshop.

  15. QUARKONIUM PRODUCTION IN RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KHARZEEV,D.

    1999-04-20

    The RIKEN-BNL Workshop on Quarkonium Production in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions was held September 28--October 2, 1998, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Workshop brought together about 50 invited participants from around the world and a number of Brookhaven physicists from both particle and nuclear physics communities.

  16. Open charm meson production at BNL RHIC within $k_{t}$-factorization approach and revision of their semileptonic decays

    CERN Document Server

    Maciula, Rafal; Luszczak, Marta

    2015-01-01

    We discuss inclusive production of open charm mesons in proton-proton scattering at the BNL RHIC. The calculation is performed in the framework of $k_t$-factorization approach which effectively includes higher-order pQCD corrections. Different models of unintegrated gluon distributions (UGDF) from the literature are used. We focus on UGDF models favoured by the LHC data and on a new up-to-date parametrizations based on the HERA collider DIS high-precision data. Results of the $k_t$-factorization approach are compared to next-to-leading order collinear predictions. The hadronization of heavy quarks is done by means of fragmentation function technique. The theoretical transverse momentum distributions of charmed mesons are compared with recent experimental data of the STAR collaboration at $\\sqrt{s} = 200$ and $500$ GeV. Theoretical uncertainties related to the choice of renormalization and factorization scales as well as due to the quark mass are discussed. Very good description of the measured integrated cros...

  17. OVERVIEW ON BNL ASSESSMENT OF SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODS FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED NPP STRUCTURES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    XU,J.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.; GRAVES, H.

    2007-04-01

    A study was performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under the sponsorship of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), to determine the applicability of established soil-structure interaction analysis methods and computer programs to deeply embedded and/or buried (DEB) nuclear power plant (NPP) structures. This paper provides an overview of the BNL study including a description and discussions of analyses performed to assess relative performance of various SSI analysis methods typically applied to NPP structures, as well as the importance of interface modeling for DEB structures. There are four main elements contained in the BNL study: (1) Review and evaluation of existing seismic design practice, (2) Assessment of simplified vs. detailed methods for SSI in-structure response spectrum analysis of DEB structures, (3) Assessment of methods for computing seismic induced earth pressures on DEB structures, and (4) Development of the criteria for benchmark problems which could be used for validating computer programs for computing seismic responses of DEB NPP structures. The BNL study concluded that the equivalent linear SSI methods, including both simplified and detailed approaches, can be extended to DEB structures and produce acceptable SSI response calculations, provided that the SSI response induced by the ground motion is very much within the linear regime or the non-linear effect is not anticipated to control the SSI response parameters. The BNL study also revealed that the response calculation is sensitive to the modeling assumptions made for the soil/structure interface and application of a particular material model for the soil.

  18. BNL Building 650 lead decontamination and treatment feasibility study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalb, P.D.; Cowgill, M.G.; Milian, L.W. [and others

    1995-10-01

    Lead has been used extensively at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for radiation shielding in numerous reactor, accelerator and other research programs. A large inventory of excess lead (estimated at 410,000 kg) in many shapes and sizes is currently being stored. Due to it`s toxicity, lead and soluble lead compounds are considered hazardous waste by the Environmental Protection Agency. Through use at BNL, some of the lead has become radioactive, either by contamination of the surface or through activation by neutrons or deuterons. This study was conducted at BNL`s Environmental and Waste Technology Center for the BNL Safety and Environmental Protection Division to evaluate feasibility of various treatment options for excess lead currently being stored. The objectives of this effort included investigating potential treatment methods by conducting a review of the literature, developing a means of screening lead waste to determine the radioactive characteristics, examining the feasibility of chemical and physical decontamination technologies, and demonstrating BNL polyethylene macro-encapsulation as a means of treating hazardous or mixed waste lead for disposal. A review and evaluation of the literature indicated that a number of physical and chemical methods are available for decontamination of lead. Many of these techniques have been applied for this purpose with varying degrees of success. Methods that apply mechanical techniques are more appropriate for lead bricks and sheet which contain large smooth surfaces amenable to physical abrasion. Lead wool, turnings, and small irregularly shaped pieces would be treated more effectively by chemical decontamination techniques. Either dry abrasion or wet chemical methods result in production of a secondary mixed waste stream that requires treatment prior to disposal.

  19. Collaboration 'Engineerability'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, Gwendolyn L.; de Vreede, Gert-Jan; Briggs, Robert O.; Sol, Henk G.

    2010-01-01

    Collaboration Engineering is an approach to create sustained collaboration support by designing collaborative work practices for high-value recurring tasks, and transferring those designs to practitioners to execute for themselves without ongoing support from collaboration professionals. A key assum

  20. Multipacting simulation and test results of BNL 704 MHz SRF gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu W.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Cullen, C. et al

    2012-05-20

    The BNL 704MHz SRF gun has a grooved choke joint to support the photo-cathode. Due to the distortion of grooves at the choke joint during the BCP for the choke joint, several multipacting barriers showed up when it was tested with Nb cathode stalk at JLab. We built a setup to use the spare large grain SRF cavity to test and condition the multipacting at BNL with various power sources up to 50kW. The test is carried out in three stages: testing the cavity performance without cathode, testing the cavity with the Nb cathode stalk that was used at Jlab, and testing the cavity with a copper cathode stalk that is based on the design for the SRF gun. This paper summarizes the results of multipacting simulation, and presents the large grain cavity test setup and the test results.

  1. NEUTRINO SUPER BEAM FACILITY FOR A LONG BASELINE EXPERIMENT FROM BNL TO HOMESTAKE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KAHN,S.

    2002-10-21

    An upgrade to the BNL Alternate Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) could produce a very intense proton source at a relatively low cost. Such a proton beam could be used to generate a conventional neutrino beam with a significant flux at large distances from the laboratory. This provides the possibility of a very long baseline neutrino experiment at the Homestake mine. The construction of this facility would allow a program of experiments to study many of the aspects of neutrino oscillations including CP violations. This study examines a 1 MW proton source at BNL and a large 1 megaton detector positioned at the Homestake Mine as the ultimate goal of a staged program to study neutrino oscillations.

  2. Radiation damage control in the BNL hypernuclear spectrometer drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pile, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    A high rate drift chamber system has been in use at the BNL hypernuclear spectrometer system for the past three years. Some of the chambers have accumulated charge doses up to about 0.2 C/cm-wire without showing external signs of aging. The system design and performance will be discussed as well as the results of some laboratory drift chamber aging tests. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. E. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) [http://www.arm.gov/campaigns/osc2013rwpcf] campaign was scheduled to take place from 15 July 2013 through 15 July 2015 (or until shipped for the next U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Climate Research Facility first Mobile Facility [AMF1] deployment). The campaign involved the deployment of the AMF1 Scintec 915 MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) at BNL, in conjunction with several other ARM, BNL and National Weather Service (NWS) instruments. The two main scientific foci of the campaign were: 1) To provide profiles of the horizontal wind to be used to test and validate short-term cloud advection forecasts for solar-energy applications and 2) to provide vertical profiling capabilities for the study of dynamics (i.e., vertical velocity) and hydrometeors in winter storms. This campaign was a serendipitous opportunity that arose following the deployment of the RWP at the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign in Cape Cod, Massachusetts and restriction from participation in the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 (GoAmazon 2014/15) campaign due to radio-frequency allocation restriction for international deployments. The RWP arrived at BNL in the fall of 2013, but deployment was delayed until fall of 2014 as work/safety planning and site preparation were completed. The RWP further encountered multiple electrical failures, which eventually required several shipments of instrument power supplies and the final amplifier to the vendor to complete repairs. Data collection began in late January 2015. The operational modes of the RWP were changed such that in addition to collecting traditional profiles of the horizontal wind, a vertically pointing mode was also included for the purpose of precipitation sensing and estimation of vertical velocities. The RWP operated well until the end of the campaign in July 2015 and collected observations for more than 20 precipitation

  4. Experimental Characterization of the Seeded FEL Amplifier at the BNL SDL

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, T; Murphy, J B; Rose, J; Shaftan, T V; Tsang, Thomas; Wang, X J; Yu, L H

    2005-01-01

    A laser seeded near IR FEL amplifier experiment was initiated at the BNL SDL [1] to explore various schemes of FEL efficiency improvement and generation of short Rayleigh length (SRL) FEL output. The FEL achieved first SASE lasing at 0.8 μm on May 6, 2005. The experimental characterization of the laser seeded FEL output power, spectrum and transverse mode structure evolution will be presented.

  5. BNL program in support of LWR degraded-core accident analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsberg, T.; Greene, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Two major sources of loading on dry watr reactor containments are steam generatin from core debris water thermal interactions and molten core-concrete interactions. Experiments are in progress at BNL in support of analytical model development related to aspects of the above containment loading mechanisms. The work supports development and evaluation of the CORCON (Muir, 1981) and MARCH (Wooton, 1980) computer codes. Progress in the two programs is described in this paper. 8 figures.

  6. SynapSense Wireless Environmental Monitoring System of the RHIC & ATLAS Computing Facility at BNL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, K.; Garcia, E.; Hogue, R.; Hollowell, C.; Strecker-Kellogg, W.; Wong, A.; Zaytsev, A.

    2014-06-01

    RHIC & ATLAS Computing Facility (RACF) at BNL is a 15000 sq. ft. facility hosting the IT equipment of the BNL ATLAS WLCG Tier-1 site, offline farms for the STAR and PHENIX experiments operating at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the BNL Cloud installation, various Open Science Grid (OSG) resources, and many other small physics research oriented IT installations. The facility originated in 1990 and grew steadily up to the present configuration with 4 physically isolated IT areas with the maximum rack capacity of about 1000 racks and the total peak power consumption of 1.5 MW. In June 2012 a project was initiated with the primary goal to replace several environmental monitoring systems deployed earlier within RACF with a single commercial hardware and software solution by SynapSense Corporation based on wireless sensor groups and proprietary SynapSense™ MapSense™ software that offers a unified solution for monitoring the temperature and humidity within the rack/CRAC units as well as pressure distribution underneath the raised floor across the entire facility. The deployment was completed successfully in 2013. The new system also supports a set of additional features such as capacity planning based on measurements of total heat load, power consumption monitoring and control, CRAC unit power consumption optimization based on feedback from the temperature measurements and overall power usage efficiency estimations that are not currently implemented within RACF but may be deployed in the future.

  7. Microwave measurements and beam dynamics simulations of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA emittance-compensated 1.6-cell photocathode rf gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Dennis T.; Miller, Roger H.; Winick, Herman; Wang, Xi J.; Batchelor, Kenneth; Woodle, Martin H.; Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    1995-09-01

    A dedicated low energy (2 to 10 MeV) experimental beam line is now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory/Accelerator Test Facility (BNL/ATF) for photocathode RF gun testing and photoemission experiments. Microwave measurements of the 1.6 cell photocathode RF gun have been conducted along with beam dynamics simulations of the emittance compensated low energy beam. These simulations indicate that the 1.6 cell photocathode RF gun in combination with solenoidal emittance compensation will be capable of producing a high brightness beam with a normalization rms emittance of (epsilon) n,rms approximately equals 1 (pi) mm mrad. The longitudinal accelerating field Ez has been measured as a function of azimuthal angle in the full cell of the cold test model for the 1.6 cell BNL/SLAC/UCLA #3 S-band RF Gun using a needle rotation/frequency perturbation technique. These measurements were conducted before and after symmetrizing the full cell with a vacuum pump out port and an adjustable short. Two different waveguide to full cell coupling schemes were studied. Experimental and theoretical studies of the field balance versus mode separation were conducted. The dipole mode of the full cell using the (theta) - coupling scheme is an order of magnitude less severe before symmetrization than the Z- coupling scheme. The multi-pole contribution to the longitudinal field asymmetry are calculated using standard Fourier series techniques for both coupling schemes. The Panofsky- Wenzel theorem is used in estimating the transverse emittance due to the multipole components of Ez. Detailed beam dynamics simulations were performed for the 1.6 cell photocathode RF gun injector using a solenoidal emittance compensation technique. The design of the experimental line along with a proposed experimental program using the 1.6 cell photocathode RF gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA RF gun collaboration is presented. This experimental program includes measurements of beam loading caused

  8. THE BNL ASTD FIELD LAB - NEAR - REAL - TIME CHARACTERIZATION OF BNL STOCKPILED SOILS TO ACCELERATE COMPLETION OF THE EM CHEMICAL HOLES PROJECT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOWERMAN,B.S.; ADAMS,J.W.; HEISER,J.; KALB,P.D.; LOCKWOOD,A.

    2003-04-01

    As of October 2001, approximately 7,000 yd{sup 3} of stockpiled soil remained at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) after the remediation of the BNL Chemical/Animal/Glass Pits disposal area. The soils were originally contaminated with radioactive materials and heavy metals, depending on what materials had been interred in the pits, and how the pits were excavated. During the 1997 removal action, the more hazardous/radioactive materials were segregated, along with, chemical liquids and solids, animal carcasses, intact gas cylinders, and a large quantity of metal and glass debris. Nearly all of these materials have been disposed of. In order to ensure that all debris was removed and to characterize the large quantity of heterogeneous soil, BNL initiated an extended sorting, segregation, and characterization project directed at the remaining soil stockpiles. The project was co-funded by the Department of Energy Environmental Management Office (DOE EM) through the BNL Environmental Restoration program and through the DOE EM Office of Science and Technology Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) program. The focus was to remove any non-conforming items, and to assure that mercury and radioactive contaminant levels were within acceptable limits for disposal as low-level radioactive waste. Soils with mercury concentrations above allowable levels would be separated for disposal as mixed waste. Sorting and segregation were conducted simultaneously. Large stockpiles (ranging from 150 to 1,200 yd{sup 3}) were subdivided into manageable 20 yd{sup 3} units after powered vibratory screening. The 1/2-inch screen removed almost all non-conforming items (plus some gravel). Non-conforming items were separated for further characterization. Soil that passed through the screen was also visually inspected before being moved to a 20 yd{sup 3} ''subpile.'' Eight samples from each subpile were collected after establishing a grid of four quadrants: north, east

  9. Design and Data Model of the BNL Archive and Dissemination System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, J.; Osterer, L.

    1977-03-01

    The BNL Archive and Dissemination (BNLAD) System was designed to operate on a homogeneous distributed data base in a computer network. Its primary function is to present a uniform logical and physical view of already existing sequential files of data, so that these files can be accessed at any node of a computer network where the BNLAD System is operable. The architecture of the system, based on a subset of PL/I (the host language), is presented. The Data Model, i.e. the information content of the data base as it is viewed by the users, of the BNLAD System is discussed by means of examples. 7 figs.

  10. Target and orbit feedback simulations of a muSR beamline at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKay, W. W. [Residence, 25 Rhododendron Circle, Asheville, NC (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pile, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    Well-polarized positive surface muons are a tool to measure the magnetic properties of materials since the precession rate of the spin can be determined from the observation of the positron directions when the muons decay. The use of the AGS complex at BNL has been explored for a muSR facility previously. Here we report simulations of a beamline with a target inside a solenoidal field, and of an orbit feed-back system with single muon beam positioning monitors based on technology available today

  11. Target and orbit feedback simulations of a muSR beamline at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKay, W. W. [Residence, 25 Rhododendron Circle, Asheville, NC (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pile, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    Well-polarized positive surface muons are a tool to measure the magnetic properties of materials since the precession rate of the spin can be determined from the observation of the positron directions when the muons decay. The use of the AGS complex at BNL has been explored for a muSR facility previously. Here we report simulations of a beamline with a target inside a solenoidal field, and of an orbit feed-back system with single muon beam positioning monitors based on technology available today

  12. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Progress in High-pT Physics at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazilevsky, A.; Bland, L.; Vogelsang, W.

    2010-03-17

    This volume archives the presentations at the RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop 'Progress in High-PT Physics at RHIC', held at BNL in March 2010. Much has been learned from high-p{sub T} physics after 10 years of RHIC operations for heavy-ion collisions, polarized proton collisions and d+Au collisions. The workshop focused on recent progress in these areas by both theory and experiment. The first morning saw review talks on the theory of RHIC high-p{sub T} physics by G. Sterman and J. Soffer, and on the experimental results by M. Tannenbaum. One of the most exciting recent results from the RHIC spin program is the first observation of W bosons and their associated single-spin asymmetry. The new preliminary data were reported on the first day of our workshop, along with a theoretical perspective. There also were detailed discussions on the global analysis of polarized parton distributions, including the knowledge on gluon polarization and the impact of the W-data. The main topic of the second workshop day were single-transverse spin asymmetries and their analysis in terms of transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions. There is currently much interest in a future Drell-Yan program at RHIC, thanks to the exciting physics opportunities this would offer. This was addressed in some of the talks. There also were presentations on the latest results on transverse-spin physics from HERMES and BELLE. On the final day of the workshop, the focus shifted toward forward and small-x physics at RHIC, which has become a cornerstone of the whole RHIC program. Exciting new data were presented and discussed in terms of their possible implications for our understanding of strong color-field phenomena in QCD. In the afternoon, there were discussions of nuclear parton distributions and jet observables, among them fragmentation. The workshop was concluded with outlooks toward the near-term (LHC, JLab) and longer-term (EIC) future. The workshop has been a great success

  13. 演化过程主导的流体力学模型与Cu-Cu在BNL-RHIC能量碰撞中带电粒子的赝快度分布%Evolution-dominated Hydrodynamic Model and the Pseudorapidity Distributions of the Charged Particles Pro duced in Cu-Cu Collisions at BNL-RHIC Energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜志进; 王杰; 张海丽; 马可

    2014-01-01

    The charged particles resulting in high energy heavy ion collisions consist of two parts: One is from the hot and dense matter produced in collisions. The other is the leading particles. We suppose that the hot and dense matter expands and freezes out into the charged particles according to the evolution-dominated hydrodynamics, and the leading particles are from participants with approximately the same energy. On the basis of this assumption, we get the pseudorapidity distributions of the charged particles produced in high energy heavy ion collisions, and make a comparison with the experimental data presented by PHOBOS Collaboration at BNL-RHIC in Cu-Cu collisions at√sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV. The theoretical predictions are in good accordance with experimental measurements.%高能重离子碰撞产生的带电粒子由两部分组成:一部分来源于碰撞产生的高温高密度物质,另一部分是带头粒子。假设高温高密度物质按照由演化过程主导的流体力学的规律膨胀并冻析为带电粒子,带头粒子来源于参与者且具有大致相同的能量。基于该假设,得到了高能重离子碰撞带电粒子的赝快度分布,并与BNL-RHIC上的PHOBOS合作组在√sNN=62.4与200 GeV的Cu-Cu碰撞中给出的实验结果相比较,理论与实验测量符合得很好。

  14. Tidal Signatures of the Benthic Nepheloid Layer (BNL) in the Gaoping/Kaoping Submarine Canyon off Southwestern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. T.; Lee, I.; Wang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Temporal and spatial variations of benthic nepheloid layer (BNL) have been observed in the head region of the Gaoping/Kaoping Submarine Canyon (KPSC) along the canyon thalweg in different seasons between 1999 and 2000. The top of the BNL could be as high as 100 m above the canyon floor whose suspended sediment concentration (SSC) could be as high as 30 mg/l. In the BNL, silt comprises the largest size-class in the suspended sediment population. In 2000, 2002, and 2004 three taut-line moorings were deployed at different locations in the head region of the KPSC for one month. Time series measurements of along- canyon flow velocity, water temperature, and the volume concentration (VC) of clay, very-fine-to-medium silt, coarse silt and sand size-classes were obtained near the canyon floor from each mooring. Results show that the BNL is strongly modulated by the tides in the descending order at semidiurnal, diurnal, and spring-neap frequencies. In the course of a semidiurnal tidal cycle, the flood (up-canyon) current brings colder water from seaward part of the canyon and the SSC and thickness of the BNL increases. The SSC near the canyon floor also increases in response to the peaks of flood and ebb currents of the semidiurnal tide. The tidal-to-total energy ratio (ER) for the along-canon flow is between 70-80%, and between 50-80% among the suspended sediment of clay, very-fine-to-medium silt, coarse silt and sand size-classes. M2 is the most important constituent in the along-canyon flow, water temperature, and the VC of the four size-classes. The local phase difference between the forcing (velocity), and the responses (temperature and VC) at the M2 frequency suggest the a mixture of progressive and standing waves and that topographic effect caused the phase varied along the canyon. The VC tidal amplitude ratio between M4 and M2 constituents of the four size-classes indicates that the temporal fluctuations of the suspended sediment concentration in the BNL are highly

  15. Access to the energy system network simulator (ESNS), via remote computer terminals. [BNL CDC 7600/6600 computer facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisman, A W

    1976-08-15

    The Energy System Network Simulator (ESNS) flow model is installed on the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) CDC 7600/6600 computer facility for access by off-site users. The method of access available to outside users is through a system called CDC-INTERCOM, which allows communication between the BNL machines and remote teletype terminals. This write-up gives a brief description of INTERCOM for users unfamiliar with this system and a step-by-step guide to using INTERCOM in order to access ESNS.

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN/BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP FUTURE TRANSVERSITY MEASUREMENTS (VOLUME 29).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boer, D.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.

    2001-01-02

    The RIKEN-BNL Research Center workshop on ''Future Transversity Measurements'' was held at BNL from September 18-20, 2000. The main goal of the workshop was to explore future measurements of transversity distributions. This issue is of importance to the RHIC experiments, which will study polarized proton-proton collisions with great precision. One of the workshop's goals was to enhance interactions between the DIS community at HERA and the spin community at RHIC in this field. The workshop has been well received by the participants; the number of 69 registered participants demonstrates broad interest in the workshop's topics. The program contained 35 talks and there was ample time for lively discussions. The program covered all recent work in the field and in addition some very elucidating educational talks were given. At the workshop the present status of the field was discussed and it has succeeded in stimulating new experimental and theoretical studies (e.g. model calculations for interference fragmentation functions (IFF), IFF analysis at DELPHI). It also functioned to focus attention on the open questions that need to be resolved for near future experiments. In general, the conclusions were optimistic, i.e. measuring the transversity functions seems to be possible, although some new experimental hurdles will have to be taken.

  17. Thermal considerations in the cryogenic regime for the BNL double ridge higher order mode waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay K. Ravikumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL has proposed to build an electron ion collider (EIC as an upgrade to the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC. A part of the new design is to use superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities for acceleration, which sit in a bath of superfluid helium at a temperature of 2 K. SRF cavities designed for the BNL EIC create a standing electromagnetic wave, oscillating at a fundamental frequency of 647 MHz. Interaction of the charged particle beam with the EM field in the cavity creates higher order modes (HOM of oscillation which have adverse effects on the beam when allowed to propagate down the beam tube. HOM waveguides are thus designed to remove this excess energy which is then damped at room temperature. As a result, these waveguides provide a direct thermal link between room temperature and the superconducting cavities adding a static thermal load. The EM wave propagating through the warmer sections of the waveguide creates an additional dynamic thermal load. This study calculates these thermal loads, concluding that the dynamic load is small in comparison to the static load. Temperature distributions are mapped on the waveguide and the number of heat intercepts required to efficiently manage thermal loads have been determined. In addition, a thermal radiation study has been performed and it is found that this contribution is around three orders of magnitude smaller than the static conduction and dynamic loads.

  18. The Cornell-BNL FFAG-ERL Test Accelerator: White Paper

    CERN Document Server

    Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Hoffstaetter, Georg; Mayes, Christopher; Patterson, Ritchie; Sagan, David; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Berg, Scott; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brooks, Stephen; Brown, Kevin; Fischer, Wolfram; Hao, Yue; Meng, Wuzheng; Méot, François; Minty, Michiko; Peggs, Stephen; Ptitsin, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Thieberger, Peter; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The Cornell-BNL FFAG-ERL Test Accelerator (C$\\beta$) will comprise the first ever Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) based on a Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) lattice. In particular, we plan to use a Non Scaling FFAG (NS-FFAG) lattice that is very compact and thus space- and cost- effective, enabling multiple passes of the electron beam in a single recirculation beam line, using the superconducting RF (SRF) linac multiple times. The FFAG-ERL moves the cost optimized linac and recirculation lattice to a dramatically better optimum. The prime accelerator science motivation for C$\\beta$ is proving that the FFAG-ERL concept works. This is an important milestone for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) plans to build a major Nuclear Physics facility, eRHIC, based on producing 21 GeV electron beams to collide with the RHIC ion beams. A consequence of the C$\\beta$ work would be the availability of significantly better, cost-effective, compact CW high-brightness electron beams for a plethora of scientific inves...

  19. CHALLENGES ENCOUNTERED DURING THE PROCESSING OF THE BNL ERL 5 CELL ACCELERATING CAVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURRILL,A.

    2007-06-25

    One of the key components for the Energy Recovery Linac being built by the Electron cooling group in the Collider Accelerator Department is the 5 cell accelerating cavity which is designed to accelerate 2 MeV electrons from the gun up to 15-20 MeV, allow them to make one pass through the ring and then decelerate them back down to 2 MeV prior to sending them to the dump. This cavity was designed by BNL and fabricated by AES in Medford, NY. Following fabrication it was sent to Thomas Jefferson Lab in VA for chemical processing, testing and assembly into a string assembly suitable for shipment back to BNL for integration into the ERL. The steps involved in this processing sequence will be reviewed and the deviations from processing of similar SRF cavities will be discussed. The lessons learned from this process are documented to help future projects where the scope is different from that normally encountered.

  20. Thermal considerations in the cryogenic regime for the BNL double ridge higher order mode waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, Dhananjay K.; Than, Yatming; Xu, Wencan; Longtin, Jon

    2017-09-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has proposed to build an electron ion collider (EIC) as an upgrade to the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). A part of the new design is to use superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for acceleration, which sit in a bath of superfluid helium at a temperature of 2 K. SRF cavities designed for the BNL EIC create a standing electromagnetic wave, oscillating at a fundamental frequency of 647 MHz. Interaction of the charged particle beam with the EM field in the cavity creates higher order modes (HOM) of oscillation which have adverse effects on the beam when allowed to propagate down the beam tube. HOM waveguides are thus designed to remove this excess energy which is then damped at room temperature. As a result, these waveguides provide a direct thermal link between room temperature and the superconducting cavities adding a static thermal load. The EM wave propagating through the warmer sections of the waveguide creates an additional dynamic thermal load. This study calculates these thermal loads, concluding that the dynamic load is small in comparison to the static load. Temperature distributions are mapped on the waveguide and the number of heat intercepts required to efficiently manage thermal loads have been determined. In addition, a thermal radiation study has been performed and it is found that this contribution is around three orders of magnitude smaller than the static conduction and dynamic loads.

  1. Collaboration and E-collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana; Kirchner, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding student’s perception of collaboration and how collaboration is supported by ICT is important for its efficient use in the classroom. This article aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and how they use new technologies in collaborative group work. Furthermore, it tr...

  2. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop entitled Hydrodynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions and QCD Equation of State (Volume 88)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsch,F.; Kharzeev, D.; Molnar, K.; Petreczky, P.; Teaney, D.

    2008-04-21

    The interpretation of relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies with thermal concepts is largely based on the relative success of ideal (nondissipative) hydrodynamics. This approach can describe basic observables at RHIC, such as particle spectra and momentum anisotropies, fairly well. On the other hand, recent theoretical efforts indicate that dissipation can play a significant role. Ideally viscous hydrodynamic simulations would extract, if not only the equation of state, but also transport coefficients from RHIC data. There has been a lot of progress with solving relativistic viscous hydrodynamics. There are already large uncertainties in ideal hydrodynamics calculations, e.g., uncertainties associated with initial conditions, freezeout, and the simplified equations of state typically utilized. One of the most sensitive observables to the equation of state is the baryon momentum anisotropy, which is also affected by freezeout assumptions. Up-to-date results from lattice quantum chromodynamics on the transition temperature and equation of state with realistic quark masses are currently available. However, these have not yet been incorporated into the hydrodynamic calculations. Therefore, the RBRC workshop 'Hydrodynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions and QCD Equation of State' aimed at getting a better understanding of the theoretical frameworks for dissipation and near-equilibrium dynamics in heavy-ion collisions. The topics discussed during the workshop included techniques to solve the dynamical equations and examine the role of initial conditions and decoupling, as well as the role of the equation of state and transport coefficients in current simulations.

  3. STAR Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahab, N. M.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-11-01

    We thank the RHIC Operations Group and RCF at BNL, the NERSC Center at LBNL, the KISTI Center in Korea, and the Open Science Grid consortium for providing resources and support. This work was supported in part by the Offices of NP and HEP within the U.S. DOE Office of Science, the U.S. NSF, CNRS/IN2P3, FAPESP CNPq of Brazil, the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation, NNSFC, CAS, MoST and MoE of China, the Korean Research Foundation, GA and MSMT of the Czech Republic, FIAS of Germany, DAE, DST, and CSIR of India, the National Science Centre of Poland, National Research Foundation (NRF-2012004024), the Ministry of Science, Education and Sports of the Republic of Croatia, and RosAtom of Russia.

  4. New result on K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} from BNL E787

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REDLINGER,G.

    1999-06-21

    E787 at BNL has reported evidence for the rare decay K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, based on the observation of one candidate event. In this paper, we present the result of analyzing a new dataset of comparable sensitivity to the published result.

  5. A silicon multiplicity detector system for an experiment on the interaction of antiprotons with nuclei at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Clement, J.M.; Empl, A.; Mutchler, G.S.; Toshkov, S. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Bonner Nuclear Labs.); Eiseman, S.E.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Lindenbaum, S.J. (City Coll., New York, NY (Unit

    1991-01-01

    A Large Angle Multiplicity Detector (LAMD) system has been developed and used at the BNL experiment E854: Antiproton Nucleus Interactions. This system performed well with an energetic antiproton beam. Charged particle multiplicity distributions from pbar annihilations were measured. We discuss the design and performance of the LAMD system in this paper. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  6. A silicon multiplicity detector system for an experiment on the interaction of antiprotons with nuclei at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Clement, J.M.; Empl, A.; Mutchler, G.S.; Toshkov, S. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Bonner Nuclear Labs.; Eiseman, S.E.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Lindenbaum, S.J. [City Coll., New York, NY (United States); Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Peaslee, D.C. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States)

    1991-12-31

    A Large Angle Multiplicity Detector (LAMD) system has been developed and used at the BNL experiment E854: Antiproton Nucleus Interactions. This system performed well with an energetic antiproton beam. Charged particle multiplicity distributions from pbar annihilations were measured. We discuss the design and performance of the LAMD system in this paper. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  7. A silicon multiplicity detector system for an experiment on the interaction of antiprotons with nuclei at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, S.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Clement, J.M.; Empl, A.; Mutchler, G.S.; Toshkov, S. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Bonner Nuclear Labs.); Eiseman, S.E.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-08-01

    A Large Angle Multiplicity Detector (LAMD) system has been developed and used at the BNL experiment E854: Antiproton Nucleus Interactions. This system performed well with an energetic antiproton beam. Charged particle multiplicity distributions from [bar p] annihilations were measured. The authors discuss the design and performance of the LAMD system in this paper.

  8. Beam-energy dependence of charge balance functions from Au + Au collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, H. F.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, Z. M.; Li, X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, R. M.; Ma, Y. G.; Magdy, N.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solanki, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B. J.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Q. H.; Yan, W.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    Balance functions have been measured in terms of relative pseudorapidity (Δ η ) for charged particle pairs at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider from Au + Au collisions at √{sNN}=7.7 GeV to 200 GeV using the STAR detector. These results are compared with balance functions measured at the CERN Large Hadron Collider from Pb + Pb collisions at √{sNN}=2.76 TeV by the ALICE Collaboration. The width of the balance function decreases as the collisions become more central and as the beam energy is increased. In contrast, the widths of the balance functions calculated using shuffled events show little dependence on centrality or beam energy and are larger than the observed widths. Balance function widths calculated using events generated by UrQMD are wider than the measured widths in central collisions and show little centrality dependence. The measured widths of the balance functions in central collisions are consistent with the delayed hadronization of a deconfined quark gluon plasma (QGP). The narrowing of the balance function in central collisions at √{sNN}=7.7 GeV implies that a QGP is still being created at this relatively low energy.

  9. Studies of material properties under irradiation at BNL Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP)

    CERN Document Server

    Simos, N; Ludewig, H; Mokhov, N; Hurh, P; Misek, J

    2012-01-01

    Effects of proton beams irradiating materials considered for targets in high-power accelerator experiments have been under study using the Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) 200 MeV Linac. The primary objectives of the study that includes a wide array of materials and alloys ranging between low and high-Z are to (a) observe changes in physio-mechanical properties which are important in maintaining high-power target functionality, (b) identify possible limits of proton flux or fluence above which certain material seize to maintain integrity, (c) study the role of material operating temperature in inducing or maintaining radiation damage reversal, and (d) correlate radiation damage effects of different species such as energetic protons and neutrons on materials by utilizing reactor and particle accelerator experience data. These objectives are specifically being addressed in the latest material irradiation study linked to the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE). Observations on irradiation effects on m...

  10. Performance on the low charge state laser ion source in BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, M.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Costanzo, M.; DeSanto, L.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kanesue, T.; Lambiase, R.; Lehn, D.; Liaw, C. J.; McCafferty, D.; Morris, J.; Olsen, R.; Pikin, A.; Raparia, D.; Steszyn, A.; Ikeda, S.

    2015-09-07

    On March 2014, a Laser Ion Source (LIS) was commissioned which delivers high-brightness, low-charge-state heavy ions for the hadron accelerator complex in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Since then, the LIS has provided many heavy ion species successfully. The low-charge-state (mostly singly charged) beams are injected to the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), where ions are then highly ionized to fit to the following accelerator’s Q/M acceptance, like Au32+. Recently we upgraded the LIS to be able to provide two different beams into EBIS on a pulse-to-pulse basis. Now the LIS is simultaneously providing beams for both the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL).

  11. Target and orbit feedback simulations of a muSR beam line at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKay, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pile, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-07-28

    Well-polarized positive surface muons are a tool to measure the magnetic properties of materials since the precession rate of the spin can be determined from the observation of the positron directions when the muons decay. For a dc beam an ideal µSR flux for surface µ+ should be about 40 kHz/mm2. In this report we show how this flux could be achieved in a beam line using the AGS complex at BNL for a source of protons. We also determined that an orbit feedback system with a pair of thin silicon position monitors and kickers would miss the desired flux by at least an order of magnitude, even with perfect time resolution and no multiple scattering.

  12. Parameters Optimization for a Novel Vacuum Laser Acceleration Test at BNL-ATF

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Lei; Zhou, Feng

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new VLA theory model which has revealed that the injection electrons with low energy and small incident angle relative to the laser beam are captured and significantly accelerated in a strong laser field. For the further step for verifying the novel-VLA mechanics, we propose to use the BNL-ATF Terawatt CO2 laser and a high-brightness electron beam to carry out a proof-of-principle beam experiment. Experiment setup including the laser injection optics and electron extraction system and beam diagnostics is presented. Extensive optimized simulation results with ATF practical parameters are also presented, which shows that even when the laser intensity is not very high, the net energy gain still can be seen obviously. This could be prospect for a new revolution of vacuum laser acceleration.

  13. NRC-BNL Benchmark Program on Evaluation of Methods for Seismic Analysis of Coupled Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chokshi, N.; DeGrassi, G.; Xu, J.

    1999-03-24

    A NRC-BNL benchmark program for evaluation of state-of-the-art analysis methods and computer programs for seismic analysis of coupled structures with non-classical damping is described. The program includes a series of benchmarking problems designed to investigate various aspects of complexities, applications and limitations associated with methods for analysis of non-classically damped structures. Discussions are provided on the benchmarking process, benchmark structural models, and the evaluation approach, as well as benchmarking ground rules. It is expected that the findings and insights, as well as recommendations from this program will be useful in developing new acceptance criteria and providing guidance for future regulatory activities involving licensing applications of these alternate methods to coupled systems.

  14. NRC-BNL BENCHMARK PROGRAM ON EVALUATION OF METHODS FOR SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF COUPLED SYSTEMS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    XU,J.

    1999-08-15

    A NRC-BNL benchmark program for evaluation of state-of-the-art analysis methods and computer programs for seismic analysis of coupled structures with non-classical damping is described. The program includes a series of benchmarking problems designed to investigate various aspects of complexities, applications and limitations associated with methods for analysis of non-classically damped structures. Discussions are provided on the benchmarking process, benchmark structural models, and the evaluation approach, as well as benchmarking ground rules. It is expected that the findings and insights, as well as recommendations from this program will be useful in developing new acceptance criteria and providing guidance for future regulatory activities involving licensing applications of these alternate methods to coupled systems.

  15. Collaborative experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    Literature review: Collaborative experience has been shown to have a positive effect on the collaborative outcome in general (Anand & Khanna, 2000; Kale, Dyer & Singh, 2002). Furthermore, it has been linked to the ability to exploit the network of the firm for learning (Powell, Koput and Smith...... experience was largest the higher the hypothesized ambiguity. Theoretically contribution: This research project aims at contributing to existing literature by arguing, that collaborative experience is a moderating variable which moderates the effects on collaborative outcome from the level of complexity......, that the largest effects from collaborative experience is from recent collaborative experience, since knowledge depreciates when it is not used. Methodologically contribution: The research project studies the dyad and aims at introducing, to this field of research, an established way of collecting data, a new...

  16. Working Collaboratively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holder, Anna; Lovett, George

    2009-01-01

    Working collaboratively is arguably an essential skill in architectural practice as the complexity of contemporary projects involves multiple agents in the conception, construction and use of architecture. This has been emphasised by recent government rhetoric. Mass collaboration has been...... identified as a transformative global force of the last decade, most notably in knowledge and information publishing, communication and creation. This paper presents a structured conversation on changing understandings of collaboration, and the realities of collaborative methodology in architectural work....... Ideas of the platforms and structures necessary to support ‘creative’ collaborations are advanced and tested, and a vocabulary of key terms is developed. The conversation extends to reflect on the role of the architecture profession in supporting or enabling collaboration in architectural works....

  17. Performance of microstrip gas chambers in BNL-E885: a search for LAMBDA LAMBDA-hypernuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Landry, M; Davis, C A; Faszer, W; Gan, L; Lee, L; Page, S A; Ramsay, W D; Salomon, M; Oers, W T H

    1999-01-01

    The performance of MicroStrip Gas Chambers (MSGC) in BNL Experiment 885, a search for LAMBDA LAMBDA-hypernuclei, is detailed. Chambers with an active area of 80x50 mm sup 2 were instrumented and operated as a vertex detector in the experiment. Furthermore, two distinct types of microstrip prints were utilized in these chambers. Prints manufactured with Integrated Circuit (IC) photolithographic technology have fine tolerances and thin minimum trace widths, but can suffer from a high rate of defects per print and are more costly. Prints constructed with Printed Circuit (PC) photolithographic technology have coarser tolerances but relatively few defects per print, and are extremely cost-effective. Results of bench and beam tests of both IC and PC based MSGCs are presented and their performance in BNL-E885 is discussed. E885 marks the first use of PC based MSGCs in an experiment.

  18. Collaborative experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    sample of firms, an establish way of measuring the outcome of product development and a new way of measuring experience. Where the previous research in this field primarily uses secondary databases, this research project collects primary data by an online questionnaire to the NPD manager from one......, that the largest effects from collaborative experience is from recent collaborative experience, since knowledge depreciates when it is not used. Methodologically contribution: The research project studies the dyad and aims at introducing, to this field of research, an established way of collecting data, a new...... of the new product development as a performance measure. Finally, where previous research primarily has used the number of collaborations as a measure of collaborative experience, this research includes the recency in the measure of collaborative experience. Results: Since data has not yet been collected...

  19. Collaborative Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Horst, Willem

    2014-01-01

    of the prototyping process, the actual prototype was used as a tool for communication or development, thus serving as a platform for the cross-fertilization of knowledge. In this way, collaborative prototyping leads to a better balance between functionality and usability; it translates usability problems into design......This paper presents an inductive study that shows how collaborative prototyping across functional, hierarchical, and organizational boundaries can improve the overall prototyping process. Our combined action research and case study approach provides new insights into how collaborative prototyping...... can provide a platform for prototype-driven problem solving in early new product development (NPD). Our findings have important implications for how to facilitate multistakeholder collaboration in prototyping and problem solving, and more generally for how to organize collaborative and open innovation...

  20. Collaborative Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Horst, Willem

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an inductive study that shows how collaborative prototyping across functional, hierarchical, and organizational boundaries can improve the overall prototyping process. Our combined action research and case study approach provides new insights into how collaborative prototyping...... constraints in involving the appropriate stakeholders at the right time. The paper specifically elaborates on the role of users in collaborative prototyping, which is important in order to cover all phases of the problem-solving cycle but triggers an interesting challenge due to the “reverse empathy...... can provide a platform for prototype-driven problem solving in early new product development (NPD). Our findings have important implications for how to facilitate multistakeholder collaboration in prototyping and problem solving, and more generally for how to organize collaborative and open innovation...

  1. eRHIC Design Study: An Electron-Ion Collider at BNL

    CERN Document Server

    Aschenauer, E C; Bazilevsky, A; Boyle, K; Belomestnykh, S; Ben-Zvi, I; Brooks, S; Brutus, C; Burton, T; Fazio, S; Fedotov, A; Gassner, D; Hao, Y; Jing, Y; Kayran, D; Kiselev, A; Lamont, M A C; Lee, J -H; Litvinenko, V N; Liu, C; Ludlam, T; Mahler, G; McIntyre, G; Meng, W; Meot, F; Miller, T; Minty, M; Parker, B; Pinayev, I; Ptitsyn, V; Roser, T; Stratmann, M; Sichtermann, E; Skaritka, J; Tchoubar, O; Thieberger, P; Toll, T; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Tuozzolo, J; Ullrich, T; Wang, E; Wang, G; Wu, Q; Xu, W; Zheng, L

    2014-01-01

    This document presents BNL's plan for an electron-ion collider, eRHIC, a major new research tool that builds on the existing RHIC facility to advance the long-term vision for Nuclear Physics to discover and understand the emergent phenomena of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of the strong interaction that binds the atomic nucleus. We describe the scientific requirements for such a facility, following up on the community wide 2012 white paper, "Electron-Ion Collider: the Next QCD Frontier", and present a design concept that incorporates new, innovative accelerator techniques to provide a cost-effective upgrade of RHIC with polarized electron beams colliding with the full array of RHIC hadron beams. The new facility will deliver electron-nucleon luminosity of $\\sim10^{33} cm^{-2}sec^{-1}$ for collisions of 15.9 GeV polarized electrons on either 250 GeV polarized protons or 100 GeV/u heavy ion beams. The facility will also be capable of providing an electron beam energy of 21.2 GeV, at reduc...

  2. Distribution and ecotoxicity of chlorotriazines in the Scheldt Estuary (B-Nl)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noppe, Herlinde [Ghent University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Research group of Veterinary Public Health and Zoonoses, Laboratory of Chemical Analysis, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke (Belgium)]. E-mail: hubert.debrabander@ugent.be; Ghekiere, An [Ghent University, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Aquatic Ecology, J. Plateaustraat 22, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Verslycke, Tim [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Biology Department, MS32, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Wulf, Eric de [Flemish Environment Agency, Laboratory for Analysis of Organic Micropollutants, Krijgslaan 281-S2, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Verheyden, Karolien [Ghent University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Research group of Veterinary Public Health and Zoonoses, Laboratory of Chemical Analysis, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke (Belgium); Monteyne, Els [Management Unit of the North Sea Mathematical Models, 3e and 23e Linieregimentsplein, B-8400 Ostend (Belgium); Polfliet, Karen [Ghent University, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Aquatic Ecology, J. Plateaustraat 22, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Caeter, Peter van [Flemish Environment Agency, Laboratory for Analysis of Organic Micropollutants, Krijgslaan 281-S2, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Janssen, Colin R. [Ghent University, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Aquatic Ecology, J. Plateaustraat 22, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Brabander, Hubert F. de [Ghent University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Research group of Veterinary Public Health and Zoonoses, Laboratory of Chemical Analysis, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke (Belgium)]. E-mail: herlinde.noppe@ugent.be

    2007-06-15

    As part of the Endis-Risks project, the current study describes the occurrence of the chlorotriazine pesticides atrazine, simazine and terbutylazine in water, sediment and suspended matter in the Scheldt estuary (B-Nl) from 2002 to 2005 (3 samplings a year, 8 sampling points). Atrazine was found at the highest concentrations, varying from 10 to 736 ng/l in water and from 5 up to 10 ng/g in suspended matter. Simazine and terbutylazine were detected at lower concentrations. Traces of the targeted pesticides were also detected in sediments, but these were below the limit of quantification. As part of an ecotoxicological assessment, we studied the potential effect of atrazine on molting of Neomysis integer (Crustacea:Mysidacea), a resident invertebrate of the Scheldt Estuary and a proposed test organism for the evaluation of endocrine disruption. Following chronic exposure ({approx}3 weeks), atrazine did not significantly affect mysid molting at environmentally relevant concentrations (up to 1 {mu}g/l). - The water of the Scheldt estuary and its associated suspended solids are contaminated with chlorotriazines at concentrations that do not affect mysid molting.

  3. The Upgrade of the DUV-FEL Facility at the BNL

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xijie; Murphy, James; Rakowsky, George; Rose, James; Sheehy, Brian; Shen, Yuzhen; Skaritka, John; Wu, Zilu; Yu Li Hua

    2004-01-01

    The DUV-FEL at BNL, is the world's only facility dedicated to laser-seeded FEL R&D and its applications. The HGHG at the DUV-FEL reached saturation at 266 nm with 800 nm seeding [1] in 2002. Since then, the first chemical science experiment ? ion pair imaging, was successfully completed [2].The DUV-FEL linac is being upgraded from 200 to 300 MeV to enable the HGHG FEL to produce 100 μJ pulses of 100 nm light. This will establish the DUV FEL as a premier user facility for XUV radiation. The upgraded facility will also enable several critical R&Ds for a future X-ray FEL based on HGHG, such as cascaded HGHG and higher harmonic HGHG (n>5). The upgraded HGHG will operate at the 4th harmonic with the seed laser at 400nm. The increase of the electron beam energy will be accomplished by installing a 5th linac cavity and two 45 MW klystrons. New modulator and dispersion sections vacuum chambers will be manufactured to accommodate new matching optics and 8th harmonic HGHG. The status of the DUV-FEL upgra...

  4. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Physics of W and Z Bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, S.; Okada, K.; Patwa, A.; Qiu, J.; Surrow, B.

    2010-06-24

    A two-day workshop on 'The Physics of Wand Z Bosons' Was held at the RIKEN BNL Research Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory on June 24-25, 2010. With the recent release of the first measurement of W bosons in proton-proton collisions at RHIC and the first observation of W events at the LHC, the workshop was a timely opportunity to bring together experts from both the high energy particle and nuclear physics communities to share their ideas and expertise on the physics of Wand Z bosons, with the aim of fully exploring the potential of the W/Z physics programs at RHIC and the LHC. The focus was on the production and measurement of W/Z bosons in both polarized and unpolarized proton-proton collisions, and the role of W/Z production in probing the parton flavor and helicity structure of the colliding proton and in the search for new physics. There were lively discussions about the potential and future prospects of W/Z programs at RHIC, Tevatron, and the LHC.

  5. A five-watt G-M/J-T refrigerator for LHe target at BNL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, L. X.; Wang, L.; Addessi, L.; Miglionico, G.; Martin, D.; Leskowicz, J.; McNeill, M.; Yatauro, B.; Tallerico, T.

    2002-05-01

    A five-watts G-M/J-T refrigerator was built and installed for the high-energy physics research at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2001. A liquid helium target of 8.25 liters was required for an experiment in the proton beam line at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of BNL. The large radiation heat load towards the target requires a five-watts refrigerator at 4.2 K to support a liquid helium flask of 0.2 meter in diameter and 0.3 meter in length, which is made of Mylar film of 0.35 mm in thickness. The liquid helium flask is thermally exposed to the vacuum windows that are also made of 0.35 mm thickness Mylar film at room temperature. The refrigerator uses a two-stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler for precooling the Joule-Thomson circuit that consists of five Linde-type heat exchangers. A mass flow rate of 0.8˜1.0 grams per second at 17.7 atm is applied to the refrigerator cold box. The two-phase helium flows between the liquid target and liquid/gas separator by means of a thermosyphon. This paper presents the system design as well as the test results including the control of the thermal oscillation.

  6. Proposal for Reduction of Transverse Emittance of BNL 200 MeV Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Alessi, J; Raparia, D; Weng, W T

    2004-01-01

    BNL plans to upgrade the AGS proton beam from the current 0.14 MW to higher than 1.0 MW and beyond for such a neutrino facility which consists of two major subsystems. First is a 1.2 GeV super-conducting linac (SCL) to replace the booster as injector for the AGS. Second is the performance upgrade for the AGS itself for the higher intensity and repetition rate. For high intensity proton accelerators, such as the upgraded AGS, there are very stringent limitations on uncontrolled beam losses. A direct effect of linac beam emittance is the halo/tail generation in the circulating beam. Studies show the estimated halo/tail generation in the beam for present normalized RMS emittance of linac beam is unacceptable. To reduce the transverse emittance of 200 MeV linac, the existing radio frequency quadrupole linac (RFQ) has to be relocated closer to drift tube linac (DTL) tank 1 to meet emittance requirement for the AGS injection with low loss. This paper will present the various options of matching between RFQ and DTL,...

  7. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and communities 13.Embedding social values in tourism management: Community currencies as laboratories of social entrepreneurship? Rita Cannas 14.Improvising Economy: Everyday encounters and tourism consumption Gunnar Thór Jóhannesson and Katrín Anna Lund 15.Community and connection: Exploring the outcomes......This book employs an interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral lens to explore the collaborative dynamics that are currently disrupting, re-creating and transforming the production and consumption of tourism. House swapping, ridesharing, voluntourism, couchsurfing, dinner hosting, social enterprise...... collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...

  8. Collaborative tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Manickam

    2007-01-01

    @@ A successful next generation fusion experiment, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project, will need experimentalists, theorists, and computational scientists to collaborate efficiently, to understand the overwhelming amount of information from experiments, codes, and theory.

  9. Collaborative Appropriation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Michael; Neureiter, Katja; Verdezoto, Nervo;

    2016-01-01

    Previous workshops and papers have examined how individual users adopt and adapt technologies to meet their own local needs, by “completing design through use.” However, there has been little systematic study of how groups of people engage collaboratively in these activities. This workshop opens ...... a discussion for these under-studied forms of collaborative appropriation, using a broad range of perspectives including empirical data, design explorations, research, and critique....

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP (VOLUME 55) COLLECTIVE FLOW AND QGP PROPERTIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BASS,S.ESUMI,S.HEINZ,U.KOLB,P.SHURYAK,E.XU,N.

    2003-11-17

    The first three years of RHIC physics, with Au/Au collisions induced at 65, 130 and 200 GeV per nucleon pair, produced dramatic results, particularly with respect to collective observables such as transverse flow and anisotropies in transverse momentum spectra. It has become clear that the data show very strong rescattering at very early times of the reaction, strong enough in fact to be described by the hydrodynamic limit. Therefore, with today's experiments, we are able to investigate the equation of state of hot quark gluon matter, discuss its thermodynamic properties and relate them to experimental observables. At this workshop we came together to discuss our latest efforts both in the theoretical description of heavy ion collisions as well as most recent experimental results that ultimately allow us to extract information on the properties of RHIC matter. About 50 participants registered for the workshop, but many more dropped in from the offices at BNL. The workshop lasted for three days, of which each day was assigned a special topic on which the talks focused. On the first day we dealt with the more general question what the strong collective phenomena observed in RHIC collisions tell us about the properties and the dynamics of RHIC matter. The second day covered all different aspects of momentum anisotropies, and interesting new experimental results were presented for the first time. On the third day, we focused on the late fireball dynamics and the breakdown of the assumption of thermalization. New experimental observables were discussed, which will deliver more information of how the expanding fireball breaks up, once the frequent interaction ceases.

  11. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    The thesis data have been collected in the EU-sponsored project: Collaborative Improvement Tool for the Extended Manufacturing Enterprise, CO-IMPROVE. In this project four universities (Denmark, Ireland, Italy, and The Netherlands), two software vendors (Greece and Sweden) and three companies (De...... learn how to improve operations in (hopefully) a win-win like manner through collaboration.......The thesis data have been collected in the EU-sponsored project: Collaborative Improvement Tool for the Extended Manufacturing Enterprise, CO-IMPROVE. In this project four universities (Denmark, Ireland, Italy, and The Netherlands), two software vendors (Greece and Sweden) and three companies...... (Denmark, Italy and The Netherlands) each with three to five suppliers were involved. The CO-IMPROVE project and the thesis is based on “action research” and “action learning”. The main aim of the whole project is through actual involvement and actions make the researchers, companies and selected suppliers...

  12. Interprofessional Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Prentice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this hermeneutic phenomenological study, we examined the experience of interprofessional collaboration from the perspective of nursing and medical students. Seventeen medical and nursing students from two different universities participated in the study. We used guiding questions in face-to-face, conversational interviews to explore students’ experience and expectations of interprofessional collaboration within learning situations. Three themes emerged from the data: the great divide, learning means content, and breaking the ice. The findings suggest that the experience of interprofessional collaboration within learning events is influenced by the natural clustering of shared interests among students. Furthermore, the carry-forward of impressions about physician–nurse relationships prior to the educational programs and during clinical placements dominate the formation of new relationships and acquisition of new knowledge about roles, which might have implications for future practice.

  13. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    -called Extended Manufacturing Enterprises (EMEs). In effect, the battlefield of competition is increasingly moving from the level of individual firms to that of EMEs. Consequently, new approaches must be developed not only to enhance the business performance of EMEs, but also, in particular, the inter-organisational......Many companies have gradually moved from vertically aligned operations to horizontally aligned operations, a change implying that co-ordination is shifting from the hierarchy to the market place with emphasis on collaboration with other companies. One form of collaboration with companies is so...

  14. Development of a practical training program based on BNL`s input to new NFPA Lined Masonary Chimney Venting Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, G. [Agway Energy Products, Tully, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes how we developed a practical training program for technicians and sales personnel from the BNL studies that evolved into the Lined Chimney Venting Tables. One of the topics discussed is our search for solutions to the reoccurring problems associated with flue gas condensation on newly installed oil fired appliances. The paper will also discuss our own experiences in applying the new venting tables and working through the questions that arise when we encounter installations beyond the scope of the present tables.

  15. High-intensity polarized H-(proton), deuteron and 3He++ion source development at BNL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenski,A.

    2008-06-23

    New techniques for the production of polarized electron, H{sup -} (proton), D (D+) and {sup 3}H{sup ++} ion beams are discussed. Feasibility studies of these techniques are in progress at BNL. An Optically Pumped Polarized H{sup -} Ion Source (OPPIS) delivers beam for polarization studies in RHIC. The polarized deuteron beam will be required for the deuteron Electron Dipole Moment (EDM) experiment, and the {sup 3}H{sup ++} ion beam is a part of the experimental program for the future eRHIC (Electron Ion) collider.

  16. Collaborative Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Debora

    2014-01-01

    This practitioner research study investigates the power of multimodal texts within a real-world context and argues that a participatory culture focused on literary arts offers marginalized high school students opportunities for collaborative design and authoring. Additionally, this article invites educators to rethink the at-risk label. This…

  17. Electric dipole moment planning with a resurrected BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron electron analog ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talman, Richard M.; Talman, John D.

    2015-07-01

    There has been much recent interest in directly measuring the electric dipole moments (EDM) of the proton and the electron, because of their possible importance in the present day observed matter/antimatter imbalance in the Universe. Such a measurement will require storing a polarized beam of "frozen spin" particles, 15 MeV electrons or 230 MeV protons, in an all-electric storage ring. Only one such relativistic electric accelerator has ever been built—the 10 MeV "electron analog" ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1954; it can also be referred to as the "AGS analog" ring to make clear it was a prototype for the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) proton ring under construction at that time at BNL. (Its purpose was to investigate nonlinear resonances as well as passage through "transition" with the newly invented alternating gradient proton ring design.) By chance this electron ring, long since dismantled and its engineering drawings disappeared, would have been appropriate both for measuring the electron EDM and to serve as an inexpensive prototype for the arguably more promising, but 10 times more expensive, proton EDM measurement. Today it is cheaper yet to "resurrect" the electron analog ring by simulating its performance computationally. This is one purpose for the present paper. Most existing accelerator simulation codes cannot be used for this purpose because they implicitly assume magnetic bending. The new ual/eteapot code, described in detail in an accompanying paper, has been developed for modeling storage ring performance, including spin evolution, in electric rings. Illustrating its use, comparing its predictions with the old observations, and describing new expectations concerning spin evolution and code performance, are other goals of the paper. To set up some of these calculations has required a kind of "archeological physics" to reconstitute the detailed electron analog lattice design from a 1991 retrospective report by Plotkin as well

  18. Demonstration of the BNL Continuous Dual Trap Analyzer to Detect Perfluorocarbon Tracers for the Tag, Track and Location Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser,J.H.; Adams, J.; Dietz, R..; Milian, L.; Watson, T.

    2008-10-07

    The Tag, Track and Location System (TTL) Program is investigating methods of tracking an asset using perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT). The success of any TTL method requires sound detection/location instrumentation. Tracer Detection Technologies Corp (TDT), through a contract with the Office of Naval Research (ONR), is investigating different detection systems. The detections systems generally fall into two categories; proximity detectors and standoff detectors. Proximity detectors, as the name implies, need to be in close proximity (e.g., meter to 10's of meters) to the PFT source. Standoff detection searches for the PFT from a greater distance away from the source (e.g., 100's of meters to kilometers). Gas Chromatographs (GC) are generally considered a proximity detection systems, but in the case of PFTs should be considered for both proximity and standoff detection with the caveat that in standoff use the GC needs to be somewhere in the PFT plume, i.e., generally downwind of the source. With a properly sized PFT source, the right GC can afford fairly large standoff (distance from the source) distances; 100's of meters to kilometers downwind. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has such a GC system and offered to demonstrate the CDTA for TTL as a no cost addition to the TDTTTL project, of which BNL was a participant. BNL is a leading authority on the sampling, collection, release and detection of PFTs. In addition, the BNL team has extensive background in atmospheric dispersion, the application of PFTs to such studies and the development of applications utilizing PFTs such as building infiltration measurements, control room integrity determination, leak location and environmental investigations. This experience and expertise is essential in developing any PFT application were dispersion, dilution and overcoming environmental conditions and interferences are integral to success. BNL has developed sophisticated gas chromatography methods and

  19. Collaborative Care

    OpenAIRE

    コラボレイティブケア研究科

    2005-01-01

    本書を著したHornbyは英国のソーシャルワーカーである。彼女は1983年に「Collaboration in social work(Journal of social work practice,1.1)」を発表し、ソーシャルワークでの職種間の連携の重要性について報告している。さらに1993年に発刊した本書では、同一機関内の人間関係 ...

  20. Timeline Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohøj, Morten; Borchorst, Nikolaj Gandrup; Bouvin, Niels Olof

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores timelines as a web-based tool for collaboration between citizens and municipal caseworkers. The paper takes its outset in a case study of planning and control of parental leave; a process that may involve surprisingly many actors. As part of the case study, a web-based timeline......, CaseLine, was designed. This design crosses the boundaries between leisure and work, in ways that are different from what is often seen in current HCI. The timeline has several roles on these boundaries: It is a shared planning and visualization tool that may be used by parents and caseworkers alone......, and beyond this case....

  1. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 57, HIGH PT PHYSICS AT RHIC, DECEMBER 2-6, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretzer, Stefan; Venugopalan, Raju; Vogelsang, Werner

    2004-02-18

    The AuAu, dAu, and pp collision modes of the RHIC collider at BNL have led to the publication of exciting high p{perpendicular} particle production data. There have also been two physics runs with polarized protons, and preliminary results on the double-spin asymmetry for pion production had been presented very recently. The ontological questions behind these measurements are fascinating: Did RHIC collisions create a Quark-Gluon-Plasma phase and did they verify the Color Glass Condensate as the high energy limit of QCD? Will the Spin Crisis finally be resolved in terms of gluon polarization and what new surprises are we yet to meet for Transverse Spin? Phenomena related to sub-microscopic questions as important as these call for interpretations that are footed in solid theory. At large p{perpendicular}, perturbative concepts are legitimately expected to provide useful approaches. The corresponding hard parton dynamics are, in several ways, key to unraveling the initial or final state and collisional phase of hard scattering events in vacuum as well as in hot or cold nuclear matter. Before the advent of RHIC data, a RIKEN-BNL workshop had been held at BNL in March 1999 on ''Hard Parton Physics in High Energy Nuclear Collisions''. The 2003 workshop on ''High p{perpendicular} Physics at RHIC'' was a logical continuation of this previous workshop. It gave the opportunity to revisit the 1999 expectations in the light of what has been found in the meantime and, at the same time, to critically discuss the underlying theoretical concepts. We brought together theorists who have done seminal work on the foundations of parton phenomenology in field theory, with theorists and experimentalists who are presently working on RHIC phenomenology. The participants were both from a high-energy physics and nuclear physics background and it remains only to be said here that this chemistry worked perfectly and the workshop was a great success.

  2. Using Collaborative Engineering to Inform Collaboration Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration is a critical competency for modern organizations as they struggle to compete in an increasingly complex, global environment. A large body of research on collaboration in the workplace focuses both on teams, investigating how groups use teamwork to perform their task work, and on the use of information systems to support team processes ("collaboration engineering"). This research essay presents collaboration from an engineering perspective ("collaborative engineering"). It uses examples from professional and student engineering teams to illustrate key differences in collaborative versus collaboration engineering and investigates how challenges in the former can inform opportunities for the latter.

  3. Using Collaborative Engineering to Inform Collaboration Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration is a critical competency for modern organizations as they struggle to compete in an increasingly complex, global environment. A large body of research on collaboration in the workplace focuses both on teams, investigating how groups use teamwork to perform their task work, and on the use of information systems to support team processes ("collaboration engineering"). This research essay presents collaboration from an engineering perspective ("collaborative engineering"). It uses examples from professional and student engineering teams to illustrate key differences in collaborative versus collaboration engineering and investigates how challenges in the former can inform opportunities for the latter.

  4. Collaborative Environments. Considerations Concerning Some Collaborative Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela I. MUNTEAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is obvious, that all collaborative environments (workgroups, communities of practice, collaborative enterprises are based on knowledge and between collaboration and knowledge management there is a strong interdependence. The evolution of information systems in these collaborative environments led to the sudden necessity to adopt, for maintaining the virtual activities and processes, the latest technologies/systems, which are capable to support integrated collaboration in business services. In these environments, portal-based IT platforms will integrate multi-agent collaborative systems, collaborative tools, different enterprise applications and other useful information systems.

  5. Operational tests of the BNL 24.8 kW, 3.8 K helium refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. P.; Farah, Y.; Gibbs, R. J.; Schlafke, A. P.; Sondericker, J. H.; Wu, K. C.; Freeman, M.; Ganni, V.; Kowalski, R.; McWilliams, R.

    1985-06-01

    The BNL 24.8 kW refrigeration system is completely installed and major portions of the acceptance tests have been completed. So far, the equipment tested has performed at or above design levels. The room temperature helium compressor station has been completely tested and accepted. The two-stage oil injected screw compressor system exhibited an isothermal efficiency of 57% while delivering a helium flow in excess of 4400 g/s. Data on the performance of the make-up gas cryogenic purifier is given. The refrigerator turbomachinery, 13 expanders and three cold compressors, has been tested at room temperature for mechanical integrity and control stability. The first cooldown to operating temperature will be attempted in late August, 1985.

  6. A very thin havar film vacuum window for heavy ions to perform radiobiology studies at the BNL Tandem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieberger, P.; Abendroth, H.; Alessi, J.; Cannizzo, L.; Carlson, C.; Gustavsson, A.; Minty, M.; Snydstrup, L.

    2011-03-28

    Heavy ion beams from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will be made available for radiobiology studies on cell cultures. Beam energy losses need to be minimized both in the vacuum window and in the air in order to achieve the ranges required for the cells to be studied. This is particularly challenging for ions heavier than iron. The design is presented of a 0.4-inch diameter Havar film window that will satisfy these requirements. Films as thin as 80 microinches were successfully pressure tested. The final thickness to be used may be slightly larger to help in achieving pin hole free windows. We discuss design considerations and present pressure and vacuum test results as well as tests with heavy ion beams.

  7. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, HADRON STRUCTURE FROM LATTICE QCD, MARCH 18 - 22, 2002, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLUM, T.; BOER, D.; CREUTZ, M.; OHTA, S.; ORGINOS, K.

    2002-03-18

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop on ''Hadron Structure from Lattice QCD'' was held at BNL during March 11-15, 2002. Hadron structure has been the subject of many theoretical and experimental investigations, with significant success in understanding the building blocks of matter. The nonperturbative nature of QCD, however, has always been an obstacle to deepening our understanding of hadronic physics. Lattice QCD provides the tool to overcome these difficulties and hence a link can be established between the fundamental theory of QCD and hadron phenomenology. Due to the steady progress in improving lattice calculations over the years, comparison with experimentally measured hadronic quantities has become important. In this respect the workshop was especially timely. By providing an opportunity for experts from the lattice and hadron structure communities to present their latest results, the workshop enhanced the exchange of knowledge and ideas. With a total of 32 registered participants and 26 talks, the interest of a growing community is clearly exemplified. At the workshop Schierholz and Negele presented the current status of lattice computations of hadron structure. Substantial progress has been made during recent years now that the quenched results are well under control and the first dynamical results have appeared. In both the dynamical and the quenched simulations the lattice results, extrapolated to lighter quark masses, seem to disagree with experiment. Melnitchouk presented a possible explanation (chiral logs) for this disagreement. It became clear from these discussions that lattice computations at significantly lighter quark masses need to be performed.

  8. Collaborative Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Netter, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers and opportunities for business models based on the ideas of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry. Design/methodology/approach – The analysis is based on a multiple-case study of Scandinavian fashion libraries – a new......, clothes-sharing concept that has emerged as a fashion niche within the last decade. Findings – It is concluded that fashion libraries offers interesting perspectives, e.g. by allowing people to experiment with styles without having to pay the full cost and becoming a meeting place for young designers...... and end consumers. However, at present fashion libraries remain a small-scale phenomenon with difficulties reaching the mainstream market, not least due to limited financial and human resources as well as conventional fashion consumption patterns. Research limitations/implications – The study is limited...

  9. Collaborative Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Netter, Sarah

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers and opportunities for business models based on the ideas of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry. Design/methodology/approach: The analysis is based on a multiple-­‐‑case study of Scandinavian fashion libraries – a new......, clothes-­‐‑sharing concept that has emerged as a fashion niche within the last decade. Findings: It is concluded that fashion libraries offers interesting perspectives, e.g. by allowing people to experiment with styles without having to pay the full cost and becoming a meeting place for young designers...... and end consumers. However, at present fashion libraries remain a small-­‐‑scale phenomenon with difficulties reaching the mainstream market, not least due to limited financial and human resources as well as conventional fashion consumption patterns. Research limitations/implications: The study is limited...

  10. Contested collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1995-01-01

    support patterns of work activities, social groups, and personal beliefs. In these situations, design is fundamentally an interactive process that requires communication among users, designers, and developers. However, communication among these groups is often difficult although of paramount importance...... to design outcomes. Through a qualitative analysis of a house, expert system, and telecommunications network architecture and management system design situations, a descriptive model of design that characterizes communication among users, designers, and developers as they create an artifact was developed....... The model describes design phases, roles, themes, and intergroup communication networks as they evolve throughout the design process and characterizes design as a process of "contested collaboration". It is a first step towards a predictive design model that suggests strategies which may help participants...

  11. Technology collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Jacob [Halliburton (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present Halliburton's Brazilian technology center. Halliburton has technology centers in the United States, Saudi Arabia, India, Singapore and Brazil, all of which aim at delivering accelerated innovation in the oil sector. The technology centers engage in research and development activities with the help of various universities and in collaboration with the customer or supplier. The Halliburton Brazil technology center provides its customers with timely research and development solutions for enhancing recovery and mitigating reservoir uncertainty; they are specialized in finding solutions for pre- and post-salt carbonate drilling and in the enhancement of production from mature fields. This presentation showcased the work carried out by the Halliburton Brazil technology center to help customers develop their deepwater field activities.

  12. Collaborative information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2008-01-01

    , the activities involved in information seeking are often performed by varying subgroups of actors. Consequently, collaborative grounding is necessary to share information among collaborating actors and, thereby, establish and maintain the common ground necessary for their collaborative work. By focusing......Since common ground is pivotal to collaboration, this paper proposes to define collaborative information seeking as the combined activity of information seeking and collaborative grounding. While information-seeking activities are necessary for collaborating actors to acquire new information...... on the collaborative level, collaborative information seeking aims to avoid both individual reductionism and group reductionism, while at the same time recognizing that only some information and understanding need be shared....

  13. Oblivious Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Afek, Yehuda; Feige, Uriel; Gafni, Eli; Linial, Nati; Sudakov, Benny

    2011-01-01

    Communication is a crucial ingredient in every kind of collaborative work. But what is the least possible amount of communication required for a given task? We formalize this question by introducing a new framework for distributed computation, called {\\em oblivious protocols}. We investigate the power of this model by considering two concrete examples, the {\\em musical chairs} task $MC(n,m)$ and the well-known {\\em Renaming} problem. The $MC(n,m)$ game is played by $n$ players (processors) with $m$ chairs. Players can {\\em occupy} chairs, and the game terminates as soon as each player occupies a unique chair. Thus we say that player $P$ is {\\em in conflict} if some other player $Q$ is occupying the same chair, i.e., termination means there are no conflicts. By known results from distributed computing, if $m \\le 2n-2$, no strategy of the players can guarantee termination. However, there is a protocol with $m = 2n-1$ chairs that always terminates. Here we consider an oblivious protocol where in every time step ...

  14. Managing collaborative design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sebastian, R.

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative design has been emerging in building projects everywhere. The more complex a building project becomes, the closer and more intensive collaboration between the design actors is required. This research focuses on collaborative design in the conceptual architecture design phase,

  15. Collaborative Service Arrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Søren; J. May, Peter

    2007-01-01

    in particular differs among collaborators. Our modeling of the influence of collaboration on perceived employment outcomes suggests that these impacts are relatively minor. They are greater when there is active involvement of municipal employment managers in fostering cooperative relationships...... with collaborators. In short, collaboration requires a healthy and active relationship to foster improved outcomes. These findings have implications for future research about collaborative service delivery concerning the measurement of collaboration, different bases for it, and potential impacts....

  16. Collaborative Service Arrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    J. May, Peter; Winter, Søren

    in particular differs among collaborators. Our modeling of the influence of collaboration on perceived employment outcomes suggests that these impacts are relatively minor. They are greater when there is active involvement of municipal employment managers in fostering cooperative relationships...... with collaborators. In short, collaboration requires a healthy and active relationship to foster improved outcomes. These findings have implications for future research about collaborative service delivery concerning the measurement of collaboration, different bases for it, and potential impacts....

  17. Collaborative Service Arrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    J. May, Peter; Winter, Søren

    While much of prior research on collaboration addresses the service delivery network as a whole, we address collaborative relationships between one type of organization—municipal employment services—and a range of governmental and non-governmental partners for employment services in Denmark...... with collaborators. In short, collaboration requires a healthy and active relationship to foster improved outcomes. These findings have implications for future research about collaborative service delivery concerning the measurement of collaboration, different bases for it, and potential impacts....

  18. Collaboration rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Philip; Wolf, Bob

    2005-01-01

    Corporate leaders seeking to boost growth, learning, and innovation may find the answer in a surprising place: the Linux open-source software community. Linux is developed by an essentially volunteer, self-organizing community of thousands of programmers. Most leaders would sell their grandmothers for workforces that collaborate as efficiently, frictionlessly, and creatively as the self-styled Linux hackers. But Linux is software, and software is hardly a model for mainstream business. The authors have, nonetheless, found surprising parallels between the anarchistic, caffeinated, hirsute world of Linux hackers and the disciplined, tea-sipping, clean-cut world of Toyota engineering. Specifically, Toyota and Linux operate by rules that blend the self-organizing advantages of markets with the low transaction costs of hierarchies. In place of markets' cash and contracts and hierarchies' authority are rules about how individuals and groups work together (with rigorous discipline); how they communicate (widely and with granularity); and how leaders guide them toward a common goal (through example). Those rules, augmented by simple communication technologies and a lack of legal barriers to sharing information, create rich common knowledge, the ability to organize teams modularly, extraordinary motivation, and high levels of trust, which radically lowers transaction costs. Low transaction costs, in turn, make it profitable for organizations to perform more and smaller transactions--and so increase the pace and flexibility typical of high-performance organizations. Once the system achieves critical mass, it feeds on itself. The larger the system, the more broadly shared the knowledge, language, and work style. The greater individuals' reputational capital, the louder the applause and the stronger the motivation. The success of Linux is evidence of the power of that virtuous circle. Toyota's success is evidence that it is also powerful in conventional companies.

  19. Collaborative outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmarti-Vila, Lydia; García-Matos, Marta; Beduini, Federica; Carrasco, Silvia

    2016-09-01

    Many research projects and scientific initiatives multiple their impact and relevance through collaborations. It is the contact and exchange with others that often brings a scientist's work to the next level. The same happens with outreach: sharing activities, concepts, materials and knowhow may lead to greater impact, more innovative, inspirational ideas with enough potential to create pioneering outreach activities. A good example for this is the FP7 European project "GoPhoton!", an initiative of ECOP (European Centres of Outreach in Photonics) that ran through 2014 and 2015 and finished at the beginning of 2016 and was directed at the general public, young minds as well as current and future entrepreneurs. This project was based on the idea of sharing activities - which is at the core of ECOP's identity- already existing in other nodes (institutions within the project), or created within GoPhoton! The main concept was the effective leverage of local links such as the networks of educators and professionals in general, industrial clusters, museums, universities, governmental and non-governmental organizations, all from a Pan-European perspective possible through ECOP. This has resulted in over 200 events impacting over two million people. The sharing of activities across institutions that have different resources, facilities, and cultural environments is not straightforward. One of the biggest challenges for the consortium was to be able to extract the concept and identity of each activity, so that it could be realistically adapted to each local context. A crucial point was being able to effectively use the knowhow gained from a partner's activity, in a way that the essence of the activity remained untainted across the participating nodes, while still triggering innovation locally.

  20. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Understanding QGP through Spectral Functions and Euclidean Correlators (Volume 89)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocsy,A.; Petreczky, P.

    2008-06-27

    In the past two decades, one of the most important goals of the nuclear physics community has been the production and characterization of the new state of matter--Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Understanding how properties of hadrons change in medium, particularly, the bound state of a very heavy quark and its antiquark, known as quarkonium, as well as determining the transport coefficients is crucial for identifying the properties of QGP and for the understanding of the experimental data from RHIC. On April 23rd, more than sixty physicists from twenty-seven institutions gathered for this three-day topical workshop held at BNL to discuss how to understand the properties of the new state of matter obtained in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions (particularly at RHIC-BNL) through spectral functions. In-medium properties of the different particle species and the transport properties of the medium are encoded in spectral functions. The former could yield important signatures of deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration at high temperatures and densities, while the later are crucial for the understanding of the dynamics of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Participants at the workshop are experts in various areas of spectral function studies. The workshop encouraged direct exchange of scientific information among experts, as well as between the younger and the more established scientists. The workshops success is evident from the coherent picture that developed of the current understanding of transport properties and in-medium particle properties, illustrated in the current proceedings. The following pages show calculations of meson spectral functions in lattice QCD, as well as implications of these for quarkonia melting/survival in the quark gluon plasma; Lattice calculations of the transport coefficients (shear and bulk viscosities, electric conductivity); Calculation of spectral functions and transport coefficients in field theories using weak coupling

  1. Antagonistic effects of ethyl methanesulfonate and maleic hydrazide in inducing somatic mutations in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone BNL 4430

    OpenAIRE

    市川, 定夫

    1998-01-01

    Mutagenic interaction between ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS; a monofunctional alkylating agent) and maleic hydrazide (MH; a promutagen activated into a mutagen in plants highly likely by peroxidase) was studied in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone BNL 4430, a blue/pink heterozygote. Since EMS has been shown to act synergistically with X rays in inducing mutations, and mutagenic synergisms have also been observed between X rays and MH by exposing to X rays before MH treatments, EMS and MH w...

  2. Neutral current quasielastic (anti)neutrino scattering beyond the Fermi gas model at MiniBooNE and BNL kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, M V; Barbaro, M B; Giusti, C; Meucci, A; Caballero, J A; Gonzalez-Jimenez, R; de Guerra, E Moya; Udias, J M

    2015-01-01

    Neutral current quasielastic (anti)neutrino scattering cross sections on a $^{12}$C target are analyzed using a realistic spectral function $S(p,E)$ that gives a scaling function in accordance with the ($e,e'$) scattering data. The spectral function accounts for the nucleon-nucleon (NN) correlations by using natural orbitals (NOs) from the Jastrow correlation method and has a realistic energy dependence. The standard value of the axial mass $M_A= 1.032$ GeV is used in all calculations. The role of the final-state interaction (FSI) on the spectral and scaling functions, as well as on the cross sections is accounted for. A comparison of the calculations with the empirical data of the MiniBooNE and BNL experiments is performed. Our results are analyzed in comparison with those when NN correlations are not included, and also with results from other theoretical approaches, such as the relativistic Fermi gas (RFG), the relativistic mean field (RMF), the relativistic Green's function (RGF), as well as with the Super...

  3. NUMERICAL ALGORITHMS AT NON-ZERO CHEMICAL POTENTIAL. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLUM,T.

    1999-09-14

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center hosted its 19th workshop April 27th through May 1, 1999. The topic was Numerical Algorithms at Non-Zero Chemical Potential. QCD at a non-zero chemical potential (non-zero density) poses a long-standing unsolved challenge for lattice gauge theory. Indeed, it is the primary unresolved issue in the fundamental formulation of lattice gauge theory. The chemical potential renders conventional lattice actions complex, practically excluding the usual Monte Carlo techniques which rely on a positive definite measure for the partition function. This ''sign'' problem appears in a wide range of physical systems, ranging from strongly coupled electronic systems to QCD. The lack of a viable numerical technique at non-zero density is particularly acute since new exotic ''color superconducting'' phases of quark matter have recently been predicted in model calculations. A first principles confirmation of the phase diagram is desirable since experimental verification is not expected soon. At the workshop several proposals for new algorithms were made: cluster algorithms, direct simulation of Grassman variables, and a bosonization of the fermion determinant. All generated considerable discussion and seem worthy of continued investigation. Several interesting results using conventional algorithms were also presented: condensates in four fermion models, SU(2) gauge theory in fundamental and adjoint representations, and lessons learned from strong; coupling, non-zero temperature and heavy quarks applied to non-zero density simulations.

  4. Towards the collaborative hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim; Hasle, Peter; Edwards, Kasper;

    2015-01-01

    of the collaborative hospital concern the creation of an appropriate balance between standardization and local autonomy, shared purpose centred around providing the best possible care, and use of enabling structures that sustain the new ways of collaborative work. The chapter builds on the theoretical framework...... for the collaborative hospital as new organizational form which is better equipped to respond to the challenges facing modern hospitals. The collaborative hospital is an ambidextrous organization that opens for pursuing both exploration and exploitation within the same organizational structure. The basic principles...... of the collaborative organization which is used for a discussion of theoretical and empirical aspects of the collaborative hospital....

  5. Collaborative Contracting in Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suprapto, M.

    2016-01-01

    Project practitioners have increasingly recognized the importance of collaborative relationships to ensure successful executions of projects. However, the ability to sustain and consistenly drive real collaborative attitudes and behavior for achieving the desired outcomes remains of enduring practic

  6. Collaborative Contracting in Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suprapto, M.

    2016-01-01

    Project practitioners have increasingly recognized the importance of collaborative relationships to ensure successful executions of projects. However, the ability to sustain and consistenly drive real collaborative attitudes and behavior for achieving the desired outcomes remains of enduring

  7. Global Collaborative STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meabh Kelly, Susan; Smith, Walter

    2016-04-01

    Global Collaborative STEM Education, as the name suggests, simultaneously supports two sets of knowledge and skills. The first set is STEM -- science, technology, engineering and math. The other set of content knowledge and skills is that of global collaboration. Successful global partnerships require awareness of one's own culture, the biases embedded within that culture, as well as developing awareness of the collaborators' culture. Workforce skills fostered include open-mindedness, perseverance when faced with obstacles, and resourceful use of technological "bridges" to facilitate and sustain communication. In respect for the 2016 GIFT Workshop focus, Global Collaborative STEM Education projects dedicated to astronomy research will be presented. The projects represent different benchmarks within the Global Collaborative STEM Education continuum, culminating in an astronomy research experience that fully reflects how the global STEM workforce collaborates. To facilitate wider engagement in Global Collaborative STEM Education, project summaries, classroom resources and contact information for established international collaborative astronomy research projects will be disseminated.

  8. Collaboration in Agricultural Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Roland L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Theme articles discuss environment, food, agriculture, and renewal resources as they relate to science education, learning partnerships, collaboration in Kyrghyzstan, leadership development, opportunities for collaboration, networking, and the creation of a shared course between agribusiness and biology. (JOW)

  9. Collaboration in Agricultural Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Roland L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Theme articles discuss environment, food, agriculture, and renewal resources as they relate to science education, learning partnerships, collaboration in Kyrghyzstan, leadership development, opportunities for collaboration, networking, and the creation of a shared course between agribusiness and biology. (JOW)

  10. Experiences of Collaborative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahneman, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The author's personal history of the research that led to his recognition in economics is described, focusing on the process of collaboration and on the experience of controversy. The author's collaboration with Amos Tversky dealt with 3 major topics: judgment under uncertainty, decision making, and framing effects. A subsequent collaboration,…

  11. Trust repertoires for collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Lars

    little about how such processes develop and how trust, understood as “confident positive expectations” (Lewicki et al. 1998) to collaborative activities, arises out of collaboration. The paper contributes by showing how trust and collaboration are intertwined. The main finding is that a facilitator can...

  12. Targeted Alpha Therapy: The US DOE Tri-Lab (ORNL, BNL, LANL) Research Effort to Provide Accelerator-Produced 225Ac for Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy is an emerging discipline of cancer therapy that exploits the biochemical differences between normal cells and cancer cells to selectively deliver a lethal dose of radiation to cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells relatively unperturbed. A broad overview of targeted alpha therapy including isotope production methods, and associated isotope production facility needs, will be provided. A more general overview of the US Department of Energy Isotope Program's Tri-Lab (ORNL, BNL, LANL) Research Effort to Provide Accelerator-Produced 225Ac for Radiotherapy will also be presented focusing on the accelerator-production of 225Ac and final product isolation methodologies for medical applications.

  13. Trust repertoires for collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Lars

    This case study analyses the role of trust in a public private innovation network that involved a private consultancy company as a facilitator. We know that collaboration is a important for innovation, and that collaboration across organizational boundaries is not a trivial issue. But we know very...... little about how such processes develop and how trust, understood as “confident positive expectations” (Lewicki et al. 1998) to collaborative activities, arises out of collaboration. The paper contributes by showing how trust and collaboration are intertwined. The main finding is that a facilitator can...

  14. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Quarkonium Production in Elementary and Heavy Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumitru, A.; Lourenco, C.; Petreczky, P.; Qiu, J., Ruan, L.

    2011-08-03

    Understanding the structure of the hadron is of fundamental importance in subatomic physics. Production of heavy quarkonia is arguably one of the most fascinating subjects in strong interaction physics. It offers unique perspectives into the formation of QCD bound states. Heavy quarkonia are among the most studied particles both theoretically and experimentally. They have been, and continue to be, the focus of measurements in all high energy colliders around the world. Because of their distinct multiple mass scales, heavy quarkonia were suggested as a probe of the hot quark-gluon matter produced in heavy-ion collisions; and their production has been one of the main subjects of the experimental heavy-ion programs at the SPS and RHIC. However, since the discovery of J/psi at Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory over 36 years ago, theorists still have not been able to fully understand the production mechanism of heavy quarkonia, although major progresses have been made in recent years. With this in mind, a two-week program on quarkonium production was organized at BNL on June 6-17, 2011. Many new experimental data from LHC and from RHIC were presented during the program, including results from the LHC heavy ion run. To analyze and correctly interpret these measurements, and in order to quantify properties of the hot matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, it is necessary to improve our theoretical understanding of quarkonium production. Therefore, a wide range of theoretical aspects on the production mechanism in the vacuum as well as in cold nuclear and hot quark-gluon medium were discussed during the program from the controlled calculations in QCD and its effective theories such as NRQCD to various models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. The scientific program was divided into three major scientific parts: basic production mechanism for heavy quarkonium in vacuum or in high energy elementary collisions; the

  15. BNL future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littenberg, L.

    1998-01-01

    In 1999, after almost 40 years of independent existence, the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) is scheduled to be pressed into service as an injector to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Although at first sight this seems like the end of an era, in actuality, it represents a very attractive new opportunity. For the AGS is actually needed by RHIC for only a few hours per day. The balance of the time it is available for extracted proton beam work at a very small incremental cost. This represents the reverse of the current situation in which the nuclear physics program gets access to the AGS (for fixed target heavy ion experiments) at incremental cost, while the base cost of maintaining the accelerator is borne by the high energy physics program. Retaining the AGS for particle physics work would broaden the US HEP program considerably, allowing continued exploitation of the world`s most intense source of medium energy protons. High energy possibilities include incisive probes of Standard Model and non-SM CP-violation, and of low energy manifestations of supersymmetry.

  16. The Collaborative Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Marlowe

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Collaboration has become an important goal in modern ventures, across the spectrum of commercial, social, and intellectual activities, sometimes as a mediating factor, and sometimes as a driving, foundational principle. Research, development, social programs, and ongoing ventures of all sorts benefit from interactions between teams, groups, and organizations, across intellectual disciplines and across facets and features of the inquiry, product, entity, or activity under consideration. We present a survey of the state of collaboration and collaborative enterprise, in the context of papers and presentations at the International Symposium on Collaborative Enterprises 2011 (CENT 2011, and the extended papers appearing in this special issue.

  17. Staging Collaborative Innovation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe; Clausen, Christian

    Organisations are currently challenged by demands for increased collaborative innovation internally as well as with external and new entities - e.g. across the value chain. The authors seek to develop new approaches to managing collaborative innovative processes in the context of open innovation...... and public private innovation partnerships. Based on a case study of a collaborative design process in a large electronics company the paper points to the key importance of staging and navigation of collaborative innovation process. Staging and navigation is presented as a combined activity: 1) to translate...

  18. The Collaborative Leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Carolyn Grubbs

    1998-01-01

    Uses the Los Angeles Partners Advocating Student Success, an interinstitutional educational reform effort, as a case study in collaboration. Discusses the role of the president, and contends that collaboration provides community colleges with new opportunities to promote access and enhance the educational success of underserved students by…

  19. Collaboration in teacher teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, P.

    2011-01-01

    In order to deal with innovations and the associated complexity of work, ongoing collaboration between teachers has become more important in secondary education. Teacher collaboration is one of the factors that contribute to the successful implementation of innovations in secondary schools. However,

  20. Corrections for collaborators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1953-01-01

    In the ”Directions and Hints” for collaborators in Flora Malesiana, which has been forwarded to all collaborators, two corrections should be made, viz: 1) p. 12; Omit the explanatory notes under Jamaica Plain, Mass., and Cambridge, Mass. 2) p. 13; Add as number 12a; Stockholm, Paleobotaniska Avdelni

  1. Enabling distributed collaborative science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, T.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Maglaughlin, K.

    2000-01-01

    To enable collaboration over distance, a collaborative environment that uses a specialized scientific instrument called a nanoManipulator is evaluated. The nanoManipulator incorporates visualization and force feedback technology to allow scientists to see, feel, and modify biological samples being...... studied with an Atomic Force Microscope....

  2. Sensemaking in collaborative networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peronard, Jean-Paul; Brix, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    be redesigned to strengthen the collaboration between companies. To enable this discussion we delve into the sensemaking literature and theory from loosely coupled systems. Our discussion leads to the development of the Balanced Activity System (BAS) model. The paper’s key contribution is the prescriptive BAS...... model that can be used strategically in collaborative networks to redesign or create new joint activities....

  3. Toward Collaboration Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bertrand; Pea, Roy

    2014-01-01

    We describe preliminary applications of network analysis techniques to eye-tracking data collected during a collaborative learning activity. This paper makes three contributions: first, we visualize collaborative eye-tracking data as networks, where the nodes of the graph represent fixations and edges represent saccades. We found that those…

  4. Collaboration in teacher teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, P.

    2011-01-01

    In order to deal with innovations and the associated complexity of work, ongoing collaboration between teachers has become more important in secondary education. Teacher collaboration is one of the factors that contribute to the successful implementation of innovations in secondary schools. However,

  5. Enabling distributed collaborative science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, T.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Maglaughlin, K.

    2000-01-01

    To enable collaboration over distance, a collaborative environment that uses a specialized scientific instrument called a nanoManipulator is evaluated. The nanoManipulator incorporates visualization and force feedback technology to allow scientists to see, feel, and modify biological samples bein...

  6. Collaborative augmented reality environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Büscher, Monika; Christensen, Michael; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes Manufaktur, a prototype of a concept and infrastructure that goes beyond the classical CVE systems toward a collaborative augmented reality environment, where users? documents and objects appear as live representations in a 3D workspace. Manufaktur supports collaborative...

  7. Nurse-patient collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dorthe; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Groefte, Thorbjoern

    2013-01-01

    at three intensive care units and one general respiratory ward in Denmark. Results: Succeeding emerged as the nurses’ main concern in the nurse-patient collaboration during non-invasive ventilation treatment. Four collaborative typologies emerged as processing their main concern: (1) twofold oriented......Objectives: This paper provides a theoretical account of nurses’ collaboration with patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during non-invasive ventilation treatment in hospital. Background: Despite strong evidence for the effect of non-invasive ventilation treatment, success remains...... a huge challenge. Nurse-patient collaboration may be vital for treatment tolerance and success. A better understanding of how nurses and patients collaborate during non-invasive ventilation may therefore contribute to improvement in treatment success. Design: A constant comparative classical grounded...

  8. Nurse–patient collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dorthe; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Grøfte, Thorbjørn;

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This paper provides a theoretical account of nurses’ collaboration with patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during non-invasive ventilation treatment in hospital. Background: Despite strong evidence for the effect of non-invasive ventilation treatment, success remains...... a huge challenge. Nurse-patient collaboration may be vital for treatment tolerance and success. A better understanding of how nurses and patients collaborate during non-invasive ventilation may therefore contribute to improvement in treatment success. Design: A constant comparative classical grounded...... at three intensive care units and one general respiratory ward in Denmark. Results: Succeeding emerged as the nurses’ main concern in the nurse-patient collaboration during non-invasive ventilation treatment. Four collaborative typologies emerged as processing their main concern: (1) twofold oriented...

  9. On Coordinating Collaborative Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Imine, Abdessamad

    2010-01-01

    A collaborative object represents a data type (such as a text document) designed to be shared by a group of dispersed users. The Operational Transformation (OT) is a coordination approach used for supporting optimistic replication for these objects. It allows the users to concurrently update the shared data and exchange their updates in any order since the convergence of all replicas, i.e. the fact that all users view the same data, is ensured in all cases. However, designing algorithms for achieving convergence with the OT approach is a critical and challenging issue. In this paper, we propose a formal compositional method for specifying complex collaborative objects. The most important feature of our method is that designing an OT algorithm for the composed collaborative object can be done by reusing the OT algorithms of component collaborative objects. By using our method, we can start from correct small collaborative objects which are relatively easy to handle and incrementally combine them to build more ...

  10. OGC Collaborative Platform undercover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, G.; Arctur, D. K.; Bermudez, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    The mission of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is to serve as a global forum for the collaboration of developers and users of spatial data products and services, and to advance the development of international standards for geospatial interoperability. The OGC coordinates with over 400 institutions in the development of geospatial standards. OGC has a dedicated staff supported by a Collaborative Web Platform to enable sophisticated and successful coordination among its members. Since its origins in the early 1990s, the OGC Collaborative Web Platform has evolved organically to be the collaboration hub for standards development in the exchange of geospatial and related types of information, among a global network of thousands of technical, scientific and management professionals spanning numerous disparate application domains. This presentation describes the structure of this collaboration hub, the relationships enabled (both among and beyond OGC members), and how this network fits in a broader ecosystem of technology development and information standards organizations.

  11. Theoretical foundations for collaboration engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    Collaboration is often presented as the solution to numerous problems in business and society. However, collaboration is challenging, and collaboration support is not an off-the-shelf-product. This research offers theoretical foundations for Collaboration Engineering. Collaboration Engineering is an

  12. Energy Efficiency Collaboratives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Michael [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Bryson, Joe [US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Collaboratives for energy efficiency have a long and successful history and are currently used, in some form, in more than half of the states. Historically, many state utility commissions have used some form of collaborative group process to resolve complex issues that emerge during a rate proceeding. Rather than debate the issues through the formality of a commission proceeding, disagreeing parties are sent to discuss issues in a less-formal setting and bring back resolutions to the commission. Energy efficiency collaboratives take this concept and apply it specifically to energy efficiency programs—often in anticipation of future issues as opposed to reacting to a present disagreement. Energy efficiency collaboratives can operate long term and can address the full suite of issues associated with designing, implementing, and improving energy efficiency programs. Collaboratives can be useful to gather stakeholder input on changing program budgets and program changes in response to performance or market shifts, as well as to provide continuity while regulators come and go, identify additional energy efficiency opportunities and innovations, assess the role of energy efficiency in new regulatory contexts, and draw on lessons learned and best practices from a diverse group. Details about specific collaboratives in the United States are in the appendix to this guide. Collectively, they demonstrate the value of collaborative stakeholder processes in producing successful energy efficiency programs.

  13. Collaborative Learning in the Cloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchner, Kathrin; Razmerita, Liana

    2015-01-01

    This present study aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and identifies associated technologies used to collaborate. In particular we aim to address the following research questions: What are the factors that impact satisfaction with collaboration? How do these factors differ...... in different collaborative settings? Based on data from 75 students from Denmark and Germany, the article identifies collaborative practices and factors that impact positively and negatively satisfaction with collaboration....

  14. Collaborative Policy Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Boch Waldorff, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Governments all over the Western world currently face wicked problems that call for policy innovation. A new strand of research in public innovation points to collaboration between public authorities and relevant and affected stakeholders as an important driver of public innovation. A case study...... and policy ideas produced in collaborative governance arenas are not diffused to the formal political institutions of representative democracy because the participating politicians only to a limited extent function as boundary spanners between the collaborative governance arena and the decision making arenas...

  15. Innovation and network collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Müller, Sabine; Jørgensen, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can benefit from network collaboration by enhancing opportunities for innovation. Managing the necessary collaboration to benefit from network participation may however be particularly challenging for SMEs due to their size...... and their inherent shortage of resources. In this paper, we propose that human resource management (HRM) practices may provide a means by which SMEs can increase their innovation capacity through network collaboration. Following a brief presentation of the relevant literature on networks, and innovation in networks...

  16. Collaboration in experiential therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdondini, Lucia; Elliott, Robert; Shearer, Joan

    2012-02-01

    We offer a view of the nature and role of client-therapist collaboration in experiential psychotherapy, focusing on Gestalt and emotion-focused therapy (EFT). We distinguish between the necessary condition of mutual trust (the emotional bond between client and therapist) and effective collaboration (regarding the goals and tasks of therapy). Using a case study of experiential therapy for social anxiety, we illustrate how the development of collaboration can be both complex and pivotal for therapeutic success, and how it can involve client and therapist encountering one another through taking risks by openly and nonjudgementally disclosing difficult experiences in order to enrich and advance the work.

  17. Writing as collaborative inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth; Pedersen, Christina Hee; Novak, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In our presentation we strive to disturb and unravel the romantic discourses of collaboration, dialogue and empowerment in relation to qualitative inquiry. For more than two years we (five Danish and Czech researchers) have been exploring the complex obstructions, difficulties and potentials...... involved in collaborative knowledge production across difference (including age, professional position, life situation, nation). We tell about our experiences with how collaboration can lead toward re-invention of our research practices and methods, as well as our own subjectivities, through involvement...

  18. Collaboration in Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Lukosch, S.; Billinghurst, M; Alem, L.; Kiyokawa, K.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a technology that allows users to view and interact in real time with virtual images seamlessly superimposed over the real world. AR systems can be used to create unique collaborative experiences. For example, co-located users can see shared 3D virtual objects that they interact with, or a user can annotate the live video view of a remote worker, enabling them to collaborate at a distance. The overall goal is to augment the face-to-face collaborative experience, or t...

  19. Designing collaborative policy innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika; Sørensen, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Recent approaches to enhancing public innovation suffer from two shortcomings: They overemphasize competition as a driver of innovation and overlook the fact that public sector innovation involves policy innovation as well as service innovation. Drawing on governance research and innovation theory......, the chapter investigates the extent to which and how collaboration between politicians and relevant stakeholders can spur the formulation, implementation and diffusion of new innovative policies. A case study of a process of collaborative policy innovation in a Danish municipality shows that collaborative...... policy arenas do contribute to policy innovation but also that the degree to which they do so depends on the institutional design of these arenas....

  20. (BNL/DoE-hyped) ``Self-Organized-Criticality'' (SOC) is Merely Newton's(1687) Third Law of Motion F = ma REdiscovery: LONG PRE-``Bak''!!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, P. R. E.; Newton, I.; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    "Bak"/BNL/DoE "self-organized-criticality"(SOC) usual BNL/DoE media-hype P.R spin-doctoring "show-biz" "Bush-waaa-...-aaah!!!" is manifestly-demonstrated in two distinct ways to be nothing but Newton's Third Law of Motion F = ma REdiscovery!!! PHYSICS: (1687) cross-multiplied F = ma rewritten as 1/m = a/F = OUTPUT/INPUT = EFFECT/ CAUSE = inverse-mass mechanical-susceptibility = X ("w "); X ("w ") (F.-D. theorem-equivalence /proportionality) P("w ") "noise" power-spectrum; E w ; and E (any/all media upper-limiting-speeds) m. Thus: w E m; inversion yields: 1/w 1 /E 1 /m a/F = X ("w ") P("w "); hence: F = ma dual/inverse-integral-transform is "'SOC"'s" P(w) 1 / w (1) !!! ; "PURE"-MATHS: F = ma double-integral time-series s(t) = [vot + (1/2) at (2) ] inverse/dual-integral-transform formally defines power-spectrum: P (w) = S { s (t) e [ - (iORnoi) wt ] } dt = S { [ vot + (1 / 2) at 2) ] e [ - (iORnoi) wt ] } dt = voS { te [ - (iORnoi) wt ] } dt + (1 / 2) S { [ a = / = a (t) ] e [ - (iORnoi) wt) } dt = vo (d / dw) Delta (w) + (1 / 2) [ a = / = a (t) ] (d / dw) (2) Delta (w) = vo / w (0) + (1 / 2) [ a = / = a (t) ] / w 1 : ifa = 0 , then P(w) 1 / w 0 , VS . ifa = / = a (t) = / = 0 , then P(w) 1 /w; = by physics: ``SOC'' RE-expresses F = ma!!!: ``just `a tad' late/tardy'' REdiscovery of F=ma: LONG PRE-"Bak"!!!

  1. Collaboration during visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolmson, Kelly A; Reynolds, Michael G; Smilek, Daniel

    2007-08-01

    Two experiments examine how collaboration influences visual search performance. Working with a partner or on their own, participants reported whether a target was present or absent in briefly presented search displays. We compared the search performance of individuals working together (collaborative pairs) with the pooled responses of the individuals working alone (nominal pairs). Collaborative pairs were less likely than nominal pairs to correctly detect a target and they were less likely to make false alarms. Signal detection analyses revealed that collaborative pairs were more sensitive to the presence of the target and had a more conservative response bias than the nominal pairs. This pattern was observed even when the presence of another individual was matched across pairs. The results are discussed in the context of task-sharing, social loafing and current theories of visual search.

  2. Configurable Project Collaboration Portal

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SplashNote Systems is proposing to develop a more effective and innovative approach to project collaboration in distributed teams. The proposed system uniquely gives...

  3. Providers’ perspectives on collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bruner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Changes in models of health care are required to better meet the needs of diverse, underserved patient populations. Collaboration among providers is one way to promote accessible, comprehensive and continuous care in healthcare organizations. This paper describes the quantitative findings from two time points that examined providers' views of collaboration among a sample of diverse personnel (e.g. clinical nurses, social workers, dental providers, mental health providers, clerical staff, medical assistants, public health staff, and administrators within a federally qualified nurse managed health care centre in the United States. Methods: The quantitative arm of a mixed-method study is presented in this paper. Two instruments, the Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale and the University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire (comprised of 4 subscales-Communication and Teamwork Scale, Interprofessional Learning Scale, Interprofessional Interaction Scale, and Interprofessional Relationships Scale were administered to providers at baseline and three to eight months following six same discipline focus group discussions on collaboration, in order to evaluate whether participating in the focus group discussions changed providers' views of collaboration. A summary of the focus group data which were published elsewhere is additionally summarized to help provide insight to the quantitative findings. Thirty-nine staff participated. Results: Paired t-tests revealed that only one scale out of the five, Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale (33.97 at time one and 37.45 at time two, significantly and positively changed after the focus group discussion (p=0.046. Providers' views on collaboration ranged from positive to moderate views of collaboration; most measures revealed a non-significant improvement after the focus group discussions. Staff with some graduate school reported the greatest

  4. Drivers of Collaborative Advantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Gudrid

    Drawing upon extant alliance literature, this article substantiates the argument that we need to look beyond mere structural and formative aspects of cooperation in order to fully understand the performance antecedents of public-private partnerships. Currently, scholarly work on operational...... processes and behavioural dimensions is practically non-existent. This article tries to remedy the current gap in the literature by reviewing research findings on interfirm collaboration (alliances). On that basis a conceptual framework for analyzing partnership processes is developed. Finally......, the antecedents of collaborative advantage are theoretically examined, and the organizational competences contributing to collaborative success are identified. The conclusion is that operational processes and social dynamics are vital drivers of collaborative advantage. Another significant conclusion...

  5. Indico: CERN Collaboration Hub

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Indico development is also moving towards a broader collaboration where other institutes, hosting their own Indico instance, can contribute to the project in order make it a better and more complete tool.

  6. Collaborative software development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, M. de; Visser, E.; Visser, J.M.W.

    2001-01-01

    We present an approach to collaborative software development where obtaining components and contributing components across organizational boundaries are explicit phases in the development process. A lightweight generative infrastructure supports this approach with an online package base, and several

  7. EPA Collaboration with Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States and Israel focus on scientific and technical collaboration to protect the environment, by exchanging scientific and technical information, arranging visits of scientific personnel, cooperating in scientific symposia and workshops, etc.

  8. Providers’ perspectives on collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bruner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Changes in models of health care are required to better meet the needs of diverse, underserved patient populations. Collaboration among providers is one way to promote accessible, comprehensive and continuous care in healthcare organizations. This paper describes the quantitative findings from two time points that examined providers' views of collaboration among a sample of diverse personnel (e.g. clinical nurses, social workers, dental providers, mental health providers, clerical staff, medical assistants, public health staff, and administrators within a federally qualified nurse managed health care centre in the United States.Methods: The quantitative arm of a mixed-method study is presented in this paper. Two instruments, the Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale and the University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire (comprised of 4 subscales-Communication and Teamwork Scale, Interprofessional Learning Scale, Interprofessional Interaction Scale, and Interprofessional Relationships Scale were administered to providers at baseline and three to eight months following six same discipline focus group discussions on collaboration, in order to evaluate whether participating in the focus group discussions changed providers' views of collaboration. A summary of the focus group data which were published elsewhere is additionally summarized to help provide insight to the quantitative findings. Thirty-nine staff participated.Results: Paired t-tests revealed that only one scale out of the five, Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale (33.97 at time one and 37.45 at time two, significantly and positively changed after the focus group discussion (p=0.046. Providers' views on collaboration ranged from positive to moderate views of collaboration; most measures revealed a non-significant improvement after the focus group discussions. Staff with some graduate school reported the greatest

  9. EPA Collaboration with Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the last four years, EPA has been collaborating with Morocco on environmental governance through the Middle East Partnership Initiative (MEPI). Initial work with Morocco focused on water pollution from the textile industry.

  10. CMS Collaboration Board Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Hoch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The first CMS Collaboration Board meeting of the year (2013) provided an opportunity to thank Teresa Rodrigo, Matthias Kasemann and Randy Ruchti, the 2011-12 CB Chair, Deputy Chair and Secretary, respectively.

  11. Opposing incentives for collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, Bertil F.; Wien, Charlotte; Larsen, Asger Væring

    The Danish Bibliometric Research Indicator (BFI) is part of the performance-based model for the distribution of a special pool of baseline funding for universities and public research institutions in Denmark. BFI rewards the research publications published in the most recognized scientific journals...... collaboration is associated with a higher number of citations than single authorship which may present the author with two opposing incentives for research collaboration....

  12. Joint collaborative technology experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Michael; Ciccimaro, Donny; Yee, See; Denewiler, Thomas; Stroumtsos, Nicholas; Messamore, John; Brown, Rodney; Skibba, Brian; Clapp, Daniel; Wit, Jeff; Shirts, Randy J.; Dion, Gary N.; Anselmo, Gary S.

    2009-05-01

    Use of unmanned systems is rapidly growing within the military and civilian sectors in a variety of roles including reconnaissance, surveillance, explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), and force-protection and perimeter security. As utilization of these systems grows at an ever increasing rate, the need for unmanned systems teaming and inter-system collaboration becomes apparent. Collaboration provides a means of enhancing individual system capabilities through relevant data exchange that contributes to cooperative behaviors between systems and enables new capabilities not possible if the systems operate independently. A collaborative networked approach to development holds the promise of adding mission capability while simultaneously reducing the workload of system operators. The Joint Collaborative Technology Experiment (JCTE) joins individual technology development efforts within the Air Force, Navy, and Army to demonstrate the potential benefits of interoperable multiple system collaboration in a force-protection application. JCTE participants are the Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Airbase Technologies Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRL/RXQF); the Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center Software Engineering Directorate (AMRDEC SED); and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center - Pacific (SSC Pacific) Unmanned Systems Branch operating with funding provided by the Joint Ground Robotics Enterprise (JGRE). This paper will describe the efforts to date in system development by the three partner organizations, development of collaborative behaviors and experimentation in the force-protection application, results and lessons learned at a technical demonstration, simulation results, and a path forward for future work.

  13. Reputational Information and Strategic Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman; Bendix, Henrik B.

    1998-01-01

    What types of information do decision-makers use when deciding on collaboration? What are the role of reputational information in relation to decisions on collaboration......What types of information do decision-makers use when deciding on collaboration? What are the role of reputational information in relation to decisions on collaboration...

  14. Production of doubly-strange systems in the (K sup - , K sup +) reaction in E885 at BNL

    CERN Document Server

    Khaustov, P; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Berdoz, A R; Biglan, A; Buerger, T; Carman, D S; Chrien, R E; Davis, C A; Fischer, H; Franklin, G B; Franz, J; Gan, L; Ichikawa, A; Iijima, T; Imai, K; Kondo, Y; Koran, P; Landry, M; Lee, L; Lowe, J; Magahiz, R; May, M; McCrady, R; Meyer, C A; Merrill, F; Motoba, T; Page, S A; Paschke, K; Pile, P H; Quinn, B; Ramsay, W D; Rusek, A; Sawafta, R; Schmitt, H; Schumacher, R A; Stotzer, R W; Sutter, R; Takeutchi, F; Oers, W T H V; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, Y; Yosoi, M; Zeps, V J

    2000-01-01

    The E885 collaboration utilized the 1.8 GeV/c K sup - beam line at the AGS to accumulate greater than 10 times the world's existing data sample of (K sup - ,K sup +) events on carbon. The data were used to search for signatures of the production of XI hypernuclei, double-LAMBDA hypernuclei, and H Dibaryons. Evidence for the creation of sup 1 sup 2 subXI Be is seen. Reasonable agreement between the data and theory is achieved by assuming a XI-nucleus Wood-Saxon potential well depth, V sub 0 subXI, of about 14 MeV. Upper limits for the production of double-LAMBDA hypernuclei are presented. Upper limits for H-Dibaryon production are presented which are a factor of 50 below calculated rates.

  15. COLLABORATION BOARD (CB55)

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Cousins

    Open Access Publication Policy ATLAS had recently issued a short statement in support of open access publishing. The mood of the discussions in the December CMS Collaboration Board had appeared to be in favour and so it was being proposed that CMS issue the same statement as that made by ATLAS (the statement is attached to the agenda of this meeting). The Collaboration Board agreed. Election of the Chair of the Collaboration Board Following the agreement to shorten the terms of both the Spokesperson and the Collaboration Board Chair, and to introduce a longer overlap period between the election and the start of the term, the election for the next Collaboration Board Chair was due in December 2007. If the old standard schedule specified in the Constitution were adapted to this date, then the Board should be informed at the present meeting that the election was being prepared. However, it was felt that the experience of the previous year's election of the Spokesperson had shown that it would be desirable to...

  16. The collaboration imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidumolu, Ram; Ellison, Jib; Whalen, John; Billman, Erin

    2014-04-01

    Addressing global sustainability challenges--including climate change, resource depletion, and ecosystem loss--is beyond the individual capabilities of even the largest companies. To tackle these threats, and unleash new value, companies and other stakeholders must collaborate in new ways that treat fragile and complex ecosystems as a whole. In this article, the authors draw on cases including the Latin American Water Funds Partnership, the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (led by Nike, Patagonia, and Walmart), and Action to Accelerate Recycling (a partnership between Alcoa, consumer packaged goods companies, and local governments, among others) to describe four new collaboration models that create shared value and address environmental protection across the value stream. Optimal collaborations focus on improving either business processes or outcomes. They start with a small group of key organizations, bring in project management expertise, link self-interest to shared interest, encourage productive competition, create quick wins, and, above all, build and maintain trust.

  17. Indico: A Collaboration Hub

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, P; Bossy, C; Gonzalez, J B; Pugh, M; Resco, A; Trzaskoma, J; Wachter, C

    2012-01-01

    Since 2009, the development of Indico has focused on usability, performance and new features, especially the ones related to meeting collaboration. Usability studies have resulted in the biggest change Indico has experienced up to now, a new web layout that makes user experience better. Performance improvements were also a key goal since 2010; the main features of Indico have been optimized remarkably. Along with usability and performance, new features have been added to Indico such as webchat integration, video services bookings, webcast and recording requests, designed to really reinforce Indico position as the main hub for all CERN collaboration services, and many others which aim is to complete the conference lifecycle management. Indico development is also moving towards a broader collaboration where other institutes, hosting their own Indico instance, can contribute to the project in order make it a better and more complete tool.

  18. Collaborative Economy and Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    or spare capacity make it difficult to theorise. In this chapter, we lay the foundation for a social science approach to the exploration of the collaborative economy and its relationship with tourism. We argue that “collaborative” and “economy” should be conceptualised in a broad and inclusive manner......The digital collaborative economy is one of the most fascinating developments to have claimed our attention in the last decade. Not only does it defy clear definition, but its historical links back to non-monetised sharing and gift economies and its contemporary foundations in monetising idling...... in order to avoid narrow theorisations and blinkered accounts that focus only on digitally-mediated, monetised transactions. A balance between individual and collective dimensions of the collaborative economy is also necessary if we are to understand its societal implications....

  19. Innovation and network collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Müller, Sabine; Jørgensen, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can benefit from network collaboration by enhancing opportunities for innovation. Managing the necessary collaboration to benefit from network participation may however be particularly challenging for SMEs due to their size...... and their inherent shortage of resources. In this paper, we propose that human resource management (HRM) practices may provide a means by which SMEs can increase their innovation capacity through network collaboration. Following a brief presentation of the relevant literature on networks, and innovation in networks...... in particular, and HRM, we analyse and evaluate the potential applicability of existing models for supporting innovation in SMEs participating in networks. Finally, we propose several lines of inquiry arising from our analysis that provide directions for future research....

  20. Collaborative Economy and Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The digital collaborative economy is one of the most fascinating developments to have claimed our attention in the last decade. Not only does it defy clear definition, but its historical links back to non-monetised sharing and gift economies and its contemporary foundations in monetising idling...... or spare capacity make it difficult to theorise. In this chapter, we lay the foundation for a social science approach to the exploration of the collaborative economy and its relationship with tourism. We argue that “collaborative” and “economy” should be conceptualised in a broad and inclusive manner...... in order to avoid narrow theorisations and blinkered accounts that focus only on digitally-mediated, monetised transactions. A balance between individual and collective dimensions of the collaborative economy is also necessary if we are to understand its societal implications....

  1. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON RHIC SPIN PHYSICS III AND IV, POLARIZED PARTONS AT HIGH Q2 REGION, AUGUST 3, 2000 AT BNL, OCTOBER 14, 2000 AT KYOTO UNIVERSITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUNCE, G.; VIGDOR, S.

    2001-03-15

    International workshop on II Polarized Partons at High Q2 region 11 was held at the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan on October 13-14, 2000, as a satellite of the international conference ''SPIN 2000'' (Osaka, Japan, October 16-21,2000). This workshop was supported by RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and by Yukawa Institute. The scientific program was focused on the upcoming polarized collider RHIC. The workshop was also an annual meeting of RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC). The number of participants was 55, including 28 foreign visitors and 8 foreign-resident Japanese participants, reflecting the international nature of the RHIC spin program. At the workshop there were 25 oral presentations in four sessions, (1) RHIC Spin Commissioning, (2) Polarized Partons, Present and Future, (3) New Ideas on Polarization Phenomena, (4) Strategy for the Coming Spin Running. In (1) the successful polarized proton commissioning and the readiness of the accelerator for the physics program impressed us. In (2) and (3) active discussions were made on the new structure function to be firstly measured at RHIC, and several new theoretical ideas were presented. In session (4) we have established a plan for the beam time requirement toward the first collision of polarized protons. These proceedings include the transparencies presented at the workshop. The discussion on ''Strategy for the Coming Spin Running'' was summarized by the chairman of the session, S. Vigdor and G. Bunce.

  2. Communication and collaboration technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    This is the third in a series of columns exploring health information technology (HIT) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The first column provided background information on the implementation of information technology throughout the health care delivery system, as well as the requisite informatics competencies needed for nurses to fully engage in the digital era of health care. The second column focused on information and resources to master basic computer competencies described by the TIGER initiative (Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform) as learning about computers, computer networks, and the transfer of data.1 This column will provide additional information related to basic computer competencies, focusing on communication and collaboration technologies. Computers and the Internet have transformed the way we communicate and collaborate. Electronic communication is the ability to exchange information through the use of computer equipment and software.2 Broadly defined, any technology that facilitates linking one or more individuals together is a collaborative tool. Collaboration using technology encompasses an extensive range of applications that enable groups of individuals to work together including e-mail, instant messaging (IM ), and several web applications collectively referred to as Web 2.0 technologies. The term Web 2.0 refers to web applications where users interact and collaborate with each other in a collective exchange of ideas generating content in a virtual community. Examples of Web 2.0 technologies include social networking sites, blogs, wikis, video sharing sites, and mashups. Many organizations are developing collaborative strategies and tools for employees to connect and interact using web-based social media technologies.3.

  3. Collaborating Across Borders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatten, Amy

    Physicists transcend national boundaries, ethnic differences, and scientific disciplines to address globally shared problems and questions. This talk will highlight how scientists have collaborated across borders - both geographic and scientific - to achieve ground-breaking discoveries through international scientific cooperation. The speaker also will address how international collaborations will be even more crucial for addressing future challenges faced by the physics community, such as building large-scale research facilities, strengthening scientific capacity in developing countries, fostering ''science for diplomacy'' in times of political tensions and other critical issues.

  4. Playful Collaboration (or Not)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Sproedt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    also be conducive to deep learning. As such, a game can engage different dimensions of learning and embed elements of active, collaborative, cooperative and problem-based learning. Building on this logic, we present an exploratory case study of the use of a particular board game in a class of a course......This paper explores how games and play, which are deeply rooted in human beings as a way to learn and interact, can be used to teach certain concepts and practices related to open collaborative innovation. We discuss how playing games can be a source of creativity, imagination and fun, while it can...

  5. Organizing for Asymmetric Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørn Flohr; Sørensen, Henrik B.

      The vision of new organizational forms consists of less-organized networks and alliances between organizations, in which collaborative capabilities are assumed to be crucial (Miles et al., 2005). The path to such new forms may go through fragile cooperative efforts. Despite the good will of many...... complexity to already complex models, we claim that our approach has practical implications: it offers rather simple diagnostic cues to change agents that are coping with the barriers to management and collaboration among loosely coupled units....

  6. Collaborative form(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunn, Wendy

    Gunn asks us to consider beauty as collaborative forms of action generated by moving between design by means of anthropology and anthropology by means of design. Specifically, she gives focus to play-like reflexions on practices of designing energy products, systems and infrastructure. Design...

  7. The Promise of Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauml, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Whether a teacher loves it or dreads it, lesson planning is a crucial step in the teaching process. Done effectively, collaborative lesson planning--in which teachers work together to design lessons--leads to increased professional learning, higher job satisfaction for teachers, and better lesson plans. The process poses challenges for both…

  8. Learning Music from Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, R. Keith

    2008-01-01

    I draw on two traditions of research: the social psychology of collaborative groups, and the ethnographic study of improvisational performance. I outline a general model of group creativity derived from these traditions. I show how the model can be used to better understand musical competence and performance, and I provide recommendations for how…

  9. The RD11 Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Unit

    1993-01-01

    Presentation of the RD11 Collaboration which is specialized in elaborating the second level trigger for the LHC. Also named EAST (Embedded Architectures for Second-level Triggering) in LHC Experiments.With John Strong, Rudy Bock, Werner Krischer, Gennaddi Klioutchnikov, Claudia Bondila, Iosif Legrand and Erwin Denes.

  10. Thematising Intercultural Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte; Askehave, Inger

    2013-01-01

    Taking a critical discursive approach (Potter and Wetherell, 1987; Wetherell and Potter, 1988, 1992) to analysing interview data, the article discusses the possible implications of top and middle managers’ constructions of intercultural collaboration for the day-to-day workings of a Danish...

  11. Collaboration in Print

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    During the Second World War, Germany's National Socialist regime mobilized German universities in order to support the war efforts through academic collaboration and a number of publications that were meant to legitimize Germany's territorial ambitions. The rector of the University of Kiel, Dr Paul...

  12. Collaboration Between Multistakeholder Standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Maclean, Camilla

    responsibility is unlikely to support a great variety of partly competing and overlapping standards. Increased collaboration between these standards would enhance both their impact and their adoption by firms. This report examines the nature, benefits, and shortcomings of existing multistakeholder standards...

  13. Collaborative Movie Annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zad, Damon Daylamani; Agius, Harry

    In this paper, we focus on metadata for self-created movies like those found on YouTube and Google Video, the duration of which are increasing in line with falling upload restrictions. While simple tags may have been sufficient for most purposes for traditionally very short video footage that contains a relatively small amount of semantic content, this is not the case for movies of longer duration which embody more intricate semantics. Creating metadata is a time-consuming process that takes a great deal of individual effort; however, this effort can be greatly reduced by harnessing the power of Web 2.0 communities to create, update and maintain it. Consequently, we consider the annotation of movies within Web 2.0 environments, such that users create and share that metadata collaboratively and propose an architecture for collaborative movie annotation. This architecture arises from the results of an empirical experiment where metadata creation tools, YouTube and an MPEG-7 modelling tool, were used by users to create movie metadata. The next section discusses related work in the areas of collaborative retrieval and tagging. Then, we describe the experiments that were undertaken on a sample of 50 users. Next, the results are presented which provide some insight into how users interact with existing tools and systems for annotating movies. Based on these results, the paper then develops an architecture for collaborative movie annotation.

  14. Team Collaboration Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeou-Fang; Schrock, Mitchell; Baldwin, John R.; Borden, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    The Ground Resource Allocation and Planning Environment (GRAPE 1.0) is a Web-based, collaborative team environment based on the Microsoft SharePoint platform, which provides Deep Space Network (DSN) resource planners tools and services for sharing information and performing analysis.

  15. Playful Collaboration (Or Not)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Sproedt, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how playing games can be used to teach intangible social interaction across boundaries, in particular within open collaborative innovation. We present an exploratory case study of how students learned from playing a board game in a graduate course of the international...... imply several opportunities and challenges within education and beyond....

  16. Collaboration in Augmented Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukosch, S.; Billinghurst, M.; Alem, L.; Kiyokawa, K.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a technology that allows users to view and interact in real time with virtual images seamlessly superimposed over the real world. AR systems can be used to create unique collaborative experiences. For example, co-located users can see shared 3D virtual objects that they int

  17. Learning Music from Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, R. Keith

    2008-01-01

    I draw on two traditions of research: the social psychology of collaborative groups, and the ethnographic study of improvisational performance. I outline a general model of group creativity derived from these traditions. I show how the model can be used to better understand musical competence and performance, and I provide recommendations for how…

  18. Collaborative Support for Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanahuja-Gavaldà, Josep M.; Olmos-Rueda, Patricia; Morón-Velasco, Mar

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, in Catalonia, students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are increasingly in regular schools although their presence, participation, learning and success are unequal. Barriers towards inclusion often depend on how to organise supporting at regular schools and the teachers' collaboration during this process. In this paper, the support…

  19. Collaboration in Augmented Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukosch, S.; Billinghurst, M.; Alem, L.; Kiyokawa, K.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a technology that allows users to view and interact in real time with virtual images seamlessly superimposed over the real world. AR systems can be used to create unique collaborative experiences. For example, co-located users can see shared 3D virtual objects that they int

  20. Intercultural Collaboration Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gertsen, Martine Cardel; Søderberg, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    follows their recognizing new dimensions of their conflicts, eventually furthering their collaboration. We explain how Greimas's actantial model is valuable when mapping differences between and changes in the narrators’ projects, alliances and oppositions in the course of their interaction. Thus, we make...

  1. Driving collaborative improvement processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, Rick; Gieskes, José; Fisscher, Olaf

    2002-01-01

    Continuous Improvement is a consolidated concept in theory and practice, mainly in the context of stand-alone companies. However, the battlefield of competition is increasingly moving from the level of individual firms to that of organisational settings based on loose company boundaries and collabor

  2. Driving collaborative improvement processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, R.; Gieskes, J.; Fisscher, O.

    2005-01-01

    Continuous improvement is a consolidated concept in theory and practice, mainly in the context of stand-alone companies. However, the battlefield of competition is increasingly moving from the level of individual firms to that of organizational settings based on loose company boundaries and collabor

  3. High-brightness picosecond ion beam source based on BNL Terawatt CO2 laser: Proof-of-principle experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkolnikov, Peter

    2012-10-04

    Under the continuing DOE support, we have: o assembled the basic experiment setup and then continued expanding it to include diverse diagnostics and to accommodate gas jet targets in addition to metal foils; o conducted an extensive study of our novel laser, significantly enhanced laser beam diagnostics, and improved relevant laser parameters; o turned our experiments into a truly international endeavor with active collaboration of close to 20 researchers in US, UK, and Germany; o conducted the first ever experiments with proton and ion acceleration by lasers interacting with overcritical plasma of gas jets; o for the first time directly observed radiation pressure acceleration of protons, including quasi-monoenergetic spectra promising for future applications; o for the first time directly observed quasi-stable, bubble-like plasma structures that likely evolved from relativistic laser-plasma solitons (post-solitons). Thus, we have confirmed a strong potential of a picosecond TW CO2 laser as a research tool in laser-plasma science and as a promising vehicle for future applications of laser ion acceleration. This has led to apparent increase of the interest in mid-IR laser ion acceleration. In particular, another major research group began extensive proton acceleration experiments with their own CO2 laser at UCLA. As a result, the mechanisms responsible for laser proton acceleration in gas jets have become somewhat clearer. It is also important to note that modest DOE funding played the role of a seed support ensuring the formation of a multinational research team, whose members contributed its time and equipment with value well in excess of that seed amount.

  4. Collaborations in Open Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard

    2015-01-01

    This thesis researches automated services for professionals aiming at starting collaborative learning projects in open learning environments, such as MOOCs. It investigates the theoretical backgrounds of team formation for collaborative learning. Based on the outcomes, a model is developed describin

  5. Collaborations in Open Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard

    2015-01-01

    This thesis researches automated services for professionals aiming at starting collaborative learning projects in open learning environments, such as MOOCs. It investigates the theoretical backgrounds of team formation for collaborative learning. Based on the outcomes, a model is developed

  6. Composition of the ATLAS Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Pater, Joleen; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration consists of about 5,000 members from 178 institutes in 38 countries. About half of the members of the collaboration are scientific authors of the papers, and there are about 1,200 students in the collaboration. This note presents data showing aspects of the composition of the collaboration; in particular the relative fraction of women is described at several levels within the hierarchy of the ATLAS experiment.

  7. International Scientific Collaboration of China: Collaborating Countries, Institutions and Individuals

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xianwen; Wang, Zhi; Peng, Lian; Wang, Chuanli

    2014-01-01

    Using bibliometric methods, we investigate China's international scientific collaboration from 3 levels of collaborating countries, institutions and individuals. We design a database in SQL Server, and make analysis of Chinese SCI papers based on the corresponding author field. We find that China's international scientific collaboration is focused on a handful of countries. Nearly 95% international co-authored papers are collaborated with only 20 countries, among which the USA account for more than 40% of all. Results also show that Chinese lineage in the international co-authorship is obvious, which means Chinese immigrant scientists are playing an important role in China's international scientific collaboration, especially in English-speaking countries.

  8. Security for ICT collaboration tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broenink, E.G.; Kleinhuis, G.; Fransen, F.

    2011-01-01

    In order for collaboration tools to be productive in an operational setting, an information base that is shared across the collaborating parties is needed. Therefore, a lot of research is done for tooling to create such a common information base in a collaboration tool. However, security is often no

  9. Developing and Evaluating Collaborative Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    undertaking. This paper considers the topic of assessing collaborative technologies in the context of military logistics . A historical view of collaborative...research in military logistics is provided, as well as a discussion of current research aimed at developing a framework for assessing collaborative technologies.

  10. International collaborations through the internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olson, Gary M.; David, Paul A.; Eksteen, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The past decade has seen remarkable advances in the availability of tools to support scientific collaboration at a distance. This is especially good news for international collaborations, where in the past constraints on collocation and travel have made such collaborations a major challenge. The ...

  11. Regulating Collaboration in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobber, Marjolein; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Verloop, Nico; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration in teacher education can be seen as a way to prepare student teachers for future social practices at school. When people collaborate with each other, they have to regulate their collaboration. In the Dutch teacher education programme that was investigated, student teachers were members of different types of groups, each of which had…

  12. Realities of Supply Chain Collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampstra, R.P.; Ashayeri, J.; Gattorna, J.

    2006-01-01

    Successful supply chain collaboration (SCC) practices are rather exceptional, yet collaboration is believed to be the single most pressing need in supply chain management.In this paper we discuss the realities of SCC, present prerequisites for the collaboration process, indicate where the process

  13. Security for ICT collaboration tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broenink, E.G.; Kleinhuis, G.; Fransen, F.

    2010-01-01

    In order for collaboration tools to be productive in an operational setting, an information base that is shared across the collaborating parties is needed. Therefore, a lot of research is done for tooling to create such a common information base in a collaboration tool. However, security is often

  14. Task modeling for collaborative authoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, van der Gerrit; Kulyk, Olga; Vyas, Dhaval; Kubbe, Onno; Ebert, Achim; Dittmar, A.; Forbrig, P.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation –Task analysis for designing modern collaborative work needs a more fine grained approach. Especially in a complex task domain, like collaborative scientific authoring, when there is a single overall goal that can only be accomplished only by collaboration between multiple roles, each req

  15. Collaboration in scientific practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenknecht, Susann

    2014-01-01

    This monograph investigates the collaborative creation of scientific knowledge in research groups. To do so, I combine philosophical analysis with a first-hand comparative case study of two research groups in experimental science. Qualitative data are gained through observation and interviews......, and I combine empirical insights with existing approaches to knowledge creation in philosophy of science and social epistemology. On the basis of my empirically-grounded analysis I make several conceptual contributions. I study scientific collaboration as the interaction of scientists within research...... groups. Thereby, I argue that research groups and their role in scientific practice deserve more philosophical attention than they have hitherto received. In contemporary natural science, research groups are key to the formulation and corroboration of scientific knowledge claims prior...

  16. Collaborative Tax Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    2016-01-01

    their customer bases decline to commercially non-viable levels. The analysis is framed by public governance literature and argues that the regulation is an example of collaborative or interactive governance, because the tax administrators do not regulate non-compliance directly, but activate external...... stakeholders, i.e. the consumers, in the regulatory craft. The study is based on a qualitative methodology and draws on a unique case of regulation in the cleaning sector. This sector is at high risk of tax evasion and human exploitation of vulnerable workers operating in the informal economy. The article has...... implications for how tax practitioners think about collaborative and interactive regulatory initiatives. While the tax administration in the study sees the approach as effective, the analysis shows that there are a number of caveats in relation to regularity, public listing, costs and revenue focus...

  17. Collaborative Knowledge Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Birgitte Ravn

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on the conditions for working with collaborative research in current academic settings. On the basis of reflections on goals, challenges and results of earlier projects, the author looks into how economic and political shifts and transformations in work have...... changed the conditions for shared knowledge production with the institutionalization of neo-liberal discourse of the knowledge economy as managerial regimes. She questions if context-specific enactments of the discourse of participation can be handled, when neoliberal managerial regimes guide research...... activities and other working practices and the identities of academics and other professionals who are inscribed as subjects in these regimes. The conclusion is, that we have to look for cracks in the wall and insist on collaborative research because it is it the process of “being in relation that forms...

  18. Collaborative Tax Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This article shows a new form of regulation within a tax administration where tax administrators abate tax evasion by nudging and motivating consumers to only purchase services from tax compliant businesses. This indirectly closes or forces tax evading businesses to change their practices, because...... their customer bases decline to commercially non-viable levels. The analysis is framed by public governance literature and argues that the regulation is an example of collaborative or interactive governance, because the tax administrators do not regulate non-compliance directly, but activate external...... implications for how tax practitioners think about collaborative and interactive regulatory initiatives. While the tax administration in the study sees the approach as effective, the analysis shows that there are a number of caveats in relation to regularity, public listing, costs and revenue focus...

  19. The Collaborative Heliophysics Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlburt, N.; Freeland, S.; Cheung, M.; Bose, P.

    2007-12-01

    The Collaborative Heliophysics Observatory (CHO) would provide a robust framework and enabling tools to fully utilize the VOs for scientific discovery and collaboration. Scientists across the realm of heliophysics would be able to create, use and share applications -- either as services using familiar tools or through intuitive workflows -- that orchestrate access to data across all virtual observatories. These applications can be shared freely knowing that proper recognition of data and processing components are acknowledged; that erroneous use of data is flagged; and that results from the analysis runs will in themselves be shared Ð all in a transparent and automatic fashion. In addition, the CHO would incorporate cross-VO models and tools to weave the various virtual observatories into a unified system. These provide starting points for interactions across the solar/heliospheric and heliospheric/magnetospheric boundaries.

  20. The Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avital, Michel; Andersson, Magnus; Nickerson, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    An economy based on the exchange of capital, assets and services between individuals has grown significantly, spurred by proliferation of internet-based platforms that allow people to share underutilized resources and trade with reasonably low transaction costs. The movement toward this economy...... of “sharing” translates into market efficiencies that bear new products, reframe established services, have positive environmental effects, and may generate overall economic growth. This emerging paradigm, entitled the collaborative economy, is disruptive to the conventional company-driven economic paradigm...... as evidenced by the large number of peer-to-peer based services that have captured impressive market shares sectors ranging from transportation and hospitality to banking and risk capital. The panel explores economic, social, and technological implications of the collaborative economy, how digital technologies...

  1. Making Collaborative Innovation Accountable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva

    The public sector is increasingly expected to be innovative, but the prize for a more innovative public sector might be that it becomes difficult to hold public authorities to account for their actions. The article explores the tensions between innovative and accountable governance, describes...... the foundation for these tensions in different accountability models, and suggest directions to take in analyzing the accountability of collaborative innovation processes....

  2. Collaborative Robotics Design Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-06

    in Multirobot Systems," IEEE Transactions on Robotics and Automation, Vol. 18, No. 5, October 2002 [3] Batavia, P., "A Survey of Collaborative... Transactions on Robotics and Automation, Vol. 18, No.5, Oct. 2002, pp 781-795. [21]Scholtz, J.C., "Human-Robot Interactions: Creating Synergistic Cyber...Parker, L.E, eds., Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2002, pp 185-193. [20] Roumeliotis, S., Bekey, G.A., "Distributed Multirobot Localization," IEEE

  3. Collaborative Public Management and Collaborative Governance: Conceptual Similarities and Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim Kapucu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been considerable interest among Public Administration scholars in collaborative public management and governance. However, there is a need for conceptual analysis of the two terms which share common aspects and differ essentially in scope and substance. We found that collaborative public management has a more local approach and focuses on the substance of collaboration practiced to solve societal problems and reach community goals at the organizational level. On the other hand, widely researched in management, political science, and public administration disciplines, collaborative governance has a global scope and focuses on both substance and process of collaboration in effectively solving societal problems with improved structures of nonhierarchical and decentralized institutions and mechanisms of citizen participation both through partnership projects and e-governance tools. The paper contributes to the better understanding of collaborative public management and collaborative governance with implications for both future research and practice.

  4. Collaborative exams: Cheating? Or learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyewon; Lasry, Nathaniel; Miller, Kelly; Mazur, Eric

    2017-03-01

    Virtually all human activity involves collaboration, and yet, collaboration during an examination is typically considered cheating. Collaborative assessments have not been widely adopted because of the perceived lack of individual accountability and the notion that collaboration during assessments simply causes propagation of correct answers. Hence, collaboration could help weaker students without providing much benefit to stronger students. In this paper, we examine student performance in open-ended, two-stage collaborative assessments comprised of an individually accountable round followed by an automatically scored, collaborative round. We show that collaboration entails more than just propagation of correct answers. We find greater rates of correct answers after collaboration for all students, including the strongest members of a team. We also find that half of teams that begin without a correct answer to propagate still obtain the correct answer in the collaborative round. Our findings, combined with the convenience of automatic feedback and grading of open-ended questions, provide a strong argument for adopting collaborative assessments as an integral part of education.

  5. State Technologies Advancement Collaborative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David S. Terry

    2012-01-30

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy

  6. Collaborative editing within the pervasive collaborative computing environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Marcia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Agarwal, Deb [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-09-11

    Scientific collaborations are established for a wide variety of tasks for which several communication modes are necessary, including messaging, file-sharing, and collaborative editing. In this position paper, we describe our work on the Pervasive Collaborative Computing Environment (PCCE) which aims to facilitate scientific collaboration within widely distributed environments. The PCCE provides a persistent space in which collaborators can locate each other, exchange messages synchronously and asynchronously and archive conversations. Our current interest is in exploring research and development of shared editing systems with the goal of integrating this technology into the PCCE. We hope to inspire discussion of technology solutions for an integrated approach to synchronous and asynchronous communication and collaborative editing.

  7. Collaboratively Constructed Contradictory Accounts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tunby Gulbrandsen, Ib; Just, Sine Nørholm

    2013-01-01

    the theoretical and methodological implications of the empirical findings. It is argued that although the findings are not in themselves surprising, they adequately reflect that online meaning formation is, indeed, a collaborative process in which centrifugal forces have centripetal consequences. Furthermore......Based on a mixed-method case study of online communication about the Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk, this article argues that online communication plays out as a centrifugal narration process with centripetal consequences. Through a content analysis of communication about Novo Nordisk...

  8. Blade reliability collaborative :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwill, Thomas D.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2013-04-01

    The Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) was started by the Wind Energy Technologies Department of Sandia National Laboratories and DOE in 2010 with the goal of gaining insight into planned and unplanned O&M issues associated with wind turbine blades. A significant part of BRC is the Blade Defect, Damage and Repair Survey task, which will gather data from blade manufacturers, service companies, operators and prior studies to determine details about the largest sources of blade unreliability. This report summarizes the initial findings from this work.

  9. Advances in Collaborative Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Yehuda; Bell, Robert

    The collaborative filtering (CF) approach to recommenders has recently enjoyed much interest and progress. The fact that it played a central role within the recently completed Netflix competition has contributed to its popularity. This chapter surveys the recent progress in the field. Matrix factorization techniques, which became a first choice for implementing CF, are described together with recent innovations. We also describe several extensions that bring competitive accuracy into neighborhood methods, which used to dominate the field. The chapter demonstrates how to utilize temporal models and implicit feedback to extend models accuracy. In passing, we include detailed descriptions of some the central methods developed for tackling the challenge of the Netflix Prize competition.

  10. Collaboration or contestation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Middleton, Geoff; Evans, Adam Brian; Henderson, Hannah;

    2016-01-01

    -agency approach. The strength of health promotion initiatives relies on formed ‘coalitions’ or partnerships and the subsequent collaboration in the design, delivery and administration of the programme’s multiple components. Advantages of partnership are the pooling of resources, avoiding duplication...... and potentially understanding the social context more holistically given the engagement of stakeholders’ from different perspectives. Despite best intentions, these large community-based programmes are not without difficulties and recent literature exposes stakeholder concerns particularly in relation...... in the administration of community-based obesity prevention programmes should carefully consider the components which lead to facilitation of efficiency in the capacity building process discussed in this commentary....

  11. The Efficient Windows Collaborative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petermann, Nils

    2006-03-31

    The Efficient Windows Collaborative (EWC) is a coalition of manufacturers, component suppliers, government agencies, research institutions, and others who partner to expand the market for energy efficient window products. Funded through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy, the EWC provides education, communication and outreach in order to transform the residential window market to 70% energy efficient products by 2005. Implementation of the EWC is managed by the Alliance to Save Energy, with support from the University of Minnesota and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  12. Globally Collaborative Experiential Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi UTSUMI

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The Global University System (GUS [Utsumi, et al, 2003] is a worldwide initiative to create advanced telecommunications infrastructure for access to educational resources across national and cultural boundaries for global peace. GUS aims to create a worldwide consortium of universities to provide the underdeveloped world with access to 21st Century education via broadband Internet technologies. The aim is to achieve “education and healthcare for all,” anywhere, anytime and at any pace. The GUS works in the major regions of the globe with partnerships of higher education and healthcare institutions. Learners in these regions will be able to take their courses from member institutions around the world to receive a GUS degree. These learners and their professors from partner institutions will also form a global forum for exchange of ideas and information and for conducting collaborative research and development with emerging global GRID computer network technology. Globally Collaborative Environmental Peace Gaming (GCEPG project [Utsumi, 2003] with a globally distributed computer simulation system, focusing on the issue of environment and sustainable development in developing countries, is to train would-be decision-makers in crisis management, conflict resolution, and negotiation techniques basing on “facts and figures.” The GUS will supply game players from around the world.

  13. A collaborative adventure

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    At the start of a new year, I’d like to wish all of you and your families a happy, successful and peaceful 2014. It’s a year that holds particular significance for CERN, as on 29 September it will be 60 years since the Organization was founded.   As CERN turns 60, it is still going strong, maintaining its underlying attraction of international collaboration for basic science. Since its foundation in 1954, it has grown steadily and this year begins well as we welcome a new Member State, Israel. CERN and Israel already have a long history of mutual collaboration and now we can look forward to increasingly fruitful scientific cooperation. Israel’s accession brings the total number of Member States to 21, and other countries are in the stages leading up to becoming Members or Associates, while still others are expressing interest. CERN is becoming a global success, while retaining its original, European flavour. This year’s events for the 60th anniversary ...

  14. Collaboration in Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Dall'Asta, Luca; Pin, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The very notion of social network implies that linked individuals interact repeatedly with each other. This allows them not only to learn successful strategies and adapt to them, but also to condition their own behavior on the behavior of others, in a strategic forward looking manner. Game theory of repeated games shows that these circumstances are conducive to the emergence of collaboration in simple games of two players. We investigate the extension of this concept to the case where players are engaged in a local contribution game and show that rationality and credibility of threats identify a class of Nash equilibria -- that we call "collaborative equilibria" -- that have a precise interpretation in terms of sub-graphs of the social network. For large network games, the number of such equilibria is exponentially large in the number of players. When incentives to defect are small, equilibria are supported by local structures whereas when incentives exceed a threshold they acquire a non-local nature, which r...

  15. A neighbourly collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2014-01-01

    CERN and its host territories in France have created a new partnership aimed at reinforcing and making permanent numerous projects for the people who live in the region.   Over the last four years, CERN has developed a number of initiatives with its partners in Geneva and neighbouring France. To formalise and improve the structure of this collaboration, CERN, the French government, the Conseil général de l’Ain and the Communauté de communes du Pays de Gex have recently formed a quadripartite partnership. The CERN Director-General has been appointed Chair of the committee leading the partnership for this year. “Due to its geographical location, activities and aims, CERN has always placed great emphasis on dialogue with its neighbours,” explains Friedemann Eder, Head of the Relations with the Host States Service.  “The current Director-General wanted to boost dialogue and collaboration – an aim that the auth...

  16. COLLABORATIVE DESIGN OF MULTIPHYSICS PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Shaoyun; LI Shiqi

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative design is recommendedto solve multiphysics problems (MPPS). Firstly,mathematical model of MPPS is constructed and solved by a proposed partitioned method, analysis of which suggests that collaborative design be feasible to solve MPPS. As the key technology of collaborative design of MPPS, a task collaboration algorithm is then proposed. To develop the application framework of collaborative design, applied unified process(AUP) is proposed based on rational unified process(RUP). Then AUP is used to develop the collaborative design platform, whose function framework is constructed according to the process of project management. Finally three MPPS are solved on this platform and the results suggest that the proposed model, algorithm and framework be feasible.

  17. The collaborative Economy and Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dredge, Dianne; Gyimóthy, Szilvia

    2015-01-01

    House swapping, ridesharing, voluntourism, couchsurfing, dinner hosting and similar innovations epitomize the collaborative economy. The rise of the collaborative economy, also known as collaborative consumption, the sharing economy and peer-to-peer consumption, has been fuelled by a range...... experiences; and higher levels of consumer risk-taking balanced against mechanisms such as peer-to-peer feedback designed to engender trust between producers and consumers. This paper explores and critically assesses the collaborative economy and its implications for tourism industrial systems. It achieves...... this by mapping out the current knowledge dynamics characterising tourism and the collaborative economy, paying particular attention to the asymmetries of knowledge that are emerging. The paper then identifies and critically discusses five pervasive claims being made about the collaborative economy, arguing...

  18. Coordination theory and collaboration technology

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, Gary M; Smith, John B

    2001-01-01

    The National Science Foundation funded the first Coordination Theory and Collaboration Technology initiative to look at systems that support collaborations in business and elsewhere. This book explores the global revolution in human interconnectedness. It will discuss the various collaborative workgroups and their use in technology. The initiative focuses on processes of coordination and cooperation among autonomous units in human systems, in computer and communication systems, and in hybrid organizations of both systems. This initiative is motivated by three scientific issues which have been

  19. Supporting collaborative computing and interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McParland, Charles [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Perry, Marcia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-05-22

    To enable collaboration on the daily tasks involved in scientific research, collaborative frameworks should provide lightweight and ubiquitous components that support a wide variety of interaction modes. We envision a collaborative environment as one that provides a persistent space within which participants can locate each other, exchange synchronous and asynchronous messages, share documents and applications, share workflow, and hold videoconferences. We are developing the Pervasive Collaborative Computing Environment (PCCE) as such an environment. The PCCE will provide integrated tools to support shared computing and task control and monitoring. This paper describes the PCCE and the rationale for its design.

  20. Information handling in collaborative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Collins

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available UK public policy makers have a growing interest in collaborative research, where academics work with public, private or third sector partners on a joint project which supports the partner’s aims. This paper reports on the findings of five case studies, looking at how information is sourced, managed, used and shared within collaborative research projects. It finds that researchers within collaborative projects have similar information management issues as are known to exist within academia more broadly, but that the specific conditions which govern research collaborations mean that interventions to improve or support information management must be carefully tailored.

  1. Adaptive Collaboration Support Systems: Designing Collaboration Support for Dynamic Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janeiro, J.; Knoll, S.W.; Lukosch, S.G.; Kolfschoten, G.L.

    2012-01-01

    Today, engineering systems offer a variety of local and webbased applications to support collaboration by assisting groups in structuring activities, generating and sharing data, and improving group communication. To ensure the quality of collaboration, engineering system design needs to analyze and

  2. Persuading Collaboration: Analysing Persuasion in Online Collaboration Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McHugh, Ronan; Larsen, Birger

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we propose that online collaborative production sites can be fruitfully analysed in terms of the general theoretical framework of Persuasive Design. OpenStreetMap and The Pirate Bay are used as examples of collaborative production sites. Results of a quantitative analysis of persuas...

  3. Organizing for Asymmetric Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørn Flohr; Sørensen, Henrik B.

    participants and optimistic plans for cooperation between equals there are still poorly understood barriers, and attempts at interorganizational cooperation may lead to frustration. It is too often assumed that the parties are equally eager, trusting, and dependent or at least have some symmetry in how......' different motives and different situational factors appear in an interorganizational setting. We classify interfaces according to the symmetry/asymmetry in the respective parent organizations' resources, commitment, and control of representatives and indicate how  classification schemes can be used......  The vision of new organizational forms consists of less-organized networks and alliances between organizations, in which collaborative capabilities are assumed to be crucial (Miles et al., 2005). The path to such new forms may go through fragile cooperative efforts. Despite the good will of many...

  4. Collaboration across clinical silos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, M Jane

    2013-01-01

    We face significant challenges to healthcare integration as well as tremendous opportunities to advance healthcare reform as we endeavor to provide a coordinated continuum of high-value services to defined populations for which we are clinically and fiscally accountable. As we move away from fee-for-service and poorly coordinated care toward value-based and bundled care, systems such as UnityPoint Health and clinical entities such as Piedmont Heart are leading the way, breaking down their clinical silos, improving value and access, and gaining patient loyalty. Evidence points us to sound principles that can inform the clinical integration process. Health systems must reinvent themselves, reengineer clinical operations, and streamline processes, all of which require collaboration across traditional silos, both inside our organizations and outside into our wider communities, to ensure that our patients receive the safe, high-value care they deserve.

  5. Collaborative Hierarchical Sparse Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Sprechmann, Pablo; Sapiro, Guillermo; Eldar, Yonina C

    2010-01-01

    Sparse modeling is a powerful framework for data analysis and processing. Traditionally, encoding in this framework is done by solving an l_1-regularized linear regression problem, usually called Lasso. In this work we first combine the sparsity-inducing property of the Lasso model, at the individual feature level, with the block-sparsity property of the group Lasso model, where sparse groups of features are jointly encoded, obtaining a sparsity pattern hierarchically structured. This results in the hierarchical Lasso, which shows important practical modeling advantages. We then extend this approach to the collaborative case, where a set of simultaneously coded signals share the same sparsity pattern at the higher (group) level but not necessarily at the lower one. Signals then share the same active groups, or classes, but not necessarily the same active set. This is very well suited for applications such as source separation. An efficient optimization procedure, which guarantees convergence to the global opt...

  6. Exploiting Publication Contents and Collaboration Networks for Collaborator Recommendation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangjie Kong

    Full Text Available Thanks to the proliferation of online social networks, it has become conventional for researchers to communicate and collaborate with each other. Meanwhile, one critical challenge arises, that is, how to find the most relevant and potential collaborators for each researcher? In this work, we propose a novel collaborator recommendation model called CCRec, which combines the information on researchers' publications and collaboration network to generate better recommendation. In order to effectively identify the most potential collaborators for researchers, we adopt a topic clustering model to identify the academic domains, as well as a random walk model to compute researchers' feature vectors. Using DBLP datasets, we conduct benchmarking experiments to examine the performance of CCRec. The experimental results show that CCRec outperforms other state-of-the-art methods in terms of precision, recall and F1 score.

  7. Accounting Experiences in Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmond, Tracie; Tiggeman, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses incorporating collaborative learning into accounting classes as a response to the Accounting Education Change Commission's call to install a more active student learner in the classroom. Collaborative learning requires the students to interact with each other and with the material within the classroom setting. It is a…

  8. Job Migration: A Collaborative Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Music teachers often change jobs several times during their careers. Reasons for job changes vary, but regardless, these changes bring a different set of challenges. Sharing knowledge and learning are part and parcel of collaboration. So what if, as education professionals, music teachers decided to collaborate during job migrations? For all music…

  9. Facilitating Collaboration in Online Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Geralyn E.; Roberts, Kathryn L.

    2017-01-01

    Demonstrating the ability to collaborate effectively is essential for students moving into 21st century workplaces. Employers are expecting new hires to already possess group-work skills and will seek evidence of their ability to cooperate, collaborate, and complete projects with colleagues, including remotely or at a distance. Instructional…

  10. Job Migration: A Collaborative Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Music teachers often change jobs several times during their careers. Reasons for job changes vary, but regardless, these changes bring a different set of challenges. Sharing knowledge and learning are part and parcel of collaboration. So what if, as education professionals, music teachers decided to collaborate during job migrations? For all music…

  11. The Limits of Collaborative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewkowicz, Jo A.; Nunan, David

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development of a collaborative evaluation model and its application to a curricular innovation project within a secondary school system in Hong Kong. Focuses on the limits of collaboration in long-term evaluation projects with multiple stakeholders. (Author/VWL)

  12. The Limits of Collaborative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewkowicz, Jo A.; Nunan, David

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development of a collaborative evaluation model and its application to a curricular innovation project within a secondary school system in Hong Kong. Focuses on the limits of collaboration in long-term evaluation projects with multiple stakeholders. (Author/VWL)

  13. Geo-collaboration under stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looije, R.; Brake, G.M. te; Neerincx, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    “Most of the science and decision making involved in geo-information is the product of collaborative teams. Current geospatial technologies are a limiting factor because they do not provide any direct support for group efforts. In this paper we present a method to enhance geo-collaboration by commun

  14. English Language Learner Engineering Collaborative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergraft, Katy; Daugherty, Michael K.; Rossetti, Charles

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to develop an engineering design project that would deliver the necessary content and reach out to the English Language Learner (ELL) community, faculty in the Engineering Academy at Springdale High School in Springdale, Arkansas instituted the ELL Engineering Collaborative. The ELL Engineering Collaborative has four primary goals…

  15. Networks of Collaboration in Oligopoly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Goyal (Sanjeev); S. Joshi

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn an oligopoly, prior to competing in the market, firms have an opportunity to form pair-wise collaborative links with other firms. These pair-wise links involve a commitment of resources and lead to lower costs of production of the collaborating firms. The collection of pair-wise links

  16. Collaborative argumentation in academic education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, A.; Andriessen, J.; Kanselaar, G.

    2002-01-01

    The general purpose of this research is to discover principles for the design of educational tasks that provoke collaborative argumentation. The specific research question concentrates on the relationship between question asking and argumentation and is examined in three different collaborative lear

  17. Knowledge Convergence and Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Heisawn; Chi, Michelene T. H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper operationalized the notion of knowledge convergence and assessed quantitatively how much knowledge convergence occurred during collaborative learning. Knowledge convergence was defined as an increase in common knowledge where common knowledge referred to the knowledge that all collaborating partners had. Twenty pairs of college students…

  18. Breakdowns in collaborative information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2010-01-01

    of the use of the electronic medication record adopted in a Danish healthcare region and of the reports of five years of medication incidents at Danish hospitals. The results show that breakdowns in collaborative information seeking is a major source of medication incidents, that most of these breakdowns......Collaborative information seeking is integral to many professional activities. In hospital work, the medication process encompasses continual seeking for information and collaborative grounding of information. This study investigates breakdowns in collaborative information seeking through analyses...... are breakdowns in collaborative grounding rather than information seeking, that the medication incidents mainly concern breakdowns in the use of records as opposed to oral communication, that the breakdowns span multiple degrees of separation between clinicians, and that the electronic medication record has...

  19. Collaboration Scripts--A Conceptual Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollar, Ingo; Fischer, Frank; Hesse, Friedrich W.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a conceptual analysis of collaboration scripts used in face-to-face and computer-mediated collaborative learning. Collaboration scripts are scaffolds that aim to improve collaboration through structuring the interactive processes between two or more learning partners. Collaboration scripts consist of at least five components:…

  20. Wikis and Collaborative Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Binbin; Niiya, Melissa; Warschauer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    While collaborative learning and collaborative writing can be of great value to student learning, the implementation of a technology-supported collaborative learning environment is a challenge. With their built-in features for supporting collaborative writing and social communication, wikis are a promising platform for collaborative learning;…

  1. A Design Approach for Collaboration Processes: A Multi-Method Design Science Study in Collaboration Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, G.L.; De Vreede, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Collaboration Engineering is an approach for the design and deployment of repeatable collaboration processes that can be executed by practitioners without the support of collaboration professionals such as facilitators. A critical challenge in Collaboration Engineering concerns how the design activi

  2. Collaborative Multicash Servicedesk – An Intelligent Collaborative Banking System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Ciurea

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the role of intelligent agents in collaborative systems and their use in the banking information systems. The Collaborative Multicash Servicedesk application is presented, seen as an intelligent banking system and being optimized for mobile access. A real data analysis is performed in order to determine which are the most frequently requests of the bank customers and how these problems can be minimized. Some further research perspectives are indicated in order to analyze how intelligent are the collaborative banking systems.

  3. RESTful Web Services at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, R.

    2011-06-14

    RESTful (REpresentational State Transfer) web services are an alternative implementation to SOAP/RPC web services in a client/server model. BNLs IT Division has started deploying RESTful Web Services for enterprise data retrieval and manipulation. Data is currently used by system administrators for tracking configuration information and as it is expanded will be used by Cyber Security for vulnerability management and as an aid to cyber investigations. This talk will describe the implementation and outstanding issues as well as some of the reasons for choosing RESTful over SOAP/RPC and future directions.

  4. Highlights from BNL-RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2012-01-01

    Recent highlights from Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are reviewed and discussed. Topics include: Discovery of the strongly interacting Quark Gluon Plasma (sQGP) in 2005; RHIC machine operation in 2011 as well as latest achievements from the superconducting Magnet Division and the National Synchrotron Light Source II project. Highlights from QGP physics at RHIC include: comparison of new measurements of charged multiplicity in A+A collisions by ALICE at the LHC to previous RHIC measurements; Observation of the anti-alpha particle by the STAR experiment; Collective Flow, including the Triangular Flow discovery and the latest results on v3; the RHIC beam energy scan in search of the QCD critical point. The pioneering use at RHIC of hard-scattering as a probe of the sQGP will also be reviewed and the latest results presented including: jet-quenching via suppression of high pT particles and two particle correlations; new results on fragmentation functions using gamma...

  5. Collaborating on Referring Expressions

    CERN Document Server

    Heeman, P A; Heeman, Peter A.; Hirst, Graeme

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a computational model of how conversational participants collaborate in order to make a referring action successful. The model is based on the view of language as goal-directed behavior. We propose that the content of a referring expression can be accounted for by the planning paradigm. Not only does this approach allow the processes of building referring expressions and identifying their referents to be captured by plan construction and plan inference, it also allows us to account for how participants clarify a referring expression by using meta-actions that reason about and manipulate the plan derivation that corresponds to the referring expression. To account for how clarification goals arise and how inferred clarification plans affect the agent, we propose that the agents are in a certain state of mind, and that this state includes an intention to achieve the goal of referring and a plan that the agents are currently considering. It is this mental state that sanctions the adoption of g...

  6. Collaboratively Patching Linked Data

    CERN Document Server

    Knuth, Magnus; Sack, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Today's Web of Data is noisy. Linked Data often needs extensive preprocessing to enable efficient use of heterogeneous resources. While consistent and valid data provides the key to efficient data processing and aggregation we are facing two main challenges: (1st) Identification of erroneous facts and tracking their origins in dynamically connected datasets is a difficult task, and (2nd) efforts in the curation of deficient facts in Linked Data are exchanged rather rarely. Since erroneous data often is duplicated and (re-)distributed by mashup applications it is not only the responsibility of a few original publishers to keep their data tidy, but progresses to be a mission for all distributers and consumers of Linked Data too. We present a new approach to expose and to reuse patches on erroneous data to enhance and to add quality information to the Web of Data. The feasibility of our approach is demonstrated by example of a collaborative game that patches statements in DBpedia data and provides notifications ...

  7. Adaptation in Collaborative Governance Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K.

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program.

  8. Collaborative Windows – A User Interface Concept for Distributed Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbensen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Distributed collaboration is the work arrangement in which people distributed across different locations collaborate on achieving a common goal. One particular domain of work that has embraced distributed collaboration is software development. Global software development is the special kind...... of software development where the production of software is carried out by geographically dispersed people. Such work however, is challenged by the distance between people and a strategy for handling the complex dependencies that exists in distributed software development is to engage in closely coupled work...... where close collaboration and frequent meetings drive the work. One way to achieve this way of working is to implement the Scrum software development framework. Implementing Scrum in globalized context however, requires transforming the Scrum development methods to a distributed setup and extensive use...

  9. Persuading Collaboration: Analysing Persuasion in Online Collaboration Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McHugh, Ronan; Larsen, Birger

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we propose that online collaborative production sites can be fruitfully analysed in terms of the general theoretical framework of Persuasive Design. OpenStreetMap and The Pirate Bay are used as examples of collaborative production sites. Results of a quantitative analysis of persuas...... of persuasion in these sites are presented and discussed. This framework may be of value to other researchers interested in design of persuasive systems.......In this paper we propose that online collaborative production sites can be fruitfully analysed in terms of the general theoretical framework of Persuasive Design. OpenStreetMap and The Pirate Bay are used as examples of collaborative production sites. Results of a quantitative analysis...

  10. Collaborate The Art of We

    CERN Document Server

    Sanker, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The hands-on guide for the new way to compete: collaboration The 21st Century's counterpart to Sun Tzu's The Art of War: Dan Sanker's Collaborate: The Art of We, gives a new generation of pioneering business enthusiasts a practical guide to capture tomorrow's business opportunities. Globalization, technology advances, and cultural changes have opened the door for a new winning formula that combines traditional competition with contemporary collaborative business practices. Readers change their mindsets and learn practical tools to tap into talent, overcome organizational obstacles, and create

  11. International collaborations through the internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olson, Gary M.; David, Paul A.; Eksteen, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The past decade has seen remarkable advances in the availability of tools to support scientific collaboration at a distance. This is especially good news for international collaborations, where in the past constraints on collocation and travel have made such collaborations a major challenge...... because something is possible does not mean it will happen. Many forces involving incentives to work together through emerging technologies and policies that govern how such work might proceed serve as inhibitors to success. The papers in the session that led to this chapter explore a number...

  12. Collaborative writing: Tools and tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eapen Bell

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Majority of technical writing is done by groups of experts and various web based applications have made this collaboration easy. Email exchange of word processor documents with tracked changes used to be the standard technique for collaborative writing. However web based tools like Google docs and Spreadsheets have made the process fast and efficient. Various versioning tools and synchronous editors are available for those who need additional functionality. Having a group leader who decides the scheduling, communication and conflict resolving protocols is important for successful collaboration.

  13. When is collaboration not collaboration? When it's militarized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Karen

    2012-03-01

    In adopting the medical lobby's preferred definition of collaboration where midwives are legally compelled to seek endorsement for their care plan from an obstetrician, Determination 2010 connotes a form of militarized collaboration and thus negates all that genuine collaboration stands for--equality, mutual trust and reciprocal respect. Using Critical Discourse Analysis, the first half of this paper analyses the submissions from medical, midwifery and consumer peak organisations to the Maternity Services Review and Senate reviews held between 2008 and 2010 showing that Determination 2010 privileges the medical lobby worldview in adopting a vertical definition of collaboration. The second half of the paper responds to the principal assumption of Determination 2010--that midwives do not voluntarily collaborate. It argues by reference to a qualitative inquiry conducted into select caseload maternity units in South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales during 2009-2010 that this presupposition is erroneous. The evidence shows that genuine collaboration is possible without legislative force but it requires a coalition of the willing among senior midwives and obstetricians to institute regular interdisciplinary meetings and clinical reviews and to model respectful behaviour to new entrants.

  14. Interdisciplinary Educational Collaborations: Chemistry and Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Ronald S.; Woo, Daniel T.; Hudson, Benjamin T.; Mori, Joji C.; Ngan, Evey S. M.; Pak, Wing-Yee

    2007-01-01

    Research collaborations between chemists and other scientists resulted in significant outcomes such as development of software. Such collaboration provided a realistic learning experience for computer science students.

  15. Collaborative competency in physiotherapy students: Implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Collaborative competency in physiotherapy students: Implications for interprofessional education. ... To describe the development of the ability to collaborate in a South African university physiotherapy department. Methods. ... Article Metrics.

  16. Proactive Assessment for Collaboration Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa L. Ju

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a government–academia–industry joint training project that produces Vietnamese midlevel technical managers. To ensure collaboration success, a proactive assessment methodology was developed as a supplement to the conventional project management practices. In the postproject feedback, the funding agencies acknowledged that the project fulfilled its contractual obligations and achieved its objectives. The implementing university was pleased as it broke ground in this type of collaboration in Taiwan. The industrial partners, however, were not so sure about the effectiveness of this collaborative training endeavor because there were many skirmishes between company supervisors and Vietnamese interns caused by the interns’ self-interested perception and expectation. Consequently, a theoretical framework for predicting internship acceptance and preventing unfavorable perceptions was proposed to strengthen the proactive assessment methodology. Collaboration research, funding agencies, academia, and industry could all benefit from this study.

  17. Introduction to the Cochrane Collaboration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The Cochrane Collaboration was established in 1993, and named after the epidemiologist, Archie Cochrane (1909-1988), a British medical researcher who contributed greatly to the development of epidemiology as a science.The organisation benefits from thousands of contributors worldwide,working collaboratively from w ithin many independent groups of people ('entities').For this reason,the term 'collaboration' is used.The Cochrane Collaboration's principles include fostering good communication, open decision-making and teamwork; reducing barriers to contributing; and encouraging diversity.These things cannot be achieved without people co-operating with each other, setting aside self-interest,and working together to provide evidence with which to improve health care.

  18. Facilitating Collaboration through Design Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Eva; Messeter, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    In recent years both companies and research communities call for collaborative work practices and user-centered approaches in various design fields. There are several challenges and issues to take into consideration. For instance there is a need to find ways of collaborating across various...... in collaboration with industrial partners and potential users, and use of the games in three educational settings.The overall aim of the design games is to help facilitate a user-centered design process for cross-disciplinary design groups early in the design process. Framing collaborative design activities...... understanding of the development task. This paper presents a set of four design games, which offers solutions to the challenges mentioned. The design games have been developed in the Space Studio during several projects and years. Here experiences are discussed on the basis of two research projects carried out...

  19. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Update (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, S.; Keller, J.; Glinsky, C.

    2013-10-01

    This presentation was given at the Sandia Reliability Workshop in August 2013 and provides information on current statistics, a status update, next steps, and other reliability research and development activities related to the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative.

  20. Collaborative Strategy on Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collaborative Strategy on Bed Bugs was developed by the Federal Bed Bug Workgroup to clarify the federal role in bed bug control and highlight ways that government, community, academia and private industry can work together on bed bug issues.

  1. Contextual Modelling of Collaboration System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafaa DACHRY

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Faced with new environmental constraints, firms decide to collaborate in collective entities and adopt new patterns of behavior. So, this firms’ collaboration becomes an unavoidable approach. Indeed, our aim interest in our study is to propose a collaborative information system for supply chain. Our proposed platform ensures cooperation and information sharing between partners in real time. In fact, several questions have to be asked: What is the information nature may be shared between partners? What processes are implemented between actors? What functional services are supported by the platform? In order to answer these questions, we present, in this article, our methodological approach of modelling, called CMCS (Contextual Modelling of Collaborative System

  2. Collaborative on-line teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin

    2007-01-01

      It is often stressed that the pedagogic models and approaches of Collaborative Online Learning support learners' shared knowledge building within collaborating groups of learners, the individual construction of knowledge as well as the formation of an ongoing learning Community of Practice...... exclude students from participating in the learning Community of Practice. Conclusively, the case study identifies slowly emerging tendencies that may be detected and observed at earlier stages, thus pointing to areas requiring awareness in online learning environments....

  3. Developing Collaborative Product Development Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahnke, Volker; Tran, Yen

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative product development capabilities support a company’s product innovation activities. In the context of the fast fashion sector, this paper examines the development of the product development capabilities (PDC) that align product development capabilities in a dual innovation context, ......-level, simultaneous learning processes and highlight the role of human agency in capability development with partners. Building on our analyses, we advance propositions for future research and managerial practices on developing dynamic collaboration capabilities....

  4. Organizing for the Collaborative Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim; Hasle, Peter; Nielsen, Anders Paarup

    2016-01-01

    To meet demands for high quality and efficient care, hospitals increasingly organize horizontally around standardized processes (like lean and care pathways) and/or set-up formal structural arrangements such as using performance boards, having daily huddles or assigning specific roles. This trend...... design to foster and maintain collaboration, thereby pointing towards mechanisms for developing the collaborative hospital. The findings also provide insights to managers which can be utilized for the further development of hospitals....

  5. Collaborative on-line teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin

    2007-01-01

      It is often stressed that the pedagogic models and approaches of Collaborative Online Learning support learners' shared knowledge building within collaborating groups of learners, the individual construction of knowledge as well as the formation of an ongoing learning Community of Practice...... exclude students from participating in the learning Community of Practice. Conclusively, the case study identifies slowly emerging tendencies that may be detected and observed at earlier stages, thus pointing to areas requiring awareness in online learning environments....

  6. The testis-specific VAD1.3/AEP1 interacts with {beta}-actin and syntaxin 1 and directs peri-nuclear/Golgi expression with bipartite nucleus localization (BNL) sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Yan; Gao, Jing [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Hong Kong); Yeung, William S.B. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Hong Kong); Centre for Reproduction, Development and Growth, Hong Kong Jockey Club Clinical Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Hong Kong); Lee, Kai-Fai, E-mail: ckflee@hkucc.hku.hk [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Hong Kong); Centre for Reproduction, Development and Growth, Hong Kong Jockey Club Clinical Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Hong Kong)

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} VAD1.3 interacts {beta}-actin and syntaxin 1. {yields} VAD1.3 colocalizes {beta}-actin in spermatids. {yields} The bipartite nucleus localization (BNL) signal is important for peri-nuclear/Golgi expression in transfected cells. {yields} The C-terminal region of VAD1.3 direct nuclei localization. -- Abstract: VAD1.3 (AEP1), a novel testis-specific gene, was first isolated from the testis of a retinol-treated vitamin-A-deficient (VAD) rat model. It is expressed at the acrosomal region of spermatids from postnatal day 25. VAD1.3 immunoreactivity is present in rat, human, monkey and porcine spermatids and spermatozoa, suggesting that VAD1.3 may play a role in acrosome formation. However, direct evidence on the detailed sub-cellular localization of the VAD1.3 protein in the acrosome and how VAD1.3 is involved in acrosome formation remains largely unknown. Here, we isolated and identified VAD1.3 interacting proteins by immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry, and determined the functional motifs of VAD1.3 that were important for its specific sub-cellular location in vitro. We found that VAD1.3 bound to syntaxin 1 and {beta}-actin proteins in vitro. Immunogold electron microscopic study localized VAD1.3 immunoreactivity to the acrosome membranes and matrix, and colocalized it with the {beta}-actin protein. The full-length GFP-VAD (1-3601) and GFP-VAD (1-730) fusion proteins that contain the bipartite nucleus localization (BNL) signal were located in the peri-nucleus/Golgi of the transfected cells. In addition, the GFP signal colocalized with the endoplasmic reticulum marker and the syntaxin 1 protein in the transfected HeLa and GC-2spd cells. The C-terminal GFP-VAD (1770-3601) was expressed in the nucleus. Taken together, VAD1.3 interacts with {beta}-actin and syntaxin 1 in vitro. The BNL signal may mediate the peri-nuclei localization of the protein that may interact with syntaxin 1 and {beta}-actin for acrosome formation in

  7. Assessment of (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strijbos, J. -W.

    2011-01-01

    Within the (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning (CS)CL research community, there has been an extensive dialogue on theories and perspectives on learning from collaboration, approaches to scaffold (script) the collaborative process, and most recently research methodology. In contrast, the issue of assessment of collaborative learning has…

  8. Reminiscences, collaborations and reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, T

    1994-02-01

    their subunits of plant-type enzyme molecules derived from the prokaryotic photosynthetic bacteria; (c) molecular evolution of RuBisCO genes; (d) mode of actions (formation, intracellular transport and secretion) of rice seed α-amylase and its structural characteristics (distinctive glycosylation), and (e) DNA methylation and regulatory mechanism of photosynthesis gene expression in plastids (amyloplasts). In each step of my research, I shared joy, excitement, disappointment, and agony with my colleagues, an experience that may be common to all researchers. Although it is now becoming well recognized among the scientific community in Japan, I want to point out that interaction of multinational scientific minds in the laboratory produces a vital and creative atmosphere for performance of successful research. I experienced and realized this important fact in my earlier days in the USA and the Philippines. Inasmuch as I believe that this is the most crucial element for any research laboratory to possess, I fondly remember the friendships gained with numerous overseas visitors and collaborators who have contributed immensely to our work.

  9. Interprofessional collaboration and collaboration among nurses in Northern Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstadinidou-Straukou A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A I M : This study aimed at assessing satisfaction from collaboration among nursing staff members as well as betweennurses and physicians, and to determine factors influencing their collaboration.B A C K G R O U N D : Studies investigating the collaboration among nursing staff members are mainly focusedon its negative effects in their work, on horizontal violence among nurses, on colleagues’ aggression, and on verbalabuse. Multidisciplinary and interprofessional working is currently a priority in health care.M A T E R I A L - M E T H O D : The study is descriptive. The data collection was carried out through a self-administeredquestionnaire, which was developed by the researchers. The participants were 336 nursing staff membersworking in hospitals in the greater area of Thessaloniki.R E S U L T S : 87.8% agree that colleagues in the hospital help one the other, and 76.9% agree that there is teamworkand collaboration between the various levels of nursing staff. Almost half (50.5% disagree that no-one doesnot undermine the efforts of the other. Many nursing staff members (50.6% agree that physicians collaborate verywell with them. More than a half of the sample (56% disagree that physicians have a complete picture of the activitiesof a nurse and 57.7% disagree that physicians underestimate too much the nursing staff.C O N C L U S I O N S : Since the nursing work environment has a critical impact on patient safety, nursing staffmembers and physicians should make an effort to collaborate well and to provide quality services.

  10. Prospects for measuring K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} and K{sub L}{sup 0} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup 0} {nu}{bar {nu}} at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D.A.; Littenberg, L.

    2000-09-18

    Rare kaon decay experiments underway or planned for the BNL AGS will yield new and independent determinations of V*{sub ts}V{sub td}. A measurement of B(K{sub L}{sup 0} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup 0} {nu}{bar {nu}}) allows a determination of the imaginary part of this quantity, which is the fundamental CP-violating parameter of the Standard Model, in a uniquely clean manner. Since the measurement of B(K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}}) determines {vert_bar}V*{sub ts}V{sub td}, a complete derivation of the unitarity triangle is facilitated. These results can be compared to high precision data expected to come from the B sector in a number of ways, allowing for unique tests of new physics.

  11. Emotion understanding during computer-supported collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Xolocotzin Eligio, Ulises

    2010-01-01

    Affect has been neglected in computer-supported collaborative learning, which is unfortunate because emotions play important roles in collaborative learning and human-computer interaction. This thesis investigated affect in co-located and remote remote-synchronous collaboration, answering the question: How does the task environment and interaction with a partner influence people’s emotions during computer-supported collaboration? In Study 1, the collaborative tasks and affective features o...

  12. Understanding the collaborative-participatory design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scariot, Cristiele A; Heemann, Adriano; Padovani, Stephania

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the role of collaboration in design is discussed, placing emphasis on how to include end-users in the development process. The study is based on a literature review focusing on aspects of collaboration in design, usability and human factors. Thereby, it introduces, compares and contrasts the characteristics of both collaborative and user-centered design perspectives, leading to the collaborative-participatory design approach. Finally, the advantages, disadvantages and precautions of implementing collaborative and participatory models are pointed out.

  13. A Metrics Approach for Collaborative Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian CIUREA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents different types of collaborative systems, their structure and classification. This paper defines the concept of virtual campus as a collaborative system. It builds architecture for virtual campus oriented on collaborative training processes. It analyses the quality characteristics of collaborative systems and propose techniques for metrics construction and validation in order to evaluate them. The article analyzes different ways to increase the efficiency and the performance level in collaborative banking systems.

  14. India joins the ISOLDE collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    On 18 April India signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the ISOLDE collaboration, thus strengthening its links with CERN. Three experiments led by Indian scientists at ISOLDE have been recommended by the Research Board and will be performed in the coming months, and more projects are being designed for the future HIE-ISOLDE scientific programme.   Shaking hands: Rüdiger Voss (left), adviser for India in CERN’s International Relations Office, and SINP Director Milan Kumar Sanyal (right). Also photographed: ISOLDE spokesperson Yorick Blumenfeld, (centre left) and Sunanda Banerjee, head of high-energy at SINP (centre right).  The new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed in Kolkata at the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics (SINP). India thus becomes the 15th member of the ISOLDE collaboration, after having signed similar collaboration documents with the CMS and ALICE experiments. “This agreement will a...

  15. Response Generation in Collaborative Negotiation

    CERN Document Server

    Chu-Carroll, J; Chu-Carroll, Jennifer; Carberry, Sandra

    1995-01-01

    In collaborative planning activities, since the agents are autonomous and heterogeneous, it is inevitable that conflicts arise in their beliefs during the planning process. In cases where such conflicts are relevant to the task at hand, the agents should engage in collaborative negotiation as an attempt to square away the discrepancies in their beliefs. This paper presents a computational strategy for detecting conflicts regarding proposed beliefs and for engaging in collaborative negotiation to resolve the conflicts that warrant resolution. Our model is capable of selecting the most effective aspect to address in its pursuit of conflict resolution in cases where multiple conflicts arise, and of selecting appropriate evidence to justify the need for such modification. Furthermore, by capturing the negotiation process in a recursive Propose-Evaluate-Modify cycle of actions, our model can successfully handle embedded negotiation subdialogues.

  16. Performative Tools and Collaborative Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minder, Bettina; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    of performative tools used in transdisciplinary events for collaborative learning. The results of this single case study add to extant knowledge- and learning literature by providing the reader with a rich description of characteristics and learning functions of performative tools in transdisciplinary events......The use of performative tools can support collaborative learning across knowledge domains (i.e. science and practice), because they create new spaces for dialog. However, so far innovation literature provides little answers to the important discussion of how to describe the effects and requirements...... and a description of how they interrelate with the specific setting of such an event. Furthermore, they complement previous findings by relating performative tools to collaborative learning for knowledge intensive ideas....

  17. Hypoallometric scaling in international collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiehchen, David; Espinoza, Magdalena; Hsieh, Antony

    2016-02-01

    Collaboration is a vital process and dominant theme in knowledge production, although the effectiveness of policies directed at promoting multinational research remains ambiguous. We examined approximately 24 million research articles published over four decades and demonstrated that the scaling of international publications to research productivity for each country obeys a universal and conserved sublinear power law. Inefficient mechanisms in transborder team dynamics or organization as well as increasing opportunity costs may contribute to the disproportionate growth of international collaboration rates with increasing productivity among nations. Given the constrained growth of international relationships, our findings advocate a greater emphasis on the qualitative aspects of collaborations, such as with whom partnerships are forged, particularly when assessing research and policy outcomes.

  18. Collaborative Mobile Charging and Coverage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴杰

    2014-01-01

    Wireless energy charging using mobile vehicles has been a viable research topic recently in the area of wireless networks and mobile computing. This paper gives a short survey of recent research conducted in our research group in the area of collaborative mobile charging. In collaborative mobile charging, multiple mobile chargers work together to accomplish a given set of ob jectives. These ob jectives include charging sensors at different frequencies with a minimum number of mobile chargers and reaching the farthest sensor for a given set of mobile chargers, subject to various constraints, including speed and energy limits of mobile chargers. Through the process of problem formulation, solution construction, and future work extension for problems related to collaborative mobile charging and coverage, we present three principles for good practice in conducting research. These principles can potentially be used for assisting graduate students in selecting a research problem for a term project, which can eventually be expanded to a thesis/dissertation topic.

  19. Collaborative Environment and Agile Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan GHILIC-MICU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over time, information and communications technology development has made a direct impact on human activity in the individual context as well as familial, economic and social. This has laid the premise for adoption of new and modern paradigms in individual and organizational activity management. The evolutionary climax of the social universe is called nowadays knowledge society. The knowledge society succeeds the information society, emphasizing the development of the opportunities brought by collaborative work environment and agile approach. In this paper we will highlight the use of collaborative environment in agile software development, as an instrument for managing organizations in knowledge society. Thus, we will emphasize the paradigms of agile testing, validation and verification in collaborative environment.

  20. Network effects on scientific collaborations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahadat Uddin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The analysis of co-authorship network aims at exploring the impact of network structure on the outcome of scientific collaborations and research publications. However, little is known about what network properties are associated with authors who have increased number of joint publications and are being cited highly. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Measures of social network analysis, for example network centrality and tie strength, have been utilized extensively in current co-authorship literature to explore different behavioural patterns of co-authorship networks. Using three SNA measures (i.e., degree centrality, closeness centrality and betweenness centrality, we explore scientific collaboration networks to understand factors influencing performance (i.e., citation count and formation (tie strength between authors of such networks. A citation count is the number of times an article is cited by other articles. We use co-authorship dataset of the research field of 'steel structure' for the year 2005 to 2009. To measure the strength of scientific collaboration between two authors, we consider the number of articles co-authored by them. In this study, we examine how citation count of a scientific publication is influenced by different centrality measures of its co-author(s in a co-authorship network. We further analyze the impact of the network positions of authors on the strength of their scientific collaborations. We use both correlation and regression methods for data analysis leading to statistical validation. We identify that citation count of a research article is positively correlated with the degree centrality and betweenness centrality values of its co-author(s. Also, we reveal that degree centrality and betweenness centrality values of authors in a co-authorship network are positively correlated with the strength of their scientific collaborations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Authors' network positions in co

  1. Handbook of Collaborative Management Research

    CERN Document Server

    Shani, A B Rami B; Pasmore, William A A; Stymne, Dr Bengt; Adler, Niclas

    2007-01-01

    This handbook provides the latest thinking, methodologies and cases in the rapidly growing area of collaborative management research. What makes collaborative management research different is its emphasis on creating a close partnership between scholars and practitioners in the search for knowledge concerning organizations and complex systems. In the ideal situation, scholars and their managerial partners would work together to define the research focus, develop the methods to be used for data collection, participate equally in the analysis of data, and work together in the application and dis

  2. Collaborative Astrophysical Research in Aire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianfeng

    The AIRE (Astrophysical Integrated Research Environment) consists of three main parts: a Data Archive Center (DAC) which collects and manages public astrophysical data; a web-based Data Processing Center (DPC) which enables astrophysicists to process the data in a central server at any place and anytime; and a Collaborative Astrophysical Research Project System (CARPS) with which astrophysicists in different fields can pursue a collaborative reserch efficiently. Two research examples QPO study of RXTE data and wavelet analysis of large amount of galaxies are shown here.

  3. International collaboration clusters in Africa

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Jonathan; Hook, Daniel; Leydesdorff, Loet

    2013-01-01

    Recent discussion about the increase in international research collaboration suggests a comprehensive global network centred around a group of core countries and driven by generic socio-economic factors where the global system influences all national and institutional outcomes. In counterpoint, we demonstrate that the collaboration pattern for countries in Africa is far from universal. Instead, it exhibits layers of internal clusters and external links that are explained not by monotypic global influences but by regional geography and, perhaps even more strongly, by history, culture and language. Analysis of these bottom-up, subjective, human factors is required in order to provide the fuller explanation useful for policy and management purposes.

  4. Designing for Transformations in Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bossen, Claus; Thomsen, Anders Bo

    2005-01-01

    Transformations in collaborative work due to the introduction of new technology are inevitable, but are often difficult to study. In this paper, we consider the patterns of transformation that are seen in a patient-physician relationship based on the introduction of homecare monitoring equipment....... We report findings from interviews and fieldwork with patients and physicians participating in a clinical experiment of homecare monitoring. By studying both the group of patients who receive homecare-based treatment and the control group we were able to identify transformations in the collaborative...

  5. Collaborative Approaches in Emerging Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Peder Veng; Han, Yang

    2011-01-01

    The paper investigates innovative collaboration undertaken by newly established foreign invested R&D units in emerging markets. In particular, the paper investigates how foreign invested newly established R&D centers in emerging markets can leverage local knowledge networks, such as universities......, in order to increase innovation performance. The theoretical framework is based on theories on trust, as well as institutional theory. The findings suggest that cognition-based trust as well as affect-based trust is needed for successful innovative collaboration, however, in emerging markets affect...

  6. Visioning future emergency healthcare collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderholm, Hanna M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2010-01-01

    New video technologies are emerging to facilitate collaboration in emergency healthcare. One such technology is 3D telepresence technology for medical consultation (3DMC) that may provide richer visual information to support collaboration between medical professionals to, ideally, enhance patient...... care in real time. Today only an early prototype of 3DMC exists. To better understand 3DMC's potential for adoption and use in emergency healthcare before large amounts of development resources are invested we conducted a visioning study. That is, we shared our vision of 3DMC with emergency room...

  7. Novelties on Sharepoint Collaboration Workspace

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    Your Sharepoint Collaboration workspaces will have to migrate to the new Sharepoint 2010 version. As soon as you will create a new site or subsite within your own site or as soon as you will click on “Update my site”, you will be forced to migrate to Sharepoint 2010. In order to anticipate these changes, the technical training invites you to discover all the new features of this interface in a new one day course called “Novelties on Sharepoint Collaboration Workspace 2010”. To sign in, please click on our training catalogue.

  8. Collaborative Tool and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiyo MAEDA

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The desk side laboratory (DSLab which makes it possible for users who are in far places geographically to do research and development through internet on their web browsers, has been developed only using commodity products. It has easy-to-use user interface. It has been shown that DSLab is useful for collaborative research of particle image velocimetry in fluid dynamics, collaborative system development, and e-Learning. It is emphasized that, when used with digital equipment such as digital microscope, DSLab has a wide range of applications. It is expected that both of time and of travel cost needed in research and development are reduced largely.

  9. Rules for collaborative scientific writing

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Several years ago, one of us, having noticed that inexperienced scientists tend to make largely the same mistakes while writing their first papers, was compelled to write a one-page note summarizing some dos and don'ts intended to help take care of common problems before they occur. Since these days the majority of research papers are written collaboratively by groups of co-authors, we are compelled to extend these recommendations to collaborative writing as we observe groups of co-authors fa...

  10. Project Learning and Virtual Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fibiger, Bo; Nielsen, Janni; Sorensen, Elsebeth

    2005-01-01

    that it builds on the pedagogical framework of project pedagogy and is based on online collaboration.The paper will describe MIL, the universities involved, the administrative organization, and the profile of the students. We will discuss the pedagogical framework and the project collaboration in relation...... will be directed towards problems experienced by the students. From an analytical perspective, the paper will identify and discuss fundamental problems related to the organization, flexibility, and implementation of project pedagogy online. MIL is organized around ICT and Learning and the study theme focuses...

  11. Rules for collaborative scientific writing

    CERN Document Server

    Budker, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Several years ago, one of us, having noticed that inexperienced scientists tend to make largely the same mistakes while writing their first papers, was compelled to write a one-page note summarizing some dos and don'ts intended to help take care of common problems before they occur. Since these days the majority of research papers are written collaboratively by groups of co-authors, we are compelled to extend these recommendations to collaborative writing as we observe groups of co-authors falling into the same traps again and again.

  12. Why Does Collaboration Work? Linking Positive Psychology and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conoley, Jane Close; Conoley, Collie Wyatt

    2010-01-01

    Authors in this special issue edited by Cook and Friend provide analyses of many important relationships within a school: teacher to teacher; teacher to paraprofessional, educators, and home caregivers; and whole-building systems. Their focus on collaboration prompted these authors to reflect on a possible theoretical mechanism behind the success…

  13. Collaboration Meets Interactive Surfaces (CMIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anslow, Craig; Campos, Pedro; Grisoni, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    This workshop proposes to bring together researchers who are interested in improving collaborative experiences through the combination of multiple interaction surfaces with diverse sizes and formats, ranging from large-scale walls, to tables, mobiles, and wearables. The opportunities for innovati...

  14. Evaluating Collaborative Learning and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Jessica J.; Beretvas, S. Natasha; Svinicki, Marilla D.; Gorin, Joanna S.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to validate measures and assess the effects of collaborative group-learning methods in real classrooms on 3 specific dependent variables: feelings of campus connectedness, academic classroom community, and effective group processing (2 factors). Confirmatory factor analysis were conducted to evaluate a 4-factor model.…

  15. Policy Development Fosters Collaborative Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Daniel M; Kaste, Linda M; Lituri, Kathy M;

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an example of interprofessional collaboration for policy development regarding environmental global health vis-à-vis the Minamata Convention on Mercury. It presents an overview of mercury and mercury-related environmental health issues; public policy processes and stakeholders...

  16. Mapping the Collaborative Research Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, Julie Reed; Scholz, Carrie; Garcia, Alicia N.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant federal investments in the production of high-quality education research, the direct use of that research in policy and practice is not evident. Some education researchers are increasingly employing collaborative research models that use structures and processes to integrate practitioners into the research process in an effort…

  17. International collaboration clusters in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, J.; Gurney, K.; Hook, D.; Leydesdorff, L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent discussion about the increase in international research collaboration suggests a comprehensive global network centred around a group of core countries and driven by generic socio-economic factors where the global system influences all national and institutional outcomes. In counterpoint, we d

  18. Collaborating in Electronic Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ava S.

    2009-01-01

    There are obvious differences between face-to-face instruction and learning and online instruction and learning. Although collaboration and community building do occur in the campus classroom, as does active learning, it is imperative in an online class. Students today will reluctantly attend classes that consist entirely of faculty lectures and…

  19. International collaboration clusters in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, J.; Gurney, K.; Hook, D.; Leydesdorff, L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent discussion about the increase in international research collaboration suggests a comprehensive global network centred around a group of core countries and driven by generic socio-economic factors where the global system influences all national and institutional outcomes. In counterpoint, we

  20. Assessments That Promote Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Maika; Evans, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses assessments that can be used to help encourage a collaborative classroom community, in which students help one another learn mathematics. The authors describe participation quizzes and explanation quizzes as assessment tools that encourage students to work together, share specific questions on challenging mathematics…

  1. Authority, Identity, and Collaborative Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer-Osuna, Jennifer M.

    2017-01-01

    The field of mathematics education research has seen a resurgence of interest in understanding collaborative learning because students in K-12 classrooms are increasingly expected to make sense of mathematics problems together. This Research Commentary argues for the importance of understanding student authority relations in collaborative…

  2. Collaborative Approaches in Emerging Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Peder Veng; Han, Yang

    2011-01-01

    The paper investigates innovative collaboration undertaken by newly established foreign invested R&D units in emerging markets. In particular, the paper investigates how foreign invested newly established R&D centers in emerging markets can leverage local knowledge networks, such as universities...

  3. Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, June G.

    2002-01-01

    The feature story in this issue, "Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment," focuses on the growing emphasis on teamwork in the workplace. It discusses how the concept of empowering employees in the workplace is evolving and the benefits--faster decision making, lower costs and absenteeism, higher productivity and quality, and…

  4. Architectural patterns for collaborative applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avgeriou, Paris; Tandler, Peter

    2006-01-01

    There is currently little reuse of either design or code in the development of collaborative applications. Though there are some application frameworks for this domain, they tend to be rather inflexible in the functionality they offer. This paper seeks to provide design reuse in the form of

  5. Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, June G.

    2002-01-01

    The feature story in this issue, "Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment," focuses on the growing emphasis on teamwork in the workplace. It discusses how the concept of empowering employees in the workplace is evolving and the benefits--faster decision making, lower costs and absenteeism, higher productivity and quality, and…

  6. Therapists Value of Interprofessional Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, Dawn R.

    2012-01-01

    The work of occupational (OT), physical (PT), and recreational therapists (RT), as well as speech- language pathologists (SLP), is interrelated and requires effective teamwork and collaboration to optimize patient outcomes and satisfaction. Literature shows that health care professionals are ill prepared to work in an interprofessional manner due…

  7. Computer-Mediated Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Ken; Nunan, David

    2004-01-01

    The study reported here investigates collaborative learning at the computer. Ten pairs of students were presented with a series of comprehension questions about Mary Shelley's novel "Frankenstein or a Modern Prometheus" along with a CD-ROM, "Frankenstein Illuminated," containing the novel and a variety of source material. Five students worked with…

  8. Computer-Mediated Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Ken; Nunan, David

    2004-01-01

    The study reported here investigates collaborative learning at the computer. Ten pairs of students were presented with a series of comprehension questions about Mary Shelley's novel "Frankenstein or a Modern Prometheus" along with a CD-ROM, "Frankenstein Illuminated," containing the novel and a variety of source material. Five students worked with…

  9. Children of Dutch Nazi collaborators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tames, I.

    2015-01-01

    This article looks into what happened to the children of Dutch Nazi collaborators after the liberation of the Netherlands in May 1945. The author first outlines the historical context in which these children lived and the manner in which they recounted and recorded their memories much later. In comb

  10. The concept of collaborative health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Håkan

    2010-11-01

    Based on empirical research about teamwork in human service organizations in Sweden, the concept of collaborative health (CH) encapsulates the physical, psychological and social health resources the individual uses in teamwork; resources which at the same time are influenced by the teamwork. My argument built on empirical research leading up to identifying and defining the core concept in this article, is that teamwork affects team members' health and this in turn affects the teamwork and its outcome. In this paper collaborative health is viewed from a social constructionism perspective and discussed in relation to earlier concepts developed in social psychology and working life research, including psychosocial stress and burnout. The paper also introduces the concept of functional synergy, which in this context is defined as the simultaneous presence of sharp goal-orientation and synergy in teamwork. The need for a holistic team theory is emphasized as a tool in research on teamwork. Such a theory relies on identifying sound and illuminating constituent concepts. I suggest that collaborative health could be a useful concept for better understanding the complex collaborative and co-operative teamwork of human service organizations of today.

  11. Collaborative development of embedded systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, Marcel; Pierce, Kenneth; Gamble, Carl; Broenink, Jan; Fitzgerald, John; Larsen, Peter Gorm; Verhoef, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents motivation for taking a collaborative multi-disciplinary approach to the model-based development of embedded systems. Starting from a consideration of the ubiquity of embedded systems in daily life it identifies challenges faced by industry in developing products in a timely ma

  12. Leading Partnerships: Competencies for Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amey, Marilyn J.

    2010-01-01

    Community colleges are constantly challenged to find new ways to meet the needs of multiple constituents. One strategy becoming more popular in addressing these pressing needs is partnerships and other forms of organizational collaboration, consortia, and networks. Partnerships can allow for resource sharing, creation of joint educational…

  13. The Contemporary Art of Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Sheridan

    2008-01-01

    Predetermined assessment criteria and target levels threaten to constrain and limit teachers' desire to provide a balanced and innovative curriculum for their pupils. Through the collaborative production of annual installations, the fine art department at Trinity Catholic School has attempted to confound the effects of a comprehensive school's…

  14. Collaborative Action Research: Historical Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulyan, Lisa

    This paper presents a historical overview of the use of action research in education and describes the basic assumptions and expectations that continue to characterize collaborative research projects today. Action research was initiated in the 1930's by Kurt Lewin and adapted by educators in the 1940's. Interest in action research declined between…

  15. Some Remarks on Collaborative Systems Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available DARPA Intelligent Collaboration and Visualization Program [DARPA1997] developed a general framework for the collaborative systems architecture for the audit of these systems. The authors applied the framework for different applications and for collaborative project management [Nitchi2006]. In different particular type of collaborative systems were developed other frameworks. By these, but also from our experience we developed a new general framework for collaborative systems. This note would be a short presentation of this framework used by the authors in development of the CSCW for the collaborative systems in business and also in education.

  16. Incorporating Brokers within Collaboration Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekar, A.; Moore, R.; de Torcy, A.

    2013-12-01

    A collaboration environment, such as the integrated Rule Oriented Data System (iRODS - http://irods.diceresearch.org), provides interoperability mechanisms for accessing storage systems, authentication systems, messaging systems, information catalogs, networks, and policy engines from a wide variety of clients. The interoperability mechanisms function as brokers, translating actions requested by clients to the protocol required by a specific technology. The iRODS data grid is used to enable collaborative research within hydrology, seismology, earth science, climate, oceanography, plant biology, astronomy, physics, and genomics disciplines. Although each domain has unique resources, data formats, semantics, and protocols, the iRODS system provides a generic framework that is capable of managing collaborative research initiatives that span multiple disciplines. Each interoperability mechanism (broker) is linked to a name space that enables unified access across the heterogeneous systems. The collaboration environment provides not only support for brokers, but also support for virtualization of name spaces for users, files, collections, storage systems, metadata, and policies. The broker enables access to data or information in a remote system using the appropriate protocol, while the collaboration environment provides a uniform naming convention for accessing and manipulating each object. Within the NSF DataNet Federation Consortium project (http://www.datafed.org), three basic types of interoperability mechanisms have been identified and applied: 1) drivers for managing manipulation at the remote resource (such as data subsetting), 2) micro-services that execute the protocol required by the remote resource, and 3) policies for controlling the execution. For example, drivers have been written for manipulating NetCDF and HDF formatted files within THREDDS servers. Micro-services have been written that manage interactions with the CUAHSI data repository, the Data

  17. Enhancing collaborative learning by means of collaborative serious games:providing requirements to collaborative serious games' design

    OpenAIRE

    Parzhetskaya, L. (Lyana)

    2014-01-01

    The current study is a theoretical overview which aim is to define collaborative serious games, identify the problems arising in using and implementation of these games in learning and education and search of ways of improvement of the collaborative process by means of providing the requirements to collaborative serious games’ design. The study makes connections among the following concepts: collaboration, gaming and technology and shows how they can be combined into a one study in order to i...

  18. Learning to Collaborate by Collaborating: A Face-to-Face Collaborative Activity for Measuring and Learning Basics about Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, C.; Nussbaum, M.; Woywood, G.; Aravena, R.

    2009-01-01

    In today's fast-changing business environment, teams have emerged as a requirement for business success. However, in schools and universities, students are usually not taught teamwork skills. In this paper, we introduce learning to collaborate by collaborating, a process that enables collaboration and teamwork skills to be taught and measured…

  19. Learning to Collaborate by Collaborating: A Face-to-Face Collaborative Activity for Measuring and Learning Basics about Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, C.; Nussbaum, M.; Woywood, G.; Aravena, R.

    2009-01-01

    In today's fast-changing business environment, teams have emerged as a requirement for business success. However, in schools and universities, students are usually not taught teamwork skills. In this paper, we introduce learning to collaborate by collaborating, a process that enables collaboration and teamwork skills to be taught and measured…

  20. Taxonomy of collaborative networks forms: FInES Task Force on Collaborative Networks and SOCOLNET - Society of Collaborative Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Camarinha-Matos; H. Afsarmanesh

    2012-01-01

    This chapter is intended as a contribution to the consolidation of base terminology in collaborative networks and thus facilitate the dialogue and collaboration among the Factories of the Future projects included in the FInES cluster. The main current forms of collaborative networks, both in industr

  1. Intel: High Throughput Computing Collaboration: A CERN openlab / Intel collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The Intel/CERN High Throughput Computing Collaboration studies the application of upcoming Intel technologies to the very challenging environment of the LHC trigger and data-acquisition systems. These systems will need to transport and process many terabits of data every second, in some cases with tight latency constraints. Parallelisation and tight integration of accelerators and classical CPU via Intel's OmniPath fabric are the key elements in this project.

  2. The Complex Dynamics of Collaborative Tagging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halpin, H.; Robu, V.; Shepherd, H.

    2007-01-01

    The debate within the Web community over the optimal means by which to organize information often pits formalized classifications against distributed collaborative tagging systems. A number of questions remain unanswered, however, regarding the nature of collaborative tagging systems including wheth

  3. Cultivating Collaborative Improvement: An Action Learning Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, H.G.A.; McNichols, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    As competitive pressure mounts to innovate in the global knowledge economy, many organizations are exploring new ways of collaborating with their supply chain partners. However, the process of implementing collaborative initiatives across disparate members of supply networks is fraught with

  4. Illuminating collaboration in emergency health care situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Söderholm, Hanna Maurin; Welch, Gregory F.;

    2014-01-01

    reported the technology would require additional training, changes to existing financial models used in emergency health care, and increased access to physicians. Conclusions. Teaching collaboration skills and strategies to physicians and paramedics could benefit their collaboration today, and increase...

  5. Creating Networks through Interinstitutional Faculty Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Sarah R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes efforts by the consortium Associated Colleges of the Midwest to support interinstitutional faculty collaboration and development. Focuses on three programs: the Global Partners Project, an information literacy grant, and an academic collaboration grant. (EV)

  6. Behavioral aspects in collaborative enterprise networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Afsarmanesh, H.

    2011-01-01

    The collaborative networks paradigm can empower enterprises with the needed agility and survival capability to face market turbulence. However, the success and sustainability of collaboration requires proper understanding and modeling of the involved behavioral aspects, a basis for sound development

  7. A collaboration process for enterprise architecture creation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakakawa, Agnes

    2012-01-01

    Designing an enterprise architecture involves architect-specific tasks (those that are executed by enterprise architects) and collaboration dependent tasks (those whose proper execution requires enterprise architects to collaborate with organizational stakeholders). Enterprise architecture framework

  8. Collaborative Networks for biodiversity domain organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ermilova, E.; Afsarmanesh, H.

    2010-01-01

    European scientific research and development organizations, operating in the domains of biology, ecology, and biodiversity, strongly need to cooperate/collaborate with other centers. Unavailability of interoperation infrastructure as well as the needed collaboration environment among research

  9. A collaboration process for enterprise architecture creation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakakawa, Agnes

    2012-01-01

    Designing an enterprise architecture involves architect-specific tasks (those that are executed by enterprise architects) and collaboration dependent tasks (those whose proper execution requires enterprise architects to collaborate with organizational stakeholders). Enterprise architecture

  10. Cooperation enabled systems for collaborative networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio, A. L.; Camarihna-Matos, L.M.; Afsarmanesh, H.

    2011-01-01

    A fast evolution to collaborative business models requires novel strategies for the development of collaboration-based information technology (IT) solutions. The complexity of building such solutions based on heterogeneous sub-systems requires a multidisciplinary approach, involving the perspectives

  11. Proximity and Collaboration in European Nanotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cunningham, S.W.; Werker, C.

    2011-01-01

    Collaborations are particularly important for the development and deployment of technology. We analyze the influence of organizational, technological and geographical proximity on European nanotechnology collaborations with the help of a publication dataset and additional geographical information. W

  12. Behavioral aspects in collaborative enterprise networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Afsarmanesh, H.

    2011-01-01

    The collaborative networks paradigm can empower enterprises with the needed agility and survival capability to face market turbulence. However, the success and sustainability of collaboration requires proper understanding and modeling of the involved behavioral aspects, a basis for sound development

  13. Collaborative pharmacy practice: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law AV

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Anandi V Law, Eric K Gupta, Micah Hata, Karl M Hess, Roger S Klotz, Quang A Le, Emmanuelle Schwartzman, Bik-Wai Bilvick Tai Department of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA, USA Abstract: Collaborative practice among health professionals is slowly coming of age, given the global focus on efficiency and effectiveness of care to achieve positive patient outcomes and to reduce the economic burden of fragmented care. Collaborative pharmacy practice (CPP is accordingly evolving within different models including: disease management, medication therapy management, patient centered medical home, and accountable care organizations. Pharmacist roles in these models relate to drug therapy management and include therapy introduction, adjustment, or discontinuation, patient counseling and education, and identification, resolution, and prevention of problems leading to drug interactions and adverse reactions. Most forms of CPP occur with physicians in various settings. Collaborative practice agreements exist in many states in the US and are mentioned in the International Pharmaceutical Federation policy statement. Impetus for CPP comes from health system and economic concerns, as well as from a regulatory push. There are positive examples in community, ambulatory care, and inpatient settings that have well documented protocols, indicators of care, and measurement and reporting of clinical, economic, and patient reported outcomes; however, implementation of the practice is still not widespread. Conceptual and implementation challenges include health professional training, attitudes, confidence and comfort levels, power and communication issues, logistic barriers of time, workload, proximity, resistance to establish and adopt regulations, and importantly, payment models. Some of the attitudinal and perceptual challenges can be mitigated by incorporation of interprofessional concepts and

  14. Autonomy Mediated through University-Business Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Olav Jull

    2016-01-01

    -industry (U-I) collaboration in a university autonomy perspective, including the rationale for an increase in the collaboration, a conceptualization of the development, and the impact of the collaboration on university autonomy related especially to academic freedom and financial autonomy. The paper......-sum game, but a relationship with a synergistic potential and with university autonomy as one important parameter in the collaboration formula....

  15. Process model patterns for collaborative work

    OpenAIRE

    Lonchamp, Jacques

    1998-01-01

    Colloque avec actes et comité de lecture.; As most real work is collaborative in nature, process model developers have to model collaborative situations. This paper defines generic collaborative patterns, ie, pragmatic and abstract building blocks for modelling recurrent situations. The first part specifies the graphical notation for the solution description. The second part gives some current patterns for the collaborative production of a single document in isolation and for the synchronizat...

  16. The Informatics Audit - A Collaborative Process

    OpenAIRE

    Ciurea, Cristian

    2010-01-01

    The paper present issues regarding the audit in informatics field, the audit seen as a collaborative process and how the collaborative banking systems are audited. In this paper, the methodology and techniques for an effective audit process are described. There are highlighted some aspects regarding the assessment of collaborative systems and specific flows of informatics audit.

  17. The Informatics Audit - A Collaborative Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian CIUREA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper present issues regarding the audit in informatics field, the audit seen as a collaborative process and how the collaborative banking systems are audited. In this paper, the methodology and techniques for an effective audit process are described. There are highlighted some aspects regarding the assessment of collaborative systems and specific flows of informatics audit.

  18. Analysis and evaluation of collaborative modeling processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ssebuggwawo, D.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis and evaluation of collaborative modeling processes is confronted with many challenges. On the one hand, many systems design and re-engineering projects require collaborative modeling approaches that can enhance their productivity. But, such collaborative efforts, which often consist of the

  19. Coordination processes in computer supported collaborative writing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanselaar, G.; Erkens, Gijsbert; Jaspers, Jos; Prangsma, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    In the COSAR-project a computer-supported collaborative learning environment enables students to collaborate in writing an argumentative essay. The TC3 groupware environment (TC3: Text Composer, Computer supported and Collaborative) offers access to relevant information sources, a private notepad, a

  20. Forging Collaborative Partnerships: The Waterloo Neighborhood Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenewald, Anne

    The Forging Collaborative Partnerships Project in Waterloo, Iowa is a collaborative venture to assist voluntary agencies in developing tools and strategies to strengthen collaborative relationships among public and nonprofit child welfare agencies and other key stakeholders as they adopt a family-focused philosophy. This monograph details how the…

  1. Assessment of (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbos, Jan-Willem

    2011-01-01

    Within the (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning (CS) CL research community, there has been an extensive dialogue on theories and perspectives on learning from collaboration, approaches to scaffold (script) the collaborative process, and most recently research methodology. In contrast, the iss

  2. [Psychologist-nurse, a rewarding collaboration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Isabelle; Cludy, Laurence

    2011-10-01

    Psychologist-nurse, a rewarding collaboration. The collaboration between nurses and psychologists is relatively recent within healthcare institutes. Gaining maximum value from such a collaboration requires solid knowledge of the roles and the limits of each profession as well as a real desire to work together, for the benefit of the greater well-being of the patient and, indirectly, of the teams.

  3. Serving the Disabled Gifted through Educational Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanTassel-Baska, Joyce

    1991-01-01

    Background information is provided on gifted students with learning disabilities and/or physical impairments. The need for collaborative interventions to meet the needs of these students is discussed, viewing collaboration as personal interaction, as the interaction of roles, and as interinstitutional interaction. A collaborative/consultation…

  4. Managing collaboration in the nanoManipulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, Thomas C.; Helser, Aren T.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2004-01-01

    We designed, developed, deployed, and evaluated the Collaborative nanoManipulator (CnM), a distributed, collaborative virtual environment system supporting remote scientific collaboration between users of the nanoManipulator interface to atomic force microscopes. This paper describes the entire...

  5. LawSync: Collaboration in Action

    OpenAIRE

    Griffith, Peter; Smith, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A presentation about collaboration, itself the product of a collaboration, looking at a collaborative project as an example of the value of people from different teams working together! That was us at BIALL 2014 in Glasgow, a conference which took as its theme ‘law as a business.’

  6. The Collaborative Prescription: Remedy or Reverie?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Pauline E.; Leonard, Lawrence J.

    2001-01-01

    Clarifies understandings of collaboration and its potential and limitations in transforming schools from organized hierarchies to moral communities. Presents research findings examining perceptions of school collaboration. Discusses implications for theory, research, and practice pertaining to the collaborative dimensions of schools as moral…

  7. Assessment of (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbos, Jan-Willem

    2011-01-01

    Within the (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning (CS) CL research community, there has been an extensive dialogue on theories and perspectives on learning from collaboration, approaches to scaffold (script) the collaborative process, and most recently research methodology. In contrast, the iss

  8. Inter-Organizational Collaborative Capacity (ICC) Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Hocevar, Susan Page; Jansen, Erik; Thomas, Gail Fann

    2012-01-01

    Effective collaboration across organizational boundaries is important for achieving governance reform. But, given the complexities of both aligning and competing interests, collaboration is often a challenge. The Inter-­‐Organizational Collaborative Capacity (ICC) model was originally developed to help public sector agencies (municipal, state, regional and federa...

  9. Meaning Negotiations of Collaborative Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plotnikof, Mie; Zandee, Danielle P.

    2016-01-01

    engages with recent debates about the complexity of such new governance forms, as well as discussions on the relationship between discourse and materiality and the calls made to develop multi-method approaches to study complex organizational phenomena. In effect, the chapter develops empirical......This chapter explores the potential for developing organizational discourse approaches through ethnographic fieldwork in the context of collaborative governance: a procedure to involve stakeholders in public problem solving of, for example, policy and service innovation. In doing so, the researcher...... and analytical approaches to unfold discourse-material aspects of the negotiations of meanings and matters of such new governance form in practice. The chapter provides examples based on ethnographic fieldwork in collaborations across actors from the welfare area of education. In conclusion, the author reflects...

  10. ATLAS Live: Collaborative Information Streams

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfarb, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    I report on a pilot project launched in 2010 focusing on facilitating communication and information exchange within the ATLAS Collaboration, through the combination of digital signage software and webcasting. The project, called ATLAS Live, implements video streams of information, ranging from detailed detector and data status to educational and outreach material. The content, including text, images, video and audio, is collected, visualised and scheduled using the SCALA digital signage software system. The system is robust and flexible, allowing for the usage of scripts to input data from remote sources, such as the CERN Document Server, Indico, or any available URL, and to integrate these sources into professional-quality streams, including text scrolling, transition effects, inter and intrascreen divisibility. The video is made available to the collaboration or public through the encoding and webcasting of standard video streams, viewable on all common platforms, using a web browser or other common video t...

  11. Collaborative Lea(r)ning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jacob S.

    to establishing a joint improvement and learning culture with these organisations. Simply, if companies want to create new capabilities and improve their competitiveness, they must combine their knowledge and skills in a unique way, and create improvement and learning links to enable personal and information......, the strategies of companies, and the work of managers. Alliances are both a cause and an effect of intensive competition. Collaboration can help firms to lower costs and risks, to expand markets, to develop new products and to learn or create new knowledge. One of the challenges is building capability...... that is flexible and dynamic, easy to understand and manage, valued by people, and supportive of a broad based learning culture. Another challenge, when we talk collaboration, is to forget the traditional understanding that the boundaries of companies are well defined, and instead view the boundaries of companies...

  12. Understanding collaborative partnerships between farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asai, Masayasu

    the extent and functioning of such existing partnerships between farms as well as farmers’ perceptions of what constitutes successful arrangements. Based on registry and farmer survey data the PhD thesis shows that the vast majority of manure exporters know their partners prior to establishing manure...... arrangements, either as family or neighbors, or through their local or professional networks. Social relationships are also shown to play an important role in shaping the functions of partnerships, expressed for example in the burden-sharing of manure transportation and spreading, frequency of communication......, duration of the partnership and transport distance. The most important aspects of farmers' perception of successful collaborative arrangements seem to be trust, continuity, flexibility and accessibility. These findings supplement the understanding of farmer collaboration based on spatial-economic models...

  13. Online University-Industry Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Helle Alsted; Bergenholtz, Carsten; Juhl, Hans Jørn

    Extant studies have shown how online communities can promote collaborative and innovative activities in general. Studies on university-industry collaborations have so far focused less on online activities. We therefore set out to examine the individual and organizational drivers and barriers...... for academics and industrial professionals to contribute to online community-based platforms. We use a mixed method approach using both survey data and in-depth interviews with respondents from the Danish food sector. Findings show that in line with known studies on online innovation communities in general......, the main drivers for engagement are organizational and individual learning, and establishing connections, rather than monetary incentives. In contrast to offline studies on university-industry interactions, well-connected academics are less interested in online communities of academics and industry...

  14. Semiotic dynamics and collaborative tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattuto, Ciro; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

    2007-01-30

    Collaborative tagging has been quickly gaining ground because of its ability to recruit the activity of web users into effectively organizing and sharing vast amounts of information. Here we collect data from a popular system and investigate the statistical properties of tag cooccurrence. We introduce a stochastic model of user behavior embodying two main aspects of collaborative tagging: (i) a frequency-bias mechanism related to the idea that users are exposed to each other's tagging activity; (ii) a notion of memory, or aging of resources, in the form of a heavy-tailed access to the past state of the system. Remarkably, our simple modeling is able to account quantitatively for the observed experimental features with a surprisingly high accuracy. This points in the direction of a universal behavior of users who, despite the complexity of their own cognitive processes and the uncoordinated and selfish nature of their tagging activity, appear to follow simple activity patterns.

  15. Visioning future emergency healthcare collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderholm, Hanna M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2010-01-01

    New video technologies are emerging to facilitate collaboration in emergency healthcare. One such technology is 3D telepresence technology for medical consultation (3DMC) that may provide richer visual information to support collaboration between medical professionals to, ideally, enhance patient...... care in real time. Today only an early prototype of 3DMC exists. To better understand 3DMC's potential for adoption and use in emergency healthcare before large amounts of development resources are invested we conducted a visioning study. That is, we shared our vision of 3DMC with emergency room...... physicians, nurses, administrators, and information technology (IT) professionals working at large and small medical centers, and asked them to share their perspectives regarding 3DMC's potential benefits and disadvantages in emergency healthcare and its compatibility and/or lack thereof...

  16. Understanding collaborative partnerships between farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asai, Masayasu

    , duration of the partnership and transport distance. The most important aspects of farmers' perception of successful collaborative arrangements seem to be trust, continuity, flexibility and accessibility. These findings supplement the understanding of farmer collaboration based on spatial-economic models...... arrangements, either as family or neighbors, or through their local or professional networks. Social relationships are also shown to play an important role in shaping the functions of partnerships, expressed for example in the burden-sharing of manure transportation and spreading, frequency of communication...... which only take into account economic criteria for decision making concerning resource use. Also, they illuminate the many formal and informal connections between farmers developed for other types of local action....

  17. Meaning Negotiations of Collaborative Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plotnikof, Mie; Zandee, Danielle P.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores the potential for developing organizational discourse approaches through ethnographic fieldwork in the context of collaborative governance: a procedure to involve stakeholders in public problem solving of, for example, policy and service innovation. In doing so, the researcher...... and analytical approaches to unfold discourse-material aspects of the negotiations of meanings and matters of such new governance form in practice. The chapter provides examples based on ethnographic fieldwork in collaborations across actors from the welfare area of education. In conclusion, the author reflects...... engages with recent debates about the complexity of such new governance forms, as well as discussions on the relationship between discourse and materiality and the calls made to develop multi-method approaches to study complex organizational phenomena. In effect, the chapter develops empirical...

  18. A Win-Win Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Beth Parkinson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This brief article reports on a collaborative book-borrowing policy between The Brendlinger Library of Montgomery County Community College and the Wissahickon Valley Public Library (WVPL, both located in Blue Bell, PA.  Beginning in January 2013, WVPL will donate books periodically to the Brendlinger Library in support of the students enrolled in Reading classes.  Circulation statistics will be reported to WVPL, and the books will be returned to WVPL for sale in the WVPL Friends of the Library book sale. Keywords: academic library; public library,  community college library; collaboration; developmental readers; reading programs; reading instruction; literacy; Montgomery County Community College; Wissahickon Valley Public Library

  19. Improving Creativity in Collaborative Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang; Purushothaman, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to build a theoretical framework by a literature review that is focusing on how a learning model based on Communities of Practice (CoP) can be useful in collaborative processes in organizational learning contexts. In the light of social approach to learning theories and knowledge...... management, this paper firstly will discuss: (1) learning as a process involving knowledge conversations between different types of knowledge such as tacit knowledge, explicit knowledge, individual knowledge and collective knowledge, and (2) creativity as a driver to the conversations between the different...... types of knowledge. (3) These points drive this paper to develop a knowledge creation model by discussing how CoP can be used to improve creativity in collaborative processes in organizational learning contexts. The point of departure for the learning model is the learning framework proposed...

  20. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Bearing Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Dam, J.

    2011-10-01

    NREL has initiated the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) to investigate the root cause of the low wind turbine gearbox reliability. The GRC follows a multi-pronged approach based on a collaborative of manufacturers, owners, researchers and consultants. The project combines analysis, field testing, dynamometer testing, condition monitoring, and the development and population of a gearbox failure database. At the core of the project are two 750kW gearboxes that have been redesigned and rebuilt so that they are representative of the multi-megawatt gearbox topology currently used in the industry. These gearboxes are heavily instrumented and are tested in the field and on the dynamometer. This report discusses the bearing calibrations of the gearboxes.

  1. The collaborative roots of corruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Ori; Shalvi, Shaul

    2015-08-25

    Cooperation is essential for completing tasks that individuals cannot accomplish alone. Whereas the benefits of cooperation are clear, little is known about its possible negative aspects. Introducing a novel sequential dyadic die-rolling paradigm, we show that collaborative settings provide fertile ground for the emergence of corruption. In the main experimental treatment the outcomes of the two players are perfectly aligned. Player A privately rolls a die, reports the result to player B, who then privately rolls and reports the result as well. Both players are paid the value of the reports if, and only if, they are identical (e.g., if both report 6, each earns €6). Because rolls are truly private, players can inflate their profit by misreporting the actual outcomes. Indeed, the proportion of reported doubles was 489% higher than the expected proportion assuming honesty, 48% higher than when individuals rolled and reported alone, and 96% higher than when lies only benefited the other player. Breaking the alignment in payoffs between player A and player B reduced the extent of brazen lying. Despite player B's central role in determining whether a double was reported, modifying the incentive structure of either player A or player B had nearly identical effects on the frequency of reported doubles. Our results highlight the role of collaboration-particularly on equal terms-in shaping corruption. These findings fit a functional perspective on morality. When facing opposing moral sentiments-to be honest vs. to join forces in collaboration-people often opt for engaging in corrupt collaboration.

  2. Collaborative engineering for complex products

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erasmus, J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Erasmus_2015.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 6206 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Erasmus_2015.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Collaborative engineering... • Only viable means of beneficiating natural resources in SA Current situation Competitiveness of manufacturing in SA has dramatically decreased [1] NIPF: Manufacturing drives employment and growth in the economy [2] IPAP: 16 industry sectors...

  3. Innovating through collaborative business models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerding, Allan Næs; Kringelum, Louise Tina Brøns

    -ered as a coherent system. The generalization is explicated in terms of different domi-nant market logics in which collaborative efforts can be positioned. Underlying this presentation, the paper argues that business model innovation involves uncertainty to the degree that innovation is based on cooperative efforts......, and that there exists a dialec-tical relationship between sources of selection and sources of survival, which tend to re-inforce one another. This constitutes a new aspect of business model innovation....

  4. Designing for Transformations in Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bossen, Claus; Thomsen, Anders Bo

    2005-01-01

    Transformations in collaborative work due to the introduction of new technology are inevitable, but are often difficult to study. In this paper, we consider the patterns of transformation that are seen in a patient-physician relationship based on the introduction of homecare monitoring equipment...... activity as caused by the homecare monitoring technology. We apply activity theory as a theoretical basis for this analysis. We consider the implications of these findings for the design of pervasive health monitoring technologies....

  5. Freaky: Collaborative Enactments of Emotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leahu, Lucian; Sengers, Phoebe

    2015-01-01

    The field of CSCW is increasingly drawing on theories and approaches from feminist philosophy of science. To date such efforts have focused on understanding users and their practices. We present a research prototype showing that feminist theories can lead to novel design solutions. Freaky...... is a mobile, interactive system that collaborates with its users in the enactment of emotion. Informed by the feminist literature, the system introduces a novel approach to emotion: designing for human-machine co-production of emotion....

  6. A Win-Win Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Beth Parkinson

    2013-01-01

    This brief article reports on a collaborative book-borrowing policy between The Brendlinger Library of Montgomery County Community College and the Wissahickon Valley Public Library (WVPL), both located in Blue Bell, PA.  Beginning in January 2013, WVPL will donate books periodically to the Brendlinger Library in support of the students enrolled in Reading classes.  Circulation statistics will be reported to WVPL, and the books will be returned to WVPL for sale in the WVPL Friends of the Libra...

  7. Advanced engineering environment collaboration project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamph, Jane Ann; Pomplun, Alan R.; Kiba, Grant W.; Dutra, Edward G.; Dankiewicz, Robert J.; Marburger, Scot J.

    2008-12-01

    The Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a model for an engineering design and communications system that will enhance project collaboration throughout the nuclear weapons complex (NWC). Sandia National Laboratories and Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) worked together on a prototype project to evaluate the suitability of a portion of PTC's Windchill 9.0 suite of data management, design and collaboration tools as the basis for an AEE. The AEE project team implemented Windchill 9.0 development servers in both classified and unclassified domains and used them to test and evaluate the Windchill tool suite relative to the needs of the NWC using weapons project use cases. A primary deliverable was the development of a new real time collaborative desktop design and engineering process using PDMLink (data management tool), Pro/Engineer (mechanical computer aided design tool) and ProductView Lite (visualization tool). Additional project activities included evaluations of PTC's electrical computer aided design, visualization, and engineering calculations applications. This report documents the AEE project work to share information and lessons learned with other NWC sites. It also provides PTC with recommendations for improving their products for NWC applications.

  8. NASA Earth Science Education Collaborative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerin, T. G.; Callery, S.; Chambers, L. H.; Riebeek Kohl, H.; Taylor, J.; Martin, A. M.; Ferrell, T.

    2016-12-01

    The NASA Earth Science Education Collaborative (NESEC) is led by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies with partners at three NASA Earth science Centers: Goddard Space Flight Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Langley Research Center. This cross-organization team enables the project to draw from the diverse skills, strengths, and expertise of each partner to develop fresh and innovative approaches for building pathways between NASA's Earth-related STEM assets to large, diverse audiences in order to enhance STEM teaching, learning and opportunities for learners throughout their lifetimes. These STEM assets include subject matter experts (scientists, engineers, and education specialists), science and engineering content, and authentic participatory and experiential opportunities. Specific project activities include authentic STEM experiences through NASA Earth science themed field campaigns and citizen science as part of international GLOBE program (for elementary and secondary school audiences) and GLOBE Observer (non-school audiences of all ages); direct connections to learners through innovative collaborations with partners like Odyssey of the Mind, an international creative problem-solving and design competition; and organizing thematic core content and strategically working with external partners and collaborators to adapt and disseminate core content to support the needs of education audiences (e.g., libraries and maker spaces, student research projects, etc.). A scaffolded evaluation is being conducted that 1) assesses processes and implementation, 2) answers formative evaluation questions in order to continuously improve the project; 3) monitors progress and 4) measures outcomes.

  9. Rocinante, a virtual collaborative visualizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, M.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center; Ice, L.G. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    With the goal of improving the ability of people around the world to share the development and use of intelligent systems, Sandia National Laboratories` Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center is developing new Virtual Collaborative Engineering (VCE) and Virtual Collaborative Control (VCC) technologies. A key area of VCE and VCC research is in shared visualization of virtual environments. This paper describes a Virtual Collaborative Visualizer (VCV), named Rocinante, that Sandia developed for VCE and VCC applications. Rocinante allows multiple participants to simultaneously view dynamic geometrically-defined environments. Each viewer can exclude extraneous detail or include additional information in the scene as desired. Shared information can be saved and later replayed in a stand-alone mode. Rocinante automatically scales visualization requirements with computer system capabilities. Models with 30,000 polygons and 4 Megabytes of texture display at 12 to 15 frames per second (fps) on an SGI Onyx and at 3 to 8 fps (without texture) on Indigo 2 Extreme computers. In its networked mode, Rocinante synchronizes its local geometric model with remote simulators and sensory systems by monitoring data transmitted through UDP packets. Rocinante`s scalability and performance make it an ideal VCC tool. Users throughout the country can monitor robot motions and the thinking behind their motion planners and simulators.

  10. Collaborative Clustering for Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff. Loro :/; Green Jillian; Lane, Terran

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, nodes in a sensor network simply collect data and then pass it on to a centralized node that archives, distributes, and possibly analyzes the data. However, analysis at the individual nodes could enable faster detection of anomalies or other interesting events, as well as faster responses such as sending out alerts or increasing the data collection rate. There is an additional opportunity for increased performance if individual nodes can communicate directly with their neighbors. Previously, a method was developed by which machine learning classification algorithms could collaborate to achieve high performance autonomously (without requiring human intervention). This method worked for supervised learning algorithms, in which labeled data is used to train models. The learners collaborated by exchanging labels describing the data. The new advance enables clustering algorithms, which do not use labeled data, to also collaborate. This is achieved by defining a new language for collaboration that uses pair-wise constraints to encode useful information for other learners. These constraints specify that two items must, or cannot, be placed into the same cluster. Previous work has shown that clustering with these constraints (in isolation) already improves performance. In the problem formulation, each learner resides at a different node in the sensor network and makes observations (collects data) independently of the other learners. Each learner clusters its data and then selects a pair of items about which it is uncertain and uses them to query its neighbors. The resulting feedback (a must and cannot constraint from each neighbor) is combined by the learner into a consensus constraint, and it then reclusters its data while incorporating the new constraint. A strategy was also proposed for cleaning the resulting constraint sets, which may contain conflicting constraints; this improves performance significantly. This approach has been applied to collaborative

  11. International Collaboration for Venus Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, James; Limaye, Sanjay; Zasova, Ludmila; Wilson, Colin; Ocampo, Adriana; Glaze, Lori; Svedhem, H.; Nakamura, Masato; Widemann, Thomas

    The Venus Exploration Analysis Group (VEXAG) was established by NASA in July 2005 to identify scientific priorities and strategy for exploration of Venus. From the outset, VEXAG has been open to the international community participation and has followed the progress of the ESA Venus Express Mission and the JAXA Akasuki mission as well exploring potential broad international partnerships for Venus exploration through coordinated science and missions. This paper discussed three mechanisms through which these collaborations are being explored in which VEXAG members participate One pathway for international collaboration has been through COSPAR. The International Venus Exploration Working Group (IVEWG) was formed during the 2012 COSPAR general assembly in Mysore, India. Another potentially significant outcome has been the IVEWG’s efforts to foster a formal dialog between IKI and NASA/PSD on the proposed Venera D mission resulting in a meeting in June 2013 to be followed by a discussion at the 4MS3 conference in October 2013. This has now resulted in an agreement between NASA/PSD and IKI to form a joint Science Definition Team for Venera D. A second pathway has been through an international focus on comparative climatology. Scientists from the established space faring nations participated in a first international conference on Comparative Climatology for Terrestrial Planet (CCTP) in Boulder Colorado in June 2012 sponsored by several international scientific organizations. A second conference is planned for 2015. The Planetary Robotics Exploration Coordinating Group (PRECG) of International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) the IAA has been focusing on exploring affordable contributions to the robotic exploration by non-space-faring nations wishing to get involved in planetary exploration. PRECG has sponsored a two year study of Comparative Climatology for which Venus is the focal point and focused on engaging nations without deep space exploration capabilities. A third

  12. Multidisciplinary design using collaborative optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieski, Ian Patrick

    Management of the modern aircraft design process is a substantial challenge. Formal iterative optimization is commonly used with disciplinary design tools to aid designers in the definition of optimal subsystems. However, the expense in executing high fidelity analysis, the decomposition of the design expertise into disciplines, and the size of the design space, often precludes the use of direct optimization in the overall design process. Collaborative optimization is a recently developed methodology that shows promise in enabling formal optimization of the overall design. The architecture preserves disciplinary design autonomy while providing a coordinating mechanism that leads to interdisciplinary agreement and improved designs. The basic formulation has been applied to a variety of sample design problems which demonstrate that the method successfully discovers correct optimal solutions. This work places collaborative optimization in the context of other multidisciplinary design optimization methods and characterizes problems for which the basic formulation is applicable. Artifacts of the problem formulation are discussed and methods for handling high bandwidth coupling, such as that found in aeroelasticity, are presented. The use of response surfaces for representing expensive analyses has become increasingly popular in design optimization. Response surfaces are smooth analytic functions that are inexpensive to evaluate and may be generated from data points obtained from the parallel execution of analyses. These properties motivate the introduction of response surfaces into collaborative optimization. Response surfaces have been previously used to model subproblem analyses and were generated just once. Here, approximate models are used to represent the subproblem optimization results, not the analysis, and are regenerated as the design is modified. The use of response surfaces in collaborative optimization requires an inexpensive method for generating the

  13. Forecast Collaboration in Grocery Supply Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aastrup, Jesper; Gammelgaard, Britta

    -requisites, degree of forecast collaboration, demand related contingency factors and outcomes/KPIs based. The hypotheses are tested in a survey among Danish grocery suppliers. The survey findings provide evidence of a positive effect of collaborative orientation and retailer competencies and trustworthiness...... on the degress of forecast collaboration. Also, campaign frequency as a demand related contingency variable is found to positively affect degree of forecast collaboration. Finally, the survey findings provide evidence of a positive effect of degree of forecast collaboration on inventory levels and forecast...

  14. Collaborative Software Engineering: Challenges and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistrík, Ivan; Grundy, John; van der Hoek, André; Whitehead, Jim

    Much work is presently ongoing in collaborative software engineering research. This work is beginning to make serious inroads into our ability to more effectively practice collaborative software engineering, with best practices, processes, tools, metrics, and other techniques becoming available for day-to-day use. However, we have not yet reached the point where the practice of collaborative software engineering is routine, without surprises, and generally as optimal as possible. This chapter summarizes the main findings of this book, draws some conclusions on these findings and looks at the prospects for software engineers in dealing with the challenges of collaborative software development. The chapter ends with prospects for collaborative software engineering.

  15. Collaboration enhances later individual memory for emotional material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bärthel, Gwennis A; Wessel, Ineke; Huntjens, Rafaële J C; Verwoerd, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Research on collaborative remembering suggests that collaboration hampers group memory (i.e., collaborative inhibition), yet enhances later individual memory. Studies examining collaborative effects on memory for emotional stimuli are scarce, especially concerning later individual memory. In the

  16. Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration and Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deana D. Pennington

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Complex environmental problem solving depends on cross-disciplinary collaboration among scientists. Collaborative research must be preceded by an exploratory phase of collective thinking that creates shared conceptual frameworks. Collective thinking, in a cross-disciplinary setting, depends on the facility with which collaborators are able to learn and understand each others' perspectives. This paper applies three perspectives on learning to the problem of enabling cross-disciplinary collaboration: Maslow's hierarchy of needs, constructivism, and organizational learning. Application of learning frameworks to collaboration provides insights regarding receptive environments for collaboration, and processes that facilitate cross-disciplinary interactions. These environments and interactions need time to develop and require a long phase of idea generation preceding any focused research effort. The findings highlight that collaboration is itself a complex system of people, scientific theory, and tools that must be intentionally managed. Effective management of the system requires leaders who are facilitators and are capable of orchestrating effective environments and interactions.

  17. Supporting Dynamic Ad hoc Collaboration Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Berket, Karlo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-07-14

    Modern HENP experiments such as CMS and Atlas involve as many as 2000 collaborators around the world. Collaborations this large will be unable to meet often enough to support working closely together. Many of the tools currently available for collaboration focus on heavy-weight applications such as videoconferencing tools. While these are important, there is a more basic need for tools that support connecting physicists to work together on an ad hoc or continuous basis. Tools that support the day-to-day connectivity and underlying needs of a group of collaborators are important for providing light-weight, non-intrusive, and flexible ways to work collaboratively. Some example tools include messaging, file-sharing, and shared plot viewers. An important component of the environment is a scalable underlying communication framework. In this paper we will describe our current progress on building a dynamic and ad hoc collaboration environment and our vision for its evolution into a HENP collaboration environment.

  18. Collaboration leads to enhanced curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerius, J; Mohan, V; Doctor, D; Hersh, W

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, we initiated a health information management (HIM) track of our biomedical informatics graduate program, and subsequent ongoing program assessment revealed a confluence of topics and courses within HIM and clinical informatics (CI) tracks. We completed a thorough comparative analysis of competencies derived from AMIA, AHIMA, and CAHIIM. Coupled with the need to streamline course offerings, the process, described in this paper allowed new opportunities for faculty collaboration, resulted in the creation of a model assessment for best practice in courses, and led to new avenues of growth within the program. The objective of the case study is to provide others in the informatics educational community with a model for analysis of curriculum in order to improve quality of student learning. We describe a case study where an academic informatics program realigned its course offerings to better reflect the HIM of today, and prepare for challenges of the future. Visionary leadership, intra-departmental self-analysis and alignment of the curriculum through defined mapping process reduced overlap within the CI and HIM tracks. Teaching within courses was optimized through the work of core faculty collaboration. The analysis of curriculum resulted in reduction of overlap within course curriculum. This allowed for additional and new course content to be added to existing courses. Leadership fostered an environment where top-down as well as bottom-up collaborative assessment activities resulted in a model to consolidate learning and reduce unnecessary duplication within courses. A focus on curriculum integration, emphasis on course alignment and strategic consolidation of course content raised the quality of informatics education provided to students. Faculty synergy was an essential component of this redesign process. Continuous quality improvement strategy included an ongoing alignment of curriculum and competencies through a comparative analysis approach. Through

  19. Collaborative design in virtual environments

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiangyu

    2011-01-01

    Collaborative virtual environments (CVEs) are multi-user virtual realities which actively support communication and co-operation. This book offers a comprehensive reference volume to the state-of-the-art in the area of design studies in CVEs. It is an excellent mix of contributions from over 25 leading researcher/experts in multiple disciplines from academia and industry, providing up-to-date insight into the current research topics in this field as well as the latest technological advancements and the best working examples. Many of these results and ideas are also applicable to other areas su

  20. Collaborative Composition For Musical Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kapur

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research is to collaborate with a number of different artists to explore the capabilities of robotic musical instruments to cultivate new music. This paper describes the challenges faced in using musical robotics in rehearsals and on the performance stage. It also describes the design of custom software frameworks and tools for the variety of composers and performers interacting with the new instruments. Details of how laboratory experiments and rehearsals moved to the concert hall in a variety of diverse performance scenarios are described. Finally, a paradigm for how to teach musical robotics as a multimedia composition course is discussed.

  1. The Myth of Global Science Collaboration - Collaboration patterns in epistemic communities

    CERN Document Server

    Hennemann, Stefan; Liefner, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    Scientific collaboration is often perceived as a joint global process that involves researchers worldwide, regardless of their place of work and residence. Globalization of science, in this respect, implies that collaboration among scientists takes place along the lines of common topics and irrespective of the spatial distances between the collaborators. The networks of collaborators, termed 'epistemic communities', should thus have a space-independent structure. This paper shows that such a notion of globalized scientific collaboration is not supported by empirical data. It introduces a novel approach of analyzing distance-dependent probabilities of collaboration. The results of the analysis of six distinct scientific fields reveal that intra-country collaboration is about 10-50 times more likely to occur than international collaboration. Moreover, strong dependencies exist between collaboration activity (measured in co-authorships) and spatial distance when confined to national borders. However, the fact th...

  2. Polymorphic collaboration in the global grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuay, William K.

    2006-05-01

    Next generation collaborative systems must be able to represent the same information in different forms on a broad spectrum of devices and resources from low end personal digital assistants (PDA) to high performance computers (HPC). Users might be on a desktop then switch to a laptop and then to a PDA while accessing the global grid. The user preference profile for a collaboration session should be capable of moving with them as well as be automatically adjusted for the device type. Collaborative systems must be capable of representing the same information in many forms for different domains and on many devices and thus be polymorphic. Polymorphic collaboration will provide an ability for multiple heterogeneous resources (human to human, human to machine and machine to machine) to share information and activities, as well as the ability to regulate collaborative sessions based on client characteristics and needs; reuse user profiles, tool category choices, and settings in future collaboration session by same or different users; use intelligent agents to assist collaborative systems in learning user/resource preferences and behaviors, and autonomously derive optimal information to provide to users and decision makers. This paper discusses ongoing research in next generation collaborative environments with the goal of making electronic collaboration as easy to use as the telephone - collaboration at the touch of the screen.

  3. Tie strength distribution in scientific collaboration networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Qing; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2014-09-01

    Science is increasingly dominated by teams. Understanding patterns of scientific collaboration and their impacts on the productivity and evolution of disciplines is crucial to understand scientific processes. Electronic bibliography offers a unique opportunity to map and investigate the nature of scientific collaboration. Recent studies have demonstrated a counterintuitive organizational pattern of scientific collaboration networks: densely interconnected local clusters consist of weak ties, whereas strong ties play the role of connecting different clusters. This pattern contrasts itself from many other types of networks where strong ties form communities while weak ties connect different communities. Although there are many models for collaboration networks, no model reproduces this pattern. In this paper, we present an evolution model of collaboration networks, which reproduces many properties of real-world collaboration networks, including the organization of tie strengths, skewed degree and weight distribution, high clustering, and assortative mixing.

  4. ‘You should collaborate, children’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob; Vanderlinde, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Touchscreens are being integrated into classrooms to support collaborative learning, yet little empirical evidence has been presented regarding how children collaborate using touchscreens in classrooms. In particular, minimal research has been directed towards how teachers can design for and guid...... for collaborative activities in their classrooms.......Touchscreens are being integrated into classrooms to support collaborative learning, yet little empirical evidence has been presented regarding how children collaborate using touchscreens in classrooms. In particular, minimal research has been directed towards how teachers can design for and guide...... 2nd-grade children and three teachers from two classrooms participated. The cases are based on ethnographic field data and 150 hours of video footage of natural occurring interaction in classroom settings. The ethnographic field data and video footage are examined using a collaboration model...

  5. Managing collaboration in the nanoManipulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, Thomas C.; Helser, Aren T.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.;

    2004-01-01

    We designed, developed, deployed, and evaluated the Collaborative nanoManipulator (CnM), a distributed, collaborative virtual environment system supporting remote scientific collaboration between users of the nanoManipulator interface to atomic force microscopes. This paper describes the entire...... collaboration system, but focuses on the shared nanoManipulator (nM) application. To be readily accepted by users, the shared nM application had to have the same high level of interactivity as the single-user system and include all the functions of the single-user system. In addition the application had...... to support a user's ability to interleave working privately and working collaboratively. Based on our experience developing the CnM, we present: a method of analyzing applications to characterize the concurrency requirements for sharing data between collaborating sites, examples of data structures...

  6. 10 years of the Medipix2 Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The Medipix2 Collaboration was started officially in September 1999 with the aim of disseminating hybrid pixel detector technology from High Energy Physics to other fields. The Collaboration was initially composed of 13 European research institutes. Over the ensuing 10 years the Collaboration expanded to reach a peak of 17 member institutes. Although our main scientific focus has been the development of the Medipix2 and Timepix single photon counting pixel detector readout chips the Collaboration members have expanded the range of applications for the technology to many more scientific fields than initially foreseen. We have signed a number of Technology Transfer Agreements during that time, most notably with PANalytical, whose commercially available PIXcel detector is based on the second version of the Medipix2 chip. This paper will review the history of the Collaboration covering as much as possible the main technical highlights. The success of the Collaboration is testimony to the willingness of a large nu...

  7. [Practice of international collaborations in Southeast Asia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Masanori

    2011-09-01

    Leprosy Research Center is engaged in the international collaborative research project since 1989. The project was consists of two parts. One part is the JICA training course which has been practiced since 1989. Another part is the international collaborative research which was started in Indonesia in the year 1991. Author has participated in this project since 1998. Then, we started collaboration with various organizations including Pakistan, Vietnam, and Myanmar. The contents of the collaborative research were mainly technical assistances for leprosy diagnosis and we have trained young doctors, staff to conduct serological diagnosis and molecular biological diagnosis of leprosy. The projects between the countries were succesful. Throughout the collaboration with foreign countries, author felt strongly that one of most important things in such collaboration was better communication and relation between people having different cultural background.

  8. Tie Strength Distribution in Scientific Collaboration Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ke, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Science is increasingly dominated by teams. Understanding patterns of scientific collaboration and their impacts on the productivity and evolution of disciplines is crucial to understand scientific processes. Electronic bibliography offers a unique opportunity to map and investigate the nature of scientific collaboration. Recent work have demonstrated a counter-intuitive organizational pattern of scientific collaboration networks: densely interconnected local clusters consist of weak ties, whereas strong ties play the role of connecting different clusters. This pattern contrasts itself from many other types of networks where strong ties form communities while weak ties connect different communities. Although there are many models for collaboration networks, no model reproduces this pattern. In this paper, we present an evolution model of collaboration networks, which reproduces many properties of real-world collaboration networks, including the organization of tie strengths, skewed degree and weight distribut...

  9. Computer Supported Collaborative Processes in Virtual Organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Paszkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    In global economy, turbulent organization environment strongly influences organization's operation. Organizations must constantly adapt to changing circumstances and search for new possibilities of gaining competitive advantage. To face this challenge, small organizations base their operation on collaboration within Virtual Organizations (VOs). VO operation is based on collaborative processes. Due to dynamism and required flexibility of collaborative processes, existing business information systems are insufficient to efficiently support them. In this paper a novel method for supporting collaborative processes based on process mining techniques is proposed. The method allows activity patterns in various instances of collaborative processes to be identified and used for recommendation of activities. This provides an opportunity for better computer support of collaborative processes leading to more efficient and effective realization of business goals.

  10. University Researcher and Law Enforcement Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Brett C; Akins, Scott; Sassaman, Jon; Jackson, Scott; Elwer, Ken; Lanfear, Charles; Amorim, Mariana; Stevens, Katelyn

    2017-04-01

    In 2012, heads of local law enforcement agencies in Benton County, Oregon, contacted researchers at Oregon State University to discuss a problem: a sharp rise in the number of contacts between police and suspects displaying symptoms of mental illness. This initial inquiry led to an ongoing collaborative examination of the nature, causes, and consequences of the rise in police contacts. In this article, the authors describe this collaboration between researchers and law enforcement officials from the perspective of both parties, situating it within the context of mental illness in the U.S. criminal justice system. The collaborators draw on firsthand experiences and prior collaborations to discuss the benefits of, challenges in, and recommendations for university-police research collaborations. Although such collaborations may pose challenges (related to relationship definition, data collection and analysis, outputs, and relationship maintenance), the potential benefits-for researchers and law enforcement agencies-are substantial.

  11. An emerging view of scientific collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hara, Noriko; Solomon, Paul; Kim, Seung Lye

    2003-01-01

    -disciplinary research groups. Each group had 14 to 34 members, including faculty, postdoctoral fellows and students, at four geographically dispersed universities. To investigate challenges that emerge in establishing scientific collaboration, data were collected about members' previous and current collaborative......Collaboration is often a critical aspect of scientific research, which is dominated by complex problems, rapidly changing technology, dynamic growth of knowledge, and highly specialized areas of expertise. An individual scientist can seldom provide all of the expertise and resources necessary...

  12. Towards Collaborative Data Analytics for Smart Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarova-Molnar, Sanja; Mohamed, Nader

    2017-01-01

    buildings that is available for further analytics to support meeting BMS’ performance goals. For a single building to benefit from this data-based analytics, it will take a long time. Collaboration of BMS in their data analytics processes can significantly shorten this time period. This paper makes two...... contributions: one, a careful examination of the potential of buildings for collaborative data analytics; and two, description of models for collaborative data analytics....

  13. Collaborative work between the West and Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Bart, Gavin; Li, Li; Giang, Le Minh

    2013-12-01

    The "Collaborative Work between the West and Asia" session was chaired by Dr. Yih-Ing Hser and had three speakers. The speakers (and their topics) were: Dr. Gavin Bart (Collaborative Addiction Research in Asian Populations Home and Abroad), Dr. Li Li (Implementing Intervention Research Projects in Asia), and Dr. Le Minh Giang (Building Research Infrastructure for International Collaborative Studies on Substance Use Disorder and HIV: The Case of Hanoi Medical University/Vietnam).

  14. Distributed user interfaces usability and collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, María D; Tesoriero, Ricardo; Penichet, Victor MR

    2013-01-01

    Written by international researchers in the field of Distributed User Interfaces (DUIs), this book brings together important contributions regarding collaboration and usability in Distributed User Interface settings. Throughout the thirteen chapters authors address key questions concerning how collaboration can be improved by using DUIs, including: in which situations a DUI is suitable to ease the collaboration among users; how usability standards can be used to evaluate the usability of systems based on DUIs; and accurately describe case studies and prototypes implementing these concerns

  15. Understanding Collaborative capacity in an ICT context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Sudhanshu

    In this paper my endeavor is to explore the meaning and implication of collaberation within a dynamic frame which I refer to a capacity. First I review the collaboration literature from an innovation perspective and then develop a framework that enables me to engage with the data we collected dur...... this paper discussing the new insight on collaborative capacity (CC) of firms and their implications for ICT collaboration and firm innovativness....

  16. Collaborative Planning in Modern Supply Chain

    OpenAIRE

    Nýdlová, Olga

    2009-01-01

    This master thesis describes and proves how companies can improve their operational performance and supplier relationships by using modern collaborative and planning practices, specifically the Collaborative Planning Forecasting and Replenishment (CPFR) concept. The theoretical part depicts main developments in supply chain planning over time, shows common challenges in the world of supply chain and offers possible solutions in terms of collaborative supply chain planning practices. The pract...

  17. Strategy of interorganization collaboration: practical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galyna Tarasiuk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The approach to the development of organizational and operational changes program taking into consideration the peculiaritiesof the developed (improved interorganizational collaboration process has been covered. Types of business operations interdependency while executing the interorganizational collaboration process have been determined. The best practice advice concerning responsibility and accountabilitypattern transformation, communication process improvement, an approach to providing the conformity of rewarding mechanism with expected strategic results, coordination and control methodsof interorganizational collaboration have been given.

  18. A latent model for collaborative filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langseth, Helge; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    2012-01-01

    Recommender systems based on collaborative filtering have received a great deal of interest over the last two decades. In particular, recently proposed methods based on dimensionality reduction techniques and using a symmetrical representation of users and items have shown promising results....... Following this line of research, we propose a probabilistic collaborative filtering model that explicitly represents all items and users simultaneously in the model. Experimental results show that the proposed system obtains significantly better results than other collaborative filtering systems (evaluated...

  19. Collaborative Planning in Modern Supply Chain

    OpenAIRE

    Nýdlová, Olga

    2009-01-01

    This master thesis describes and proves how companies can improve their operational performance and supplier relationships by using modern collaborative and planning practices, specifically the Collaborative Planning Forecasting and Replenishment (CPFR) concept. The theoretical part depicts main developments in supply chain planning over time, shows common challenges in the world of supply chain and offers possible solutions in terms of collaborative supply chain planning practices. The pract...

  20. Processes of international collaboration in management research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsen, Karsten; Butler, Christina; Mäkelä, Kristiina;

    2013-01-01

    collaborative research. We offer systematic insights into the social and intellectual processes of academic collaborative writing, identifying six lessons and two key tensions that influence the success of international research teams. Our findings may benefit the formation of future coauthor teams......Scientists and academics increasingly work on collaborative projects and write papers in international research teams. This trend is driven by greater publishing demands in terms of the quality and breadth of data and analysis methods, which tend to be difficult to achieve without collaborating...

  1. Mobile serious games for collaborative problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jaime; Mendoza, Claudia; Salinas, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained from the implementation of a series of learning activities based on mobile serious games (MSG) for the development of problem-solving and collaborative skills in Chilean 8th grade students. Three MSGs were developed and played by teams of four students, who had to solve the problems posed by the game collaboratively. The data shows that the experimental group had a higher perception of their own skills of collaboration and of the plan execution dimension of problem solving than the control group, providing empirical evidence regarding the contribution of MSGs to the development of collaborative problem-solving skills.

  2. Social Media, Collaboration and Social Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondahl, Margrethe; Razmerita, Liana

    2014-01-01

    a social media-enhanced collaborative learning environment in case-based teaching of foreign languages. Based on social constructivismwe argue that foreign language learning is an individual as well as collaborative process and cognitive processes underlying learning and in particular foreign language...... of the challenges in using social media and collaborative group work for teaching and learning at university level.......Social media has created new possibilities for digitally native students to engage, interact and collaborate in learning tasks that foster learning processes and the overall learning experience. Using both qualitative and quantitative data, this article discusses experiences and challenges of using...

  3. Negotiating collaborative governance designs: a discursive approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mie Plotnikof

    2015-01-01

    .... This article contributes to theorizing discursive aspects of such processes by conceptualizing and exploring the meaning negotiations through which collaborative governance designs emerge and change...

  4. Task Management to enhance Collaborative Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Amilcar Olvera Vera

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The collaborative work in the classroom is not something new, the really new is the Management of tasks that enhance the collaborative work that is supported in Web 2.0, considered as an appendix of the web, the same that is based on communities Of users with multiple services, allowing the collaborative fomentation and the exchange of the information of agile form. Thus it can also be said that it offers a universe of possibilities in the collaborative construction of knowledge through tools that offer shared work. Having this type of pedagogical collaborative tools allows a number of collaborative activities with students in the classroom. It is necessary to emphasize the importance that as teachers we must focus the attention on the use that must be given to this type of tools when giving classes and this way guiding the students in the production of collaborative activities, without leaving aside the essential objective of the process Of teaching learning. Collaborative work can be considered as the participation of many people, organizations, which will always be inserted in a dynamic context, we must start from the premise that collaborative work is a process in which each individual learns more than he would learn by Yes alone, as a result of the interaction of the team members, the result being that it will be enriching.

  5. Collaborative inhibition in spatial memory retrieval

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sjolund, Lori A; Erdman, Matthew; Kelly, Jonathan W

    2014-01-01

    .... Two experiments were designed to explore whether collaborative inhibition, which has heretofore been studied using traditional memory stimuli such as word lists, also characterizes spatial memory retrieval...

  6. CERAPP: Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data from a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project) demonstrating using predictive computational...

  7. Students experiences with collaborative learning in asynchronous computer-supported collaborative learning environments.

    OpenAIRE

    Dewiyanti, Silvia; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Jochems, Wim; Broers, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Dewiyanti, S., Brand-Gruwel, S., Jochems, W., & Broers, N. (2007). Students experiences with collaborative learning in asynchronous computer-supported collaborative learning environments. Computers in Human Behavior, 23, 496-514.

  8. Students experiences with collaborative learning in asynchronous computer-supported collaborative learning environments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewiyanti, Silvia; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Jochems, Wim; Broers, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Dewiyanti, S., Brand-Gruwel, S., Jochems, W., & Broers, N. (2007). Students experiences with collaborative learning in asynchronous computer-supported collaborative learning environments. Computers in Human Behavior, 23, 496-514.

  9. Social Innovation and Collaborative Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Linda Lundgaard; Hulgård, Lars

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we explore the roots and inspirations as well as the innovative pedagogy, learning and study programmes in social innovation and social entrepreneurship at Roskilde University in Denmark. We further outline the contribution of academic capacity building nationally...... and internationally in the area of social entrepreneurship and social innovation. We sketch out six inspirational traditions that influence learning and teaching in social innovation and social entrepreneurship: 1/ features and concepts of classic entrepreneurship teaching, 2/ critical pedagogy of the oppressed...... and critical experiential learning, 3/ reform pedagogy as critical societal and subjective learning formats, 4/ creativity, scenarios and future workshops, 5/ collaborative and action learning trends and 6/ social entrepreneurship innovation labs, incubators and hubs. Consequently, we conclude...

  10. ATLAS Live: Collaborative Information Streams

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfarb, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    I report on a pilot project launched in 2010 focusing on facilitating communication and information exchange within the ATLAS Collaboration, through the combination of digital signage software and webcasting. The project, called ATLAS Live, implements video streams of information, ranging from detailed detector and data status to educational and outreach material. The content, including text, images, video and audio, is collected, visualised and scheduled using digital signage software. The system is robust and flexible, utilizing scripts to input data from remote sources, such as the CERN Document Server, Indico, or any available URL, and to integrate these sources into professional-quality streams, including text scrolling, transition effects, inter and intra-screen divisibility. Information is published via the encoding and webcasting of standard video streams, viewable on all common platforms, using a web browser or other common video tool. Authorisation is enforced at the level of the streaming and at th...

  11. Collaborative Lea(r)ning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jacob S.

    to establishing a joint improvement and learning culture with these organisations. Simply, if companies want to create new capabilities and improve their competitiveness, they must combine their knowledge and skills in a unique way, and create improvement and learning links to enable personal and information...... systems to work together closely. Although only limited research has been done in this area it is clear that creating a joint improvement and learning culture between organisations is not easy. One of the first major step to explore this field was started in 2001 when a three year EU-funded project......, the strategies of companies, and the work of managers. Alliances are both a cause and an effect of intensive competition. Collaboration can help firms to lower costs and risks, to expand markets, to develop new products and to learn or create new knowledge. One of the challenges is building capability...

  12. Security through Collaboration in MANETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjia; Parker, James; Joshi, Anupam

    It is well understood that Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANETs) are extremely susceptible to a variety of attacks, and traditional security mechanisms do not work well. Many security schemes have been proposed that depend on cooperation amongst the nodes in a MANET for identifying nodes that are exhibiting malicious behavior such as packet dropping, packet modification, and packet misrouting. We argue that in general, this problem can be viewed as an instance of detecting nodes whose behavior is an outlier when compared to others. In this paper, we propose a collaborative outlier detection algorithm for MANETs that factors in a nodes reputation. The algorithm leads to a common outlier view amongst distributed nodes with a limited communication overhead. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is efficient and accurate.

  13. Learning Multidisciplinary Collaboration with Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Thomas Duus

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the design of a game-based learning process for developing communication in public organisations. The game-design presented here emphasises those parts of public organisations that tend to employ multidisciplinary teams for solving wicked problems. As such teams employ...... members from different, professional backgrounds, the game Public Professional sought to develop new understandings among team members and across professions. The purpose of this game was to facilitate an understanding among team members and across professions, a game-based learning process named Public...... Professional was designed. Its purpose was to a) provide team members with a shared language for discussing work related problems in regard to communication. To facilitate an understanding on the collaboration across professions, and to provide a space for dialogue about professional cooperation, Public...

  14. Project Learning and Virtual Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fibiger, Bo; Nielsen, Janni; Sorensen, Elsebeth

    2005-01-01

    on ICT and Learning. In addition, MIL provides a learning space where practice is under constant negotiation and reconstruction as an inherent, integrated part of the learning process. Consequently, we argue that MIL may be seen as an example of best practice in blended learning.......This paper will introduce a master program in ICT and Learning (MIL) and present some of the experiences we have gained so far. MIL is a result of a collaborative initiative taken by five Danish universities, and it is an accredited part-time 2-year master program. It is unique in the sense...... will be directed towards problems experienced by the students. From an analytical perspective, the paper will identify and discuss fundamental problems related to the organization, flexibility, and implementation of project pedagogy online. MIL is organized around ICT and Learning and the study theme focuses...

  15. Collaborations Between Scott and Skidmore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Robinson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines the collaboration between architect and designer George Gilbert Scott and metalworker Francis Skidmore. It compares their metalwork screens at the cathedrals of Hereford, Lichfield, and Salisbury—projects which sometimes overlapped and were all completed in the relatively short time span between 1861 and 1870—within the wider context of Skidmore’s career. While Scott was lauded in his lifetime and has been much studied since, Skidmore has not often been written about, despite having achieved an impressive scale and pace of work in British cathedrals, parish churches, and town halls. This essay therefore shines particular light on Skidmore’s work as designer and maker, and particularly the high profile commissions for these great cathedrals, restored and enhanced with the aesthetics and ambition of the Victorian era.

  16. Toward a Nevada Digital Collaborative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Vaughan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In mid-2008, a statewide committee was formed to engage in a comprehensive, Nevada statewide digital planning process. This group consisted of broad membership from the range of Nevada cultural heritage institutions, and was focused on creating a five year digital plan for the state, with an emphasis on collaboration amongst various cultural heritage institutions, increased digitization, and adoption of a digital preservation strategy. This article describes the initial work of the parent committee and two subsequent working groups, funded by the Library Technology and Services Act and aided by outside consultants. Early steps included a comprehensive planning survey and various meetings to understand the capabilities and desires of both primary stakeholders and the community at large. While several challenges not necessarily unique to Nevada arose over the first couple of years, a clear path forward for additional progress has been charted.

  17. Author Credit for Transdisciplinary Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Ding, Ying; Malic, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Transdisciplinary collaboration is the key for innovation. An evaluation mechanism is necessary to ensure that academic credit for this costly process can be allocated fairly among coauthors. This paper proposes a set of quantitative measures (e.g., t_credit and t_index) to reflect authors' transdisciplinary contributions to publications. These measures are based on paper-topic probability distributions and author-topic probability distributions. We conduct an empirical analysis of the information retrieval domain which demonstrates that these measures effectively improve the results of harmonic_credit and h_index measures by taking into account the transdisciplinary contributions of authors. The definitions of t_credit and t_index provide a fair and effective way for research organizations to assign credit to authors of transdisciplinary publications.

  18. ATLAS Live: Collaborative Information Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Steven; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    I report on a pilot project launched in 2010 focusing on facilitating communication and information exchange within the ATLAS Collaboration, through the combination of digital signage software and webcasting. The project, called ATLAS Live, implements video streams of information, ranging from detailed detector and data status to educational and outreach material. The content, including text, images, video and audio, is collected, visualised and scheduled using digital signage software. The system is robust and flexible, utilizing scripts to input data from remote sources, such as the CERN Document Server, Indico, or any available URL, and to integrate these sources into professional-quality streams, including text scrolling, transition effects, inter and intra-screen divisibility. Information is published via the encoding and webcasting of standard video streams, viewable on all common platforms, using a web browser or other common video tool. Authorisation is enforced at the level of the streaming and at the web portals, using the CERN SSO system.

  19. Industrial collaborators honoured by ALICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Picture 01 : the winners gather after the ALICE Award ceremony (from left to right): Yuri Saveliev, Stanislav Burachas and Sergei Beloglovsky of North Crystals; Maximilian Metzger, CERN's secretary-general; Rang Cai of ATM; Jürgen Schukraft, ALICE spokesperson; Erich Pamminger and Daniel Gattinger of FACC; and Tiejun Wang of ATM. The ALICE collaboration has presented its second round of awards to three companies for their novel and remarkable contributions to major detector systems: Advance Technology and Materials (ATM), Fischer Advanced Composite Components (FACC) and North Crystals. The awards presented to these three leaders in advanced, modern materials were beautifully sculpted from one of the oldest materials used by mankind to manufacture tools - Mexican Obsidian

  20. Collaborative Planetary GIS with JMARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenshied, S.; Christensen, P. R.; Edwards, C. S.; Prashad, L. C.; Anwar, S.; Engle, E.; Noss, D.; Jmars Development Team

    2010-12-01

    Traditional GIS tools have allowed users to work locally with their own datasets in their own computing environment. More recently, data providers have started offering online repositories of preprocessed data which helps minimize the learning curve required to access new datasets. The ideal collaborative GIS tool provides the functionality of a traditional GIS and easy access to preprocessed data repositories while also enabling users to contribute data, analysis, and ideas back into the very tools they're using. JMARS (Java Mission-planning and Analysis for Remote Sensing) is a suite of geospatial applications developed by the Mars Space Flight Facility at Arizona State University. This software is used for mission planning and scientific data analysis by several NASA missions, including Mars Odyssey, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. It is used by scientists, researchers and students of all ages from more than 40 countries around the world. In addition to offering a rich set of global and regional maps and publicly released orbiter images, the JMARS software development team has been working on ways to encourage the creation of collaborative datasets. Bringing together users from diverse teams and backgrounds allows new features to be developed with an interest in making the application useful and accessible to as wide a potential audience as possible. Actively engaging the scientific community in development strategy and hands on tasks allows the creation of user driven data content that would not otherwise be possible. The first community generated dataset to result from this effort is a tool mapping peer-reviewed papers to the locations they relate to on Mars with links to ancillary data. This allows users of JMARS to browse to an area of interest and then quickly locate papers corresponding to that area. Alternately, users can search for published papers over a specified time interval and visually see what areas of Mars have

  1. PBL and beyond: trends in collaborative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, William J; Richards, Boyd F; Mutnick, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Building upon the disruption to lecture-based methods triggered by the introduction of problem-based learning, approaches to promote collaborative learning are becoming increasingly diverse, widespread and generally well accepted within medical education. Examples of relatively new, structured collaborative learning methods include team-based learning and just-in-time teaching. Examples of less structured approaches include think-pair share, case discussions, and the flipped classroom. It is now common practice in medical education to employ a range of instructional approaches to support collaborative learning. We believe that the adoption of such approaches is entering a new and challenging era. We define collaborate learning by drawing on the broader literature, including Chi's ICAP framework that emphasizes the importance of sustained, interactive explanation and elaboration by learners. We distinguish collaborate learning from constructive, active, and passive learning and provide preliminary evidence documenting the growth of methods that support collaborative learning. We argue that the rate of adoption of collaborative learning methods will accelerate due to a growing emphasis on the development of team competencies and the increasing availability of digital media. At the same time, the adoption collaborative learning strategies face persistent challenges, stemming from an overdependence on comparative-effectiveness research and a lack of useful guidelines about how best to adapt collaborative learning methods to given learning contexts. The medical education community has struggled to consistently demonstrate superior outcomes when using collaborative learning methods and strategies. Despite this, support for their use will continue to expand. To select approaches with the greatest utility, instructors must carefully align conditions of the learning context with the learning approaches under consideration. Further, it is critical that modifications are made

  2. Evaluation of Intelligent Grouping Based on Learners' Collaboration Competence Level in Online Collaborative Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muuro, Maina Elizaphan; Oboko, Robert; Wagacha, Waiganjo Peter

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we explore the impact of an intelligent grouping algorithm based on learners' collaborative competency when compared with (a) instructor based Grade Point Average (GPA) method level and (b) random method, on group outcomes and group collaboration problems in an online collaborative learning environment. An intelligent grouping…

  3. Collaborative e-Purchasing for Hospitals: IT for addressing collaborative purchasing impediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, Robbert; Versendaal, Johan

    2011-01-01

    The benefits of collaborative purchasing are many, yet in the healthcare sector, in particular at hospitals, it is still uncommon. In this paper we identify major impediments for collaborative purchasing, resulting in a first component of our proposed collaborative e-purchasing model for hospitals;

  4. A Data Mining Approach to Reveal Representative Collaboration Indicators in Open Collaboration Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Antonio R.; Boticario, Jesus G.

    2009-01-01

    Data mining methods are successful in educational environments to discover new knowledge or learner skills or features. Unfortunately, they have not been used in depth with collaboration. We have developed a scalable data mining method, whose objective is to infer information on the collaboration during the collaboration process in a…

  5. Collaboration between Chiang Mai and Aarhus Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Henrik; Trisonthi, Chusie; Srithi, Kamonnate

    2011-01-01

    in Bangkok and involved a large amount of collaborative fieldwork, graduate and post-graduate training, and publication. Over the years the collaboration has been extended to several other institutions and universities. Recent activities of Aarhus University have involved joint graduate training with Chiang...

  6. Harnessing Collaborative Annotations on Online Formative Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian-Wei; Lai, Yuan-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    This paper harnesses collaborative annotations by students as learning feedback on online formative assessments to improve the learning achievements of students. Through the developed Web platform, students can conduct formative assessments, collaboratively annotate, and review historical records in a convenient way, while teachers can generate…

  7. Examining Peer Collaboration in Online Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castek, Jill; Coiro, Julie; Guzniczak, Lizbeth; Bradshaw, Carlton

    2012-01-01

    This study examines peer collaboration among four pairs of seventh graders who read online to determine what caused the downfall of the Mayan civilization. More and less productive collaborative interactions are presented through snippets of dialogue in which pairs negotiated complex texts. Few examples of how teachers can skillfully facilitate…

  8. Augmented Reality for Multi-disciplinary Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, XIANGYU; Rui

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents a framework for multi-disciplinary collaboration. Tangible Augmented Reality has been raised as one of suitable systems for design collaboration. Furthermore, it emphasizes the advantages of Tangible Augmented Reality to illustrate the needs for integrating the Tangible User Interfaces and Augmented Reality Systems.

  9. International collaboration in medical radiation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, Gary; Allen, Carla; Platt, Jane

    2016-06-01

    International collaboration is recognised for enhancing the ability to approach complex problems from a variety of perspectives, increasing development of a wider range of research skills and techniques and improving publication and acceptance rates. The aim of this paper is to describe the current status of international collaboration in medical radiation science and compare this to other allied health occupations. This study utilised a content analysis approach where co-authorship of a journal article was used as a proxy for research collaboration and the papers were assigned to countries based on the corporate address given in the by-line of the publication. A convenience sample method was employed and articles published in the professional medical radiation science journals in the countries represented within our research team - Australia, the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States of America (USA) were sampled. Physiotherapy, speech pathology, occupational therapy and nursing were chosen for comparison. Rates of international collaboration in medical radiation science journals from Australia, the UK and the USA have steadily increased over the 3-year period sampled. Medical radiation science demonstrated lower average rates of international collaboration than the other allied health occupations sampled. The average rate of international collaboration in nursing was far below that of the allied health occupations sampled. Overall, the UK had the highest average rate of international collaboration, followed by Australia and the USA, the lowest. Overall, medical radiation science is lagging in international collaboration in comparison to other allied health fields.

  10. Collaborative Strategic Planning: Myth or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbugua, Flora; Rarieya, Jane F. A.

    2014-01-01

    The concept and practice of strategic planning, while entrenched in educational institutions in the West, is just catching on in Kenya. While literature emphasizes the importance of collaborative strategic planning, it does not indicate the challenges presented by collaboratively engaging in strategic planning. This article reports on findings of…

  11. Mock Interdisciplinary Staffing: Educating for Interprofessional Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quealy-Berge, Diana; Caldwell, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Training for interprofessional collaboration is important because professionals are increasingly required to work together in a coordinated and collaborative manner to meet the complex needs of clients. However, few published reports exist on interprofessional training for community counselors and marriage and family therapists. The authors…

  12. Writing Together: An Arendtian Framework for Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restaino, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This essay considers the long-standing challenges, in both practice and theory, to collaborative writing in the first-year classroom. I argue that Hannah Arendt's concepts of plurality and natality are useful frameworks for thinking constructively and practically about teaching argumentative writing through collaboration. I explore these…

  13. Collaborative Methods for Business Process Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Zacarias, Marielba; Martins, Paula Ventura

    2011-01-01

    Information flows across the organization are complex and procedures employed to understand, share and control organizational knowledge and experiences should be properly supported by collaborative environments. Nevertheless, few collaborative methodologies had been proposed to describe and evolve business processes. Existing tools don't provide the right methods for business processes discovery, modelling, monitoring and improvement. In the future, business processes models shoul...

  14. Describing and Enhancing Collaboration at the Computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Beatty

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Computer-based learning materials differ from classroom practice in that they seldom explicitly offer opportunities for collaboration. Despite this, students do collaborate, helping one another through the content and affordances of computer materials. But, in doing so, students meet with challenges. Paradoxically, these challenges can either inspire or discourage learning and second-language acquisition. This paper, based on research with twenty Hong Kong university students in a controlled experiment, evaluates challenges to collaboration at the computer as evidenced by discourse. The students were videotaped and their discourse transcribed and evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively, according to a set of discourse markers created to describe collaborative, non-collaborative and ambiguous strategies. The paper begins by exploring the differences between collaboration and similar terms such as teamwork and cooperative learning then goes on to define collaboration in the context of computer-assisted learning. It ends by presenting practical suggestions for software designers, teachers and students to enhance collaboration at the computer.

  15. How Collaborative Is Structural Family Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Ryan T.; Nichols, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the charge by "collaborative" therapies, such as solution focused and narrative, that structural family therapy is an aggressive, confrontational, and impositional approach, this investigation examines the role of therapist empathy in creating a collaborative partnership in structural family therapy. Twenty-four videotaped therapy…

  16. Cultivating Collaborative Improvement: An Action Learning Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, Rick; McNichols, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    As competitive pressure mounts to innovate in the global knowledge economy, many organizations are exploring new ways of collaborating with their supply chain partners. However, the process of implementing collaborative initiatives across disparate members of supply networks is fraught with difficul

  17. Messy Collaboration: Learning from a Learning Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Bob; Walker, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Messy collaboration refers to complexity, unpredictability and management dilemmas when educators work together. Such messiness was evident in a Hong Kong English Learning Study, a structured cyclical process in which teachers and researcher-participants from a teacher education institution work collaboratively on effective student learning. This…

  18. Collaborative Practices that Support Creativity in Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyas, Dhaval; Heylen, Dirk; Nijholt, Anton; Veer, van der Gerrit; Wagner, Ina

    2009-01-01

    Design is a ubiquitous, collaborative and highly material activity. Because of the embodied nature of the design profession, designers apply certain collaborative practices to enhance creativity in their everyday work. Within the domain of industrial design, we studied two educational design departm

  19. The GRIP method for collaborative roadmapping workshops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piirainen, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    Technology roadmapping is a well-known tool for technology management, but practical advice for facilitating collaborative roadmapping workshops is relatively scarce. To cater for this need, we have designed a method for collaborative roadmapping, dubbed the GRIP method, for facilitating group work...

  20. Lessons Learned from the Collaborative Writing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavsar, Victoria; Ahn, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    We reflect on how to implement the instrumental aspect of collaborative writing in such a way that the developmental aspect of collaborative writing is maximally fostered, based on conditions necessary for socially constructed learning. We discuss four instrumental strategies that bolster mutual ownership of the writing and protect the social…