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  1. BNL ALARA Center: ALARA Notes, No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alara Notes includes the agenda for the Third International Workshop on ALARA and specific instructions on the use of the on-line fax-on-demand service provided by BNL. Other topics included in this issue are: (1) A discussion of low-level discharges from Canadian nuclear plants, (2) Safety issues at French nuclear plants, (3) Acoustic emission as a means of leak detection, (4) Replacement of steam generators at Doel-3, Beaznau, and North Anna-1, (5) Remote handling equipment at Bruce, (6) EPRI's low level waste program, (7) Radiation protection during concrete repairs at Savannah River, (8) Reactor vessel stud removal/repair at Comanche Peak-1, (9) Rework of reactor coolant pump motors, (10) Restoration of service water at North Anna-1 and -2, (11) Steam generator tubing problems at Mihama-1, (12) Full system decontamination at Indian Point-2, (13) Chemical decontamination at Browns Ferry-2, and (14) Inspection methodolody in France and Japan

  2. BNL ALARA Center experience with an information exchange system on dose control at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The essential elements of an international information exchange system on dose control at nuclear power plants are summarized. Information was collected from literature abstracting services, by attending technical meetings, by circulating data collection forms, and through personal contacts. Data are assembled in various databases and periodically disseminated to several hundred interested participants through a variety of publications and at technical meetings. Immediate on-line access to the data is available to participants with modems, commercially available communications software, and a password that is provided by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center to authorized users of the system. Since January 1992, rapid access also has been provided to persons with fax machines. Some information is available for ''polling'' the BNL system at any time, and other data can be installed for polling on request. Most information disseminated to data has been through publications; however, new protocols, simplified by the ALARA Center staff, and the convenience of fax machines are likely to make the earlier availability of information through these mechanisms increasingly important

  3. BNL ALARA Center's development of a computerized radiological assessment and design system (RADS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health Physics and Industrial Hygiene sponsored a study of Radiological Engineering Programs at selected DOE contractor facilities. This study was conducted to review, evaluate, and summarize techniques and practices that should be considered in the design phase that reduce dose and the spread of radioactive materials during subsequent construction and operation of DOE radiological facilities. As in a previous study on operational ALARA programs, a variety of good-practice documents will be generated. It is envisioned that these documents will serve as a resource to assist radiological engineers in the process of designing radiological facilities, and in performing radiological safety/ALARA design reviews. This paper presents the features for three good-practice documents and related software applications that are being developed based on the findings of this study. The proposed software called Radiological Assessment and Design System (RADS) will be a menu-driven database and spreadsheet program. It will be designed to provide easy, consistent, and effective implementation of the methodologies described in the three good-practice documents. These documents and the associated RADS software will provide the user with the following three functions: (1) enter dose assessment information and data into computer worksheets and provide printed tables of the results which can then be inserted into safety analysis reports or cost-benefit analyses, (2) perform a wide variety of sorts of radiological design criteria from DOE Orders and produce a checklist of the desired design criteria, and (3) enter cost/benefit data and qualitative rating of attributes for various design alternatives which reduce dose into computer worksheets and provide printed reports of cost-effectiveness results

  4. ALARA Center of Technology -- resource guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose is to provide a source of information that can be used to assist personnel in the planning, training, and execution of radiological work using the principles of ALARA. This document is not intended to replace HNF or WHC Control Manual requirements. The ALARA Tools-List provides detailed information on the use and procurement of engineered controls, mockup training guidelines, and good radiological work practices that have been proven to be ALARA

  5. ALARA Center of Technology -- resource guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-02-05

    The purpose is to provide a source of information that can be used to assist personnel in the planning, training, and execution of radiological work using the principles of ALARA. This document is not intended to replace HNF or WHC Control Manual requirements. The ALARA Tools-List provides detailed information on the use and procurement of engineered controls, mockup training guidelines, and good radiological work practices that have been proven to be ALARA.

  6. Fluor Hanford ALARA Center is a D and D Resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation changed when the last reactor plant was shut down in 1989 and work was started to place all the facilities in a safe condition and begin decontamination, deactivation, decommissioning, and demolition (D and D). These facilities consisted of old shutdown reactor plants, spent fuel pools, processing facilities, and 177 underground tanks containing 53 million gallons of highly radioactive and toxic liquids and sludge. New skills were needed by the workforce to accomplish this mission. By 1995, workers were in the process of getting the facilities in a safe condition and it became obvious improvements were needed in their tools, equipment and work practices. The Hanford ALARA Program looked good on paper, but did little to help contractors that were working in the field. The Radiological Control Director decided that the ALARA program needed to be upgraded and a significant improvement could be made if workers had a place they could visit that had samples of the latest technology and could talk to experienced personnel who have had success doing D and D work. Two senior health physics personnel who had many years experience in doing radiological work were chosen to obtain tools and equipment from vendors and find a location centrally located on the Hanford site. Vendors were asked to loan their latest tools and equipment for display. Most vendors responded and the Hanford ALARA Center of Technology opened on October 1, 1996. Today, the ALARA Center includes a classroom for conducting training and a mockup area with gloveboxes. Two large rooms have a containment tent, several glove bags, samples of fixatives/expandable foam, coating displays, protective clothing, heat stress technology, cutting tools, HEPA filtered vacuums, ventilation units, pumps, hydraulic wrenches, communications equipment, shears, nibblers, shrouded tooling, and several examples of innovative tools developed by the Hanford facilities. See Figures I and

  7. The program of the ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1984 the Brookhaven National Laboratory was asked by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to set up a Center to monitor dose-reduction efforts in the US and abroad and to focus the industry's attention on ALARA. The paper summarizes the main work of the ALARA Center between 1984 and 1992. The Center maintains nine data bases for the NRC and the Nuclear Power Industry. These databases are constantly updated and access to them is provided through a personal computer and a modem and by periodic publications in the form of a newsletter and NUREG reports. Also described briefly are eight other projects related to dose-reduction at nuclear power plants that the Center has carried out for the NRC. Among these are projects that analyze the cost-effectiveness of engineering modifications, look at worldwide activities at dose reduction and compare US and foreign dose experience, examine high-dose worker groups and high-dose jobs, develop optimum techniques to control contamination at nuclear plants, and look at the doses being received by men and women in all sectors of the nuclear industry

  8. Fluor hanford ALARA center -showcases- tools, equipment, and work practices used during D and D work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1996, Fluor established the ALARA Center at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State to 'showcase' tools and equipment used to support the principle of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). Much of the work was being done by workers who used hand tools while dressed in multiple sets of protective clothing. The Center was opened so that workers could see and handle the latest tools and equipment and have experienced personnel to help them plan work evolutions. Experienced personnel who were familiar with the ALARA concept as well as new technology were assigned to the Center. In addition, vendors were asked to display their products so the Hanford workers could experience state-of-the-art tools and equipment for doing work in a radiological environment. Since opening, the ALARA Center has evolved into a tremendous resource - not only for Hanford, but also most of the entire DOE Complex, as well as contractors around the world. Classes in fundamental radiological work practices are presented when the facilities recognize a need. The ALARA Center has a variety of products that range from simple hand tools to robots, video scopes, and gamma cameras. The tools and equipment on display are used in these training classes to train the workers on the work practices to operate them, take them apart to determine how they work and decide how to maintain them. Many facilities invite the ALARA Center staff to attend planning meetings at the facilities and participate in job walk-downs. Generally, ALARA Center personnel provide several options on how the radiological work can be accomplished safely and recommend the option that is ALARA and safest for the workers. A few years ago, it became obvious that the work scope was changing and many facilities had a new job to clean out the facilities and demolish them. The ALARA Center began contacting vendors who had tools and equipment that could be used for D and D work. Today, the ALARA

  9. Physics of the 1 Teraflop RIKEN-BNL-Columbia QCD project. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop: Volume 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A workshop was held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on October 16, 1998, as part of the first anniversary celebration for the center. This meeting brought together the physicists from RIKEN-BNL, BNL and Columbia who are using the QCDSP (Quantum Chromodynamics on Digital Signal Processors) computer at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for studies of QCD. Many of the talks in the workshop were devoted to domain wall fermions, a discretization of the continuum description of fermions which preserves the global symmetries of the continuum, even at finite lattice spacing. This formulation has been the subject of analytic investigation for some time and has reached the stage where large-scale simulations in QCD seem very promising. With the computational power available from the QCDSP computers, scientists are looking forward to an exciting time for numerical simulations of QCD

  10. Physics of the 1 Teraflop RIKEN-BNL-Columbia QCD project. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop: Volume 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-16

    A workshop was held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on October 16, 1998, as part of the first anniversary celebration for the center. This meeting brought together the physicists from RIKEN-BNL, BNL and Columbia who are using the QCDSP (Quantum Chromodynamics on Digital Signal Processors) computer at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for studies of QCD. Many of the talks in the workshop were devoted to domain wall fermions, a discretization of the continuum description of fermions which preserves the global symmetries of the continuum, even at finite lattice spacing. This formulation has been the subject of analytic investigation for some time and has reached the stage where large-scale simulations in QCD seem very promising. With the computational power available from the QCDSP computers, scientists are looking forward to an exciting time for numerical simulations of QCD.

  11. ALARA engineering at Department of Energy facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the second in the series of bibliographies supporting the efforts at the Brookhaven National Laboratory ALARA Center on dose reduction at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health to include DOE nuclear facilities. Abstracts for this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy Data Base, and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Information that the reader feels should be included in the next volume of this bibliography may be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center. These abstracts, which have a bearing on dose reduction, consolidates information from publications pertinent to Radiological Engineers and Operational Health Physicists. Volume 2 contains 127 abstracts numbered from 69 through 195 as well as author and subject indices. The subject index contains the abstract numbers from both the previous volume and the current volume, the latter being indicated in boldface

  12. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workwhop on RHIC spin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SOFFER,J.

    1999-10-06

    This RHIC Spin Workshop is the 1999 annual meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration, and the second to be hosted at Brookhaven and sponsored by the RIKEN BNL Research Center. The previous meetings were at Brookhaven (1998), Marseille (1996), MIT in 1995, Argonne 1994, Tucson in 1991, and the Polarized Collider Workshop at Penn State in 1990. As noted last year, the Center provides a home for combined work on spin by theorists, experimenters, and accelerator physicists. This proceedings, as last year, is a compilation of 1 page summaries and 5 selected transparencies for each speaker. It is designed to be available soon after the workshop is completed. Speakers are welcome to include web or other references for additional material. The RHIC spin program and RHIC are rapidly becoming reality. RHIC has completed its first commissioning run, as described here by Steve Peggs. The first Siberian Snake for spin has been completed and is being installed in RHIC. A new polarized source from KEK and Triumf with over 1 milliampere of polarized H{sup minus} is being installed, described by Anatoli Zelenski. They have had a successful test of a new polarimeter for RHIC, described by Kazu Kurita and Haixin Huang. Spin commissioning is expected next spring (2000), and the first physics run for spin is anticipated for spring 2001. The purpose of the workshop is to get everyone together about once per year and discuss goals of the spin program, progress, problems, and new ideas. They also have many separate regular forums on spin. There are spin discussion sessions every Tuesday, now organized by Naohito Saito and Werner Vogelsang. The spin discussion schedule and copies of presentations are posted on http://riksg01.rhic.bnl.gov/rsc. Speakers and other spinners are encouraged to come to BNL and to lead a discussion on your favorite idea. They also have regular polarimeter and snake meetings on alternate Thursdays, led by Bill McGahern, the lead engineer for the accelerator spin

  13. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop on RHIC spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This RHIC Spin Workshop is the 1999 annual meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration, and the second to be hosted at Brookhaven and sponsored by the RIKEN BNL Research Center. The previous meetings were at Brookhaven (1998), Marseille (1996), MIT in 1995, Argonne 1994, Tucson in 1991, and the Polarized Collider Workshop at Penn State in 1990. As noted last year, the Center provides a home for combined work on spin by theorists, experimenters, and accelerator physicists. This proceedings, as last year, is a compilation of 1 page summaries and 5 selected transparencies for each speaker. It is designed to be available soon after the workshop is completed. Speakers are welcome to include web or other references for additional material. The RHIC spin program and RHIC are rapidly becoming reality. RHIC has completed its first commissioning run, as described here by Steve Peggs. The first Siberian Snake for spin has been completed and is being installed in RHIC. A new polarized source from KEK and Triumf with over 1 milliampere of polarized Hminus is being installed, described by Anatoli Zelenski. They have had a successful test of a new polarimeter for RHIC, described by Kazu Kurita and Haixin Huang. Spin commissioning is expected next spring (2000), and the first physics run for spin is anticipated for spring 2001. The purpose of the workshop is to get everyone together about once per year and discuss goals of the spin program, progress, problems, and new ideas. They also have many separate regular forums on spin. There are spin discussion sessions every Tuesday, now organized by Naohito Saito and Werner Vogelsang. The spin discussion schedule and copies of presentations are posted on http://riksg01.rhic.bnl.gov/rsc. Speakers and other spinners are encouraged to come to BNL and to lead a discussion on your favorite idea. They also have regular polarimeter and snake meetings on alternate Thursdays, led by Bill McGahern, the lead engineer for the accelerator spin effort

  14. ALARA engineering at Department of Energy facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report, prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health, is the second in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose reduction activities, with a specific focus towards DOE facilities. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste; uranium enrichment; fuel fabrication, storage, and reprocessing; facility decommissioning; hot laboratories; tritium production; research, test and production reactors; weapons fabrication and testing; and accelerators. Material on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, job planning, improved operational techniques, and other topics has also been included. This volume (Volume 2 of the series) contains 127 abstracts numbered from 69 through 195, as well as author and subject indices. The subject index contains the abstract numbers from both the previous volume and the current volume, the latter being indicated in boldface. Information that the reader feels should be included in the next volume of this bibliography should be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center

  15. PRODEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP : HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING WITH QCDOC AND BLUEGENE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHRIST,N.; DAVENPORT,J.; DENG,Y.; GARA,A.; GLIMM,J.; MAWHINNEY,R.; MCFADDEN,E.; PESKIN,A.; PULLEYBLANK,W.

    2003-03-11

    Staff of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Columbia University, IBM and the RIKEN BNL Research Center organized a one-day workshop held on February 28, 2003 at Brookhaven to promote the following goals: (1) To explore areas other than QCD applications where the QCDOC and BlueGene/L machines can be applied to good advantage, (2) To identify areas where collaboration among the sponsoring institutions can be fruitful, and (3) To expose scientists to the emerging software architecture. This workshop grew out of an informal visit last fall by BNL staff to the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center that resulted in a continuing dialog among participants on issues common to these two related supercomputers. The workshop was divided into three sessions, addressing the hardware and software status of each system, prospective applications, and future directions.

  16. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report, prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health, contains the third in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. This report also contains abstracts from the two previous volumes. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy Data Base, and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, storage, and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, and accelerators. Material on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, job planning, improved operational techniques, and other topics are also included

  17. ALARA: Progress and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper has two main topics. The first part describes the establishment and work of the ALARA Center; the second part presents some results of studies at the Center with international data on doses at PWR plants. This data then is used to reach a preliminary understanding of some of the factors that are causing high doses at PWRs. This approach should help in reducing occupational exposures in a more effective manner

  18. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Progress in High-pT Physics at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazilevsky, A.; Bland, L.; Vogelsang, W.

    2010-03-17

    This volume archives the presentations at the RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop 'Progress in High-PT Physics at RHIC', held at BNL in March 2010. Much has been learned from high-p{sub T} physics after 10 years of RHIC operations for heavy-ion collisions, polarized proton collisions and d+Au collisions. The workshop focused on recent progress in these areas by both theory and experiment. The first morning saw review talks on the theory of RHIC high-p{sub T} physics by G. Sterman and J. Soffer, and on the experimental results by M. Tannenbaum. One of the most exciting recent results from the RHIC spin program is the first observation of W bosons and their associated single-spin asymmetry. The new preliminary data were reported on the first day of our workshop, along with a theoretical perspective. There also were detailed discussions on the global analysis of polarized parton distributions, including the knowledge on gluon polarization and the impact of the W-data. The main topic of the second workshop day were single-transverse spin asymmetries and their analysis in terms of transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions. There is currently much interest in a future Drell-Yan program at RHIC, thanks to the exciting physics opportunities this would offer. This was addressed in some of the talks. There also were presentations on the latest results on transverse-spin physics from HERMES and BELLE. On the final day of the workshop, the focus shifted toward forward and small-x physics at RHIC, which has become a cornerstone of the whole RHIC program. Exciting new data were presented and discussed in terms of their possible implications for our understanding of strong color-field phenomena in QCD. In the afternoon, there were discussions of nuclear parton distributions and jet observables, among them fragmentation. The workshop was concluded with outlooks toward the near-term (LHC, JLab) and longer-term (EIC) future. The workshop has been a great success

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN/BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP FUTURE TRANSVERSITY MEASUREMENTS (VOLUME 29).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boer, D.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.

    2001-01-02

    The RIKEN-BNL Research Center workshop on ''Future Transversity Measurements'' was held at BNL from September 18-20, 2000. The main goal of the workshop was to explore future measurements of transversity distributions. This issue is of importance to the RHIC experiments, which will study polarized proton-proton collisions with great precision. One of the workshop's goals was to enhance interactions between the DIS community at HERA and the spin community at RHIC in this field. The workshop has been well received by the participants; the number of 69 registered participants demonstrates broad interest in the workshop's topics. The program contained 35 talks and there was ample time for lively discussions. The program covered all recent work in the field and in addition some very elucidating educational talks were given. At the workshop the present status of the field was discussed and it has succeeded in stimulating new experimental and theoretical studies (e.g. model calculations for interference fragmentation functions (IFF), IFF analysis at DELPHI). It also functioned to focus attention on the open questions that need to be resolved for near future experiments. In general, the conclusions were optimistic, i.e. measuring the transversity functions seems to be possible, although some new experimental hurdles will have to be taken.

  20. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN/BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP FUTURE TRANSVERSITY MEASUREMENTS (VOLUME 29)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RIKEN-BNL Research Center workshop on ''Future Transversity Measurements'' was held at BNL from September 18-20, 2000. The main goal of the workshop was to explore future measurements of transversity distributions. This issue is of importance to the RHIC experiments, which will study polarized proton-proton collisions with great precision. One of the workshop's goals was to enhance interactions between the DIS community at HERA and the spin community at RHIC in this field. The workshop has been well received by the participants; the number of 69 registered participants demonstrates broad interest in the workshop's topics. The program contained 35 talks and there was ample time for lively discussions. The program covered all recent work in the field and in addition some very elucidating educational talks were given. At the workshop the present status of the field was discussed and it has succeeded in stimulating new experimental and theoretical studies (e.g. model calculations for interference fragmentation functions (IFF), IFF analysis at DELPHI). It also functioned to focus attention on the open questions that need to be resolved for near future experiments. In general, the conclusions were optimistic, i.e. measuring the transversity functions seems to be possible, although some new experimental hurdles will have to be taken

  1. Hadron spin-flip at RHIC energies: Volume 3. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    From July 21 to August 22, 1997 a working group sponsored by the RIKEN BNL Research Center was convened to consider ``Hadron Spin-Flip at RHIC Energies.`` The original motivation for this arose from the importance of understanding the hadronic part of the proton-proton spin flip amplitude in using the Coulomb-Nuclear Interference for polarimetry. This is a very difficult, non-perturbative problem and it is not possible to make a calculation with controlled approximations, so a number of approaches were followed: (1) methods to extract the necessary information from past experiments and from RHIC experiments were examined; (2) phenomenological, Regge models--some of them very old--were reviewed; (3) the predictions of several non-perturbative theoretical models were evaluated; (4) the use of nuclei for the CNI experiment was quantitatively considered; (5) alternative methods of polarimetry were critically studied. These included Primikoff effect, large-t pp scattering, and pe double spin asymmetry.

  2. Hadron spin-flip at RHIC energies: Volume 3. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From July 21 to August 22, 1997 a working group sponsored by the RIKEN BNL Research Center was convened to consider ''Hadron Spin-Flip at RHIC Energies.'' The original motivation for this arose from the importance of understanding the hadronic part of the proton-proton spin flip amplitude in using the Coulomb-Nuclear Interference for polarimetry. This is a very difficult, non-perturbative problem and it is not possible to make a calculation with controlled approximations, so a number of approaches were followed: (1) methods to extract the necessary information from past experiments and from RHIC experiments were examined; (2) phenomenological, Regge models--some of them very old--were reviewed; (3) the predictions of several non-perturbative theoretical models were evaluated; (4) the use of nuclei for the CNI experiment was quantitatively considered; (5) alternative methods of polarimetry were critically studied. These included Primikoff effect, large-t pp scattering, and pe double spin asymmetry

  3. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop, Volume 91, RBRC Scientific Review Committee Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samios,N.P.

    2008-11-17

    The ninth evaluation of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) took place on Nov. 17-18, 2008, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The members of the Scientific Review Committee (SRC) were Dr. Dr. Wit Busza (Chair), Dr. Miklos Gyulassy, Dr. Akira Masaike, Dr. Richard Milner, Dr. Alfred Mueller, and Dr. Akira Ukawa. We are pleased that Dr. Yasushige Yano, the Director of the Nishina Institute of RIKEN, Japan participated in this meeting both in informing the committee of the activities of the Nishina Institute and the role of RBRC and as an observer of this review. In order to illustrate the breadth and scope of the RBRC program, each member of the Center made a presentation on his/her research efforts. This encompassed three major areas of investigation, theoretical, experimental and computational physics. In addition the committee met privately with the fellows and postdocs to ascertain their opinions and concerns. Although the main purpose of this review is a report to RIKEN Management (Dr. Ryoji Noyori, RIKEN President) on the health, scientific value, management and future prospects of the Center, the RBRC management felt that a compendium of the scientific presentations are of sufficient quality and interest that they warrant a wider distribution. Therefore we have made this compilation and present it to the community for its information and enlightenment.

  4. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, RHIC SPIN PHYSICS V, VOLUME 32, FEBRUARY 21, 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUNCE,G.; SAITO,N.; VIGDOR,S.; ROSER,T.; SPINKA,H.; ENYO,H.; BLAND,L.C.; GURYN,W.

    2001-02-21

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. During the fast year, the Center had only a Theory Group. In the second year, an Experimental Group was also established at the Center. At present, there are seven Fellows and nine post dots in these two groups. During the third year, we started a new Tenure Track Strong Interaction Theory RHIC Physics Fellow Program, with six positions in the academic year 1999-2000; this program will increase to include eleven theorists in the next academic year, and, in the year after, also be extended to experimental physics. In addition, the Center has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics, about ten workshops a year, with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. The construction of a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor, which was begun at the Center on February 19, 1998, was completed on August 28, 1998.

  5. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Physics of W and Z Bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, S.; Okada, K.; Patwa, A.; Qiu, J.; Surrow, B.

    2010-06-24

    A two-day workshop on 'The Physics of Wand Z Bosons' Was held at the RIKEN BNL Research Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory on June 24-25, 2010. With the recent release of the first measurement of W bosons in proton-proton collisions at RHIC and the first observation of W events at the LHC, the workshop was a timely opportunity to bring together experts from both the high energy particle and nuclear physics communities to share their ideas and expertise on the physics of Wand Z bosons, with the aim of fully exploring the potential of the W/Z physics programs at RHIC and the LHC. The focus was on the production and measurement of W/Z bosons in both polarized and unpolarized proton-proton collisions, and the role of W/Z production in probing the parton flavor and helicity structure of the colliding proton and in the search for new physics. There were lively discussions about the potential and future prospects of W/Z programs at RHIC, Tevatron, and the LHC.

  6. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Study of ALARA programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors with information that will be useful for reducing occupational radiation doses at DOE's nuclear facilities. In 1989 and 1990, health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) ALARA Center visited twelve DOE contractor facilities with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). The health physicists interviewed radiological safety staff, engineers, and training personnel who were responsible for dose control. The status of ALARA practices at the major contractor facilities was compared with the requirements and recommendation in DOE Order 5480.11 ''Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers'' and PNL-6577 ''Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are as Low as Reasonably Achievable.'' The information and data collected are described and examples of successful practices are presented. The findings on the status of the DOE Contractor ALARA Programs are summarized and evaluated. In addition, the supplement to this report contains examples of good-practice documents associated with implementing the major elements of a formally documented ALARA program for a major DOE contractor facility

  7. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Study of ALARA programs. Status 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Meinhold, C.B.; Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-08-01

    This report provides the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors with information that will be useful for reducing occupational radiation doses at DOE`s nuclear facilities. In 1989 and 1990, health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) ALARA Center visited twelve DOE contractor facilities with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). The health physicists interviewed radiological safety staff, engineers, and training personnel who were responsible for dose control. The status of ALARA practices at the major contractor facilities was compared with the requirements and recommendation in DOE Order 5480.11 ``Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers`` and PNL-6577 ``Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are as Low as Reasonably Achievable.`` The information and data collected are described and examples of successful practices are presented. The findings on the status of the DOE Contractor ALARA Programs are summarized and evaluated. In addition, the supplement to this report contains examples of good-practice documents associated with implementing the major elements of a formally documented ALARA program for a major DOE contractor facility.

  8. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED: ''PARTON ORBITAL ANGULAR MOMENTUM'' VOLUME 81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The joint UNM/RBRC 'Workshop on Parton Orbital Angular Momentum' was held on February 24th through 26th at the University of New Mexico Department of Physics and Astronomy in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and was sponsored by The University of New Mexico (Physics Department, New Mexico Center for Particle Physics, Dean of Arts and Sciences, and Office of the Vice Provost for Research and Economic Development) and the NUN-BNL Research Center. The workshop was motivated by recent and upcoming experimental data based on methods which have been proposed to access partonic angular momenta, including Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering, measuring the Sivers functions, and measuring helicity dependent kt in jets. Our desire was to clarify the state of the art in the theoretical understanding in this area, and to help define what might be learned about partonic orbital angular momenta Erom present and upcoming high precision data, particularly at RHIC, Jlab, COMPASS and HERMES. The workshop filled two rather full days of talks fiom both theorists and experimentalists, with a good deal of discussion during, and in between talks focusing on the relationship between the intrinsic transverse momentum, orbital angular momentum, and observables such as the Sivers Function. These talks and discussions were particularly illuminating and the organizers wish to express their sincere thanks to everyone for contributing to this workshop. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select a few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. To date there are eighty proceeding volumes available

  9. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA; Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report was prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health. It contains the fifth in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE`s Office of Environment, Safety and Health, to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts.

  10. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA; Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report was prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health. It contains the fifth in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health, to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 72, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETINGS XXXI, XXXII, XXXIII.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OGAWA, A.

    2005-04-11

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has both a theory and experimental component. At present the theoretical group has 4 Fellows and 3 Research Associates as well as 11 RHIC Physics/University Fellows (academic year 2003-2004). To date there are approximately 30 graduates from the program of which 13 have attained tenure positions at major institutions worldwide. The experimental group is smaller and has 2 Fellows and 3 RHIC Physics/University Fellows and 3 Research Associates, and historically 6 individuals have attained permanent positions. Beginning in 2001 a new RIKEN Spin Program (RSP) category was implemented at RBRC. These appointments are joint positions of RBRC and RIKEN and include the following positions in theory and experiment: RSP Researchers, RSP Research Associates, and Young Researchers, who are mentored by senior RBRC Scientists. A number of RIKEN Jr. Research Associates and Visiting Scientists also contribute to the physics program at the Center. RBRC has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select a few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. To date there are seventy-two proceeding volumes available. The construction of a 0.6 teraflops parallel processor, dedicated to lattice QCD, begun at the Center on February 19, 1998, was completed on August

  12. Establishment of a Photon Data Section of the BNL National Nuclear Data Center: A preliminary proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is proposed to establish a Photon Data Section (PDS) of the BNL National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). This would be a total program encompassing both photon-atom and photon-nucleus interactions. By utilizing the existing NNDC data base management expertise and on-line access capabilities, the implementation of photon interaction data activities within the existing NNDC nuclear structure and nuclear-reaction activities can reestablish a viable photon interaction data program at minimum cost. By taking advantage of the on-line capabilities, the x-ray users' community will have access to a dynamic, state-of-the-art data base of interaction information. The proposed information base would include data that presently are scattered throughout the literature usually in tabulated form. It is expected that the data bases would include at least the most precise data available in photoelectric cross sections, atomic form factors and incoherent scattering functions, anomalous scattering factors, oscillator strengths and oscillator densities, fluorescence yields, Auger electron yields, etc. It could also include information not presently available in tabulations or in existing data bases such as EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) reference spectra, chemical bonding induced shifts in the photoelectric absorption edge, matrix corrections, x-ray Raman, and x-ray resonant Raman cross sections. The data base will also include the best estimates of the accuracy of the interaction data as it exists in the data base. It is proposed that the PDS would support computer programs written for calculating scattering cross sections for given solid angles, sample geometries, and polarization of incident x-rays, for calculating Compton profiles, and for analyzing data as in EXAFS and x-ray fluorescence

  13. Establishment of a Photon Data Section of the BNL National Nuclear Data Center: A preliminary proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, A.L.; Pearlstein, S.

    1992-05-01

    It is proposed to establish a Photon Data Section (PDS) of the BNL National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). This would be a total program encompassing both photon-atom and photon-nucleus interactions. By utilizing the existing NNDC data base management expertise and on-line access capabilities, the implementation of photon interaction data activities within the existing NNDC nuclear structure and nuclear-reaction activities can reestablish a viable photon interaction data program at minimum cost. By taking advantage of the on-line capabilities, the x-ray users' community will have access to a dynamic, state-of-the-art data base of interaction information. The proposed information base would include data that presently are scattered throughout the literature usually in tabulated form. It is expected that the data bases would include at least the most precise data available in photoelectric cross sections, atomic form factors and incoherent scattering functions, anomalous scattering factors, oscillator strengths and oscillator densities, fluorescence yields, Auger electron yields, etc. It could also include information not presently available in tabulations or in existing data bases such as EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) reference spectra, chemical bonding induced shifts in the photoelectric absorption edge, matrix corrections, x-ray Raman, and x-ray resonant Raman cross sections. The data base will also include the best estimates of the accuracy of the interaction data as it exists in the data base. It is proposed that the PDS would support computer programs written for calculating scattering cross sections for given solid angles, sample geometries, and polarization of incident x-rays, for calculating Compton profiles, and for analyzing data as in EXAFS and x-ray fluorescence.

  14. Establishment of a Photon Data Section of the BNL National Nuclear Data Center: A preliminary proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, A.L.; Pearlstein, S.

    1992-05-01

    It is proposed to establish a Photon Data Section (PDS) of the BNL National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). This would be a total program encompassing both photon-atom and photon-nucleus interactions. By utilizing the existing NNDC data base management expertise and on-line access capabilities, the implementation of photon interaction data activities within the existing NNDC nuclear structure and nuclear-reaction activities can reestablish a viable photon interaction data program at minimum cost. By taking advantage of the on-line capabilities, the x-ray users` community will have access to a dynamic, state-of-the-art data base of interaction information. The proposed information base would include data that presently are scattered throughout the literature usually in tabulated form. It is expected that the data bases would include at least the most precise data available in photoelectric cross sections, atomic form factors and incoherent scattering functions, anomalous scattering factors, oscillator strengths and oscillator densities, fluorescence yields, Auger electron yields, etc. It could also include information not presently available in tabulations or in existing data bases such as EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) reference spectra, chemical bonding induced shifts in the photoelectric absorption edge, matrix corrections, x-ray Raman, and x-ray resonant Raman cross sections. The data base will also include the best estimates of the accuracy of the interaction data as it exists in the data base. It is proposed that the PDS would support computer programs written for calculating scattering cross sections for given solid angles, sample geometries, and polarization of incident x-rays, for calculating Compton profiles, and for analyzing data as in EXAFS and x-ray fluorescence.

  15. Alara in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews how the general frameworks of the ALARA procedures, ALARA Audits and Predictive ALARA Plans can be used in the non-nuclear power sector to give practical effect to the concept of optimization. The development of the use of ALARA Audits as an integral part of a Radiation Protection Adviser service and our experience of this structured approach is described. Particular attention is drawn to the use of site specific reference levels to trigger graded levels of response to increasing doses. Also several examples of the use of Cost Benefit Analysis within the ALARA Procedure are briefly described

  16. ALARA development in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even though the ALARA philosophy was formally implemented in the early 1980's, to some extent, ALARA considerations already had been incorporated into the design of most commercial equipment and facilities based on experience and engineering development. In Mexico, the design of medical and industrial facilities were based on international recommendations containing those considerations. With the construction of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Station, formal ALARA groups were created to review some parts of its design, and to prepare the ALARA Program and related procedures necessary for its commercial operation. This paper begins with a brief historical description of ALARA development in Mexico, and then goes on to discuss our regulatory frame in Radiation Protection, some aspects of the ALARA Program, efforts in controlling and reducing of sources of radiation, and finally, future perspectives in the ALARA field

  17. PROCEEDINGS FROM RIKEN-BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP: PARITY-VIOLATING SPIN ASYMMETRIES AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VOGELSANG,W.; PERDEKAMP, M.; SURROW, B.

    2007-04-26

    . Also, new observables, such as jet and W+charrn final states and spin asymmetries in Z production, were proposed and discussed. All of the talks attracted much interest and initiated active discussions. This was a very successful workshop. It stimulated many discussions and new collaborations. We are grateful to all participants and speakers for coming to the Center, and for their excellent work. The support provided for this workshop by Dr. N. Samios and his RIKEN-BNL Research Center has been magnificent, and we are very grateful for it. We thank Brookhaven National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy for providing the facilities to hold the workshop. Finally, sincere thanks go to Jane Lysik for her efficient work on organizing and running the workshop.

  18. QUARKONIUM PRODUCTION IN RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KHARZEEV,D.

    1999-04-20

    The RIKEN-BNL Workshop on Quarkonium Production in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions was held September 28--October 2, 1998, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Workshop brought together about 50 invited participants from around the world and a number of Brookhaven physicists from both particle and nuclear physics communities.

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 77, RBRC SCIENTIFIC REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING, OCTOBER 10-12, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SAMIOS, N.P.

    2005-10-10

    The eighth evaluation of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) took place on October 10-12, 2005, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The members of the Scientific Review Committee (SRC) were Dr. Jean-Paul Blaizot, Professor Makoto Kobayashi, Dr. Akira Masaike, Professor Charles Young Prescott (Chair), Professor Stephen Sharpe (absent), and Professor Jack Sandweiss. We are grateful to Professor Akira Ukawa who was appointed to the SRC to cover Professor Sharpe's area of expertise. In addition to reviewing this year's program, the committee, augmented by Professor Kozi Nakai, evaluated the RBRC proposal for a five-year extension of the RIKEN BNL Collaboration MOU beyond 2007. Dr. Koji Kaya, Director of the Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, Japan, presided over the session on the extension proposal. In order to illustrate the breadth and scope of the RBRC program, each member of the Center made a presentation on higher research efforts. In addition, a special session was held in connection with the RBRC QCDSP and QCDOC supercomputers. Professor Norman H. Christ, a collaborator from Columbia University, gave a presentation on the progress and status of the project, and Professor Frithjof Karsch of BNL presented the first physics results from QCDOC. Although the main purpose of this review is a report to RIKEN Management (Dr. Ryoji Noyori, RIKEN President) on the health, scientific value, management and future prospects of the Center, the RBRC management felt that a compendium of the scientific presentations are of sufficient quality and interest that they warrant a wider distribution. Therefore we have made this compilation and present it to the community for its information and enlightenment.

  20. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 77, RBRC SCIENTIFIC REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING, OCTOBER 10-12, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The eighth evaluation of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) took place on October 10-12, 2005, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The members of the Scientific Review Committee (SRC) were Dr. Jean-Paul Blaizot, Professor Makoto Kobayashi, Dr. Akira Masaike, Professor Charles Young Prescott (Chair), Professor Stephen Sharpe (absent), and Professor Jack Sandweiss. We are grateful to Professor Akira Ukawa who was appointed to the SRC to cover Professor Sharpe's area of expertise. In addition to reviewing this year's program, the committee, augmented by Professor Kozi Nakai, evaluated the RBRC proposal for a five-year extension of the RIKEN BNL Collaboration MOU beyond 2007. Dr. Koji Kaya, Director of the Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, Japan, presided over the session on the extension proposal. In order to illustrate the breadth and scope of the RBRC program, each member of the Center made a presentation on higher research efforts. In addition, a special session was held in connection with the RBRC QCDSP and QCDOC supercomputers. Professor Norman H. Christ, a collaborator from Columbia University, gave a presentation on the progress and status of the project, and Professor Frithjof Karsch of BNL presented the first physics results from QCDOC. Although the main purpose of this review is a report to RIKEN Management (Dr. Ryoji Noyori, RIKEN President) on the health, scientific value, management and future prospects of the Center, the RBRC management felt that a compendium of the scientific presentations are of sufficient quality and interest that they warrant a wider distribution. Therefore we have made this compilation and present it to the community for its information and enlightenment

  1. Perturbative QCD as a probe of hadron structure: Volume 2. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop brought together about thirty invited participants from around the world, and an almost equal number of Brookhaven users and staff, to discuss recent developments and future prospects for hadronic strong interaction studies at high energy, particularly relating to the RHIC project at Brookhaven. RIKEN and Brookhaven have long traditions in and commitments to the study of the strong interactions, and the advent of the RHIC collider will open new opportunities both for relativistic heavy ion and polarized proton-proton studies. Activities at the RIKEN BNL Research Center are intended to focus on physics opportunities stimulated by this new facility. Thus, one of the purposes of the center is to provide a forum where workers in the field can gather to share and develop their ideas in a stimulating environment. The purpose of the workshop was both to delineate theoretical problems and stimulate collaborations to address them. The workshop focused primarily, but not exclusively, on spin and small-x physics

  2. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, A.; Qiu, Jianwei; Vogelsang, W.; Yuan, F.

    2011-08-02

    Understanding the structure of the nucleon is of fundamental importance in sub-atomic physics. Already the experimental studies on the electro-magnetic form factors in the 1950s showed that the nucleon has a nontrivial internal structure, and the deep inelastic scattering experiments in the 1970s revealed the partonic substructure of the nucleon. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin and the gluonic structure of the nucleon. Experiments using deep inelastic scattering or polarized p-p collisions are carried out in the US at the CEBAF and RHIC facilities, respectively, and there are other experimental facilities around the world. More than twenty years ago, the European Muon Collaboration published their first experimental results on the proton spin structure as revealed in polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and concluded that quarks contribute very little to the proton's spin. With additional experimental and theoretical investigations and progress in the following years, it is now established that, contrary to naive quark model expectations, quarks and anti-quarks carry only about 30% of the total spin of the proton. Twenty years later, the discovery from the polarized hadron collider at RHIC was equally surprising. For the phase space probed by existing RHIC experiments, gluons do not seem to contribute any to the proton's spin. To find out what carries the remaining part of proton's spin is a key focus in current hadronic physics and also a major driving force for the new generation of spin experiments at RHIC and Jefferson Lab and at a future Electron Ion Collider. It is therefore very important and timely to organize a series of annual spin physics meetings to summarize the status of proton spin physics, to focus the effort, and to layout the future perspectives. This summer program on 'Nucleon Spin Physics' held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on July 14-27, 2010 [http://www.bnl.gov/spnsp/] is the

  3. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Thermal Photons and Dileptons in Heavy-Ion Collisions. Volume 119

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rapp, R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ruan, L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yee, H-U. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-09-11

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan and the U. S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The RBRC is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has theory, lattice gauge computing and experimental components. It is presently exploring the possibility of an astrophysics component being added to the program. The primary theme for this workshop related to sharing the latest experimental and theoretical developments in area of low transverse momentum (pT) dielectron and photons. All the presentations given at the workshop are included in this proceedings, primarily as PowerPoint presentations.

  4. Alara and decision analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In applying ALARA somebody has to determine what is reasonable. A decision has to be made. Decision Analysis is a procedure for structuring decision problems, and therefore it might be expected to be of use in the application of the ALARA principle. This paper explores the contribution that Decision Analysis may make in this context, particularly discussing the application of multi-attribute value theory. An example of using the theory on a problem of radioactive waste disposal is given, and the potential of an increased use of Decision Analysis in making the ALARA principle work, is discussed

  5. What is ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) philosophy as it applies to personnel radiation exposure has been with us for a long time. The essential tenets of this philosophy surfaced quite early in the history of the Manhattan Project. Although the terminology has suffered through various translations and the application has seen many organizations and agencies come and go, the principles remain as valid today as ever. It is regretable that some regulatory agencies claim ALARA as their newfound miracle drug and that application according to their prescriptions will result in endless rounds of cyclical improvement in radiation protection practices. Others have taken advantage of the popularity of ALARA and have bastardized the philosophy to mean whatever is expedient for their purposes. In this paper, we review briefly the history of ALARA and what it seemingly means to different interest groups and offer a balanced viewpoint that health physicists should adopt

  6. HARD PARTON PHYSICS IN HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARROLL,J.

    1999-09-10

    The RIKEN-BNL center workshop on ''Hard parton physics in high energy nuclear collisions'' was held at BNL from March 1st-5th! 1999. The focus of the workshop was on hard probes of nucleus-nucleus collisions that will be measured at RHIC with the PHENIX and STAR detectors. There were about 45 speakers and over 70 registered participants at the workshop, with roughly a quarter of the speakers from overseas. About 60% of the talks were theory talks. A nice overview of theory for RHIC was provided by George Sterman. The theoretical talks were on a wide range of topics in QCD which can be classified under the following: (a) energy loss and the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect; (b) minijet production and equilibration; (c) small x physics and initial conditions; (d) nuclear parton distributions and shadowing; (e) spin physics; (f) photon, di-lepton, and charm production; and (g) hadronization, and simulations of high pt physics in event generators. Several of the experimental talks discussed the capabilities of the PHENIX and STAR detectors at RHIC in measuring high pt particles in heavy ion collisions. In general, these talks were included in the relevant theory sessions. A session was set aside to discuss the spin program at RHIC with polarized proton beams. In addition, there were speakers from 08, HERA, the fixed target experiments at Fermilab, and the CERN fixed target Pb+Pb program, who provided additional perspective on a range of issues of relevance to RHIC; from jets at the Tevatron, to saturation of parton distributions at HERA, and recent puzzling data on direct photon production in fixed target experiments, among others.

  7. HARD PARTON PHYSICS IN HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RIKEN-BNL center workshop on ''Hard parton physics in high energy nuclear collisions'' was held at BNL from March 1st-5th, 1999. The focus of the workshop was on hard probes of nucleus-nucleus collisions that will be measured at RHIC with the PHENIX and STAR detectors. There were about 45 speakers and over 70 registered participants at the workshop, with roughly a quarter of the speakers from overseas. About 60% of the talks were theory talks. A nice overview of theory for RHIC was provided by George Sterman. The theoretical talks were on a wide range of topics in QCD which can be classified under the following: (a) energy loss and the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect; (b) minijet production and equilibration; (c) small x physics and initial conditions; (d) nuclear parton distributions and shadowing; (e) spin physics; (f) photon, di-lepton, and charm production; and (g) hadronization, and simulations of high pt physics in event generators. Several of the experimental talks discussed the capabilities of the PHENIX and STAR detectors at RHIC in measuring high pt particles in heavy ion collisions. In general, these talks were included in the relevant theory sessions. A session was set aside to discuss the spin program at RHIC with polarized proton beams. In addition, there were speakers from 08, HERA, the fixed target experiments at Fermilab, and the CERN fixed target Pb+Pb program, who provided additional perspective on a range of issues of relevance to RHIC; from jets at the Tevatron, to saturation of parton distributions at HERA, and recent puzzling data on direct photon production in fixed target experiments, among others

  8. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED - DOMAIN WALL FERMIONS AT TEN YEARS (VOLUME 84)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop was held to mark the 10th anniversary of the first numerical simulations of QCD using domain wall fermions initiated at BNL. It is very gratifying that in the intervening decade widespread use of domain wall and overlap fermions is being made. It therefore seemed appropriate at this stage for some ''communal introspection'' of the progress that has been made, hurdles that need to be overcome, and physics that can and should be done with chiral fermions. The meeting was very well attended, drawing about 60 registered participants primarily from Europe, Japan and the US. It was quite remarkable that pioneers David Kaplan, Herbert Neuberger, Rajamani Narayanan, Yigal Shamir, Sinya Aoki, and Pavlos Vranas all attended the workshop. Comparisons between domain wall and overlap formulations, with their respective advantages and limitations, were discussed at length, and a broad physics program including pion and kaon physics, the epsilon regime, nucleon structure, and topology, among others, emerged. New machines and improved algorithms have played a key role in realizing realistic dynamical fermion lattice simulations (small quark mass, large volume, and so on), so much in fact that measurements are now as costly. Consequently, ways to make the measurements more efficient were also discussed. We were very pleased to see the keen and ever growing interest in chiral fermions in our community and the significant strides our colleagues have made in bringing chiral fermions to the fore of lattice QCD calculations. Their contributions made the workshop a success, and we thank them deeply for sharing their time and ideas. Finally, we must especially acknowledge Norman Christ and Bob Mawhinney for their early and continued collaboration without which the success of domain wall fermions would not have been possible

  9. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED - DOMAIN WALL FERMIONS AT TEN YEARS (VOLUME 84)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLUM,T.; SONI,A.

    2007-03-15

    The workshop was held to mark the 10th anniversary of the first numerical simulations of QCD using domain wall fermions initiated at BNL. It is very gratifying that in the intervening decade widespread use of domain wall and overlap fermions is being made. It therefore seemed appropriate at this stage for some ''communal introspection'' of the progress that has been made, hurdles that need to be overcome, and physics that can and should be done with chiral fermions. The meeting was very well attended, drawing about 60 registered participants primarily from Europe, Japan and the US. It was quite remarkable that pioneers David Kaplan, Herbert Neuberger, Rajamani Narayanan, Yigal Shamir, Sinya Aoki, and Pavlos Vranas all attended the workshop. Comparisons between domain wall and overlap formulations, with their respective advantages and limitations, were discussed at length, and a broad physics program including pion and kaon physics, the epsilon regime, nucleon structure, and topology, among others, emerged. New machines and improved algorithms have played a key role in realizing realistic dynamical fermion lattice simulations (small quark mass, large volume, and so on), so much in fact that measurements are now as costly. Consequently, ways to make the measurements more efficient were also discussed. We were very pleased to see the keen and ever growing interest in chiral fermions in our community and the significant strides our colleagues have made in bringing chiral fermions to the fore of lattice QCD calculations. Their contributions made the workshop a success, and we thank them deeply for sharing their time and ideas. Finally, we must especially acknowledge Norman Christ and Bob Mawhinney for their early and continued collaboration without which the success of domain wall fermions would not have been possible.

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP (VOLUME 55) COLLECTIVE FLOW AND QGP PROPERTIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first three years of RHIC physics, with Au/Au collisions induced at 65, 130 and 200 GeV per nucleon pair, produced dramatic results, particularly with respect to collective observables such as transverse flow and anisotropies in transverse momentum spectra. It has become clear that the data show very strong rescattering at very early times of the reaction, strong enough in fact to be described by the hydrodynamic limit. Therefore, with today's experiments, we are able to investigate the equation of state of hot quark gluon matter, discuss its thermodynamic properties and relate them to experimental observables. At this workshop we came together to discuss our latest efforts both in the theoretical description of heavy ion collisions as well as most recent experimental results that ultimately allow us to extract information on the properties of RHIC matter. About 50 participants registered for the workshop, but many more dropped in from the offices at BNL. The workshop lasted for three days, of which each day was assigned a special topic on which the talks focused. On the first day we dealt with the more general question what the strong collective phenomena observed in RHIC collisions tell us about the properties and the dynamics of RHIC matter. The second day covered all different aspects of momentum anisotropies, and interesting new experimental results were presented for the first time. On the third day, we focused on the late fireball dynamics and the breakdown of the assumption of thermalization. New experimental observables were discussed, which will deliver more information of how the expanding fireball breaks up, once the frequent interaction ceases

  11. ALARA training at INSTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1990 the CEPN, the National Radiological Protection Board and the INSTN organized for the first time in Europe one teaching specifically established to radioprotection optimization. This training has allowed to spread the experience of the best european specialists while guaranteeing a wide exchange between the participants coming from different countries. At the national level the training ALARA goes on at the INSTN-Saclay. Its aim is to give base notions, the methods and the tools allowing the implementation of the ALARA concept, and to privilege the exchange between the participants coming from different horizons. 2 refs., 2 figs

  12. NUMERICAL ALGORITHMS AT NON-ZERO CHEMICAL POTENTIAL. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLUM,T.

    1999-09-14

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center hosted its 19th workshop April 27th through May 1, 1999. The topic was Numerical Algorithms at Non-Zero Chemical Potential. QCD at a non-zero chemical potential (non-zero density) poses a long-standing unsolved challenge for lattice gauge theory. Indeed, it is the primary unresolved issue in the fundamental formulation of lattice gauge theory. The chemical potential renders conventional lattice actions complex, practically excluding the usual Monte Carlo techniques which rely on a positive definite measure for the partition function. This ''sign'' problem appears in a wide range of physical systems, ranging from strongly coupled electronic systems to QCD. The lack of a viable numerical technique at non-zero density is particularly acute since new exotic ''color superconducting'' phases of quark matter have recently been predicted in model calculations. A first principles confirmation of the phase diagram is desirable since experimental verification is not expected soon. At the workshop several proposals for new algorithms were made: cluster algorithms, direct simulation of Grassman variables, and a bosonization of the fermion determinant. All generated considerable discussion and seem worthy of continued investigation. Several interesting results using conventional algorithms were also presented: condensates in four fermion models, SU(2) gauge theory in fundamental and adjoint representations, and lessons learned from strong; coupling, non-zero temperature and heavy quarks applied to non-zero density simulations.

  13. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Approach to Equilibrium in Strongly Interacting Matter. Volume 118

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Venugopalan, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berges, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaizot, J. -P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gelis, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-04-09

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory*. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan and the U. S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The RBRC is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has theory, lattice gauge computing and experimental components. It is presently exploring the possibility of an astrophysics component being added to the program. The purpose of this Workshop is to critically review the recent progress on the theory and phenomenology of early time dynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions from RHIC to LHC energies, to examine the various approaches on thermalization and existing issues, and to formulate new research efforts for the future. Topics slated to be covered include Experimental evidence for equilibration/isotropization, comparison of various approaches, dependence on the initial conditions and couplings, and turbulent cascades and Bose-Einstein condensation.

  14. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED "ODDERON SEARCHES AT RHIC" (VOLUME 76)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ORGANIZERS: GURYN, W.; KOVCHEGOV, Y.; VOGELSANG, W.; TRUEMAN, L.

    2005-10-25

    The Odderon, a charge-conjugation-odd partner of the Pomeron, has been a puzzle ever since its introduction in 1973. The Pomeron describes a colorless exchange with vacuum quantum numbers in the t-channel of hadronic scattering at high energies. The concept was originally formulated for the non-perturbative regime of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In perturbation theory, the simplest picture of the Poineron is that of a two-gluon exchange process, whereas an Odderon can be thought of as an exchange of three gluons. Both the Pomeron and the Odderon are expected in QCD. However, while there exists plenty of experimental data that could be successfully described by Pomeron exchanges (for example in electron-proton and hadron-hadron scattering at high energies), no experimental sign of the Odderon has been observed. One of the very few hints so far is the difference in the diffractive minima of elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering measured at the ISR. The Odderon has recently received renewed attention by QCD researchers, mainly for the following two reasons. First of all, RHIC has entered the scene, offering exciting unique new opportunities for Odderon searches. RHIC provides collisions of nuclei at center-of-mass energies far exceeding those at all previous experiments. RHIC also provides collisions of protons of the highest center-of-mass energy, and in the interval, which has not been explored previously in p {bar p} collisions. In addition, it also has the unique feature of polarization for the proton beams, promising to become a crucial tool in Odderon searches. Indeed, theorists have proposed possible signatures of the Odderon in some spin asymmetries measurable at RHIC. Qualitatively unique signals should be seen in these observables if the Odderon coupling is large. Secondly, the Odderon has recently been shown to naturally emerge from the Color Glass Condensate (CGC), a theory for the high-energy asymptotics of QCD. It has been argued that

  15. Applied ALARA techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation focuses on some of the time-proven and new technologies being used to accomplish radiological work. These techniques can be applied at nuclear facilities to reduce radiation doses and protect the environment. The last reactor plants and processing facilities were shutdown and Hanford was given a new mission to put the facilities in a safe condition, decontaminate, and prepare them for decommissioning. The skills that were necessary to operate these facilities were different than the skills needed today to clean up Hanford. Workers were not familiar with many of the tools, equipment, and materials needed to accomplish:the new mission, which includes clean up of contaminated areas in and around all the facilities, recovery of reactor fuel from spent fuel pools, and the removal of millions of gallons of highly radioactive waste from 177 underground tanks. In addition, this work has to be done with a reduced number of workers and a smaller budget. At Hanford, facilities contain a myriad of radioactive isotopes that are 2048 located inside plant systems, underground tanks, and the soil. As cleanup work at Hanford began, it became obvious early that in order to get workers to apply ALARA and use hew tools and equipment to accomplish the radiological work it was necessary to plan the work in advance and get radiological control and/or ALARA committee personnel involved early in the planning process. Emphasis was placed on applying,ALARA techniques to reduce dose, limit contamination spread and minimize the amount of radioactive waste generated. Progress on the cleanup has,b6en steady and Hanford workers have learned to use different types of engineered controls and ALARA techniques to perform radiological work. The purpose of this presentation is to share the lessons learned on how Hanford is accomplishing radiological work

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 65, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETINGS XXVII, XXVIII, and XXX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RSRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the 'Rikagaku Kenkyusho' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has both a theory and experimental component. At present the theoretical group has 4 Fellows and 3 Research Associates as well as 11 RHIC Physics/University Fellows (academic year 2003-2004). To date there are approximately 30 graduates from the program of which 13 have attained tenure positions at major institutions worldwide. The experimental group is smaller and has 2 Fellows and 3 RHIC Physics/University Fellows and 3 Research Associates, and historically 6 individuals have attained permanent positions. Beginning in 2001 a new RIKEN Spin Program (RSP) category was implemented at RBRC. These appointments are joint positions of RBRC and RIKEN and include the following positions in theory and experiment: RSP Researchers, RSP Research Associates, and Young Researchers, who are mentored by senior RBRC Scientists, A number of RIKEN Jr. Research Associates and Visiting Scientists also contribute to the physics program at the Center. RBRC has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select a few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. To date there are sixty nine proceedings volumes available. The construction of a 0.6 teraflops parallel processor, dedicated to lattice QCD, begun at the Center on February 19, 1998, was completed on August 28, 1998 and is still

  17. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: P- and CP-odd Effects in Hot and Dense Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the proceedings of the RBRC/CATHIE workshop on 'P- and CP-odd Effects in Hot and Dense Matter' held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on April 26-30, 2010. The workshop was triggered by the experimental observation of charge correlations in heavy ion collisions at RHIC, which were predicted to occur due to local parity violation (P- and CP-odd fluctuations) in hot and dense QCD matter. This experimental result excited a significant interest in the broad physics community, inspired a few alternative interpretations, and emphasized the need for a deeper understanding of the role of topology in QCD vacuum and in hot and dense quark-gluon matter. Topological effects in QCD are also closely related to a number of intriguing problems in condensed matter physics, cosmology and astrophysics. We therefore felt that a broad cross-disciplinary discussion of topological P- and CP-odd effects in various kinds of matter was urgently needed. Such a discussion became the subject of the workshop. Specific topics discussed at the workshop include the following: (1) The current experimental results on charge asymmetries at RHIC and the physical interpretations of the data; (2) Quantitative characterization of topological effects in QCD matter including both analytical (perturbative and non-perturbative using gauge/gravity duality) and numerical (lattice-QCD) calculations; (3) Topological effects in cosmology of the Early Universe (including baryogenesis and dark energy); (4) Topological effects in condensed matter physics (including graphene and superfiuids); and (5) Directions for the future experimental studies of P- and CP-odd effects at RHIC and elsewhere. We feel that the talks and intense discussions during the workshop were extremely useful, and resulted in new ideas in both theory and experiment. We hope that the workshop has contributed to the progress in understanding the role of topology in QCD and related fields. We thank all the speakers and

  18. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: P- and CP-odd Effects in Hot and Dense Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, A.; Fukushima, K.; Kharzeev, D.; Warringa, H.; Voloshin, S.

    2010-04-26

    This volume contains the proceedings of the RBRC/CATHIE workshop on 'P- and CP-odd Effects in Hot and Dense Matter' held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on April 26-30, 2010. The workshop was triggered by the experimental observation of charge correlations in heavy ion collisions at RHIC, which were predicted to occur due to local parity violation (P- and CP-odd fluctuations) in hot and dense QCD matter. This experimental result excited a significant interest in the broad physics community, inspired a few alternative interpretations, and emphasized the need for a deeper understanding of the role of topology in QCD vacuum and in hot and dense quark-gluon matter. Topological effects in QCD are also closely related to a number of intriguing problems in condensed matter physics, cosmology and astrophysics. We therefore felt that a broad cross-disciplinary discussion of topological P- and CP-odd effects in various kinds of matter was urgently needed. Such a discussion became the subject of the workshop. Specific topics discussed at the workshop include the following: (1) The current experimental results on charge asymmetries at RHIC and the physical interpretations of the data; (2) Quantitative characterization of topological effects in QCD matter including both analytical (perturbative and non-perturbative using gauge/gravity duality) and numerical (lattice-QCD) calculations; (3) Topological effects in cosmology of the Early Universe (including baryogenesis and dark energy); (4) Topological effects in condensed matter physics (including graphene and superfiuids); and (5) Directions for the future experimental studies of P- and CP-odd effects at RHIC and elsewhere. We feel that the talks and intense discussions during the workshop were extremely useful, and resulted in new ideas in both theory and experiment. We hope that the workshop has contributed to the progress in understanding the role of topology in QCD and related fields. We thank all the speakers and

  19. Integration of Formal Job Hazard Analysis and ALARA Work Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Nelsen, D P

    2002-01-01

    ALARA work practices have traditionally centered on reducing radiological exposure and controlling contamination. As such, ALARA policies and procedures are not well suited to a wide range of chemical and human health issues. Assessing relative risk, identifying appropriate engineering/administrative controls and selecting proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for non nuclear work activities extends beyond the limitations of traditional ALARA programs. Forging a comprehensive safety management program in today's (2002) work environment requires a disciplined dialog between health and safety professionals (e.g. safety, engineering, environmental, quality assurance, industrial hygiene, ALARA, etc.) and personnel working in the field. Integrating organizational priorities, maintaining effective pre-planning of work and supporting a team-based approach to safety management represents today's hallmark of safety excellence. Relying on the mandates of any single safety program does not provide industrial hygien...

  20. Cost-effectiveness studies as part of an ALARA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies of cost effectiveness of engineering modifications for dose reduction at nuclear power plants conducted at BNL will be considered in this report. Since each of these items has the potential for a 50% to 60% reduction in collective dose, it appears there is large potential for dose reduction from engineering type modifications. The question that must be answered for each plant is ''which modifications or improvements are required for optimization (ALARA). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that quantified optimization need not be costly and can often be highly beneficial

  1. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETINGS XII AND XIII, SEPTEMBER 16, 2002, OCTOBER 22, 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,B.

    2003-03-06

    Since its inception, the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) has held semi-regular meetings each year to discuss the physics possibilities and the operational details of the program. Having collected our first data sample of polarized proton-proton collisions in Run02 of RHIC, we are now in the process of examining the performance of both the accelerator and the experiments. During the PAC meeting on August 29, 2002, the beam use proposal with a four week, polarized proton physics run was approved as part of the plan for Run-03. So, we meet at BNL on September 16, 2002 to discuss the concrete plans for this proton-proton run.

  2. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose reduction activities, with a focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and aocelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts. An author index and a subject index are provided to facilitate use. Both indices contain the abstract numbers from previous volumes, as well as the current volume. Information that the reader feels might be included in the next volume of this bibliography should be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center.

  3. Project W-320 ALARA Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This supporting document establishes the As Low As Reasonable Achievable (ALARA) Plan to be followed during Sluicing Project W-320 design and construction activities to minimize personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials

  4. Project W-320 ALARA Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harty, W.M.

    1995-06-06

    This supporting document establishes the As Low As Reasonable Achievable (ALARA) Plan to be followed during Sluicing Project W-320 design and construction activities to minimize personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials.

  5. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 57, HIGH PT PHYSICS AT RHIC, DECEMBER 2-6, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretzer, Stefan; Venugopalan, Raju; Vogelsang, Werner

    2004-02-18

    The AuAu, dAu, and pp collision modes of the RHIC collider at BNL have led to the publication of exciting high p{perpendicular} particle production data. There have also been two physics runs with polarized protons, and preliminary results on the double-spin asymmetry for pion production had been presented very recently. The ontological questions behind these measurements are fascinating: Did RHIC collisions create a Quark-Gluon-Plasma phase and did they verify the Color Glass Condensate as the high energy limit of QCD? Will the Spin Crisis finally be resolved in terms of gluon polarization and what new surprises are we yet to meet for Transverse Spin? Phenomena related to sub-microscopic questions as important as these call for interpretations that are footed in solid theory. At large p{perpendicular}, perturbative concepts are legitimately expected to provide useful approaches. The corresponding hard parton dynamics are, in several ways, key to unraveling the initial or final state and collisional phase of hard scattering events in vacuum as well as in hot or cold nuclear matter. Before the advent of RHIC data, a RIKEN-BNL workshop had been held at BNL in March 1999 on ''Hard Parton Physics in High Energy Nuclear Collisions''. The 2003 workshop on ''High p{perpendicular} Physics at RHIC'' was a logical continuation of this previous workshop. It gave the opportunity to revisit the 1999 expectations in the light of what has been found in the meantime and, at the same time, to critically discuss the underlying theoretical concepts. We brought together theorists who have done seminal work on the foundations of parton phenomenology in field theory, with theorists and experimentalists who are presently working on RHIC phenomenology. The participants were both from a high-energy physics and nuclear physics background and it remains only to be said here that this chemistry worked perfectly and the workshop was a great success.

  6. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Understanding QGP through Spectral Functions and Euclidean Correlators (Volume 89)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocsy,A.; Petreczky, P.

    2008-06-27

    In the past two decades, one of the most important goals of the nuclear physics community has been the production and characterization of the new state of matter--Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Understanding how properties of hadrons change in medium, particularly, the bound state of a very heavy quark and its antiquark, known as quarkonium, as well as determining the transport coefficients is crucial for identifying the properties of QGP and for the understanding of the experimental data from RHIC. On April 23rd, more than sixty physicists from twenty-seven institutions gathered for this three-day topical workshop held at BNL to discuss how to understand the properties of the new state of matter obtained in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions (particularly at RHIC-BNL) through spectral functions. In-medium properties of the different particle species and the transport properties of the medium are encoded in spectral functions. The former could yield important signatures of deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration at high temperatures and densities, while the later are crucial for the understanding of the dynamics of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Participants at the workshop are experts in various areas of spectral function studies. The workshop encouraged direct exchange of scientific information among experts, as well as between the younger and the more established scientists. The workshops success is evident from the coherent picture that developed of the current understanding of transport properties and in-medium particle properties, illustrated in the current proceedings. The following pages show calculations of meson spectral functions in lattice QCD, as well as implications of these for quarkonia melting/survival in the quark gluon plasma; Lattice calculations of the transport coefficients (shear and bulk viscosities, electric conductivity); Calculation of spectral functions and transport coefficients in field theories using weak coupling

  7. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Understanding QGP through Spectral Functions and Euclidean Correlators (Volume 89)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past two decades, one of the most important goals of the nuclear physics community has been the production and characterization of the new state of matter--Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Understanding how properties of hadrons change in medium, particularly, the bound state of a very heavy quark and its antiquark, known as quarkonium, as well as determining the transport coefficients is crucial for identifying the properties of QGP and for the understanding of the experimental data from RHIC. On April 23rd, more than sixty physicists from twenty-seven institutions gathered for this three-day topical workshop held at BNL to discuss how to understand the properties of the new state of matter obtained in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions (particularly at RHIC-BNL) through spectral functions. In-medium properties of the different particle species and the transport properties of the medium are encoded in spectral functions. The former could yield important signatures of deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration at high temperatures and densities, while the later are crucial for the understanding of the dynamics of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Participants at the workshop are experts in various areas of spectral function studies. The workshop encouraged direct exchange of scientific information among experts, as well as between the younger and the more established scientists. The workshops success is evident from the coherent picture that developed of the current understanding of transport properties and in-medium particle properties, illustrated in the current proceedings. The following pages show calculations of meson spectral functions in lattice QCD, as well as implications of these for quarkonia melting/survival in the quark gluon plasma; Lattice calculations of the transport coefficients (shear and bulk viscosities, electric conductivity); Calculation of spectral functions and transport coefficients in field theories using weak coupling

  8. Gentilly - 2 NGS ALARA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a slide-based oral presentation given to the COG/IAEA: Fifth technical committee meeting on 'Exchange of operating experience of pressurized heavy water reactors' held in Mangalia, Romania on 7-10 September 1998. The operation experience of Gentilly -1 and Gentilly - 2 nuclear power stations is summarized. The radiation protection philosophy is addressed, the orange/yellow/green RP qualifications are explained and the ALARA Program objectives are described. The criteria used to develop the Gentilly - 2 station ALARA Program are presented. The program is based on: strong Hydro Quebec commitments, organization (responsibilities well defined); ALARA Committee; tools; procedures; good documentation. Description of the program is given then in details. Measures for dose and radioactive sources reduction are presented. Collective doses recorded at Gentilly - 2 between 1984 and 1997 are plotted and figures are given in a table

  9. Education and training for ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The practice of ALARA or the optimisation of Radiation Protection is an important feature of the task of the Radiation Protection Professionals. The teaching of the subject is an equally important part of the education and training curriculum. This paper commences with a general view of the educational process and concludes with specific comments on the educational needs. The concept of ALARA is suggested to be central to the safety culture of radiation protection practice. It is considered to be a part of the scientific culture which is well recognised but not well understood. These topics are reviewed and the conclusions applied to a proposal for a syllabus for the teaching of ALARA and this is compared with the content of courses on the subject. (Author)

  10. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Quarkonium Production in Elementary and Heavy Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumitru, A.; Lourenco, C.; Petreczky, P.; Qiu, J., Ruan, L.

    2011-08-03

    Understanding the structure of the hadron is of fundamental importance in subatomic physics. Production of heavy quarkonia is arguably one of the most fascinating subjects in strong interaction physics. It offers unique perspectives into the formation of QCD bound states. Heavy quarkonia are among the most studied particles both theoretically and experimentally. They have been, and continue to be, the focus of measurements in all high energy colliders around the world. Because of their distinct multiple mass scales, heavy quarkonia were suggested as a probe of the hot quark-gluon matter produced in heavy-ion collisions; and their production has been one of the main subjects of the experimental heavy-ion programs at the SPS and RHIC. However, since the discovery of J/psi at Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory over 36 years ago, theorists still have not been able to fully understand the production mechanism of heavy quarkonia, although major progresses have been made in recent years. With this in mind, a two-week program on quarkonium production was organized at BNL on June 6-17, 2011. Many new experimental data from LHC and from RHIC were presented during the program, including results from the LHC heavy ion run. To analyze and correctly interpret these measurements, and in order to quantify properties of the hot matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, it is necessary to improve our theoretical understanding of quarkonium production. Therefore, a wide range of theoretical aspects on the production mechanism in the vacuum as well as in cold nuclear and hot quark-gluon medium were discussed during the program from the controlled calculations in QCD and its effective theories such as NRQCD to various models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. The scientific program was divided into three major scientific parts: basic production mechanism for heavy quarkonium in vacuum or in high energy elementary collisions; the

  11. Accountability system ALARA/optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report makes part of a series of eight reports which have been drawn up in behalf of the dutch Policy Notition Radiation Standards (BNS). The aim of the project with which this report deals, is to assess an accountability system for application of ALARA (As Low As Reasonable Achievable)/optimisation and from these forthcoming bottlenecks. Herein (for this subproject) ALARA is defined as optimization of radiation protection below a risk limit which is to be assessed in another framework. In ch. 2 this discussed further. First it is indicated which categories applications/activities are to be distinguished. Then the elements of the accountability system are elaborated further. In ch. 3 a discussion is given of the actual legislation, the actual policy (national and international), the practice developed with regard to ALARA/optimization and the boundary condition forthcoming from these. In ch. 4 finally the results of ch. 2 are enlightened upon governmental consequences against the background of the actual situation, outlined in ch. 3. In behalf of the insight in the actual practice of ALARA/optimization and the governmental consequences of the in ch. 2 elaborated system interviews have been made with radiation-protection specialists. These are summarized in appendix 2. (H.W.)

  12. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED "GLOBAL ANALYSIS OF POLARIZED PARTON DESTRIBUTIONS IN THE RHIC ERA" (VOLUME 86).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DESHPANDE,A.; VOGELSANG, W.

    2007-10-08

    The determination of the polarized gluon distribution is a central goal of the RHIC spin program. Recent achievements in polarization and luminosity of the proton beams in RHIC, has enabled the RHIC experiments to acquire substantial amounts of high quality data with polarized proton beams at 200 and 62.4 GeV center of mass energy, allowing a first glimpse of the polarized gluon distribution at RHIC. Short test operation at 500 GeV center of mass energy has also been successful, indicating absence of any fundamental roadblocks for measurements of polarized quark and anti-quark distributions planned at that energy in a couple of years. With this background, it has now become high time to consider how all these data sets may be employed most effectively to determine the polarized parton distributions in the nucleon, in general, and the polarized gluon distribution, in particular. A global analysis of the polarized DIS data from the past and present fixed target experiments jointly with the present and anticipated RHIC Spin data is needed.

  13. Catawba nuclear station preoperational ALARA review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the particular emphasis placed on preoperational as los as reasonably achievable (ALARA) considerations at Duke Power's Catawba Nuclear Station. A strong station commitment to the ALARA philosophy, and review of existing capabilities, led to development of an aggressive two-part ALARA program. Capabilities consisted of sufficient numbers of available personnel, lengthy lead time during construction, a very detailed plastic model, and a sister plant of similar design. The program, as developed, consisted of a preoperational program, which looked at design and construction aspects of ALARA, and the operational program, dealing with the ALARA committee and operational problems. MAnagement's philosophy of holding everyone responsible for ALARA provided the motivation to organize the preoperational program to use that resource. The Health Physics group accepted responsibility for development, coordination, and reviewer training. The problem provided a base to build on as station personnel gained experience in their own crafts and radiation protection in general

  14. Integration of Formal Job Hazard Analysis and ALARA Work Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALARA work practices have traditionally centered on reducing radiological exposure and controlling contamination. As such, ALARA policies and procedures are not well suited to a wide range of chemical and human health issues. Assessing relative risk, identifying appropriate engineering/administrative controls and selecting proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for non nuclear work activities extends beyond the limitations of traditional ALARA programs. Forging a comprehensive safety management program in today's (2002) work environment requires a disciplined dialog between health and safety professionals (e.g. safety, engineering, environmental, quality assurance, industrial hygiene, ALARA, etc.) and personnel working in the field. Integrating organizational priorities, maintaining effective pre-planning of work and supporting a team-based approach to safety management represents today's hallmark of safety excellence. Relying on the mandates of any single safety program does not provide industrial hygiene with the tools necessary to implement an integrated safety program. The establishment of tools and processes capable of sustaining a comprehensive safety program represents a key responsibility of industrial hygiene. Fluor Hanford has built integrated safety management around three programmatic attributes: (1) Integration of radiological, chemical and ergonomic issues under a single program. (2) Continuous improvement in routine communications among work planning/scheduling, job execution and management. (3) Rapid response to changing work conditions, formalized work planning and integrated worker involvement

  15. Integrating ALARA into work planning and organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents various organizational structures and systematic approaches that can be of benefit in integrating ALARA into work planning and organization. It is possible to have elegant policy statements, procedures and organizations and yet fail to implement ALARA effectively. The real key to success in ALARA work management is to recognize that ALARA is primarily a way of thinking and to secure the commitment of individuals at all levels within the organization, from senior management to workers carrying out specific tasks. The authors explain that the recommendations of ICRP Publication 60 will have an impact and will maintain the downward pressure on individual doses. 6 figs

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON SPIN PHYSICS AT RHIC IN YEAR-1 AND BEYOND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The much anticipated RHIC spin physics program will commence this fall when the first physics run with colliding beams of polarized protons is expected. More specifically, the planned year-1 RHIC-Spin measurements are (1) the double-spin asymmetry ALLπ in production of pions by collisions of longitudinally polarized protons (in order to obtain first information on the proton's spin-dependent gluon density, Δg); (2) the transverse single-spin asymmetry ANπ for pion production. These two reactions provided part of the motivation for our workshop. On the first day there were informative talks on the specific plans of STAR (by Rakness) and PHENIX (by Goto) for the polarized run of Year-1. Some of the theoretical questions related to the double-spin asymmetry ALLπ were discussed on the first day by Vogelsang and Kretzer, which centered mostly around the questions of how well the unpolarized fragmentation functions are known, the need for next-to-leading order calculations, and on how sensitive the asymmetry is to the possible Δg distributions. Vetterli presented HERMES measurements of fragmentation functions, which overlap in Q2 with the future lower-pT measurements at RHIC

  17. Chernobyl information: The ALARA backlash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk information to the public failed after the Chernobyl accident, also in countries where radiation protection authorities and experts initially enjoyed public confidence. In contrast to many other large accidents, the responsibility for the information failure stays mainly with the authorities and experts themselves, not with the mass media. Many factors together caused the radiation risk information from SSI (Swedish Radiation Protection Institute), and its sister authorities in many other countries, to be confusing and inadequate, despite the best of intentions. The two major malefactors were the handling of food contamination restrictions and the short-sighted risk optimisation by applying the ALARA principle. In addition, the assurance that the Chernobyl contamination was fairly harmless made no sense to the layman, as a massive array of controlling procedures was enforced simultaneously. The food regulations became unfortunately focused on becquerel per kilogram limits instead of the primary goal, a dose reduction per year, corresponding to an yearly intake of Cs-137. The lesson learned is that the risk significant long-term intake ambition must be understood and digested by laymen and media, before any secondary limits, e.g. the activity concentration of foodstuffs expressed as becquerel per kg, for controlling or trading purposes, are introduced. As it were, the experts and authorities lost credibility, due to what people considered as ambiguities. The concept of ALARA (As Low As Readily Achievable) is in the backbone of every ionising radiation expert, and a useful strategy for optimising dose burdens during controlled situations. In connection to the Chernobyl accident many advices to the public was given based on the ALARA principle. 'Rinse leafy vegetables' sounds at first very reasonable, cheap and innocent, but if the averted dose is low, such an advice should not be given. The individual dose-reduction should be weighted against all negative

  18. ALARA and planning of interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implementation of ALARA programs implies integration of radiation protection criterion at all stages of outage management. Within the framework of its ALARA policy, Electricide de France (EDF) has given an incentive to all of its nuclear power plants to develop open-quotes good practicesclose quotes in this domain, and to exchange their experience by the way of a national feed back file. Among the developments in the field of outage organization, some plants have focused on the planning stage of activities because of its influence on the radiological conditions of interventions and on the good succession of tasks within the radiological controlled areas. This paper presents the experience of Chinon nuclear power plant. At Chinon, we are pursuing this goal through careful outage planning. We want the ALARA program during outages to be part of the overall maintenance task planning. This planning includes the provision of the availability of every safety-related component, and of the variations of water levels in hthereactor and steam generators to take advantage of the shield created by the water. We have developed a computerized data base with the exact position of all the components in the reactor building in order to avoid unnecessary interactions between different tasks performed in the same room. A common language between Operation and Maintenance had been established over the past years, using open-quotes Milestones and Corridorsclose quotes. A real time dose rate counting system enables the Radiation Protection (RP) Department to do an accurate and efficient follow up during the outage for all the open-quotes ALARAclose quotes maintenance tasks

  19. Savannah River Site ALARA Program appraisals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.R.

    1992-06-01

    ALARA Program audits are recommended in PNL-6566, ``Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA).`` The Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.11, ``Radiation Protection For Occupational Workers,`` requires contractors to conduct internal audits of all functional elements of the radiological protection program, which includes the ALARA program, as often as necessary, but at a minimum every three years. At the Savannah River Site (SRS), these required audits are performed as part of the Health Protection Internal Appraisal Program. This program was established to review the Site radiological protection program, which includes the ALARA program, on an ongoing basis and to provide recommendations for improvement directly to senior Health Protection management. This paper provides an overview of the SRS Health Protection Internal Appraisal program. In addition, examples of specific performance criteria and detailed appraisal guidelines used ALARA appraisals are provided.

  20. Preliminary ALARA design concept for SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMART(System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) is a space saving integral type nuclear rector with the thermal power of 330 MW. This report provides general design guide and authority in NSSS designs for SMART needed to maintain the occupational doses and doses to members of public ALARA to meet the regulatory requirements. Paragraph 20.1 of 10 CFR 20, ''Standards for Protection Against Radiation'', states that licensee should make every reasonable effort to maintain exposures to radiation as far below the limits specified in Part 20 as is reasonably achievable. The ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principle is incorporated into Korean radiation protection law as paragraph one Article 97 of the Atomic Energy Act. (Jan. 1995). This ALARA Design Concept for SMART provides 1) description of the organization and responsibilities needed for upper level management support and authority in order for the implementation of ALARA, 2) guidance and procedures for design, review, and evaluation needed for SMART ALARA program implementation, 3) general design guidelines for SMART NSSS and BOP designers to implement ALARA principles in design stage, and 4) training and instruction requirement of SMART NSSS and BOP designers for the familiarization of ALARA principles to be implemented in NSSS designs. (Author). 4 refs., 1 tabs

  1. Alara - from theory towards practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alara principle states that all exposures shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. It is a simple concept - the idea behind it is widely used in nearly all spheres of life, i.e. to do the best one can under the given circumstances. This book aims to help define what is meant by best in the context of radiation protection. It describes a procedure that is useful in structuring one's approach to any particular situation where a decision as to the best course of action is required. It also provides practical guidance on how the concept can be incorporated into radiation protection programmes. This book has been written as a reference manual on both the theoretical and practical aspects of the subject. But it is especially targeted at those involved in radiation protection at the practical level

  2. Can practical ALARA be taught?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Purpose: Outside of the nuclear industry, many users of sources of ionising radiation may be characterised as 'High Frequency/Low Dose' users. It is argued here that they have special training requirements in order to understand the ICRP concept ALARA, indeed all the fundamental concepts of radiological protection and their relevance to the workplace. It is not practicable to practise dose avoidance in many situations so dose reduction becomes even more important. For example, laboratory life sciences researchers often have to use very small quantities and activities of beta emitting radioisotopes which give small or minuscule external doses to well trained workers but can give extremely serious high doses if mishandled Similarly, dentists routinely use 60- 100 kV X-ray generators to diagnose abnormalities and disease which other techniques would fail to detect. By practising simple and effective dose reduction methods, they can reduce the dose to themselves and their patients to arguably trivial levels. Method: The paper will use examples from Radiation Protection Supervisors courses run over the past 6 years for UK pharmaceutical companies and research into courses for general dental practitioners run over the past 8 years in East Anglia, England. The latter courses must meet the requirements laid down in the Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations 2000 and the requirements of the professional dental association, the British Dental Council, and the continuing professional development requirements of the dental registration body, the General Dental Council. Major Findings and Conclusions: The research findings show an urgent need to train dental practitioners in the concepts and practical aspects of dose avoidance and dose minimisation, social and economic factors being considered. Pharmaceutical company research Radiation Protection Supervisors are generally well trained but also need to know the practical implications of the ALARA principle

  3. World class ALARA performance at Darlington Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In January 2008, Darlington Nuclear was selected by Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) North American Technical Center to receive the 2007 World Class ALARA Performance Award for setting and achieving high standards in radiation protection. The purpose of this presentation is to share some of the station's successes and challenges in reducing dose to operation and maintenance personnel. In particular, the following dose reduction initiatives will be discussed: - Innovative shielding design including the use of water shielding walls for on-line airlock maintenance, tungsten shielding blocks for feeder replacement, and exposure reduction for horizontal flux detectors - Use of remote monitoring array to scan reactor face for hot spots to reduce dose and save critical path time - Tritium reduction through improvements in human performance, outage scheduling and introduction of new technology With increasing work scope associated with maintenance, refurbishment and retro-fit activities, there is an upward pressure on collective dose making it a critical resource for many inspection and maintenance work groups. There is a need to reduce radiation source terms as a lasting solution to address ever-increasing collective dose. Darlington's long term strategic goals to reduce tritium and gamma source terms and a bold vision for the future will be discussed. (author)

  4. BNL325 - Nuclear reaction data display program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer code for the graphical display of nuclear reaction data is described. The code, which works on a computer with VMS operating system, can overlay experimental data from an EXFOR/CSISRS table-computation format with evaluated data from ENDF formatted data libraries. Originally, this code has been used at the U.S. National Nuclear Data Center to produce the well-known neutron cross-section atlas published as report BNL-325. (author). 3 tabs

  5. Maintaining occupational dose ALARA through work management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadian philosophy in keeping occupational dose ALARA has been to train staff in radiation safety so that they can be fully responsible for participating in minimizing the risks associated with the hazardous work. Senior managers actively promote high standards of performance in dose reduction techniques as a means for integrating ALARA into the operation and maintenance of the station by all personnel. Minimizing radiation dose is accomplished by applying cost effective work management techniques such as Job Safety Analysis, pre-job briefings and establishing and achieving radiation dose goals. Radiation dose goals are used as a management tool for involving all work groups in reducing doses as well as providing a means of assessing the effectiveness of dose reduction actions. ALARA, along with conventional safety, is used as a lever to raise the standard of quality of work and to overall build a safety culture. (author). 4 figs

  6. Experience of implementing ALARA outside the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of the structured approach of ALARA Audits can help judgements on whether the ALARA principle has been implemented. The development of ALARA Audits, their integration into a nationwide Radiation Protection Adviser service to the non nuclear power sector, and the experience of their use are described. (author)

  7. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETINGS VIII, IX, X, XI, APRIL 12, MAY, 22, JUNE 17, JULY 29, 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,B.

    2003-03-06

    Since its inception, the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) has held semi-regular meetings each year to discuss the physics possibilities and the operational details of the program. Having collected our first data sample of polarized proton-proton collisions in Run02 of RHIC, we are now in the process of examining the performance of both the accelerator and the experiments. From this evaluation, we not only aim to formulate a consensus plan for polarized proton-proton during Run03 of RHIC but also to look more forward into the future to ensure the success of the spin program. In the second meeting of this series (which took place at BNL on April 12, 2002), we focused on Run02 polarization issues. This meeting opened with a presentation by Thomas Roser about his reflections on the outcome from the RHIC retreat during which the Run02 performance was evaluated. Of particular importance, Thomas pointed out that, with the expected beam time and his estimates for machine-tuning requirements, the experiments should limit their beam requests to two or three programs.

  8. New influences on the ALARA concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ALARA concept is an essential component of an occupational radiation protection program because the fatality risk associated with continued exposure at or near the 5-rems/year limit is unacceptably high. Using a risk coefficient of 4 x 10-4 fatalities/person-rem the risk for a large worker population exposed in this manner for a working lifetime would be 10%. The ICRP fatality risk criterion is an average of 1 per year per 10 thousand workers. The average annual dose that would achieve this objective depends on the risk coefficient used. Using 4 x 10-4 again, the annual dose average would have to be 0.25 rem, a factor of 20 below the limit. It is evident that the ALARA concept is the most important aspect of occupational radiation protection and that the justification for an effective ALARA program is the cancer fatality risk. Not quite so evident but nonetheless important is the consideration that once the ICRP criterion is achieved, it is probably int eh best interest of the workforce to use resources available for their health and safety to reduce other risks. In this paper the risk information under examination by the government agencies is reviewed from the viewpoint of dose reduction through enhanced implementation of the occupational ALARA concept

  9. Front-end electronics development at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AT BNL the monolithic front-end electronics development effort is an outgrowth of work in discrete and hybrid circuits over the past 30 years. BNL's area of specialization centers on circuits for precision amplitude measurement, with signal-to-noise ratios of 100:1 and calibration to the same level of precision. Circuits are predominantly classical, continuous-time implementation of the functions now performed by hybrids, with little or no loss of performance. Included in this category are charge and current-sensitive preamplifiers, pulse shapers, sample/hold, multiplexing, and associated calibration and control circuits. Presently integration densities are limited to 16 channels per chip. Two examples are presented to illustrate the techniques needed to adopt hybrid circuits to the constraints of monolithic CMOS technology. They are programmable pulse shapes and a charge-sensitive preamp for very low detector capacitance

  10. Radiation exposure management - The Westinghouse ALARA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse has incorporated radiation management into the design of its NSSS plants. This paper describes the Westinghouse program for incorporating As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) radiation exposure into the design process. A description is given of the method of collecting data from operating Westinghouse plants. The analysis of this data and its use in the total NSSS plant exposure estimate is presented. Application of a detailed exposure review to the development of an improved mechanical component is described. A particular exposure review for a refueling task is discussed. One high exposure task is detailed and specific design improvements are identified. The disadvantages of the existing design are expressed and design improvements are suggested. The matrix management of the team that develops the improved design is described and the resulting product is presented. The specific example is used to illustrate the operation of the Westinghouse ALARA program

  11. ALARA in the radiation protection training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This part treats especially the question of the training in radiation protection. The electro nuclear sector has given an ALARA principle culture and succeeded to sensitize each level of hierarchy, but for small industry, the research and the medical world the same method appears more difficult to use. It seems better to reinforce the importance of the competent person and to include a training in radiation protection on the initial formation in numerous professional categories. (N.C.)

  12. ALARA application in Spanish NPP's. New approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One main objective of all nuclear installations is to underlie the principle of optimization. The focus in the application of this principle varies considerably, from cost-benefit techniques in the design phases to commitment, attitude and motivation in operation. The ALARA principle should permeate the entire organisation of the company during operation. Management should be the first link of a chain originating with explicit corporate commitment, leading to increasingly specific decisions, finally to reach those who are responsible for actual performance of each task. The safety culture is an element integrating the mentality that is to prevail throughout the organisation. The organisation shall contribute to incorporating the principle of optimization in all plant operations and all phases of activity. Management's commitment and motivation are transferred to all the workers and organisations involved. The ALARA commitment naturally extends to all outside organisations. The ultimate objective is to reduce collective doses through the promotion and enforcing of an ALARA culture and compliance with the operating collective dose objectives. (author)

  13. ALARA Review of the SHAARS Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SHARS mobile hot cell was designed and manufactured by Necsa intended to address the problem of disused Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) from teletherapy units, gamma irradiators and brachytherapy units. This unit is to be used in countries with no remote infrastructure to handle SHARS. The hot cell was designed for a 3.7E+13Bq (1000Ci) activity although it was demonstrated that it can handle even more than 7.4E+13Bq (2000Ci). The unit has a biological shield which consists of river sand sandwiched between metal plates and a viewing window filled with 50% zinc bromide solution. The unit was designed to provide sufficient shielding to ensure that doses are kept ALARA (As low As Reasonably Achieved). This paper compares the modelled dose rates with the actual measured doses during operations conducted in Sudan, Tanzania and Uruguay. It also presents the key lessons learned in the application of the ALARA principle during the SHARS missions. The new working practices and additional methods are proposed in order to reduce doses in accordance with the ALARA principle. (author)

  14. The Alara principle in backfitting Borssele

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive backfitting program, the Modifications Project, was carried out at the Borssele Nuclear Power Station. It involved sixteen modifications to technical systems. The scope of activities, and the dose rates encountered in places where work was to be performed, made it obvious from the outset that a high collective dose had to be anticipated. As a consequence, radiation protection within the project was organized in such a way that applicable radiation protection principles were applied in all phases of the project. From the point of view of radiation protection, the Modifications Project had to be subdivided into three phases, i.e., a conceptual design phase in which mainly the justification principle was applied; the engineering phase in which the Alara principle was employed; the execution phase in which management of the (internal) dose limits had to be observed in addition to the Alara principle. Throughout all project phases, radiation protection considerations and results were documented in so-called Alara reports and radiation protection checklists. As a result of the strictest possible observance of radiation protection principles in all phases of the project, a collective dose of 2505 mSv was achieved, which stands for a reduction by a factor of 4 compared to the very first estimate. In view of the scope and complex nature of the activities involved, and the radiation levels in the Borssele Nuclear Power Station, this is an excellent result. (orig.)

  15. Proceedings of the Department of Energy ALARA Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W. [comps.

    1992-12-31

    The report contains summaries of papers, discussions, and operational exercises presented at the first Department of Energy ALARA Workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on April 21--22, 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for, and enhance communication among, ALARA personnel, as well as to inform DOE`s field office and contractor personnel about the Office of Health`s programs and expectations from the entire DOE complex efforts in the ALARA area.The two-day workshop consisted of one day dedicated to presentations on implementing various elements of a formal ALARA program at the DOE contractors` facilities, regulatory aspects of ALARA programs, and DOE Headquarters` ALARA expectations/initiatives. The second day was devoted to detailed discussions on ALARA improvements and problems, and operational exercises on cost-benefit analyses and on ALARA job/experiment reviews. At this workshop, 70 health physicists and radiation safety engineers from 5 DOE Headquarter Offices, 7 DOE operations/area offices, and 27 contractor facilities exchanged information, which is expected to stimulate further improvement in the DOE contractors` ALARA programs. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  16. Proceedings of the Department of Energy ALARA Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W. (comps.)

    1992-01-01

    The report contains summaries of papers, discussions, and operational exercises presented at the first Department of Energy ALARA Workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on April 21--22, 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for, and enhance communication among, ALARA personnel, as well as to inform DOE's field office and contractor personnel about the Office of Health's programs and expectations from the entire DOE complex efforts in the ALARA area.The two-day workshop consisted of one day dedicated to presentations on implementing various elements of a formal ALARA program at the DOE contractors' facilities, regulatory aspects of ALARA programs, and DOE Headquarters' ALARA expectations/initiatives. The second day was devoted to detailed discussions on ALARA improvements and problems, and operational exercises on cost-benefit analyses and on ALARA job/experiment reviews. At this workshop, 70 health physicists and radiation safety engineers from 5 DOE Headquarter Offices, 7 DOE operations/area offices, and 27 contractor facilities exchanged information, which is expected to stimulate further improvement in the DOE contractors' ALARA programs. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  17. Proceedings of the Department of Energy ALARA Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains summaries of papers, discussions, and operational exercises presented at the first Department of Energy ALARA Workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on April 21--22, 1992. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for, and enhance communication among, ALARA personnel, as well as to inform DOE's field office and contractor personnel about the Office of Health's programs and expectations from the entire DOE complex efforts in the ALARA area.The two-day workshop consisted of one day dedicated to presentations on implementing various elements of a formal ALARA program at the DOE contractors' facilities, regulatory aspects of ALARA programs, and DOE Headquarters' ALARA expectations/initiatives. The second day was devoted to detailed discussions on ALARA improvements and problems, and operational exercises on cost-benefit analyses and on ALARA job/experiment reviews. At this workshop, 70 health physicists and radiation safety engineers from 5 DOE Headquarter Offices, 7 DOE operations/area offices, and 27 contractor facilities exchanged information, which is expected to stimulate further improvement in the DOE contractors' ALARA programs. Individual papers are indexed separately

  18. ALARA at Tyco Health care-Mallinckrodt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How to approach the ALARA requirement? That was one of the question in the beginning of the 1990's at the Mallinckrodt site for the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. This question was raised after the ICRP published their guidelines in the ICRP 60 publication, with the average effective dose limit that was changed from 50 to 20 mSv per year. In the early 1990's the individual effective dose at Mallinckrodt was up to 20 mSv7year and some of the people over this number. As a first result of the discussion Mallinckrodt adopted the 20 mSv/year as being the legal limit, although it finally took over a decade to incorporate this ICRP limit into legislation. A second action was to introduce a site internal limit: if a person would exceed 75% of the legal limit, the person would be restrained from radiation work. This restriction forced everybody to look for solutions to decrease dose and area dose rate. This was the beginning and resulted in nobody exceeding 15 mSv/year after a couple of years and a lower average dose than before, with no extra employees. The second stage in the process of ALARA was a systematic approach of the decrease in personal dose. This systematic approach consists of three phases. The first phase is dose assessment followed by routine measurements. The third phase is the ALARA step. First phase, dose assessment. Normally this could be done in a meeting or even behind the desk: assess the dose per department or per group or per activity. Make a decision on which party will get high priority, medium priority and low priority. Normally this means that the department with the highest dose will get the highest priority. (Author)

  19. PHYSICS OF THE 1 TERAFLOP RIKEN-BNL-COLUMBIA QCD PROJECT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAWHINNEY,R.

    1998-10-16

    A workshop was held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on the afternoon of October 16, i 998, as part of the first anniversary ceremony for the center. Titled ''Workshop on Physics of the 1 Teraflop RIKEN-BNL-Columbia QCD Project'', this meeting brought together the physicists from RIKEN-BNL, BNL and Columbia who are using the QCDSP (Quantum Chromodynamics on Digital Signal Processors) computer at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for studies of QCD. In addition, Akira Ukawa, a leader of the CP-PACS project at the University of Tsukuba in Japan, attended and gave a talk on the Aoki phase. There were also others in attendance who were interested in more general properties of the QCDSP computer. The QCDSP computer and lattice QCD had been presented during the morning ceremony by Shigemi Ohta of KEK and the RIKEN-BNL Research Center. This was followed by a tour of the QCDSP machine room and a formal unveiling of the computer to the attendees of the anniversary ceremony and the press. The rapid completion of construction of the QCDSP computer was made possible through many factors: (1) the existence of a complete design and working hardware at Columbia when the RIKEN-BNL center was being set up, (2) strong support for the project from RIKEN and the center and (3) aggressive involvement of members of the Computing and Communications Division at BNL. With this powerful new resource, the members of the RIKEN-BNL-Columbia, QCD project are looking forward to advances in our understanding of QCD.

  20. PHYSICS OF THE 1 TERAFLOP RIKEN-BNL-COLUMBIA QCD PROJECT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAWHINNEY,R.

    1998-10-16

    A workshop was held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on the afternoon of October 16, 1998, as part of the first anniversary ceremony for the center. Titled ''Workshop on Physics of the 1 Teraflop RIKEN-BNL-Columbia QCD Project'', this meeting brought together the physicists from RIKEN-BNL, BNL and Columbia who are using the QCDSP (Quantum Chromodynamics on Digital Signal Processors) computer at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for studies of QCD. In addition, Akira Ukawa, a leader of the CP-PACS project at the University of Tsukuba in Japan, attended and gave a talk on the Aoki phase. There were also others in attendance who were interested in more general properties of the QCDSP computer. The QCDSP computer and lattice QCD had been presented during the morning ceremony by Shigemi Ohta of KEK and the RIKEN-BNL Research Center. This was followed by a tour of the QCDSP machine room and a formal unveiling of the computer to the attendees of the anniversary ceremony and the press. The rapid completion of construction of the QCDSP computer was made possible through many factors: (1) the existence of a complete design and working hardware at Columbia when the RIKEN-BNL center was being set up, (2) strong support for the project from RIKEN and the center and (3) aggressive involvement of members of the Computing and Communications Division at BNL. With this powerful new resource, the members of the RIKEN-BNL-Columbia, QCD project are looking forward to advances in our understanding of QCD.

  1. Maintenance and radioprotection: the implementation of ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing maintenance works on reactors has incited Electricite de France (EDF) to adopt a dosimetry optimization policy using the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle. Reactor maintenance represents 80% of the personnel exposures. This paper described the actions taken by EDF to improve the personnel (EDF and contractors) training and surveillance (medical examination, film dosemeters..) and the labor laws relative to the contractors and temporary employees. Other tools developed by EDF, such as robots, remote handling equipments, and a computerized individual and collective dosimetry database are described. (J.S.). 2 figs

  2. FPC conditioning cart at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 703 MHz superconducting gun for the BNL Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) prototype has two fundamental power couplers (FPCs), and each of them will deliver up to 500 kW of CW RF power. In order to prepare the couplers for high power RF service and process multipacting, the FPCs should be conditioned prior to installation into the gun cryomodule. A conditioning cart based test stand, which includes a vacuum pumping system, controllable bake-out system, diagnostics, interlocks and data log system has been designed, constructed and commissioned by collaboration of BNL and AES. This paper presents FPC conditioning cart systems and the conditioning process.

  3. Strengthening ALARA approach in work management at Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) occupational exposures at nuclear power plants should be included in work management as a concept. There are world-wide trends required by the utilities for improved design, operation and maintenance. Within the period of seventeen years of plant operation maintaining low radiation exposures requires additional efforts. The benefit of this effort should be reducing risks to nuclear workers, better work planning and performance. The Krsko Plant ALARA organisations has been revised recently and built on different levels of the hierarchy. The goal is to promote good industry practice and the management of work on primary systems. The established ALARA programme describes the objectives and defines the procedures and tools for its implementation. Brief presentation of the programme as well as organisational responsibilities of dedicated ALARA committee and working groups is the scope of this paper. The management tools and ALARA indicators are discussed to implement the programme and to evaluate the results.(author)

  4. Towards the development of an ALARA culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ALARA principle, which states, for each exposure situation, that doses must be kept As Low As Reasonably Achievable, taking into account economic and social factors' represents the basis of the > developed to manage the radiological risk in a responsible manner. The practical implementation of the ALARA principle is complex. It requires defining transaction mechanisms which enable a responsible management of the radiological risk, taking into account, among other things, possible risk transfers in groups and the allocation of protection resources. The players who can take part in radiological risk management are numerous and have different functions: from the authorities to exposed workers, together with company managers. They all possess specific knowledge and have objectives which are not necessarily compatible. The transactions and negotiations initiated between these players during decision-taking relative to exposure management will therefore only be efficient and productive if there exists both a mutual comprehension of individual objectives and a readiness to collaborate on a common objective: keeping the residual risk at a level both acceptable to, and accepted by, the various parties involved. A fundamental element of this process therefore lies in the development among the various players concerned of a common culture with respect to radiological risks and the methods used for their management, in order to facilitate transactions by the sharing of a common language and system of values. A possible definition of > could be: >. Based on this statement, the paper presents, illustrated by the experience of the French Utility Electricite de France, the main components which should enter into consideration for the development of an ALARA culture for the management of occupational exposures. It concludes on the necessity to construct and transmit a common patrimony of a radiological risk management system comprising the scientific and technical knowledge

  5. Comments on two American justice decisions founded on ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of the ALARA principle in the American justice is considered as a very important part of the law in evolution. The first decision called 'James decision' was the case of a worker who received a dose under the dose limit and was agreed in his demand. The second one,'Three Miles Island decision', was to refuse the ALARA principle as a norm because it would consider that the justice is more able to pilot a nuclear power plant than competent authorities. These two examples show that the ALARA principle must stay an operational guide and not a legal norm of precautions susceptible to impose sanctions by justice. (N.C.)

  6. BNL heavy ion fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A principal attraction of heavy ion fusion is that existing accelerator technology and theory are sufficiently advanced to allow one to commence the design of a machine capable of igniting thermonuclear explosions. There are, however, a number of features which are not found in existing accelerators built for other purposes. The main thrust of the BNL Heavy Ion Fusion program has been to explore these features. Longitudinal beam bunching, very low velocity acceleration, and space charge neutralization are briefly discussed

  7. ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining

  8. The optimization (ALARA) problem: A direct formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alternative method to that set out by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for implementing the optimization (ALARA) principle of radiation protection is proposed. The method follows directly from the basic dose limitation system and naturally integrates the three components of the system. An essential feature of the method is that 'all exposures' is taken to mean 'each and every one' rather than the 'sum of individual doses', as in the usual method using the collective dose concept. The method draws on established techniques from optimization theory and those aspects of micro-economic theory which form the basis of cost-benefit analysis. The method takes separate account of both the direct costs to the community of the effects of radiation exposures and each individual's 'risk-benefit' attitudes to radiation exposures. The conundrum concerning the 'value of a life' turns out to be operationally and quantitatively irrelevant. Various constraints including the dose limits, economic and social constraints and natural physical constraints are included in the method which leads directly to a standard form problem in mathematical programming. A practical advantage of the method is that it is conceptually consistent with the operational methods used and judgements made regularly by health physicists and radiation safety officers. While the proposed method allows an optimization problem to be readily specified, it does require some familiarity with optimization solution techniques in larger applications. (author). 15 refs, 2 figs

  9. Incremental ALARA cost/benefit computer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commonwealth Edison Company has developed and is testing an enhanced Fortran Computer Program to be used for cost/benefit analysis of Radiation Reduction Projects at its six nuclear power facilities and Corporate Technical Support Groups. This paper describes a Macro-Diven IBM Mainframe Program comprised of two different types of analyses-an Abbreviated Program with fixed costs and base values, and an extended Engineering Version for a detailed, more through and time-consuming approach. The extended engineering version breaks radiation exposure costs down into two components-Health-Related Costs and Replacement Labor Costs. According to user input, the program automatically adjust these two cost components and applies the derivation to company economic analyses such as replacement power costs, carrying charges, debt interest, and capital investment cost. The results from one of more program runs using different parameters may be compared in order to determine the most appropriate ALARA dose reduction technique. Benefits of this particular cost / benefit analysis technique includes flexibility to accommodate a wide range of user data and pre-job preparation, as well as the use of proven and standardized company economic equations

  10. Computer code for quantitative ALARA evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A FORTRAN computer code has been developed to simplify the determination of whether dose reduction actions meet the as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) criterion. The calculations are based on the methodology developed for the Atomic Industrial Forum. The code is used for analyses of eight types of dose reduction actions, characterized as follows: reduce dose rate, reduce job frequency, reduce productive working time, reduce crew size, increase administrative dose limit for the task, and increase the workers' time utilization and dose utilization through (a) improved working conditions, (b) basic skill training, or (c) refresher training for special skills. For each type of action, two analysis modes are available. The first is a generic analysis in which the program computes potential benefits (in dollars) for a range of possible improvements, e.g., for a range of lower dose rates. Generic analyses are most useful in the planning stage and for evaluating the general feasibility of alternative approaches. The second is a specific analysis in which the potential annual benefits of a specific level of improvement and the annual implementation cost are compared. The potential benefits reflect savings in operational and societal costs that can be realized if occupational radiation doses are reduced. Because the potential benefits depend upon many variables which characterize the job, the workplace, and the workers, there is no unique relationship between the potential dollar savings and the dose savings. The computer code permits rapid quantitative analyses of alternatives and is a tool that supplements the health physicist's professional judgment. The program output provides a rational basis for decision-making and a record of the assumptions employed

  11. Westinghouse Hanford Company ALARA year-end report, Calendar Year 1994: Revision 3A, Radiological engineering and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has long been the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Policy that radiation doses should be maintained as far below the dose limits as is reasonably achievable. This policy, known as the ''ALARA Principle of radiation protection,'' maintains that radiation exposures should be maintained as low as reasonably achievable, taking into account social, technical, economic, practical, and public policy considerations. The ALARA Principle is based on the hypothesis that even very low radiation doses carry some risk. As a result, it is not enough to maintain doses at/or slightly below limits; the lower the doses, the lower the risks. Because it is not possible to reduce all doses at DOE facilities to zero, economic and social factors must be considered to determine the optimal level of radiation doses. According to the ALARA Principle, if doses are too high, resources should be well spent to reduce them. At some point, the resources being spent to maintain low doses are exactly balanced by the risks avoided. Reducing doses below this point results in a misallocation of resources; the resources could be spent elsewhere and have a greater positive impact on health and safety. The objective of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) ALARA/Contamination Control Improvement Project (CCIP) Program is to manage and control exposures (both individual and collective) to the work force, the general public, and the environment to levels as low as is reasonable using the aforementioned ALARA Principle

  12. Report on the PWR-radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1992, representatives from several utilities with operational Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) formed the PWR-Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee. The mission of the Committee is to facilitate open communications between member utilities relative to radiation protection and ALARA issues such that cost effective dose reduction and radiation protection measures may be instituted. While industry deregulation appears inevitable and inter-utility competition is on the rise, Committee members are fully committed to sharing both positive and negative experiences for the benefit of the health and safety of the radiation worker. Committee meetings provide current operational experiences through members providing Plant status reports, and information relative to programmatic improvements through member presentations and topic specific workshops. The most recent Committee workshop was facilitated to provide members with defined experiences that provide cost effective ALARA performance

  13. Experiences in ALARA application: 7th parade of maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The achieved experience with these activities, and all the carried out during the seventh stop but that they are not included here, carried to take a serie of decisions in the ALARA group, of which can be mentioned the following: 1. Definition of goals of collective dose and singular for works, to complete the ALARA commitment toward the occupational exposure personnel of the CLV. 2. To analyze the obtained information, as quick as possible, for using it in similar situations of work (to normalize the obtained results, when this is possible. 3. To coordinate the activities in those that participate different work groups with the end of not hindering the development of the same ones. 4. To establish ALARA responsibles of the works to fulfill functions of: pursuit of the work and information to the workers for their safety

  14. Pacific Northwest Laboratory ALARA Report for Calendar Year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides summary results of the Calendar Year (CY) 1993 As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report includes information regarding whole-body exposures to radiation, and skin contaminations. The collective whole-body radiation dose to employees during 1993 was 0.58 person-sievert (58 person-rem). This dose was 11 percent lower than the projected dose of 0.65 person-sievert (65 person-rem). The Radiation Protection Section's Field Dosimetry Services group projected that no PNL employee's dose would exceed 0.02 sievert (2 rem) based on dosimeters processed during the year; no worker actually exceeded the limit by the end of CY 1993. There were 15 reported cases of skin contamination for PNL employees during 1993. This number of 60 percent of the projected total of 25 cases. There were an additional 21 cases of personal-effects contamination to PNL staff: Nine of these contamination events occurred at the 324 Building, nine occurred at the 325 Building, one occurred in the 327 Building, one occurred in the 3720 Building, and one occurred in the 326 Building. Line management set numerous challenging and production ALARA goals for their facilities. Appendix A describes the final status of the 1993 ALARA goals. Appendix B describes the radiological ALARA goals for 1994. The Radiation Protection Section of the Laboratory Safety Dept. routinely perform audits of radiological ALARA requirements for specific facilities with significant potential for exposure. These ALARA audits are part of a comprehensive safety audit of the facility, designed to evaluate and improve total safety performance

  15. THE FUTURE OF SPIN PHYSICS AT BNL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ARONSON, S.; DESHPANDE, A.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL is the world's only polarized proton-proton collider. Collisions at center-of-mass energies up to 500 GeV and beam polarizations approaching 70% (longitudinal or transverse) are provided to two experiments, STAR and PHENIX, at luminosities {ge} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. Transverse polarized beam has also been provided to the BRAHMS experiment. Measurements that bear on the important question of the spin content of the nucleon are beginning to appear. Over the next 10 years, as the performance of polarized proton running at RHIC is further developed, the Spin Physics program at RHIC will provide definitive measurements of the contributions to the proton's spin of the gluon, the sea quarks and the orbital motion of the partons in the proton's wave function. We plan to extend the reach of our study of the role of spin in QCD with the development of ''eRHIC'', which will provide polarized e-p collisions to a new detector.

  16. VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning and communication tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human operations are required in nuclear installation, during maintenance, outage, repair and decommissioning. This leads to the exposure of the worker to radiation. It is clear that these operations must be performed according to the ALARA principle (to reduce the dose As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The person responsible for planning the job needs to evaluate different scenarios based on the exposure of the worker. This involves the manipulation of a lot of information specific to the work place such as the geometry, materials, radiological and technical boundary conditions to assess the dose. A lot of communication between the ALARA stakeholders is needed during this pre-job study. A communication that can be cumbersome and tedious when based on written documents and paper plans. The use of 3D calculation and simulation tools provide a solution to this problem. They provide an excellent means to make the above mentioned process more efficient and effective by calculating and visualising the environment and the associated radiological risk. The VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning tool is developed and designed by SCK-CEN as a dose assessment tool enabling the user to calculate the dose in a 3D environment for work scenarios. This software is very successful in the ALARA field. At present 22 companies in Europe use the VISIPLAN software in the field of dose assessment in maintenance and decommissioning. Recent developments and applications are discussed

  17. ALARA review for the 202-S plutonium loadout hood stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used to manage personnel exposures, control contamination levels, and control airborne radioactivity concentrations while conducting stabilization of the Reduction-Oxidation (REDOX) Facility plutonium loadout hood and associated piping, and the isolation of the ER-8 ventilation system

  18. ALARA [as low as reasonably achievable] engineering at Department of Energy facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the first in the series of bibliographies supporting the efforts at the Brookhaven National Laboratory ALARA Center on dose reduction at DOE facilities. Abstracts for this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, and searches of the DOE Energy Data Base. The abstracts included in this report relate to operational health physics as well as other subjects which have a bearing on dose reduction. Facilities covered include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fabrication, unirradiated fissile materials storage, irradiated fissile material storage, reprocessing, decommissioning, recovery, hot laboratories, tritium production, reactors (research, test and production but not power reactors), and accelerators. We have also included material in improved design, materials selection, planning, and other topics which are related to dose-reduction efforts. The report contains 68 abstracts as well as subject and author indices

  19. BNL Direct Wind Superconducting Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, B.; Anerella, M.; Escallier, J.; Ghosh, A.; Jain, A.; Marone, A.; Muratore, A.; Wanderer, P.

    2011-09-12

    BNL developed Direct Wind magnet technology is used to create a variety of complex multi-functional multi-layer superconducting coil structures without the need for creating custom production tooling and fixturing for each new project. Our Direct Wind process naturally integrates prestress into the coil structure so external coil collars and yokes are not needed; the final coil package transverse size can then be very compact. Direct Wind magnets are produced with very good field quality via corrections applied during the course of coil winding. The HERA-II and BEPC-II Interaction Region (IR) magnet, J-PARC corrector and Alpha antihydrogen magnetic trap magnets and our BTeV corrector magnet design are discussed here along with a full length ILC IR prototype magnet presently in production and the coils that were wound for an ATF2 upgrade at KEK. A new IR septum magnet design concept for a 6.2 T combined-function IR magnet for eRHIC, a future RHIC upgrade, is introduced here.

  20. BNL ATF II beamlines design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is currently undergoing a major upgrade (ATF-II). Together with a new location and much improved facilities, the ATF will see an upgrade in its major capabilities: electron beam energy and quality and CO2 laser power. The electron beam energy will be increased in stages, first to 100-150 MeV followed by a further increase to 500 MeV. Combined with the planned increase in CO2 laser power (from 1-100 TW), the ATF-II will be a powerful tool for Advanced Accelerator research. A high-brightness electron beam, produced by a photocathode gun, will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. Besides the energy range (up to a possible 500 MeV in the final stage) the electron beam can be tailored to each experiment with options such as: small transverse beam size (<10 um), short bunch length (<100 fsec) and, combined short and small bunch options. This report gives a detailed overview of the ATFII capabilities and beamlines configuration.

  1. BNL ATF II beamlines design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedurin, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Jing, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stratakis, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Swinson, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is currently undergoing a major upgrade (ATF-II). Together with a new location and much improved facilities, the ATF will see an upgrade in its major capabilities: electron beam energy and quality and CO2 laser power. The electron beam energy will be increased in stages, first to 100-150 MeV followed by a further increase to 500 MeV. Combined with the planned increase in CO2 laser power (from 1-100 TW), the ATF-II will be a powerful tool for Advanced Accelerator research. A high-brightness electron beam, produced by a photocathode gun, will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. Besides the energy range (up to a possible 500 MeV in the final stage) the electron beam can be tailored to each experiment with options such as: small transverse beam size (<10 um), short bunch length (<100 fsec) and, combined short and small bunch options. This report gives a detailed overview of the ATFII capabilities and beamlines configuration.

  2. BWR stability analyses at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The March 9, 1988 instability at the LaSalle County-2 boiling water reactor power plant at Seneca, IL was simulated with Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL's) Engineering Plant Analyzer (EPA) for the purpose of demonstrating that the EPA is suitable for simulating large-amplitude, limit-cycle power and flow oscillations. It was shown in fall of 1988, by comparing all the available plant data from the STARTREC recording system of LaSalle-2 with EPA simulation results, that the EPA reproduces the LaSalle-2 oscillations without the use of stabilizing or destabilizing model or parameter modifications. The power vs. flow map of the LaSalle-2 plant was also reproduced at five lines of constant control rod positions. The LaSalle-2 stability boundary was established with the EPA and confirmed within ±15% accuracy by comparing the EPA results with the results of the frequency domain code LAPUR of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Comparisons of EPA simulation results with plant data from three Peach Bottom stability tests show an agreement, based on mean and standard deviation, of -10±28%, -1±40% and +28±52% (low power) in the gain of the pressure to power transfer functions. This demonstrates that the time domain code HIPA in the EPA is capable of simulating instabilities

  3. Designing plants for ALARA-revelation or evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author traces the Duke Nuclear program from the late 1960s to today. He then looks at the future. The primary goal, he says, should be to continue to reduce individual exposure in order to reduce total station, industry exposure. In order to accomplish this goal in the design process, he recommends continued training of design personnel to reinforce the ALARA concepts and to provide new industry techniques and actual examples

  4. LANL Environmental ALARA Program Status Report for CY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mcnaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gillis, Jessica Mcdonnel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-29

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ensures that radiation exposures to members of the public and the environment from LANL operations, past and present, are below regulatory thresholds and are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) through compliance with DOE Order 458.1 Radiation Protection for the Public and the Environment, and LANL Policy 412 Environmental Radiation Protection. In 2007, a finding (RL.2-F-1) and observation (RL.2-0-1) in the NNSA/ LASO report, September 2007, Release of Property (Land) Containing Residual Radioactive Material Self-Assessment Report, indicated that LANL had no policy or documented process in place for the release of property containing residual radioactive material. In response, LANL developed PD410, Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental ALARA Program. The most recent version of this document became effective on September 28, 2011. The document provides program authorities, responsibilities, descriptions, processes, and thresholds for conducting qualitative and quantitative ALARA analyses for prospective and actual radiation exposures to the public and t o the environment resulting from DOE activities conducted on the LANL site.

  5. Effective use of metrics in an ALARA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALARA radiological protection programs require metrics to meet their objectives. Sources of metrics include; external dosimetry; internal dosimetry; radiological occurrences from the occurrence reporting and processing system (ORPS); and radiological incident reports (RIR). The sources themselves contain an abundance of specific ''indicators''. To choose the site-specific indicators that will be tracked and trended requires careful review. This required the end users to expend valuable time and effort to locate the data they needed. To address this problem, a central metrics database has been developed so that customers can have all their questions addressed quickly and correctly. The database was developed in the beginning to answer some of the customer's most frequently asked questions. It is now also a tool to communicate the status of the radiation protection program to facility managers. Finally it also addresses requirements contained in the Rad Con manual and the 10CFR835 implementation guides. The database uses currently available, ''user friendly'', software and contains information from RIR's, ORPS, and external dosimetry records specific to ALARA performance indicators. The database is expandable to allow new metrics input. Specific reports have been developed to assist customers in their tracking and trending of ALARA metrics

  6. ALARA approach on Qinshan unit I lower internals recovery project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qinshan unit-1 is a 300 Mwe prototype PWR. It has been successfully operating for 4 fuel cycles about 10 years. Some loose parts by the failure of the guide tube of the reactor core neutron flux measurement thimble were observed on the lower structure of Core Barrel during periodical inspection after unloading all fuel assemblies. Qinshan Nuclear Power Company selected Westinghouse Electric Company as contractor to perform the reactor core barrel recovery service after negotiated with 4 world big company. QNPC and Westinghouse worked together to approach the ALARA by increasing water shielding, adding additional steel shielding, fuel pool cleaning and using the long hand tools, remote camera system. The training, mock-up exercise, good personal behavior was greatly contributed to the ALARA approaching. The collective dose and personal exposure of this job were successful controlled by implementing the preset ALARA program. The job was done by the cost of 70 man.mSv collective dose and 3.5 mSv maximum personal exposure despite of the high dose-rate which hot spot in some place is up to several hundred Sv per hour. (author)

  7. 2013 BNL Site Environmental Report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratel, K.; Remien, J.; Pohlot, P.; Williams, J.; Green, T.; Paquette, P.; Dorsch, W.; Welty, T.; Burke, J.

    2014-10-01

    A summary of Brookhaven National Laboratory’s (BNL) Site Environmental Report, meant to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory’s environmental performance in the lab’s surrounding area during the calendar year. The review is comprised of multiple volumes relevant to environmental data/environmental management performance and groundwater status report.

  8. ALARA and reactor shutdown organization in foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To have an ALARA policy at EdF, the CEPN realized a study on unit shutdown organization and the place of radiation protection in four nuclear power plants: Ringhals (Sweden), Philippsburg (Germany), Koeberg (South Africa) and Clinton (Usa). These sites have common characteristics such strong integration of radiation protection in any phases of shutdown, a collaboration between services, a decision power given to radio protectionists and a real motivation to reduce exposure at any level of operators. Each site uses a radiological working license for intervention in controlled area. 5 refs

  9. Pacific Northwest Laboratory plan to maintain radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the radiation safety program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The practices and administrative policies of this program support the principles of ALARA (to maintain radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable). This document also describes a program to establish safety goals at PNL to help ensure that operations are conducted according to ALARA principles

  10. History and Culture of Alara--The Action Learning and Action Research Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber-Skerritt, Ortrun; Passfield, Ron

    2016-01-01

    As co-founders of the Action Learning and Action Research Association (ALARA), we tell the story of this international network organisation through our personal experience. Our history traces the evolution of ALARA from origins at the first World Congress in 1990 in Brisbane, Australia, through development over two and a half decades, to its…

  11. Experience and new developments in implementing ALARA in occupational, public and patient exposures. Summary and recommendations of the 10. european ALARA network workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 10. european ALARA network (E.A.N.) workshop took place in Prague (Czech Republic) in September 2006. This was the 10-year anniversary of the E.A.N., and unlike the previous workshops that addressed a particular ALARA topic, the aim of this workshop was to consider the implementation of the optimisation principle in all domains of activities (nuclear and conventional industry, medical sector, NORM industry). This principle is fundamental to radiation protection, and the workshop drew together key stakeholders to discuss its past, present and future status. The workshop was asked to consider the practical implementation of ALARA, and how this might be improved in the next 10 years. The objectives of the 10. E.A.N. workshop were to review the past evolution of the ALARA concept, internationally, within the Eu, and nationally, in terms of the practical impact on radiation protection; to examine the current status of the implementation of the ALARA principle; and to identify needs for future developments in the concept and implementation of optimisation. As with previous workshops, half the programme time was devoted to invited presentations, and half to working group discussions and report backs. After discussion, the output of these working groups was collated by the E.A.N. co-computers, to produce seven formal recommendations to international organizations (IAEA, International Labour Organisation, European Commission), to E.A.N. itself and to national authorities. These recommendations deal with justification of practices, holistic approach, ALARA culture, ALARA training, especially in the medical sector, ALARA focus through inspection and control, and stakeholder involvement. Individual presentations. (authors)

  12. ALARA issues arising for safety and security of radiation sources and security screening devices - Summary and recommendations of the 12. European ALARA network workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 12. European ALARA Network (EAN) workshop on 'ALARA issues arising for safety and security of radiation sources and security screening devices' took place in Vienna (Austria) in October 2009. The aim of that workshop was to consider how the implementation of ALARA3, in terms of planned and emergency situations, involving worker and public doses, is affected by the introduction of security-related measures. In the case of new equipment and procedures, there was also the question of whether exposures arising from security screening devices can be justified and optimised. This workshop consisted of invited oral presentations, which highlighted the main issues, and half of the programme was devoted to discussions within working groups on specific topics. During their discussions, the working groups identified recommendations dealing with the following topics: the implementation of the Code of Conduct and HASS4 - ensuring ALARA; balancing security and safety - how to achieve an optimum solution; the management of an emergency exposure situation from an ALARA perspective; the justification and optimisation of the use of security devices. The objective of this paper is to present the main conclusions and recommendations produced during the workshop. Individual presentations (papers and slides) as well as the reports from the working groups are available to download on the EAN web site (http://www.eu-alara.net). (authors)

  13. BNL ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN TRIENNIAL UPDATE, JANUARY 2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2003-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multi-program national laboratory operated by Brookhaven Science Associates for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and is located on a 5,265-acre site in Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. BNL has a comprehensive Environmental Management System (EMS) in place, which meets the requirements of the International Organization for Standardization 14001 EMS Standard, as described in the BNL EMS Manual. BNL's extensive environmental monitoring program is one component of the EMS, and the BNL Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) describes this program in detail. The data derived from systematically monitoring the various environmental media on site enable BNL to make informed decisions concerning the protection of human health and the environment and to be responsive to community concerns.

  14. BNL Building 650 lead decontamination and treatment feasibility study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead has been used extensively at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for radiation shielding in numerous reactor, accelerator and other research programs. A large inventory of excess lead (estimated at 410,000 kg) in many shapes and sizes is currently being stored. Due to it's toxicity, lead and soluble lead compounds are considered hazardous waste by the Environmental Protection Agency. Through use at BNL, some of the lead has become radioactive, either by contamination of the surface or through activation by neutrons or deuterons. This study was conducted at BNL's Environmental and Waste Technology Center for the BNL Safety and Environmental Protection Division to evaluate feasibility of various treatment options for excess lead currently being stored. The objectives of this effort included investigating potential treatment methods by conducting a review of the literature, developing a means of screening lead waste to determine the radioactive characteristics, examining the feasibility of chemical and physical decontamination technologies, and demonstrating BNL polyethylene macro-encapsulation as a means of treating hazardous or mixed waste lead for disposal. A review and evaluation of the literature indicated that a number of physical and chemical methods are available for decontamination of lead. Many of these techniques have been applied for this purpose with varying degrees of success. Methods that apply mechanical techniques are more appropriate for lead bricks and sheet which contain large smooth surfaces amenable to physical abrasion. Lead wool, turnings, and small irregularly shaped pieces would be treated more effectively by chemical decontamination techniques. Either dry abrasion or wet chemical methods result in production of a secondary mixed waste stream that requires treatment prior to disposal

  15. BNL Building 650 lead decontamination and treatment feasibility study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalb, P.D.; Cowgill, M.G.; Milian, L.W. [and others

    1995-10-01

    Lead has been used extensively at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for radiation shielding in numerous reactor, accelerator and other research programs. A large inventory of excess lead (estimated at 410,000 kg) in many shapes and sizes is currently being stored. Due to it`s toxicity, lead and soluble lead compounds are considered hazardous waste by the Environmental Protection Agency. Through use at BNL, some of the lead has become radioactive, either by contamination of the surface or through activation by neutrons or deuterons. This study was conducted at BNL`s Environmental and Waste Technology Center for the BNL Safety and Environmental Protection Division to evaluate feasibility of various treatment options for excess lead currently being stored. The objectives of this effort included investigating potential treatment methods by conducting a review of the literature, developing a means of screening lead waste to determine the radioactive characteristics, examining the feasibility of chemical and physical decontamination technologies, and demonstrating BNL polyethylene macro-encapsulation as a means of treating hazardous or mixed waste lead for disposal. A review and evaluation of the literature indicated that a number of physical and chemical methods are available for decontamination of lead. Many of these techniques have been applied for this purpose with varying degrees of success. Methods that apply mechanical techniques are more appropriate for lead bricks and sheet which contain large smooth surfaces amenable to physical abrasion. Lead wool, turnings, and small irregularly shaped pieces would be treated more effectively by chemical decontamination techniques. Either dry abrasion or wet chemical methods result in production of a secondary mixed waste stream that requires treatment prior to disposal.

  16. ALARA studies on spent fuel and waste casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, S.H.

    1980-04-01

    In this report, some implications of applying the ALARA concept to cask designs for transporting spent fuel, high-level commercial and defense waste, and remote-handled transuranic waste are investigated. The XSDRNPM, one-dimensional radiation transport code, was used to obtain potential shield designs that would yield total dose rates at 1.8 m from the cask surface of 10, 5, and 2 mrem/h. Gamma shields of depleted uranium, lead, and steel were studied. The capacity of the casks was assumed to be 1, 4, or 7 elements or canisters, and the wastes were 1, 3, 5, and 10 years old. Depending on the dose rate, the cask empty weights and lifetime transportation costs were estimated.

  17. ALARA studies on spent fuel and waste casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, some implications of applying the ALARA concept to cask designs for transporting spent fuel, high-level commercial and defense waste, and remote-handled transuranic waste are investigated. The XSDRNPM, one-dimensional radiation transport code, was used to obtain potential shield designs that would yield total dose rates at 1.8 m from the cask surface of 10, 5, and 2 mrem/h. Gamma shields of depleted uranium, lead, and steel were studied. The capacity of the casks was assumed to be 1, 4, or 7 elements or canisters, and the wastes were 1, 3, 5, and 10 years old. Depending on the dose rate, the cask empty weights and lifetime transportation costs were estimated

  18. Application of ALARA principles to shipment of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The public exposure from spent fuel shipment is very low. In view of this low exposure and the perfect safety record for spent fuel shipment, existing systems can be considered satisfactory. On the other hand, occupational exposure reduction merits consideration and technology improvement to decrease dose should concentrate on this exposure. Practices that affect the age of spent fuel in shipment and the number of times the fuel must be shipped prior to disposal have the largest impact. A policy to encourage a 5-year spent fuel cooling period prior to shipment coupled with appropriate cask redesign to accommodate larger loads would be consistent with ALARA and economic principles. And finally, bypassing high population density areas will not in general reduce shipment dose

  19. The ALARA project of the EDF nuclear park exploitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To bring the exploitation of the nuclear park of EDF at the level of the best exploiters in the world in matter of collective and individual dosimetry, the ALARA principle coordinates numerous actions: to associate the temporary societies, to define common language, methods and tools for the whole park to organize a level effect in this area, to optimize the maintenance that is expansive in radiation doses, to make the different levels of management responsible on dosimetric stakes, to reduce the singular sources of exposure, to assure the organisation and exploitation of the experience back in this field and adapt consequently the system of information. The results are cheerful and the objectives for 2000 are: less than 1.2 h.Sv by year and by reactor, no intervener whom annual radiation dose is upper than 20 mSv (out of exceptional case). (N.C.)

  20. Experience of occupational dose ALARA through work management in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occupational dose to radiation workers in nuclear power plants depends on not only plant-specific factors such as design features, materials, water chemistry and other factors related to dose rates but also work management particles. The long-term experience in the nuclear power industry has showed that the work management can be applied for the simultaneous achievement of two conflicting goals for cost saving and occupational dose reduction. KEPCO has been trying to fulfill these two goals through work management since early 1990s, and achieved great success in the occupational dose reduction. In this paper, the work management policy of KEPCO has been briefly described. Work management experiences for steam generator replacement job of Kori 1, RTD bypass line removal job of Kori 3 and 4, and some other important jobs presented in the ALARA workshop held in 1999 were summarized. Then the lessons learned from the experiences were discussed. (author). 9 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig

  1. Application of the ALARA process in the regulation of nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the historical and conceptual basis of the ALARA process has been reviewed. The application solely of a prescriptive approach, particularly a rigorous quantitative approach to the decision-making process, has been questioned. While the Committees recognize the value of quantitative techniques they strongly emphasize that application of the ALARA concept is a much broader process for the determination of acceptable levels of protection. An ALARA process should take into account social and economic factors that are not quantifiable and involve representation of all those having a legitimate interest in the results of the process

  2. Digital Dosemeter 'ALARA OD 2 - ORT' Monitoring Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: New Croatian radiation protection law regulations are based, among other positive principles, on the principle of establishing the controlled area in which the workers undergo legal and obligatory external occupational dosimetry monitoring. Outside the area the 1 mSv/year level of exposure is not to be exceeded by the operating radiation source. 'ORT' is the common name for the above mentioned 'outside area' which is to be monitored. The new digital dosimeter device ALARA OD, produced by ALARA Instruments Ltd. has the probe sensitive to the background radiation and fast enough to record any change in normal environmental-background radiation field. If user or dosimeter device enter the higher radiation field area or radiation source produces higher radiation output, second mode will separately start to measure the dose which is at least two times higher than the background at the spot. This methodology of measurement was performed one year long with the set of 60 devices on more than 35 X-ray units used for the civil baggage control on the airports and else. The dosimeter device was a part of whole x-ray system, meaning that one device was always on the spot which was recommended from the manufacturer as a spot with highest external exposure possibilities if any at all. Devices integrated the radiation for the whole year (battery cap. 5 years) and the net result is that there is no need for obligatory dosimetry monitoring of the workers and other stuff working with or near such X-ray units because the integrated dose while X-ray units working on the full load did not exceed the 1 mSv/year level. (author)

  3. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in a continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This volume 8 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected form proceedings of technical meetings and conference journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to the many aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges form use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 8 contains 232 abstracts, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 8. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes

  4. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaurin, D.G.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-07-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This is volume 7 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from use of robotics to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 7 contains 293 abstract, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 7. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  5. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This is volume 7 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from use of robotics to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 7 contains 293 abstract, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 7. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes

  6. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, S.G.; Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in a continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This volume 8 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected form proceedings of technical meetings and conference journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to the many aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges form use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 8 contains 232 abstracts, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 8. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  7. BNl 703 MHz superconducting RF cavity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BNL 5-cell, 703 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity has been installed in the high-current ERL experiment. This experiment will function as a proving ground for the development of high-current machines in general and is particularly targeted at beam development for an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). The cavity performed well in vertical tests, demonstrating gradients of 20 MV/m and a Q0 of 1e10. Here we will present its performance in the horizontal tests, and discuss technical issues involved in its implementation in the ERL.

  8. OPERATIONS ELECTRONIC LOGBOOK EXPERIENCE AT BNL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SATOGATA,T.; CAMPBELL,I.; MARR,G.; SAMPSON,P.

    2002-06-02

    A web-based system for electronic logbooks, ''elog'', developed at Fermilab (FNAL), has been adopted for use by AGS and RHIC operations and physicists at BNL for the 2001-2 fixed target and collider runs. This paper describes the main functional and technical issues encountered in the first year of electronic logbook use, including security, search and indexing, sequencer integration, archival, and graphics management. We also comment on organizational experience and planned changes for the next facility run starting in September 2002.

  9. Determining the open-quotes Rclose quotes in ALARA: A parametric study to establish cleanup criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the use of a tool for establishing criteria for cleanup of low-level radioactive contamination that will result in cost-effective remedial action. Central to this tool is the application of the principles of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable). ALARA goals are driven by a desire to remediate a site to meet the strictest criteria practicable; to meet economic requirements, waste volumes must be minimized. The result of using this tool is the development of a remedial action program that satisfies ALARA requirements while limiting health and environmental risks to acceptable levels. Topics discussed in depth include the ALARA process, its principles, and its application to remedial action programs. The paper concludes with a case study in which the tool is applied to establishing cleanup criteria for the Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

  10. ALARA Review for the Sediment Relocation and Removal from the 105-N Fuel Storage Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This as low as reasonable achievable (ALARA) review revision provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used to manage personnel exposure, control contamination levels, and airborne radioactivity concentrations during sediment relocation and removal in the 105-N Fuel Storage Basin. This document updates and supercedes the ALARA review of the sediment-related activities contained in 100-N Basin Stabilization Project As Low As Reasonably Achievable Plan (BHI 1995)

  11. Proposal of organisation and ALARA procedures for maintenance site: application to replacement of steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report proposes generic organization and ALARA procedures for preparing a maintenance site at a NPP. After a short description of the ALARA principle, it describes the proposition for French sites. They are grouped according to the following: motivation, organisation, means. They are illustrated by the example of steam generator replacement. Three special points concerning preparation of the site are developed: education; training of operators; review of the project

  12. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An engineering plant analyzer has been developed at BNL for realistically and accurately simulating transients and severe abnormal events in BWR power plants. Simulations are being carried out routinely with high fidelity, high simulation speed, at low cost and with unsurpassed user convenience. The BNL Plant Analyzer is the only operating facility which (a) simulates more than two orders-of-magnitude faster than the CDC-7600 mainframe computer, (b) is accessible and fully operational in on-line interactive mode, remotely from anywhere in the US, from Europe or the Far East (Korea), via widely available IBM-PC compatible personal computers, standard modems and telephone lines, (c) simulates both slow and rapid transients seven times faster than real-time speed in direct access, and four times faster in remote access modes, (d) achieves high simulation speed without compromising fidelity, and (e) is available to remote access users at the low cost of $160 per hour. The accomplishment of detailed and accurate simulations in complex power plants at high speed and low cost are due chiefly to two reasons. The first reason is the application of five distinct modeling principles [2] which are not employed in any other simulation code. The second, and even more important reason is the utilization of a special-purpose peripheral computer with its 13 task-specific parallel processors

  13. Highlights from BNL and RHIC 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2016-01-01

    Highlights of news from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the period July 2014-June 2015 are presented. The news this year was mostly very positive. The major event at BNL was the startup and dedication of the new NSLS II, "the World's brightest Synchrotron Light Source". The operation of RHIC was outstanding with a polarized p+p run at $\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV with integrated luminosity that exceeded the sum of all previous p+p integrated luminosity at this $\\sqrt{s}$. For the first time at RHIC asymmetric p+Au and p+Al runs were made but the p+Al run caused damage in the PHENIX forward detectors from quenches that were inadequately shielded for this first p+A run. This was also the 10th anniversary of the 2005 announcement of the Perfect Liquid Quark Gluon Plasma at RHIC and a review is presented of the discoveries leading to this claim. A new result on net-charge fluctuations (with no particle identification) from PHENIX based on previous scans ov...

  14. Latest Results from BNL and RHIC--2013

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2015-01-01

    A selection of results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) from 2012 to 2013 is presented together with a few newsworthy developments in this period. The move of the g-2 magnet from BNL to Fermilab for the "fifth muon g-2 experiment" inspired a brief discussion of the original g-2 experiments at CERN. Highlights of the past year include a change in the measurement of the suppression of large transverse momentum ($p_T$) particles in the Quark Gluon Plasma to a measure of the fractional shift in the observed $p_T$ spectrum from the expected A+A spectrum for independent collisions as an estimate of the energy loss in the medium. The p+Pb run at LHC in early 2013 spurred new or improved measurements in d+Au at RHIC which included the observation of elliptical flow in d+Au collisions and measurements of transverse energy ($E_T$) spectra in p-p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV nucleon-nucleon c.m. energy which demonstrated that constituent quarks are the fund...

  15. Fuel transfer system ALARA design review - Project A.15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One mission of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project is to move the SNF from the K Basins in the Hanford 100K Area to an interim dry storage at the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in the Hanford 200 East Area. The Fuel Transfer System (FTS) is a subproject that will move the SNF from the 105K East (KE) Facility to the 105K West (KW) Facility. The SNF will be treated for shipment to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) facility at the KW Basin. The SNF canisters will be loaded underwater into a Shielded Transfer Cask (STC) in the KE Basin. The fully loaded STC will be brought out of the water and placed into a Cask Transfer Overpack (CTO) by the STC Straddle Carrier. As the STC is removed from the water, it will be washed down with demineralized water by an manual rinse system. The CTO with the STC inside will be placed on a transport trailer and transferred to the KW Basin as an intra-facility transfer. The CTO will be unloaded from the shipping trailer at the KW Basin and the STC will be removed from the CTO. The STC will then be lowered into the KW Basin water and the fuel will be removed. The SNF will then be processed for shipment to the CVD. As soon as all of the fuel has been removed from the STC, the cask will be removed from the KW Basin water and placed into the CTO. The CTO will again be placed on the trailer for transport back to the KE Basin where the entire cycle will be repeated approximately 400 times. This document records the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) findings and design recommendations/requirements by the SNF Project noted during the Final Design Review of the STC, CTO, STC Transfer System, Annexes and Roadways for support of FTS. This document is structured so that all statements that include the word ''shall'' represent design features that have been or will be implemented within the project scope. Statements that include the words ''should'' or ''recommend'' represent ALARA design features to be evaluated for future implementation

  16. Ten years of ALARA experience in commercial nuclear pharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to review ten years of extremity exposure in a growing nuclear pharmacy company and determine those practices that have been most effective in keeping exposures ALARA. The focus of this study was specifically on extremity exposure since whole body exposures have not been as significant. Methods: More than 400 dispensing employees are monitored weekly for extremity exposure. Currently, these employees handle and dispense more than 9,000 Curies (333,000 GBq) of activity ready for use in nuclear medicine procedures each week. The quarterly and annual extremity exposure histories were examined and compared with the introduction of different initiatives to limit these exposures. Changes in the total activity per unit dose were considered as well as the introduction of different compounding practices during this time. An attempt was made to also determine specifically which activities contribute most to the extremity exposure of a dispenser. Procedural changes were reviewed as well as engineering controls such as new shielding materials and designs. Results: A significant conversion of cardiac doses occurred during the time period evaluated. Tc-99m heart agents became the preferred radiopharmaceutical replacing a significant portion of Tl-201 that had been used previously. Tl-201 is still used often in conjunction with a Tc-99m agent. The significance of the switch is the high percentage of dispensed doses for cardiac studies and the higher activities of the Tc-99m agents. A combination of procedural changes and engineering controls (primarily tungsten shielding devices) have been effective in preventing the extremity exposure increase one might expect based on higher activities dispensed per unit dose and the higher energy of Tc-99m compared to Tl-201. One procedural change, the mandatory use of tongs for handling unshielded syringes of radiopharmaceuticals, resulted in a 17% reduction in the average exposure to the extremities

  17. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP (VOLUME 70)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JACAK, B.; SHURYAK, E.; HALLMAN, T.; BASS, S.; DAVIDSON, R.

    2005-01-14

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was commissioned for heavy ion collisions and for polarized pp collisions in 2001. All principal components of the accelerator chain were operational by the 2003 RHIC run. Approximately 50 papers on RHIC experimental results have been published in refereed journals to date. This is a testament to the vast amount of exciting new information and the unprecedented analysis and publication rate from RHIC. A number of signals of creation of matter at extreme energy density, and of new physics in that matter, have been observed. The RHIC community has been heavily engaged in discussion about these signals, and about the appropriate level of proof for Quark Gluon Plasma discovery at the RHIC. In fact, such discussions were the subject of an earlier RBRC Workshop. One of the striking results from heavy ion collisions at RHIC is that the quark gluon plasma accessible appears to be strongly coupled. The properties of strongly coupled plasmas are of intense interest in the traditional Plasma Physics community, who have been developing tools to study such matter theoretically and experimentally. Despite the fact that one plasma interacts electromagnetically and the other through the strong interaction, there is tremendous commonality in the intellectual approach and even the theoretical and experimental tools. It is important to broaden the discussion of Quark Gluon Plasma discovery beyond possible signals of deconfinement to also encompass signals of plasma phenomena in heavy ion collisions. Thus it is imperative establish more direct contact among Nuclear, Plasma and Atomic physicists to share techniques and ideas. RHIC physicists will benefit from familiarity with typical plasma diagnostics and theoretical methods to study strongly coupled plasmas. Plasma and Atomic physicists may fmd new techniques parallel to the multi-particle correlations used in RHIC data analysis, and theoretical tools to study high energy density matter where the coupling constant is not small. The goal of this Workshop was to bring together experts at the forefront of theoretical and experimental work on strongly coupled systems in the three communities. From the variety and depth of the presentations at the workshop, we believe that we successfully fostered the exchange of information and ideas. Furthermore, many overlaps and possible exchanges of techniques were identified. Extremely interesting discussions took place, identifying possible avenues for further exchanges and interdisciplinary collaborations.

  18. Antineutron physics at BNL and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history of antineutron counter experiments below 1 GeV/c is rather short. Several measurements of the charge exchange total and differential cross-sections have been reported. In addition there have been a few low statistics attempts to measure the (anti np transmission and annihilation cross-sections. In 1981 at BNL, AGS Experiment 767 was proposed to simultaneously measure both the annihilation and the transmission cross-sections for anti np). The data were taken during the winter and spring of 1984 and very preliminary results were reported at Durham in July 1984. The results presented here represent a significantly more complete data analysis but some sources of systematic error are still under investigation, and as such only relative cross-sections will be quoted which should still be regarded as preliminary to some degree

  19. ν-oscillation experiment at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Construction of a 100 ton fiducial volume water Cherenkov test detector segmented with wave shifter bars is proposed. When completely instrumented, it will form one of two detectors needed for the possible experiments described. It will be located approx. 200 m from the ν target. Transitions between neutrino flavors are not ruled out in the current theories. Neither is the possibility that all or some neutrinos may carry some masses. So there are distinct possibilities that neutrinos may oscillate into each other. There is some experimental evidence for such oscillation but none is conclusive. The opportunities that exist at the AGS, BNL to explore this topical question are discussed. In the discussion, no attempt is made to optimize the experimental design or to take practical considerations into account. Detectors 1, 2, and 3 are defined to be approx. 100 tons, approx. 100 tons, approx. 1000 tons at approx. 100 m, approx. 200 m, approx. 1000 m from the ν target, respectively

  20. Nuclear Data Parameter Adjustment BNL-INL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation reports on the consistent adjustment of nuclear data parameters performed within a BNL-INL collaboration. The main advantage compared to the classical adjustment of multigroup constants is to provide final nuclear data constrained by the nuclear reaction theory and consistent with both differential and integral measurements. The feasibility of a single-isotope assimilation was tested on a few priority materials (23Na, 56Fe, 105Pd, 235,238U, 239Pu) using a selection of clean integral experiments. The multi-isotope assimilation is under study for the Big-3 (235,238U, 239Pu). This work shows that a consistent assimilation is feasible, but there are pitfalls to avoid (e.g. non-linearity, cross section fluctuations) and prerequisites (e.g. realistic covariances, good prior, realistic weighting of differential and integral experiments). Finally, only all experimental information combined with the state of the art modelling may provide a 'right' answer

  1. Application of the ALARA principle to the bleed condenser relief valve replacement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darlington Nuclear Generating Division's achievements in radiation dose performance can be attributed, in part, to adherence to the ALARA principle. The station's ALARA program, which is an integral part of the safety culture, derives its strength from a strong and unwavering commitment by the site Vice President. This commitment is supported by performance standards and an accountability system which holds managers and supervisors responsible for dose performance. A LAN-based hazard and dose information system with site-wide accessibility was established to facilitate work planning and exposure control. The principle of dose optimization is fully integrated into the work management process and includes work planning, progress monitoring and post-job review. An integrated performance assessment and reporting system also provides timely feedback to management on dose performance. An example of the ALARA program was the bleed condenser relieve valve replacement project. Pre-job ALARA review meetings for the project were held with supervisory staff and technicians to discuss job details and dose reduction measures. All work groups were required to prepare a detailed step be step task safety analysis (TSA). The trades and engineering staff were requested to critique the TSA and suggest ways of reducing dose. Over 30 practical ALARA suggestions were received and adopted for implementation. Daily meetings were held to review job progress and the effectiveness exposure control. A post-job ALARA review was held at the conclusion of each project to obtain feedback and lessons learned. All improvement suggestions were reviewed for implementation during subsequent installations. As a result of the ALARA initiatives, significant dose savings were achieved. The normalized dose expenditure has been reduced from 9.6 rem for the first installation to 6.9 rem for the fourth and last installation. (author)

  2. Emergency response training with the BNL plant analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented in the experience in the use of the BNL plant analyzer for NRC emergency response training to simulated accidents in a BWR. The unique features of the BNL Plant Analyzer that are important for the emergency response training are summarized. A closed-loop simulation of all the key systems of a power plant in question was found essential to the realism of the emergency drills conducted at NRC. The faster than real-time simulation speeds afforded by the BNL Plant Analyzer have demonstrated its usefulness for the timely conduct of the emergency response training

  3. Man-rem audit - a tool for exposure ALARA at Madras Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALARA - acronym for As Low As Reasonably Achievable, which means making every reasonable effort to maintain exposures to radiation as far below the dose limits as is practical. ICRP has recommended ALARA to be implemented as a formal practice into the System of Dose Limitation, which contains three parts, 1) Justification of practice 2) Optimization 3) Dose Limits. As with the human endeavor, there is always room for improvement. Keeping this in mind, ALARA program is being practiced in our Nuclear Power Plants over the years. There has been a gradual reduction of collective dose in our Nuclear Power Plants due to successful implementation of the ALARA programs. This was possible due to the rigorous application of O and M experience, feedback and active participation of workforce towards ALARA. Furthermore, ALARA is an ongoing continual improvement programme towards collective dose reduction and has enough scope for improvement at any point of time. In order to substantiate the gains of ALARA programme and to improve it further, first time Mam-rem Audit was conducted at MAPS during the month of Sep-Oct 2010. This paper gives the brief outline about the method man-rem audit, its findings, corrective action implementation and the benefits derived from it. Man-rem audit similar to financial audit, serves as a tool for finding out grey areas where improvements is required so that station collective dose can be further optimized. It is one of the identified missions to achieve excellence in area of reducing station collective dose, unplanned exposures and RPP deviation. The scope of this audit is to bring further improvements in the reduction in station collective dose, create more awareness among the employees about ALARA principles and seek valuable suggestions for improvements. Audit team consisting of senior HP persons had one to one interaction with the individuals of the respective section in the field and tried to gather the information from the individual and

  4. Department of Energy ALARA implementation guide. Response to the Health Physics Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the August 1993 Health Physics Society (HPS) newsletter, the HPS Scientific and Public Issues Committee published a Position Statement entitled open-quotes Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment.close quotes. In this article, this HPS committee made the statement that they were deeply concerned by the trend for agencies to incorporate the ALARA concept as a regulatory requirements, without providing specific guidance as to what it means and how to implement it consistently. The HPS position paper was in response to the DOE notice on proposed rulemaking for Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 834, open-quotes Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environmentclose quotes (10 CFR 834). In the notice of proposed rulemaking for 10 CFR 834, the Department of Energy (DOE) defined ALARA as follows: open-quotes As used in this part, ALARA is not a dose limit, but rather a process which has the objective of attaining doses as far below the applicable limit of this part as is reasonably achievableclose quotes (10 CFR 834.2, p. 16283 of the Federal Register). The HPS position paper continues, open-quotes The section goes on to elaborate on what is meant by a process without providing sufficient guidance to assure uniform applicability of the process.close quotes. Although this concern is directed towards the ALARA process as it relates to the environment, the Office of Health, which is responsible for occupational workers, shares the same definition for ALARA

  5. Digital Dosemeters - 'ALARA OD' - Personal and Environmental Monitoring Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The importance of prompt dose reporting rises when dose is received within short-time interval or when the radiation source suffers technical failures. New dosimetry concept, where radiation exposure is recognized as a private /or/ group hazard of each person involved in occupational ionizing sources handling, taking into account actual radiation quality of the source, based among other principles, on the principle of establishing the well defined controlled area is introduced. New digital dosemeter device, produced by ALARA Instruments Ltd., measures small occupational doses, including the background. Device is based on ionizing GM tube, a set of modern EEPROM memory chips and Li compound battery set. It operates in two modes and the measurements are continuously performed no matter which mode is on. First mode integrates the dose (including background). If user or dosemeter device enter the higher radiation field area second mode will separately start to measure the dose which is at least two times higher than the surrounding background. The level above which the higher field is considered has to be preprogrammed during the calibration of device. Level depends on the workplace type /or/ environmental conditions where the device will be used. Device is suitable as well for the low level measurements and for the high radiation outputs. When used in the stronger fields, several devices can form a field monitoring system. Device is suitable for the various non-occupational purposes. With some telecommunication electronics and technical improvement, this device is usable as a point (Ort) environmental measuring station. Probe is sensitive to the background radiation and it is fast enough to record any change in normal environmental radiation field, send the data to the central station and raise alarm if necessary. We have built a prototype for environmental monitoring connectable to any kind of telecommunication net. (author)

  6. ALARA and decommissioning: The Fort St. Vrain experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station, the first and only commercial High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor to operate in the United States, completed initial fuel loading in late 1973 and initial startup in early 1974. Due to a series of non-nuclear technical problems, Fort St. Vrain never operated consistently, attaining a lifetime capacity factor of slightly less than 15%. In August of 1989, the decision was made to permanently shut down the plant due to control rod drive and steam generator ring header failures. Public Service Company of Colorado elected to proceed with early dismantlement (DECON) as opposed to SAFSTOR on the bases of perceived societal benefits, rad waste, and exposure considerations, regulatory uncertainties associated with SAFSTOR, and cost. The decommissioning of Fort St. Vrain began in August of 1992, and is scheduled to be completed in early 1996. Decommissioning is being conducted by a team consisting of Westinghouse, MK-Ferguson, and Scientific Ecology Group. Public Service Company of Colorado as the licensee provides contract management and oversight of contractor functions. An aggressive program to maintain project radiation exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) has been established, with the following program elements: temporary and permanent shielding contamination control; mockup training; engineering controls; worker awareness; integrated work package reviews communication; special instrumentation; video camera usage; robotics application; and project committees. To date, worker exposures have been less than project estimates. from the start of the project through Februrary of 1994, total exposure has been 98.666 person-rem, compared to the project estimate of 433 person-rem and goal of 347 person-rem. The presentation will discuss the site characterization efforts, the radiological performance indicator program, and the final site release survey plans

  7. Experimental results from the BNL zero power reactor HITREX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitching, S.J.; Lewis, T.A.; Playle, T.S.

    1973-10-15

    This report presents experimental results obtained with the BNL reactor Hitrex. Measurements of reactivity, and of thermal and fast neutron reaction rate distributions have been made with various experimental control rod configurations.

  8. Radionuclide production and radiopharmaceutical chemistry with BNL cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) radiopharmaceutical chemistry program focuses on production and utilization of radionuclides having a half-life of > 2 hr. However, a major portion of the BNL program is devoted to short-lived radionuclides, such as 11C and 18F. Activities encompassed in the program are classified into seven areas: cyclotron parameters, radiochemistry, design and rapid synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals and labeled compounds, radiotracer evaluation in animals, studies in humans, technology transfer, and several other areas

  9. Methodology for making environmental as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overall evaluation concept for use in making differential cost-benefit analyses in environmental as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) determinations is being implemented by Rockwell Hanford Operations. This evaluation includes consideration of seven categories: (1) capital costs; (2) operating costs; (3) state of the art; (4) safety; (5) accident or upset consequences; (6) reliability, operability, and maintainability; and (7) decommissionability. Appropriate weighting factors for each of these categories are under development so that ALARA determinations can be made by comparing scores of alternative proposals for facility design, operations, and upgrade. This method of evaluation circumvents the traditional basis of a stated monetary sum per person-rem of dose commitment. This alternative was generated by advice from legal counsel who advised against formally pursuing this avenue of approach to ALARA for environmental and occupational dose commitments

  10. Five-Year ALARA Review of Dosimetry Results 1 January 2010 through 31 December 2014.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, Luke R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A review of dosimetry results from 1 January 2010 through 31 December 2014 was conducted to demonstrate that radiation protection methods used are compliant with regulatory limits and conform to the philosophy to keep exposures to radiation As Low As is Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). This included a review and evaluation of personnel dosimetry (external and internal) results at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico as well as at Sandia National Laboratories, California. Additionally, results of environmental monitoring efforts at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico were reviewed. ALARA is a philosophical approach to radiation protection by managing and controlling radiation exposures (individual and collective) to the work force and to the general public to levels that are As Low As is Reasonably Achievable taking social, technical, economic, practical, and public policy considerations into account. ALARA is not a dose limit but a process which has the objective of attaining doses as far below applicable dose limits As Low As is Reasonably Achievable.

  11. Five-Year ALARA Review of Dosimetry Results 1 January 2009 through 31 December 2013.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, Luke R

    2014-08-01

    A review of dosimetry results from 1 January 2009 through 31 December 2013 was conducted to demonstrate that radiation protection methods used are compliant with regulatory limits and conform to the ALARA philosophy. This included a review and evaluation of personnel dosimetry (external and internal) results at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico as well as at Sandia National Laboratories, California. Additionally, results of environmental monitoring efforts at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico were reviewed. ALARA is a philosophical approach to radiation protection by managing and controlling radiation exposures (individual and collective) to the work force and to the general public to levels that are As Low As is Reasonably Achievable taking social, technical, economic, practical, and public policy considerations into account. ALARA is not a dose limit but a process which has the objective of attaining doses as far below applicable dose limits As Low As is Reasonably Achievable.

  12. ALARA Design Review for the Resumption of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Cementation Process Project Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Dayley, L

    2000-01-01

    The requirements for the performance of radiological design reviews are codified in 10CFR835, Occupational Radiation Protection. The basic requirements for the performance of ALARA design reviews are presented in the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM). The HSRCM has established trigger levels requiring radiological reviews of non-routine or complex work activities. These requirements are implemented in site procedures HNF-PRO-1622 and 1623. HNF-PRO-1622 Radiological Design Review Process requires that ''radiological design reviews [be performed] of new facilities and equipment and modifications of existing facilities and equipment''. In addition, HNF-PRO-1623 Radiological Work Planning Process requires a formal ALARA Review for planned activities that are estimated to exceed 1 person-rem total Dose Equivalent (DE). The purpose of this review is to validate that the original design for the PFP Cementation Process ensures that the principles of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) were included...

  13. Development of a general framework for the practical implementation of ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of optimization of protection of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) had its roots in the realization that radiation damage is not solely a threshold phenomenon, so a system of protection could not rely solely on limits. It was originally a qualitative idea that you did what was reasonable to reduce doses in the region below the limits. In Publication 26 of the ICRP the recommendation was in terms of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable). It seems that there are still a number of problem areas and misconceptions about the practical implementation of ALARA, particularly the relationship between the ALARA requirement, decision-aiding techniques and decisions. The development of a general methodological framework for ALARA studies is primary objective of a joint project between the United Kingdom National Radiological Protection Board and the French Centre d'etude sur l'evaluation de la protection dans le domaine nucleaire, sponsored by the Biology and Health Protection programme of the Commission of the European Communities. Following a review of the underlying concepts, the paper outlines progress made on the general framework in a step-by-step guide to performing ALARA studies. The framework covers the initial structuring of the radiological protection problem; the identification of alternative protection options; the selection and quantification of relevant factors for each option; the use of decision-aiding techniques incorporating judgements on the relative weight assigned to these factors; and subsequent sensitivity analyses. This framework provides a method for carrying out ALARA studies to form a structured input to decisions involving non-radiological aspects. Each stage is described, highlighting problem areas where detailed technical guidance or value judgements are required. (author)

  14. ALARA radiation protection applications at NPP A1 decommissioning using VISPLAN planning tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SCK.CEN developed during the BR3 reactor decommissioning a graphical interfaced 3D dose assessment tool aimed at the above mentioned dose optimization problems. The tool was improved further and commercialized under the name VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning tool. The use of VISIPLAN tool at NPP A1 decommissioning was advised by EDF within the IAEA TCP SLR/4008 project missions as a component of a 3D technological chain ensuring acquisition and evaluation of digitized information leading to ALARA optimisation of the developed decommissioning working procedures (see Fig. 1). VISIPLAN license was purchased by IAEA and granted to VUJE and NPP A1 within the IAEA TCP project SLR/4008, covering also the necessary basic and advanced training (at NPP A1 real decommissioning environment), and is currently used by VUJE analysts at NPP A1 decommissioning as an ALARA tool for intervention planning and optimisation. The VISIPLAN allows a fast dose assessment for work planned in a radioactive environment. The calculations are based on a 3D model of the work place. This PC-based tool is user friendly and calculates a detailed dose account for different work scenarios defined by the ALARA analyst, taking into account worker position, work duration and subsequent geometry and source distribution changes. The VISIPLAN methodology is described. The VISIPLAN tool was applied to several ALARA studies carried out by the VUJE within development and analysis of various Work Programs for NPP Al decommissioning tasks. The applications ranged from simpler to complex ALARA planning tasks covering simple shielding applications to selection of the most suitable order of complex working procedures. Removal of inner liners from underground reservoirs 6/1 and 6/2 as well as Dismantling of pipes and components from a (hostile) 60 m corridor are described. (authors)

  15. BNL-NYSERNet ATM project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Connor, M.; Peskin, A.; Rabinowitz, G. [and others

    1997-07-01

    In 1994, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and NYSERNet, Incorporated embarked on a joint project to develop a prototype Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Regional Network testbed. This project was funded as a three-year effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Activity (CRADA) agreement between the parties, with half the funds being provided directly by the U.S. Department of Energy and the remainder as an in-kind contribution by NYSERNet. This report documents that effort as it comes to a close, providing an account of the original goals, the accomplishments of the projects, and the results as they might apply to the future. It is useful to remember that, when the collaboration discussions first began in 1993, it was far from certain that ATM would be the technology of choice for the then-next generation of the Internet. That, of course, has turned out to be the case, which in retrospect makes this experience particularly valuable. The investigators were not totally prescient, however, and the project changed during its duration to account for changes in technology, available infrastructure, and other circumstances.

  16. The new BNL partial wave analysis programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiment E852 at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a meson spectroscopy experiment which took data at the Multi-Particle Spectrometer facility of the Alternating Gradient Syncrotron. Upgrades to the spectrometer's data acquisition and trigger electronics allowed over 900 million data events, of numerous topologies, to be recorded to tape in 1995 running alone. One of the primary goals of E852 is identification of states beyond the quark model, i.e., states with gluonic degrees of freedom. Identification of such states involves the measurement of a systems spin-parity. Such a measurement is usually done using Partial Wave Analysis. Programs to perform such analyses exist, in fact, one was written at BNL and used in previous experiments by some of this group. This program, however, was optimized for a particular final state, and modification to allow analysis of the broad range of final states in E852 would have been difficult. The authors therefore decided to write a new program, with an eye towards generality that would allow analysis of a large class of reactions

  17. Review: BNL graphite blanket design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) minimum activity graphite blanket designs is made. Three designs are identified and discussed in the context of an experimental power reactor (EPR) and commercial power reactor. Basically, the three designs employ a thick graphite screen (typically 30 cm or greater, depending on type as well as application-experimental power reactor or commercial reactor). Bremsstrahlung energy is deposited on the graphite surface and re-radiated away as thermal radiation. Fast neutrons are slowed down in the graphite, depositing most of their energy. This energy is then either radiated to a secondary blanket with coolant tubes, as in types A and B, or is removed by intermittent direct gas cooling (type C). In types A and B, radiation damage to the structural material of the coolant tubes in the secondary blanket is reduced by one or two orders of magnitude by the graphite screen, while in type C, the blanket is only cooled when the reactor is shut down, so that coolant cannot quench the plasma, whatever the degree of radiation damage

  18. Highlights from BNL and RHIC 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2015-01-01

    Highlights of news from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the period July 2013-June 2014 are presented. It was a busy year for news, most notably a U. S. Government shutdown for 16 days beginning October 1, 2013 due to the lack of an approved budget for FY2014. Even with this unusual government activity, the $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV Au+Au Run14 at RHIC was the best ever with integrated luminosity exceeding the sum of all previous runs. Additionally there was a brief He$^3$+Au run to continue the study of collective flow in small systems which was reinforced by new results presented on identified particle flow in d+Au. The other scientific highlights are also mostly concerned with ``soft (low $p_T$)'' physics complemented by the first preliminary results of reconstructed jets from hard-scattered partons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC . The measurements of transverse energy ($E_T$) spectra in p-p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions, which demonstrated last ye...

  19. Performances of BNL high-intensity synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AGS proton synchrotron was completed in 1960 with initial intensity in the 10 to the 10th power proton per pulse (ppp) range. Over the years, through many upgrades and improvements, the AGS now reached an intensity record of 6.3 x 1013 ppp, the highest world intensity record for a proton synchrotron on a single pulse basis. At the same time, the Booster reached 2.2 x 1013 ppp surpassing the design goal of 1.5 x 1013 ppp due to the introduction of second harmonic cavity during injection. The intensity limitation caused by space charge tune spread and its relationship to injection energy at 50 MeV, 200 MeV, and 1,500 MeV will be presented as well as many critical accelerator manipulations. BNL currently participates in the design of an accumulator ring for the SNS project at Oak Ridge. The status on the issues of halo formation, beam losses and collimation are also presented

  20. Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on the implementation of ALARA at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the papers presented and the discussions that took place at the Third International Workshop on ALARA Implementation at Nuclear Power Plants, held in Hauppauge, Long Island, New York from May 8--11, 1994. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together scientists, engineers, health physicists, regulators, managers and other persons who are involved with occupational dose control and ALARA issues. The countries represented were: Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, Mexico, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. The workshop was organized into twelve sessions and three panel discussions. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  1. Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on the implementation of ALARA at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Roecklein, A.K. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications

    1995-03-01

    This report contains the papers presented and the discussions that took place at the Third International Workshop on ALARA Implementation at Nuclear Power Plants, held in Hauppauge, Long Island, New York from May 8--11, 1994. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together scientists, engineers, health physicists, regulators, managers and other persons who are involved with occupational dose control and ALARA issues. The countries represented were: Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, Mexico, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. The workshop was organized into twelve sessions and three panel discussions. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  2. Dose assessment and dose optimisation in decommissioning using the VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimisation of radiological protection of the workers in nuclear industry is an important part of the safety culture especially in the field of decommissioning where we are confronted with a radioactive environment that is in the process of constant change. The application of the ALARA concept (to keep exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable) is not always straightforward in such cases. A good ALARA pre-job study must be performed and should contain predicted doses in the work area and investigate the effects of geometry, material, source or work position changes. This information provides a quantitative basis to select between various alternative work scenario's for a specific operation. In order to handle this information SCK-CEN developed the VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning tool. This PC-based tool makes it possible to create and edit work scenarios taking into account worker positions and subsequent geometry and source distribution changes in a 3D environment. The presentation will show the current status of the tool and its application to the decommissioning of the BR3 reactor and other installations. New developments will also be presented regarding the geometric and radioactive characterisation of a decommissioning site. The use of human motion simulation tools in ALARA assessment will also be discussed. This will show how new developments of software and measurement tools can help dealing with the new challenges of decommissioning in the field of dose optimization. (authors)

  3. Radiation protection-culture. Culture improvement in radiation protection and ALARA behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to that the optimization principle become an actual professional liable dynamical critter in the radiological protection topics, the hierarchic impulse and the personnel sensitiveness are determining. The ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) in the firm cultivation modify the behaviour and act philosophy. 7 refs., 2 figs

  4. Health physics manual of good practices for reducing radiation exposure to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A primary objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) health physics and radiation protection program has been to limit radiation exposures to those levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). As a result, the ALARA concept developed into a program and a set of operational principles to ensure that the objective was consistently met. Implementation of these principles required that a guide be produced. The original ALARA guide was issued by DOE in 1980 to promote improved understanding of ALARA concepts within the DOE community and to assist those responsible for operational ALARA activities in attaining their goals. Since 1980, additional guidance has been published by national and international organizations to provide further definition and clarification to ALARA concepts. As basic ALARA experience increased, the value and role of the original guide prompted the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) to support a current revision. The revised manual of good practices includes six sections: 1.0 Introduction, 2.0 Administration, 3.0 Optimization, 4.0 Setting and Evaluating ALARA Goals, 5.0 Radiological Design, and 6.0 Conduct of Operations. The manual is directed primarily to contractor and DOE staff who are responsible for conduct and overview of radiation protection and ALARA programs at DOE facilities. The intent is to provide sufficient guidance such that the manual, if followed, will ensure that radiation exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable and will establish the basis for a formally structured and auditable program. 118 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Health physics manual of good practices for reducing radiation exposure to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrington, W.N.; Higby, D.P.; Kathren,., R.L.; Merwin, S.E.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1988-06-01

    A primary objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) health physics and radiation protection program has been to limit radiation exposures to those levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). As a result, the ALARA concept developed into a program and a set of operational principles to ensure that the objective was consistently met. Implementation of these principles required that a guide be produced. The original ALARA guide was issued by DOE in 1980 to promote improved understanding of ALARA concepts within the DOE community and to assist those responsible for operational ALARA activities in attaining their goals. Since 1980, additional guidance has been published by national and international organizations to provide further definition and clarification to ALARA concepts. As basic ALARA experience increased, the value and role of the original guide prompted the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) to support a current revision. The revised manual of good practices includes six sections: 1.0 Introduction, 2.0 Administration, 3.0 Optimization, 4.0 Setting and Evaluating ALARA Goals, 5.0 Radiological Design, and 6.0 Conduct of Operations. The manual is directed primarily to contractor and DOE staff who are responsible for conduct and overview of radiation protection and ALARA programs at DOE facilities. The intent is to provide sufficient guidance such that the manual, if followed, will ensure that radiation exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable and will establish the basis for a formally structured and auditable program. 118 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Independent code assessment at BNL in FY 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Independent assessment of the advanced codes such as TRAC and RELAP5 has continued at BNL through the Fiscal Year 1982. The simulation tests can be grouped into the following five categories: critical flow, counter-current flow limiting (CCFL) or flooding, level swell, steam generator thermal performance, and natural circulation. TRAC-PF1 (Version 7.0) and RELAP5/MOD1 (Cycle 14) codes were assessed by simulating all of the above experiments, whereas the TRAC-BD1 (Version 12.0) code was applied only to the CCFL tests. Results and conclusions of the BNL code assessment activity of FY 1982 are summarized below

  7. Strangelet Search at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    OpenAIRE

    Abelev, B. I.

    2008-01-01

    We have searched for strangelets in a triggered sample of 61 million central (top 4percent) Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV near beam rapidities at the STAR solenoidal tracker detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We have sensitivity to metastable strangelets with lifetimes of order >_0.1 ns, in contrast to limits over ten times longer in BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) studies and longer still at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Upper limits of a few ...

  8. BNL hypernuclear spectrometers and instrumentation present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period 1981 to 1984 the BNL hypernuclear spectrometer system was upgraded resulting in an increase in kaon flux and an increase in solid angle and momentum acceptance. The modifications require drift chambers to be operated at rates up to 107 s-1. The performance of the spectrometer-drift chamber systems will be discussed

  9. Development of an ALARA programme based on radiological measurements at a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) approach, recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the control of radiation exposures of personnel, requires assigning monetary value to the detriment implied in the radiation exposure based on social and economic consideration. It is, however, felt that the global application of such an approach could neither be practical nor be objective in view of the widely differing socio-economic conditions of various countries. In view of these difficulties, an analytical method has been developed to quantify avoidable collective external dose of the work force at a Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) type of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in implementing ALARA methodology

  10. ALARA database value in future outage work planning and dose management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALARA database encompassing job-specific duration and man-rem plant specific information over three refueling outages represents an invaluable tool for the outage work planner and ALARA engineer. This paper describes dose-management trends emerging based on analysis of three refueling outages at Clinton Power Station. Conclusions reached based on hard data available from a relational database dose-tracking system is a valuable tool for planning of future outage work. The system's ability to identify key problem areas during a refueling outage is improving as more outage comparative data becomes available. Trends over a three outage period are identified in this paper in the categories of number and type of radiation work permits implemented, duration of jobs, projected vs. actual dose rates in work areas, and accuracy of outage person-rem projection. The value of the database in projecting 1 and 5 year station person-rem estimates is discussed

  11. ALARA Review for the Decontamination, Deactivation and Housekeeping of the 233-S Viewing Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A formal as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review is required by BHI-SH-02, Vol. 1, Safety and Health Procedures, Procedure 1.22, 'Planning Radiological Work', when radiological conditions exceed trigger level. The level of contamination inside the viewing room of the 233-S Facility meets this criterion. This ALARA review is for task instructions 1997-03-18-005-8.3.1, 'Instructions for Routine Entries and Minor Maintenance Work at 233-S,' and 8.3.2, 'Instructions for Deactivation, Decon, and Housekeeping in Viewing Room.' The radiological work permit (RWP) request broke the two task instructions into nine separate tasks. The nine tasks identified in the RWP request were used to estimate airborne concentrations and the total exposure

  12. ALARA optimization at decommissioning of NPP A1, Slovak Republic, using advanced radiation protection tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning operations effect changes in the environment and lead to situations where occupational doses strongly depend on space distribution of dose rates (DR) and time duration of critical activities. In such cases one needs an adequate geometrical and source model that allows the user to calculate the DR dose exposures. In the end a comparison of doses for alternative sets of work trajectories can lead to the selection of the most adequate scenario with minimised dose burden to the workers. The use of laser scanning with respective as-built 3D modeling software, gamma imagery of the dominant sources and application of 3D ALARA planning tool, VISIPLAN, for the above mentioned purposes was the solution advised by EDF, the technical advisor within the IAEA TCP SLR/4008 project. The above-mentioned components were intended to create a 3D technological chain ensuring acquisition and evaluation of digitized information leading to ALARA optimisation of the decommissioning work procedures. In the case of very complex structures to be modelled for ALARA purposes, an auxiliary code, VISIMODELLER, allows the direct transfer of already existing 3D objects to VISIPLAN. This means the saving of a lot of man-power in drawing the geometry. For gamma imaging and positioning of main sources in the installation the old version gamma camera, ALADIN, owned by NPP A1 was used. Applications of radiation protection techniques at NPP A1 decommissioning project are presented in the paper. These range from simple shielding application by the 3D VISIPLAN planning tool, or creating a 3D as-built model, to ALARA applications for alternative work trajectories in complex geometrical and hostile environment with multiple sources. As examples, removal of plastic liner from large underground reservoirs and removal of contaminated pipes from a long corridor are described in more detail. (author)

  13. Current practices for maintaining occupational exposures ALARA at low-level waste disposal sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadlock, D.E.; Herrington, W.N.; Hooker, C.D.; Murphy, D.W.; Gilchrist, R.L.

    1983-12-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide technical assistance in establishing operational guidelines, with respect to radiation control programs and methods of minimizing occupational radiation exposure, at Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal sites. The PNL, through site visits, evaluated operations at LLW disposal sites to determine the adequacy of current practices in maintaining occupational exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The data sought included the specifics of: ALARA programs, training programs, external exposure control, internal exposure control, respiratory protection, surveillance, radioactive waste management, facilities and equipment, and external dose analysis. The results of the study indicated the following: The Radiation Protection and ALARA programs at the three commercial LLW disposal sites were observed to be adequate in scope and content compared to similar programs at other types of nuclear facilities. However, it should be noted that there were many areas that could be improved upon to help ensure the health and safety of occupationally exposed individuals.

  14. Application of the Alara principle to the occupationally exposed workers in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report sets down how the Alara (as low as reasonably achievable) principle is applied in radiation protection of the occupationally exposed personnel at light-water reactors in EC countries. In some instances the practices, experiences and results from EC countries are supplemented by the practice in other States (e.g. USA, Sweden). Commencing with a short summary of the legal situation in the Member States of the European Community with regard to Alara, the report describes the framework in which the optimization practice has been developed. The main chapters elaborate in detail how the Alara principle has been put into practice in design and operation in LWRs. The importance of qualification and training of power-plant personnel in relation to optimization of radiation protection is considered and some comparisons are drawn with the US practice. Recommendations are made where reason for modification or harmonization of practices is seen in the conclusions of the different chapters and the overall conclusions and summary of the report

  15. Guide to reducing radiation exposure to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is designed to provide DOE contractor personnel with general guidance regarding programs and techniques to reduce radiation exposures to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Thus it is directed towards a broad audience, and should have special relevance and interest for operating management as well as radiation protection personnel. It is well recognized that each contractor has needs specific and critical to its radiation protection program. Hence no single set of specific and detailed criteria can be set down as a prescription for achieving the ALARA goal. Rather, general guidance in the form of broad principles is given in order to acquaint management with ALARA needs and concepts. The purpose is to encourage maximum management support of the technical personnel responsible for carrying out day-to-day radiation protection activities. Although primarily written for management, this document also contains technical guidance of potential value to those directly involved in radiation protection activities. Again it should be stressed that what is provided is guidance, and is therefore not mandatory

  16. Guide to reducing radiation exposure to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathren, R.L.

    1980-04-01

    This document is designed to provide DOE contractor personnel with general guidance regarding programs and techniques to reduce radiation exposures to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Thus it is directed towards a broad audience, and should have special relevance and interest for operating management as well as radiation protection personnel. It is well recognized that each contractor has needs specific and critical to its radiation protection program. Hence no single set of specific and detailed criteria can be set down as a prescription for achieving the ALARA goal. Rather, general guidance in the form of broad principles is given in order to acquaint management with ALARA needs and concepts. The purpose is to encourage maximum management support of the technical personnel responsible for carrying out day-to-day radiation protection activities. Although primarily written for management, this document also contains technical guidance of potential value to those directly involved in radiation protection activities. Again it should be stressed that what is provided is guidance, and is therefore not mandatory.

  17. ALARA review for the decontamination and decommissioning of the 233-S pipe trench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 233-S Facility was completed in 1955 to expand plutonium production by further concentrating the plutonium nitrate product solution from the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) Plant. The facility is radiologically contaminated because of operations and accidents. Isolation from REDOX and removal of the product transfer lines from the pipe trench is the second step in the decontamination and decommissioning of the entire 233-S Facility. The work scope is to isolate all piping from REDOX and then to remove all the piping/equipment from the pipe trench. The building is presently a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Facility. A formal as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review is required by BHI-SH-02, Vol. 1, Procedure No. 1.22, Planning Radiological Work, when radiological conditions exceed trigger levels. The level of contamination inside the pipe trench and the process fluid piping is unknown. The potential exists to exceed the level of loose surface contamination, which requires a formal ALARA review when opening the pipe trench and cutting of piping commences. This ALARA review is for task instruction 1997-03-18-009 Revision 1, 233-S Pipe Trench Decon and Pipe Removal

  18. ALARA Review of the Spallation Neutron Source Accumulator Ring and Transfer Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haire, M.J.

    2003-06-30

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is designed to meet the growing need for new tools that will deepen our understanding in materials science, life science, chemistry, fundamental and nuclear physics, earth and environmental sciences, and engineering sciences. The SNS is an accelerator-based neutron-scattering facility that when operational will produce an average beam power of 2 MW at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. The accelerator complex consists of the front-end systems, which will include an ion source; a 1-GeV full-energy linear accelerator; a single accumulator ring and its transfer lines; and a liquid mercury target. This report documents an as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) review of the accumulator ring and transfer lines at their early design stage. An ALARA working group was formed and conducted a review of the SNS ring and transfer lines at the {approx}25% complete design stage to help ensure that ALARA principles are being incorporated into the design. The radiological aspects of the SNS design criteria were reviewed against regulatory requirements and ALARA principles. Proposed features and measures were then reviewed against the SNS design criteria. As part of the overall review, the working group reviewed the design manual; design drawings and process and instrumentation diagrams; the environment, safety, and health manual; and other related reports and literature. The group also talked with SNS design engineers to obtain explanations of pertinent subject matter. The ALARA group found that ALARA principles are indeed being incorporated into the early design stage. Radiation fields have been characterized, and shielding calculations have been performed. Radiological issues are being adequately addressed with regard to equipment selection, access control, confinement structure and ventilation, and contamination control. Radiation monitoring instrumentation for worker and environment protection are also being considered--a good practice at this

  19. ALARA Design Review for the Resumption of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Cementation Process Project Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The requirements for the performance of radiological design reviews are codified in 10CFR835, Occupational Radiation Protection. The basic requirements for the performance of ALARA design reviews are presented in the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM). The HSRCM has established trigger levels requiring radiological reviews of non-routine or complex work activities. These requirements are implemented in site procedures HNF-PRO-1622 and 1623. HNF-PRO-1622 Radiological Design Review Process requires that ''radiological design reviews [be performed] of new facilities and equipment and modifications of existing facilities and equipment''. In addition, HNF-PRO-1623 Radiological Work Planning Process requires a formal ALARA Review for planned activities that are estimated to exceed 1 person-rem total Dose Equivalent (DE). The purpose of this review is to validate that the original design for the PFP Cementation Process ensures that the principles of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) were included in the original project design. That is, that the design and operation of existing Cementation Process equipment and processes allows for the minimization of personnel exposure in its operation, maintenance and decommissioning and that the generation of radioactive waste is kept to a minimum

  20. ELECTRON COOLING AND ELECTRON-ION COLLIDERS AT BNL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEN-ZVI,I.

    2007-10-03

    Superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) have significant potential uses in various fields, including High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is pursuing some of the potential applications in this area and the technology issues that are associated with these applications. The work addressed in this paper is carried out at BNL towards applications in electron cooling of high-energy hadron beams and electron-nucleon colliders. The common issues for these applications are the generation of high currents of polarized or high-brightness unpolarized electrons, high-charge per bunch and high-current. One must address the associated issue of High-Order Modes generation and damping. Superconducting ERLs have great advantages for these applications as will be outlined in the text.

  1. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL [Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An engineering plant analyzer has been developed at BNL for realistically and accurately simulating transients and severe abnormal events in BWR power plants. Simulations are being carried out routinely with high fidelity, high simulation speed, at low cost and with unsurpassed user convenience. The BNL Plant Analyzer is the only operating facility which (a) simulates more than two orders-of-magnitude faster than the CDC-7600 mainframe computer, (b) is accessible and fully operational in on-line interactive mode, remotely from anywhere in the US, from Europe or the Far East (Korea), via widely available IBM-PC compatible personal computers, standard modems and telephone lines, (c) simulates both slow and rapid transients seven times faster than real-time in direct access, and four times faster in remote access modes, (d) achieves high simulation speed without compromising fidelity, and (e) is available to remote access users at the low cost of $160 per hour

  2. SCIENTIFIC PRESENTATION. 7TH MEETING OF THE MANAGEMENT STEERING COMMITTEE OF THE RIKEN BNL COLLABORATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.D.

    2001-02-13

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho,'' (RIKEN) The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including hard QCD/spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) physics through nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The Director of RBRC is Professor T. D. Lee. The first years were dedicated to the establishment of a theory group. This has essentially been completed consisting of Fellows, Postdocs, and RHIC Physics/University Fellows, with an active group of consultants. The center also organizes an extensive series of workshops on specific topics in strong interactions with an accompanying series of published proceedings. In addition, a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor computer has been constructed and operational since August 1998. It was awarded the Supercomputer 1998 Gordon Bell Prize for price performance. An active experimental group centered around the spin physics program at RHIC has subsequently also been established at RBRC. It presently consists of five Fellows, one Postdoc and several scientific collaborators with more appointments being expected in the near future. Members and participants of RBRC on occasion will develop articles such as this one, in the nature of a status report or a general review.

  3. SCIENTIFIC PRESENTATION. 7TH MEETING OF THE MANAGEMENT STEERING COMMITTEE OF THE RIKEN BNL COLLABORATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEE,T.D.

    2001-02-13

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho,'' (RIKEN) The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong 'interactions, including hard QCD/spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) physics through nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The Director of RBRC is Professor T. D. Lee. The first years were dedicated to the establishment of a theory group. This has essentially been completed consisting of Fellows, Postdocs, and RHIC Physics/University Fellows, with an active group of consultants. The center also organizes an extensive series of workshops on specific topics in strong interactions with an accompanying series of published proceedings. In addition, a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor computer has been constructed and operational since August 1998. It was awarded the Supercomputer 1998 Gordon Bell Prize for price performance. An active experimental group centered around the spin physics program at RHIC has subsequently also been established at RBRC. It presently consists of five Fellows, one Postdoc and several scientific collaborators with more appointments being expected in the near future. Members and participants of RBRC on occasion will develop articles such as this one, in the nature of a status report or a general review.

  4. Scientific presentation. 7th meeting of the management steering committee of the RIKEN BNL Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho,'' (RIKEN) The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including hard QCD/spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) physics through nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The Director of RBRC is Professor T. D. Lee. The first years were dedicated to the establishment of a theory group. This has essentially been completed consisting of Fellows, Postdocs, and RHIC Physics/University Fellows, with an active group of consultants. The center also organizes an extensive series of workshops on specific topics in strong interactions with an accompanying series of published proceedings. In addition, a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor computer has been constructed and operational since August 1998. It was awarded the Supercomputer 1998 Gordon Bell Prize for price performance. An active experimental group centered around the spin physics program at RHIC has subsequently also been established at RBRC. It presently consists of five Fellows, one Postdoc and several scientific collaborators with more appointments being expected in the near future. Members and participants of RBRC on occasion will develop articles such as this one, in the nature of a status report or a general review

  5. Report on the BWR owners group radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection programs at U.S. boiling water reactor (BWR) stations have evolved during the 1980s and early 1990s from a regulatory adherence-based endeavor to a proactive, risk-based radiation protection and prevention mission. The objectives are no longer to merely monitor and document exposure to radiation and radioactive materials. The focus of the current programs is the optimization of radiation protection of occupational workers consistent with the purpose of producing cost-effective electric power. The newly revised 10 CFR 20 defines the term ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) to take into account the state of technology, the economics of improvements in relation to the state of the technology, and the benefits to the public health and safety. The BWR Owners Group (BWROG) initially formed the Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee in January 1990 to evaluate methods of reducing occupational radiation exposure during refueling outages. Currently, twenty U.S. BWR owner/operators (representing 36 of the operational 37 domestic BWR units), as well as three foreign BWR operators (associate members), have broadened the scope to promote information exchange between BWR radiation protection professionals and develop good practices which will affect optimization of their radiation protection programs. In search of excellence and the challenge of becoming open-quotes World Classclose quotes performers in radiation protection, the BWROG Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee has recently accepted a role in assisting the member utilities in improving radiation protection performance in a cost-effective manner. This paper will summarize the recent activities of this Committee undertaken to execute their role of exchanging information in pursuit of optimizing the improvement of their collective radiation protection performance

  6. Measures to obtain ALARA radiation exposures in ABB Atom BWRs: the BKM project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short review is made of the water chemistry, fuel crud and collective radiation exposure in the ABB Atom BWRs and of a computer simulation study of decontamination strategies. The presented data represent a small selection of results that have been produced by the BKM project in order to investigate how the ALARA concept can be met in a BWR plant. The data show that an annual collective exposure of 0.5 manSv is a realistic target in newer BWR plants. (author)

  7. Networking as a tool to promote stakeholder involvement: Example of the European ALARA Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European ALARA Network (EAN), set up in 1996 by the European Commission, has helped reveal stakeholders needs regarding feedback on good radiation protection practice and helped towards stakeholders' satisfaction through their direct involvement into the network's life. Good examples of that involvement are the EAN workshops. The stakeholders are involved during the preparation phase, the workshops themselves, the development of recommendations and finally within the follow up actions. More and more categories of stakeholders are interested in topics covered within the EAN, and other similar networks are being set up in other regions. (author)

  8. BNL flashing experiments: test facility and measurement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two objectives of the BNL light water reactor thermohydraulic development program are as follows: first, analytical expressions for the non-equilibrium vapor generation rates under circumstances of interest in accident analysis were developed; second, the experimental program consists of measuring the actual vapor generation rates in flashing flows. In order to support this effort, both global and local instruments were developed and calibrated to provide the necessary information. At the same time, suitable methods were devised for handling and analysis of the signals and data derived from the various instruments

  9. Fast ferrite tuner for the BNL synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of ferrite tuner has been tested at the BNL. The ferrite tuner uses garnet slabs partially filling a stripline. One of the important features of the tuner is that the ferrite is perpendicularly biased for operation above FMR, thus reducing the magnetic losses. A unique design was adopted to achieve the efficient cooling. The principle of operation of the tuner as well as our preliminary results on tuning a 52 MHz cavity are reported. Optimized conditions under which we demonstrated linear tunability of 80 KHz are described. The tuner's losses and its effect on higher-order modes in the cavity are discussed. 2 refs., 8 figs

  10. HERA LUMINOSITY UPGRADE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET PRODUCTION AT BNL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PARKER,B.; ANERELLA,M.; ESCALLIER,J.; GHOSH,A.; JAIN,A.; MARONE,A.; MURATORE,J.; PRODELL,A.; THOMPSON,P.; WANDERER,P.; WU,K.C.

    2000-09-17

    Production of two types of superconducting multi-function magnets, needed for the HEX4 Luminosity Upgrade is underway at BNL. Coil winding is now completed and cryostat assembly is in progress. Magnet type GO and type GG cold masses have been satisfactorily cold tested in vertical dewars and the first fully assembled GO magnet system has been horizontally cold tested and shipped to DESY. Warm measurements confirm that the coils meet challenging harmonic content targets. In this paper we discuss GO and GG magnet design and construction solutions, field harmonic measurements and quench test results.

  11. Results from the experiment E895 at the BNL AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Rai, G; Alexander, J; Anderson, M; Best, D; Brady, F P; Case, T; Caskey, W; Cebra, D A; Chance, J L; Chung, P; Cole, B; Crowe, K; Das, A; Draper, J E; Gilkes, M L; Gushue, S; Heffner, M; Hirsch, A S; Hjort, E L; Huo, L; Justice, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kintner, J; Klay, J; Krofcheck, D; Lacey, R; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Liu, Y M; McGrath, R; Milosevich, Z; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Olson, D L; Panitkin, S Y; Pinkenburg, C H; Porile, N T; Ritter, H G; Romero, J L; Scharenberg, R P; Schröder, L S; Srivastava, B K; Stone, N T B; Symons, T J M; Wang, S; Wells, R; Whitfield, J; Wienold, T; Witt, R; Wood, L; Yang, X; Zhang, W; Zhang, Y

    1999-01-01

    We present some of the latest results from the E895 experiment conducted at the BNL AGS accelerator. Au+Au collisions were recorded by the EOS Time Projection Chamber (TPC) at beam energies of 2, 4, 6, and 8 A GeV. The TPC detector permitted the reconstruction of individual collision events with almost 4 pi acceptance and good particle identification. This capability allowed E895 to study global observables and two particle correlations with respect to symmetries of the event. Flow excitation functions are examined and discussed in the context of the Nuclear Equation of State.

  12. BNL 56 MHz HOM Damper Prototype Fabrication at JLab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huque, Naeem A. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Daly, Edward F. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Clemens, William A. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); McIntyre, Gary T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Qiong [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seberg, Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bellavia, Steve [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A prototype Higher-Order Mode (HOM) Damper was fabricated at JLab for the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider's (RHIC) 56 MHz cavity at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Primarily constructed from high RRR Niobium and Sapphire, the coaxial damper presented significant challenges in electron-beam welding (EBW), brazing and machining via acid etching. The results of the prototype operation brought about changes in the damper design, due to overheating braze alloys and possible multi-pacting. Five production HOM dampers are currently being fabricated at JLab. This paper outlines the challenges faced in the fabrication process, and the solutions put in place.

  13. Rebootless Linux Kernel Patching with Ksplice Uptrack at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ksplice/Oracle Uptrack is a software tool and update subscription service which allows system administrators to apply security and bug fix patches to the Linux kernel running on servers/workstations without rebooting them. The RHIC/ATLAS Computing Facility (RACF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has deployed Uptrack on nearly 2,000 hosts running Scientific Linux and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The use of this software has minimized downtime, and increased our security posture. In this paper, we provide an overview of Ksplice's rebootless kernel patch creation/insertion mechanism, and our experiences with Uptrack.

  14. BNL 56 MHz HOM damper prototype fabrication at JLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huque, N.; McIntyre, G.; Daly, E. F.; Clemens, W.; Wu, Q.; Seberg, S.; Bellavia, S.

    2015-05-03

    A prototype Higher-Order Mode (HOM) Damper was fabricated at JLab for the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider’s (RHIC) 56 MHz cavity at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Primarily constructed from high RRR Niobium and Sapphire, the coaxial damper presented significant challenges in electron-beam welding (EBW), brazing and machining via acid etching. The results of the prototype operation brought about changes in the damper design, due to overheating braze alloys and possible multi-pacting. Five production HOM dampers are currently being fabricated at JLab. This paper outlines the challenges faced in the fabrication process, and the solutions put in place.

  15. DOE/NORA/BNL oil heat research agenda development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, R.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Batey, J. [Energy Research Center, Easton, CT (United States)

    1996-07-01

    The National Oilheat Research Alliance (NORA) has been formed and is currently working to establish a Congressionally approved oilheat check-off program to provide funding for research, education, training, safety, and marketing to benefit the US oilheat industry. NORA will be presenting this program to the Congress for its consideration and approval in the coming year. It will follow the same path as the National Propane Gas Association which is currently working on obtaining Congressional approval of a propane check off program that has already attracted over 120 cosponsors in the House of representatives. An effort to define the basis of a joint US Department of Energy (DOE) and Oilheat industry (marketers) program for future oilheat equipment research and development will be conducted during FY-1996. At the request of NORA representatives BNL will coordinate the development of a research agenda addressing three categories of activities, research appropriate for DOE support only, research appropriate for NORA support only, and research appropriate for co-funding by both organizations. This will also serve to update a prior oil-fueled research plan developed for DOE ten years ago which has been the road map for DOE`s very successful Oil Heat R&D program at BNL.

  16. ALARA plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks contents removal project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) Tanks Contents Removal Project is to remove the liquid low-level waste from the five underground storage tanks located at OHF and transfer the resulting slurry to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks facility for treatment and disposal. Among the technical objectives for the OHF Project, there is a specific provision to maintain personnel exposures as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) during each activity of the project and to protect human health and the environment. The estimated doses and anticipated conditions for accomplishing this project are such that an ALARA Plan is necessary to facilitate formal radiological review of the campaign. This ALARA Plan describes the operational steps necessary for accomplishing the job together with the associated radiological impacts and planned controls. Individual and collective dose estimates are also provided for the various tasks. Any significant changes to this plan (i.e., planned exposures that are greater than 10% of original dose estimates) will require formal revision and concurrence from all parties listed on the approval page. Deviations from this plan (i.e., work outside the scope covered by this plan) also require the preparation of a task-specific ALARA Review that will be amended to this plan with concurrence from all parties listed on the approval page

  17. As low as reasonably achievable (ALARA): is it appropriate for low level exposures?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through various researches and investigations it has been established that high doses of ionizing radiation are harmful to health and there is a linear relationship between dose and the effect. There is substantial controversy regarding the biological and health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation in humans and the biota, in vitro and in vivo despite the large amount of work carried out (both laboratory and epidemiological). By low-level exposure, we mean the exposure to radiation levels comparable to those encountered in the natural environment (ambient radiation level). The proponents of the ALARA policy are the believers of LNT hypothesis adopted by major scientific, official and governmental organizations such as ICRP, NCRP, the NAS-NRC etc. for risk assessment, according to which exposure to any amount of radiation, no matter howsoever small is potentially harmful. The idea that the dose to radiation worker should be As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) is only appropriate if small doses have a risk. Current radiation risk estimates, drawn by linear extrapolation, from high dose and dose rate of radiation to zero dose, clearly ignore the effects of the repair of DNA- the target of radiation damage. If the hormetic effect is added to the effect predicted by the LNT hypothesis, the resultant effect will be somewhat different from that predicted by the LNT hypothesis alone. Excellent human data show that a moderate increase in background radiation decreases the risk of cancer and significantly increases longevity. There are strong arguments, both experimental and epidemiological, which support the radiation hormesis (beneficial effects of low-level ionizing radiation). In the present paper, we propose to highlight the results of a comprehensive study of the available literature, data and reports of various radiation exposure and protection studies carried out in India and abroad. In conclusion, we find that the radiation hormesis contradicts the

  18. Practical application of the ALARA principle in management of the nuclear legacy: optimization under uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiological protection has a long and distinguished history in taking a balanced approach to optimization. Both utilitarian and individual interests and perspectives are addressed through a process of constrained optimisation, with optimisation intended to lead to the most benefit to the most people, and constraints being operative to limit the degree of inequity among the individuals exposed. At least, expressed simplistically, that is what the recommendations on protection are intended to achieve. This paper examines the difficulties in achieving that objective, based on consideration of the active role of optimisation in regulatory supervision of the historic nuclear legacy. This example is chosen because the application of the ALARA principle has important implications for some very major projects whose objective is remediation of existing legacy facilities. But it is also relevant because timely, effective and cost efficient completion of those projects has implications for confidence in the future development of nuclear power and other uses of radioactive materials. It is also an interesting example because legacy management includes mitigation of some major short and long term hazards, but those mitigating measures themselves involve operations with their own risk, cost and benefit profiles. Like any other complex activity, a legacy management project has to be broken down into logistically feasible parts. However, from a regulatory perspective, simultaneous application of ALARA to worker protection, major accident risk mitigation and long-term environmental and human health protection presents its own challenges. Major uncertainties which exacerbate the problem arise from ill-characterised source terms, estimation of the likelihood of unlikely failures in operational processes, and prospective assessment of radiological impacts over many hundreds of years and longer. The projects themselves are set to run over decades, during which time the

  19. Managing the radiological risk: ALARA, a principle, an obligation, a state of mind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the 1993 data published by French nuclear operators and by the Ionizing Radiations Protection Office (OPRI), only two workers have exceeded the maximum annual permissible dose of 50 mSv. However, the respect of dose limits is not a sufficient warranty to accept the ionizing radiations exposure risk. The ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle is a masterpiece of the radiological protection system. Its goal is to maintain the exposures as low as reasonably achievable taking into account the socio-economical constraints. In France, the application of this principle is as compulsory as the respect of dose limits. The proper management and optimization of radiological risk requires the motivation of everybody. (J.S.). 2 refs., 3 figs

  20. Use of rank sum method in identifying high occupational dose jobs for ALARA implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cost-effective reduction of occupational radiation exposure (ORE) dose at a nuclear power plant could not be achieved without going through an extensive analysis of accumulated ORE dose data of existing plants. It is necessary to identify what are high ORE jobs for ALARA implementation. In this study, the Rank Sum Method (RSM) is used in identifying high ORE jobs. As a case study, the database of ORE-related maintenance and repair jobs for Kori Units 3 and 4 is used for assessment, and top twenty high ORE jobs are identified. The results are also verified and validated using the Friedman test, and RSM is found to be a very efficient way of analyzing the data. (author)

  1. ALARA in design and operation of KAIGA-3 and 4, Indian 220 MW(e) PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiological protection by ALARA in design and operation of nuclear power reactors had made down trend collective dose to occupational workers as well as members of the public. India is operating PHWRs type reactors RAPS onwards and gained a lot of experiences in the design and operation of 100 to 540 MW(e) rated capacity factor. The dose reduction measures have been incorporated into the design of the later reactors based on the operating experiences of earlier reactors. The various components/parts in the design stage have been modified and/or replaced in KAIGA-3 and 4, a long journey of lndian PHWRs operation. The improved operational practices have evolved which resulted in high level of the radiological safety. The radiological safety is ensured by approved guidelines, design improvements, effective shielding, source control, delay/decay of sources, radiation work control, protective equipments, contamination control, ventilation, radioactive waste management, effluent monitoring, work management, training, pep-talk/table-top, ALARA goals/achievements, close review of operational parameters, personal monitoring and other elements. This paper discusses the design and operation improvements of KAIGA-3 and 4 which reduced the Station collective dose and effluent releases. Low ambient gamma radiation field and very low tritium-in-air activity in reactor building has reduced the collective dose compared with similar reactor (KGS-1 and 2 and RAPS-3 and 4) and made record of lowest collective dose. The lowest tritium-in-air activity in accessible/shutdown areas and better fuel management has reduced tritium and FPNG gaseous effluent. The overall radiological safety of KAIGA-3 and 4 maintain low collective dose and insignificant contribution to public dose. The continual improvements in design and operation would bring down collective in the future new 700 MWe IPHWR series

  2. Experimental results from the BNL TestEBIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory, an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) is operational and has produced charge states such as N7+, Ar16+, and Xe26+ using neutral gas injection. Ions such as Na7+ and Tl41+ have been produced using external ion injection. The BNL EBIS effort is directed at reaching intensities of interest to RHIC, approximately 3 x 109 particles/pulse which will require EBIS electron beams on the order of 10A. Pulsed electron beams up to 1.14 A have been produced using a 3mm LaB6 cathode. Ion yields corresponding to 50% of the maximum trap capacity for electron beams up to 0.5A have been obtained. The goal for the TestEBIS is to produce a uranium ion charge state distribution peaks at U45+ with 50% of the trap capacity for a 1A electron beam

  3. Proposed UV-FEL user facility at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Di Mauro, L.F.; Krinsky, S.; White, M.G.; Yu, L.H.

    1990-01-01

    The NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory is proposing the construction of a UV-FEL operating in the wavelength range from visible to 1000{angstrom}. Nano-Coulomb electron pulses will be generated at a laser photo-cathode RF gun at a repetition rate of 10 KHz. The 6 ps pulses will be accelerated to 250 MeV in a superconducting linac. The FEL consists of an exponential growth section followed by a tapered section. The amplifier input is a harmonic of a tunable visible laser generated either by nonlinear optical material or the non-linearity of the FEL itself. The FEL output in 10{sup {minus}4} bandwidth is 1 mJ per pulse, resulting in an average power of 10 watts. The availability of radiation with these characteristics would open up new opportunities in photochemistry, biology and non linear optics, as discussed in a recent workshop held at BNL. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Beam instrumentation for the BNL Heavy Ion Transfer Line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heavy Ion Transfer Line (HITL) was constructed to transport beams from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff (TVDG) to be injected into the AGS. Because the beam line is approximately 2000 feet long and the particle rigidity is so low, 20 beam monitor boxes were placed along the line. The intensity ranges from 1 to 100 nanoAmps for the dc trace beam used for line set-up, to over 100 μA for the pulsed beam to be injected into the AGS. Profiles are measured using multiwire arrays (HARPS) while Faraday cups and beam transformers monitor the intensity. The electronics stations are operated through 3 Instrumentation Controllers networked to Apollo workstations in the TVDG and AGS control rooms. Details of the detectors and electronics designs and performance will be given

  5. Field testing the prototype BNL fan-atomized oil burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, R.; Celebi, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-04-01

    BNL has developed a new oil burner design referred to as the Fan Atomized burner System. The primary objective of the field study was to evaluate and demonstrate the reliable operation of the Fan Atomized Burner. The secondary objective was to establish and validate the ability of a low firing rate burner (0.3-0.4 gph) to fully satisfy the heating and domestic hot water load demands of an average household in a climate zone with over 5,000 heating-degree-days. The field activity was also used to evaluate the practicality of side-wall venting with the Fan Atomized Burner with a low stack temperature (300F) and illustrate the potential for very high efficiency with an integrated heating system approach based on the Fan Atomized Burner.

  6. Proposal of organisation and ALARA procedure for preparation, follow-up and experience gained from maintenance: application to replacement of pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report proposes the organisation and ALARA procedures for preparation, follow-up and analysis of the lessons learned during maintenance works at a nuclear power plant. After a brief description of the ALARA principle in the first chapter, the following chapters describe proposals for establishing and start-up of a maintenance building site. The proposals are illustrated by the replacement of the pressure vessel as an example

  7. ALARA in pediatric interventional and fluoroscopic imaging: striving to keep radiation doses as low as possible during fluoroscopy of pediatric patients--a white paper executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Keith J; Kaste, Sue C

    2006-09-01

    Pediatric patients might be as much as 10 times more radiosensitive than adults. Thus, adherence to the principle of "As low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) represents a practice mandate that minimizes ionizing radiation exposure while optimizing imaging results. This symposium is the third multidisciplinary program that focused on the ALARA principle in pediatric imaging and addressed issues associated with pediatric fluoroscopy and interventional imaging techniques. PMID:17412149

  8. BNL workshop on rare K decays and CP violation, August 25-27, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: rare and forbidden K decays; CP violation in the K system; the status of current experiments at BNL, CERN, FNAL, and KEK; and future experiments and facilities.

  9. BNL workshop on rare K decays and CP violation, August 25-27, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: rare and forbidden K decays; CP violation in the K system; the status of current experiments at BNL, CERN, FNAL, and KEK; and future experiments and facilities

  10. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikin, Alexander; Alessi, James G.; Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm2 and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  11. ALARA Review of the Activation/Repair of Fire Detectors in Zone Three at the 233-S Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A formal as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review is required by BHI-SH-02, Vol. 1, Procedure 1.22, 'Planning Radiological Work', when radiological conditions exceed trigger levels. The level of contamination inside the viewing room meets this criterion. This ALARA review is for task instruction 1997-03-18-005-8.3.3 (mini task instruction to a living work package), 'Instructions for D ampersand D Support of Fire Detector Troubleshooting and Minor Maintenance Work at 233-S,' and DynCorp 2G-98-7207C, '233-S Reconnect Smoke Detectors Zone 3.' The Radiological Work Permit (RWP) request broke these two task instructions into four separate tasks. The four tasks identified in the RWP request were used to estimate airborne concentrations and the total exposure

  12. Implementation of ALARA radiation protection on the ISS through polyethylene shielding augmentation of the Service Module Crew Quarters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavers, M. R.; Zapp, N.; Barber, R. E.; Wilson, J. W.; Qualls, G.; Toupes, L.; Ramsey, S.; Vinci, V.; Smith, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2004-01-01

    With 5-7 month long duration missions at 51.6° inclination in Low Earth Orbit, the ionizing radiation levels to which International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers are exposed will be the highest planned occupational exposures in the world. Even with the expectation that regulatory dose limits will not be exceeded during a single tour of duty aboard the ISS, the "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) precept requires that radiological risks be minimized when possible through a dose optimization process. Judicious placement of efficient shielding materials in locations where crewmembers sleep, rest, or work is an important means for implementing ALARA for spaceflight. Polyethylene (C nH n) is a relatively inexpensive, stable, and, with a low atomic number, an effective shielding material that has been certified for use aboard the ISS. Several designs for placement of slabs or walls of polyethylene have been evaluated for radiation exposure reduction in the Crew Quarters (CQ) of the Zvezda (Star) Service Module. Optimization of shield designs relies on accurate characterization of the expected primary and secondary particle environment and modeling of the predicted radiobiological responses of critical organs and tissues. Results of the studies shown herein indicate that 20% or more reduction in equivalent dose to the CQ occupant is achievable. These results suggest that shielding design and risk analysis are necessary measures for reducing long-term radiological risks to ISS inhabitants and for meeting legal ALARA requirements. Verification of shield concepts requires results from specific designs to be compared with onboard dosimetry.

  13. Progress in BNL High-Temperature Hydrogen Combustion Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the BNL High-Temperature Hydrogen Combustion Research Program are discussed. The experimental facilities are described and two sets of preliminary experiments are presented. Chemical reaction time experiments have been performed to determine the length of time reactive mixtures of interest can be kept at temperature before reaction in the absence of ignition sources consumes the reactants. Preliminary observations are presented for temperatures in the range 588K--700K. Detonation experiments are described in which detonation cell width is measured as a measure of mixture sensitivity to detonation. Preliminary experiments are described which are being carried out to establish data reproducibility with previous measurements in the literature and to test out and refine experimental methods. Intensive studies of hydrogen combustion phenomena were carried out during the 1980s. Much of this effort was driven by issues related to nuclear reactor safety. The ''high-speed'' combustion phenomena of flame acceleration, deflagration-to-detonation transition, direct initiation of detonation, detonation propagation, limits of detonation in tubes and channels, transmission of detonations from confined to unconfined geometry and other related phenomena were studied using a variety of gaseous fuel-oxidant systems, including hydrogen-steam-air systems of interest in reactor safety studies. Several reviews are available which document this work [Lee, 1989; Berman, 1986

  14. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users' facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high gradient acceleration and state of the art free electron lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 to 100 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps Nd:YAG laser and a 100 mJ, 10 ps CO2 laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high brightness electron beams. The AFT's experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the High power laser will begin operation this year. 28 refs., 4 figs

  15. BNL severe accident sequence experiments and analysis program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyses of LWR degraded core accidents require mathematical characterization of two major sources of pressure and temperature loading on the reactor containment buildings: (1) steam generation from core debris-water thermal interactions and (2) molten core-concrete interactions. Experiments are in progress at BNL in support of analytical model development related to aspects of the above containment loading mechanisms. The work supports development and evaluation of the CORCON, MARCH, CONTAIN and MEDICI computer under development at other NRC-contractor laboratories. The thermal-hydraulic behavior of hot debris located within the reactor core region upon sudden introduction of cooling water is being investigated in a joint experimental and analytical program. This work supports development and evaluation of the SCDAP computer code being developed at EG and G to characterize in-vessel severe core damage accident sequences. Progress is described in the two areas of: 1) core debris thermal-hydraulic phenomenology and 2) heat transfer in core-concrete interactions

  16. The BNL fan-atomized burner system prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, T.A.; Celebi, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has a continuing interest in the development of advanced oil burners which can provide new capabilities not currently available with pressure atomized, retention head burners. Specifically program goals include: the ability to operate at firing rates as low as 0.25 gph; the ability to operate with very low excess air levels for high steady state efficiency and to minimize formation of sulfuric acid and iron sulfate fouling; low emissions of smoke, CO, and NO{sub x} even at very low excess air levels; and the potential for modulation - either staged firing or continuous modulation. In addition any such advanced burner must have production costs which would be sufficiently attractive to allow commercialization. The primary motivation for all work sponsored by the US DOE is, of course, improved efficiency. With existing boiler and furnace models this can be achieved through down-firing and low excess air operation. Also, with low excess air operation fouling and efficiency degradation due to iron-sulfate scale formation are reduced.

  17. First Results from the DUV-FEL Upgrade at BNL

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xijie; Murphy, James; Pinayev, Igor; Rakowsky, George; Rose, James; Shaftan, Timur; Sheehy, Brian; Skaritka, John; Wu, Zilu; Yu Li Hua

    2005-01-01

    The DUV-FEL at BNL is the world’s only facility dedicated to laser-seeded FEL R&D and its applications. Tremendous progress was made in both HGHG FEL and its applications in the last couple years.*,** In response to the requests of many users to study chemical science at the facility, the DUV-FEL linac was upgraded from 200 to 300 MeV to enable the HGHG FEL to produce 100 uJ pulses of 100 nm light. This will establish the DUV FEL as a premier user facility for ultraviolet radiation and enable state-of-the-art gas phase photochemistry research. The upgraded facility will also make possible key R&D experiments such as higher harmonic HGHG (n>5) that would lay the groundwork for future X-ray FEL based on HGHG. The upgraded HGHG FEL will operate at the 4th harmonic with the seed laser at either 800 nm or 400nm. The increase of the electron beam energy will be accomplished by installing a 5th linac cavity and two 45 MW klystrons. New HGHG modulator and dispersion sections vacuum chambers w...

  18. BWR stability analysis with the BNL Engineering Plant Analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March 9, 1989 instability at the LaSalle-2 Power Plant and more than ninety related BWR transients have been simulated on the BNL Engineering Plant Analyzer (EPA). Power peaks were found to be potentially seventeen times greater than the rated power, flow reversal occurs momentarily during large power oscillations, the fuel centerline temperature oscillates between 1,030 and 2,090 K, while the cladding temperature oscillates between 560 and 570 K. The Suppression Pool reaches its specified temperature limit either never or in as little as 4.3 minutes, depending on operator actions and transient scenario. Thermohydraulic oscillations occur at low core coolant flow (both Recirculation Pumps tripped), with sharp axial or redial fission power peaking and with partial loss of feedwater preheating while the feedwater is flow kept high to maintain coolant inventory in the vessel. Effects from BOP system were shown to influence reactor stability strongly through dosed-loop resonance feedback. High feedwater flow and low temperature destabilize the reactor. Low feedwater flow restabilizes the reactor, because of steam condensation and feedwater preheating in the downcomer, which reduces effectively the destabilizing core inlet subcooling. The EPA has been found to be capable of analyzing BWR stability '' shown to be effective for scoping calculations and for supporting accident management

  19. Serpentine Coil Topology for BNL Direct Wind Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Brett

    2005-01-01

    BNL direct wind technology, with the conductor pattern laid out without need for extra tooling (no collars, coil presses etc.) began with RHIC corrector production. RHIC patterns were wound flat and then wrapped on cylindrical support tubes. Later for the HERA-II IR magnets we improved conductor placement precision by winding directly on a support tube. To meet HERA-II space and field quality goals took sophisticated coil patterns, (some wound on tapered tubes). We denote such patterns, topologically equivalent to RHIC flat windings, "planar patterns." Multi-layer planar patterns run into trouble because it is hard to wind across existing turns and magnet leads get trapped at poles. So we invented a new "Serpentine" winding style, which goes around 360 degrees while the conductor winds back and forth on the tube. To avoid making solenoidal fields, we wind Serpentine layers in opposite handed pairs. With a Serpentine pattern each turn can have the same projection on the coil axis and integral field harmonics t...

  20. Commissioning of experimental enclosures (Hutches) at the Advanced Photon Source - A to Z ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), 7 GeV electron Storage Ring at the Argonne National Laboratory is designed to be a major national user facility providing high-brilliance x-ray beams. Figure 1 shows a plan view of the APS. At completion, APS will have 35 bending magnet (BM) beamlines and 35 insertion device (ID) beamlines. A typical x-ray beamline at APS comprises of a front end (FE) that confines the beam; a first optics enclosure (FOE) which houses optics to filter and monochromatize the beam; and beam transports, additional optics, and the experiment stations. Figure 2 shows a section of the storage ring with the layout of the ID and BM beamlines and typical experiment stations. The first x-ray beam was delivered to an experiment station in 1995. Ever since, to date, over 120 experimental stations (hutches) have been commissioned and are receiving intense x-ray beams of varying energies for various experiments. This paper describes in some detail the steps involved in the process of commissioning experimental stations and the implementation of the ALARA at each step

  1. Review of ALARA plan for activities at the 105 K-East fuel storage basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargo, G.J.; Durham, J.S.; Hickey, E.E.; Stansbury, P.S.; Cicotte, G.R.

    1994-09-01

    As part of its ongoing efforts to reduce doses to workers to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) tasked the Health Protection Department of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to review operations at the 105 K-East Fuel Storage Basin (105 K-East). This review included both routine operations and a proposed campaign to encapsulate N-Reactor fuel stored there. This report summarizes the results of PNL`s reviews of policy, procedures, and practices for operations at 105 K-East as well as an evaluation of the major sources of occupational radiation exposures. Where possible, data previously collected by WHC and its predecessors were used. In addition, PNL staff developed a three-dimensional model of the radiological environment within 105 K-East to assess the relative contributions of different radiation sources to worker dose and to provide a decision tool for use in evaluating alternative methods of dose rate reduction. The model developed by PNL indicates that for most areas in the basin the primary source of occupational radiation exposure is the contaminated concrete surfaces of the basin near the waterline. Basin cooling water piping represents a significant source in a number of areas, particularly the Technical Viewing Pit. This report contains specific recommendations to reduce the impact of these sources of occupational radiation exposure in 105 K-East. Other recommendations to reduce doses to workers during activities such as filter changes and filter sampling are also included.

  2. Review of ALARA plan for activities at the 105 K-East fuel storage basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of its ongoing efforts to reduce doses to workers to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) tasked the Health Protection Department of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to review operations at the 105 K-East Fuel Storage Basin (105 K-East). This review included both routine operations and a proposed campaign to encapsulate N-Reactor fuel stored there. This report summarizes the results of PNL's reviews of policy, procedures, and practices for operations at 105 K-East as well as an evaluation of the major sources of occupational radiation exposures. Where possible, data previously collected by WHC and its predecessors were used. In addition, PNL staff developed a three-dimensional model of the radiological environment within 105 K-East to assess the relative contributions of different radiation sources to worker dose and to provide a decision tool for use in evaluating alternative methods of dose rate reduction. The model developed by PNL indicates that for most areas in the basin the primary source of occupational radiation exposure is the contaminated concrete surfaces of the basin near the waterline. Basin cooling water piping represents a significant source in a number of areas, particularly the Technical Viewing Pit. This report contains specific recommendations to reduce the impact of these sources of occupational radiation exposure in 105 K-East. Other recommendations to reduce doses to workers during activities such as filter changes and filter sampling are also included

  3. Commissioning of experimental enclosures (Hutches) at the Advanced Photon Source - A to Z ALARA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacca, J.; Job, P. K.; Rauchas, A.; Justus, A.; Veluri, V. R.

    2000-11-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), 7 GeV electron Storage Ring at the Argonne National Laboratory is designed to be a major national user facility providing high-brilliance x-ray beams. Figure 1 shows a plan view of the APS. At completion, APS will have 35 bending magnet (BM) beamlines and 35 insertion device (ID) beamlines. A typical x-ray beamline at APS comprises of a front end (FE) that confines the beam; a first optics enclosure (FOE) which houses optics to filter and monochromatize the beam; and beam transports, additional optics, and the experiment stations. Figure 2 shows a section of the storage ring with the layout of the ID and BM beamlines and typical experiment stations. The first x-ray beam was delivered to an experiment station in 1995. Ever since, to date, over 120 experimental stations (hutches) have been commissioned and are receiving intense x-ray beams of varying energies for various experiments. This paper describes in some detail the steps involved in the process of commissioning experimental stations and the implementation of the ALARA at each step.

  4. Tropical Ocean Climate Study (TOCS) and Japan-United States Tropical Ocean Study (JUSTOS) on the R/V KAIYO, 25 Jan to 2 March 1997, to the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean BNL component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, R.M.; Smith, S.

    1997-04-11

    The Japanese U.S. Tropical Ocean Study (JUSTOS) cruise on the R/V KAIYO in the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean was a collaborative effort with participants from the Japanese Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and Brookhaven National Laboratory BNL. This report is a summary of the instruments, measurements, and initial analysis of the BNL portion of the cruise only. It includes a brief description of the instrument system, calibration procedures, problems and resolutions, data collection, processing and data file descriptions. This is a working document, which is meant to provide both a good description of the work and as much information as possible in one place for future analysis.

  5. INNOVATIVE ALARA TECHNIQUES and WORK PRACTICES USED AT HANFORD FOR D and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy's Hanford Site has several nuclear facilities in the process of decontamination and decommissioning (DandD) with many more to follow. These facilities contain hazardous and highly radioactive materials in plant systems, gloveboxes, hot cells, rooms, collection tanks, ventilation ducts, fuel pools and outside these facilities. Some of the radioactive isotopes are fissile material and have to be closely guarded and require special handling. To safely work in this environment, workers had to learn new skills and develop innovative techniques to decontaminate, remove all equipment and demolish these radioactive work facilities without spreading contamination to the environment. Changing the workscope and worker attitudes involves a culture change for workers, managers, Department of Energy (DOE) and support organizations. DandD involves making different types of risk-based decisions than were made when the plants were operated or sitting dormant. Management involvement, use of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), communications and sharing lessons learned are essential ingredients in developing a successful DandD strategy. New technologies have to be learned including the use of robotic devices and manipulative arms due to high dose rates and amount of radioactive contamination. Minimizing the amount of Transuranic and Mixed radioactive waste and learning how to ship the large quantities of waste are additional skills the Hanford workers have had to learn. DandD work at Hanford is in progress and Hanford Contractors have completed some very difficult and intense DandD work. This presentation will provide information on the best As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) protective measures, work practices, and the lessons learned to date

  6. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility External Data Center Operations Plan Located At Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cialella, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gregory, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lazar, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liang, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ma, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tilp, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wagener, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The External Data Center (XDC) Operations Plan describes the activities performed to manage the XDC, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), for the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. It includes all ARM infrastructure activities performed by the Data Management and Software Engineering Group (DMSE) at BNL. This plan establishes a baseline of expectation within the ARM Operations Management for the group managing the XDC.

  7. ALARA review of the maintenance and repair jobs of repetitive high radiation dose at Kori Unit 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The policy of maintaining occupational radiation dose (ORD) as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) requires the effective reduction of ORD in the phases of design as well as operation of nuclear power plants. It has been identified that a predominant portion of ORD arises during maintenance and repair operations at nuclear power plants. The cost-effective reduction of ORD cannot be achieved without a comprehensive analysis of accumulated ORD data of existing nuclear power plants. To identify the jobs of repetitive high ORD, the ORD data of Kori Units 3 and 4 over 10-year period from 1986 to 1995 were compiled into the PC-based ORD database program. As the radiation job classification structure, 26 main jobs are considered, most of which are further subdivided into detailed jobs. According to the order of the collective dose values for 26 main jobs, 10 jobs of high collective dose are identified. As an ALARA review, then, top 10 jobs of high collective dose are statistically analyzed with regard to 1) dose rate, 2) crew number and 3) job frequency that are the factors determining the collective dose for the radiation job of interest. Through the ALARA review, main reasons causing to high collective dose values are identified as follows. The high collective dose of RCP maintenance job is mainly due to the large crew number and the high job frequency. The characteristics of refueling job are similar to those of RCP maintenance job. However, the high collective doses of SG-related jobs such as S/G nozzle dam job, S/G man-way job and S/G tube maintenance job are mainly due to high radiation dose rate. (author)

  8. Measurements of the radioactive inventory of the old effluent pipe line on the BNL site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When Berkeley Nuclear Laboratory (BNL) was built, a 3 inch cast iron pipe was laid to carry the radioactive effluent from the BNL effluent treatment plant to the power station for further treatment and/or discharge. In 1980/81 a new pipe line was installed and since then the old line has remained unused. As part of the refurbishment of certain parts of the BNL site currently in progress, the majority of the pipe is to be dug up in two stages, although a small length of the pipe which runs under existing foundations will be left in the ground. This report gives the radioactive inventory of the pipe based on measurements made during the first state of removal. Samples from the trench dug to expose the pipe were taken before and after the removal of the pipe and analysed to determine whether the pipe had leaked and the level of contamination caused by the pipe's removal. (author)

  9. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory's hazardous waste management facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an open-quotes As Low as Reasonably Achievableclose quotes (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique

  10. ALARA principle and applications in the safety files of Laboratories and factories. Experience return from three years expertise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dispositions of operational radiation protection used by the nuclear exploiting societies contribute to the safety of their installations. The Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety (I.P.S.N.) is led to evaluate these dispositions, particularly the application of the ALARA principle. It appears that it was interesting to make an accounting on the period where the optimization and workers protection were taken into account. The accounting presented in this work is relative to the installations else than power reactors, that is to say: laboratories, fuel cycle facilities, research installations, irradiators. (N.C.)

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI, VOLUME 36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sixth meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) took place on October 1, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. RHIC is now in its second year of operation for physics production and the first polarized proton collision run at √s=200 GeV is expected to start in eight weeks. The RSC has developed a plan for this coming run through two previous meetings, RHIC Spin Physics III (August 3, 2000) and IV (October 13-14, 2000). We requested the following: two weeks of polarized proton studies in AGS, three weeks of polarized collider commissioning, and five weeks of polarized proton physics run. As a result, we have obtained all we asked and the above plans are implemented in the current operation schedule. The focus of the present meeting was to bring all involved in the RHIC Spin activities up-to-date on the progress of machine development, theory issues, and experimental issues. This meeting was right after the Program Advisory Committee (PAC) meeting and it started with the comments on the PAC discussion by Gerry Bunce, who was informed about the PAC deliberations by Tom Kirk. The PAC was fully supportive to complete the proposed spin program within the currently available budget for RHIC run 2 operations. Gerry further explained the expected luminosity to be ∫ Ldt = 0.5 pb-1 per week, reflecting the current machine status. The introductory session also had a talk from Werner Vogelsang that reviewed the progress in perturbative QCD theory focused on spin effects

  12. RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON GAUGE-INVARIANT VARIABLES IN GAUGE THEORIES, VOLUME 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This four-day workshop focused on the wide variety of approaches to the non-perturbative physics of QCD. The main topic was the formulation of non-Abelian gauge theory in orbit space, but some other ideas were discussed, in particular the possible extension of the Maldacena conjecture to nonsupersymmetric gauge theories. The idea was to involve most of the participants in general discussions on the problem. Panel discussions were organized to further encourage debate and understanding. Most of the talks roughly fell into three categories: (1) Variational methods in field theory; (2) Anti-de Sitter space ideas; (3) The fundamental domain, gauge fixing, Gribov copies and topological objects (both in the continuum and on a lattice). In particular some remarkable progress in three-dimensional gauge theories was presented, from the analytic side by V.P. Nair and mostly from the numerical side by O. Philipsen. This work may ultimately have important implications for RHIC experiments on the high-temperature quark-gluon plasma

  13. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER, VOLUME 37, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI (PART 2).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLAND, L.; SAITO, N.

    2001-11-15

    The second part of the sixth RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) meeting was held on November 15, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Previous meetings have elaborated on the new generation of proton spin-structure studies (e.g. gluon polarization and flavor separation of q and {bar q} polarizations via real W{sup {+-}} production) enabled by studying polarized proton collisions at energies and momentum transfers where perturbative QCD models are expected to be applicable. The focus of this meeting was on many of the experimental issues that must be resolved to achieve these physics goals. This summary is written with the benefit of hindsight following the completion of the first-ever run of a polarized proton collider. This first run can be considered as a successfully completed milestone of the RHIC Spin Collaboration. Other milestones remain important. Long term machine items were identified in Waldo Mackay's talk, the most important being the completion of the spin rotator magnets that will be installed in 2002 to allow the flexible orientation of the proton beam polarization at the PHENM and STAR experiments. At the meeting Waldo discussed a stronger partial snake magnet for the AGS as a means of producing highly polarized proton beams to inject into RHIC. Developments subsequent to this meeting suggest that a superconducting helical dipole magnet may be feasible for the AGS, and is likely to be needed to achieve the 70% beam polarization in RHIC. Longer term items were also presented, including potential increases in luminosity by the addition of electron cooling to RHIC and the possibility of increasing the collision energy by {approx}20% by replacement of the DX magnets. These items could be considered for a second generation of RHIC spin experiments. The other topics covered at the meeting were related to polarimetry and to the absolute calibration of the proton beam polarization in RHIC. These topics were divided into short- and long-term solutions to polarimetry issues. George Igo led a discussion about the addition of a Coulomb-Nuclear Interference (CNI) polarimeter to the AGS prior to FY2003 RHIC operations. The experience from the first RHIC spin run reinforces the need for reducing the time needed to complete polarization measurements in the AGS, and illustrated the importance of polarization measurements at different energies in the RHIC injectors. Progress continues to be made on the completion of a CNI polarimeter for the AGS prior to the FY2003 run.

  14. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER, VOLUME 37, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI (PART 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second part of the sixth RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) meeting was held on November 15, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Previous meetings have elaborated on the new generation of proton spin-structure studies (e.g. gluon polarization and flavor separation of q and bar q polarizations via real W± production) enabled by studying polarized proton collisions at energies and momentum transfers where perturbative QCD models are expected to be applicable. The focus of this meeting was on many of the experimental issues that must be resolved to achieve these physics goals. This summary is written with the benefit of hindsight following the completion of the first-ever run of a polarized proton collider. This first run can be considered as a successfully completed milestone of the RHIC Spin Collaboration. Other milestones remain important. Long term machine items were identified in Waldo Mackay's talk, the most important being the completion of the spin rotator magnets that will be installed in 2002 to allow the flexible orientation of the proton beam polarization at the PHENM and STAR experiments. At the meeting Waldo discussed a stronger partial snake magnet for the AGS as a means of producing highly polarized proton beams to inject into RHIC. Developments subsequent to this meeting suggest that a superconducting helical dipole magnet may be feasible for the AGS, and is likely to be needed to achieve the 70% beam polarization in RHIC. Longer term items were also presented, including potential increases in luminosity by the addition of electron cooling to RHIC and the possibility of increasing the collision energy by ∼20% by replacement of the DX magnets. These items could be considered for a second generation of RHIC spin experiments. The other topics covered at the meeting were related to polarimetry and to the absolute calibration of the proton beam polarization in RHIC. These topics were divided into short- and long-term solutions to polarimetry issues. George Igo led a discussion about the addition of a Coulomb-Nuclear Interference (CNI) polarimeter to the AGS prior to FY2003 RHIC operations. The experience from the first RHIC spin run reinforces the need for reducing the time needed to complete polarization measurements in the AGS, and illustrated the importance of polarization measurements at different energies in the RHIC injectors. Progress continues to be made on the completion of a CNI polarimeter for the AGS prior to the FY2003 run

  15. RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON GAUGE-INVARIANT VARIABLES IN GAUGE THEORIES, VOLUME 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VAN BAAL,P.; ORLAND,P.; PISARSKI,R.

    2000-06-01

    This four-day workshop focused on the wide variety of approaches to the non-perturbative physics of QCD. The main topic was the formulation of non-Abelian gauge theory in orbit space, but some other ideas were discussed, in particular the possible extension of the Maldacena conjecture to nonsupersymmetric gauge theories. The idea was to involve most of the participants in general discussions on the problem. Panel discussions were organized to further encourage debate and understanding. Most of the talks roughly fell into three categories: (1) Variational methods in field theory; (2) Anti-de Sitter space ideas; (3) The fundamental domain, gauge fixing, Gribov copies and topological objects (both in the continuum and on a lattice). In particular some remarkable progress in three-dimensional gauge theories was presented, from the analytic side by V.P. Nair and mostly from the numerical side by O. Philipsen. This work may ultimately have important implications for RHIC experiments on the high-temperature quark-gluon plasma.

  16. RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON HIGH ENERGY POLARIMETRY, VOLUME 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEADER,E.

    2000-06-15

    The RHIC collider, in its pp mode, will be a unique machine. It will open up a new frontier in the use of spin in the study of hadronic physics. Using its polarized beams, a whole new range of tests of the Standard Model will become feasible, and much new information about the detailed partonic structure of-the nucleon will emerge. It will also be possible to answer intriguing questions concerning the relationship between pp and pp total cross-sections and real parts of forward amplitudes, questions which are relevant to attempts to understand certain aspects of non-perturbative QCD. This entire, rich program relies upon an accurate determination of the polarization of the proton beams, a matter which is far from trivial. In the summer of 1997 Larry Trueman and the author ran a six-week Working Group, the aim of which was to try to understand theoretically the accuracy with which one could predict the analyzing power of various reactions which were under consideration as high energy proton polarimeters. The results of the study were somewhat negative in the sense that they concluded that analyzing powers could only be predicted to within an accuracy of {+-}10%, whereas RHIC was aiming for {+-}5%. On the other hand some very positive consequences followed. The working group stimulated the study of a polarimeter based on CNI in proton-carbon scattering and this is the polarimeter that will be used in the early stages of RHIC operation. It will be regarded as a relative polarimeter and will have to be calibrated absolutely at some later stage, probably via use of a polarized jet hydrogen target. In addition the surprising discovery was made that proton-proton elastic scattering, at high energy and very small momentum transfer, is self-spin analyzing, in the sense that the measurement of a sufficient number of spin-dependent observables will yield not only the values of the helicity amplitudes, but also the value of the beam and target polarizations.

  17. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Resarch Center Workshop: Fluctuations, Correlations and RHIC Low Energy Runs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsch, F.; Kojo, T.; Mukherjee, S.; Stephanov, M.; Xu, N.

    2011-10-27

    Most of our visible universe is made up of hadronic matter. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory of strong interaction that describes the hadronic matter. However, QCD predicts that at high enough temperatures and/or densities ordinary hadronic matter ceases to exist and a new form of matter is created, the so-called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Non-perturbative lattice QCD simulations shows that for high temperature and small densities the transition from the hadronic to the QCD matter is not an actual phase transition, rather it takes place via a rapid crossover. On the other hand, it is generally believed that at zero temperature and high densities such a transition is an actual first order phase transition. Thus, in the temperature-density phase diagram of QCD, the first order phase transition line emanating from the zero temperature high density region ends at some higher temperature where the transition becomes a crossover. The point at which the first order transition line turns into a crossover is a second order phase transition point belonging to three dimensional Ising universality class. This point is known as the QCD Critical End Point (CEP). For the last couple of years the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been performing experiments at lower energies in search of the elusive QCD CEP. In general critical behaviors are manifested through appearance of long range correlations and increasing fluctuations associated with the presence of mass-less modes in the vicinity of a second order phase transition. Experimental signatures of the CEP are likely to be found in observables related to fluctuations and correlations. Thus, one of the major focuses of the RHIC low energy scan program is to measure various experimental observables connected to fluctuations and correlations. On the other hand, with the start of the RHIC low energy scan program, a flurry of activities are taking place to provide solid theoretical background for the search of the CEP using observables related to fluctuations and correlations. While new data are pouring in from the RHIC low energy scan program, many recent advances have also been made in the phenomenological and lattice gauge theory sides in order to have a better theoretical understanding of the wealth of new data. This workshop tried to create a synergy between the experimental, phenomenological and lattice QCD aspects of the fluctuation and correlation related studies of the RHIC low energy scan program. The workshop brought together all the leading experts from related fields under the same forum to share new ideas among themselves in order to streamline the continuing search of CEP in the RHIC low energy scan program.

  18. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED ''SINGLE SPIN ASYMMETRIES'' (VOLUME 75)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-transverse spin asymmetries (SSA) in strong interactions have a long history, starting from the 1970s and 1980s when surprisingly large single-transverse spin asymmetries were observed in p+p → πX and pp → Λ + X, where really none were expected. They have again attracted much interest in recent years from both experimental and theoretical sides. In particular, first measurements by the STAR, PHENIX, and BRAHMS collaborations at RHIC have now become available which again reveal large single transverse spin asymmetries for hadron production in polarized proton proton scattering. This extends the SSA observations from the fixed target energy range to the collider regime. Meanwhile, experimental studies in Deep Inelastic Scattering by the HERMES collaboration at DESY, SMC at CERN, and CLAS at JLab also show a remarkably large SSA in semi-inclusive hadron production, γ*p → πX, when the proton is transversely polarized. On the theoretical side, there are several approaches to understanding SSA within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). For example, to explain the large SSAs for hadron production in hadron collisions, a mechanism that takes into account the contribution from quark-gluon-quark correlations (twist-3) in the nucleon was proposed. On the other hand, possible origins of SSA in DIS and hadronic scattering were also found in leading-twist transverse momentum dependent parton distributions. Current theoretical efforts aim at a better conceptual understanding of these two types of mechanisms, and of their connections. We were very happy at this timely date to bring together the theorists and experimentalists of this field to review and discuss the current theoretical status and the latest experimental results. The whole workshop contained 25 formal talks, both experiment (15) and theory (10), and a few informal talks and many fruitful discussions. The topics covered all the relevant SSA observables, including in Deep Inelastic Scattering, the Drell-Yan process, and in inclusive hadron production and dijet correlations at hadron colliders. There were not only discussions on possible interpretations of the existing SSA data, but also on the future observables for the ongoing experiments as well as for planned experiments (such as RHIC II and eRHIC). On the theory side, the talks ranged from overviews and descriptions of the fundamental aspects of SSAs, to presentations of detailed phenomenological studies. All of the talks attracted much interest and initiated active discussions. Directions for future measurements were pointed out, in particular for studies at RHIC. Also, significant theoretical advances were made that may tie together some of the currently proposed mechanisms for single-spin asymmetries. This was a very successful workshop. It stimulated many discussions and new collaborations

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI, VOLUME 36.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLAND,L.; SAITO,N.

    2001-10-10

    The sixth meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) took place on October 1, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. RHIC is now in its second year of operation for physics production and the first polarized proton collision run at {radical}s=200 GeV is expected to start in eight weeks. The RSC has developed a plan for this coming run through two previous meetings, RHIC Spin Physics III (August 3, 2000) and IV (October 13-14, 2000). We requested the following: two weeks of polarized proton studies in AGS, three weeks of polarized collider commissioning, and five weeks of polarized proton physics run. As a result, we have obtained all we asked and the above plans are implemented in the current operation schedule. The focus of the present meeting was to bring all involved in the RHIC Spin activities up-to-date on the progress of machine development, theory issues, and experimental issues. This meeting was right after the Program Advisory Committee (PAC) meeting and it started with the comments on the PAC discussion by Gerry Bunce, who was informed about the PAC deliberations by Tom Kirk. The PAC was fully supportive to complete the proposed spin program within the currently available budget for RHIC run 2 operations. Gerry further explained the expected luminosity to be {integral} Ldt = 0.5 pb{sup -1} per week, reflecting the current machine status. The introductory session also had a talk from Werner Vogelsang that reviewed the progress in perturbative QCD theory focused on spin effects.

  20. Event generator for RHIC spin physics. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop: Volume 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major objective of the workshop was to establish a firm collaboration to develop suitable event generators for the spin physics program at RHIC. With the completion of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as a polarized collider a completely new domain of high-energy spin physics will be opened. The planned studies address the spin structure of the nucleon, tests of the standard model, and transverse spin effects in initial and final states. RHIC offers the unique opportunity to pursue these studies because of its high and variable energy, 50 ≤ √s ≤ 500 GeV, high polarization, 70%, and high luminosity, 2 x 1032 cm-2 sec-1 or more at 500 GeV. To maximize the output from the spin program at RHIC, the understanding of both experimental and theoretical systematic errors is crucial. It will require full-fledged event generators, to simulate the processes of interest in great detail. The history of event generators shows that their development and improvement are ongoing processes taking place in parallel to the physics analysis by various experimental groups. The number of processes included in the generators has been increasing and the precision of their predictions is being improved continuously. This workshop aims at getting this process well under way for the spin physics program at RHIC, based on the first development in this direction, SPHINX

  1. Twenty years of space radiation physics at the BNL AGS and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J; Zeitlin, C

    2016-06-01

    Highly ionizing atomic nuclei HZE in the GCR will be a significant source of radiation exposure for humans on extended missions outside low Earth orbit. Accelerators such as the LBNL Bevalac and the BNL AGS, designed decades ago for fundamental nuclear and particle physics research, subsequently found use as sources of GCR-like particles for ground-based physics and biology research relevant to space flight. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL was constructed specifically for space radiation research. Here we review some of the space-related physics results obtained over the first 20 years of NASA-sponsored research at Brookhaven. PMID:27345198

  2. Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization - KVM-based infrastructure services at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortijo, D.

    2011-06-14

    Over the past 18 months, BNL has moved a large percentage of its Linux-based servers and services into a Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) environment. This presentation will address our approach to virtualization, critical decision points, and a discussion of our implementation. Specific topics will include an overview of hardware and software requirements, networking, and storage; discussion of the decision of Red Hat solution over competing products (VMWare, Xen, etc); details on some of the features of RHEV - both current and on their roadmap; Review of performance and reliability gains since deployment completion; path forward for RHEV at BNL and caveats and potential problems.

  3. Twenty years of space radiation physics at the BNL AGS and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.

    2016-06-01

    Highly ionizing atomic nuclei HZE in the GCR will be a significant source of radiation exposure for humans on extended missions outside low Earth orbit. Accelerators such as the LBNL Bevalac and the BNL AGS, designed decades ago for fundamental nuclear and particle physics research, subsequently found use as sources of GCR-like particles for ground-based physics and biology research relevant to space flight. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL was constructed specifically for space radiation research. Here we review some of the space-related physics results obtained over the first 20 years of NASA-sponsored research at Brookhaven.

  4. A corporate ALARA engineering support for all EDF nuclear power plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1991, EDF has established a national ALARA programme with a very effective result in terms of dose reduction. Of course, EDF management has decided to further improve occupational exposure management and dose reduction (both collective and individuals). Since 2002, one key element allowing reaching the new goals, is the set up of a national corporate engineering as a support for EDF sites for preparing maintenance interventions. Its objective is to reduce occupational exposure with the help of up to date tools and methods. That engineering support consists of a growing up team comprising at the moment about ten engineers, including CAD specialists and health physicists. It is in charge of using very efficient tools such as P.A.N.T.H.E.R. -R.P. to perform national modelling studies concerning the reactor and auxiliary buildings areas, which are the most costly in terms of doses. That tool has been developed initially for the first steam generator replacements by EDF S.E.P.T.E.N. engineering department. It uses friendly user 3D software to create a geometrical model of the concerned area with all existing materials (pipes, valves, concrete walls allowing visualizing on personal computers, each area from all perspectives. Other important inputs for P.A.N.T.H.E.R. R.P. are the quantities of radioisotopes present in each material. The code allows then estimating the dose rates at each location in the area, calculating the contribution of each equipment (i.e sources) in the area to the dose rate in each point; calculating also the contribution of each radio isotope to the dose rates. With the help of these models the engineering is then able to perform in depth generic work areas optimisation studies, taking into account the workload in each workstation. Up to recently these studies were performed only for huge operations such as steam generator replacements, they are now proposed to EDF sites for more usual interventions. The selection of these interventions takes

  5. Patient-centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, April

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient and the individual's particular health care needs. The goal of patient-centered health care is to empower patients to become active participants in their care. This requires that physicians, radiologic technologists and other health care providers develop good communication skills and address patient needs effectively. Patient-centered care also requires that the health care provider become a patient advocate and strive to provide care that not only is effective but also safe. For radiologic technologists, patient-centered care encompasses principles such as the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept and contrast media safety. Patient-centered care is associated with a higher rate of patient satisfaction, adherence to suggested lifestyle changes and prescribed treatment, better outcomes and more cost-effective care. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your area of interest. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store. According to one theory, most patients judge the quality of their healthcare much like they rate an airplane flight. They assume that the airplane is technically viable and is being piloted by competent people. Criteria for judging a particular airline are personal and include aspects like comfort, friendly service and on-time schedules. Similarly, patients judge the standard of their healthcare on nontechnical aspects, such as a healthcare practitioner's communication and "soft skills." Most are unable to evaluate a practitioner's level of technical skill or training, so the qualities they can assess become of the utmost importance in satisfying patients and providing patient-centered care.(1). PMID:19901351

  6. Beam dynamics enhancement due to accelerating field symmetrization in the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell S-band photocathode RF gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 1.6 cell photocathode S-Band gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is now in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). One of the main features of this RF gun is the symmetrization of the RF coupling iris with an identical vacuum pumping port located in the full cell. The effects of the asymmetry caused by the RF coupling iris were experimentally investigated by positioning a metallic plunger at the back wall of the vacuum port iris. The higher order modes produced were studied using electron beamlets with 8-fold symmetry. The 8-fold beamlets were produced by masking the laser beam. These experimental results indicate that the integrated electrical center and the geometrical center of the gun are within 175 microm. Which is within the laser alignment tolerance of 250 microm

  7. Multipacting-free quarter-wavelength choke joint design for BNL SRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Liaw, C. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tuozzolo, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Wang, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Weiss, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    The BNL SRF gun cavity operated well in CW mode up to 2 MV. However, its performance suffered due to multipacting in the quarter-wavelength choke joint. A new multipacting-free cathode stalk was designed and conditioned. This paper describes RF and thermal design of the new cathode stalk and its conditioning results.

  8. New result on K+ → π+ ν νbar from BNL E787

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E787 at BNL has reported evidence for the rare decay K+ → π+νbar ν, based on the observation of one candidate event. In this paper, we present the result of analyzing a new dataset of comparable sensitivity to the published result

  9. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm2 and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given

  10. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S.C. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique. This document contains the Appendices for the report.

  11. Replacement of neutron absorbers in the spent fuel pool storage facility of the Tihange 3: an ALARA approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiated fuel assemblies placed in the storage racks (pools) subject the Boraflex to an intense gamma flux, which causes degradation of the Boraflex arising from the radiolysis reaction and rupture and rearrangement of the chemical bonds by the gamma rays. The decision was taken to remove the Boraflex from the existing racks and reuse them with a neutron absorber, boron steel or borated stainless steel. Throughout this replacement project, the ALARA principle has been applied in developing tools and choosing methods. Each phase was then re-evaluated in terms of dosimetry cost in order to make improvements that would mean a reduction in the dosimetry of the operation. (A.L.B.)

  12. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

  13. New recommendations of the ICRP and the ALARA program of the Nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the events happened in it finishes it decade, in the nuclear environment, it is necessary that any he/she practices that it involves exhibition to the radiation, real or potential, be detailed and systematically analyzed by the light of the current knowledge, capitalizing the generated experience. They think about three fundamental aspects in the campaign of radiological cultivation: 1. New methods of evaluation of equivalent dose. 2. Limit of individual dose, base of the change and control implications, and 3. Analysis philosophies and the application of the system of dose limitation. The program ALARA of the Laguna Verde Central from its installation in 1987 observes and it implements actions trending to optimize it practice of situation of potential and planned exhibition with the purpose of fulfilling the commitment settled down in the declaration of political of this program

  14. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory's hazardous waste management facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an open-quotes As Low as Reasonably Achievableclose quotes (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique. This document contains the Appendices for the report

  15. Place of the radiation safety officer in the implementation of the ALARA principle through European directive 97-43 items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to define the role of the radiation safety officer in raising the awareness of the radiology staff to the ALARA (As low as reasonable achievable) principle specified in European directive 97-43. The actions taken and the techniques used in our hospital, as well as the potential improvements that could be achieved with extra funding, will be presented. The didactic value of flow charts recording technical factors and fluoroscopy times for quality improvement will be demonstrated. In the future, a dosimeter incorporated on the new equipment could allow direct recording of the dose. The different items presented in this paper should allow routine implementation of the required elements described in the law 2003-270, i.e the French translation of European Directive 97-43. (author)

  16. [Place of the radiation safety officer in the implementation of the ALARA principle through European directive 97-43 items].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozziconacci, J G; Ayivi, J; Loat, A; Ifergan, J; Mourbrun, M; Drevet, B

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to define the role of the radiation safety officer in raising the awareness of the radiology staff to the ALARA (As low as reasonable achievable) principle specified in European directive 97-43. The actions taken and the techniques used in our hospital, as well as the potential improvements that could be achieved with extra funding, will be presented. The didactic value of flow charts recording technical factors and fluoroscopy times for quality improvement will be demonstrated. In the future, a dosimeter incorporated on the new equipment could allow direct recording of the dose. The different items presented in this paper should allow routine implementation of the required elements described in the law 2003-270, i.e the French translation of European Directive 97-43. PMID:16114200

  17. Hitrex 1: an interim report on experimental and analytical work on BNL's zero power HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beynon, A.J.; Kitching, S.J.; Lewis, T.A.; Waterson, R.H.

    1972-06-15

    This report presents interim experimental and theoretical results for the BNL Hitrex reactor. Reactivity effects and thermal and fast reaction rate distributions have been measured. Preliminary analysis has been performed, and some initial comparisons between theory and experiments made. (auth)

  18. Multipacting simulation and test results of BNL 704 MHz SRF gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu W.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Cullen, C. et al

    2012-05-20

    The BNL 704MHz SRF gun has a grooved choke joint to support the photo-cathode. Due to the distortion of grooves at the choke joint during the BCP for the choke joint, several multipacting barriers showed up when it was tested with Nb cathode stalk at JLab. We built a setup to use the spare large grain SRF cavity to test and condition the multipacting at BNL with various power sources up to 50kW. The test is carried out in three stages: testing the cavity performance without cathode, testing the cavity with the Nb cathode stalk that was used at Jlab, and testing the cavity with a copper cathode stalk that is based on the design for the SRF gun. This paper summarizes the results of multipacting simulation, and presents the large grain cavity test setup and the test results.

  19. A wire scanner system for characterizing the BNL energy recovery LINAC beam position monitor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michnoff R.; Biscardi, C.; Cerniglia, P.; Degen, C.; Gassner, D.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.

    2012-04-15

    A stepper motor controlled wire scanner system has recently been modified to support testing of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Collider-Accelerator department's Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) beam position monitor (BPM) system. The ERL BPM consists of four 9.33 mm diameter buttons mounted at 90 degree spacing in a cube with 1.875 inch inside diameter. The buttons were designed by BNL and fabricated by Times Microwave Systems. Libera brilliance single pass BPM electronic modules with 700 MHz bandpass filter, manufactured by Instrumentation Technologies, will be used to measure the transverse beam positions at 14 locations around the ERL. The wire scanner assembly provides the ability to measure the BPM button response to a pulsed wire, and evaluate and calibrate the Libera position measurement electronics. A description of the wire scanner system and test result data will be presented.

  20. Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Michael P [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, Scott E [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, Mary Jane [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) [http://www.arm.gov/campaigns/osc2013rwpcf] campaign was scheduled to take place from 15 July 2013 through 15 July 2015 (or until shipped for the next U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Climate Research Facility first Mobile Facility [AMF1] deployment). The campaign involved the deployment of the AMF1 Scintec 915 MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) at BNL, in conjunction with several other ARM, BNL and National Weather Service (NWS) instruments. The two main scientific foci of the campaign were: 1) To provide profiles of the horizontal wind to be used to test and validate short-term cloud advection forecasts for solar-energy applications and 2) to provide vertical profiling capabilities for the study of dynamics (i.e., vertical velocity) and hydrometeors in winter storms. This campaign was a serendipitous opportunity that arose following the deployment of the RWP at the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign in Cape Cod, Massachusetts and restriction from participation in the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 (GoAmazon 2014/15) campaign due to radio-frequency allocation restriction for international deployments. The RWP arrived at BNL in the fall of 2013, but deployment was delayed until fall of 2014 as work/safety planning and site preparation were completed. The RWP further encountered multiple electrical failures, which eventually required several shipments of instrument power supplies and the final amplifier to the vendor to complete repairs. Data collection began in late January 2015. The operational modes of the RWP were changed such that in addition to collecting traditional profiles of the horizontal wind, a vertically pointing mode was also included for the purpose of precipitation sensing and estimation of vertical velocities. The RWP operated well until the end of the campaign in July 2015 and collected observations for more than 20 precipitation

  1. SynapSense wireless environmental monitoring system of the RHIC and ATLAS computing facility at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RHIC and ATLAS Computing Facility (RACF) at BNL is a 15000 sq. ft. facility hosting the IT equipment of the BNL ATLAS WLCG Tier-1 site, offline farms for the STAR and PHENIX experiments operating at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the BNL Cloud installation, various Open Science Grid (OSG) resources, and many other small physics research oriented IT installations. The facility originated in 1990 and grew steadily up to the present configuration with 4 physically isolated IT areas with the maximum rack capacity of about 1000 racks and the total peak power consumption of 1.5 MW. In June 2012 a project was initiated with the primary goal to replace several environmental monitoring systems deployed earlier within RACF with a single commercial hardware and software solution by SynapSense Corporation based on wireless sensor groups and proprietary SynapSense™ MapSense™ software that offers a unified solution for monitoring the temperature and humidity within the rack/CRAC units as well as pressure distribution underneath the raised floor across the entire facility. The deployment was completed successfully in 2013. The new system also supports a set of additional features such as capacity planning based on measurements of total heat load, power consumption monitoring and control, CRAC unit power consumption optimization based on feedback from the temperature measurements and overall power usage efficiency estimations that are not currently implemented within RACF but may be deployed in the future.

  2. THE BNL ASTD FIELD LAB - NEAR - REAL - TIME CHARACTERIZATION OF BNL STOCKPILED SOILS TO ACCELERATE COMPLETION OF THE EM CHEMICAL HOLES PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As of October 2001, approximately 7,000 yd3 of stockpiled soil remained at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) after the remediation of the BNL Chemical/Animal/Glass Pits disposal area. The soils were originally contaminated with radioactive materials and heavy metals, depending on what materials had been interred in the pits, and how the pits were excavated. During the 1997 removal action, the more hazardous/radioactive materials were segregated, along with, chemical liquids and solids, animal carcasses, intact gas cylinders, and a large quantity of metal and glass debris. Nearly all of these materials have been disposed of. In order to ensure that all debris was removed and to characterize the large quantity of heterogeneous soil, BNL initiated an extended sorting, segregation, and characterization project directed at the remaining soil stockpiles. The project was co-funded by the Department of Energy Environmental Management Office (DOE EM) through the BNL Environmental Restoration program and through the DOE EM Office of Science and Technology Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) program. The focus was to remove any non-conforming items, and to assure that mercury and radioactive contaminant levels were within acceptable limits for disposal as low-level radioactive waste. Soils with mercury concentrations above allowable levels would be separated for disposal as mixed waste. Sorting and segregation were conducted simultaneously. Large stockpiles (ranging from 150 to 1,200 yd3) were subdivided into manageable 20 yd3 units after powered vibratory screening. The 1/2-inch screen removed almost all non-conforming items (plus some gravel). Non-conforming items were separated for further characterization. Soil that passed through the screen was also visually inspected before being moved to a 20 yd3 ''subpile.'' Eight samples from each subpile were collected after establishing a grid of four quadrants: north, east, south and west, and two layers: top and

  3. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together

  4. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to

  5. IMPROVED WELL PLUGGING EQUIPMENT AND WASTE MANGEMENT TECHNIQUES EXCEED ALARA GOALS AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteside, R.; Pawlowicz, R.; Whitehead, L.; Arnseth, R.

    2002-02-25

    In 2000, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) contracted Tetra Tech NUS, Inc. (TtNUS) and their sub-contractor, Texas World Operations, Inc. (TWO), to plug and abandon (P&A) 111 wells located in the Melton Valley area of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). One hundred and seven of those wells were used to monitor fluid movement and subsurface containment of the low level radioactive liquid waste/grout slurry that was injected into the Pumpkin Valley Shale Formation, underlying ORNL. Four wells were used as hydrofracture injection wells to emplace the waste in the shale formation. Although the practice of hydrofracturing was and is considered by many to pose no threat to human health or the environment, the practice was halted in 1982 after the Federal Underground Injection Control regulations were enacted by United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) making it necessary to properly close the wells. The work is being performed for the United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations (DOE ORO). The project team is using the philosophy of minimum waste generation and the principles of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) as key project goals to minimize personnel and equipment exposure, waste generation, and project costs. Achievement of these goals was demonstrated by the introduction of several new pieces of custom designed well plugging and abandonment equipment that were tested and used effectively during field operations. Highlights of the work performed and the equipment used are presented.

  6. Reference values of the workers' collective dose unit for the implementation of ''ALARA'' policy in EDF nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implementing the ALARA principle at the design, operation and maintenance stages of EDF's PWRs aims at ensuring a coherent management of individual and collective exposures. The objective of such a policy is, as recommended by ICRP 60, to keep exposures (number of individuals exposed and levels of exposure) as low as reasonably achievable, with an equitable distribution taking into consideration economical and social aspects. This leads EDF to adopt, among other tools, a system of reference monetary values for the unit of collective dose averted. After having recalled the ethical issue associated with such an approach as well as the international consensus on the dose-risk relationship for low doses, the model adopted, integrating risk aversion considerations, is presented. Its main characteristic is a rapid increase of the monetary values with the level of annual individual doses coming close to the regulatory limits. This model will be used as a decision-aiding tool for the evaluation and comparison of alternative protection actions within the optimization process of workers'exposure

  7. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well other topics, has been included. This volume (Volume 4 of the series) contains 209 abstracts. An author index and a subject index are provided to facilitate use. The subject index contains the abstract numbers from previous volumes, as well as the current volume

  8. New experimental results obtained in Au-Au collisions at the energies available to the RHIC-BNL using BRAHMS experimental setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many experimental data for Au-Au collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV and √sNN = 200 GeV have been obtained in the last two years at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, USA. The experimental setup BRAHMS is one of the five experimental setups used at RHIC-BNL. Interesting experimental results on many physical quantities with dynamic signification have been obtained. In the present work we report the new results on charged particle multiplicities, pseudorapidities, rapidities, transverse, momentum spectra, and particle to antiparticle ratios. These experimental results lead to nuclear temperatures and nuclear densities at different collision centralities and rapidities. Some interesting results on collective flow velocities of the nuclear matter are also obtained. Dependencies on the collision centrality, pseudorapidity and beam energy, in the center-of-mass system, are included in the work. The highest multiplicities (more than 5000 charged particles per event) and the highest pionic, kaonic and protonic temperatures obtained up to now are reported for the most central collisions (0-6%). The Coulomb effects are very low at very small velocities. A significant increase of the negative kaon to positive kaon ratio appears at rapidities around y = 0.0. Similar results are obtained for antiproton to proton ratio. The stopping of the nuclear matter is reflected by the high collective velocities obtained in the same rapidity range (up to 0.6 c). All these experimental results, as well as the experimental results obtained in the frame of other collaborations, including the RHIC-BNL collaboration, will be used to obtain new information on the behaviour of the highly excited and dense nuclear matter and the formation conditions for the quark-gluon plasma. Interesting information on the Universe behaviour in the first microsecond after Big Bang can also be obtained. (authors)

  9. Simulations of the recent Lasalle-2 incident with the BNL plant analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of simulations of the recent power oscillation incident at the LaSalle-2 Nuclear Power Plant using the BNL Plant Analyzer. The causes of the oscillation were investigated and the sensitivity of the oscillation to key parameters was studied. It is concluded that the observed power oscillation was caused by boiling instability (i.e., density wave oscillation) reinforced by the reactivity feedback in neutron kinetics, and that the density wave oscillation resulted from flow reduction due to recirculation pump trip and feedwater temperature reduction due to partial loss of feedwater heating capability as well as power peaking. 7 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  10. Simulations of the recent Lasalle-2 incident with the BNL plant analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.; Wulff, W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of simulations of the recent power oscillation incident at the LaSalle-2 Nuclear Power Plant using the BNL Plant Analyzer. The causes of the oscillation were investigated and the sensitivity of the oscillation to key parameters was studied. It is concluded that the observed power oscillation was caused by boiling instability (i.e., density wave oscillation) reinforced by the reactivity feedback in neutron kinetics, and that the density wave oscillation resulted from flow reduction due to recirculation pump trip and feedwater temperature reduction due to partial loss of feedwater heating capability as well as power peaking. 7 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Computer analysis, design and construction of the BNL Mk V magnetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a program to develop a high energy neutral beam injector for fusion reactor applications, the BNL Neutral Beam Group is studying, among other options, a surface plasma source of the magnetron type. This source has been developed to the point at which a large compact model, known as the Mk V magnetron, has been designed and constructed. The source is designed to operate in the steady state mode and to produce 1-2A of H-(D-) ions at 25 kV. Under these conditions, 18 KW of heat are removed from the source by the cooling system

  12. Target and orbit feedback simulations of a muSR beamline at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKay, W. W. [Residence, 25 Rhododendron Circle, Asheville, NC (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pile, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    Well-polarized positive surface muons are a tool to measure the magnetic properties of materials since the precession rate of the spin can be determined from the observation of the positron directions when the muons decay. The use of the AGS complex at BNL has been explored for a muSR facility previously. Here we report simulations of a beamline with a target inside a solenoidal field, and of an orbit feed-back system with single muon beam positioning monitors based on technology available today

  13. Status of the RHIC and BNL/CERN heavy ion programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the gold beam operation at the Brookhaven AGS started in 1992, and with the lead beam operation at the CERN SPS planned for 1994--1995, investigation of high nucleon density states through high energy heavy ion collisions is becoming a reality. In addition, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, which is dedicated to the study of ultra-high energy heavy ion collisions, is under construction with a target completion date in 1997. There also is a plan to run the proposed CERN LHC for a few months a year for the heavy ion program. These colliders should provide opportunities to extend our knowledge of nuclear matter to the extraordinary states of extreme high temperature and high density, thus opening the way to the creation and study of quark-gluon plasma. The lattice gauge calculation based on the theory of strong interactions (QCD) predicts that, at such states, quarks and gluons are deconfined from individual nucleons and form a hot plasma. In this paper, the status of heavy ion stationary target programs at the BNL AGS and the CERN SPS, the progress of RHIC construction, and heavy ion research potential at LHC will be presented. The status of the CERN LHC will be covered elsewhere in these Proceedings

  14. High Frequency, High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at SLAC and BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenzweig, James; /UCLA; Travish, Gil; /UCLA; Hogan, Mark; /SLAC; Muggli, Patric; /Southern California U.

    2012-07-05

    Given the recent success of >GV/m dielectric wakefield accelerator (DWA) breakdown experiments at SLAC, and follow-on coherent Cerenkov radiation production at the UCLA Neptune, a UCLA-USC-SLAC collaboration is now implementing a new set of experiments that explore various DWA scenarios. These experiments are motivated by the opportunities presented by the approval of FACET facility at SLAC, as well as unique pulse-train wakefield drivers at BNL. The SLAC experiments permit further exploration of the multi-GeV/m envelope in DWAs, and will entail investigations of novel materials (e.g. CVD diamond) and geometries (Bragg cylindrical structures, slab-symmetric DWAs), and have an over-riding goal of demonstrating >GeV acceleration in {approx}33 cm DWA tubes. In the nearer term before FACET's commissioning, we are planning measurements at the BNL ATF, in which we drive {approx}50-200 MV/m fields with single pulses or pulse trains. These experiments are of high relevance to enhancing linear collider DWA designs, as they will demonstrate potential for efficient operation with pulse trains.

  15. The Cornell-BNL FFAG-ERL Test Accelerator: White Paper

    CERN Document Server

    Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Hoffstaetter, Georg; Mayes, Christopher; Patterson, Ritchie; Sagan, David; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Berg, Scott; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brooks, Stephen; Brown, Kevin; Fischer, Wolfram; Hao, Yue; Meng, Wuzheng; Méot, François; Minty, Michiko; Peggs, Stephen; Ptitsin, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Thieberger, Peter; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The Cornell-BNL FFAG-ERL Test Accelerator (C$\\beta$) will comprise the first ever Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) based on a Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) lattice. In particular, we plan to use a Non Scaling FFAG (NS-FFAG) lattice that is very compact and thus space- and cost- effective, enabling multiple passes of the electron beam in a single recirculation beam line, using the superconducting RF (SRF) linac multiple times. The FFAG-ERL moves the cost optimized linac and recirculation lattice to a dramatically better optimum. The prime accelerator science motivation for C$\\beta$ is proving that the FFAG-ERL concept works. This is an important milestone for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) plans to build a major Nuclear Physics facility, eRHIC, based on producing 21 GeV electron beams to collide with the RHIC ion beams. A consequence of the C$\\beta$ work would be the availability of significantly better, cost-effective, compact CW high-brightness electron beams for a plethora of scientific inves...

  16. Design and first cold test of BNL superconducting 112 MHz QWR for electron gun applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Boulware, C.H.; Chang, X.; Grimm, T.L.; Siegel, B.; Than, R.; Winowski, M.

    2011-03-28

    Brookhaven National Laboratory and Niowave, Inc. have designed, fabricated, and performed the first cold test of a superconducting 112 MHz quarter-wave resonator (QWR) for electron gun experiments. The first cold test of the QWR cryomodule has been completed at Niowave. The paper discusses the cryomodule design, presents the cold test results, and outline plans to upgrade the cryomodule for future experiments. A quarter-wave resonator concept of superconducting RF (SRF) electron gun was proposed at BNL for electron cooling ion/proton beams at RHIC. QWRs can be made sufficiently compact even at low RF frequencies (long wavelengths). The long wavelength allows to produce long electron bunches, thus minimizing space charge effects and enabling high bunch charge. Also, such guns should be suitable for experiments requiring high average current electron beams. A 112 MHz QWR gun was designed, fabricated, and cold-tested in collaboration between BNL and Niowave. This is the lowest frequency SRF gun ever tested successfully. In this paper we describe the gun design and fabrication, present the cold test results, and outline plans for the cryomodule upgrade for future experiments.

  17. Savannah River Site Radiological Technology Center's Efforts Supporting Waste Minimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberger, K. H.; Smith, L. S.; Bates, R. L.

    2003-02-25

    This paper describes the efforts of the newly formed Radiological Technology Center (RTC) at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) to support waste minimization. The formation of the RTC was based upon the highly successful ALARA Center at the DOE Hanford Site. The RTC is tasked with evaluation and dissemination of new technologies and techniques for radiological hazard reduction and waste minimization. Initial waste minimization efforts have focused on the promotion of SRS containment fabrication capabilities, new personal protective equipment and use of recyclable versus disposable materials.

  18. INNOVATIVE ALARA TOOLS AND WORK PRACTICES USED AT THE DOE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WAGGONER LO

    2010-02-12

    The Hanford Nuclear Reservation occupies an area of 586 square miles in southeastern Washington state. The site was created as part of the World War II Manhattan Project to produce weapons grade plutonium. A multitude of old reactor plants, processing facilities, underground tank farms, contaminated soil and ground water remain and are part of an on-going environmental cleanup mission of the site. The Columbia River bisects Hanford, and the concern is that the river will become contaminated if the sources of contamination are not removed. Currently facilities are being removed, the ground water is being treated, and contaminated soil is being transferred to an approved burial ground about 15 miles away from the River located in the center of the Hanford Site The remaining facilities and adjacent structures are undergoing D&D (decontaminate and demolish) and to date, significant progress has been made. During this presentation, I will discuss how we are using innovative tools and work practices to D&D these Hanford Site facilities.

  19. Impact of main radiological pollutants on contamination risks (ALARA) optimisation of physico-chemical environment and retention techniques during operation and shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this paper is to precise the behaviour of different radiochemical species in the primary coolant of PWR plants. Managing these pollutants must lead to limit Reactor Coolant System (RCS) walls 'over-contamination' to decrease the dose rates during the maintenance operations (ALARA). In French Plants, 60Co, silver and antimony represent the major radiochemical pollutants which require a good knowledge of the different phenomena to ensure the lowest contamination risks. The stakes deal with the control and the optimisation of collective and individual doses including waste treatment with low costs. These stakes represent primordial elements of nuclear acceptability. (authors)

  20. New result on K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} from BNL E787

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REDLINGER,G.

    1999-06-21

    E787 at BNL has reported evidence for the rare decay K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, based on the observation of one candidate event. In this paper, we present the result of analyzing a new dataset of comparable sensitivity to the published result.

  1. Summary of construction details and test performance of recent series of 1.8 meter SSC dipoles at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain design features of the SSC dipole magnets are evaluated with 1.8-meter models built and tested at BNL. We report the results of recent tests of such magnets relating quench performance and field quality measurements to mechanical design and assembly features such as collar material, collared coil dimensions and fit with the yoke and coil prestress level. 9 figs., 5 tabs

  2. Chemical aspects of the commissioning and early operation of the BNL pond water treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account is given of the chemical aspects of the work done in commissioning and setting-to-work the pond water treatment plant at BNL. The plant is designed to maintain the fuel pond within the specified chemical conditions for Magnox fuel storage. In normal operation the treatment requirements are met by anion exchange, i.e. the carbonate and other impurity anions in the pond water are replaced by hydroxide held on an anion exchange resin. This method is referred to as ''anion only''. In the commissioning tests the performance of the plant was substantiated by passing simulated pond water of the correct chemical composition through the plant and monitoring the water quality at the plant outlet. During the first phase of operation on the pond itself the plant was operated in non-standard fashion to convert the chemistry from the previous ''carbonate'' regime to the required conditions. (author)

  3. Parameters Optimization for a Novel Vacuum Laser Acceleration Test at BNL-ATF

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Lei; Zhou, Feng

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new VLA theory model which has revealed that the injection electrons with low energy and small incident angle relative to the laser beam are captured and significantly accelerated in a strong laser field. For the further step for verifying the novel-VLA mechanics, we propose to use the BNL-ATF Terawatt CO2 laser and a high-brightness electron beam to carry out a proof-of-principle beam experiment. Experiment setup including the laser injection optics and electron extraction system and beam diagnostics is presented. Extensive optimized simulation results with ATF practical parameters are also presented, which shows that even when the laser intensity is not very high, the net energy gain still can be seen obviously. This could be prospect for a new revolution of vacuum laser acceleration.

  4. Target and orbit feedback simulations of a muSR beam line at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKay, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pile, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-07-28

    Well-polarized positive surface muons are a tool to measure the magnetic properties of materials since the precession rate of the spin can be determined from the observation of the positron directions when the muons decay. For a dc beam an ideal µSR flux for surface µ+ should be about 40 kHz/mm2. In this report we show how this flux could be achieved in a beam line using the AGS complex at BNL for a source of protons. We also determined that an orbit feedback system with a pair of thin silicon position monitors and kickers would miss the desired flux by at least an order of magnitude, even with perfect time resolution and no multiple scattering.

  5. Power spectrum calculation for the Cornell Wiggler A SASE experiment at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, we showed (Yu, Phys. Rev. E 58 (1998) 4991) that the widely used simulation code TDA3D, even though a single-frequency code, can be used to determine the power spectrum in the SASE process with excellent approximation in the exponential growth regime. In this paper, we apply this method to the BNL Cornell Wiggler A SASE experiment as an example. When the gain is not very high, there are many modes in the radiation, which seems to make the analytical calculation very difficult. However, we show that the increment of the radiation due to SASE over the spontaneous radiation can be expanded in terms of guided modes with rapid convergence. Thus when the spontaneous radiation is subtracted from the SASE power during the calculation, there is a good agreement between the analytical theory and the numerical simulation

  6. A combined model for pseudorapidity distributions in Cu-Cu collisions at BNL-RHIC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Zhjin; Huang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The charged particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions come from leading particles and those frozen out from the hot and dense matter created in collisions. The leading particles are conventionally supposed having Gaussian rapidity distributions normalized to the number of participants. The hot and dense matter is assumed to expand according to the unified hydrodynamics, a hydro model which unifies the features of Landau and Hwa-Bjorken model, and freeze out into charged particles from a space-like hypersurface with a proper time of Tau_FO . The rapidity distribution of this part of charged particles can be derived out analytically. The combined contribution from both leading particles and unified hydrodynamics is then compared against the experimental data performed by BNL-RHIC-PHOBOS Collaboration in different centrality Cu-Cu collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 and 62.4 GeV, respectively. The model predictions are in well consistent with experimental measurements.

  7. Emittance Studies of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 Cell Photocathode RF Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, D.T.; /SLAC; Wang, X.J.; /Brookhaven; Miller, R.H.; /SLAC; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; /Brookhaven; Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA; Sheehan, J.; Skaritka, J.; /Brookhaven; Winick, H.; /SLAC; Woodle, M.; Yakimenko, V.; /Brookhaven

    2011-09-09

    The symmetrized 1.6 cell S-band photocathode gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A novel emittance compensation solenoid magnet has also been designed, built and is in operation at the ATF. These two subsystems form an emittance compensated photoinjector used for beam dynamics, advanced acceleration and free electron laser experiments at the ATF. The highest acceleration field achieved on the copper cathode is 150 MV/m, and the guns normal operating field is 130 MV/m. The maximum rf pulse length is 3 {mu}s. The transverse emittance of the photoelectron beam were measured for various injection parameters. The 1 nC emittance results are presented along with electron bunch length measurements that indicated that at above the 400 pC, space charge bunch lengthening is occurring. The thermal emittance, {epsilon}{sub o}, of the copper cathode has been measured.

  8. MEASUREMENTS AND MODELING OF EDDY CURRENT EFFECTS IN BNL'S AGS BOOSTER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN, K.A.; AHRENS, L.; GARDNER, C.; GLENN, J.W.; HARVEY, M.; MENG, W.; ZENO, K.

    2006-06-23

    Recent beam experiments at BNL's AGS Booster have enabled us to study in more detail the effects of eddy currents on the lattice structure and our control over the betatron tune. The Booster is capable of operating at ramp rates as high as 9 T/sec. At these ramp rates eddy currents in the vacuum chambers significantly alter the fields and gradients seen by the beam as it is accelerated. The Booster was designed with these effects in mind and to help control the field uniformity and linearity in the Booster Dipoles special vacuum chambers were designed with current windings to negate the affect of the induced eddy currents. In this report results from betatron tune measurements and eddy current simulations will be presented. We will then present results from modeling the accelerator using the results of the magnetic field simulations and compare these to the measurements.

  9. POWER SPECTRUM CALCULATION FOR THE CORNELL WIGGLER A SASE EXPERIMENT AT BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently the authors showed [I] that the widely used simulation code TDA3D, even though a single frequency code, can be used to determine the power spectrum in the SASE process with excellent approximation in the exponential growth regime. In this paper, they apply this method to the BNL Cornell Wiggler A SASE experiment as an example. When the gain is not very high, there are many modes in the radiation, which seems to make the analytical calculation very difficult. However, they show that the increment of the radiation due to SASE over the spontaneous radiation can be expanded in terms of guided modes with rapid convergence. Thus when the spontaneous radiation is subtracted from the SASE power during the calculation, there is a good agreement between the analytical theory and the numerical simulation

  10. PERFORMANCE RESULTS FOR THE BNL PSI DESIGNED FOR THE SNS AND ITS APPLICATION TO OTHER ACCELERATORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed a Power Supply Interface (PSI) as part of the construction of the accumulator ring and transfer lines of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) that will be located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These units have now been constructed in production quantities. This paper will be in two parts. The first part reports the results of performance testing for it's application to the SNS. But the PSI can also be used for other applications, and is currently being used for another application at BNL, the Booster Application Facility (BAF). The second part of this paper will describe how the versatile PSI can be configured for other machines, and it's performance in ramping applications

  11. Progress on the high-current 704 MHz superconducting RF cavity at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu W.; Astefanous, C.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; et al

    2012-05-20

    The 704 MHz high current superconducting cavity has been designed with consideration of both performance of fundamental mode and damping of higher order modes. A copper prototype cavity was fabricated by AES and delivered to BNL. RF measurements were carried out on this prototype cavity, including fundamental pass-band and HOM spectrum measurements, HOM studies using bead-pull setup, prototyping of antenna-type HOM couplers. The measurements show that the cavity has very good damping for the higher-order modes, which was one of the main goals for the high current cavity design. 3D cavity models were simulated with Omega3P code developed by SLAC to compare with the measurements. The paper describes the cavity design, RF measurement setups and results for the copper prototype. The progress with the niobium cavity fabrication will also be described.

  12. Performance on the low charge state laser ion source in BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, M.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Costanzo, M.; DeSanto, L.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kanesue, T.; Lambiase, R.; Lehn, D.; Liaw, C. J.; McCafferty, D.; Morris, J.; Olsen, R.; Pikin, A.; Raparia, D.; Steszyn, A.; Ikeda, S.

    2015-09-07

    On March 2014, a Laser Ion Source (LIS) was commissioned which delivers high-brightness, low-charge-state heavy ions for the hadron accelerator complex in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Since then, the LIS has provided many heavy ion species successfully. The low-charge-state (mostly singly charged) beams are injected to the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), where ions are then highly ionized to fit to the following accelerator’s Q/M acceptance, like Au32+. Recently we upgraded the LIS to be able to provide two different beams into EBIS on a pulse-to-pulse basis. Now the LIS is simultaneously providing beams for both the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL).

  13. DESIGN OF 1.2 GEV SCL AS NEW INJECTOR FOR THE BNL AGS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RUGGIERO,A.G.ALESSI,J.HARRISON,M.IAROCCI,M.NEHRING,T.RAPARIA,D.ROSER,T.TUOZZOLO,J.WENG,W.

    2003-09-08

    Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) accelerator complex at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to provide an average beam power of 1 MW at the energy of 28 GeV. The facility is to be used primarily as a proton driver for the production of intense neutrino beams [1,2]. A study of a proton Super-Conducting Linac (SCL) as the new injector to the AGS has just been completed [3] and found feasible. We are now initiating a second design phase with more emphasis on engineering considerations, namely: cryogenics, cryostat design, RF cavity design, RF power couplers and power sources, conventional engineering, and insertions for transverse focusing and other beam utilities. Some of these issues are addressed in this paper.

  14. Microwave measurements of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell photocathode rf gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The longitudinal accelerating field E. has been measured as a function of azimuthal angle in the full cell of the cold test model for the 1.6 cell BNL/SLAC/UCLA number-sign 3 S-band RF Gun using a needle rotation/frequency perturbation technique. These measurements were conducted before and after symmetrizing the full cell with a vacuum pump out port and an adjustable short. Two different waveguide to full cell coupling schemes were studied. The dipole mode of the full cell is an order of magnitude less severe before symmetrization for the 0θ-coupling scheme. The multi-pole contribution to the longitudinal field asymmetry are calculated using standard Fourier series techniques. The Panofsky-Wenzel theorem is used in estimating the transverse emittance due to the multipole components of Ex

  15. BNL NONLINEAR PRE TEST SEISMIC ANALYSIS FOR THE NUPEC ULTIMATE STRENGTH PIPING TEST PROGRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has been conducting a multi-year research program to investigate the behavior of nuclear power plant piping systems under large seismic loads. The objectives of the program are: to develop a better understanding of the elasto-plastic response and ultimate strength of nuclear piping; to ascertain the seismic safety margin of current piping design codes; and to assess new piping code allowable stress rules. Under this program, NUPEC has performed a large-scale seismic proving test of a representative nuclear power plant piping system. In support of the proving test, a series of materials tests, static and dynamic piping component tests, and seismic tests of simplified piping systems have also been performed. As part of collaborative efforts between the United States and Japan on seismic issues, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and its contractor, the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), are participating in this research program by performing pre-test and post-test analyses, and by evaluating the significance of the program results with regard to safety margins. This paper describes BNL's pre-test analysis to predict the elasto-plastic response for one of NUPEC's simplified piping system seismic tests. The capability to simulate the anticipated ratcheting response of the system was of particular interest. Analyses were performed using classical bilinear and multilinear kinematic hardening models as well as a nonlinear kinematic hardening model. Comparisons of analysis results for each plasticity model against test results for a static cycling elbow component test and for a simplified piping system seismic test are presented in the paper

  16. The necessary guidance on the application of JUSTIFICATION and ALARA by the nuclear authorities, using 'Accountability for Reasonableness' as a decision making process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In all branches of law, but foremost in international nuclear law, the global economic system brings along a vast record of Soft Law covering General Principles and Standards. For a part we can find these Soft Law Principles and Standards back in the clothing of hard law, or in the licensing procedures, at the national level. The larger part however is never 'transposed' into national laws and especially the harmonization, the implementation and control of such Principles and Standards remain doubtful. In this paper the focus lies on JUSTIFICATION and ALARA, as the main nuclear safety principles, accepted world-wide. The regulatory guidance and demonstration of these Principles, indicating which (numerical) safety levels or safety objectives are mandatory and which are only guidance should be undertaken by the international regulators and authorities, but are often lacking. It is the aim of this paper to come up with a better procedural framework for a priority setting process by nuclear authorities. Establishing a fair process for priority setting is easier than agreeing on principles. We use the idea of 'Accountability for Reasonableness', developed in the field of Health Care Management. An ideal model of priority setting within the JUSTIFICATION/ALARA approach will need to specify what should be done (i.e. justified ethically) and how it can be done (i.e. based in empirical reality and on benchmarking), to reach optimal levels of nuclear safety. (author)

  17. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP CIRCUM-PAN-PACIFIC RIKEN SYMPOSIUM ON HIGH ENERGY SPIN PHYSICS, VOLUME 25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Circum-Pan-Pacific Riken Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics was held at Oukouchi Memorial Hall in Riken from November 3 through 6, 1999. It was held as a joint meeting of the 2nd Circum-Pan-Pacific Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics and the 3rd of the series of Riken Symposia related to the RHIC-SPIN. The 1st Circum-Pan-Pacific Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics was held at Kobe in 1996 and the RHIC-SPIN Riken Symposia had been held every two years since 1995. As Prof. Ozaki mentioned in his talk at the beginning of this meeting, the RHIC was ready for the first beam, physics experiments scheduled in 2000, and the RHIC-SPIN would start in 2001. It was therefore considered to be very timely for the researchers in the field of high energy spin physics to get together, clarifying the present status of the field and discussing interesting and important topics as well as experimental subjects to be pursued. It is especially important for the success of the RHIC-SPIN project that the researchers in the neighboring countries surrounding the Pacific are actively involved in it. This is why the above two series were joined in this. symposium. The subjects discussed in the symposium include: Hard processes probing spin-structure functions, polarization mechanisms in high energy reactions, lattice studies of polarized structure functions, theoretical models for the nucleon and its spin structure, RHIC and RHIC-SPIN projects, results and future projects of existing experimental facilities. Totally 73 scientists participated in the symposium, 27 from abroad and 46 from Japan. it consisted of 13 main sessions, with 33 invited and contributed talks, and 4 discussion sessions covering recent experimental and theoretical developments and important topics in high energy spin physics and closely related fields

  18. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON BARYON DYNAMICS AT RHIC, MARCH 28-30, 2002, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the striking observations at RHIC is the large valence baryon rapidity density observed at mid rapidity in central Au+Au at 130 A GeV. There are about twice as many valence protons at mid-rapidity than predicted based on extrapolation from p+p collisions. Even more striking PHENIX observed that the high pt spectrum is dominated by baryons and anti-baryons. The STAR measured event anisotropy parameter v2 for lambdas are as high as charged particles at pt ∼ 2.5 GeV/c. These are completely unexpected based on conventional pQCD parton fragmentation phenomenology. One exciting possibility is that these observables reveal the topological gluon field origin of baryon number transport referred to as baryon junctions. Another is that hydrodynamics may apply up to high pt in A+A. There is no consensus on what are the correct mechanisms for producing baryons and hyperons at high pt and large rapidity shifts and the new RHIC data provide a strong motivation to hold a meeting focusing on this class of observables. The possible role of junctions in forming CP violating domain walls and novel nuclear bucky-ball configurations would also be discussed. In this workshop, we focused on all measured baryon distributions at RHIC energies and related theoretical considerations. To facilitate the discussions, results of heavy ion collisions at lower beam energies, results from p+A /p+p/e+e collisions were included. Some suggestions for future measurements have been made at the workshop

  19. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL research center workshop, equilibrium and non-equilibrium aspects of hot, dense QCD, Vol. 28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven, beginning operation this year, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, beginning operation ∼2005, will provide an unprecedented range of energies and luminosities that will allow us to probe the Gluon-Quark plasma. At RHIC and LHC, at central rapidity typical estimates of energy densities and temperatures are e * 1-10 GeV/fm3 and T0 * 300 - 900 MeV. Such energies are well above current estimates for the GQ plasma. Initially, this hot, dense plasma is far from local thermal equilibrium, making the theoretical study of transport phenomena, kinetic and chemical equilibration in dense and hot plasmas, and related issues a matter of fundamental importance. During the last few years a consistent framework to study collective effects in the Gluon-Quark plasma, and a microscopic description of transport in terms of the hard thermal (and dense) loops resummation program has emerged. This approach has the potential of providing a microscopic formulation of transport, in the regime of temperatures and densities to be achieved at RHIC and LHC. A parallel development over the last few years has provided a consistent formulation of non-equilibrium quantum field theory that provides a real-time description of phenomena out of equilibrium. Novel techniques including non-perturbative approaches and the dynamical renormalization group techniques lead to new insights into transport and relaxation. A deeper understanding of collective.excitations and transport phenomena in the GQ plasma could lead to recognize novel potential experimental signatures. New insights into small-c physics reveals a striking similarity between small-c and hard thermal loops, and novel real-time numerical simulations have recently studied the parton distributions and their thermalizations in the initial stages of a heavy ion collision

  20. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN/BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, EQUILIBRIUM AND NON-EQUILIBRIM ASPECTS OF HOT, DENSE QCD, VOLUME 28.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vega, H.J.; Boyanovsky, D. [and others

    2000-07-17

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven, beginning operation this year, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, beginning operation {approximately}2005, will provide an unprecedented range of energies and luminosities that will allow us to probe the Gluon-Quark plasma. At RHIC and LHC, at central rapidity typical estimates of energy densities and temperatures are e * 1-10 GeV/fm3 and T0 * 300 - 900 MeV. Such energies are well above current estimates for the GQ plasma. Initially, this hot, dense plasma is far from local thermal equilibrium, making the theoretical study of transport phenomena, kinetic and chemical equilibration in dense and hot plasmas, and related issues a matter of fundamental importance. During the last few years a consistent framework to study collective effects in the Gluon-Quark plasma, and a microscopic description of transport in terms of the hard thermal (and dense) loops resummation program has emerged. This approach has the potential of providing a microscopic formulation of transport, in the regime of temperatures and densities to be achieved at RHIC and LHC. A parallel development over the last few years has provided a consistent formulation of non-equilibrium quantum field theory that provides a real-time description of phenomena out of equilibrium. Novel techniques including non-perturbative approaches and the dynamical renormalization group techniques lead to new insights into transport and relaxation. A deeper understanding of collective.excitations and transport phenomena in the GQ plasma could lead to recognize novel potential experimental signatures. New insights into small-c physics reveals a striking similarity between small-c and hard thermal loops, and novel real-time numerical simulations have recently studied the parton distributions and their thermalizations in the initial stages of a heavy ion collision.

  1. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN/BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, EQUILIBRIUM AND NON-EQUILIBRIM ASPECTTS OF HOT, DENSE QCD, VOLUME 28.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE VEGA,H.J.; BOYANOVSKY,D. [and others

    2000-07-17

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven, beginning operation this year, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, beginning operation {approximately}2005, will provide an unprecedented range of energies and luminosities that will allow us to probe the Gluon-Quark plasma. At RHIC and LHC, at central rapidity typical estimates of energy densities and temperatures are e * 1-10 GeV/fm3 and T0 * 300 - 900 MeV. Such energies are well above current estimates for the GQ plasma. Initially, this hot, dense plasma is far from local thermal equilibrium, making the theoretical study of transport phenomena, kinetic and chemical equilibration in dense and hot plasmas, and related issues a matter of fundamental importance. During the last few years a consistent framework to study collective effects in the Gluon-Quark plasma, and a microscopic description of transport in terms of the hard thermal (and dense) loops resummation program has emerged. This approach has the potential of providing a microscopic formulation of transport, in the regime of temperatures and densities to be achieved at RHIC and LHC. A parallel development over the last few years has provided a consistent formulation of non-equilibrium quantum field theory that provides a real-time description of phenomena out of equilibrium. Novel techniques including non-perturbative approaches and the dynamical renormalization group techniques lead to new insights into transport and relaxation. A deeper understanding of collective.excitations and transport phenomena in the GQ plasma could lead to recognize novel potential experimental signatures. New insights into small-c physics reveals a striking similarity between small-c and hard thermal loops, and novel real-time numerical simulations have recently studied the parton distributions and their thermalizations in the initial stages of a heavy ion collision.

  2. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop entitled Hydrodynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions and QCD Equation of State (Volume 88)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsch,F.; Kharzeev, D.; Molnar, K.; Petreczky, P.; Teaney, D.

    2008-04-21

    The interpretation of relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies with thermal concepts is largely based on the relative success of ideal (nondissipative) hydrodynamics. This approach can describe basic observables at RHIC, such as particle spectra and momentum anisotropies, fairly well. On the other hand, recent theoretical efforts indicate that dissipation can play a significant role. Ideally viscous hydrodynamic simulations would extract, if not only the equation of state, but also transport coefficients from RHIC data. There has been a lot of progress with solving relativistic viscous hydrodynamics. There are already large uncertainties in ideal hydrodynamics calculations, e.g., uncertainties associated with initial conditions, freezeout, and the simplified equations of state typically utilized. One of the most sensitive observables to the equation of state is the baryon momentum anisotropy, which is also affected by freezeout assumptions. Up-to-date results from lattice quantum chromodynamics on the transition temperature and equation of state with realistic quark masses are currently available. However, these have not yet been incorporated into the hydrodynamic calculations. Therefore, the RBRC workshop 'Hydrodynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions and QCD Equation of State' aimed at getting a better understanding of the theoretical frameworks for dissipation and near-equilibrium dynamics in heavy-ion collisions. The topics discussed during the workshop included techniques to solve the dynamical equations and examine the role of initial conditions and decoupling, as well as the role of the equation of state and transport coefficients in current simulations.

  3. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED ''SINGLE SPIN ASYMMETRIES'' (VOLUME 75)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    YUAN, F.; VOGELSANG, W.

    2005-06-01

    Single-transverse spin asymmetries (SSA) in strong interactions have a long history, starting from the 1970s and 1980s when surprisingly large single-transverse spin asymmetries were observed in p+p {yields} {pi}X and pp {yields} {Lambda} + X, where really none were expected. They have again attracted much interest in recent years from both experimental and theoretical sides. In particular, first measurements by the STAR, PHENIX, and BRAHMS collaborations at RHIC have now become available which again reveal large single transverse spin asymmetries for hadron production in polarized proton proton scattering. This extends the SSA observations from the fixed target energy range to the collider regime. Meanwhile, experimental studies in Deep Inelastic Scattering by the HERMES collaboration at DESY, SMC at CERN, and CLAS at JLab also show a remarkably large SSA in semi-inclusive hadron production, {gamma}*p {yields} {pi}X, when the proton is transversely polarized. On the theoretical side, there are several approaches to understanding SSA within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). For example, to explain the large SSAs for hadron production in hadron collisions, a mechanism that takes into account the contribution from quark-gluon-quark correlations (twist-3) in the nucleon was proposed. On the other hand, possible origins of SSA in DIS and hadronic scattering were also found in leading-twist transverse momentum dependent parton distributions. Current theoretical efforts aim at a better conceptual understanding of these two types of mechanisms, and of their connections. We were very happy at this timely date to bring together the theorists and experimentalists of this field to review and discuss the current theoretical status and the latest experimental results. The whole workshop contained 25 formal talks, both experiment (15) and theory (10), and a few informal talks and many fruitful discussions. The topics covered all the relevant SSA observables, including in Deep Inelastic Scattering, the Drell-Yan process, and in inclusive hadron production and dijet correlations at hadron colliders. There were not only discussions on possible interpretations of the existing SSA data, but also on the future observables for the ongoing experiments as well as for planned experiments (such as RHIC II and eRHIC). On the theory side, the talks ranged from overviews and descriptions of the fundamental aspects of SSAs, to presentations of detailed phenomenological studies. All of the talks attracted much interest and initiated active discussions. Directions for future measurements were pointed out, in particular for studies at RHIC. Also, significant theoretical advances were made that may tie together some of the currently proposed mechanisms for single-spin asymmetries. This was a very successful workshop. It stimulated many discussions and new collaborations.

  4. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON BARYON DYNAMICS AT RHIC, MARCH 28-30, 2002, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GYULASSY,M.; KHARZEEV,D.; XU,N.

    2002-03-28

    One of the striking observations at RHIC is the large valence baryon rapidity density observed at mid rapidity in central Au+Au at 130 A GeV. There are about twice as many valence protons at mid-rapidity than predicted based on extrapolation from p+p collisions. Even more striking PHENIX observed that the high pt spectrum is dominated by baryons and anti-baryons. The STAR measured event anisotropy parameter v2 for lambdas are as high as charged particles at pt {approx} 2.5 GeV/c. These are completely unexpected based on conventional pQCD parton fragmentation phenomenology. One exciting possibility is that these observables reveal the topological gluon field origin of baryon number transport referred to as baryon junctions. Another is that hydrodynamics may apply up to high pt in A+A. There is no consensus on what are the correct mechanisms for producing baryons and hyperons at high pt and large rapidity shifts and the new RHIC data provide a strong motivation to hold a meeting focusing on this class of observables. The possible role of junctions in forming CP violating domain walls and novel nuclear bucky-ball configurations would also be discussed. In this workshop, we focused on all measured baryon distributions at RHIC energies and related theoretical considerations. To facilitate the discussions, results of heavy ion collisions at lower beam energies, results from p+A /p+p/e+e collisions were included. Some suggestions for future measurements have been made at the workshop.

  5. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP CIRCUM-PAN-PACIFIC RIKEN SYMPOSIUM ON HIGH ENERGY SPIN PHYSICS, VOLUME 25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KUMANO,S.; SHIBATA,T.A.; YAZAKI,K.

    2000-06-28

    The Circum-Pan-Pacific Riken Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics was held at Oukouchi Memorial Hall in Riken from November 3 through 6, 1999. It was held as a joint meeting of the 2nd Circum-Pan-Pacific Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics and the 3rd of the series of Riken Symposia related to the RHIC-SPIN. The 1st Circum-Pan-Pacific Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics was held at Kobe in 1996 and the RHIC-SPIN Riken Symposia had been held every two years since 1995. As Prof. Ozaki mentioned in his talk at the beginning of this meeting, the RHIC was ready for the first beam, physics experiments scheduled in 2000, and the RHIC-SPIN would start in 2001. It was therefore considered to be very timely for the researchers in the field of high energy spin physics to get together, clarifying the present status of the field and discussing interesting and important topics as well as experimental subjects to be pursued. It is especially important for the success of the RHIC-SPIN project that the researchers in the neighboring countries surrounding the Pacific are actively involved in it. This is why the above two series were joined in this. symposium. The subjects discussed in the symposium include: Hard processes probing spin-structure functions, polarization mechanisms in high energy reactions, lattice studies of polarized structure functions, theoretical models for the nucleon and its spin structure, RHIC and RHIC-SPIN projects, results and future projects of existing experimental facilities. Totally 73 scientists participated in the symposium, 27 from abroad and 46 from Japan. it consisted of 13 main sessions, with 33 invited and contributed talks, and 4 discussion sessions covering recent experimental and theoretical developments and important topics in high energy spin physics and closely related fields.

  6. When RCRA meets ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposes a method to identify an inconsistency between RCRA and AEA and for distinguishing a true inconsistency from a compliance difficulty. The paper also provides examples of each situation, accommodating specific RCRA requirements to maintain adherence to radiation protection requirements. The proposed method is derived from radiation protection guidance to Federal agencies for occupational exposure that was issued by EPA, under authority derived from Executive Order 10831, the AEA, and Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1970. This EPA guidance was approved by President Reagan on January 20, 1987 and closely reflects the guidance of national and international radiation standard-setting groups

  7. ALARA notes, Number 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the 'tyranny' of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment

  8. ALARA and work management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the request of Electricite de France (EDF) and Framatome, the Nuclear Protection Evaluation Centre (CEPN) developed a three-year research project, between 1991 and 1993, to evaluate the impact of various work management factors that can influence occupational exposures in nuclear power plants (NPPs) and to assess the effectiveness of protective actions implemented to reduce them. Three different categories of factors have been delineated: those linked to working conditions (such as ergonomic of work areas and protective suits), those characterizing the operators (qualification, experience level, motivation, etc.). In order to quantify the impact of these factors, a detailed survey was carried out in five French NPPs, focusing on three types of operations: primary valves maintenance, decontamination of reactor cavity, and specialized maintenance operations on the steam generator. This survey was augmented by a literature review on the influence of open-quotes hostileclose quotes environment on working conditions. Finally, a specific study was performed in order to quantify the impact of various types of protective suits used in French nuclear installations according to the type of work to be done. All of these factors have been included in a model aiming at quantifying the effectiveness of protection actions, both from dosimetric and economic point of views

  9. Status of 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long SSC dipole magnet R ampersand D program at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last year-and-a-half, several 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long dipole magnet prototypes were built by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under contract with the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory. These prototypes are the last phase of a half-decade-long R ampersand D program, carried out in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of the SSC main ring dipole magnets. They also prepare the way of the 5-cm-aperture dipole magnet program to be started soon. In this paper, we analyze the mechanical behavior of the BNL prototypes during cool-down and excitation, and we attempt to relate this behavior to the magnet features. The data reveal that the mechanical behavior is sensitive to the vertical collar-yoke interference, and that the magnets exhibited somewhat erratic changes in coil end-loading during cool-down. 9 refs., 6 figs

  10. Performance of microstrip gas chambers in BNL-E885: a search for LAMBDA LAMBDA-hypernuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Landry, M; Davis, C A; Faszer, W; Gan, L; Lee, L; Page, S A; Ramsay, W D; Salomon, M; Oers, W T H

    1999-01-01

    The performance of MicroStrip Gas Chambers (MSGC) in BNL Experiment 885, a search for LAMBDA LAMBDA-hypernuclei, is detailed. Chambers with an active area of 80x50 mm sup 2 were instrumented and operated as a vertex detector in the experiment. Furthermore, two distinct types of microstrip prints were utilized in these chambers. Prints manufactured with Integrated Circuit (IC) photolithographic technology have fine tolerances and thin minimum trace widths, but can suffer from a high rate of defects per print and are more costly. Prints constructed with Printed Circuit (PC) photolithographic technology have coarser tolerances but relatively few defects per print, and are extremely cost-effective. Results of bench and beam tests of both IC and PC based MSGCs are presented and their performance in BNL-E885 is discussed. E885 marks the first use of PC based MSGCs in an experiment.

  11. Technical aspects of boron neutron capture therapy at the BNL Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, BMRR, is a 3 MW heterogeneous, tank-type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was designed for biomedical studies. Early BNL work in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) used a beam of thermal neutrons for experimental treatment of brain tumors. Research elsewhere and at BNL indicated that higher energy neutrons would be required to treat deep seated brain tumors. Epithermal neutrons would be thermalized as they penetrated the brain and peak thermal neutron flux densities would occur at the depth of brain tumors. One of the two BMRR thermal port shutters was modified in 1988 to include plates of aluminum and aluminum oxide to provide an epithermal port. Lithium carbonate in polyethylene was added in 1991 around the bismuth port to reduce the neutron flux density coming from outside the port. To enhance the epithermal neutron flux density, the two vertical thimbles A-3 (core edge) and E-3 (in core) were replaced with fuel elements. There are now four fuel elements of 190 grams each and 28 fuel elements of 140 grams each for a total of 4.68 kg of 235U in the core. The authors have proposed replacing the epithermal shutter with a fission converter plate shutter. It is estimated that the new shutter would increase the epithermal neutron flux density by a factor of seven and the epithermal/fast neutron ratio by a factor of two. The modifications made to the BMRR in the past few years permit BNCT for brain tumors without the need to reflect scalp and bone flaps. Radiation workers are monitored via a TLD badge and a self-reading dosimeter during each experiment. An early concern was raised about whether workers would be subject to a significant dose rate from working with patients who have been irradiated. The gamma ray doses for the representative key personnel involved in the care of the first 12 patients receiving BNCT are listed. These workers did not receive unusually high exposures

  12. A NRC-BNL benchmark evaluation of seismic analysis methods for non-classically damped coupled systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the auspices of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) developed a comprehensive program to evaluate state-of-the-art methods and computer programs for seismic analysis of typical coupled nuclear power plant (NPP) systems with non-classical damping. In this program, four benchmark models of coupled building-piping/equipment systems with different damping characteristics were developed and analyzed by BNL for a suite of earthquakes. The BNL analysis was carried out by the Wilson-θ time domain integration method with the system-damping matrix computed using a synthesis formulation as presented in a companion paper [Nucl. Eng. Des. (2002)]. These benchmark problems were subsequently distributed to and analyzed by program participants applying their uniquely developed methods and computer programs. This paper is intended to offer a glimpse at the program, and provide a summary of major findings and principle conclusions with some representative results. The participant's analysis results established using complex modal time history methods showed good comparison with the BNL solutions, while the analyses produced with either complex-mode response spectrum methods or classical normal-mode response spectrum method, in general, produced more conservative results, when averaged over a suite of earthquakes. However, when coupling due to damping is significant, complex-mode response spectrum methods performed better than the classical normal-mode response spectrum method. Furthermore, as part of the program objectives, a parametric assessment is also presented in this paper, aimed at evaluation of the applicability of various analysis methods to problems with different dynamic characteristics unique to coupled NPP systems. It is believed that the findings and insights learned from this program will be useful in developing new acceptance criteria and providing guidance for future regulatory activities involving license

  13. Sulfur polymer stabilization/solidification (SPSS) treatment of mixed waste mercury recovered from environmental restoration activities at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 1,140 yd3 of radioactively contaminated soil containing toxic mercury (Hg) and several liters of mixed-waste elemental mercury were generated during a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Mixed Waste Focus Area (DOE MWFA) is sponsoring a comparison of several technologies that may be used to treat these wastes and similar wastes at BNL and other sites across the DOE complex. This report describes work conducted at BNL on the application and pilot-scale demonstration of the newly developed Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process for treatment of contaminated mixed-waste soils containing high concentrations (approximately 5,000 mg/L) of mercury and liquid elemental mercury. BNL's SPSS (patent pending) process chemically stabilizes the mercury to reduce vapor pressure and leachability and physically encapsulates the waste in a solid matrix to eliminate dispersion and provide long-term durability. Two 55-gallon drums of mixed-waste soil containing high concentrations of mercury and about 62 kg of radioactive contaminated elemental mercury were successfully treated. Waste loadings of 60 wt% soil were achieved without resulting in any increase in waste volume, while elemental mercury was solidified at a waste loading of 33 wt% mercury. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) analyses indicate the final waste form products pass current Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) allowable TCLP concentrations as well as the more stringent proposed Universal Treatment Standards. Mass balance measurements show that 99.7% of the mercury treated was successfully retained within the waste form, while only 0.3% was captured in the off gas system

  14. Environmental radioactivity measurements at BNL during the year following the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident which destroyed Unit 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station on 26 April 1986 provided the world's scientists with an opportunity, unique in recent years, to study many of the processes which follow the release of large quantities of radioactivity into the atmosphere. BNL undertook a wide ranging programme of environmental measurements after the accident, the immediate aim being to supply HM Government with data to help assess the radiological consequences to the UK population. As it became clear that the UK dose commitment was relatively low, the thrust of the measurements began to be concentrated on airborne radioactivity and the movement of nuclides in the grass-soil system. The aim of these studies was to assess dispersion and diffusion of radioactivity in these particular compartments of the environment. The measurements have continued over the twelve month period since the Chernobyl accident. This report aims to disseminate the year's data and to offer some initial interpretations of the trends. (U.K.)

  15. Distribution and ecotoxicity of chlorotriazines in the Scheldt Estuary (B-Nl)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the Endis-Risks project, the current study describes the occurrence of the chlorotriazine pesticides atrazine, simazine and terbutylazine in water, sediment and suspended matter in the Scheldt estuary (B-Nl) from 2002 to 2005 (3 samplings a year, 8 sampling points). Atrazine was found at the highest concentrations, varying from 10 to 736 ng/l in water and from 5 up to 10 ng/g in suspended matter. Simazine and terbutylazine were detected at lower concentrations. Traces of the targeted pesticides were also detected in sediments, but these were below the limit of quantification. As part of an ecotoxicological assessment, we studied the potential effect of atrazine on molting of Neomysis integer (Crustacea:Mysidacea), a resident invertebrate of the Scheldt Estuary and a proposed test organism for the evaluation of endocrine disruption. Following chronic exposure (∼3 weeks), atrazine did not significantly affect mysid molting at environmentally relevant concentrations (up to 1 μg/l). - The water of the Scheldt estuary and its associated suspended solids are contaminated with chlorotriazines at concentrations that do not affect mysid molting

  16. Studies of material properties under irradiation at BNL Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos, N.; Kirk, H.; Ludewig, H.; /Brookhaven; Mokhov, N.; Hurh, P.; Misek, J.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    Effects of proton beams irradiating materials considered for targets in high-power accelerator experiments have been under study using the Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) 200 MeV Linac. The primary objectives of the study that includes a wide array of materials and alloys ranging between low and high-Z are to (a) observe changes in physio-mechanical properties which are important in maintaining high-power target functionality, (b) identify possible limits of proton flux or fluence above which certain material seize to maintain integrity, (c) study the role of material operating temperature in inducing or maintaining radiation damage reversal, and (d) correlate radiation damage effects of different species such as energetic protons and neutrons on materials by utilizing reactor and particle accelerator experience data. These objectives are specifically being addressed in the latest material irradiation study linked to the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE). Observations on irradiation effects on materials considered for high-power targets and other beam intercepting elements, such as collimators, from past studies and preliminary observations of the ongoing LBNE study are presented in this paper.

  17. Investigation of a plant and fish kill downstream from BNL sewage treatment outfall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period May 13 to May 17, 1974, a plant and fish kill occurred in a headwater of the Peconic River, which originates on the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) site. Although the stream itself, and hence the magnitude of the mortality, was small, the fish kill was near total in the impacted reach, and therefore received more attention than the numbers alone would warrant. The Laboratory has utilized the stream for the past 25 years for the discharge of treated sanitary wastes containing low levels of radioactivity, without perceptible effect up to the time of this incident. Although an investigation during the following several months has not disclosed a completely satisfactory explanation, it has pointed out weaknesses in the Laboratory's knowledge of the on site amounts and locations of environmentally toxic agents, as well as of the accountability for their use. The investigation also suggested the need for additional monitoring to detect unusual agents in the sanitary treatment plant influent for prompt analyses of suspect samples, and for a means of holding up the effluent until such analyses can be accomplished. Additionally, the investigation led to the identification of supporting analytical capabilities of other government agencies, without which a competent investigation would have been difficult. It also revealed the desirability for the prompt submission of relevant samples to them, in the event of a recurrence

  18. The Upgrade of the DUV-FEL Facility at the BNL

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xijie; Murphy, James; Rakowsky, George; Rose, James; Sheehy, Brian; Shen, Yuzhen; Skaritka, John; Wu, Zilu; Yu Li Hua

    2004-01-01

    The DUV-FEL at BNL, is the world's only facility dedicated to laser-seeded FEL R&D and its applications. The HGHG at the DUV-FEL reached saturation at 266 nm with 800 nm seeding [1] in 2002. Since then, the first chemical science experiment ? ion pair imaging, was successfully completed [2].The DUV-FEL linac is being upgraded from 200 to 300 MeV to enable the HGHG FEL to produce 100 μJ pulses of 100 nm light. This will establish the DUV FEL as a premier user facility for XUV radiation. The upgraded facility will also enable several critical R&Ds for a future X-ray FEL based on HGHG, such as cascaded HGHG and higher harmonic HGHG (n>5). The upgraded HGHG will operate at the 4th harmonic with the seed laser at 400nm. The increase of the electron beam energy will be accomplished by installing a 5th linac cavity and two 45 MW klystrons. New modulator and dispersion sections vacuum chambers will be manufactured to accommodate new matching optics and 8th harmonic HGHG. The status of the DUV-FEL upgra...

  19. A FIVE-WATTS G-M/J-T REFRIGERATOR FOR THE TARGET AT BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A five-watts G-M/J-T refrigerator was built and installed for the high-energy physics research at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2001. A liquid helium target of 8.25 liters was required for an experiment in the proton beam line at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of BNL. The large radiation heat load towards the target requires a five-watts refrigerator at 4.2 K to support a liquid helium flask of 0.2 meter in diameter and 0.3 meter in length which is made of Mylar film of 0.35 mm in thickness. The liquid helium flask is thermally exposed to the vacuum windows that are also made of 0.35 mm thickness Mylar film at room temperature. The refrigerator uses a two-stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler for precooling the Joule-Thomson circuit that consists of five Linde-type heat exchangers. A mass flow rate of 0.8(approx) 1.0 grams per second at 17.7 atm is applied to the refrigerator cold box. The two-phase helium flows between the liquid target and liquid/gas separator by means of thermosyphon. The paper presents the system design as well as the test results including the control of thermal oscillation

  20. Analysis of the BNL ThO2-233U exponential experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BNL ThO2--3 w/o 233U light-water-moderated exponential experiments were analyzed to evaluate (1) cross section library sets for 233U and 232Th, and (2) correlations with measured ThO2 resonance integral data. A total of six cross section library sets were evaluated, including ENDF/B-2 and ENDF/B-3 libraries for 232Th, ENDF/B-2 library for 233U, and ThO2 resonance integral correlations based on data by Weitman and Pettus, Hardy and Palowitch, and corrections to the latter data by Steen. A modified version of the LEOPARD code was used throughout this analysis. The principle results of this work are as follows: (1) The library set containing ENDF/B-2 data for 233U and ENDF/B-3 data for 232Th, together with ThO2 resonance integral correlation based on Steen's corrections to the Hardy and Palowitch data, yields the best agreement with measurements, giving an average k/sub eff/ of 0.9975 with a standard deviation of 0.0067 for the 21 analyzed configurations. (2) With respect to this ''best'' set, the ENDF/B-2 232Th data is less reactive than the corresponding ENDF/B-3 data by approximately 0.1 percent Δk. (3) The ThO2 resonance integral correlation based on data by Weitman and Pettus yields resonance integrals that are consistently higher than those produced by the correlation with Steen's values, even though the latter is normalized to an infinitely dilute resonance integral of 85.9 barns (0.5 ev cutoff), while the former is normalized to a corresponding value of 80 barns. Thus, with respect to the ''best'' set, the ThO2 resonance integral correlation based on the Weitman and Pettus data is less reactive by approximately 0.7 percent Δk

  1. Search for neutrino oscillations in the BNL E8-16 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiment PS 191 at CERN was looking for decays of hypothetical heavy neutrinos in a low energy upsilon/sub μ/ beam. It found an apparent excess of neutrino interactions showing an electron, about 3 times the number expected from the fluxes of upsilon/sub e/ calculated with standard programs. The result was limited by statistics and not optimized for this search. If the events seen were indeed upsilon/sub e/ interactions and if the flux calculations were reliable, then the signal could be an indication of the oscillation upsilon/sub μ/ → upsilon/sub e/. To investigate further this result the detector was moved to BNL where the neutrino beam is about 5 times more intense. The experiment was rerun in better conditions with an unbiased trigger and more matter for shower containment. A total of 10/sup 19/ protons on target were accumulated both for neutrinos and antineutrinos. This represents more than an order of magnitude gain with respect to the CERN experiment. The detector, although light (upsilon 7 tons of fiducial mass) has the advantage of being very fine grain. It is constructed of 3 mm thick iron plates and flash tube chambers. The tubes have transverse dimensions 5 x 5 mm/sup 2/ and cover 3 x 6 m/sup 2/ for a total of 35,000 channels. The granularity for electromagnetic showers is 17% of a radiation length. The search for oscillation is a relative measurement of the number of events showing 2 branches, either with or without and electromagnetic shower. This is a direct estimate of the ratio upsilon/sub e//upsilonμ

  2. Tests of an environmental and personnel safe cleaning process for BNL accelerator and storage ring components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large measure of the successful operation of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for over a decade can be attributed to the cleaning of its UHV components during and after construction. A new UHV cleaning process, which had to be environmentally and personnel safe, was needed to replace the harsh, unfriendly process which was still in use. Dow Advanced Cleaning Systems was contracted to develop a replacement process without the use of harsh chemicals and which must clean vacuum surfaces as well as the existing process. Acceptance of the replacement process was primarily based on Photon Stimulated Desorption (PSD) measurements of beam tube samples run on NSLS beam line U10B. One meter long beam tube samples were fabricated from aluminum, 304 stainless steel and oxygen free copper. Initially, coupon samples were cleaned and passed preliminary testing for the proposed process. Next, beam tube samples of each material were cleaned, and the PSD measured on beam line U10B using white light with a critical energy of 487 ev. Prior to cleaning, the samples were contaminated with a mixture of cutting oils, lubricants, vacuum oils and vacuum grease. The contaminated samples were then baked. Samples of each material were also cleaned with the existing process after the same preparation. Beam tube samples were exposed to between 1022 and 1023 photons per meter for a PSD measurement. Desorption yields for H2, CO, CO2, CH4 and H2O are reported for both the existing cleaning and for the replacement cleaning process. Preliminary data, residual gas scans, and PSD results are given and discussed. The new process is also compared with new cleaning methods developed in other laboratories

  3. Development of a practical training program based on BNL`s input to new NFPA Lined Masonary Chimney Venting Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, G. [Agway Energy Products, Tully, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes how we developed a practical training program for technicians and sales personnel from the BNL studies that evolved into the Lined Chimney Venting Tables. One of the topics discussed is our search for solutions to the reoccurring problems associated with flue gas condensation on newly installed oil fired appliances. The paper will also discuss our own experiences in applying the new venting tables and working through the questions that arise when we encounter installations beyond the scope of the present tables.

  4. Construction and testing of arc dipoles and quadrupoles for the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production run of superconducting magnets for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) project at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is well underway. Of the 288 arc dipoles needed for the collider, more than 120 have been delivered. More than 150 arc quadrupoles have been delivered. All of these magnets have been accepted for RHIC. This paper reports the construction and performance of these magnets. Novel features of design and test, introduced to enhance technical performance and control costs, are also discussed. Other papers submitted to this Conference summarize work on the sextupoles and tuning quads, arc correctors, and combined corrector-quadrupole-sextupole assemblies (CQS)

  5. Senior Centers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to do as long as they can. Senior centers, adult day care, transportation, and meals programs are ... older adults to remain in their homes. Senior centers are places where older adults who live independently ...

  6. Place of the radiation safety officer in the implementation of the ALARA principle through European directive 97-43 items; Role de la personne competente dans la sensibilisation au principe ALARA a travers l'application de la directive europeenne 97-43

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozziconacci, J.G.; Ayivi, J.; Loat, A.; Ifergan, J.; Mourbrun, M.; Drevet, B. [Hopital J. Coeur, Service d' Imagerie et de Medecine du Travail, 18 - Bourges (France)

    2005-05-15

    The purpose of this article is to define the role of the radiation safety officer in raising the awareness of the radiology staff to the ALARA (As low as reasonable achievable) principle specified in European directive 97-43. The actions taken and the techniques used in our hospital, as well as the potential improvements that could be achieved with extra funding, will be presented. The didactic value of flow charts recording technical factors and fluoroscopy times for quality improvement will be demonstrated. In the future, a dosimeter incorporated on the new equipment could allow direct recording of the dose. The different items presented in this paper should allow routine implementation of the required elements described in the law 2003-270, i.e the French translation of European Directive 97-43. (author)

  7. Status of 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long SSC dipole magnet R ampersand D program at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last year, several 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long dipole magnet prototypes were built by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under contract with the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory. These prototypes are the last phase of a half-decade-long R ampersand D program, carried out in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of the SSC main ring magnets. They also lay the ground for the 5-cm aperture dipole magnet program to be started soon. After reviewing the design features of the BNL 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long dipole magnets, we describe in detail the various steps of their fabrication. For each step, we discuss the parameters that need to be mastered, and we compare the values that were achieved for the five most recent prototypes. The data appear coherent and reproducible, demonstrating that the assembly process in under control. 23 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Excel Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Citigroup,one of the World top 500 companies,has now settled in Excel Center,Financial Street. The opening ceremony of Excel Center and the entry ceremony of Citigroup in the center were held on March 31.Government leaders of Xicheng District,the Excel CEO and the heads of Asia-Pacific Region leaders of Citibank all participated in the ceremony.

  9. Impact of main radiological pollutants on contamination risks (ALARA). Optimisation of physico chemical environment and retention techniques during operation and shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this paper is to follow up the behaviour of different radiochemical species in the primary coolant of PWR plants. Managing these pollutants must lead to limit Reactor Coolant System (RCS) walls 'over-contamination' and consequently to decrease the dose rates during the maintenance operations (ALARA). In French plants, Co 60, silver and antimony represent the major radiochemical pollutants which require a good knowledge of the different phenomena to ensure the lowest contamination risks. The stakes deal with the control and the optimization of collective and individual doses including waste treatment with low costs. These stakes represent primordial elements of nuclear acceptability. It is obvious that implementing specific chemistry and optimizing purification features (filters, resins and flowrate) ensures a limitation of the effects of this type of pollutions. That's why studies are yet in progress to propose operators a chemical policy and adapted procedures for each type of radioactive pollution able to reduce the impact on dosimetry. On the other hand, a new specific gamma spectrometer able to characterize on the field the nature of radioactive deposits, in order to improve the diagnostic, is being developed

  10. Optimization (Alara) and probabilistic exposures: the application of optimization criteria to the control of risks due to exposures of a probabilistic nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper described the application of the principles of optimization recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to the restrain of radiation risks due to exposures that may or may not be incurred and to which a probability of occurrence can be assigned. After describing the concept of probabilistic exposures, it proposes a basis for a converging policy of control for both certain and probabilistic exposures, namely the dose-risk relationship adopted for radiation protection purposes. On that basis some coherent approaches for dealing with probabilistic exposures, such as the limitation of individual risks, are discussed. The optimization of safety for reducing all risks from probabilistic exposures to as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) levels is reviewed in full. The principles of optimization of protection are used as a basic framework and the relevant factors to be taken into account when moving to probabilistic exposures are presented. The paper also reviews the decision-aiding techniques suitable for performing optimization with particular emphasis to the multi-attribute utility-analysis technique. Finally, there is a discussion on some practical application of decision-aiding multi-attribute utility analysis to probabilistic exposures including the use of probabilistic utilities. In its final outlook, the paper emphasizes the need for standardization and solutions to generic problems, if optimization of safety is to be successful

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON RHIC SPIN PHYSICS III AND IV, POLARIZED PARTONS AT HIGH Q2 REGION, AUGUST 3, 2000 AT BNL, OCTOBER 14, 2000 AT KYOTO UNIVERSITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUNCE, G.; VIGDOR, S.

    2001-03-15

    International workshop on II Polarized Partons at High Q2 region 11 was held at the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan on October 13-14, 2000, as a satellite of the international conference ''SPIN 2000'' (Osaka, Japan, October 16-21,2000). This workshop was supported by RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and by Yukawa Institute. The scientific program was focused on the upcoming polarized collider RHIC. The workshop was also an annual meeting of RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC). The number of participants was 55, including 28 foreign visitors and 8 foreign-resident Japanese participants, reflecting the international nature of the RHIC spin program. At the workshop there were 25 oral presentations in four sessions, (1) RHIC Spin Commissioning, (2) Polarized Partons, Present and Future, (3) New Ideas on Polarization Phenomena, (4) Strategy for the Coming Spin Running. In (1) the successful polarized proton commissioning and the readiness of the accelerator for the physics program impressed us. In (2) and (3) active discussions were made on the new structure function to be firstly measured at RHIC, and several new theoretical ideas were presented. In session (4) we have established a plan for the beam time requirement toward the first collision of polarized protons. These proceedings include the transparencies presented at the workshop. The discussion on ''Strategy for the Coming Spin Running'' was summarized by the chairman of the session, S. Vigdor and G. Bunce.

  12. Job center

    Science.gov (United States)

    To better meet the needs of AGU members, a program has been started to increase the effectiveness of the Job Center activity at the Spring and Fall Meetings. As a result, participation in the Job Center at the 1988 AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore increased substantially compared to previous Spring Meetings. The number of employers, applicants, and interviews scheduled more than doubled compared to the 1987 Spring Job Center.In order to make the meeting Job Centers even better, a survey is being conducted of employers and applicants who participated in the 1988 Spring Job Center. Evaluation of this survey will be useful in continuing increased participation in and the effectiveness of the Job Center at the 1988 Fall Meeting. Past participants and those interested in the future of the Job Center are encouraged to forward comments and suggestions to AGU, Member Programs Division, 2000 Florida Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20009.

  13. Standard reference and other important nuclear data. Supplement 1 to the report BNL-NCS-51123 (Dec. 1979) = ENDF-300 = IAEA-NDS-15/300 (microfiche)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document contains inserts to be added to the report 'Standard Reference and Other Important Nuclear Data' (BNL-NCS-51123, ENDF-300), including the following two articles: Fast Neutron Capture in 238U and 232Th by W.P. Poentiz (ANL), and 239Pu Decay Power Discrepancy by T.R. England and P.G. Young (LANL)

  14. Functional Centering

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, M

    1996-01-01

    Based on empirical evidence from a free word order language (German) we propose a fundamental revision of the principles guiding the ordering of discourse entities in the forward-looking centers within the centering model. We claim that grammatical role criteria should be replaced by indicators of the functional information structure of the utterances, i.e., the distinction between context-bound and unbound discourse elements. This claim is backed up by an empirical evaluation of functional centering.

  15. Clinical application of ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA in pediatric CT imaging: “How many children can be protected from unnecessary radiation?”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Practice of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle in the developed world is currently well established. However, there is striking lack of published data regarding such experience in the developing countries. Therefore, the goal of this study is to prospectively evaluate CT request forms to assess how many children could be saved from harmful radiation exposure if ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principles of ALARA are applied before obtaining CT imaging in a developing country. • A consecutive 1302 CT request forms over a six month study period (May 16, 2013 to November 15, 2013) in a tertiary pediatric children’s hospital in India were prospectively reviewed by two pediatric radiologists before obtaining CT imaging. First, ‘Justification’ of CT was evaluated and then ‘Optimization’ was applied for evaluation of appropriateness of the requested CT studies. The number (and percentage) of CT studies that was avoided by applying ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA were calculated. The difference in number of declined and optimized CT requests between CT requests from inpatient and outpatient departments was compared using Chi-Square test. • Based on evaluation of the CT request forms for ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA by pediatric radiology reviewers, 111 individual anatomic part CT requests from 105 pediatric patients were avoided. Therefore, 8.06% (105 out of 1302 pediatric patients) were saved from unnecessary or additional radiation exposure The rates of declined or optimized CT requests from inpatient department was significantly higher than that from outpatient departments (p < 0.05). • To conclude, a substantial number of pediatric patients, particularly coming from inpatients departments, can be saved from unnecessary or additional radiation exposure from CT imaging when ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA are applied

  16. Clinical application of ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA in pediatric CT imaging: “How many children can be protected from unnecessary radiation?”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit S., E-mail: sodhiks@gmail.com [Departments of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh (India); Krishna, Satheesh; Saxena, Akshay K.; Sinha, Anindita; Khandelwal, Niranjan [Departments of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh (India); Lee, Edward Y. [Departments of Radiology and Medicine, Pulmonary Division, Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Ave. Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Practice of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle in the developed world is currently well established. However, there is striking lack of published data regarding such experience in the developing countries. Therefore, the goal of this study is to prospectively evaluate CT request forms to assess how many children could be saved from harmful radiation exposure if ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principles of ALARA are applied before obtaining CT imaging in a developing country. • A consecutive 1302 CT request forms over a six month study period (May 16, 2013 to November 15, 2013) in a tertiary pediatric children’s hospital in India were prospectively reviewed by two pediatric radiologists before obtaining CT imaging. First, ‘Justification’ of CT was evaluated and then ‘Optimization’ was applied for evaluation of appropriateness of the requested CT studies. The number (and percentage) of CT studies that was avoided by applying ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA were calculated. The difference in number of declined and optimized CT requests between CT requests from inpatient and outpatient departments was compared using Chi-Square test. • Based on evaluation of the CT request forms for ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA by pediatric radiology reviewers, 111 individual anatomic part CT requests from 105 pediatric patients were avoided. Therefore, 8.06% (105 out of 1302 pediatric patients) were saved from unnecessary or additional radiation exposure The rates of declined or optimized CT requests from inpatient department was significantly higher than that from outpatient departments (p < 0.05). • To conclude, a substantial number of pediatric patients, particularly coming from inpatients departments, can be saved from unnecessary or additional radiation exposure from CT imaging when ‘Justification’ and ‘Optimization’ principle of ALARA are applied

  17. Distribution center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Distribution center is a logistics link fulfill physical distribution as its main functionGenerally speaking, it's a large and hiahly automated center destined to receive goods from various plants and suppliers,take orders,fill them efficiently,and deliver goods to customers as quickly as possible.

  18. The operation of the BNL/ATF gun-IV photocathode RF gun at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), a free-electron laser (FEL) based on the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process is nearing completion. Recently, an rf photoinjector gun system was made available to the APS by Brookhaven National Laboratory/Accelerator Test Facility (BNL/ATF). It will be used to provide the high-brightness, low-emittance, and low-energy spread electron beam required by the SASE FEL theory. A Nd:Glass laser system, capable of producing a maximum of 500 microJ of UV in a 1-10 ps pulse at up to a 10-Hz repetition rate, serves as the photoinjector's drive laser. Here, the design, commissioning, and integration of this gun with the APS is discussed

  19. The Unified Hydrodynamics and the Pseudorapidity Distributions in Heavy Ion Collisions at BNL-RHIC and CERN-LHC Energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. J. Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The charged particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions are divided into two parts. One is from the hot and dense matter created in collisions. The other is from leading particles. The hot and dense matter is assumed to expand according to unified hydrodynamics and freezes out into charged particles from a space-like hypersurface with a fixed proper time of τFO. The leading particles are conventionally taken as the particles which inherit the quantum numbers of colliding nucleons and carry off most of incident energy. The rapidity distributions of the charged particles from these two parts are formulated analytically, and a comparison is made between the theoretical results and the experimental measurements performed in Au-Au and Pb-Pb collisions at the respective BNL-RHIC and CERN-LHC energies. The theoretical results are well consistent with experimental data.

  20. Prospects for measuring K+ -> π+ ν νbar and KL0 -> π0 ν νbar at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rare kaon decay experiments underway or planned for the BNL AGS will yield new and independent determinations of V*tsVtd. A measurement of B(KL0 rarrow π0 νbar ν) allows a determination of the imaginary part of this quantity, which is the fundamental CP-violating parameter of the Standard Model, in a uniquely clean manner. Since the measurement of B(K+ rarrow π+ νbar ν) determines vertbarV*tsVtd, a complete derivation of the unitarity triangle is facilitated. These results can be compared to high precision data expected to come from the B sector in a number of ways, allowing for unique tests of new physics

  1. Proton and pion transverse spectra at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider from radial flow and finite size effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the proton and pion transverse momentum distributions measured at BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), for all collision centralities for pions and most of the collision centralities for protons, can be simultaneously described in terms of a thermal model with common values for the radial flow and temperature, when accounting for the finite size of the interaction region at the time of decoupling. We show that this description is obtained in terms of a simple scaling law of the size of the interaction region with the number of participants in the collision. The behavior of the proton to pion ratio at mid-rapidity can also be understood as a consequence of the strength of the radial flow and system size reached at RHIC energies

  2. The HANARO neutron reflectometer with horizontal sample geometry. Relocation and upgrade plans of the BNL H9-A reflectometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chong Oh; Shin, Kwanwoo; Lee, Jeong Soo; Lee, Chang-Hee; Cho, Sang Jin; Hong, Kwang Pyo

    2006-11-01

    A new neutron reflectometer with horizontal sample geometry is under construction at a thermal neutron port at HANARO, the 30 MW research reactor at KAERI. It was originally designed and operated at the H9-A beam port at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and was relocated to HANARO in 2004. It will be initially installed at the ST3 thermal-neutron port without any significant modification, and significant improvements in structure and performance are planned when the new cold source is installed in 2008. If successfully installed, it will be the first reflectometer in Korea for the study of free surfaces, which is currently lacking. For the thermal source, the feasible wavelength of incident neutron beam is 2.5 Å and this would permits the q ranges up to 0.21 Å -1.

  3. The HANARO neutron reflectometer with horizontal sample geometry. Relocation and upgrade plans of the BNL H9-A reflectometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new neutron reflectometer with horizontal sample geometry is under construction at a thermal neutron port at HANARO, the 30 MW research reactor at KAERI. It was originally designed and operated at the H9-A beam port at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and was relocated to HANARO in 2004. It will be initially installed at the ST3 thermal-neutron port without any significant modification, and significant improvements in structure and performance are planned when the new cold source is installed in 2008. If successfully installed, it will be the first reflectometer in Korea for the study of free surfaces, which is currently lacking. For the thermal source, the feasible wavelength of incident neutron beam is 2.5 A and this would permits the q ranges up to 0.21 A-1

  4. A very thin havar film vacuum window for heavy ions to perform radiobiology studies at the BNL Tandem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy ion beams from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will be made available for radiobiology studies on cell cultures. Beam energy losses need to be minimized both in the vacuum window and in the air in order to achieve the ranges required for the cells to be studied. This is particularly challenging for ions heavier than iron. The design is presented of a 0.4-inch diameter Havar film window that will satisfy these requirements. Films as thin as 80 microinches were successfully pressure tested. The final thickness to be used may be slightly larger to help in achieving pin hole free windows. We discuss design considerations and present pressure and vacuum test results as well as tests with heavy ion beams.

  5. Reduction in airborne contamination levels at the 9201-5 Arc Melt sawing operation. A Y-12 Plant 1982 ALARA goal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, D.E.; West, C.M.

    1983-02-01

    Lowering the uranium airborne contamination level at the two saws in the 9201-5 Arc Melt Area was chosen as a Y-12 Plant As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) goal for 1982. This priority was convincingly communicated to those involving by giving specific instructions to suspend saw operations any time there was evidence of a problem until that problem could be corrected. Using control charts on air flow rates into the saw enclosures and pressure drops across filters in the saw ventilation (Delta Phase I) exhaust system, it was possible to decide when filter changes or other adjustments were necessary to maintain the exhaust flow rates needed for improved airborne contamination control. The keeping of these charts, along with the actions taken on the basis of the data gathered, made it possible to meet the goal of reducing airborne contamination levels in 1982, as compared with 1981, although production in the Arc Melt Area increased significantly. These data also showed that use of one brand of filter in the prefilter system resulted in the need to change filters more frequently than when another brand was used. This fact triggered an investigation which revealed the cause for the shorter useful life of that filter and a request that only specifically approved filters be purchased for use in this system. Use of these control data also made it possible to establish that the exhaust system operated more effectively without the Roto-clone hydrostatic pecipitators because exhaust air flow was increased without reduction in filter life.

  6. Reduction in airborne contamination levels at the 9201-5 Arc Melt sawing operation. A Y-12 Plant 1982 ALARA goal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowering the uranium airborne contamination level at the two saws in the 9201-5 Arc Melt Area was chosen as a Y-12 Plant As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) goal for 1982. This priority was convincingly communicated to those involving by giving specific instructions to suspend saw operations any time there was evidence of a problem until that problem could be corrected. Using control charts on air flow rates into the saw enclosures and pressure drops across filters in the saw ventilation (Delta Phase I) exhaust system, it was possible to decide when filter changes or other adjustments were necessary to maintain the exhaust flow rates needed for improved airborne contamination control. The keeping of these charts, along with the actions taken on the basis of the data gathered, made it possible to meet the goal of reducing airborne contamination levels in 1982, as compared with 1981, although production in the Arc Melt Area increased significantly. These data also showed that use of one brand of filter in the prefilter system resulted in the need to change filters more frequently than when another brand was used. This fact triggered an investigation which revealed the cause for the shorter useful life of that filter and a request that only specifically approved filters be purchased for use in this system. Use of these control data also made it possible to establish that the exhaust system operated more effectively without the Roto-clone hydrostatic pecipitators because exhaust air flow was increased without reduction in filter life

  7. Evolución del paisaje vegetal durante los últimos 1.680 años BP en el Macizo de Peñalara (Sierra de Guadarrama, Madrid)

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, C.; Ruíz Zapata, María Blanca; M.J. Gil; López Sáez, José Antonio; Santiesteban, J.; Mediavilla, R.; Domínguez, F.; Vera, S

    2009-01-01

    El estudio polínico de un depósito higroturboso de origen periglacial localizado en el macizo de Peñalara (Sierra de Guadarrama. Madrid) apoyado en 7 dataciones AMS de 14C, proporciona la primera reconstrucción de alta resolución de la evolución de la vegetación en el área durante los últimos 1689 años. Los resultados obtenidos reflejan la existencia de un paisaje vegetal dominado por el estrato herbáceo, constituido fundamentalmente por Poaceae y Plantago lanceolata tipo. La masa fo...

  8. Senior Centers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... variety of social and recreational activities. [Karen Albers] We provide a wide variety of activities -- physical, health, ... senior centers also offer exercise programs. [Karen Albers] We offer aerobics, tai chi, tap dancing, ballroom dancing, ...

  9. Senior Centers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... transportation, and meals programs are long-term care services available in the community which make it easier ... about senior centers and other long-term care services available in your community, contact the Eldercare Locator ...

  10. Senior Centers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Karen Albers] We provide a wide variety of activities -- physical, health, mental health programs with Senior Plus, cognitive ... of games. [Narrator] Many senior centers also offer exercise programs. [Karen Albers] We offer aerobics, tai chi, ...

  11. Senior Centers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available [Narrator] Living independently at home is something many older adults would like to do as long as they can. Senior centers, adult day care, transportation, and meals programs are ...

  12. Senior Centers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Living independently at home is something many older adults would like to do as long as they can. Senior centers, adult day care, transportation, and meals programs are long- ...

  13. Senior Centers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of games. [Narrator] Many senior centers also offer exercise programs. [Karen Albers] We offer aerobics, tai chi, ... chi, tap dancing, ballroom dancing, square dancing, chair exercise, arthritis classes, yoga, and lots of dancing. [Narrator] ...

  14. Senior Centers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... something many older adults would like to do as long as they can. Senior centers, adult day care, transportation, ... adults who live independently can go to find a variety of social and recreational activities. [Karen Albers] ...

  15. Status of 4-cm aperture, 17-m-long SSC dipole magnet R and D program at BNL. Part 1: Magnet assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last year, several 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long dipole magnet prototypes were built by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under contract with the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory. These prototypes are the last phase of a half-decade-long R and D program, carried out in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of the SSC main ring magnets. They also lay the ground for the 5-cm aperture dipole magnet program to be started soon. After reviewing the design features of the BNL 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long dipole magnets, the authors describe in detail the various steps of their fabrication. For each step, they discuss the parameters that need to be mastered, and they compare the values that were achieved for the five most recent prototypes. The data appear coherent and reproducible, demonstrating that the assembly process is under control

  16. eRHIC, the BNL design for a future Electron-Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roser, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    With the addition of a 20 GeV polarized electron accelerator to the existing Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the world's only high energy heavy ion and polarized proton collider, a future eRHIC facility will be able to produce polarized electron-nucleon collisions at center-of-mass energies of up to 145 GeV and cover the whole science case as outlined in the Electron-Ion Collider White Paper and endorsed by the 2015 Nuclear Physics Long Range Plan with high luminosity. The presentation will describe the eRHIC design concepts and recent efforts to reduce the technical risks of the project.

  17. Wake-field and space charge effects on high brightness beams calculations and measured results for the laser driven photoelectrons at BNL-ATF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the formalism used to study the effects of the interactions between the highly charged particles and the fields in the accelerating structure, including space charge and wake fields. Some of our calculations and numerical simulation results obtained for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) high-brightness photoelectron beam at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) and the measured data at ATF are also included

  18. Senior Centers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provide a wide variety of activities -- physical, health, mental health programs with Senior Plus, cognitive programs, a wide variety of general activities, billiards, Bingo, lots of games. [Narrator] Many senior centers also offer exercise programs. [Karen Albers] We offer aerobics, tai chi, ...

  19. Hastings Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BLOG We have long had the ability, we humans, to work outside the bounds of evolution. Dairy cattle, maize, and all sorts of dog ... intervention. However, in the past, the scope of human intervention was rather… Read more Share: ... Evolution? Read more HASTINGS NEWS Hastings Center research scholar ...

  20. Senior Centers

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    Full Text Available ... dancing. [Narrator] These centers can provide entree to new activities and expand a person’s social contacts. [Karen ... meeting all their interests and introducing them to new things; whether it’s an arts and crafts project, ...

  1. Senior Centers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... transportation, and meals programs are long-term care services available in the community which make it easier for older adults to ... about senior centers and other long-term care services available in your community, contact the Eldercare Locator at 1-800-677- ...

  2. Status of quality assurance system for R and D in BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to frame a basic policy for adoption of R and D QA and to guide the improvement of existing nuclear facilities-centered QA systems for regular enforcement of R and D QA in the future. We investigated the state-of-the-art of R and D QA systems in U.S.A where R and D QA is most comprehensively applied in the world. We also investigated the implementation process of QA activities to understand the state of the operation of QA system. The policy for improvement of existing QA systems for regular enforcement of R and D QA in Korea were established through the comparative study of QA system between U.S.A and Korea

  3. Effects of varying doses of gamma radiation on locally adapted Tradescantia clone 02 (BNL) (Brookhaven National Laboratory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study determined the effects of gamma radiation on the meiotic cells of Tradescantia bracteata clone 02 (BNL). The flower buds collected were exposed through dosages ranging from 1 Gy to 5 Gy using gamma cell 220 machine (AECL) in a central axis position (c/a) and grown in Peralta's solution for three days. Out of the twenty buds designated for each dosages, ten buds were treated with 0.05% colchicine solution. The occurrence of micronuclei among the irradiated pollen mother cells suggested a linear relation with the quantity of radiation dose. The occurrence of MN among cells increased linearly from 1 Gy until it reached 3 Gy and 4 Gy. Beyond this maximum dose, cells were less responsive to the dose caused by inhibition of cell division, as demonstrated in the buds exposed to 5 Gy. This result was validated through the kruskal-Wallis test, where the computed h value was 3.44 (critical region of X20.05 = 9.49) Experimental results also showed chromosomal breaks, sticky chromosomes, and anaphase bridges in the pollen mother cells of irradiated buds. A significant numbers of cells were also found to have micronuclei, which may vary from 1 to 6 per pollen mother cell, and this showed no relationship with radiation dose. (Author)

  4. Mutagenic synergism detected between 1,2-dibromoethane and X rays in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone BNL 4430

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutagenic interaction between 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) and X rays was studied in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone BNL 4430, a blue/pink heterozygote. The young inflorescence-bearing shoots with roots of this clone cultivated in a nutrient solution circulating growth chamber were used as the tester plants. EDB is a promutagen and also a bifunctional alkylating agent with a high Swain-Scott substrate constant, but is thought to react probably via SN1 mechanism. After confirming the dose-dependent mutagenicities of aqueous solutions of EDB for the first time in Tradescantia stamen hairs, a combined treatment with EDB and X rays was conducted, exposing acutely to 578 mGy X rays at the midpoint of 66.5 mM EDB treatment for 4 h. The induced somatic mutation frequency determined after the combined treatment was significantly higher (at 0.1% level) than that expected from the additive effects of EDB and X rays, showing that EDB and X rays acted obviously synergistically. The confirmation of the mutagenic synergism between EDB and X rays is reported here for the first time, although a likelihood of synergistic effects of EDB with 3H beta rays has been suggested earlier. (author)

  5. Mutagenic interactions between maleic hydrazide and X rays in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone BNL 4430

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutagenic interactions between maleic hydrazide (MH; a promutagen known to be activated into a mutagen in plant cells) and X rays were studied in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone BNL 4430, a blue/pink heterozygote. The young inflorescence-bearing shoots with roots cultivated in the nutrient solution circulating growth chamber were used as tester plants. After determining dose-response curves for X rays and for MH, nine combined treatments with MH (0.5 and 1 mM) and X rays (292 to 1,240 mGy) were conducted, exposing to X rays either 20 or 44 h before, at the midpoint of, or 2 or 44 h after the MH treatments for 4h. Clear synergistic effects in inducing somatic pink mutations were detected when X rays were given before the MH treatments. On the contrary, however, antagonistic effects were often observed when X-ray treatments were carried out during or after the MH treatments. The synergistic effects detected were thought to be the results of interactions between DNA strand breaks (and the resultant chromosomal breaks) induced by X rays and those by MH, whereas the antagonistic effects observed were presumed to have resulted from X-ray-caused inhibition of the activation of MH in the stamen-hair cells. (author)

  6. Summary of the Mini BNL/LARP/CARE-HHH Workshop on Crab Cavities for the LHC (LHC-CC08)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first mini-workshop on crab compensation for the LHC luminosity upgrade (LHC-CC08) was held February 24-25, 2008 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A total of 35 participants from 3 continents and 15 institutions from around the world participated to discuss the exciting prospect of a crab scheme for the LHC. If realized it will be the first demonstration in hadron colliders. The workshop is organized by joint collaboration of BNL, US-LARP and CARE-HHH. The enormous interest in the subject of crab cavities for the international linear collider and future light sources has resulted in a large international collaboration to exchange aspects of synergy and expertise. A central repository for this exchange of information documenting the latest design effort for LHC crab cavities is consolidated in a wiki page: https://twiki.cern.ch/twiki/bin/view/Main/LHCCrabCavities. The main goal of this workshop was to define a road-map for a prototype crab cavity to be installed in the LHC and to discuss the associated R and D and beam dynamics challenges. The diverse subject of implementing the crab scheme resulted in a scientific program with a wide range of subtopics which were divided into 8 sessions. Each session was given a list of fundamental questions to be addressed and used as a guideline to steer the discussions

  7. Independent assessment of TRAC-PD2 and RELAP5/MOD1 codes at BNL in FY 1981. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, P; Jo, J H; Neymotin, L; Rohatgi, U S; Slovik, G

    1982-12-01

    This report documents the independent assessment calculations performed with the TRAC-PD2 and RELAP/MOD1 codes at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) during Fiscal Year 1981. A large variety of separate-effects experiments dealing with (1) steady-state and transient critical flow, (2) level swell, (3) flooding and entrainment, (4) steady-state flow boiling, (5) integral economizer once-through steam generator (IEOTSG) performance, (6) bottom reflood, and (7) two-dimensional phase separation of two-phase mixtures were simulated with TRAC-PD2. In addition, the early part of an overcooling transient which occurred at the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant on March 20, 1978 was also computed with an updated version of TRAC-PD2. Three separate-effects tests dealing with (1) transient critical flow, (2) steady-state flow boiling, and (3) IEOTSG performance were also simulated with RELAP5/MOD1 code. Comparisons between the code predictions and the test data are presented.

  8. Report on IAEA-CRP on signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection (IGCAR, DDIAE, KFK, BNL - contribution)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors reliable detection of sodium boiling has been recognised as an important requirement for additional safety protection. The monitoring of acoustic noise emitted during sodium boiling is considered a promising method. However, for reliable detection, it is necessary to distinguish the boiling noise from background noise. Different methods have been developed for this purpose in several countries. An IWGFR Specialists meeting recognised the necessity for a benchmark test to make a comparative assessment of the existing signal processing techniques and identify optimum methods for a reliable on-line sodium boiling noise detection system. The IAEA accepted the recommendation of IWGFR and sponsored the project. Australia Japan, India, FRG, GDR and UK participated in the project. The data for this benchmark problem was provided by the IAEA from out-of-pile experiments performed on KNS I loop at KFK-Karlsruhe and in-pile experiments performed on BOR-60 in Russia. In this presentation, first the IGCAR work is presented. It is followed by a brief presentation of BNL (UK), Australia and FRG work. 9 figs, 3 tabs

  9. Development of brazing technique for a 1.6 cell BNL/SLAC/UCLA type photocathode guns by hydrogen brazing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two prototypes of a 1.6 cell BNL/SLAC/UCLA type RF photocathode gun, a precision machined RF structure capable of supporting gradients in excess of 80 MV/m, have been successfully brazed and leak rates of 10-10 mbar l/s have been achieved. Brazing, is carried out in two steps in a hydrogen furnace, it involves joining of two RF cavities, 6 cylindrical ports, one rectangular waveguide and one seal plate. The cavities and waveguide are made of copper and the ports and seal plate are of stainless steel. Fixtures were designed and fabricated indigenously to maintain the required assembly tolerances during brazing. This was important for brazing of ports, two of which are brazed to one cavity at an angle of 22.50 at diametrically opposite locations, and the remaining four are brazed to the other cavity in mutually perpendicular orientations. All joints were brazed using copper-silver eutectic (72-28) alloy in foil and wire forms. This paper discusses the brazing requirement, design of fixtures, and the procedure adopted for brazing of the photocathode gun. The paper also discusses results of the tests carried out to qualify the brazed joints. (author)

  10. Independent assessment of TRAC-PD2 and RELAP5/MOD1 codes at BNL in FY 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the independent assessment calculations performed with the TRAC-PD2 and RELAP/MOD1 codes at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) during Fiscal Year 1981. A large variety of separate-effects experiments dealing with (1) steady-state and transient critical flow, (2) level swell, (3) flooding and entrainment, (4) steady-state flow boiling, (5) integral economizer once-through steam generator (IEOTSG) performance, (6) bottom reflood, and (7) two-dimensional phase separation of two-phase mixtures were simulated with TRAC-PD2. In addition, the early part of an overcooling transient which occurred at the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant on March 20, 1978 was also computed with an updated version of TRAC-PD2. Three separate-effects tests dealing with (1) transient critical flow, (2) steady-state flow boiling, and (3) IEOTSG performance were also simulated with RELAP5/MOD1 code. Comparisons between the code predictions and the test data are presented

  11. Neutral current quasielastic (anti)neutrino scattering beyond the Fermi gas model at MiniBooNE and BNL kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, M V; Barbaro, M B; Giusti, C; Meucci, A; Caballero, J A; Gonzalez-Jimenez, R; de Guerra, E Moya; Udias, J M

    2015-01-01

    Neutral current quasielastic (anti)neutrino scattering cross sections on a $^{12}$C target are analyzed using a realistic spectral function $S(p,E)$ that gives a scaling function in accordance with the ($e,e'$) scattering data. The spectral function accounts for the nucleon-nucleon (NN) correlations by using natural orbitals (NOs) from the Jastrow correlation method and has a realistic energy dependence. The standard value of the axial mass $M_A= 1.032$ GeV is used in all calculations. The role of the final-state interaction (FSI) on the spectral and scaling functions, as well as on the cross sections is accounted for. A comparison of the calculations with the empirical data of the MiniBooNE and BNL experiments is performed. Our results are analyzed in comparison with those when NN correlations are not included, and also with results from other theoretical approaches, such as the relativistic Fermi gas (RFG), the relativistic mean field (RMF), the relativistic Green's function (RGF), as well as with the Super...

  12. New dynamics information from experimental results obtained in d-Au collisions at RHIC-BNL energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last runs d-Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV have been investigated at RHIC-BNL using the BRAHMS Experiment. Some interesting experimental results on charged particle multiplicities, rapidity distributions, transverse momentum spectra, antiparticle to particle ratios, participant spectator evolution have been obtained. In this work the most interesting results are presented for different rapidity and collision centrality ranges. Taking into account the importance of the collision geometry and collision symmetry in the collision dynamics, comparisons with the similar experimental results obtained in Au-Au collisions have been done. New interesting results can be reported. The most significant are related to the evolution of the nuclear modification factor with rapidity and collision centrality. The high transverse momentum suppression and the behaviours in different rapidity and centrality ranges suggest strong initial state effects. These effects could be related to the gluonic structure of the colliding nuclei. Some insights on the Color Glass Condensate formation are possible. (author)

  13. Dose response relationship and Alara

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, it will be shown how dose-response relationships allow to give quantitative figures for the detriment of irradiation. At this stage, the detriment is expressed directly as a certain number of health effects, whose valuation is not dealt with here. The present tools for quantifying, their weaknesses and their strenghts, and their scientific basis will be developed

  14. Applied ALARA Workshops Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this standard is to provide Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) with guidance for ensuring radiological considerations are adequately addressed throughout the work planning process. Incorporating radiological controls in the planning process is a requirement of the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-I), Chapter 3, Part 1. This standard is applicable to all PHMC contractors and subcontractors. The essential elements of this standard will be incorporated into the appropriate site level work control standard upon implementation of the anticipated revision of the PHMC Administration and Procedure System

  15. Centered Pyramids

    OpenAIRE

    Brigger, P.; F. Müller; Illgner, K.; Unser, M.

    1999-01-01

    Quadtree-like pyramids have the advantage of resulting in a multiresolution representation where each pyramid node has four unambiguous parents. Such a centered topology guarantees a clearly defined up-projection of labels. This concept has been successfully and extensively used in applications of contour detection, object recognition and segmentation. Unfortunately, the quadtree-like type of pyramid has poor approximation powers because of the employed piecewise-constant image model. This pa...

  16. IRASM Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRASM is a national center for radiation processing developed around an industrial Co60 gamma irradiator. Being a department in an R and D national institute, IRASM Center is dealing with radiation treatment, pre/post microbiological control, validation of irradiation sterilization, detection of irradiated foodstuffs. Training is available for operators of new irradiation facilities focused on radiation technologies, dosimetry, sterilization, food treatment, conservation by irradiation of cultural heritage, quality assurance. Expertise on proper choosing the plastics for packaging versus dose is offered to the potential clients. IRASM Center is also involved in interdisciplinary applied research like chitosan treatment, sterile male technique or implementation of irradiation step in production of pharmaceuticals. All important activities: irradiation treatment, dosimetry, microbiology, detection of irradiated food, radioprotection, nuclear safety, physical protection. are performed in accordance with the proper standards in the frame of a certified quality management system. In this way Co60 industrial sources, a byproduct of certain nuclear power plants like Candu type, appear to be the key of a large technical and R and D domain. (authors)

  17. Experience with Multi-Tier Grid MySQL Database Service Resiliency at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the use of F5's BIG-IP smart switch technology (3600 Series and Local Traffic Manager v9.0) to provide load balancing and automatic fail-over to multiple Grid services (GUMS, VOMS) and their associated back-end MySQL databases. This resiliency is introduced in front of the external application servers and also for the back-end database systems, which is what makes it 'multi-tier'. The combination of solutions chosen to ensure high availability of the services, in particular the database replication and fail-over mechanism, are discussed in detail. The paper explains the design and configuration of the overall system, including virtual servers, machine pools, and health monitors (which govern routing), as well as the master-slave database scheme and fail-over policies and procedures. Pre-deployment planning and stress testing will be outlined. Integration of the systems with our Nagios-based facility monitoring and alerting is also described. And application characteristics of GUMS and VOMS which enable effective clustering will be explained. We then summarize our practical experiences and real-world scenarios resulting from operating a major US Grid center, and assess the applicability of our approach to other Grid services in the future.

  18. Tracking algorithms in ultrarelativistic nuclear experiments applied at BRAHMS - RHIC (BNL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considering the experimental results obtained in one of the major experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider from Brookhaven National Laboratory - Upton, New York, USA - namely BRAHMS (Broad Range Hadron Magnetic Spectrometers) Experiment - which studies Au + Au collisions at 200 GeV/n (center of mass system), we study the collision geometry implications upon the experimental yields. Making use of the two spectrometers from BRAHMS - providing very accurate angular distributions - we find out the importance of vertex determination on the physical event reconstruction and on the centrality cuts. The vertex problem is of major importance in collider physics, showing wide distributions. In this analysis of the experimental data are used three groups of detectors, namely: the Beam - Beam Counters and the Zero Degree Calorimeters, providing vertex measurements by time-of-flight right-left methods, and the time projection chambers that reconstruct the vertex by the back-projection of the produced clusters. The methods used are presented and a qualitative comparison between the experimental data from Au + Au collisions at 130 GeV and 200 GeV energies is made. Finally, we present the main problems regarding the track reconstruction and also some visualization algorithms from peculiar tracking detectors from BRAHMS. (authors)

  19. RIKEN WINTER SCHOOL: STRUCTURE OF HADRONS - INTRODUCTION TO QCD HARD PROCESSES. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, DECEMBER 9-12, 1998.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SAITO,N.

    1999-12-09

    In this lecture I give a pedagogical introduction to the Perturbative QCD to understand the short-distance dynamics of the strong interaction. Starting with fundamental concepts such as the color degree of freedom of QCD, non-abelian gauge field theory, renormalization group equation etc., I explain a basic idea of the perturbative QCD and apply this idea to the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} processes and the structure functions. The notion of mass singularity and the necessity of its factorization is discussed in some detail.

  20. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON RHIC SPIN PHYSICS III AND IV, POLARIZED PARTONS AT HIGH Q2 REGION (VOLUME 31)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International workshop on II Polarized Partons at High Q2 region 11 was held at the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan on October 13-14, 2000, as a satellite of the international conference ''SPIN 2000'' (Osaka, Japan, October 16-21,2000). This workshop was supported by RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and by Yukawa Institute. The scientific program was focused on the upcoming polarized collider RHIC. The workshop was also an annual meeting of RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC). The number of participants was 55, including 28 foreign visitors and 8 foreign-resident Japanese participants, reflecting the international nature of the RHIC spin program. At the workshop there were 25 oral presentations in four sessions, (1) RHIC Spin Commissioning, (2) Polarized Partons, Present and Future, (3) New Ideas on Polarization Phenomena, (4) Strategy for the Coming Spin Running. In (1) the successful polarized proton commissioning and the readiness of the accelerator for the physics program impressed us. In (2) and (3) active discussions were made on the new structure function to be firstly measured at RHIC, and several new theoretical ideas were presented. In session (4) we have established a plan for the beam time requirement toward the first collision of polarized protons. These proceedings include the transparencies presented at the workshop. The discussion on ''Strategy for the Coming Spin Running'' was summarized by the chairman of the session, S. Vigdor and G. Bunce

  1. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER, RIKEN WINTER SCHOOL, QUARK GLUON STRUCTURE OF THE NUCLEON AND QCD, MARCH 29-31, 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EN YO,H.; SAITO,N.; SHIBATA,T.A.; YAZAKI,K.; BUNCE,G.

    2002-03-29

    The RIKEN School on ''Quark-Gluon Structure of the Nucleon and QCD'' was held from March 29th through 31st at the Nishina Memorial Hall of RIKEN, Wako, Saitama, Japan, sponsored by RIKEN (the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research). The school was the second of a new series with a broad perspective of hadron and nuclear physics. The purpose of the school was to offer young researchers an opportunity to learn theoretical aspects of hadron physics based on QCD and related experimental programs being or to be carried out by Japanese groups. We had 3 theoretical courses, each consisting of 3 one-hour lectures, and 6 experimental courses, each consisting of a one-hour lecture.

  2. The International System on Occupational Exposure. An ALARA Success Story Relying on Strong Individual Commitments, Effective International Feedback and Exchanges, and a Robust Database - 20 years of progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Why, more than 20 years ago, did there emerge the need for an International System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE)? How was it created? What were the problems and their possible solutions? Who were the main stakeholders? These are a few of the questions that the ISOE NEA Secretariat and Bureau asked Christian Lefaure, ex CEPN Deputy Director, to address in preparing a report on the history of ISOE and its progress. He had been directly involved in the brainstorming that preceded ISOE establishment, and he became the first head of the ISOE European Technical Centre, in charge of the world database development and management from 1991 to 2007. For writing this report, he made use of his own souvenirs and documentation as well as of those of tens of ISOE participants, both from major international and regional organisations (OECD/NEA, IAEA, EC and BNL), nuclear power plant utilities and national regulatory authorities. He voluntarily focused not only on the technical aspects but also on the human components of that story. This was done through personal interviews with many individuals who have played an important role at one moment of ISOE life, the analysis of answers to a questionnaire, and reviews of the minutes of many ISOE meetings that were held before and after the official establishment of the ISOE, along its lifespan to date. The most important inputs were the accounts from many individuals having very actively participated in the ISOE life at one step or another. The contacts were not always easy to make 15 or 20 years later. But in general, the questions were welcomed and the answers to the interviews and to a short questionnaire have fed this report. More than 50 individuals have answered these requests one way or another. Some have followed ISOE birth and premises; some have not seen the first steps of ISOE but have participated later on or are still participating. Some have been able to provide pictures, drawings or relevant publications. All their

  3. National Health Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ODPHP National Health Information Center National Health Information Center The National Health Information Center (NHIC) is sponsored ... interest View the NHO calendar . Federal Health Information Centers and Clearinghouses Federal Health Information Centers and Clearinghouses ...

  4. Measurements of ϕ meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Silva, C. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Souza, R. Derradi De; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; Toledo, A. Szanto De; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; Leeuwen, M. Van; Molen, A. M. Vander; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R., Jr.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J. X.

    2009-06-01

    We present results for the measurement of ϕ meson production via its charged kaon decay channel ϕ→K+K- in Au+Au collisions at sNN=62.4,130, and 200 GeV, and in p+p and d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV from the STAR experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The midrapidity (|y|<0.5) ϕ meson transverse momentum (pT) spectra in central Au+Au collisions are found to be well described by a single exponential distribution. On the other hand, the pT spectra from p+p, d+Au, and peripheral Au+Au collisions show power-law tails at intermediate and high pT and are described better by Levy distributions. The constant ϕ/K- yield ratio vs beam species, collision centrality, and colliding energy is in contradiction with expectations from models having kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for ϕ production at RHIC. The Ω/ϕ yield ratio as a function of pT is consistent with a model based on the recombination of thermal s quarks up to pT~4 GeV/c, but disagrees at higher transverse momenta. The measured nuclear modification factor, RdAu, for the ϕ meson increases above unity at intermediate pT, similar to that for pions and protons, while RAA is suppressed due to the energy loss effect in central Au+Au collisions. Number of constituent quark scaling of both Rcp and v2 for the ϕ meson with respect to other hadrons in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV at intermediate pT is observed. These observations support quark coalescence as being the dominant mechanism of hadronization in the intermediate pT region at RHIC.

  5. Centering research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katan, Lina Hauge; Baarts, Charlotte

    share as the common aim of both research and education. Despite some similarities, we find that how the two groups engage in and benefit from reading and writing diverges significantly. Thus we have even more reason to believe that centering practice-based teaching on these aspects of research is a good......’ exercises tend to dominate the common understandings of research-based learning. Here we address a specific area of inquiry overlooked by previous studies: whether and how reading, thinking and writing indeed share the same learning potentials as the practical foundation for research-based teaching....... In the humanities and social sciences, integrated acts of reading, writing and thinking account for an obvious and substantial overlap in student and researcher practices, creating a clear opportunity for research-based teaching. Moreover, our empirical data point to reading, thinking and writing as quintessential...

  6. Plant-originated glycoprotein (24 kDa) has an inhibitory effect on proliferation of BNL CL.2 cells in response to di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2011-08-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is one of the many environmental chemicals that are widely used in polyvinyl chloride products, vinyl flooring, food packaging and infant toys. They cause cell proliferation or dysfunction of human liver. The purpose of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effect of a glycoprotein (24 kDa) isolated from Zanthoxylum piperitum DC (ZPDC) on proliferation of liver cell in the DEHP-induced BNL CL. 2 cells. [³H]-thymidine incorporation, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), intracellular Ca²⁺ mobilization and activity of protein kinase C (PKC) were measured using radioactivity and fluorescence method respectively. The expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases [extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)], activator protein (AP)-1 (c-Jun and c-Fos), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cell cycle-related factors (cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase [CDK] 4) were evaluated using Western blotting or electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The results in this study showed that the levels of [³H]-thymidine incorporation, intracellular ROS, intracellular Ca²⁺ mobilization and activity of PKCα were inhibited by ZPDC glycoprotein (100 µg/ml) in the DEHP-induced BNL CL. 2 cells. Also, activities of ERK, JNK and AP-1 were reduced by ZPDC glycoprotein (100 µg/ml). With regard to cell proliferation, activities of PCNA and cyclin D1/CDK4 were significantly suppressed at treatment with ZPDC glycoprotein (100 µg/ml) in the presence of DEHP. Taken together, these findings suggest that ZPDC glycoprotein significantly normalized activities of PCNA and cyclin D1/CDK4, which relate to cell proliferation factors. Thus, ZPDC glycoprotein appears to be one of the compounds derived from natural products that are able to inhibit cell proliferation in the phthalate-induced BNL CL. 2 cells. PMID:21721021

  7. Energy Dependence of Directed Flow over a Wide Range of Pseudorapidity in Au+Au Collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Hauer, M.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2006-07-01

    We report on measurements of directed flow as a function of pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at energies of sNN=19.6, 62.4, 130 and 200 GeV as measured by the PHOBOS detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. These results are particularly valuable because of the extensive, continuous pseudorapidity coverage of the PHOBOS detector. There is no significant indication of structure near midrapidity and the data surprisingly exhibit extended longitudinal scaling similar to that seen for elliptic flow and charged particle pseudorapidity density.

  8. BNL status and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status and future plans for the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron are presented. The operating modes, accelerator improvement program, Booster synchrotron status, Stretcher ring proposal, and higher intensity options are described

  9. BNL future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littenberg, L.

    1998-01-01

    In 1999, after almost 40 years of independent existence, the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) is scheduled to be pressed into service as an injector to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Although at first sight this seems like the end of an era, in actuality, it represents a very attractive new opportunity. For the AGS is actually needed by RHIC for only a few hours per day. The balance of the time it is available for extracted proton beam work at a very small incremental cost. This represents the reverse of the current situation in which the nuclear physics program gets access to the AGS (for fixed target heavy ion experiments) at incremental cost, while the base cost of maintaining the accelerator is borne by the high energy physics program. Retaining the AGS for particle physics work would broaden the US HEP program considerably, allowing continued exploitation of the world`s most intense source of medium energy protons. High energy possibilities include incisive probes of Standard Model and non-SM CP-violation, and of low energy manifestations of supersymmetry.

  10. Spin physics at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spin Physics at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory is the most recent of new capabilities being explored at this facility. During the summer of 1984 the AGS accelerated beams of polarized protons to 16.5 GeV/c at 40% polarization to two experiments (E782, E785). These experiments; single spin asymmetry in inclusive polarized pp interactions; and spin-spin effects in polarized pp elastic scattering, operated at the highest polarized proton energy ever achieved by any accelerator in the world. These experiments are reviewed after the complementary spin physics program with unpolarized protons, and the future possibilities with a booster injector for the AGS and the secondary benefits of a Relativisitic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), are placed within the context of the present physics program

  11. BNL multiparticle spectrometer software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses some solutions to problems common to the design, management and maintenance of a large high energy physics spectrometer software system. The experience of dealing with a large, complex program and the necessity of having the program controlled by various people at different levels of computer experience has led us to design a program control structure of mnemonic and self-explanatory nature. The use of this control language in both on-line and off-line operation of the program will be discussed. The solution of structuring a large program for modularity so that substantial changes to the program can be made easily for a wide variety of high energy physics experiments is discussed. Specialized tools for this type of large program management are also discussed

  12. Call Center ist nicht gleich Call Center

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgartner, Marc; Udris, Ivars

    2005-01-01

    Untersuchungen in 14 Schweizer Call Centers erbrachten vier Call Center-Typen, die sich hinsichtlich Arbeitstätigkeiten und Kommunikationsrichtung voneinander unterscheiden: (a) Beratungs- und Beschwerdemanagement, (b) Informationsmanagement, (c) Auftragsmanagement und (d) Kunden- und Kampagnenmanagement. Dies hat auch Auswirkungen auf die Personalstruktur, -selektion und -entwicklung der Call Center. Es wird der Frage nachgegangen, welche Kompetenzanforderungen in den unterschiedlichen Call ...

  13. The ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) concept in pediatric interventional and fluoroscopic imaging: striving to keep radiation doses as low as possible during fluoroscopy of pediatric patients - a white paper executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, Keith J. [Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Kaste, Sue C. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2006-09-15

    ALARA represents a practice mandate adhering to the principle of keeping radiation doses to patients and personnel As Low As Reasonably Achievable. This concept is strongly endorsed by the Society for Pediatric Radiology, particularly in the use of procedures and modalities involving higher radiation doses such as CT and fluoroscopic examinations of pediatric patients. There is no doubt that medical imaging, which has undergone tremendous technological advances in recent decades, is integral to patient care. However, these technological advances generally precede the knowledge of end-users concerning the optimal use and correct operation of the resulting imaging equipment, and such knowledge is essential to minimizing potential risks to the patients. Current imaging methods must be optimized for radiation dose reduction in pediatric patients who might be as much as ten times more radiosensitive than adults. Unlike straightforward radiographic examinations, radiation dose to the patient during fluoroscopy is dependent on the operator's training, experience with the fluoroscope, and efficiency in completing a diagnostic study. The range of pediatric radiation doses from fluoroscopy is wide because this examination is performed not only by pediatric radiologists but also by general radiologists who occasionally care for children, interventional cardiologists, gastroenterologists, urologists and others. Thus, a venue where multidisciplinary interaction by this variety of operators can occur serves to improve pediatric patient care.

  14. The ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) concept in pediatric interventional and fluoroscopic imaging: striving to keep radiation doses as low as possible during fluoroscopy of pediatric patients - a white paper executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALARA represents a practice mandate adhering to the principle of keeping radiation doses to patients and personnel As Low As Reasonably Achievable. This concept is strongly endorsed by the Society for Pediatric Radiology, particularly in the use of procedures and modalities involving higher radiation doses such as CT and fluoroscopic examinations of pediatric patients. There is no doubt that medical imaging, which has undergone tremendous technological advances in recent decades, is integral to patient care. However, these technological advances generally precede the knowledge of end-users concerning the optimal use and correct operation of the resulting imaging equipment, and such knowledge is essential to minimizing potential risks to the patients. Current imaging methods must be optimized for radiation dose reduction in pediatric patients who might be as much as ten times more radiosensitive than adults. Unlike straightforward radiographic examinations, radiation dose to the patient during fluoroscopy is dependent on the operator's training, experience with the fluoroscope, and efficiency in completing a diagnostic study. The range of pediatric radiation doses from fluoroscopy is wide because this examination is performed not only by pediatric radiologists but also by general radiologists who occasionally care for children, interventional cardiologists, gastroenterologists, urologists and others. Thus, a venue where multidisciplinary interaction by this variety of operators can occur serves to improve pediatric patient care

  15. Transplant Center Search Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Story Give Us Feedback - A + A Transplant Center Search Form Welcome to the Blood & Marrow Transplant ... centers for patients with a particular disease. Transplant Center login Username: * Password: * Request new password Join BMT ...

  16. Womens Business Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Women's Business Centers (WBCs) represent a national network of nearly 100 educational centers throughout the United States and its territories, which are designed...

  17. Student Success Center Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobs For the Future, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Student Success Center Toolkit" is a compilation of materials organized to assist Student Success Center directors as they staff, launch, operate, and sustain Centers. The toolkit features materials created and used by existing Centers, such as staffing and budgeting templates, launch materials, sample meeting agendas, and fundraising…

  18. Seismic fragility of nuclear power plant components: Phase 2, Motor control center, switchboard, panelboard and power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Phase I of the Component Fragility Program, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a procedure to establish the seismic fragility of nuclear power plant equipment by use of existing test data and demonstrated its application by considering two equipment pieces. In Phase II of the program, BNL has collected additional test data, and has further advanced and is applying the methodology to determine the fragility levels of selected essential equipment categories. The data evaluation of four equipment families, namely, motor control center, switchboard, panelboard and power supply has been completed. Fragility levels have been determined for various failure modes of each equipment class and the deterministic results are presented in terms of test response spectra. In addition, the test data have been analyzed for determination of the respective probabilistic fragility levels. To this end, a single g-value has been selected to approximately represent the test vibration level and a statistical analysis has been performed with the g-values corresponding to a particular failure mode. The zero period acceleration and the average spectral acceleration over a frequency range of interest are separately used as the single g-value. The resulting parameters are presented in terms of a median value, an uncertainty coefficient and a randomness coefficient. Ultimately, each fragility level is expressed in terms of a single descriptor called an HCLPF value corresponding to a high (95%) confidence of a low (5%) probability of failure. The important observations made in the process of data analysis are included in this report

  19. Alzheimer's Disease Research Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plan National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Alzheimer's Disease Research Centers The National Institute on Aging ... Repository for Alzheimer's Disease ADC Directory Arizona Arizona Alzheimer’s Disease Center/Sun Health Research Institute Eric Reiman, ...

  20. New Mexico Convention Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset provides an initial version of the locations of convention centers in New Mexico, in point form, with limited attributes, compiled using available data...

  1. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  2. NIH Clinical Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH Clinical Center consists of two main facilities: The Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, which opened in 2005, houses inpatient units, day hospitals,...

  3. Tornadoes: A Center Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman-Rothlein, Liz; Meinbach, Anita M.

    1981-01-01

    Information is given on how to put together a learning center. Discusses information and activity packets for a complete learning center on tornadoes including objectives, directions, materials, photographs of physical arrangements, and posttest. (DC)

  4. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  5. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Education Centers OnSafety Blog Neighborhood Safety Network Community Outreach Resource Center CO Poster Contest Toy Recall ... of the external site as its information collection practices may differ from ours. Linking to this external ...

  6. America's Blood Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or less. Please donate now! Full Stoplight Report America's Blood Centers is... FEATURED TODAY Support the Foundation ... purchase will be donated to the Foundation for America's Blood Centers! Simply Click Here! "We Are" This ...

  7. Hydrologic Engineering Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), an organization within the Institute for Water Resources, is the designated Center of Expertise for the U.S. Army Corps of...

  8. RSW Cell Centered Grids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New cell centered grids are generated to complement the node-centered ones uploaded. Six tarballs containing the coarse, medium, and fine mixed-element and pure...

  9. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / Safety Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Carbon Monoxide Information Center The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "Invisible ...

  10. BKG Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorandt, Volkmar; Wojdziak, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities and background information of the IVS Data Center for the year 2012. Included is information about functions, structure, technical equipment, and staff members of the BKG Data Center.

  11. ACTS data center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Ali; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on ACTS Data Center status report are included. Topics covered include: ACTS Data Center Functions; data flow overview; PPD flow; RAW data flow; data compression; PPD distribution; RAW Data Archival; PPD Audit; and data analysis.

  12. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Carbon Monoxide Information Center The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  13. National Farm Medicine Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staff Agricultural Health and Safety Core Units Children's Center Cultivate Newsletter Journal of Agromedicine Milestones Auction of ... Farm Medicine, Rural Health & Safety National Farm Medicine Center Established in 1981 in response to occupational health ...

  14. Transplant Center Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mission. Learn more. My Account News Search Transplant Center Search Use the tools below to find a ... or enter your diagnosis to search for transplant centers. Select state(s) (optional) Enter diagnosis (optional) Please select ...

  15. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  16. Center of buoyancy definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The center of buoyancy of an arbitrary shaped body is defined in analogy to the center of gravity. The definitions of the buoyant force and center of buoyancy in terms of integrals over the area of the body are converted to volume integrals and shown to have simple intuitive interpretations

  17. Data center cooling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  18. Study of νd→μ-pps and νd→μ-Δ++(1232)ns using the BNL 7-foot deuterium-filled bubble chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The weak nucleon axial-vector (FA) and vector (FV) form factors are determined from the momentum-transfer-squared (Q2) distributions using 2538 μ- p and 1384 μ-Δ++ events. The data were obtained from 1 800 000 pictures taken in the BNL 7-foot deuterium-filled bubble chamber exposed to a wide-band neutrino beam with a mean energy Eν=1.6 GeV. In the framework of the conventional V-A theory with standard assumptions, the value obtained from the μ-p events for the axial-vector mass MA in the pure dipole parameterization is 1.070-0.045+0.040 GeV and from the μ-Δ++ events is 1.28-0.10+0.08 GeV. These results are in good agreement with an earlier measurement from this experiment and other recent results. The reaction mechanisms for both processes are compared and found to be very similar. A two-parameter fit for the quasielastic reaction, using dipole forms for FV and FA, yields MA=0.97-0.11+0.14 GeV and MV=0.89-0.07+0.04 GeV, which is in good agreement with the conserved-vector-current value of MV=0.84 GeV. Possible deviations from the standard assumptions are also discussed

  19. Hadronic resonance production in d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangaharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; Detoledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J. X.

    2008-10-01

    We present the first measurements of the ρ(770)0,K*(892),Δ(1232)++,Σ(1385), and Λ(1520) resonances in d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV, reconstructed via their hadronic decay channels using the STAR detector (the solenoidal tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider). The masses and widths of these resonances are studied as a function of transverse momentum pT. We observe that the resonance spectra follow a generalized scaling law with the transverse mass mT. The of resonances in minimum bias collisions are compared with the of π,K, and pmacr . The ρ0/π-,K*/K-,Δ++/p,Σ(1385)/Λ, and Λ(1520)/Λ ratios in d+Au collisions are compared with the measurements in minimum bias p+p interactions, where we observe that both measurements are comparable. The nuclear modification factors (RdAu) of the ρ0,K*, and Σ* scale with the number of binary collisions (Nbin) for pT> 1.2 GeV/c.

  20. Evolution-dominated Hydrodynamic Model and the Pseudorapidity Distributions of the Charged Particles Pro duced in Cu-Cu Collisions at BNL-RHIC Energies%演化过程主导的流体力学模型与Cu-Cu在BNL-RHIC能量碰撞中带电粒子的赝快度分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜志进; 王杰; 张海丽; 马可

    2014-01-01

    The charged particles resulting in high energy heavy ion collisions consist of two parts: One is from the hot and dense matter produced in collisions. The other is the leading particles. We suppose that the hot and dense matter expands and freezes out into the charged particles according to the evolution-dominated hydrodynamics, and the leading particles are from participants with approximately the same energy. On the basis of this assumption, we get the pseudorapidity distributions of the charged particles produced in high energy heavy ion collisions, and make a comparison with the experimental data presented by PHOBOS Collaboration at BNL-RHIC in Cu-Cu collisions at√sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV. The theoretical predictions are in good accordance with experimental measurements.%高能重离子碰撞产生的带电粒子由两部分组成:一部分来源于碰撞产生的高温高密度物质,另一部分是带头粒子。假设高温高密度物质按照由演化过程主导的流体力学的规律膨胀并冻析为带电粒子,带头粒子来源于参与者且具有大致相同的能量。基于该假设,得到了高能重离子碰撞带电粒子的赝快度分布,并与BNL-RHIC上的PHOBOS合作组在√sNN=62.4与200 GeV的Cu-Cu碰撞中给出的实验结果相比较,理论与实验测量符合得很好。

  1. 演化过程主导的流体力学模型与Cu-Cu在BNL-RHIC能量碰撞中带电粒子的赝快度分布%Evolution-dominated Hydrodynamic Model and the Pseudorapidity Distributions of the Charged Particles Pro duced in Cu-Cu Collisions at BNL-RHIC Energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜志进; 王杰; 张海丽; 马可

    2014-01-01

    The charged particles resulting in high energy heavy ion collisions consist of two parts: One is from the hot and dense matter produced in collisions. The other is the leading particles. We suppose that the hot and dense matter expands and freezes out into the charged particles according to the evolution-dominated hydrodynamics, and the leading particles are from participants with approximately the same energy. On the basis of this assumption, we get the pseudorapidity distributions of the charged particles produced in high energy heavy ion collisions, and make a comparison with the experimental data presented by PHOBOS Collaboration at BNL-RHIC in Cu-Cu collisions at√sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV. The theoretical predictions are in good accordance with experimental measurements.%高能重离子碰撞产生的带电粒子由两部分组成:一部分来源于碰撞产生的高温高密度物质,另一部分是带头粒子。假设高温高密度物质按照由演化过程主导的流体力学的规律膨胀并冻析为带电粒子,带头粒子来源于参与者且具有大致相同的能量。基于该假设,得到了高能重离子碰撞带电粒子的赝快度分布,并与BNL-RHIC上的PHOBOS合作组在√sNN=62.4与200 GeV的Cu-Cu碰撞中给出的实验结果相比较,理论与实验测量符合得很好。

  2. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R. B. [PPPL; Gobbin, M. [Euratom-ENEA Association

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  3. Airline Operation Center Workstation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airline Operation Center Workstation (AOC Workstation) represents equipment available to users of the National Airspace system, outside of the FAA, that enables...

  4. Chemical Security Analysis Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2006, by Presidential Directive, DHS established the Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) to identify and assess chemical threats and vulnerabilities in the...

  5. Small Business Development Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) provide assistance to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs throughout the United States and its territories. SBDCs...

  6. Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those...

  7. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  8. Data Center at NICT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Sekido, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    The Data Center at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) archives and releases the databases and analysis results processed at the Correlator and the Analysis Center at NICT. Regular VLBI sessions of the Key Stone Project VLBI Network were the primary objective of the Data Center. These regular sessions continued until the end of November 2001. In addition to the Key Stone Project VLBI sessions, NICT has been conducting geodetic VLBI sessions for various purposes, and these data are also archived and released by the Data Center.

  9. Test Control Center (TCC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Test Control Center (TCC) provides a consolidated facility for planning, coordinating, controlling, monitoring, and analyzing distributed test events. ,The TCC...

  10. Environmental Modeling Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Modeling Center provides the computational tools to perform geostatistical analysis, to model ground water and atmospheric releases for comparison...

  11. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  12. HRSA: Find a Health Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Please, try later. Close × Note To HRSA Health Centers: HRSA Health Center Grantees and Look-Alikes, please ... to save your changes. Close About HRSA Health Centers HRSA Health Centers care for you, even if ...

  13. Some comments on the phase diagram parameters for the nuclear matter formed in Au-Au collisions at RHIC-BNL energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of highly excited dense nuclear matter in laboratory, with the possibility to evidence a phase transition to deconfined quark-gluon plasma, can be analysed in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. The rapidity density and pseudorapidity density, respectively, are used to estimate energy density in Au-Au collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV and √sNN = 200 GeV. From transverse mass spectra and transverse momentum spectra - obtained in the same collision - pion, kaon, proton and antiproton temperatures are extracted. These quantities are important parameters of the phase diagram of the nuclear matter formed in such collisions. The mass dependence of the slope parameters provides evidence of collective transverse flow. Comparisons with the predictions with UrQMD and HIJING codes are included in this paper. Taking into account the fact that some information on the dynamics of high-energy Au-Au collisions is obtained from the analysis of the antiparticles to particles ratios, we calculated these ratios for different rapidities. We investigate the Coulomb interaction through the ratio of negative to positive pions produced in very high-energy heavy ion collisions at BRAHMS experiment. The study of Coulomb interaction could also provide information on the collision dynamics, such as collective expansion and the charge of the system produced in the central region of the collisions because the effect of the nuclear medium is not evident for particles related to the later collision stages. They can affect the phase diagram parameters. The values of the energy and baryonic densities - over 10 normal values - as well as the agreement between the experimental values on participants and phenomenological model estimations, represent a support for the estimated thermodynamic parameters of the nuclear matter in Au-Au collisions at RHIC-BNL energies. This information can be used to study the formation of the quark plasma and quark-gluon plasma in these collisions

  14. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Consumers Businesses Contact CPSC Website Design Feedback Consumers: Español Businesses: Español , 中文 , Tiếng Việt Connect with Us : Twitter YouTube ... Safely Home / Safety Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Carbon Monoxide Information Center The Invisible Killer Carbon ...

  15. About the ADEAR Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and news updates How to Contact the ADEAR Center Call toll-free at: 1-800-438-4380 (8: ... To give you the best possible service, ADEAR Center staff abide by the following customer service standards: We will answer your telephone calls promptly between 8:30 a.m. and 5: ...

  16. From Periphery To Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carré, David

    2014-01-01

    notions of Center/Periphery. As Hermans (2001) proposed, center and periphery are not fixed ‘I-positions’ of the self; in this vein, these notions are explored as relevant theoretical tools for addressing the developmental trajectories involved in the construction of scientific identities. In sum, the...

  17. Simple Machine Science Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessin, Debby

    2007-01-01

    Science centers can engage students; accommodate different learning styles and individual interests; help students become independent and confident learners; and encourage social skills among students. In this article, the author worked with third-grade students as they completed activities at learning centers during a week-long unit on simple…

  18. Technology Information Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Transportation Technology Center (TTC) has been established at Sandia to address the transportation of nuclear waste and spent fuel. The Technology Information Center (TIC) acts as TTC's clearing house for nuclear material transportation information. TIC's activities are divided into three activities: public information, policy information, and technical information. Some of the uses of TIC's activities are briefly outlined

  19. Call Center Capacity Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Bang

    The main topics of the thesis are theoretical and applied queueing theory within a call center setting. Call centers have in recent years become the main means of communication between customers and companies, and between citizens and public institutions. The extensively computerized infrastructure...

  20. Relative Lyapunov Center Bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Claudia; Schilder, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Relative equilibria (REs) and relative periodic orbits (RPOs) are ubiquitous in symmetric Hamiltonian systems and occur, for example, in celestial mechanics, molecular dynamics, and rigid body motion. REs are equilibria, and RPOs are periodic orbits of the symmetry reduced system. Relative Lyapunov...... center bifurcations are bifurcations of RPOs from REs corresponding to Lyapunov center bifurcations of the symmetry reduced dynamics. In this paper we first prove a relative Lyapunov center theorem by combining recent results on the persistence of RPOs in Hamiltonian systems with a symmetric Lyapunov...... center theorem of Montaldi, Roberts, and Stewart. We then develop numerical methods for the detection of relative Lyapunov center bifurcations along branches of RPOs and for their computation. We apply our methods to Lagrangian REs of the N-body problem....

  1. Virtual radiation fields for ALARA determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As computing power has increased, so too has the ability to model and simulate complex systems and processes. In addition, virtual reality technology has made it possible to visualize and understand many complex scientific and engineering problems. For this reason, a virtual dosimetry program called Virtual Radiation Fields (VRF) is developed to model radiation dose rate and cumulative dose to a receptor operating in a virtual radiation environment. With the design and testing of many facilities and products taking place in the virtual world, this program facilitates the concurrent consideration of radiological concerns during the design process. Three-dimensional (3D) graphical presentation of the radiation environment is made possible through the use of IGRIP, a graphical modeling program developed by Deneb Robotics, Inc. The VRF simulation program was designed to model and display a virtual dosimeter. As a demonstration of the program's capability, the Hanford tank, C-106, was modeled to predict radiation doses to robotic equipment used to remove radioactive waste from the tank. To validate VRF dose predictions, comparison was made with reported values for tank C-106, which showed agreement to within 0.5%. Graphical information is presented regarding the 3D dose rate variation inside the tank. Cumulative dose predictions were made for the cleanup operations of tank C-106. A four-dimensional dose rate map generated by VRF was used to model the dose rate not only in 3D space but also as a function of the amount of waste remaining in the tank. This allowed VRF to predict dose rate at any stage in the waste removal process for an accurate simulation of the radiological conditions throughout the tank cleanup procedure

  2. N Area Post-Deactivation ALARA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides information about a wide range of radiological work activities at the N Area Deactivation Project. The report is divided into sections that are based on specific N Area scopes of work. Each section contains specific information that was of significant radiological importance in completing N Area Deactivation work. The information presented in this report may be applicable and beneficial to similar projects throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex, and in commercial industry

  3. Peach bottom recirculation piping replacement ALARA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In late 1983, Philadelphia Electric Company (PECo) began detailed planning to replace the recirculation, residual heat removal, and part of the reactor water cleanup piping of the Peach Bottom Unit 2 reactor. Included in this work was an estimate of the collective exposure expected during piping replacement. That initial estimate, 1945 man-rem, is compared with the actual collective dose incurred during the piping replacement program. Also included are the exposures incurred during two additional tasks (safe end replacement and recirculation pump disassembly and decontamination) not considered in the initial estimate

  4. Energy efficient data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed

  5. User-centered design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simplification philosophy, as an example, that both of EPRI-URD and EUR emphasize is treated mostly for the cost reduction of the nuclear power plants, but not for the simplification of the structure of user's tasks, which is one of the principles of user-centered design. A user-centered design is a philosophy based on the needs and interests of the user, with an emphasis on making products usable and understandable. However, the nuclear power plants offered these days by which the predominant reactor vendors are hardly user-centered but still designer-centered or technology-centered in viewpoint of fulfilling user requirements. The main goal of user-centered design is that user requirements are elicited correctly, reflected properly into the system requirements, and verified thoroughly by the tests. Starting from the user requirements throughout to the final test, each requirement should be traceable. That's why requirement traceability is a key to the user-centered design, and main theme of a requirement management program, which is suggested to be added into EPRI-URD and EUR in the section of Design Process. (author)

  6. Fusion engineering design center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the spring of 1985, the Department of Energy (DOE) directed the Design Center to take a lead responsibility in assessing the engineering feasibility of a very compact tokamak experiment with copper coils. Following this assessment, the Design Center studied the Ignitor concept at the request of DOE and arrived at a design configuration. Many features of this configuration have been incorporated into the national baseline conceptual design for a Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). The Design Center continued to participate in the mirror program by contributing to the Minimars design effort, a two-year program to develop and describe an attractive tandem mirror reactor concept. The Design Center's principal role is in configuration definition of the candidate concepts. The Design Center continues to lead the engineering activities for the International Tokamak Reactor program. Advanced commercial tokamaks were studied by the Design Center as part of the Tokamak Power Systems Studies project coordinated by the DOE Office of Fusion Energy. The Design Center also provided design integration of the US effort. A cost accounting system that is applicable to all magnetic fusion reactor design studies was developed and applied to different confinement concepts and types of projects. The system provides the structure for development of a fusion cost database and validated cost estimating procedures

  7. Lens auto-centering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamontagne, Frédéric; Desnoyers, Nichola; Doucet, Michel; Côté, Patrice; Gauvin, Jonny; Anctil, Geneviève; Tremblay, Mathieu

    2015-09-01

    In a typical optical system, optical elements usually need to be precisely positioned and aligned to perform the correct optical function. This positioning and alignment involves securing the optical element in a holder or mount. Proper centering of an optical element with respect to the holder is a delicate operation that generally requires tight manufacturing tolerances or active alignment, resulting in costly optical assemblies. To optimize optical performance and minimize manufacturing cost, there is a need for a lens mounting method that could relax manufacturing tolerance, reduce assembly time and provide high centering accuracy. This paper presents a patent pending lens mounting method developed at INO that can be compared to the drop-in technique for its simplicity while providing the level of accuracy close to that achievable with techniques using a centering machine (usually innovative auto-centering method is based on the use of geometrical relationship between the lens diameter, the lens radius of curvature and the thread angle of the retaining ring. The autocentering principle and centering test results performed on real optical assemblies are presented. In addition to the low assembly time, high centering accuracy, and environmental robustness, the INO auto-centering method has the advantage of relaxing lens and barrel bore diameter tolerances as well as lens wedge tolerances. The use of this novel lens mounting method significantly reduces manufacturing and assembly costs for high performance optical systems. Large volume productions would especially benefit from this advancement in precision lens mounting, potentially providing a drastic cost reduction.

  8. Status of center dominance in various center gauges

    OpenAIRE

    Faber, M; Greensite, J.; Olejnik, S.

    2002-01-01

    We review arguments for center dominance in center gauges where vortex locations are correctly identified. We introduce an appealing interpretation of the maximal center gauge, discuss problems with Gribov copies, and a cure to the problems through the direct Laplacian center gauge. We study correlations between direct and indirect Laplacian center gauges.

  9. Center for Contaminated Sediments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Center for Contaminated Sediments serves as a clearinghouse for technology and expertise concerned with contaminated sediments. The...

  10. HUD Homeownership Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD Homeownership Centers (HOCs) insure single family Federal Housing Administration (FHA) mortgages and oversee the selling of HUD homes. FHA has four...

  11. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Chairman Commissioners Contact Information Agency Reports Legislative Affairs Job Opportunities Inspector General Safety Guides Safety Education Centers OnSafety Blog Neighborhood Safety Network Community Outreach ...

  12. National Pesticide Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Pesticide Information Center npic@ace.orst.edu 1.800.858.7378 Index A B C D E F ... Your Pest Control Your Pest Integrated Pest Management Pesticide Ingredients Active Ingredients Other/Inert Ingredients Pesticide Products ...

  13. ADVANCED DATA CENTER ECONOMY

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhov, R.; Amzarakov, M.; Isaev, E.

    2013-01-01

    The article addresses basic Data Centers (DC) drivers of price and engineering, which specify rules and price evaluation for creation and further operation. DC energy efficiency concept, its influence on DC initial price, operation costs and Total Cost of Ownership.

  14. Center Innovation Fund Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To stimulate and encourage creativity and innovation within the NASA Centers. The activities are envisioned to fall within the scope of NASA Space Technology or...

  15. FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This is a search site for FEMA's Disaster Recovery Centers (DRC). A DRC is a readily accessible facility or mobile office set up by FEMA where applicants may go for...

  16. National Automotive Center - NAC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Encouraged by the advantages of collaboration, the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) worked with the Secretary of the...

  17. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Network Community Outreach Resource Center CO Poster Contest Toy Recall Statistics Pool Safely Home / Safety Education / ... VIDEO CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest View the blog SAFETY GUIDE Clues You Can ...

  18. USU Patient Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — he National Capital Area (NCA) Medical Simulation Center is a state-of-the-art training facility located near the main USU campus. It uses simulated patients (i.e.,...

  19. Accredited Birth Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 717-933-9743 Accredited since January 2016 100 Bright Eyes Midwifery and Wild Rivers Women's Health Accredited ... Birthing Center-Cedar Park Accredited 1130 Cottonwood Creek Trail Building D Suite 2 Cedar Park, TX 78613 ...

  20. Reliability Centered Maintenance - Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    Journal article about Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodologies used by United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) in support of the Space Shuttle Program at Kennedy Space Center. The USA Reliability Centered Maintenance program differs from traditional RCM programs because various methodologies are utilized to take advantage of their respective strengths for each application. Based on operational experience, USA has customized the traditional RCM methodology into a streamlined lean logic path and has implemented the use of statistical tools to drive the process. USA RCM has integrated many of the L6S tools into both RCM methodologies. The tools utilized in the Measure, Analyze, and Improve phases of a Lean Six Sigma project lend themselves to application in the RCM process. All USA RCM methodologies meet the requirements defined in SAE JA 1011, Evaluation Criteria for Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) Processes. The proposed article explores these methodologies.

  1. Advanced Missile Signature Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Missile Signature Center (AMSC) is a national facility supporting the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and other DoD programs and customers with analysis,...

  2. CNPC International Research Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ CNPC International Research Center (CNPCIRC), jointly managed by CNODC and RIPED of China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC), was established in 1999 for providing technical research support to all the overseas oil and gas projects of CNPC.

  3. Health Center Controlled Network

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Health Center Controlled Network (HCCN) tool is a locator tool designed to make data and information concerning HCCN resources more easily available to our...

  4. Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... King St., Suite 510 Alexandria, VA 22314 Online http://www.aapcc.org/ Email not for emergency use. ... Poison Center" in the memo line. Donate online: http://bit.ly/1HDxdHb Tucson, AZ 85721 Online http:// ...

  5. Hazardous Waste Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A full-service research and evaluation center equipped with safety equipment, a high-bay pilot studies area, and a large-scale pilot studies facility The U.S. Army...

  6. World Trade Center

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Esilinastus katastroofifilm "World Trade Center" : stsenarist Andrea Berloff : režissöör Oliver Stone : kunstnik Jan Roelfs : osades Nicholas Cage, Michael Pena, Stephen Dorff jpt : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2006. Ka filmi prototüüpidest

  7. Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC) began as the Cooperative Game Fish Tagging Program (GTP) at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI) in 1954. The GTP was...

  8. The Galactic Center

    OpenAIRE

    R. Genzel; Karas, V.

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade high resolution measurements in the infrared employing adaptive optics imaging on 10m telescopes have allowed determining the three dimensional orbits stars within ten light hours of the compact radio source at the center of the Milky Way. These observations show the presence of a three million solar mass black hole in Sagittarius A* beyond any reasonable doubt. The Galactic Center thus constitutes the best astrophysical evidence for the existence of black holes which have ...

  9. Oil Reserve Center Established

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Like other countries,China has started to grow its strategic oil reserve in case oil supplies are cut On December 18,2007,the National Development and Reform Commission(NDRC),China’s top economic planner,announced that the national oil reserve center has been officially launched.The supervisory system over the oil reserves has three levels: the energy department of the NDRC,the oil reserve center,and the reserve bases.

  10. UCSF Center for HIV Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program For providers and patients VA National Viral Hepatitis Program For providers and patients TARGET Center Technical assistance tools for the Ryan White Community AETC National Resource Center Education and training for clinicians UCSF-Gladstone Center for ...

  11. Highlights from BNL-RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2012-01-01

    Recent highlights from Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are reviewed and discussed. Topics include: Discovery of the strongly interacting Quark Gluon Plasma (sQGP) in 2005; RHIC machine operation in 2011 as well as latest achievements from the superconducting Magnet Division and the National Synchrotron Light Source II project. Highlights from QGP physics at RHIC include: comparison of new measurements of charged multiplicity in A+A collisions by ALICE at the LHC to previous RHIC measurements; Observation of the anti-alpha particle by the STAR experiment; Collective Flow, including the Triangular Flow discovery and the latest results on v3; the RHIC beam energy scan in search of the QCD critical point. The pioneering use at RHIC of hard-scattering as a probe of the sQGP will also be reviewed and the latest results presented including: jet-quenching via suppression of high pT particles and two particle correlations; new results on fragmentation functions using gamma...

  12. RESTful Web Services at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, R.

    2011-06-14

    RESTful (REpresentational State Transfer) web services are an alternative implementation to SOAP/RPC web services in a client/server model. BNLs IT Division has started deploying RESTful Web Services for enterprise data retrieval and manipulation. Data is currently used by system administrators for tracking configuration information and as it is expanded will be used by Cyber Security for vulnerability management and as an aid to cyber investigations. This talk will describe the implementation and outstanding issues as well as some of the reasons for choosing RESTful over SOAP/RPC and future directions.

  13. Center for Botanical Interaction Studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Research Area: Dietary Supplements, Herbs, Antioxidants Program:Centers for Dietary Supplements Research: Botanicals Description:This center will look at safety and...

  14. Xichang Satellite Launch Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuJie

    2004-01-01

    Xichang Satellite Launch Center(XSLC) is mainly for geosynchronous orbit launches. The main purpose of XSLC is to launch spacecraft, such as broadcasting,communications and meteorological satellites, into geo-stationary orbit.Most of the commercial satellite launches of Long March vehicles have been from Xichang Satellite Launch Center. With 20 years' development,XSLC can launch 5 kinds of launch vehicles and send satellites into geostationary orbit and polar orbit. In the future, moon exploration satellites will also be launched from XSLC.

  15. User Centered Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egbert, Maria; Matthews, Ben

    The interdisciplinary approach of User Centered Design is presented here with a focus on innovation in the design and use of hearing technologies as well as on the potential of innovation in interaction. This approach is geared towards developing new products, systems, technologies and practices...... based on an understanding of why so few persons with hearing loss use the highly advanced hearing technologies. In integrating Conversation Analysis (“CA”), audiology and User Centered Design, three disciplines which are collaborating together for the first time, we are addressing the following...

  16. Economics of data center optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Traffic to and from data centers is now reaching Zettabytes/year. Even the smallest of businesses now rely on data centers for revenue generation. And, the largest data centers today are orders of magnitude larger than the supercomputing centers of a few years ago. Until quite recently, for most data center managers, optical data centers were nice to dream about, but not really essential. Today, the all-optical data center - perhaps even an all-single mode fiber (SMF) data center is something that even managers of medium-sized data centers should be considering. Economical transceivers are the key to increased adoption of data center optics. An analysis of current and near future data center optics economics will be discussed in this paper.

  17. Three Media Center Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadwin, Peggy

    1996-01-01

    An Illinois school district's multiyear, comprehensive plan requires the renovation of each school to accommodate state-of-the-art and future audiovisual and computer technology. A major part of each renovation is the school's media center. Five of the district's 13 schools have been renovated, with remaining schools set to be upgraded in phases…

  18. Starting a sleep center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Lawrence J; Valentine, Paul S

    2010-05-01

    The demand for sleep medicine services has grown tremendously during the last decade and will likely continue. To date, growth in demand has been met by growth in the number of new sleep centers. The need for more new centers will be dependent on market drivers that include increasing regulatory requirements, personnel shortages, integration of home sleep testing, changes in reimbursement, a shift in emphasis from diagnostics to treatment, and an increased consumer focus on sleep. The decision to open a new center should be based on understanding the market dynamics, completing a market analysis, and developing a business plan. The business plan should include an overview of the facility, a personnel and organizational structure, an evaluation of the business environment, a financial plan, a description of services provided, and a strategy for obtaining, managing, and extending a referral base. Implementation of the business plan and successful operation require ongoing planning and monitoring of operational parameters. The need for new sleep centers will likely continue, but the shifting market dynamics indicate a greater need for understanding the marketplace and careful planning. PMID:20442123

  19. vCenter troubleshooting

    CERN Document Server

    Mills, Chuck

    2015-01-01

    The book is designed for the competent vCenter administrator or anyone who is responsible for the vSphere environment. It can be used as a guide by vSphere architects and VMware consultants for a successful vSphere solution. You should have good knowledge and an understanding of core elements and applications of the vSphere environment.

  20. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Flickr SlideShare All Pages & Documents Recalls & News Releases Home Recalls CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits Recalls by ... CO Poster Contest Toy Recall Statistics Pool Safely Home / Safety Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Carbon ...