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  1. Heavy ion physics at BNL, the AGS and RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowenstein, D.I.

    1985-01-01

    The advent of heavy ion acceleration with the AGS at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1986 and the proposed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) for 1990 brings us into a temperature and density regime well above anything yet produced and into a time domain of the early universe of 10 -13 -10 -6 seconds. The physics of high energy heavy ions range from the more traditional nuclear physics to the formation of new forms of matter. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the latest, and as of yet, the most successful theory to describe the interaction of quarks and gluons. The nature of the confinement of the quarks and gluons under extremes of temperature and density is one of the compelling reasons for this new physics program at BNL. There are reasons to believe that with collisions of heavy nuclei at energies in the 10 to 100 GeV/amu range a very large volume of approx. 10 fm 3 would be heated to 200-300 MeV and/or acquire a sufficient quark density (5-10 times normal baryon density) so that the entire contents of the volume would be deconfined and the quarks and gluons would form a plasma. The kinematic region for the extant machines and the proposed RHIC are shown. At AGS energies the baryons in colliding nuclei bring each other to rest, yielding fragmentation regions of high baryon density. These are the regions in which supernorvae and neutrons stars exist. For energies much higher, such as in RHIC, nuclei are transparent to each other and one can form a central region of almost zero baryon density, mostly pions, and very high temperature. This is the region of the early universe and the quark-gluon plasma. Design parameters and cost of the RHIC are discussed

  2. RHIC FY15 pp Run RHIC and AGS polarization analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Adams, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-02-20

    The polarization information is important for the spin physics program in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). There are discrepancies between AGS and RHIC polarization measurements. First, the face value of AGS polarization is higher than RHIC ones in general. Second, the measured polarization profile (described by the profile ratio R) is stronger in AGS than in RHIC. This note analyzes the polarization data from FY15 pp run period. The results show that the differences between AGS and RHIC polarization measurements are reasonable, but the R value difference is puzzling. The difference between blue and yellow ring is worth of spin simulation to explain.

  3. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workwhop on RHIC spin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SOFFER,J.

    1999-10-06

    This RHIC Spin Workshop is the 1999 annual meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration, and the second to be hosted at Brookhaven and sponsored by the RIKEN BNL Research Center. The previous meetings were at Brookhaven (1998), Marseille (1996), MIT in 1995, Argonne 1994, Tucson in 1991, and the Polarized Collider Workshop at Penn State in 1990. As noted last year, the Center provides a home for combined work on spin by theorists, experimenters, and accelerator physicists. This proceedings, as last year, is a compilation of 1 page summaries and 5 selected transparencies for each speaker. It is designed to be available soon after the workshop is completed. Speakers are welcome to include web or other references for additional material. The RHIC spin program and RHIC are rapidly becoming reality. RHIC has completed its first commissioning run, as described here by Steve Peggs. The first Siberian Snake for spin has been completed and is being installed in RHIC. A new polarized source from KEK and Triumf with over 1 milliampere of polarized H{sup minus} is being installed, described by Anatoli Zelenski. They have had a successful test of a new polarimeter for RHIC, described by Kazu Kurita and Haixin Huang. Spin commissioning is expected next spring (2000), and the first physics run for spin is anticipated for spring 2001. The purpose of the workshop is to get everyone together about once per year and discuss goals of the spin program, progress, problems, and new ideas. They also have many separate regular forums on spin. There are spin discussion sessions every Tuesday, now organized by Naohito Saito and Werner Vogelsang. The spin discussion schedule and copies of presentations are posted on http://riksg01.rhic.bnl.gov/rsc. Speakers and other spinners are encouraged to come to BNL and to lead a discussion on your favorite idea. They also have regular polarimeter and snake meetings on alternate Thursdays, led by Bill McGahern, the lead engineer for the accelerator spin

  4. RHIC/AGS Online Model Environments: Experiences and Design for AGS Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.; Niederer, J.; Satogata, T.; Alai Tafti, A.; Tsoupas, N.; Zeijts, J. van

    1999-01-01

    The RHIC/AGS online modeling environment, a general client-server modeling package that supports cdev and straightforward integration of diverse computational modeling engines (CMEs), is being adapted to model the AGS and Booster at BNL. This implementation uses a version of MAD modified at BNL that allows traditional lattice structure analysis, single pass beam line analysis, multi-particle tracking, interactive graphics, and the use of field maps. The on-line model system is still under development, a real working prototype exists and is being tested. This paper describes the system and experience with its design and use for AGS and AGS Booster online modeling

  5. Technology transfer for industrial production of superconducting magnets for the RHIC project at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanderer, P.; Anerella, M.D.; Greene, A.F.; Kelly, E.; Willen, E.

    1994-01-01

    Industrial production of superconducting magnets for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has begun. The R ampersand D for the magnets was carried out at BNL. Following the award of built-to-print contracts, staff from the laboratory and the vendors worked toward transferring both design principles and practical details to an industrial framework for cost effective production. All magnets made thus far have been acceptable for use in RHIC

  6. BNL AGS - a context for kaon factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littenberg, L.S.

    1983-05-01

    Figure 1 shows the Brookhaven site with the AGS-CBA complex highlighted. In this photograph the AGS is dwarfed by CBA and indeed during the past few years future plans for particle physics at BNL have been dominated by this enormous project. However, very recently interest in future physics use of the AGS has undergone a strong revival. Indeed, since the beginning of this year, two projects for augmenting the AGS have been proposed. Such projects could keep the AGS viable as a research machine for many years to come. In general such schemes will also improve the performance and increase the versatility of the CBA, and so are doubly valuable. It should be kept in mind that in spite of the fact the AGS has been perhaps the most fruitful machine in the history of high energy physics, its full capacities have never been exploited. Even without improvements at least one generation of rare K decay experiments beyond those currently launched seems feasible. Beyond that a major effort at any of the experiments discussed above could take it to the point where it would be limited by intrinsic physics background. To pursue a full program of physics at this level one would want to increase the intensity of the AGS as described. A ten-fold increase in K flux would remove such experiments from the category of all-out technological assaults and render them manageable by reasonably small groups of physicists. In addition, certain other, cleaner experiments, e.g., K/sub L/ 0 → e + e - or e + e - π 0 , could be pushed to limits unobtainable at the present AGS. The increased flux would also be welcomed by the neutrino and hypernuclear physics programs. Even experiments which do not at present require higher fluxes would benefit through the availability of purer beams and cleaner conditions

  7. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Progress in High-pT Physics at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazilevsky, A.; Bland, L.; Vogelsang, W.

    2010-03-17

    This volume archives the presentations at the RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop 'Progress in High-PT Physics at RHIC', held at BNL in March 2010. Much has been learned from high-p{sub T} physics after 10 years of RHIC operations for heavy-ion collisions, polarized proton collisions and d+Au collisions. The workshop focused on recent progress in these areas by both theory and experiment. The first morning saw review talks on the theory of RHIC high-p{sub T} physics by G. Sterman and J. Soffer, and on the experimental results by M. Tannenbaum. One of the most exciting recent results from the RHIC spin program is the first observation of W bosons and their associated single-spin asymmetry. The new preliminary data were reported on the first day of our workshop, along with a theoretical perspective. There also were detailed discussions on the global analysis of polarized parton distributions, including the knowledge on gluon polarization and the impact of the W-data. The main topic of the second workshop day were single-transverse spin asymmetries and their analysis in terms of transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions. There is currently much interest in a future Drell-Yan program at RHIC, thanks to the exciting physics opportunities this would offer. This was addressed in some of the talks. There also were presentations on the latest results on transverse-spin physics from HERMES and BELLE. On the final day of the workshop, the focus shifted toward forward and small-x physics at RHIC, which has become a cornerstone of the whole RHIC program. Exciting new data were presented and discussed in terms of their possible implications for our understanding of strong color-field phenomena in QCD. In the afternoon, there were discussions of nuclear parton distributions and jet observables, among them fragmentation. The workshop was concluded with outlooks toward the near-term (LHC, JLab) and longer-term (EIC) future. The workshop has been a great success

  8. Polarimetry at RHIC and the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinka, H.; Bravar, A.; Alekseev, I.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of the AGS and RHIC polarimeters and results from recent polarized proton running is given. These polarimeters are based on p + C elastic scattering in the Coulomb-nuclear interference region. A surprising energy variation is observed in the t-dependence of the analyzing power between 3.8 and 24 GeV/c, while there is evidence that changes are much smaller up to 200 GeV/c. Plans for future polarimetry are also described. (author)

  9. AGS to RHIC transfer line: Design and commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKay, W.W.; Ahrens, L.; Bennan, M.; Brown, K.

    1996-01-01

    In the fall of 1995, we successfully completed a major milestone in the RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) project: the first beam test of the AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) to RHIC (ATR) transfer line. The ATR serves as a test bed for the new RHIC control system. This transfer line is highly instrumented, with several types of instrumentation for characterizing the extracted beam from AGS and for matching the beam into RHIC. We describe the design and performance of ATR with gold ions with an eye to reaching the design criteria for RHIC operation, both in beam quality and controls

  10. A safety system for personnel and equipment protection at the AGS and RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zitvogel, E.P.

    1994-01-01

    Brookhaven's Booster and AGS accelerators will soon be operating in a mode whereby different particle species and intensities are alternately accelerated within the same machine during different machine cycles. This will allow the AGS to feed the experimental program and act as a RHIC injector when needed. Along with this great flexibility comes the burden of ensuring the safety of AGS and RHIC personnel and equipment by preventing the inadvertent acceleration of high intensity beam during a period intended for low intensity beam. The Co-injection monitoring system, under development now at BNL, will meet this need. This safety system will sense the intensity of the beam by integrating the beam current signal from a transformer and trip off the accelerator if the intensity exceeds a preset level. The system is dual redundant and contains self-test circuitry to ensure its functionality. This paper describes the Co-injection system. Where available, results of the initial operation will be presented

  11. PROCEEDINGS FROM RIKEN-BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP: PARITY-VIOLATING SPIN ASYMMETRIES AT RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VOGELSANG, W.; PERDEKAMP, M.; SURROW, B.

    2007-01-01

    The RHIC spin program is now fully underway. Several runs have been successfully completed and are producing exciting first results. Luminosity and polarization have improved remarkably and promising advances toward the higher RHIC energy of √s = 500 GeV have been made. At this energy in particular, it will become possible to perform measurements of parity-violating spin asymmetries. Parity violation occurs in weak interactions, and in combination with the unique polarization capabilities at RHIC fascinating new opportunities arise. In particular, parity-violating single- and double-spin asymmetries give new insights into nucleon structure by allowing probes of up and down sea and anti-quark polarizations. Such measurements at RHIC are a DOE performance milestone for the year 2013 and are also supported by a very large effort from RIKEN. With transverse polarization, charged-current interactions may be sensitive to the Sivers effect. Parity-violating effects at RHIC have been proposed even as probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. With the era of measurements of parity-violating spin asymmetries at RHIC now rapidly approaching, we had proposed a small workshop that would bring together the main experts in both theory and experiment. We are very happy that this worked out. The whole workshop contained 17 formal talks, both experiment (10) and theory (7), and many fruitful discussions. The physics motivations for, the planned measurements were reviewed first. The RHIC machine prospects regarding polarized 500 GeV running were discussed, as well as the plans by the RHIC experiments for the vital upgrades of their detectors needed for the W physics program. We also had several talks on the topic of ''semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering'', which provides different access to related physics observables. On the theory side, new calculations were presented, for example in terms of QCD all-order resummations of perturbation theory. Also, new observables, such

  12. Polarized proton acceleration program at the AGS and RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Presented is an overview of the program for acceleration of polarized protons in the AGS and their injection into the RHIC collider. The problem of depolarizing resonances in strong focusing circulator accelerators is discussed. The intrinsic resonances are jumped over by the fast tune jump, and a partial Siberian Snake is used to compensate for over forty imperfection resonances in the AGS. Two sets of full Siberian Snake and spin rotators will be employed in RHIC

  13. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop, RHIC Spin Physics V, Volume 32, February 21, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BUNCE, G.; SAITO, N.; VIGDOR, S.; ROSER, T.; SPINKA, H.; ENYO, H.; BLAND, L.C.; GURYN, W.

    2001-01-01

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. During the fast year, the Center had only a Theory Group. In the second year, an Experimental Group was also established at the Center. At present, there are seven Fellows and nine post dots in these two groups. During the third year, we started a new Tenure Track Strong Interaction Theory RHIC Physics Fellow Program, with six positions in the academic year 1999-2000; this program will increase to include eleven theorists in the next academic year, and, in the year after, also be extended to experimental physics. In addition, the Center has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics, about ten workshops a year, with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. The construction of a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor, which was begun at the Center on February 19, 1998, was completed on August 28, 1998

  14. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI, VOLUME 36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BLAND, L.; SAITO, N.

    2001-01-01

    The sixth meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) took place on October 1, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. RHIC is now in its second year of operation for physics production and the first polarized proton collision run at √s=200 GeV is expected to start in eight weeks. The RSC has developed a plan for this coming run through two previous meetings, RHIC Spin Physics III (August 3, 2000) and IV (October 13-14, 2000). We requested the following: two weeks of polarized proton studies in AGS, three weeks of polarized collider commissioning, and five weeks of polarized proton physics run. As a result, we have obtained all we asked and the above plans are implemented in the current operation schedule. The focus of the present meeting was to bring all involved in the RHIC Spin activities up-to-date on the progress of machine development, theory issues, and experimental issues. This meeting was right after the Program Advisory Committee (PAC) meeting and it started with the comments on the PAC discussion by Gerry Bunce, who was informed about the PAC deliberations by Tom Kirk. The PAC was fully supportive to complete the proposed spin program within the currently available budget for RHIC run 2 operations. Gerry further explained the expected luminosity to be ∫ Ldt = 0.5 pb -1 per week, reflecting the current machine status. The introductory session also had a talk from Werner Vogelsang that reviewed the progress in perturbative QCD theory focused on spin effects

  15. The RHIC/AGS Online Model Environment: Design and Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satogata, T.; Brown, K.; Pilat, F.; Tafti Alai, A.; Tepikian, S.; Vanzeijtz

    1999-01-01

    An integrated online modeling environment is currently under development for use by AGS and RHIC physicists and commissioners. This environment combines the modeling efforts of both groups in a CDEV[1] client-server design, providing access to expected machine optics and physics parameters based on live and design machine settings. An abstract modeling interface has been designed as a set of adapters[2] around core computational modeling engines such as MAD and UAL/Teapot++[3]. This approach allows us to leverage existing survey, lattice, and magnet infrastructure, as well as easily incorporate new model engine developments. This paper describes the architecture of the RHIC/AGS modeling environment, including the application interface through CDEV and general tools for graphical interaction with the model using Tcl/Tk. Separate papers at this conference address the specifics of implementation and modeling experience for AGS and RHIC

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 57, HIGH PT PHYSICS AT RHIC, DECEMBER 2-6, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretzer, Stefan; Venugopalan, Raju; Vogelsang, Werner

    2004-02-18

    The AuAu, dAu, and pp collision modes of the RHIC collider at BNL have led to the publication of exciting high p{perpendicular} particle production data. There have also been two physics runs with polarized protons, and preliminary results on the double-spin asymmetry for pion production had been presented very recently. The ontological questions behind these measurements are fascinating: Did RHIC collisions create a Quark-Gluon-Plasma phase and did they verify the Color Glass Condensate as the high energy limit of QCD? Will the Spin Crisis finally be resolved in terms of gluon polarization and what new surprises are we yet to meet for Transverse Spin? Phenomena related to sub-microscopic questions as important as these call for interpretations that are footed in solid theory. At large p{perpendicular}, perturbative concepts are legitimately expected to provide useful approaches. The corresponding hard parton dynamics are, in several ways, key to unraveling the initial or final state and collisional phase of hard scattering events in vacuum as well as in hot or cold nuclear matter. Before the advent of RHIC data, a RIKEN-BNL workshop had been held at BNL in March 1999 on ''Hard Parton Physics in High Energy Nuclear Collisions''. The 2003 workshop on ''High p{perpendicular} Physics at RHIC'' was a logical continuation of this previous workshop. It gave the opportunity to revisit the 1999 expectations in the light of what has been found in the meantime and, at the same time, to critically discuss the underlying theoretical concepts. We brought together theorists who have done seminal work on the foundations of parton phenomenology in field theory, with theorists and experimentalists who are presently working on RHIC phenomenology. The participants were both from a high-energy physics and nuclear physics background and it remains only to be said here that this chemistry worked perfectly and the workshop was a great success.

  17. Transverse impedance measurement in RHIC and the AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biancacci, Nicolo [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Dutheil, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Mernick, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; White, S. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-05-12

    The RHIC luminosity upgrade program aims for an increase of the polarized proton luminosity by a factor 2. To achieve this goal a significant increase in the beam intensity is foreseen. The beam coupling impedance could therefore represent a source of detrimental effects for beam quality and stability at high bunch intensities. For this reason it is essential to quantify the accelerator impedance budget and the major impedance sources, and possibly cure them. In this MD note we summarize the results of the 2013 transverse impedance measurements in the AGS and RHIC. The studies have been performed measuring the tune shift as a function of bunch intensity and deriving the total accelerator machine transverse impedance. For RHIC, we could obtain first promising results of impedance localization measurements as well.

  18. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Physics of p+A Collisions at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Mei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Goto, Yuji [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). RIKEN Research Center; Heppelmann, Steve [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Jiang, Xiaodong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makdisi, Yousef [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liu, Ming [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Qiu, Jianwei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-01-10

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the "Rikagaku Kenkyusho" (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Memorandum of Understanding between RIKEN and BNL, initiated in 1997, has been renewed in 2002, 2007 and again in 2012. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has both a theory and experimental component. The RBRC Theory Group and the RBRC Experimental Group consists of a total of 25-30 researchers. Positions include the following: full time RBRC Fellow, half-time RHIC Physics Fellow, and full-time postdoctoral Research Associate. The RHIC Physics Fellows hold joint appointments with RBRC and other institutions and have tenure track positions at their respective universities or BNL. To date, RBRC has over 95 graduates (Fellows and Post- docs) of which approximately 40 theorists and 20 experimenters have already attained tenure positions at major institutions worldwide. Beginning in 2001 a new RIKEN Spin Program (RSP) category was implemented at RBRC. These appointments are joint positions of RBRC and RIKEN and include the following positions in theory and experiment: RSP Researchers, RSP Research Associates, and Young Researchers, who are mentored by senior RBRC Scientists. A number of RIKEN Jr. Research Associates and Visiting Scientists also contribute to the physics program at the Center. RBRC has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. In most cases all the talks are made available on the RBRC website. In addition, highlights to each speaker’s presentation are collected to form proceedings which can therefore be made available within a short time after the workshop. To date there are over one hundred proceeding volumes available

  19. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Resarch Center Workshop: Fluctuations, Correlations and RHIC Low Energy Runs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsch, F.; Kojo, T.; Mukherjee, S.; Stephanov, M.; Xu, N.

    2011-10-27

    Most of our visible universe is made up of hadronic matter. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory of strong interaction that describes the hadronic matter. However, QCD predicts that at high enough temperatures and/or densities ordinary hadronic matter ceases to exist and a new form of matter is created, the so-called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Non-perturbative lattice QCD simulations shows that for high temperature and small densities the transition from the hadronic to the QCD matter is not an actual phase transition, rather it takes place via a rapid crossover. On the other hand, it is generally believed that at zero temperature and high densities such a transition is an actual first order phase transition. Thus, in the temperature-density phase diagram of QCD, the first order phase transition line emanating from the zero temperature high density region ends at some higher temperature where the transition becomes a crossover. The point at which the first order transition line turns into a crossover is a second order phase transition point belonging to three dimensional Ising universality class. This point is known as the QCD Critical End Point (CEP). For the last couple of years the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been performing experiments at lower energies in search of the elusive QCD CEP. In general critical behaviors are manifested through appearance of long range correlations and increasing fluctuations associated with the presence of mass-less modes in the vicinity of a second order phase transition. Experimental signatures of the CEP are likely to be found in observables related to fluctuations and correlations. Thus, one of the major focuses of the RHIC low energy scan program is to measure various experimental observables connected to fluctuations and correlations. On the other hand, with the start of the RHIC low energy scan program, a flurry of activities are taking place to provide solid theoretical

  20. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED "ODDERON SEARCHES AT RHIC" (VOLUME 76)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ORGANIZERS: GURYN, W.; KOVCHEGOV, Y.; VOGELSANG, W.; TRUEMAN, L.

    2005-10-25

    The Odderon, a charge-conjugation-odd partner of the Pomeron, has been a puzzle ever since its introduction in 1973. The Pomeron describes a colorless exchange with vacuum quantum numbers in the t-channel of hadronic scattering at high energies. The concept was originally formulated for the non-perturbative regime of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In perturbation theory, the simplest picture of the Poineron is that of a two-gluon exchange process, whereas an Odderon can be thought of as an exchange of three gluons. Both the Pomeron and the Odderon are expected in QCD. However, while there exists plenty of experimental data that could be successfully described by Pomeron exchanges (for example in electron-proton and hadron-hadron scattering at high energies), no experimental sign of the Odderon has been observed. One of the very few hints so far is the difference in the diffractive minima of elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering measured at the ISR. The Odderon has recently received renewed attention by QCD researchers, mainly for the following two reasons. First of all, RHIC has entered the scene, offering exciting unique new opportunities for Odderon searches. RHIC provides collisions of nuclei at center-of-mass energies far exceeding those at all previous experiments. RHIC also provides collisions of protons of the highest center-of-mass energy, and in the interval, which has not been explored previously in p {bar p} collisions. In addition, it also has the unique feature of polarization for the proton beams, promising to become a crucial tool in Odderon searches. Indeed, theorists have proposed possible signatures of the Odderon in some spin asymmetries measurable at RHIC. Qualitatively unique signals should be seen in these observables if the Odderon coupling is large. Secondly, the Odderon has recently been shown to naturally emerge from the Color Glass Condensate (CGC), a theory for the high-energy asymptotics of QCD. It has been argued that

  1. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W. E-mail: mackay@bnl.govhttp://www.rhichome.bnl.gov/People/waldowaldo@bnl.gov; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to {radical}s=500 GeV.

  2. Improvement plans for the RHIC/AGS on-line model environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown,K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Tepikian, S.

    2009-08-31

    The on-line models for Relativistic Ion Collider (RHIC) and the RHIC pre-injectors (the AGS and the AGS Booster) can be thought of as containing our best collective knowledge of these accelerators. As we improve these on-line models we are building the framework to have a sophisticated model-based controls system. Currently the RHIC on-line model is an integral part of the controls system, providing the interface for tune control, chromaticity control, and non-linear chromaticity control. What we discuss in this paper is our vision of the future of the on-line model environment for RHIC and the RHIC preinjectors. Although these on-line models are primarily used as Courant-Snyder parameter calculators using live machine settings, we envision expanding these environments to encompass many other problem domains.

  3. Open standards for cascade models for RHIC: Volume 1. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    It is widely recognized that cascade models are potentially effective and powerful tools for interpreting and predicting multi-particle observables in heavy ion physics. However, the lack of common standards, documentation, version control, and accessibility have made it difficult to apply objective scientific criteria for evaluating the many physical and algorithmic assumptions or even to reproduce some published results. The first RIKEN Research Center workshop was proposed by Yang Pang to address this problem by establishing open standards for original codes for applications to nuclear collisions at RHIC energies. The aim of this first workshop is: (1) to prepare a WWW depository site for original source codes and detailed documentation with examples; (2) to develop and perform standardized test for the models such as Lorentz invariance, kinetic theory comparisons, and thermodynamic simulations; (3) to publish a compilation of results of the above work in a journal e.g., ''Heavy Ion Physics''; and (4) to establish a policy statement on a set of minimal requirements for inclusion in the OSCAR-WWW depository

  4. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETINGS VIII, IX, X, XI, APRIL 12, MAY, 22, JUNE 17, JULY 29, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FOX, B.

    2003-01-01

    Since its inception, the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) has held semi-regular meetings each year to discuss the physics possibilities and the operational details of the program. Having collected our first data sample of polarized proton-proton collisions in Run02 of RHIC, we are now in the process of examining the performance of both the accelerator and the experiments. From this evaluation, we not only aim to formulate a consensus plan for polarized proton-proton during Run03 of RHIC but also to look more forward into the future to ensure the success of the spin program. In the second meeting of this series (which took place at BNL on April 12, 2002), we focused on Run02 polarization issues. This meeting opened with a presentation by Thomas Roser about his reflections on the outcome from the RHIC retreat during which the Run02 performance was evaluated. Of particular importance, Thomas pointed out that, with the expected beam time and his estimates for machine-tuning requirements, the experiments should limit their beam requests to two or three programs

  5. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETINGS VIII, IX, X, XI, APRIL 12, MAY, 22, JUNE 17, JULY 29, 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,B.

    2003-03-06

    Since its inception, the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) has held semi-regular meetings each year to discuss the physics possibilities and the operational details of the program. Having collected our first data sample of polarized proton-proton collisions in Run02 of RHIC, we are now in the process of examining the performance of both the accelerator and the experiments. From this evaluation, we not only aim to formulate a consensus plan for polarized proton-proton during Run03 of RHIC but also to look more forward into the future to ensure the success of the spin program. In the second meeting of this series (which took place at BNL on April 12, 2002), we focused on Run02 polarization issues. This meeting opened with a presentation by Thomas Roser about his reflections on the outcome from the RHIC retreat during which the Run02 performance was evaluated. Of particular importance, Thomas pointed out that, with the expected beam time and his estimates for machine-tuning requirements, the experiments should limit their beam requests to two or three programs.

  6. Design of the commissioning software for the AGS to RHIC transfer line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trahern, C.G.; Saltmarsh, C.; Satogata, T.; Kewisch, J.; Sathe, S.; D'ottavio, T.; Tepikian, S.; Shea, D.

    1995-01-01

    RHIC accelerator physicists and engineers have collaboratively specified the control system software for the commissioning of the AGS to RHIC transfer line (ATR) to occur in the fall of 1995. This paper summarizes the design and progress to date. The authors discuss the basic physics/engineering device model that they use to understand process and data flows, and describe the architecture and tools they will use to build the application level software

  7. FY2014 Parameters for Helions and Gold Ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, C. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-15

    The nominal parameters for helions (helion is the bound state of two protons and one neutron, the nucleus of a helium-3 atom) and gold ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC are given for the FY2014 running period. The parameters are found using various formulas to derive mass, helion anomalous g-factor, kinetic parameters, RF parameters, ring parameters, etc..

  8. On the image in RHIC of AGS spin vector via the AtR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-07-20

    This note re-visits the transport of the spin nn0 vector, from its periodic orientation in the AGS, to the downstream end of the Blue and Yellow RHIC ring injection kickers via the AGS extraction system and the AtR line. The goal is to verify the optimal injection energy into RHIC, in matter of spin matching. This is done using newly computed OPERA 3-D field maps of the AGS cold snake, including a new setting of the cold snake solenoid as discussed in a companion Tech. Note (C-A/AP/485, July 2013), together with the machinery of the AGS and AtR models developed in the stepwise ray-tracing code Zgoubi. Computing tools and methods employed in these investigations are discussed as well, in order to facilitate possible further checks or investigations.

  9. Results on search for a QGP with a TPC magnetic spectrometer at AGS and plans for an ∼4π TPC magnetic spectrometer at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    In the first part of this paper a search for a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) with a TPC Magnetic Spectrometer at AGS by the BNL/CCNY/Johns Hopkins/Rice (E-810) Collaboration is discussed. At AGS energies the expected increase in baryon density is near maximum. If a QGP is formed even rarely this approach provides a sensitive method for its detection. We have found some interesting phenomena including strangeness enhancement, multi-Λ and K s 0 events and an increased slope for π - (corresponding to a reduced temperature) in the usual temperature plot for p perpendicular < 0.2 GeV/c. We plan to increase the statistics with the 14.5 GeV/c x A Si ions on targets from light to heavy and then to continue the program with incident Au ions. In Part 2 we discuss the BNL/CCNY/Notre Dame/Rice proposal for an ∼ 4π TPC Magnetic Spectrometer for RHIC which we believe will be a sensitive probe for hadronic QGP signals, and also capable of observing departures from QCD should they occur. 8 refs., 12 figs

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON SPIN PHYSICS AT RHIC IN YEAR-1 AND BEYOND.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLAND, L.; BOER, D.; SAITO, N.; VOGELSANG, W.

    2001-05-14

    The much anticipated RHIC spin physics program will commence this fall when the first physics run with colliding beams of polarized protons is expected. More specifically, the planned year-1 RHIC-Spin measurements are (1) the double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL}{sup {pi}} in production of pions by collisions of longitudinally polarized protons (in order to obtain first information on the proton's spin-dependent gluon density, {Delta}g); (2) the transverse single-spin asymmetry A{sub N}{sup {pi}} for pion production. These two reactions provided part of the motivation for our workshop. On the first day there were informative talks on the specific plans of STAR (by Rakness) and PHENIX (by Goto) for the polarized run of Year-1. Some of the theoretical questions related to the double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL}{sup {pi}} were discussed on the first day by Vogelsang and Kretzer, which centered mostly around the questions of how well the unpolarized fragmentation functions are known, the need for next-to-leading order calculations, and on how sensitive the asymmetry is to the possible {Delta}g distributions. Vetterli presented HERMES measurements of fragmentation functions, which overlap in Q{sup 2} with the future lower-p{sub T} measurements at RHIC.

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON SPIN PHYSICS AT RHIC IN YEAR-1 AND BEYOND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BLAND, L.; BOER, D.; SAITO, N.; VOGELSANG, W.

    2001-01-01

    The much anticipated RHIC spin physics program will commence this fall when the first physics run with colliding beams of polarized protons is expected. More specifically, the planned year-1 RHIC-Spin measurements are (1) the double-spin asymmetry A LL π in production of pions by collisions of longitudinally polarized protons (in order to obtain first information on the proton's spin-dependent gluon density, Δg); (2) the transverse single-spin asymmetry A N π for pion production. These two reactions provided part of the motivation for our workshop. On the first day there were informative talks on the specific plans of STAR (by Rakness) and PHENIX (by Goto) for the polarized run of Year-1. Some of the theoretical questions related to the double-spin asymmetry A LL π were discussed on the first day by Vogelsang and Kretzer, which centered mostly around the questions of how well the unpolarized fragmentation functions are known, the need for next-to-leading order calculations, and on how sensitive the asymmetry is to the possible Δg distributions. Vetterli presented HERMES measurements of fragmentation functions, which overlap in Q 2 with the future lower-p T measurements at RHIC

  12. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON BARYON DYNAMICS AT RHIC, MARCH 28-30, 2002, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GYULASSY,M.; KHARZEEV,D.; XU,N.

    2002-03-28

    One of the striking observations at RHIC is the large valence baryon rapidity density observed at mid rapidity in central Au+Au at 130 A GeV. There are about twice as many valence protons at mid-rapidity than predicted based on extrapolation from p+p collisions. Even more striking PHENIX observed that the high pt spectrum is dominated by baryons and anti-baryons. The STAR measured event anisotropy parameter v2 for lambdas are as high as charged particles at pt {approx} 2.5 GeV/c. These are completely unexpected based on conventional pQCD parton fragmentation phenomenology. One exciting possibility is that these observables reveal the topological gluon field origin of baryon number transport referred to as baryon junctions. Another is that hydrodynamics may apply up to high pt in A+A. There is no consensus on what are the correct mechanisms for producing baryons and hyperons at high pt and large rapidity shifts and the new RHIC data provide a strong motivation to hold a meeting focusing on this class of observables. The possible role of junctions in forming CP violating domain walls and novel nuclear bucky-ball configurations would also be discussed. In this workshop, we focused on all measured baryon distributions at RHIC energies and related theoretical considerations. To facilitate the discussions, results of heavy ion collisions at lower beam energies, results from p+A /p+p/e+e collisions were included. Some suggestions for future measurements have been made at the workshop.

  13. Analysis of low energy AGS polarimeter data and potential consequences for RHIC spin physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadman, R.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.; Yokosawa, A.; Huang, H.

    2001-01-01

    The small asymmetries measured at G γ = 7.5 during the RHIC spin commissioning were a serious concern. In earlier runs, asymmetries double those from the spin commissioning time (September 2000) had sometimes been observed, and there had been few changes to the AGS polarimeter hardware or operating conditions. Recently, the observed changes in the asymmetries measured at G γ = 7:5 have been ascribed to contamination of the carbon target asymmetry with that from the fishline target and vice-versa, because of the sizeable beam spot size compared to the separation of the targets. This note addresses this hypothesis using the observed asymmetries. This problem could directly impact spin physics at RHIC

  14. OPERATIONS ELECTRONIC LOGBOOK EXPERIENCE AT BNL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SATOGATA,T.; CAMPBELL,I.; MARR,G.; SAMPSON,P.

    2002-06-02

    A web-based system for electronic logbooks, ''elog'', developed at Fermilab (FNAL), has been adopted for use by AGS and RHIC operations and physicists at BNL for the 2001-2 fixed target and collider runs. This paper describes the main functional and technical issues encountered in the first year of electronic logbook use, including security, search and indexing, sequencer integration, archival, and graphics management. We also comment on organizational experience and planned changes for the next facility run starting in September 2002.

  15. Particle ratios from AGS to RHIC in an interacting hadronic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zschiesche, D; Zeeb, G; Paech, K; Schramm, S; Stoecker, H

    2004-01-01

    The measured particle ratios in central heavy-ion collisions at RHIC-BNL are investigated within a chemical and thermal equilibrium chiral SU(3) σ-ωapproach. The commonly adopted non-interacting gas calculations yield temperatures close to or above the critical temperature for the chiral phase transition, but without taking into account any interactions. In contrast, the chiral SU(3) model predicts temperature and density dependent effective hadron masses and effective chemical potentials in the medium and a transition to a chirally restored phase at high temperatures or chemical potentials. Three different parametrizations of the model, which show different types of phase transition behaviour, are investigated. We show that if a chiral phase transition occured in those collisions, 'freezing' of the relative hadron abundances in the symmetric phase is excluded by the data. Therefore, either very rapid chemical equilibration must occur in the broken phase, or the measured hadron ratios are the outcome of the dynamical symmetry breaking. Furthermore, the extracted chemical freeze-out parameters differ considerably from those obtained in simple non-interacting gas calculations. In particular, the three models yield up to 35 MeV lower temperatures than the free gas approximation. The in-medium masses turn out to differ up to 150 MeV from their vacuum values

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON RHIC SPIN PHYSICS III AND IV, POLARIZED PARTONS AT HIGH Q2 REGION, AUGUST 3, 2000 AT BNL, OCTOBER 14, 2000 AT KYOTO UNIVERSITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUNCE, G.; VIGDOR, S.

    2001-03-15

    International workshop on II Polarized Partons at High Q2 region 11 was held at the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan on October 13-14, 2000, as a satellite of the international conference ''SPIN 2000'' (Osaka, Japan, October 16-21,2000). This workshop was supported by RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and by Yukawa Institute. The scientific program was focused on the upcoming polarized collider RHIC. The workshop was also an annual meeting of RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC). The number of participants was 55, including 28 foreign visitors and 8 foreign-resident Japanese participants, reflecting the international nature of the RHIC spin program. At the workshop there were 25 oral presentations in four sessions, (1) RHIC Spin Commissioning, (2) Polarized Partons, Present and Future, (3) New Ideas on Polarization Phenomena, (4) Strategy for the Coming Spin Running. In (1) the successful polarized proton commissioning and the readiness of the accelerator for the physics program impressed us. In (2) and (3) active discussions were made on the new structure function to be firstly measured at RHIC, and several new theoretical ideas were presented. In session (4) we have established a plan for the beam time requirement toward the first collision of polarized protons. These proceedings include the transparencies presented at the workshop. The discussion on ''Strategy for the Coming Spin Running'' was summarized by the chairman of the session, S. Vigdor and G. Bunce.

  17. THE RHIC INJECTION SYSTEM.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FISCHER,W.; GLENN,J.W.; MACKAY,W.W.; PTITSIN,V.; ROBINSON,T.G.; TSOUPAS,N.

    1999-03-29

    The RHIC injection system has to transport beam from the AGS-to-RHIC transfer line onto the closed orbits of the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings. This task can be divided into three problems. First, the beam has to be injected into either ring. Second, once injected the beam needs to be transported around the ring for one turn. Third, the orbit must be closed and coherent beam oscillations around the closed orbit should be minimized. We describe our solutions for these problems and report on system tests conducted during the RHIC Sextant test performed in 1997. The system will be fully commissioned in 1999.

  18. PHYSICS OF POLARITY AT RHIC-VOLUME 10.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IMAI,K.; FIELDS,D.

    1998-08-04

    The RBRC Workshop on Physics of Polarimetry at RHIC was held from Aug 4 to 7, 1998 at BNL. The primary motive of the workshop is (1) to discuss the RHIC polarimeter using the elastic proton-carbon scattering at Coulomb-nuclear interference region (p-C CNI polarimeter) in detail and write a proposal for the test experiment a t the AGS, (2) to discuss the related physics, (3) and to discuss other options for the RHIC polarimetry. The idea of the p-C CNI polarimeter was proposed last year as a simple, inexpensive and efficient polarimeter for RHIC. In order to establish this polarimeter, we have decided to carry out a test experiment by using a polarized beam at the AGS. We have made a draft of the proposal during the workshop. For the p-C CNI polarimeter, a telescope detector using both the micro-channel plate (MCP) and the SSD was proposed to detect low energy recoil carbon ions, based on the test measurements at IUCF and Kyoto, where the carbon ions as low as 200 keV were successfully detected. The kinetic energy of carbon ion is measured with the SSD, and the velocity is measured by TOF between the two detectors and between the accelerator rf pulse and the two detectors. Counting rates for the background and true events were estimated. With the proposed polarimeter, one can expect to measure the beam polarization at the AGS and RHIC at an accuracy of 10% within a reasonable time period. We will test this detector system at Kyoto as soon as possible and install it in the AGS ring for the test measurement of A{sub N} during E880 which is scheduled early in the next year.

  19. RHIC and quark matter: proposal for a relativistic heavy ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    This document describes the Brookhaven National Laboratory Proposal for the construction of a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The construction of this facility represents the natural continuation of the laboratory's role as a center for nuclear and high-energy physics research and extends and uses the existing AGS, Tandem Van de Graaff and CBA facilities at BNL in a very cost effective manner. The Administration and Congress have approved a project which will provide a link between the Tandem Van de Graaf and the AGS. Completion of this project in 1986 will provide fixed target capabilities at the AGS for heavy ions of about 14 GeV/amu with masses up to approx. 30 (sulfur). The addition of an AGS booster would extend the mass range to the heaviest ions (A approx. 200, e.g., gold); its construction could start in 1986 and be completed in three years. These two new AGS experimental facilities can be combined with the proposed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to extend the energy range to 100 x 100 GeV/amu for the heaviest ions. BNL proposes to start construction of RHIC in FY 86 with completion in FY 90 at a total cost of 134 M$

  20. The Heavy Ion Injection Scheme for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhoades-Brown, M. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    1989-03-20

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven has a multi-component injection system. In order to achieve the injection requirements for RHIC, the partially stripped ions are accelerated in the Booster and pass through a stripping foil on their way to the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), where they are further accelerated before injection into RHIC.

  1. NGSPN @ BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper, S. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bachner, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gomera, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-10-05

    Brookhaven National Laboratory’s (BNL’s) Nonproliferation and National Security Department hosted the Next Generation Safeguards Professional Network (NGSPN) at BNL September 6-9, 2016. Thirteen representatives from seven Department of Energy National Laboratories, including two from BNL, participated in the four-day meeting. The NGSPN meeting was sponsored by the Office of International Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) of the National Nuclear Security Administration, which provided funding for BNL’s development and conduct of the meeting program and the participant’s labor and travel. NGSPN meetings were previously held at Savannah River National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The purpose of NGSPN is to provide a forum for early-career international safeguards practitioners to network with their peers, to meet international safeguards experts from other institutions and to learn about organizations other than their employers who contribute to international safeguards.

  2. Proceedings of the third workshop on experiments and detectors for a relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shivakumar, B.; Vincent, P.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: the RHIC Project; summary of the working group on calorimetry; J//Psi/ measurements in heavy ion collisions at CERN; QCD jets at RHIC; tracking and particle identification; a 4π tracking spectrometer for RHIC; Bose-Einstein measurements at RHIC in light of new data; summary of working group on read-out electronics; data acquisition for RHIC; summary of the working group on detector simulation; B-physics at RHIC; and CP violation revisited at BNL, B-physics at RHIC

  3. Proceedings of the third workshop on experiments and detectors for a relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shivakumar, B.; Vincent, P.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: the RHIC Project; summary of the working group on calorimetry; J//Psi/ measurements in heavy ion collisions at CERN; QCD jets at RHIC; tracking and particle identification; a 4..pi.. tracking spectrometer for RHIC; Bose-Einstein measurements at RHIC in light of new data; summary of working group on read-out electronics; data acquisition for RHIC; summary of the working group on detector simulation; B-physics at RHIC; and CP violation revisited at BNL, B-physics at RHIC.

  4. SILICON DRIFT DETECTORS FOR THE STAR/SVT EXPERIMENT AT RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TAKAHASHI, J.

    1998-01-01

    Large area linear Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD) were developed to be used in the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) of the STAR experiment at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC). The SDD is in its final design and has been submitted for large scale production. Test results show that the detector exhibits excellent position resolution and low noise. A special characterization procedure was developed to test detector wafers in order to select good detectors for the SVT. Recently, 15 STAR/SVT SDD's were assembled as a tracking device in a BNL-AGS heavy ion experiment (E896). It is the first tracking application of these detectors and their corresponding front-end electronics in an experimental environment. Preliminary results indicating good detector performance are shown and discussed in this paper

  5. Spin physics at RHIC: Present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a high intensity polarized electron/positron beam facility at BNL which would enable deep inelastic scattering (DIS) ... written down by Bjorken a couple of decades earlier, using operator product expansion. (OPE). The relation, known .... at RHIC via the production of mesons as well as Drell–Yan process. Other single-spin.

  6. Spin physics at RHIC: Present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I will review the progress made by the RHIC spin program, followed by the physics goals for the next few years. After that I will present a brief overview of a proposal to build a high intensity polarized electron/positron beam facility at BNL which would enable deep inelastic scattering (DIS) experiments to be pursued at BNL ...

  7. Spin physics at RHIC: Present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. November 2003 physics pp. 859–864. Spin physics at RHIC: Present and future. ABHAY DESHPANDE. RIKEN BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000, USA. Abstract. ..... [5] G Rakness et al, Proceedings of SPIN2002 Symposium (to be published by APS). [6] Y Fukao et al ...

  8. Joining the RHIC Online and Offline Models

    CERN Document Server

    Malitsky, Nikolay; Fedotov, Alexei V; Kewisch, Jorg; Luccio, Alfredo U; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Satogata, Todd; Talman, Richard M; Tepikian, Steven; Wei, Jie

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents an interface encompassing the RHIC online ramp model and the UAL offline simulation framework. The resulting consolidated facility aims to minimize the gap between design and operational data, and to facilitate analysis of RHIC performance and future upgrades in an operational context. The interface is based on the Accelerator Description Exchange Format (ADXF), and represents a snapshot of the RHIC online model which is in turn driven by machine setpoints. This approach is also considered as an intermediate step towards integrating the AGS and RHIC modeling environments to produce a unified online and offline AGS model for operations.

  9. Workshop on the RHIC performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khiari, F.; Milutinovic, J.; Ratti, A.; Rhoades-Brown, M.J. (eds.)

    1988-07-01

    The most recent conceptual design manual for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven was published in May 1986 (BNL 51932). The purpose of this workshop was to review the design specifications in this RHIC reference manual, and to discuss in detail possible improvements in machine performance by addressing four main areas. These areas are beam-beam interactions, stochastic cooling, rf and bunch instabilities. The contents of this proceedings are as follows. Following an overview of the workshop, in which the motivation and goals are discussed in detail, transcripts of the first day talks are given. Many of these transcripts are copies of the original transparencies presented at the meeting. The following four sections contain contributed papers, that resulted from discussions at the workshop within each of the four working groups. In addition, there is a group summary for each of the four working groups at the beginning of each section. Finally, a list of participants is given.

  10. Workshop on the RHIC performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khiari, F.; Milutinovic, J.; Ratti, A.; Rhoades-Brown, M.J.

    1988-07-01

    The most recent conceptual design manual for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven was published in May 1986 (BNL 51932). The purpose of this workshop was to review the design specifications in this RHIC reference manual, and to discuss in detail possible improvements in machine performance by addressing four main areas. These areas are beam-beam interactions, stochastic cooling, rf and bunch instabilities. The contents of this proceedings are as follows. Following an overview of the workshop, in which the motivation and goals are discussed in detail, transcripts of the first day talks are given. Many of these transcripts are copies of the original transparencies presented at the meeting. The following four sections contain contributed papers, that resulted from discussions at the workshop within each of the four working groups. In addition, there is a group summary for each of the four working groups at the beginning of each section. Finally, a list of participants is given

  11. RHIC ABORT KICKER WITH REDUCED COUPLING IMPEDANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAHN, H.; DAVINO, D.

    2002-01-01

    Kicker magnets typically represent the most important contributors to the transverse impedance budget of accelerators and storage rings. Methods of reducing the impedance value of the SNS extraction kicker presently under construction and, in view of a future performance upgrade, that of the RHIC abort kicker have been thoroughly studied at this laboratory. In this paper, the investigation of a potential improvement from using ferrite different from the BNL standard CMD5005 is reported. Permeability measurements of several ferrite types have been performed. Measurements on two kicker magnets using CMD5005 and C2050 suggest that the impedance of a magnet without external resistive damping, such as the RHIC abort kicker, would benefit

  12. Scientific articles of the RBRC/CCAST Symposium on Spin Physics Lattice QCD and RHIC Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This volume comprises scientific articles of the symposium on spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC physics organized by RIKEN BNL research center (RBRC) and China center of advanced science and technology (CCAST). The talks were discussing the spin structure of nucleons and other problems of RHIC physics

  13. RHIC cryogenics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iarocci, M.A. E-mail: iarocci@bnl.gov; Brown, D.; Sondericker, J.; Wu, K.C.; Benson, J.; Farah, Y.; Lac, C.; Morgillo, A.; Nicoletti, A.; Quimby, E.; Rank, J.; Rehak, M.; Werner, A

    2003-03-01

    An integrated helium cryogenic system was designed with the specific performance goal of cooling and refrigerating the cryogenic magnets to below their nominal operating temperature. These magnets make up the steering and focusing elements for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In addition to meeting the accelerator demands, reliability, flexibility, safety, and ease of operation were key considerations during the design phase of the project. The refrigerator, with a capacity of 25 kW at about 4 K, was originally designed to match the load for the Colliding Beam Accelerator Project. The existing refrigerator, along with its complimentary warm compressor system was reconfigured slightly to meet the cooling process cycle design for RHIC. The original VAX based process control system was also adapted for RHIC, and later expanded upon to integrate a new programmable logic controller based ring resident control system, hence forming a common system to monitor and control all cryogenic components.

  14. RHIC STATUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROSER, T.

    2007-01-29

    As the first hadron accelerator and collider consisting of two independent superconducting rings RHIC has operated with a wide range of beam energies and particle species. Machine operation and performance will be reviewed that includes high luminosity gold-on-gold and copper-on-copper collisions at design beam energy (100 GeVh), asymmetric deuteron-on-gold collisions as well as high energy polarized proton-proton collisions (100 GeV on 100 GeV) with beam polarization of up to 65%. Plans for future upgrades of RHIC will also be discussed.

  15. Two particle interferometry at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Laue, F

    2002-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a pion interferometry analysis of Au+Au collisions at square root (S/sub NN/)=130 GeV, recorded with the STAR (Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC) detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The evaluation of three-dimensional correlation functions indicates increasing source sizes with increasing event centrality. The dependence of the calculated HBT radii on transverse momentum is attributed to strong space-momentum correlations (transverse flow). In the study presented in this paper we have not observed anomalously large source sizes as have been predicted as a signal for quark-qluon plasma formation. However, the measured HBT radii seem to follow the trend established at lower energies (AGS/SPS). We find the ratio R/sub o//R/sub s/ approximately =1, suggesting a short duration of pion emission. The "universal" pion phase space density, observed at AGS/SPS, seems to hold also at RHIC. (26 refs).

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP: VOLUME 61 RIKEN-TODAI MINI-WORKSHOP ON ''TOPICS IN HADRON PHYSICS AT RHIC''. VOLUME 61

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EN' YO,H.HAMAGAKI,H.HATSUDAT.WATANABA,Y.YAZAKI,K.

    2004-05-26

    The RIKEN-TODAI Mini-Workshop on ''Topics in Hadron Physics at RHIC'' was held on March 23rd and 24th, 2064 at the Nishina Memorial Hall of RIKEN, Wako, Saitama, Japan, sponsored by RIKEN (Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and TODAI (University of Tokyo). The workshop was planned when we learned that two distinguished theorists in hadron physics, Professors L. McLerran and S.H. Lee, would be visiting TODAI and/or RIKEN during the week of March 22-26. We asked them to give key talks at the beginning of the workshop and attend the sessions consisting of talks by young theorists in RIKEN, TODAI and other institutes in Japan and they kindly agreed on both. Considering the JPS meeting scheduled from March 27 through 30, we decided to have a.one-and-half-a-day workshop on March 23 and 24. The purpose of the workshop was to offer young researchers an opportunity to learn the forefront of hadron physics as well as to discuss their own works with the distinguished theorists.

  17. Polarized proton parameters for the 2015 PP-on-Au setup in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, C. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-08-25

    Values are given for RHIC circumference shifts due to snakes for various situations. Relevant parameters are tabulated for polarized protons (PP) in the booster and in AGS and RHIC for PP-on-Au stores.

  18. Polarized proton parameters for the 2015 PP-on-Aluminum setup in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, C. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-10-02

    Values are given for RHIC circumference shifts due to snakes for various situations. Relevant parameters are tabulated for polarized protons (PP) in the booster and in AGS and RHIC for PP-on-Aluminum stores.

  19. Electron Cooling of RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Barton, D.S.; Beavis, D.B.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Burrill, A.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Chang, X.Y.; Connolly, R.; Eidelman, Yu.I.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D.M.; Hahn, H.; Harrison, M.; Hershcovitch, A.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Jain, A.K.; Johnson, P.D.J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Lambiase, R.F.; Litvinenko, V.; MacKay, W.W.; Mahler, G.J.; Malitsky, N.; McIntyre, G.T.; Meng, W.; Mirabella, K.A.M.; Montag, C.; Nehring, T.C.N.; Nicoletti, T.; Oerter, B.; Parzen, G.; Pate, D.; Rank, J.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Scaduto, J.; Smith, K.; Trbojevic, D.; Wang, G.; Wei, J.; Williams, N.W.W.; Wu, K.-C.; Yakimenko, V.; Zaltsman, A.; Zhao, Y.; Abell, D.T.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Bluem, H.; Burger, A.; Cole, M.D.; Favale, A.J.; Holmes, D.; Rathke, J.; Schultheiss, T.; Todd, A.M.M.; Burov, A.V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Delayen, J.R.; Derbenev, Y.S.; Funk, L. W.; Kneisel, P.; Merminga, L.; Phillips, H.L.; Preble, J.P.; Koop, I.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Shatunov, Y.M.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Koop, I.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Shatunov, Y.M.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Sekutowicz, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    We report progress on the R and D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R and D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV. A Zeroth Order Design Report is in an advanced draft state, and can be found on the web at http://www.agsrhichome.bnl.gov/eCool/

  20. Electron Cooling of RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. Ben-Zvi; D.S. Barton; D.B. Beavis; M. Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X.Y. Chang; R. Connolly; Yu.I. Eidelman; A.V. Fedotov; W. Fischer; D.M. Gassner; H. Hahn; M. Harrison; A. Hershcovitch; H.-C. Hseuh; A.K. Jain; P.D.J. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; V. Litvinenko; W.W. MacKay; G.J. Mahler; N. Malitsky; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; K.A.M. Mirabella; C. Montag; T.C.N. Nehring; T. Nicoletti; B. Oerter; G. Parzen; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Rao; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; K. Smith; D. Trbojevic; G. Wang; J. Wei; N.W.W. Williams; K.-C. Wu; V. Yakimenko; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; D.T. Abell; D.L. Bruhwiler; H. Bluem; A. Burger; M.D. Cole; A.J. Favale; D. Holmes; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; A.V. Burov; S. Nagaitsev; J.R. Delayen; Y.S. Derbenev; L. W. Funk; P. Kneisel; L. Merminga; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble; I. Koop; V.V. Parkhomchuk; Y.M. Shatunov; A.N. Skrinsky; I. Koop; V.V. Parkhomchuk; Y.M. Shatunov; A.N. Skrinsky; J.S. Sekutowicz

    2005-05-16

    We report progress on the R&D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R&D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV. A Zeroth Order Design Report is in an advanced draft state, and can be found on the web at http://www.agsrhichome.bnl.gov/eCool/.

  1. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP 4 . A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  2. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D' Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  3. Electron Cooling Dynamics for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedotov, A.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Eidelman, Yu.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Malitsky, N.; Bruhwiler, D.; Meshkov, I.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.; Trubnikov, G.

    2005-01-01

    Research towards high-energy electron cooling of RHIC is presently underway at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this new regime, electron cooling has many unique features and challenges. At high energy, due to the difficulty of providing operational reserves, the expected cooling times must be estimated with a high degree of accuracy compared to extant low-energy coolers. To address these high-energy cooling issues, a detailed study of cooling dynamics based on computer codes and experimental benchmarking was launched at BNL. In this paper, we present an update of the high-energy cooling dynamics studies. We also include a discussion of some features of electron cooling relevant to colliders, such as the effects of rapid cooling of the beam core and an accurate treatment of the intra-beam scattering for such cooled ion distributions

  4. Helical spin rotators and snakes for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ptitsin, V.I.; Shatunov, Yu.M.; Peggs, S.

    1995-01-01

    The RHIC collider, now under construction at BNL, will have the possibility of polarized proton-proton collisions up to a beam energy of 250 Gev. Polarized proton beams of such high energy can be only obtained with the use of siberian snakes, a special kind of spin rotator that rotates the particle spin by 180 degree around an axis lying in the horizontal plane. Siberian snakes help to preserve the beam polarization while numerous spin depolarizing resonances are crossed, during acceleration. In order to collide longitudinally polarized beams, it is also planned to install spin rotators around two interaction regions. This paper discusses snake and spin rotator designs based on sequences of four helical magnets. The schemes that were chosen to be applied at RHIC are presented

  5. Silicon drift-chamber studies for possible use at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humanic, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    It is proposed to continue the program now underway at the University of Pittsburgh to study the feasibility of using silicon drift-chambers as particle tracking devices at RHIC. We are currently testing a UA6-type detector obtained from BNL and plan to also study a new device that will become available this year: a cylindrical geometry detector designed for NA45 (CERN). In addition we propose to fabricate and study a detector to be used in vertex determination for the RHIC OASIS experiment. The two-year budget for this proposal is $246.962. 5 refs., 12 figs

  6. Structure of spin-dependent scattering amplitude and spin effects at small angles at RHIC energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akchurin, N.; Goloskokov, S.V.; Selyugin, O.V.

    1997-01-01

    Spin-dependent pomeron effects are analyzed for elastic pp-scattering and calculations for spin-dependent differential cross sections, analyzing power and double-spin correlation parameters are carried out for the energy range of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL. In this energy range, 50 ≤√≤500 GeV, the structure of pomeron-proton coupling can be measured at RHIC with colliding polarized proton beams

  7. KAON PHYSICS AT BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KETTELL, S.H.

    2001-01-01

    The rare kaon decay program at BNL is summarized. A brief review of recent results is provided along with a discussion of prospects for the future of this program. The primary focus is the two golden modes: K + → π + νbar ν and K L o → π o νbar ν

  8. Differential current measurement in the BNL energy recovery linac test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, Peter

    2006-01-01

    An energy recovery linac (ERL) test facility is presently under construction at BNL [V.N. Litvinenko, et al., High current energy recovery linac at BNL, PAC, 2005; I. Ben-Zvi, et al., Extremely high current, high brightness energy recovery linac, PAC, 2005]. The goal of this test facility is to demonstrate CW operation with an average beam current greater than 100mA, and with greater than 99.95% efficiency of current recovery. This facility will serve as a test bed for the novel high current CW photo-cathode [A. Burrill, et al., Multi-alkali photocathode development at BNL, PAC, 2005; A. Murray, et al., State-of-the-art electron guns and injector designs for energy recovery linacs, PAC, 2005], the superconducting RF cavity with HOM dampers [R. Calaga, et al., High current superconducting cavities at RHIC, EPAC, 2004; R. Calaga, et al., in: Proceedings of the 11th workshop on RF superconductivity, Lubeck, Germany, 2003], and the lattice [D. Kayran, V. Litvinenko, Novel method of emittance preservation in ERL merging system in presence of strong space charge forces, PAC, 2005; D. Kayran, et al., Optics for high brightness and high current ERL project at BNL, PAC, 2005] and feedback systems needed to insure the specified beam parameters. It is an important stepping stone for electron cooling in RHIC [I. Ben-Zvi, et al., Electron cooling of RHIC, PAC, 2005], and essential to meet the luminosity specifications of RHICII [T. Hallman, et al., RHICII/eRHIC white paper, available at http://www.bnl.gov/henp/docs/NSAC_RHICII-eRHIC_2-15-03.pdf]. The expertise and experience gained in this effort might also extend forward into a 10-20GeV ERL for the electron-ion collider eRHIC [http://www.agsrhichome.bnl.gov/eRHIC/, Appendix A, The linac-ring option, 2005]. We report here on the use of a technique of differential current measurement to monitor the efficiency of current recovery in the test facility, and investigate the possibility of using such a monitor in the machine

  9. The Strongly Interacting Quark Gluon Plasma at RHIC and LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tserruya Itzhak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of heavy-ion collisions has currently unprecedented opportunities with two first class facilities, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC at BNL and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC at CERN, and five large experiments ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, PHENIX and STAR producing a wealth of high quality data. Selected results recently obtained are presented on the study of flow, energy loss and direct photons.

  10. Beam Diagnostics for the BNL Energy Recovery Linac Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, Peter; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Michael; Connolly, Roger; Dawson, William; Degen, Chris; DellaPenna, Al; Gassner, David; Kesselman, Martin; Kewish, Jorg; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Mead, Joseph; Oerter, Brian; Russo, Tom; Vetter, Kurt; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2004-01-01

    An Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) test facility is presently under construction at BNL. The goals of this test facility are first to demonstrate stable intense CW electron beam with parameters typical for the RHIC e-cooling project (and potentially for eRHIC), second to test novel elements of the ERL (high current CW photo-cathode, superconducting RF cavity with HOM dampers, and feedback systems), and finally to test lattice dependence of stability criteria. Planned diagnostics include position monitors, loss monitors, transverse profile monitors (both optical and wires), scrapers/halo monitors, a high resolution differential current monitor, phase monitors, an energy spread monitor, and a fast transverse monitor (for beam break-up studies and the energy feedback system). We discuss diagnostics challenges that are unique to this project, and present preliminary system specifications. In addition, we include a brief discussion of the timing system

  11. Rebootless Linux Kernel Patching with Ksplice Uptrack at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollowell, Christopher; Pryor, James; Smith, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Ksplice/Oracle Uptrack is a software tool and update subscription service which allows system administrators to apply security and bug fix patches to the Linux kernel running on servers/workstations without rebooting them. The RHIC/ATLAS Computing Facility (RACF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has deployed Uptrack on nearly 2,000 hosts running Scientific Linux and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The use of this software has minimized downtime, and increased our security posture. In this paper, we provide an overview of Ksplice's rebootless kernel patch creation/insertion mechanism, and our experiences with Uptrack.

  12. BNL 56 MHz HOM Damper Prototype Fabrication at JLab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huque, Naeem A. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Daly, Edward F. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Clemens, William A. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); McIntyre, Gary T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Qiong [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seberg, Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bellavia, Steve [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A prototype Higher-Order Mode (HOM) Damper was fabricated at JLab for the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider's (RHIC) 56 MHz cavity at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Primarily constructed from high RRR Niobium and Sapphire, the coaxial damper presented significant challenges in electron-beam welding (EBW), brazing and machining via acid etching. The results of the prototype operation brought about changes in the damper design, due to overheating braze alloys and possible multi-pacting. Five production HOM dampers are currently being fabricated at JLab. This paper outlines the challenges faced in the fabrication process, and the solutions put in place.

  13. BNL glueball review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toki, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    The glueball session of the BNL workshop on glueballs, hybrids and exotic hadrons is reviewed. This include studies of K/bar K/π, /eta/ππ, γ/rho//degree/, ππ, K/bar K/, /eta//eta/, /phi//phi/, /rho//rho/, ωω, and K*/bar K/* resonances produced in γγ, J//psi/, K/sup minus/p and π/sup minus/p reactions. 44 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Future kaon programs at BNL, FNAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettell, S.H.

    2000-01-01

    Future kaon decay programs at BNL and FNAL are discussed. The primary focus of these programs is the measurement of the golden modes, K L 0 →π 0 νν-bar and K + →π + νν-bar. The observation of K + →π + νν-bar by E787 at BNL is the first step in a series of measurements which will completely determine the unitarity triangle within the kaon system. The next step after E787 in the measurement of B(K + →π + νν-bar) will be the E949 experiment at BNL that is currently under construction. This experiment, building on the experience of E787 and making use of the intense AGS proton beam, is scheduled to run in FY01-03 and to observe O(10) SM events with a small and well-understood background. The proposed CKM experiment at FNAL would take the next step, using a decay-in-flight technique and a 22 GeV/c RF-separated kaon beam from the Main Injector, to observe O(100) SM events. At the same time, two concepts for the measurement of B(K L 0 →π 0 νν-bar) have been developed. One of these, building on the experience of KTeV with a 'pencil' K L beam, has been proposed at FNAL as KAMI. The other, with a measurement of the kaon momentum in a large angle K L beam derived from a bunched proton beam, has been proposed at BNL as KOPIO

  15. Electron Cooling of RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Barton, Donald; Beavis, Dana; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bluem, Hans; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruhwiler, David L; Burger, Al; Burov, Alexey; Burrill, Andrew; Calaga, Rama; Cameron, Peter; Chang, Xiangyun; Cole, Michael; Connolly, Roger; Delayen, Jean R; Derbenev, Yaroslav S; Eidelman, Yury I; Favale, Anthony; Fedotov, Alexei V; Fischer, Wolfram; Funk, L W; Gassner, David M; Hahn, Harald; Harrison, Michael; Hershcovitch, Ady; Holmes, Douglas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Johnson, Peter; Kayran, Dmitry; Kewisch, Jorg; Kneisel, Peter; Koop, Ivan; Lambiase, Robert; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; MacKay, William W; Mahler, George; Malitsky, Nikolay; McIntyre, Gary; Meng, Wuzheng; Merminga, Lia; Meshkov, Igor; Mirabella, Kerry; Montag, Christoph; Nagaitsev, Sergei; Nehring, Thomas; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Parkhomchuk, Vasily; Parzen, George; Pate, David; Phillips, Larry; Preble, Joseph P; Rank, Jim; Rao, Triveni; Rathke, John; Roser, Thomas; Russo, Thomas; Scaduto, Joseph; Schultheiss, Tom; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Shatunov, Yuri; Sidorin, Anatoly O; Skrinsky, Aleksander Nikolayevich; Smirnov, Alexander V; Smith, Kevin T; Todd, Alan M M; Trbojevic, Dejan; Troubnikov, Grigory; Wang, Gang; Wei, Jie; Williams, Neville; Wu, Kuo-Chen; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Zaltsman, Alex; Zhao, Yongxiang; ain, Animesh K

    2005-01-01

    We report progress on the R&D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R&D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV. A Zeroth Order Design Report is in an advanced draft state, and can be found on the web at http://www.ags...

  16. Electron cooling for low-energy RHIC program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotov, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Pendzick, A.; Satogata, T.

    2009-08-31

    Electron cooling was proposed to increase luminosity of the RHIC collider for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon. Providing collisions at such energies, termed RHIC 'low-energy' operation, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about existence and location of critical point on the QCD phase diagram. The electron cooling system should deliver electron beam of required good quality over energies of 0.9-5 MeV. Several approaches to provide such cooling were considered. The baseline approach was chosen and design work started. Here we describe the main features of the cooling system and its expected performance. We have started design work on a low-energy RHIC electron cooler which will operate with kinetic electron energy range 0.86-2.8 (4.9) MeV. Several approaches to an electron cooling system in this energy range are being investigated. At present, our preferred scheme is to transfer the Fermilab Pelletron to BNL after Tevatron shutdown, and to use it for DC non-magnetized cooling in RHIC. Such electron cooling system can significantly increase RHIC luminosities at low-energy operation.

  17. Spectrum from the Proposed BNL Very Long Baseline Neutrino Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kahn, S A

    2005-01-01

    This paper calculates the neutrino flux that would be seen at the far detector location from the proposed BNL Very Long Baseline Neutrino Facility. The far detector is assumed to be located at an underground facility in South Dakota 2540 km from BNL. The neutrino beam facility uses a 1 MW upgraded AGS to provide an intense proton beam on the target and a magnetic horn to focus the secondary pion beam. The paper will examine the sensitivity of the neutrino flux at the far detector to the positioning of the horn and target so as to establish alignment tolerances for the neutrino system.

  18. RIKEN BNL Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samios, Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    Since its inception in 1997, the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) has been a major force in the realms of Spin Physics, Relativistic Heavy Ion Physics, large scale Computing Physics and the training of a new generation of extremely talented physicists. This has been accomplished through the recruitment of an outstanding non-permanent staff of Fellows and Research associates in theory and experiment. RBRC is now a mature organization that has reached a steady level in the size of scientific and support staff while at the same time retaining its vibrant youth. A brief history of the scientific accomplishments and contributions of the RBRC physicists will be presented as well as a discussion of the unique RBRC management structure.

  19. High luminosity polarized proton collisions at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    2001-01-01

    The Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides the unique opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at a center-of-mass energy of up to 500 GeV and luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 . Such high luminosity and high energy polarized proton collisions will open up the possibility of studying spin effects in hard processes. However, the acceleration of polarized beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Using a partial Siberian snake and a rf dipole that ensure stable adiabatic spin motion during acceleration has made it possible to accelerate polarized protons to 25 GeV at the Brookhaven AGS. After successful operation of RHIC with gold beams polarized protons from the AGS have been successfully injected into RHIC and accelerated using a full Siberian snakes built from four superconducting helical dipoles. A new high energy proton polarimeter was also successfully commissioned. Operation with two snakes per RHIC ring is planned for next year

  20. Bunching near transition in the BNL AGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ankenbrandt

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available The proton driver for the muon collider must produce short pulses of protons in order to facilitate muon cooling and operation with polarized beams. In order to test methods of producing these bunches, we have operated the alternating-gradient synchrotron near transition and studied procedures which involved moving the transition energy γ_{t} to the beam energy. We were able to produce stable bunches of 3–5×10^{12} protons with rms widths of σ=2.0–2.7ns for longitudinal bunch areas of 1.5eVs, in addition to making measurements of the lowest two orders of the momentum compaction factor.

  1. ERL-BASED LEPTON-HADRON COLLIDERS: eRHIC AND LHeC

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    Two hadron-ERL colliders are being proposed. The Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) plans to collide the high-energy protons and heavy ions in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN with 60-GeV polarized electrons or positrons. The baseline scheme for this facility adds to the LHC a separate recirculating superconducting (SC) lepton linac with energy recovery, delivering a lepton current of 6.4mA. The electron-hadron collider project eRHIC aims to collide polarized (and unpolarized) electrons with a current of 50 (220) mA and energies in the range 5–30 GeV with a variety of hadron beams— heavy ions as well as polarized light ions— stored in the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL. The eRHIC electron beam will be generated in an energy recovery linac (ERL) installed inside the RHIC tunnel.

  2. Status of magnet system for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, P.A.; Cottingham, J.; Dahl, P.; Fernow, R.; Garber, M.; Ghosh, A.; Goodzeit, C.; Greene, A.; Hahn, H.; Herrera, J.

    1986-01-01

    A Relativistic Heavy Ion Colliding beam accelerator (RHIC) has been proposed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The machine would generate colliding beams of energies up to 100 GeV/amu of ions as heavy as /sup 197/Au. The facilities necessary to accelerate these ions up to 11 GeV/amu are either already operational or under construction at BNL. This paper will discuss the magnet system for the actual collider ring itself, which will further accelerate the particles to beam energies of between 7 and 100 GeV/amu, store them, and provide interaction regions. This magnet system will consist of two rings of superconducting magnets placed in an existing 3.8 km tunnel.

  3. Excitation functions of parameters extracted from three-source (net-)proton rapidity distributions in Au-Au and Pb-Pb collisions over an energy range from AGS to RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Li-Na; Liu, Fu-Hu [Shanxi University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China); Sun, Yan; Sun, Zhu [Shanxi Datong University, Department of Physics, Datong, Shanxi (China); Lacey, Roy A. [Stony Brook University, Departments of Chemistry and Physics, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Experimental results of the rapidity spectra of protons and net-protons (protons minus antiprotons) emitted in gold-gold (Au-Au) and lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions, measured by a few collaborations at the alternating gradient synchrotron (AGS), super proton synchrotron (SPS), and relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC), are described by a three-source distribution. The values of the distribution width σ{sub C} and fraction k{sub C} of the central rapidity region, and the distribution width σ{sub F} and rapidity shift Δy of the forward/backward rapidity regions, are then obtained. The excitation function of σ{sub C} increases generally with increase of the center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair √(s{sub NN}). The excitation function of σ{sub F} shows a saturation at √(s{sub NN}) = 8.8 GeV. The excitation function of k{sub C} shows a minimum at √(s{sub NN}) = 8.8 GeV and a saturation at √(s{sub NN}) ∼ 17 GeV. The excitation function of Δy increases linearly with ln(√(s{sub NN})) in the considered energy range. (orig.)

  4. Brookhaven: RHIC magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heppelman, Steve

    1990-01-01

    Last year, Brookhaven's proposal for a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider - RHIC - was scrutinized by the US Department of Energy and deemed to be ready for construction funding. The hope is that the money will be voted soon so that construction can get underway at the start of the new US financial year in October. The 3.8 kilometre RHIC tunnel was completed ten years ago for the doomed Isabelle/CBA proton collider project

  5. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 66

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OGAWA, A.

    2005-01-01

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RSRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the 'Rikagaku Kenkyusho (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has both a theory and experimental component. At present the theoretical group has 4 Fellows and 3 Research Associates as well as 11 RHIC Physics/University Fellows (academic year 2003-2004). To date there are approximately 30 graduates from the program of which 13 have attained tenure positions at major institutions worldwide. The experimental group is smaller and has 2 Fellows and 3 RHIC Physics/University Fellows and 3 Research Associates, and historically 6 individuals have attained permanent positions. Beginning in 2001 a new RIKEN Spin Program (RSP) category was implemented at RBRC. These appointments are joint positions of RBRC and RIKEN and include the following positions in theory and experiment: RSP Researchers, RSP Research Associates, and Young Researchers, who are mentored by senior RBRC Scientists, A number of RIKEN Jr. Research Associates and Visiting Scientists also contribute to the physics program at the Center. RBRC has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select a few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. To date there are sixty nine proceedings volumes available. The construction of a 0.6 teraflops parallel processor, dedicated to lattice QCD, begun at the Center on February 19, 1998, was completed on August 28, 1998 and is still

  6. Machine Protection System for Concurrent Operation of RHIC and BLIP

    CERN Document Server

    Wilinski, Michelle; Glenn, Joseph; Mausner, Leonard; Unger, Kerry

    2005-01-01

    The Brookhaven 200 MeV linac is a multipurpose machine used to inject low intensity polarized protons ultimately ending up in RHIC as well as to inject high intensity protons to BLIP, a medical isotope production facility. If high intensity protons were injected to RHIC by mistake, administrative radiation limits could be exceeded or sensitive electronics could be damaged. In the past, the changeover from polarized proton to high intensity proton operation has been a lengthy process, thereby never allowing the two programs to run simultaneously. To remedy this situation and allow for concurrent operation of RHIC and BLIP, an active interlock system has been designed to monitor current levels in the AGS using two current transformers with fail safe circuitry and associated electronics to inhibit beam to RHIC if high intensity is detected.

  7. MACHINE PROTECTION SYSTEM FOR CONCURRENT OPERATION OF RHIC AND BLIP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WILINSKI, M.; BELLAVIA, S.; GLENN, J.W.; MAUSNER, L.F.; UNGER, K.L.

    2005-01-01

    The Brookhaven 200MeV linac is a multipurpose machine used to inject low intensity polarized protons for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider), as well as to inject high intensity protons to BLIP (Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer), a medical isotope production facility. If high intensity protons were injected to RHIC by mistake, administrative radiation limits could be exceeded or sensitive electronics could be damaged. In the past, the changeover from polarized proton to high intensity proton operation has been a lengthy process, thereby never allowing the two programs to run simultaneously. To remedy this situation and allow concurrent operation of RHIC and BLIP, an active interlock system has been designed to monitor current levels in the AGS using two current transformers with fail safe circuitry and associated electronics to inhibit beam to RHIC if high intensity currents are detected

  8. Silicon drift-chamber studies for possible use at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humanic, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    It is proposed to continue the program now underway at the University of Pittsburgh to study the feasibility of using silicon drift-chambers as particle tracking devices at RHIC. We are currently testing a UA6-type detector obtained from BNL, and propose to also study a new device that will become available this year: a cylindrical geometry detector design for NA45 (CERN). This new detector will be produced at BNL and the MPI-Institute in Munich and will incorporate updated techniques which should result in a reliable device with improved performance over the UA6-type detector. The one-year budget for this proposal is $50,079. 28 refs., 2 figs

  9. High-pt and jet physics from RHIC to LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estienne, M.

    2008-01-01

    The observation of the strong suppression of high-pt hadrons in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL has motivated a large experimental program using hard probes to characterize the deconfined medium created. However, what can be denoted as 'leading particle' physics accessible at RHIC presents some limitations which motivate at higher energy the study of much more penetrating objects: jets. The gain in center-of-mass energy expected at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will definitively improve our understanding on how the energy is lost in the system, opening a major new window of study: the physics of jets on an event-by-event basis. We will concentrate on the expected performance for jet reconstruction in ALICE using the EMCal calorimeter.

  10. Construction details and test results from RHIC sextupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, M.; Anerella, M.; Ganetis, G.

    1993-01-01

    Four 8 cm aperture sextupoles have been built at BNL to verify the magnetic performance of this magnet in the RHIC installation. Two significantly different mechanical configurations have been designed, and two magnets of each design have been built, and successfully tested, and have exceeded the required minimum quench current by a substantial margin. This report describes the assembly details of the second configuration, which is the final production configuration. In addition the first industry built production sextupole has been delivered and tested. This report presents the results of quench tests on all 5 magnets and field measurements on the first production sextupole

  11. Long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at the AGS. Physics design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beavis, D.; Carroll, A.; Chiang, I.

    1995-04-01

    The authors present a design for a multi-detector long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at the BNL AGS. It has been approved by the BNL-HENP-PAC as AGS Experiment 889. The experiment will search for oscillations in the ν μ , disappearance channel and the ν μ ↔ ν e appearance channel by means of four identical neutrino detectors located 1, 3, 24, and 68km from the AGS neutrino source. Observed depletion of the ν μ flux (via quasi-elastic muon neutrino events, ν μ n → μ - p) in the far detectors not attended by an observed proportional increase of the ν e flux (via quasi-elastic electron neutrino events, ν e n → e - p) in those detectors will be prima facie evidence for the oscillation channel ν μ ↔ ν τ . The experiment is directed toward exploration of the region of the neutrino oscillation parameters Δm 2 and sin 2 2θ, suggested by the Kamiokande and IMB deep underground detectors but it will also explore a region more than two orders of magnitude larger than that of previous accelerator experiments. The experiment will run in a mode new to BNL. It will receive the fast extracted proton beam on the neutrino target approximately 20 hours per day when the AGS is not filling RHIC. A key aspect of the experimental design involves placing the detectors 1.5 degrees off the center line of the neutrino beam, which has the important advantage that the central value of the neutrino energy (∼ 1 GeV) and the beam spectral shape are, to a good approximation, the same in all four detectors. The proposed detectors are massive, imaging, water Cherenkov detectors similar in large part to the Kamiokande and IMB detectors. The design has profited from their decade-long experience, and from the detector designs of the forthcoming SNO and SuperKamiokande detectors

  12. Spin tracking in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luccio, A.U. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Katayama, T. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Wu, H. [Riken Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    In the acceleration of polarized protons in RHIC many spin depolarizing resonances are encountered. Helical Siberian snakes will be used to overcome depolarizing effects. The behavior of polarization can be studied by numerical tracking in a model accelerator. That allows one to check the strength of the resonances, to study the effect of snakes, to find safe lattice tune regions, and finally to study the operation of special devices like spin flippers. In this paper the authors describe numerical spin tracking. Results show that, for the design corrected distorted orbit and the design beam emittance, the polarization of the beam will be preserved in the whole range of proton energies in RHIC.

  13. RHIC prefire protection masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drees, A.; Biscardi, C.; Curcio, T.; Gassner, D.; DeSanto, L.; Fu, W.; Liaw, C. J.; Montag, C.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.

    2015-01-01

    The protection of the RHIC experimental detectors from damage due to beam hitting close upstream elements in cases of abort kicker prefires requires some dedicated precautionary measures with two general options: to bring the beam close to a limiting aperture (i.e. the beam pipe wall), as far upstream of the detector components as possible or, alternatively, to bring a limiting aperture close to the circulating beam. Spontaneous and random prefires of abort kicker modules (Pulse Forming Network, PFN) have a history as long as RHIC is being operated. The abort system consist of 5 kickers in per ring, each of them equipped with its own dedicated PFN.

  14. Opportunities for Polarized He-3 in RHIC and EIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer E.; Deshpande, A.; Fischer, W.; Derbenev, S.; Milner, R.; Roser, T.; Zelenski, A.

    2011-10-01

    The workshop on opportunities for polarized He-3 in RHIC and EIC was targeted at finding practical ways of implementing and using polarized He-3 beams. Polarized He-3 beams will provide the unique opportunity for first measurements, i.e, to a full quark flavor separation measuring single spin asymmetries for p{sup +}, p{sup -} and p{sup 0} in hadron-hadron collisions. In electron ion collisions the combination of data recorded with polarized electron proton/He-3 beams allows to determine the quark flavor separated helicity and transverse momentum distributions. The workshop had sessions on polarized He-3 sources, the physics of colliding polarized He-3 beams, polarimetry, and beam acceleration in the AGS Booster, AGS, RHIC, and ELIC. The material presented at the workshop will allow making plans for the implementation of polarized He-3 beams in RHIC.

  15. THE RHIC SEQUENCER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN ZEIJTS, J.; DOTTAVIO, T.; FRAK, B.; MICHNOFF, R.

    2001-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has a high level asynchronous time-line driven by a controlling program called the ''Sequencer''. Most high-level magnet and beam related issues are orchestrated by this system. The system also plays an important task in coordinated data acquisition and saving. We present the program, operator interface, operational impact and experience

  16. Performances of BNL high-intensity synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, W.T.

    1998-03-01

    The AGS proton synchrotron was completed in 1960 with initial intensity in the 10 to the 10th power proton per pulse (ppp) range. Over the years, through many upgrades and improvements, the AGS now reached an intensity record of 6.3 x 10 13 ppp, the highest world intensity record for a proton synchrotron on a single pulse basis. At the same time, the Booster reached 2.2 x 10 13 ppp surpassing the design goal of 1.5 x 10 13 ppp due to the introduction of second harmonic cavity during injection. The intensity limitation caused by space charge tune spread and its relationship to injection energy at 50 MeV, 200 MeV, and 1,500 MeV will be presented as well as many critical accelerator manipulations. BNL currently participates in the design of an accumulator ring for the SNS project at Oak Ridge. The status on the issues of halo formation, beam losses and collimation are also presented

  17. RHIC beam loss monitor system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witkover, R.; Zitvogel, E.; Michnoff, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) System is designed to prevent the quenching of RHIC magnets due to beam loss, provide quantitative loss data, and the loss history in the event of a beam abort. The system uses 400 ion chambers of a modified Tevatron design. To satisfy fast (single turn) and slow (100 msec) loss beam criteria and provide sensitivity for studies measurements, a range of over 8 decades is needed. An RC pre-integrator reduces the dynamic range for a low current amplifier. This is digitized for data logging. The output is also applied to an analog multiplier which compensates the energy dependence, extending the range of the abort comparators. High and low pass filters separate the signal to dual comparators with independent programmable trip levels. Up to 64 channels, on 8 VME boards, are controlled by a micro-controller based VME module, decoupling it from the front-end computer (FEC) for real-time operation. Results with the detectors in the RHIC Sextant Test and the electronics in the AGS-to-RHIC (AtR) transfer line will be presented

  18. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  19. BNL heavy ion fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschke, A.W.

    1978-01-01

    A principal attraction of heavy ion fusion is that existing accelerator technology and theory are sufficiently advanced to allow one to commence the design of a machine capable of igniting thermonuclear explosions. There are, however, a number of features which are not found in existing accelerators built for other purposes. The main thrust of the BNL Heavy Ion Fusion program has been to explore these features. Longitudinal beam bunching, very low velocity acceleration, and space charge neutralization are briefly discussed

  20. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikin, Alexander; Alessi, James G.; Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm 2 and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given

  1. Summary of the LARP Mini-Workshop on Electron Lens Simulations at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valishev,A.; Luo,Y.; Fischer, W.

    2009-03-01

    This was a 1 day workshop that brought together a group of people working on beam-beam simulations, in particular those comprising the simulation part of LARP Beam-Beam Task. There were 8 participants from BNL, and 3 from FNAL. The goals of the mini-workshop were: (1) To identify the beam-beam effects in LHC and RHIC that could be mitigated using electron lenses, and to define machine and beam parameters one should be looking at in simulations; (2) To assess the group capabilities and establish means of collaboration; and (3) To establish near and long term simulation program, set priorities and a schedule.

  2. Why is the null HBT result at RHIC so interesting?

    CERN Document Server

    Gyulassy, M

    2003-01-01

    Pion interferometry (HBT of A+A) data have posed a thorn in the theoretical interpretation of AA collisions at RHIC (sq root s = 130 AGeV). How can R sub o sub u sub t approx R sub s sub i sub d sub e approx R sub l sub o sub n sub g and remain so between AGS and RHIC? Where is the QGP Stall? Can elephants hide along the x sub 0 sup + dimension? We rummage old hydrodynamic scenarios and uncover some previously ignored NULL solutions. (author)

  3. PHOBOS at RHIC 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, E.; Baum, R.; Bindel, R.; Mignerey, A.; Shea, J.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.; George, N.; Wuosmaa, A.H.; Baker, M.D.; Barton, D.S.; Carroll, A.; Ceglia, M.; Gushue, S.; Heintzelman, G.A.; Kraner, H.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Remsberg, L.P.; Scaduto, J.; Sinacore, J.; Steinberg, P.; Sukhanov, A.; Bogucki, W.; Budzanowski, A.; Coghen, T.; Dabrowski, B.; Despet, M.; Galuszka, K.; Godlewski, J.; Halik, J.; Holynski, R.; Kita, W.; Kotula, J.; Lemler, M.; Ligocki, J.; Michalowski, J.; Sawicki, P.; Straczek, A.; Stodulski, M.; Strek, M.; Stopa, Z.; Trzupek, A.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Zychowski, P.; Bialas, A.; Czyz, W.; Zalewski, K.; Basilev, S.; Bates, B.D.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M.P.; Fita, P.; Fitch, J.; Friedl, M.; Gomes, C.; Griesmayer, E.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Haridas, P.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J.; Katzy, J.; Kulinich, P.; Law, C.; Mulmenstadt, J.; Neal, M.; Patel, M.; Pernegger, H.; Plesko, M.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Ross, D.; Rosenberg, L.; Ryan, J.; Sarin, P.; Steadman, S.G.; Stephans, G.S.F.; Surowiecka, K.; Vale, C.M.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, G.J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wyslouch, B.; Chang, Y.H.; Chen, A.E.; Lin, W.T.; Tang, J.L.; Conner, C.; Ganz, R.; Halliwell, C.; Hollis, R.; Holzman, B.; Kucewicz, W.; McLeod, D.; Nouicer, R.; Reuter, M.; Hayes, A.; Johnson, E.; Manly, S.; Park, I.C.; Skulski, W.; Teng, R.; Wolfs, F.L.H.; Sanzgiri, A.

    2001-01-01

    The relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven national laboratory delivered in June 2000 the first collisions between Au nuclei at the highest center-of-mass energies achieved in a controlled environment to date. PHOBOS is one of the four experiments installed during this phase of RHIC running. This paper will describe the PHOBOS experiment, and discuss the results of the first physics measurement, thc pseudo rapidity densities of primary charged particles near mid rapidity in central Au + Au collisions at two different energies, √ S NN = 56 and 130 GeV. The observed densities are higher than those previously observed in any collisions, and the rate of increase between the two energies is larger than that for nucleon-nucleon collisions at comparable beam energies. This talk will describe the PHOBOS experiment, discuss the first physics measurement, and conclude with the present status of the experiment, the physics analysis and the perspectives fi the future. (Author)

  4. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP: VOLUME 69 RBRC SCIENTIFIC REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SAMIOS, N.P.

    2005-01-01

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RSRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the 'Rikagaku Kenkyusho' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has both a theory and experimental component. At present the theoretical group has 4 Fellows and 3 Research Associates as well as 11 RHIC Physics/University Fellows (academic year 2003-2004). To date there are approximately 30 graduates from the program of which 13 have attained tenure positions at major institutions worldwide. The experimental group is smaller and has 2 Fellows and 3 RHIC Physics/University Fellows and 3 Research Associates, and historically 6 individuals have attained permanent positions. Beginning in 2001 a new RIKEN Spin Program (RSP) category was implemented at RBRC. These appointments are joint positions of RBRC and RIKEN and include the following positions in theory and experiment: RSP Researchers, RSP Research Associates, and Young Researchers, who are mentored by senior RBRC Scientists, A number of RIKEN Jr. Research Associates and Visiting Scientists also contribute to the physics program at the Center. RBRC has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select a few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. To date there are sixty nine proceedings volumes available. The construction of a 0.6 teraflops parallel processor, dedicated to lattice QCD, begun at the Center on February 19, 1998, was completed on August 28, 1998 and is still

  5. Fast Automated Decoupling at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Beebe-Wang, Joanne

    2005-01-01

    Coupling correction is essential for the operational performance of RHIC. The independence of the transverse degrees of freedom makes diagnostics and tune control easier, and it is advantageous to operate an accelerator close to the coupling resonance to minimize nearby nonlinear sidebands. An automated decoupling application has been developed at RHIC for coupling correction during routine operations. The application decouples RHIC globally by minimizing the tune separation through finding the optimal settings of two orthogonal skew quadrupole families. The program provides options of automatic, semi-automatic and manual decoupling operations. It accesses tune information from all RHIC tune measurement systems: the PLL (Phase Lock Loop), the high frequency Schottky system, and the tune meter. It also supplies tune and skew quadrupole scans, finding the minimum tune separation, display the real time results and interface with the RHIC control system. We summarize the capabilities of the decoupling application...

  6. Ramp Management in RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kewisch, J.; Van Zeijts, J.; Peggs, S.; Satogata, T.

    1999-01-01

    In RHIC, magnets and RF cavities are controlled by Wave Form Generators (WFGs), simple real time computers which generate the set points. The WFGs are programmed to change set points from one state to another in a synchrotronized way. Such transition is called a ''Ramp'' and consists of a sequence of ''stepping stones'' which contain the set point of every WFG controlled device at a point in time. An appropriate interpolation defines the set points between these stepping stones. This report describes the implementation of the ramp system. The user interface, tools to create and modify ramps, interaction with modeling tools and measurements and correction programs are discussed

  7. RHIC electron lenses upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Altinbas, Z. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Bruno, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Binello, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Costanzo, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Drees, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Gassner, D. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Hock, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Hock, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Harvey, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Mi, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Mernick, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Michnoff, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Miller, T. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Pikin, A. I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Robert-Demolaize, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Samms, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Shrey, T. C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Schoefer, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tan, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Thieberger, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; White, S. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 100 GeV polarized proton run in 2015, two electron lenses were used to partially compensate for the head-on beam-beam effect for the first time. Here, we describe the design of the current electron lens, detailing the hardware modifications made after the 2014 commissioning run with heavy ions. A new electron gun with 15-mm diameter cathode is characterized. The electron beam transverse profile was measured using a YAG screen and fitted with a Gaussian distribution. During operation, the overlap of the electron and proton beams was achieved using the electron backscattering detector in conjunction with an automated orbit control program.

  8. Recent results from BNL E865

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarus, D.M.; Leipuner, L.; Ma, H.; Majid, W.; Rehak, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States); Poblaguev, A.A.; Proskurjakov, A.J. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Isakov, V.V.; Poblaguev, A.A.; Proskurjakov, A.J. [Paul Scherrer Institute (United States); Menzel, W.; Weyer, H. [University of Basel (United States); Eilerts, S.; Fischer, H.; Lowe, J.; Stotzer, R [University of New Mexico (United States); Appel, R.; Brown, D.N.; Cheung, N.; Felder, C.; Gach, M.; Kraus, D.; Thompson, J.A. [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Robmann, P.; Truol, P. [University of Zuerich (Zuerich); Dhawan, S.; Dhawan, D.O.; Lozano, J.; Pislak, S.; Zeller, M.E. [Yale University (United States)

    1999-02-01

    Experiment E865 at the BNL AGS is a search for the Lepton Family Violating decay K{sup +}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}e{sup {minus}1}. We aim to reach a single event sensitivity below 10{sup {minus}11} for this decay. The E865 apparatus allow us to collect and study other rare and semi rare K{sup +} decays. Preliminary results are shown on K{sup +}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, K{sup +}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, K{sup +}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}, K{sup +}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}e{sup +}{nu}, K{sup +}{r_arrow}e{sup +}{nu}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, K{sup +}{r_arrow}{mu}{sup +}{nu}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, K{sup +}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup 0}e{sup +}{nu} ({pi}{sup 0}{r_arrow}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}{gamma}). {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. HARD PARTON PHYSICS IN HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARROLL,J.

    1999-09-10

    The RIKEN-BNL center workshop on ''Hard parton physics in high energy nuclear collisions'' was held at BNL from March 1st-5th! 1999. The focus of the workshop was on hard probes of nucleus-nucleus collisions that will be measured at RHIC with the PHENIX and STAR detectors. There were about 45 speakers and over 70 registered participants at the workshop, with roughly a quarter of the speakers from overseas. About 60% of the talks were theory talks. A nice overview of theory for RHIC was provided by George Sterman. The theoretical talks were on a wide range of topics in QCD which can be classified under the following: (a) energy loss and the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect; (b) minijet production and equilibration; (c) small x physics and initial conditions; (d) nuclear parton distributions and shadowing; (e) spin physics; (f) photon, di-lepton, and charm production; and (g) hadronization, and simulations of high pt physics in event generators. Several of the experimental talks discussed the capabilities of the PHENIX and STAR detectors at RHIC in measuring high pt particles in heavy ion collisions. In general, these talks were included in the relevant theory sessions. A session was set aside to discuss the spin program at RHIC with polarized proton beams. In addition, there were speakers from 08, HERA, the fixed target experiments at Fermilab, and the CERN fixed target Pb+Pb program, who provided additional perspective on a range of issues of relevance to RHIC; from jets at the Tevatron, to saturation of parton distributions at HERA, and recent puzzling data on direct photon production in fixed target experiments, among others.

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN/BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP FUTURE TRANSVERSITY MEASUREMENTS (VOLUME 29)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, D.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.

    2001-01-01

    The RIKEN-BNL Research Center workshop on ''Future Transversity Measurements'' was held at BNL from September 18-20, 2000. The main goal of the workshop was to explore future measurements of transversity distributions. This issue is of importance to the RHIC experiments, which will study polarized proton-proton collisions with great precision. One of the workshop's goals was to enhance interactions between the DIS community at HERA and the spin community at RHIC in this field. The workshop has been well received by the participants; the number of 69 registered participants demonstrates broad interest in the workshop's topics. The program contained 35 talks and there was ample time for lively discussions. The program covered all recent work in the field and in addition some very elucidating educational talks were given. At the workshop the present status of the field was discussed and it has succeeded in stimulating new experimental and theoretical studies (e.g. model calculations for interference fragmentation functions (IFF), IFF analysis at DELPHI). It also functioned to focus attention on the open questions that need to be resolved for near future experiments. In general, the conclusions were optimistic, i.e. measuring the transversity functions seems to be possible, although some new experimental hurdles will have to be taken

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN/BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP FUTURE TRANSVERSITY MEASUREMENTS (VOLUME 29).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boer, D.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.

    2001-01-02

    The RIKEN-BNL Research Center workshop on ''Future Transversity Measurements'' was held at BNL from September 18-20, 2000. The main goal of the workshop was to explore future measurements of transversity distributions. This issue is of importance to the RHIC experiments, which will study polarized proton-proton collisions with great precision. One of the workshop's goals was to enhance interactions between the DIS community at HERA and the spin community at RHIC in this field. The workshop has been well received by the participants; the number of 69 registered participants demonstrates broad interest in the workshop's topics. The program contained 35 talks and there was ample time for lively discussions. The program covered all recent work in the field and in addition some very elucidating educational talks were given. At the workshop the present status of the field was discussed and it has succeeded in stimulating new experimental and theoretical studies (e.g. model calculations for interference fragmentation functions (IFF), IFF analysis at DELPHI). It also functioned to focus attention on the open questions that need to be resolved for near future experiments. In general, the conclusions were optimistic, i.e. measuring the transversity functions seems to be possible, although some new experimental hurdles will have to be taken.

  12. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, A.; Qiu, Jianwei; Vogelsang, W.; Yuan, F.

    2011-08-02

    Understanding the structure of the nucleon is of fundamental importance in sub-atomic physics. Already the experimental studies on the electro-magnetic form factors in the 1950s showed that the nucleon has a nontrivial internal structure, and the deep inelastic scattering experiments in the 1970s revealed the partonic substructure of the nucleon. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin and the gluonic structure of the nucleon. Experiments using deep inelastic scattering or polarized p-p collisions are carried out in the US at the CEBAF and RHIC facilities, respectively, and there are other experimental facilities around the world. More than twenty years ago, the European Muon Collaboration published their first experimental results on the proton spin structure as revealed in polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and concluded that quarks contribute very little to the proton's spin. With additional experimental and theoretical investigations and progress in the following years, it is now established that, contrary to naive quark model expectations, quarks and anti-quarks carry only about 30% of the total spin of the proton. Twenty years later, the discovery from the polarized hadron collider at RHIC was equally surprising. For the phase space probed by existing RHIC experiments, gluons do not seem to contribute any to the proton's spin. To find out what carries the remaining part of proton's spin is a key focus in current hadronic physics and also a major driving force for the new generation of spin experiments at RHIC and Jefferson Lab and at a future Electron Ion Collider. It is therefore very important and timely to organize a series of annual spin physics meetings to summarize the status of proton spin physics, to focus the effort, and to layout the future perspectives. This summer program on 'Nucleon Spin Physics' held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on July 14-27, 2010 [http://www.bnl.gov/spnsp/] is the

  13. SCIENTIFIC PRESENTATION. 7TH MEETING OF THE MANAGEMENT STEERING COMMITTEE OF THE RIKEN BNL COLLABORATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.D.

    2001-02-13

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho,'' (RIKEN) The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including hard QCD/spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) physics through nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The Director of RBRC is Professor T. D. Lee. The first years were dedicated to the establishment of a theory group. This has essentially been completed consisting of Fellows, Postdocs, and RHIC Physics/University Fellows, with an active group of consultants. The center also organizes an extensive series of workshops on specific topics in strong interactions with an accompanying series of published proceedings. In addition, a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor computer has been constructed and operational since August 1998. It was awarded the Supercomputer 1998 Gordon Bell Prize for price performance. An active experimental group centered around the spin physics program at RHIC has subsequently also been established at RBRC. It presently consists of five Fellows, one Postdoc and several scientific collaborators with more appointments being expected in the near future. Members and participants of RBRC on occasion will develop articles such as this one, in the nature of a status report or a general review.

  14. SCIENTIFIC PRESENTATION. 7TH MEETING OF THE MANAGEMENT STEERING COMMITTEE OF THE RIKEN BNL COLLABORATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEE,T.D.

    2001-02-13

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho,'' (RIKEN) The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong 'interactions, including hard QCD/spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) physics through nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The Director of RBRC is Professor T. D. Lee. The first years were dedicated to the establishment of a theory group. This has essentially been completed consisting of Fellows, Postdocs, and RHIC Physics/University Fellows, with an active group of consultants. The center also organizes an extensive series of workshops on specific topics in strong interactions with an accompanying series of published proceedings. In addition, a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor computer has been constructed and operational since August 1998. It was awarded the Supercomputer 1998 Gordon Bell Prize for price performance. An active experimental group centered around the spin physics program at RHIC has subsequently also been established at RBRC. It presently consists of five Fellows, one Postdoc and several scientific collaborators with more appointments being expected in the near future. Members and participants of RBRC on occasion will develop articles such as this one, in the nature of a status report or a general review.

  15. Scientific presentation. 7th meeting of the management steering committee of the RIKEN BNL Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.D.

    2001-01-01

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho,'' (RIKEN) The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including hard QCD/spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) physics through nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The Director of RBRC is Professor T. D. Lee. The first years were dedicated to the establishment of a theory group. This has essentially been completed consisting of Fellows, Postdocs, and RHIC Physics/University Fellows, with an active group of consultants. The center also organizes an extensive series of workshops on specific topics in strong interactions with an accompanying series of published proceedings. In addition, a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor computer has been constructed and operational since August 1998. It was awarded the Supercomputer 1998 Gordon Bell Prize for price performance. An active experimental group centered around the spin physics program at RHIC has subsequently also been established at RBRC. It presently consists of five Fellows, one Postdoc and several scientific collaborators with more appointments being expected in the near future. Members and participants of RBRC on occasion will develop articles such as this one, in the nature of a status report or a general review

  16. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Physics of W and Z Bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, S.; Okada, K.; Patwa, A.; Qiu, J.; Surrow, B.

    2010-06-24

    A two-day workshop on 'The Physics of Wand Z Bosons' Was held at the RIKEN BNL Research Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory on June 24-25, 2010. With the recent release of the first measurement of W bosons in proton-proton collisions at RHIC and the first observation of W events at the LHC, the workshop was a timely opportunity to bring together experts from both the high energy particle and nuclear physics communities to share their ideas and expertise on the physics of Wand Z bosons, with the aim of fully exploring the potential of the W/Z physics programs at RHIC and the LHC. The focus was on the production and measurement of W/Z bosons in both polarized and unpolarized proton-proton collisions, and the role of W/Z production in probing the parton flavor and helicity structure of the colliding proton and in the search for new physics. There were lively discussions about the potential and future prospects of W/Z programs at RHIC, Tevatron, and the LHC.

  17. Calirimeter/absorber optimization for a RHIC dimuon experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronson, S.H.; Murtagh, M.J.; Starks, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Liu, X.T.; Petitt, G.A.; Zhang, Z. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta (United States); Ewell, L.A.; Hill, J.C.; Wohn, F.K. [Iowa State Univ., Ames (United States); Costales, J.B.; Namboodiri, M.N., Sangster, T.C.; Thomas, J.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gavron, A.; Waters, L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kehoe, W.L.; Steadman, S.G. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); Awes, T.C.; Obenshain, F.E.; Saini, S.; Young, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chang, J.; Fung, S.Y.; Kang, J.H. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Kreke, J.; He, Xiaochun, Sorensen, S.P. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States); Cornell, E.C.; Maguire, C.F. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The RD-10 R&D effort on calorimeter/absorber optimization for a RHIC experiment had an extended run in 1991 using the A2 test beam at the AGS. Measurements were made of the leakage of particles behind various model hadron calorimeters. Behavior of the calorimeter/absorber as a muon-identifier was studied. First comparisons of results from test measurements to calculated results using the GHEISHA code were made

  18. The RHIC gold rush

    CERN Document Server

    Schäfer, T

    2003-01-01

    Physicists are colliding gold nuclei to recreate the fireball that existed in the very early universe, and they may have found evidence for quark-gluon plasma. What happens to ordinary matter as you heat it to higher and higher temperatures, or compress it to greater and greater densities? This simple question underpins a major effort to create extreme conditions in the lab, which has recently taken the shape of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This machine has been colliding gold nuclei since 2000, and has produced tantalizing hints that a new state of matter - the quark-gluon plasma - is created in the reactions. But it has also sparked surprises that are sending researchers back to the drawing board. (U.K.)

  19. ELECTRON COOLING OF RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.; BARTON, D.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    We report progress on the R&D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R&D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV.

  20. Proton and pion transverse spectra at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider from radial flow and finite size effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Cuautle, Eleazar; Magnin, J.; Montano, Luis Manuel

    2006-01-01

    We show that the proton and pion transverse momentum distributions measured at BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), for all collision centralities for pions and most of the collision centralities for protons, can be simultaneously described in terms of a thermal model with common values for the radial flow and temperature, when accounting for the finite size of the interaction region at the time of decoupling. We show that this description is obtained in terms of a simple scaling law of the size of the interaction region with the number of participants in the collision. The behavior of the proton to pion ratio at mid-rapidity can also be understood as a consequence of the strength of the radial flow and system size reached at RHIC energies

  1. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP (VOLUME 55) COLLECTIVE FLOW AND QGP PROPERTIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BASS,S.ESUMI,S.HEINZ,U.KOLB,P.SHURYAK,E.XU,N.

    2003-11-17

    The first three years of RHIC physics, with Au/Au collisions induced at 65, 130 and 200 GeV per nucleon pair, produced dramatic results, particularly with respect to collective observables such as transverse flow and anisotropies in transverse momentum spectra. It has become clear that the data show very strong rescattering at very early times of the reaction, strong enough in fact to be described by the hydrodynamic limit. Therefore, with today's experiments, we are able to investigate the equation of state of hot quark gluon matter, discuss its thermodynamic properties and relate them to experimental observables. At this workshop we came together to discuss our latest efforts both in the theoretical description of heavy ion collisions as well as most recent experimental results that ultimately allow us to extract information on the properties of RHIC matter. About 50 participants registered for the workshop, but many more dropped in from the offices at BNL. The workshop lasted for three days, of which each day was assigned a special topic on which the talks focused. On the first day we dealt with the more general question what the strong collective phenomena observed in RHIC collisions tell us about the properties and the dynamics of RHIC matter. The second day covered all different aspects of momentum anisotropies, and interesting new experimental results were presented for the first time. On the third day, we focused on the late fireball dynamics and the breakdown of the assumption of thermalization. New experimental observables were discussed, which will deliver more information of how the expanding fireball breaks up, once the frequent interaction ceases.

  2. An overview of Booster and AGS polarized proton operation during Run 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeno, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-10-20

    This note is an overview of the Booster and AGS for the 2015 Polarized Proton RHIC run from an operations perspective. There are some notable differences between this and previous runs. In particular, the polarized source intensity was expected to be, and was, higher this year than in previous RHIC runs. The hope was to make use of this higher input intensity by allowing the beam to be scraped down more in the Booster to provide a brighter and smaller beam for the AGS and RHIC. The RHIC intensity requirements were also higher this run than in previous runs, which caused additional challenges because the AGS polarization and emittance are normally intensity dependent.

  3. FAST AUTOMATED DECOUPLING AT RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BEEBE-WANG, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    Coupling correction is essential for the operational performance of RHIC. The independence of the transverse degrees of freedom makes diagnostics and tune control easier, and it is advantageous to operate an accelerator close to the coupling resonance to minimize nearby nonlinear sidebands. An automated coupling correction application iDQmini has been developed for RHIC routine operations. The application decouples RHIC globally by minimizing the tune separation through finding the optimal settings of two orthogonal skew quadrupole families. The program iDQmini provides options of automatic, semi-automatic and manual decoupling operations. It accesses tune information from all RHIC tune measurement systems: the PLL (phase lock loop), the high frequency Schottky system and the tune meter. It also supplies tune and skew quadrupole scans, finding the minimum tune separation, display the real time results and interface with the RHIC control system. We summarize the capabilities of the coupling correction application iDQmini, and discuss the operational protections incorporated in the program

  4. Spin physics at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Operation of RHIC with two beams of highly polarized protons (70%, either longitudinal or transverse) at high luminosity L = 2 x 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 for two months/year will allow the STAR and PHENIX detectors to perform high statististics studies of polarization phenomena in the perturbative region of hard scattering where both QCD and ElectroWeak theory make detailed predictions for polarization effects. The collision c.m. energy, √s = 200 - 500 GeV, represents a new domain for the study of spin. Direct photon production will be used to measure the gluon polarization in the polarized proton. A new twist comes from W-boson production which is expected to be 100% parity violating and will thus allow measurements of flavor separated Quark and antiquark (u, bar u, d, bar d) polarization distributions. Searches for parity violation in strong interaction processes such as jet and leading particle production will be a sensitive way to look for new physics beyond the standard model, one possibility being quark substructure

  5. Polarized protons at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1990-12-01

    The Physics case is presented for the use of polarized protons at RHIC for one or two months each year. This would provide a facility with polarizations of approx-gt 50% high luminosity ∼2.0 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 , the possibility of both longitudinal and transverse polarization at the interaction regions, and frequent polarization reversal for control of systematic errors. The annual integrated luminosity for such running (∼10 6 sec per year) would be ∫ Ldt = 2 x 10 38 cm -2 -- roughly 20 times the total luminosity integrated in ∼ 10 years of operation of the CERN Collider (∼10 inverse picobarns, 10 37 cm -2 ). This facility would be unique in the ability to perform parity-violating measurements and polarization test of QCD. Also, the existence of p-p collisions in a new energy range would permit the study of ''classical'' reactions like the total cross section and elastic scattering, etc., and serve as a complement to measurements from p-bar p colliders. 11 refs

  6. RESEARCH PLAN FOR SPIN PHYSICS AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AIDALA, C.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2005-02-01

    In this report we present the research plan for the RHIC spin program. The report covers (1) the science of the RHIC spin program in a world-wide context; (2) the collider performance requirements for the RHIC spin program; (3) the detector upgrades required, including timelines; (4) time evolution of the spin program.

  7. Configuration Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Svirida, D.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this report we present our design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. We provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.

  8. CONFIGURATION MANUAL POLARIZED PROTON COLLIDER AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROSER,T.; MACKAY,W.W.; ALEKSEEV,I.; BAI,M.; BROWN,K.; BUNCE,G.; CAMERON,P.; COURANT,E.; ET AL.

    2001-03-01

    In this report, the authors present their design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. They provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.

  9. Superconducting Storage Cavity for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi,I.

    2009-01-02

    This document provides a top-level description of a superconducting cavity designed to store hadron beams in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It refers to more detailed documents covering the various issues in designing, constructing and operating this cavity. The superconducting storage cavity is designed to operate at a harmonic of the bunch frequency of RHIC at a relatively low frequency of 56 MHz. The current storage cavities of RHIC operate at 197 MHz and are normal-conducting. The use of a superconducting cavity allows for a high gap voltage, over 2 MV. The combination of a high voltage and low frequency provides various advantages stemming from the resulting large longitudinal acceptance bucket.

  10. Ion optics of RHIC EBIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Okamura, M.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Tan, Y.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2011-09-10

    RHIC EBIS has been commissioned to operate as a versatile ion source on RHIC injection facility supplying ion species from He to Au for Booster. Except for light gaseous elements RHIC EBIS employs ion injection from several external primary ion sources. With electrostatic optics fast switching from one ion species to another can be done on a pulse to pulse mode. The design of an ion optical structure and the results of simulations for different ion species are presented. In the choice of optical elements special attention was paid to spherical aberrations for high-current space charge dominated ion beams. The combination of a gridded lens and a magnet lens in LEBT provides flexibility of optical control for a wide range of ion species to satisfy acceptance parameters of RFQ. The results of ion transmission measurements are presented.

  11. RHIC off-line computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Featherly, J.; Gibbard, B.; Gould, J.

    1993-01-01

    A report was prepared in Sept 1992, RHIC/DET Note 8, also known as ROCOCO, which estimated the various computing resources which will be required by the RHIC experimental program. A study has now been undertaken to review technical issues associated with supplying these resources. This study, organized by the HEP/NP Computing Group but including other appropriate participants, addresses questions of technologies, manpower, cost and schedule. The following document is an interim summary of this study both in terms of discussions which have occurred and initial conclusions reached

  12. Parity violation experiments at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    With longitudinally polarized protons at RHIC, even a 1 month dedicated run utilizing both approved major detectors could produce a significant search for new physics in hadron collisions via parity violation. Additionally, in the energy range of RHIC, large ''conventional'' parity violating effects are predicted due to the direct production of the weak bosons W ± and Z 0 . One can even envision measurements of the spin dependent sea-quark structure functions of nucleons using the single-spin parity violating asymmetry of W ± and Z 0

  13. POLARIZED NEUTRONS IN RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COURANT,E.D.

    1998-04-27

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. To accelerate polarized particles in a ring, one must make provisions for overcoming the depolarizing resonances that occur at certain energies. These resonances arise when the spin tune (ratio of spin precession frequency to orbit frequency) resonates with a component present in the horizontal field. The horizontal field oscillates with the vertical motion of the particles (due to vertical focusing); its frequency spectrum is dominated by the vertical oscillation frequency and its modulation by the periodic structure of the accelerator ring. In addition, the magnet imperfections that distort the closed orbit vertically contain all integral Fourier harmonics of the orbit frequency.

  14. Performance on the low charge state laser ion source in BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, M.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Costanzo, M.; DeSanto, L.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kanesue, T.; Lambiase, R.; Lehn, D.; Liaw, C. J.; McCafferty, D.; Morris, J.; Olsen, R.; Pikin, A.; Raparia, D.; Steszyn, A.; Ikeda, S.

    2015-09-07

    On March 2014, a Laser Ion Source (LIS) was commissioned which delivers high-brightness, low-charge-state heavy ions for the hadron accelerator complex in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Since then, the LIS has provided many heavy ion species successfully. The low-charge-state (mostly singly charged) beams are injected to the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), where ions are then highly ionized to fit to the following accelerator’s Q/M acceptance, like Au32+. Recently we upgraded the LIS to be able to provide two different beams into EBIS on a pulse-to-pulse basis. Now the LIS is simultaneously providing beams for both the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL).

  15. Production of quarkonia at RHIC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vértési, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 31, 28-29 (2016), č. článku 1645036. ISSN 0217-751X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-20841S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Brookhaven RHIC Coll * quarkonium: heavy * quarkonium: production * quark gluon: plasma Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.597, year: 2016

  16. SCHOTTKY MEASUREMENTS DURING RHIC 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAMERON, P.; CUPOLO, J.; DEGEN, C.; HAMMONS, L.; KESSELMAN, M.; LEE, R.; MEYER, A.; SIKORA, R.

    2001-01-01

    The 2GHz Schottky system was a powerful diagnostic during RHIC 2000 commissioning. A continuous monitor without beam excitation, it provided betatron tune, chromaticity, momentum spread relative emittance, and synchrotron tune. It was particularly useful during transition studies. In addition, a BPM was resonated at 230MHz for Schottky measurements

  17. High density matter at RHIC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    QCD predicts a phase transition between hadronic matter and a quark-gluon plasma at high energy density. The relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a new facility dedicated to the experimental study of matter under extreme conditions. Already the first round of experimental results at ...

  18. An FFAG-ERL at Cornell University for eRHIC prototyping and bright-beam applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffstaetter, Georg [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Cornell University has prototyped technology essential for any high-brightness electron ERL. This includes a DC gun and an SRF injector Linac with world-record current and normalized brightness in a bunch train, a high-current CW cryomodule for 70 MeV energy gain, a high-power beam stop, and several diagnostics tools for high-current and high-brightness beams, e.g. slid measurements for 6-D phase-space densities, a fast wire scanner for beam profiles, and beam loos diagnostics. All these are now available to equip a one-cryomodule ERL, and laboratory space has been cleared out and is radiation shielded to install this ERL at Cornell. BNL has designed a multi-turn ERL for eRHIC, where beam is transported more than 20 times around the RHIC tunnel. The number of transport lines is minimized by using two non-scaling (NS) FFAG arcs. A collaboration between BNL and Cornell has been formed to investigate the new NS-FFAG optics and the multi-turn eRHIC ERL design by building a 4-turn, one-cryomodule ERL at Cornell. It has a NS-FFAG return loop built with permanent magnets and is meant to accelerate 40 mA beam to 250 MeV.

  19. SCIENTIFIC PRESENTATIONS of the 11. MEETING OF THE MANAGEMENT STEERING COMMITTEE OF THE RIKEN BNL COLLABORATION (RBRC SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE, VOLUME 11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    2005-01-01

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho,'' (RIKEN) The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including hard QCD/spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) physics through nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The agreement was extended in 2002 for another five year period. This 11th steering group meeting consisted of a series of reports on current activities and future perspectives. Presentation titles and authors included: 'RBRC operations and accomplishments' by Nicholas P. Samios, 'Theoretical physics at RIKEN-BNL Center: strong interactions and QCD' by Larry McLerran, 'RBRC experimental group and Wako base', by Hideto En'yo, 'The QCDOC project overview and status' by Norman H. Christ, 'RHIC spin physics' by Gerry Bunce, 'RHIC heavy ion progam' by Yasuyuki Akiba, 'RIKEN's current status and future plans' by Samuel Aronson, 'Procedure for proposing renewal of the collaboration agreement in 2007' by Chiharu Shimoyamada, and 'New direction of RPRC beyond JFY 2007' by Nicholas P. Samios

  20. 2013 BNL Site Environmental Report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratel, K.; Remien, J.; Pohlot, P.; Williams, J.; Green, T.; Paquette, P.; Dorsch, W.; Welty, T.; Burke, J.

    2014-10-01

    A summary of Brookhaven National Laboratory’s (BNL) Site Environmental Report, meant to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory’s environmental performance in the lab’s surrounding area during the calendar year. The review is comprised of multiple volumes relevant to environmental data/environmental management performance and groundwater status report.

  1. PLANS FOR KAON PHYSICS AT BNL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REDLINGER,G.

    2004-06-05

    The author gives an overview of current plans for kaon physics at BNL. The program is centered around the rare decay modes K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}} and K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{bar {nu}}.

  2. Thermal considerations in the cryogenic regime for the BNL double ridge higher order mode waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay K. Ravikumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL has proposed to build an electron ion collider (EIC as an upgrade to the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC. A part of the new design is to use superconducting radio frequency (SRF cavities for acceleration, which sit in a bath of superfluid helium at a temperature of 2 K. SRF cavities designed for the BNL EIC create a standing electromagnetic wave, oscillating at a fundamental frequency of 647 MHz. Interaction of the charged particle beam with the EM field in the cavity creates higher order modes (HOM of oscillation which have adverse effects on the beam when allowed to propagate down the beam tube. HOM waveguides are thus designed to remove this excess energy which is then damped at room temperature. As a result, these waveguides provide a direct thermal link between room temperature and the superconducting cavities adding a static thermal load. The EM wave propagating through the warmer sections of the waveguide creates an additional dynamic thermal load. This study calculates these thermal loads, concluding that the dynamic load is small in comparison to the static load. Temperature distributions are mapped on the waveguide and the number of heat intercepts required to efficiently manage thermal loads have been determined. In addition, a thermal radiation study has been performed and it is found that this contribution is around three orders of magnitude smaller than the static conduction and dynamic loads.

  3. TARGET STUDIES WITH BNL E951 AT THE AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KIRK, H.; BROWN, K.; FERNOW, R.; FINFROCK, C.; GASSNER, D.; GREENE, G.; KAHN, S.; KING, B.; PRIGL, R.; SAMULYAK, R.; SCADUTO, J.; SIMOS, N.; THIEBERGER, P.; TSANG, T.; WANG, H.; WEGGEL, R.

    2001-01-01

    We report initial results of exposing low-Z solid and high-Z liquid targets to 150-ns, 4 x 10 12 proton pulses with spot sizes on the order of 1 to 2 mm. The energy deposition density approached 100 J/g. Diagnostics included fiberoptic strain sensors on the solid target and high-speed photography of the liquid targets. This work is part of the R and D program of the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration

  4. Conceptual design of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider: RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The complete Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility will be a complex set of accelerators and beam transfer equipment connecting them. A significant portion of the total facility either exists or is under construction. Two existing Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will serve for the initial ion acceleration. Ions with a charge of -1 would be accelerated from ground to +15 MV potential, pass through a stripping foil, and accelerate back to ground potential, where they would pass through a second stripping foil. From there the ions will traverse a long transfer line to the AGS tunnel and be injected into the Booster accelerator. The Booster accelerates the ion bunch, and then the ions pass through one more stripper and then enter the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), where they are accelerated to the top AGS energy and transferred to the collider. Bending and focusing of ion beams is to be achieved by superconducting magnets. The physics goals behind the RHIC are enumerated, particularly as regards the study of quark matter and the characteristics of high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. The design of the collider and all its components is described, including the injector, the lattice, magnet system, cryogenic and vacuum systems, beam transfer, injection, and dump, rf system, and beam instrumentation and control system. Also given are cost estimates, construction schedules, and a management plan

  5. Conceptual design of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider: RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samios, Nicholas P.

    1986-05-01

    The complete Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility will be a complex set of accelerators and beam transfer equipment connecting them. A significant portion of the total facility either exists or is under construction. Two existing Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will serve for the initial ion acceleration. Ions with a charge of -1 would be accelerated from ground to +15 MV potential, pass through a stripping foil, and accelerate back to ground potential, where they would pass through a second stripping foil. From there the ions will traverse a long transfer line to the AGS tunnel and be injected into the Booster accelerator. The Booster accelerates the ion bunch, and then the ions pass through one more stripper and then enter the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), where they are accelerated to the top AGS energy and transferred to the collider. Bending and focusing of ion beams is to be achieved by superconducting magnets. The physics goals behind the RHIC are enumerated, particularly as regards the study of quark matter and the characteristics of high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. The design of the collider and all its components is described, including the injector, the lattice, magnet system, cryogenic and vacuum systems, beam transfer, injection, and dump, rf system, and beam instrumentation and control system. Also given are cost estimates, construction schedules, and a management plan. (LEW)

  6. Physics with tagged forward protons at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip,K.

    2009-08-30

    The physics reach of the STAR detector at RHIC has been extended to include elastic and inelastic diffraction measurements with tagged forward protons. This program has started at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run.

  7. Prospects for spin physics at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinett, R.W.; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA

    1995-06-01

    The proposal to perform polarized proton-proton collisions at collider energies at RHIC is reviewed. After a brief reminder of the desirability of high energy spin physics measurements, we discuss the machine parameters and detector features which are taken to define a program of spin physics at RHIC. Some of the many physics processes which can provide information on polarized parton distributions and the spin-dependence of QCD and the electroweak model at RHIC energies are discussed

  8. RHIC SPIN PROGRAM: MACHINE ASPECTS AND RECENT PROGRESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ROSER, T.

    1999-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. However, the acceleration of polarized beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Using a partial Siberian Snake and a rf dipole that ensure stable adiabatic spin motion during acceleration has made it possible to accelerate polarized protons to 25 GeV at the Brookhaven AGS. Full Siberian Snakes and polarimeters are being developed for RHIC to make the acceleration of polarized protons to 250 GeV possible

  9. eRHIC Beam Scrubbing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S. Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-06-22

    We propose using beam scrubbing to mitigate the electron cloud e ect in the eRHIC. The bunch number is adjusted below the heat load limit, then it increases with the reduced secondary electron yield resulted from the beam scrubbing, up to the design bunch number. Since the electron density threshold of beam instability is lower at the injection, a preliminary injection scrubbing should go rst, where large chromaticity can be used to keep the beam in the ring for scrubbing. After that, the beam can be ramped to full energy, allowing physics scrubbing. Simulations demonstrated that with beam scrubbing in a reasonable period of time, the eRHIC baseline design is feasible.

  10. RHIC CHALLENGES FOR LOW ENERGY OPERATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SATOGATA,T.; BRENNAN, J.M.; DREES, A.; FEDOTOV, A.; ROSER, T.; TSOUPAS, N.

    2007-06-25

    There is significant interest in RHIC heavy ion collisions at {radical}s =5-50 GeV/u, motivated by a search for the QCD phase transition critical point. The lowest energies are well below the nominal RHIC gold injection {radical}s = 19.6 GeV/u. There are several challenges that face RHIC operations in this regime, including longitudinal acceptance, magnet field quality, lattice control, and luminosity monitoring. We report on the status of work to address these challenges, including results from beam tests of low energy RHIC operations with protons and gold.

  11. Novel deflecting cavity design for eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2011-07-25

    To prevent significant loss of the luminosity due to large crossing angle in the future ERL based Electron Ion Collider at BNL (eRHIC), there is a demand for crab cavities. In this article, we will present a novel design of the deflecting/crabbing 181 MHz superconducting RF cavity that will fulfil the requirements of eRHIC. The quarter-wave resonator structure of the new cavity possesses many advantages, such as compact size, high R{sub t}/Q, the absence of the same order mode and lower order mode, and easy higher order mode damping. We will present the properties and characteristics of the new cavity in detail. As the accelerator systems grow in complexity, developing compact and efficient deflecting cavities is of great interest. Such cavities will benefit situations where the beam line space is limited. The future linac-ring type electron-ion collider requires implementation of a crab-crossing scheme for both beams at the interaction region. The ion beam has a long bunches and high rigidity. Therefore, it requires a low frequency, large kicking angle deflector. The frequency of the deflecting mode for the current collider design is 181 MHz, and the deflecting angle is {approx}5 mrad for each beam. At such low frequency, the previous designs of the crab cavities will have very large dimensions, and also will be confronted by typical problems of damping the Lower Order Mode (LOM), the Same Order Mode (SOM), and as usual, the Higher Order Modes (HOM). In this paper we describe how one can use the concept of a quarter-wave (QW) resonator for a deflecting/crabbing cavity, and use its fundamental mode to deflect the beam. The simplicity of the cavity geometry and the large separation between its fundamental mode and the first HOM make it very attractive.

  12. Monolithic readout circuits for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Connor, P.; Harder, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Several CMOS ASICs have been developed for a proposed RHIC experiment. This paper discusses why ASIC implementation was chosen for certain functions, circuit specifications and the design techniques used to meet them, and results of simulations and early prototypes. By working closely together from an early stage in the planning process, in-house ASIC designers and detector and data acquisition experimenters can achieve optimal use of this important technology.

  13. PERFORMANCE AND CAPABILITIES OF THE NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY AT BNL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN, K.A.; AHRENS, L.; CHIANG, I.H.; GARDNER, C.; GASSNER, D.; HAMMONS, L.; HARVEY, M.; MORRIS, J.; RUSEK, A.; SAMPSON, P.; SIVERTZ, M.; TSOUPAS, N.; ZENO, K.

    2006-06-23

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL was commissioned in October 2002 and the facility became operational in July 2003. NSRL was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. NSRL can accept a wide variety of ions from BNL's AGS Booster; these are slow extracted with kinetic energies ranging from 0.3 to 3 GeV/n. Fast extraction from Booster to NSRL has also been developed and used. Many different beam conditions have been produced for experiments at NSRL, including very low intensity. In this report we will describe the facility and its performance over the eight experimental run periods that have taken place since it became operational. We will also describe the current and future capabilities of the NSRL.

  14. PHENIX Spinfest School 2009 at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster,S.P.; Foster,S.; Seidl, R.; Goto, Y.; Okada, K.

    2009-08-07

    Since 2005, the PHENIX Spin Physics Working Group has set aside several weeks each summer for the purposes of training and integrating recent members of the working group as well as coordinating and making rapid progress on support tasks and data analysis. One week is dedicated to more formal didactic lectures by outside speakers. The location has so far alternated between BNL and the RIKEN campus in Wako, Japan, with support provided by RBRC and LANL.

  15. BNL325 - Nuclear reaction data display program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunford, C.L.

    1994-01-01

    A computer code for the graphical display of nuclear reaction data is described. The code, which works on a computer with VMS operating system, can overlay experimental data from an EXFOR/CSISRS table-computation format with evaluated data from ENDF formatted data libraries. Originally, this code has been used at the U.S. National Nuclear Data Center to produce the well-known neutron cross-section atlas published as report BNL-325. (author). 3 tabs

  16. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  17. RHIC sextant test: Accelerator systems and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilat, F.; Trbojevic, D.; Ahrens, L.

    1997-01-01

    One sextant of the RHIC Collider was commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the performance of the accelerator systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. We also describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems performance and their impact on the planning for RHIC installation and commissioning

  18. BNL ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN TRIENNIAL UPDATE, JANUARY 2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2003-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multi-program national laboratory operated by Brookhaven Science Associates for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and is located on a 5,265-acre site in Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. BNL has a comprehensive Environmental Management System (EMS) in place, which meets the requirements of the International Organization for Standardization 14001 EMS Standard, as described in the BNL EMS Manual. BNL's extensive environmental monitoring program is one component of the EMS, and the BNL Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) describes this program in detail. The data derived from systematically monitoring the various environmental media on site enable BNL to make informed decisions concerning the protection of human health and the environment and to be responsive to community concerns.

  19. COMMISSIONING SPIN ROTATORS IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MACKAY, W.W.; AHRENS, L.; BAI, M.; COURANT, E.D.; FISCHER, W.; HUANG, H.; LUCCIO, A.; MONTAG, C.; PILAT, F.; PTITSYN, V.; ROSER, T.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; VANZIEJTS, J.

    2003-01-01

    During the summer of 2002, eight superconducting helical spin rotators were installed into RHIC in order to control the polarization directions independently at the STAR and PHENIX experiments. Without the rotators, the orientation of polarization at the interaction points would only be vertical. With four rotators around each of the two experiments, we can rotate either or both beams from vertical into the horizontal plane through the interaction region and then back to vertical on the other side. This allows independent control for each beam with vertical, longitudinal, or radial polarization at the experiment. In this paper, we present results from the first run using the new spin rotators at PHENIX

  20. INTENSITY DEPENDENT EFFECTS IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WEI, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is currently under commissioning after a seven-year construction cycle. Unlike conventional hadron colliders, this machine accelerates, stores, and collides heavy ion beams of various combinations of species. The dominant intensity dependent effects are intra-beam scattering at both injection and storage, and complications caused by crossing transition at a slow ramp rate. In this paper, the authors present theoretical formalisms that have been used for the study, and discuss mechanisms, impacts, and compensation methods including beam cooling and transition jump schemes. Effects of space charge, beam-beam, and ring impedances are also summarized

  1. RHIC beam position monitor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, P.R.; Grau, M.C.; Ryan, W.A.; Shea, T.J.; Sikora, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    Design calculations, design details, and fabrication techniques for the RHIC BPM Assemblies are discussed. The 69 mm aperture single plane detectors are 23 cm long short-circuited 50 ohm strip transmission lines subtending 80 degrees. They are mounted on the sextupole end of the Corrector-Quadrupole-Sextupole package and operate at liquid helium temperature. The 69 cm aperture was selected to be the same as that of the beampipe in the CQS package, the 23 cm length is a compromise between mechanical stability and electrical sensitivity to the long low-intensity proton and heavy ion bunches to be found in RHIC during commissioning, and the 80 degree subtended angle maximizes linear aperture. The striplines are aligned after brazing to maintain electrical-to-mechanical centers within 0.1 mm radius, eliminating the need for individual calibration. Because the cryogenic feedthrus isolate the UHV beam vacuum only from the HV insulating vacuum, and do not see liquid helium, a replaceable mini-ConFlat design was chosen to simplify fabrication, calibration, and maintenance

  2. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.S.; Wulff, W.; Mallen, A.N.; Lekach, S.V.; Stritar, A.; Cerbone, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced technology for high-speed interactive nuclear power plant simulations is of great value for timely resolution of safety issues, for plant monitoring, and for computer-aided emergency responses to an accident. Presented is the methodology employed at BNL to develop a BWR plant analyzer capable of simulating severe plant transients at much faster than real-time process speeds. Five modeling principles are established and a criterion is given for selecting numerical procedures and efficient computers to achieve the very high simulation speeds. Typical results are shown to demonstrate the modeling fidelity of the BWR plant analyzer

  3. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Thermal Photons and Dileptons in Heavy-Ion Collisions. Volume 119

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rapp, R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ruan, L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yee, H-U. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-09-11

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan and the U. S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The RBRC is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has theory, lattice gauge computing and experimental components. It is presently exploring the possibility of an astrophysics component being added to the program. The primary theme for this workshop related to sharing the latest experimental and theoretical developments in area of low transverse momentum (pT) dielectron and photons. All the presentations given at the workshop are included in this proceedings, primarily as PowerPoint presentations.

  4. RESULTS OF THE NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY BEAM STUDIES PROGRAM AT BNL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN,K.A.AHRENS,L.BEUTTENMULLER,R.H.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. The NSRL makes use of heavy ions in the range of 0.05 to 3 GeV/n slow extracted from BNL's AGS Booster. The purpose of the NSRL Beam Studies Program is to develop a clear understanding of the beams delivered to the facility, to fully characterize those beams, and to develop new capabilities in the interest of understanding the radiation environment in space. In this report we will describe the first results from this program.

  5. REFLECTIONS ON MY CONTRIBUTIONS TO PARTICLE PHYSICS AND RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SAMIOS,N.P.

    2002-01-18

    My talk today will be composed of two parts. The first part will consist of a summary of some of my experimental contributions over the years. It will not be exhaustive but will highlight the findings that had relevance to the progress of our understanding of particle physics as it has evolved over the years. This section will be divided into three periods: Early, Intermediate and Late, with an in depth discussion of a few of the more significant results. The second part will consist of a discussion of the recently completed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) machine at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). This will encompass the parameters of the accelerator and some of the interesting and exciting early experimental results emanating from this machine.

  6. Advances in high-order interaction region nonlinear optics correction at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, C.; Binello, S.; Minty, M.; Pilat, F.

    2011-03-28

    A method to indirectly measure and deterministically correct the higher order magnetic errors of the final focusing magnets in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has been in place for several years at BNL. This method yields control over the effects of multi-pole errors through application of closed orbit bumps followed by analysis and correction of the resulting betatron tune shifts using multi-pole correctors. The process has recently been automated in order to provide more efficient and effective corrections. The tune resolution along with the reliability of measurements has also been improved significantly due to advances/upgrades in the betatron tune measurement system employed at RHIC (BBQ). Here we describe the foundation of the IR bump method, followed by recent improvements along with experimental data.

  7. PHENIX EXPERIMENT AT RHIC: DECADAL PLAN 2004-2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZAJC,W.ET. AL.

    2003-11-30

    program is achievable using the present capabilities of PHENIX experimental apparatus, but the physics reach is considerably extended and the program made even more compelling by a proposed set of upgrades which include: (1) An aerogel and time-of-flight system to provide complete {pi}/K/p separation for momenta up to 10 GeV/c. (2) A vertex detector to detect displaced vertices from the decay of mesons containing charm or bottom quarks. (3) A hadron-blind detector to detect and track electrons near the vertex. (4) A micro-TPC to extend the range of PHENIX tracking in azimuth and pseudo-rapidity. (5) A forward detector upgrade for an improved muon trigger to preserve sensitivity at the highest projected RHIC luminosities. (6) A forward calorimeter to provide photon+jet studies over a wide kinematic range. The success of the proposed program is contingent upon several factors external to PHENIX. Implementation of the upgrades is predicated on the availability of R&D funds to develop the required detector technologies on a timely, and in some cases urgent, basis. The necessity for such funding, and the physics merit of the proposed PHENIX program, has been endorsed in the first meeting of BNL's Detector Advisory Committee in December, 2002. Progress towards the physics goals depends in an essential way on the development of the design values for RHIC luminosity, polarization and availability. An analysis based on the guidance from the Collider Accelerator Department indicates that moderate increases in the yearly running time lead to very considerable increases in progress toward the enunciated goals. Efficient access to the rarest probes in the proposed program is achieved via the order-of-magnitude increase in luminosity provided by RHIC-II.

  8. PHENIX EXPERIMENT AT RHIC: DECADAL PLAN 2004-2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZAJC, W.

    2003-01-01

    achievable using the present capabilities of PHENIX experimental apparatus, but the physics reach is considerably extended and the program made even more compelling by a proposed set of upgrades which include: (1) An aerogel and time-of-flight system to provide complete π/K/p separation for momenta up to 10 GeV/c. (2) A vertex detector to detect displaced vertices from the decay of mesons containing charm or bottom quarks. (3) A hadron-blind detector to detect and track electrons near the vertex. (4) A micro-TPC to extend the range of PHENIX tracking in azimuth and pseudo-rapidity. (5) A forward detector upgrade for an improved muon trigger to preserve sensitivity at the highest projected RHIC luminosities. (6) A forward calorimeter to provide photon+jet studies over a wide kinematic range. The success of the proposed program is contingent upon several factors external to PHENIX. Implementation of the upgrades is predicated on the availability of R and D funds to develop the required detector technologies on a timely, and in some cases urgent, basis. The necessity for such funding, and the physics merit of the proposed PHENIX program, has been endorsed in the first meeting of BNL's Detector Advisory Committee in December, 2002. Progress towards the physics goals depends in an essential way on the development of the design values for RHIC luminosity, polarization and availability. An analysis based on the guidance from the Collider Accelerator Department indicates that moderate increases in the yearly running time lead to very considerable increases in progress toward the enunciated goals. Efficient access to the rarest probes in the proposed program is achieved via the order-of-magnitude increase in luminosity provided by RHIC-II

  9. RHICAGR a Most Simplified RHIC Lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggiero, A. G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    1991-08-01

    In this report I describe an alternative approach to the design of the RHIC lattice. It is not my intention to propose an alternative lattice altogether, but I like to stress the differences in design methodology and philosophy.

  10. Experts dismiss doomsday scenarios for RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Levi, B G

    2000-01-01

    A panel of particle physicists examining the possibility that operation of RHIC could generate blackholes or 'strangelets' which would consume ordinary matter, have declared that such scenarios are 'firmly excluded' (1 p).

  11. RHIC low energy tests and initial operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satogata,T.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Jappe, W.; Lee, R.C.; Mackay, W.W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Michnoff, R.; Oerter, B.; Pozdeyev, E.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-05-04

    Future Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) runs, including a portion of FY10 heavy ion operations, will explore collisions at center of mass energies of 5-50 GeV/n (GeV/nucleon). Operations at these energies is motivated by a search for the QCD phase transition critical point. The lowest end of this energy range is nearly a factor of four below the nominal RHIC injection center of mass energy of {radical} s = 20.8 GeV/n. There are several operational challenges in the RHIC low-energy regime, including harmonic number changes, small longitudinal acceptance, lowered magnet field quality, nonlinear orbit control, and luminosity monitoring. We report on the experience with some of these challenges during beam tests with gold in March 2008, including first RHIC operations at {radical}s = 9.18 GeV/n and first beam experience at {radical}s = 5 GeV/n.

  12. RHIC low energy tests and initial operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satogata, T.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Jappe, W.; Lee, R.C.; Mackay, W.W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Michnoff, R.; Oerter, B.; Pozdeyev, E.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-01-01

    Future Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) runs, including a portion of FY10 heavy ion operations, will explore collisions at center of mass energies of 5-50 GeV/n (GeV/nucleon). Operations at these energies is motivated by a search for the QCD phase transition critical point. The lowest end of this energy range is nearly a factor of four below the nominal RHIC injection center of mass energy of √ s = 20.8 GeV/n. There are several operational challenges in the RHIC low-energy regime, including harmonic number changes, small longitudinal acceptance, lowered magnet field quality, nonlinear orbit control, and luminosity monitoring. We report on the experience with some of these challenges during beam tests with gold in March 2008, including first RHIC operations at √s = 9.18 GeV/n and first beam experience at √s = 5 GeV/n

  13. RHIC heavy ion operations performance

    CERN Document Server

    Satogata, T; Ferrone, R; Pilat, F

    2006-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) completed its fifth year of operation in 2005, colliding copper ion beams with ps=200 GeV/u and 62.4 GeV/u[1]. Previous heavy ion runs have collided gold ions at ps=130 GeV/u, 200 GeV/u, and 62.4 GeV/u[2], and deuterons and gold ions at ps=200 GeV/u[3]. This paper discusses operational performance statistics of this facility, including Cu- Cu delivered luminosity, availability, calendar time spent in physics stores, and time between physics stores. We summarize the major factors affecting operations efficiency, and characterize machine activities between physics stores.

  14. ABORT GAP CLEANING IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DREES, A.; AHRENS, L.; III FLILLER, R.; GASSNER, D.; MCINTYRE, G.T.; MICHNOFF, R.; TRBOJEVIC, D.

    2002-01-01

    During the RHIC Au-run in 2001 the 200 MHz storage cavity system was used for the first time. The rebucketing procedure caused significant beam debunching in addition to amplifying debunching due to other mechanisms. At the end of a four hour store, debunched beam could account for approximately 30%-40% of the total beam intensity. Some of it will be in the abort gap. In order to minimize the risk of magnet quenching due to uncontrolled beam losses at the time of a beam dump, a combination of a fast transverse kicker and copper collimators were used to clean the abort gap. This report gives an overview of the gap cleaning procedure and the achieved performance

  15. Advantages of polarization experiments at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    We point out various spin experiments that could be done if the polarized beam option is pursued at RHIC. The advantages of RHIC for investigating several current and future physics problems are discussed. In particular, the gluon spin dependent structure function of the nucleon could be measured cleanly and systematically. Relevant experience developed in conjunction with the Fermilab Polarized Beam program is also presented. 8 refs., 2 tabs

  16. RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montag, C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2008-01-01

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

  17. Design studies on the RHIC position monitor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shea, T.

    1992-09-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory will consist of two superconducting storage rings 3.8 km in circumference sharing one tunnel in a side by side configuration. After injection from the existing AGS, the collider will accelerate and store a range of ion species extending from protons through gold to energies of 250 GeV for protons and 100 GeV/nucleon for fully stripped gold ions. Storage times should exceed 10 hours. As in most modem colliders the RHIC beam position monitor system is the most extensive beam diagnostic in terms of both cost and channel multiplicity. The final system will consist of approximately 500 position monitors with over 600 measurement planes of electronics. Development of this system began early so that the monitors would be available for installation into the magnet cryostats. The following document summarizes some of the efforts undertaken during the design phase of this system. Because much of this work is still in progress, the document is necessarily incomplete and some details may not reflect the final system configuration

  18. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Approach to Equilibrium in Strongly Interacting Matter. Volume 118

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Venugopalan, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berges, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaizot, J. -P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gelis, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-04-09

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory*. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan and the U. S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The RBRC is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has theory, lattice gauge computing and experimental components. It is presently exploring the possibility of an astrophysics component being added to the program. The purpose of this Workshop is to critically review the recent progress on the theory and phenomenology of early time dynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions from RHIC to LHC energies, to examine the various approaches on thermalization and existing issues, and to formulate new research efforts for the future. Topics slated to be covered include Experimental evidence for equilibration/isotropization, comparison of various approaches, dependence on the initial conditions and couplings, and turbulent cascades and Bose-Einstein condensation.

  19. Recommendations of the NNCSC-BNL study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    In 1975 the National Neutron Cross Section Center (NNCSC) at BNL was asked to carry out a study of the nuclear structure and charged-particle reaction data compilation and evaluation efforts in the U. S. with a view toward establishing at NNCSC responsibility for a fully coordinated effort involving measurers, compilers, evaluators, and users whose activities would result in the creation and maintenance of a master file for nuclear structure and charged-particle reaction data. A critique of this study was made by the Ad Hoc Panel on Basic Nuclear Data Compilations; this critique is presented here. The Panel recommended the establishment of a standing panel to monitor and advise on the implementation of the proposed new organizational arrangement for carrying out basic data compilations

  20. Review: BNL Tokamak graphite blanket design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The BNL minimum activity graphite blanket designs are reviewed, and three are discussed in the context of an experimental power reactor (EPR) and commercial power reactor. Basically, the three designs employ a 30 cm or thicker graphite screen. Bremsstrahlung energy is deposited on the graphite surface and re-radiated away as thermal radiation. Fast neutrons are slowed down in the graphite, depositing most of their energy, which is then radiated to a secondary blanket with coolant tubes, as in types A and B, or removed by intermittent direct gas cooling (type C). In types A and B, radiation damage to the coolant tubes in the secondary blanket is reduced by one or two orders of magnitude, while in type C, the blanket is only cooled when the reactor is shut down, so that coolant cannot quench the plasma. (Auth.)

  1. High Current Energy Recovery Linac at BNL

    CERN Document Server

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bluem, Hans; Brennan, Joseph M; Burger, Al; Burrill, Andrew; Calaga, Rama; Cameron, Peter; Chang, Xiangyun; Cole, Michael; Connolly, Roger; Delayen, Jean R; Favale, Anthony; Gassner, David M; Hahn, Harald; Hershcovitch, Ady; Holmes, Douglas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Johnson, Peter; Kayran, Dmitry; Kewisch, Jorg; Lambiase, Robert; Mahler, George; McIntyre, Gary; Meng, Wuzheng; Nehring, Thomas; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Pate, David; Phillips, Larry; Preble, Joseph P; Rank, Jim; Rao, Triveni; Rathke, John; Roser, Thomas; Russo, Thomas; Scaduto, Joseph; Schultheiss, Tom; Smith, Kevin T; Todd, Alan M M; Warren Funk, L; Williams, Neville; Wu, Kuo-Chen; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yip, Kin; Zaltsman, Alex; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2004-01-01

    We present the design and the parameters of a small Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) facility, which is under construction at BNL. This R&D facility has goals to demonstrate CW operation of ERL with average beam current in the range of 0.1 - 1 ampere, combined with very high efficiency of energy recovery. The possibility for future up-grade to a two-pass ERL is being considered. The heart of the facility is a 5-cell 703.75 MHz super-conducting RF linac with HOM damping. Flexible lattice of ERL provides a test-bed for testing issues of transverse and longitudinal instabilities and diagnostics of intense CW e-beam. We present the status and plans for this facility.

  2. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bruce

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the time evolution of the heavy-ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from run-7, colliding 100  GeV/nucleon ^{197}Au^{79+} beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multiparticle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the rf bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future ^{208}Pb^{82+} beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  3. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, R.; Jowett, J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.

    2010-09-01

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy-ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from run-7), colliding 100GeV/nucleon Au79+197 beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multiparticle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the rf bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future Pb82+208 beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  4. A 4π tracking magnetic spectrometer for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    A tracking magnetic spectrometer based on large Time Projection Chambers (TPC) was previously proposed to measure the momentum of charged particles emerging from the RHIC beam pipe at angles larger than four degrees and to identify the particle type for those beyond fifteen degrees with momenta up to 700 MeV/c, which is a large fraction of the final charged particles emitted by a low cm rapidity quark-gluon plasma. Experimental progress in the successful performance of a TPC developed for AGS E-810 is reported. We have also included typical results of our event generator which contains an interface of an improved HIJET and a plasma bubble model. Typical plasma signals one can expect from this model are presented. 4 refs., 9 figs

  5. Medium energy heavy ion operations at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drees, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.M.C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K.A.; Brennan, M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Hulsart, R.; Ingrassia, P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.C.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Marr, G.; Mapes, M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.S.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; van Kuik, B.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-01-01

    As part of the search for a phase transition or critical point on the QCD phase diagram, an energy scan including 5 different energy settings was performed during the 2010 RHIC heavy ion run. While the top beam energy for heavy ions is at 100 GeV/n and the lowest achieved energy setpoint was significantly below RHICs injection energy of approximately 10 GeV/n, we also provided beams for data taking in a medium energy range above injection energy and below top beam energy. This paper reviews RHIC experience and challenges for RHIC medium energy operations that produced full experimental data sets at beam energies of 31.2 GeV/n and 19.5 GeV/n. The medium energy AuAu run covered two beam energies, both above the RHIC injection energy of 9.8 GeV but well below the standard store energy of 100 GeV (see table 1). The low energy and full energy runs with heavy ions in FY10 are summarized in (1) and (2). Stochastic Cooling ((3)) was only used for 100 GeV beams and not used in the medium energy run. The efficiency of the transition from 100 GeV operation to 31.2 GeV and then to 19.5 GeV was remarkable. Setup took 32 h and 19 h respectively for the two energy settings. The time in store, defined to be the percentage of time RHIC provides beams in physics conditions versus calendar time, was approximately 52% for the entire FY10 heavy ion run. In both medium energy runs it was well above this average, 68% for 31.5 GeV and 82% for 19.5 GeV. For both energies RHIC was filled with 111 bunches with 1.2 10 9 and 1.3 10 9 ions per bunch respectively.

  6. Medium energy heavy ion operations at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drees, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.M.C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K.A.; Brennan, M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D' Ottavio, T.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Hulsart, R.; Ingrassia, P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.C.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Marr, G.; Mapes. M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.S.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; van Kuik, B.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    As part of the search for a phase transition or critical point on the QCD phase diagram, an energy scan including 5 different energy settings was performed during the 2010 RHIC heavy ion run. While the top beam energy for heavy ions is at 100 GeV/n and the lowest achieved energy setpoint was significantly below RHICs injection energy of approximately 10 GeV/n, we also provided beams for data taking in a medium energy range above injection energy and below top beam energy. This paper reviews RHIC experience and challenges for RHIC medium energy operations that produced full experimental data sets at beam energies of 31.2 GeV/n and 19.5 GeV/n. The medium energy AuAu run covered two beam energies, both above the RHIC injection energy of 9.8 GeV but well below the standard store energy of 100 GeV (see table 1). The low energy and full energy runs with heavy ions in FY10 are summarized in [1] and [2]. Stochastic Cooling ([3]) was only used for 100 GeV beams and not used in the medium energy run. The efficiency of the transition from 100 GeV operation to 31.2 GeV and then to 19.5 GeV was remarkable. Setup took 32 h and 19 h respectively for the two energy settings. The time in store, defined to be the percentage of time RHIC provides beams in physics conditions versus calendar time, was approximately 52% for the entire FY10 heavy ion run. In both medium energy runs it was well above this average, 68% for 31.5 GeV and 82% for 19.5 GeV. For both energies RHIC was filled with 111 bunches with 1.2 10{sup 9} and 1.3 10{sup 9} ions per bunch respectively.

  7. Emergency response training with the BNL plant analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, H.S.; Guppy, J.G.; Mallen, A.N.; Wulff, W.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is the experience in the use of the BNL Plant Analyzer for NRC emergency response training to simulated accidents in a BWR. The unique features of the BNL Plant Analyzer that are important for the emergency response training are summarized. A closed-loop simulation of all the key systems of a power plant in question was found essential to the realism of the emergency drills conducted at NRC. The faster than real-time simulation speeds afforded by the BNL Plant Analyzer have demonstrated its usefulness for the timely conduct of the emergency response training.

  8. Proceedings of the symposium on RHIC detector R ampersand D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makdisi, Y.; Stevens, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Development of Analog Memories for RHIC Detector Front-end Electronic Systems; Monolithic Circuit Development for RHIC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Highly Integrated Electronics for the STAR TPC; Monolithic Readout Circuits for RHIC; New Methods for Trigger Electronics Development; Neurocomputing methods for Pattern Recognition in Nuclear Physics; The Development of a Silicon Multiplicity Detector System; A Transition Radiation Detector for RHIC Featuring Accurate

  9. Closed orbit analysis for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milutinovic, J.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    We examine the effects of four types of errors in the RHIC dipoles and quadrupoles on the on-momentum closed orbit in the machine. We use PATRIS both to handle statistically the effects of kick-modeled errors and to check the performance of the Fermilab correcting scheme in a framework of a more realistic modeling. On the basis of the accepted rms values of the lattice errors, we conclude that in about 40% of all studied cases the lattice must be to some extent pre-corrected in the framework of the so-called ''first turn around strategy,'' in order to get a closed orbit within the aperture limitations at all and, furthermore, for approximately 2/3 of the remaining cases we find that a single pass algorithm of the Fermilab scheme is not sufficient to bring closed orbit distortions down to acceptable levels. We have modified the scheme and have allowed repeated applications of the otherwise unchanged three bump method and in doing so we have been able to correct the orbit in a satisfactory manner. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Radionuclide production and radiopharmaceutical chemistry with BNL cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Wolf, A.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) radiopharmaceutical chemistry program focuses on production and utilization of radionuclides having a half-life of > 2 hr. However, a major portion of the BNL program is devoted to short-lived radionuclides, such as 11 C and 18 F. Activities encompassed in the program are classified into seven areas: cyclotron parameters, radiochemistry, design and rapid synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals and labeled compounds, radiotracer evaluation in animals, studies in humans, technology transfer, and several other areas

  11. Beam Induced Pressure Rise at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S Y; Bai, Mei; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Cameron, Peter; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Gullotta, Justin; He, Ping; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Iriso, Ubaldo; Lee, Roger C; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; MacKay, William W; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Peggs, Steve; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smart, Loralie; Snydstrup, Louis; Thieberger, Peter; Trbojevic, Dejan; Wang, Lanfa; Wei, Jie; Zeno, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Beam induced pressure rise in RHIC warm sections is currently one of the machine intensity and luminosity limits. This pressure rise is mainly due to electron cloud effects. The RHIC warm section electron cloud is associated with longer bunch spacings compared with other machines, and is distributed non-uniformly around the ring. In addition to the countermeasures for normal electron cloud, such as the NEG coated pipe, solenoids, beam scrubbing, bunch gaps, and larger bunch spacing, other studies and beam tests toward the understanding and counteracting RHIC warm electron cloud are of interest. These include the ion desorption studies and the test of anti-grazing ridges. For high bunch intensities and the shortest bunch spacings, pressure rises at certain locations in the cryogenic region have been observed during the past two runs. Beam studies are planned for the current 2005 run and the results will be reported.

  12. RHIC BPM System Modifications and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Satogata, Todd; Cameron, Peter; Cerniglia, Phil; Cupolo, John; Curcio, Anthony J; Dawson, William C; Degen, Christopher; Gullotta, Justin; Mead, Joe; Michnoff, Robert; Russo, Thomas; Sikora, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The RHIC beam position monitor (BPM) system provides independent average orbit and turn-by-turn (TBT) position measurements. In each ring, there are 162 measurement locations per plane (horizontal and vertical) for a total of 648 BPM planes in the RHIC machine. During 2003 and 2004 shutdowns, BPM processing electronics were moved from the RHIC tunnel to controls alcoves to reduce radiation impact, and the analog signal paths of several dozen modules were modified to eliminate gain-switching relays and improve signal stability. This paper presents results of improved system performance, including stability for interaction region and sextupole beam-based alignment efforts. We also summarize performance of improved million-turn TBT acquisition channels for nonlinear dynamics and echo studies.

  13. RHIC BPM SYSTEM MODIFICATIONS AND PERFORMANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SATOGATA, T.; CALAGA, R.; CAMERON, P.

    2005-01-01

    The RHIC beam position monitor (BPM) system provides independent average orbit and turn-by-turn (TBT) position measurements. In each ring, there are 162 measurement locations per plane (horizontal and vertical) for a total of 648 BPM planes in the RHIC machine. During 2003 and 2004 shutdowns, BPM processing electronics were moved from the RHIC tunnel to controls alcoves to reduce radiation impact, and the analog signal paths of several dozen modules were modified to eliminate gain-switching relays and improve signal stability. This paper presents results of improved system performance, including stability for interaction region beam-based alignment efforts. We also summarize performance of recently-added DSP profile scan capability, and improved million-turn TBT acquisition channels for 10 Hz triplet vibration, nonlinear dynamics, and echo studies

  14. Potential kaon and antiproton beams at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarus, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    The AGS at Brookhaven is the worlds most prolific producer of kaons and low energy antiprotons during operations. With the imminent operation of the AGS Booster which will increase intensities by an anticipated factor of six in the next few years, it will become possible to have purified beams of particles containing strange quarks and anti-quarks with intensities comparable to the pion beams which have so successfully dominated precision hadron spectroscopy in the past. 10 refs., 3 figs

  15. Physics of the 1 Teraflop RIKEN-BNL-Columbia QCD project. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop: Volume 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    A workshop was held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on October 16, 1998, as part of the first anniversary celebration for the center. This meeting brought together the physicists from RIKEN-BNL, BNL and Columbia who are using the QCDSP (Quantum Chromodynamics on Digital Signal Processors) computer at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for studies of QCD. Many of the talks in the workshop were devoted to domain wall fermions, a discretization of the continuum description of fermions which preserves the global symmetries of the continuum, even at finite lattice spacing. This formulation has been the subject of analytic investigation for some time and has reached the stage where large-scale simulations in QCD seem very promising. With the computational power available from the QCDSP computers, scientists are looking forward to an exciting time for numerical simulations of QCD

  16. Physics of the 1 Teraflop RIKEN-BNL-Columbia QCD project. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop: Volume 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-16

    A workshop was held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on October 16, 1998, as part of the first anniversary celebration for the center. This meeting brought together the physicists from RIKEN-BNL, BNL and Columbia who are using the QCDSP (Quantum Chromodynamics on Digital Signal Processors) computer at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for studies of QCD. Many of the talks in the workshop were devoted to domain wall fermions, a discretization of the continuum description of fermions which preserves the global symmetries of the continuum, even at finite lattice spacing. This formulation has been the subject of analytic investigation for some time and has reached the stage where large-scale simulations in QCD seem very promising. With the computational power available from the QCDSP computers, scientists are looking forward to an exciting time for numerical simulations of QCD.

  17. Dilepton Production at Fermilab and RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, J.C.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Some recent results from several fixed-target dimuon production experiments at Fermilab are presented. In particular, we discuss the use of Drell-Yan data to determine the flavor structure of the nucleon sea, as well as to deduce the energy-loss of partons traversing nuclear medium. Future dilepton experiments at RHIC could shed more light on the flavor asymmetry and possible charge-symmetry-violation of the nucleon sea. Clear evidence for scaling violation in the Drell-Yan process could also be revealed at RHIC

  18. The RHIC transfer line cable database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholl, E.H.; Satogata, T.

    1995-01-01

    A cable database was created to facilitate and document installation of cables and wiring in the RHIC project, as well as to provide a data source to track possible wiring and signal problems. The eight tables of this relational database, currently implemented in Sybase, contain information ranging from cable routing to attenuation of individual wires. This database was created in a hierarchical scheme under the assumption that cables contain wires -- each instance of a cable has one to many wires associated with it. This scheme allows entry of information pertinent to individual wires while only requiring single entries for each cable. Relationships to other RHIC databases are also discussed

  19. Summary of the RHIC Retreat 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilat, F.; Brennan, M.; Brown, K.; Fischer, W.; Montag, C.

    2008-01-01

    The main goal of the RHIC Retreat is to review last run's performance and prepare for the next. As always though we also discussed the longer term goals and plans for the facility to put the work in perspective and in the right priority. A straw-man plan for the facility was prepared for the DOE that assumes 30 cryoweek and running 2 species per year. The plan outlines RHIC operations for 2008-2012 and integrates well accelerator and detector upgrades to optimize the physics output with high luminosities. The plans includes guidance from the PAC and has been reviewed by DOE

  20. Global Decoupling on the RHIC Ramp

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Yun; Della Penna, Al; Fischer, Wolfram; Laster, Jonathan S; Marusic, Al; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Roser, Thomas; Trbojevic, Dejan

    2005-01-01

    The global betatron decoupling on the ramp is an important issue for the operation of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In the polarized proton run, the betatron tunes are required to keep almost constant on the ramp to avoid spin resonance line crossing and the beam polarization loss. Some possible correction schemes on the ramp, like three-ramp correction, the coupling amplitude modulation and the coupling phase modulaxtion, have been found. The principles of these schemes are shortly reviewed and compared. Operational results of their applications on the RHIC ramps are given.

  1. A prototype ionization profile monitor for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, R.; Cameron, P.; Ryan, W.

    1997-01-01

    Transverse beam profiles in the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) will be measured with ionization profile monitors (IPM's). Each IPM collects and measures the distribution of electrons in the beamline resulting from residual gas ionization during bunch passage. The electrons are swept transversely from the beamline and collected on strip anodes oriented parallel to the beam axis. At each bunch passage the charge pulses are amplified, integrated, and digitized for display as a profile histogram. A prototype detector was tested in the injection line during the RHIC Sextant Test. This paper describes the detector and gives results from the beam tests

  2. SIMULATION OF PARTICLE SPECTRA AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KAHANA,D.E.; KAHANA,S.H.

    2001-09-04

    A purely hadronic simulation is performed of the recently reported data from PHOBOS at energies of {radical}s = 56, 130 GeV using the relativistic heavy ion cascade LUCIFER which had previously given a good description of the NA49 inclusive spectra at {radical}s = 17.2 GeV/A. The results compare well with these early measurements at RHIC and indeed successfully predict the increase in multiplicity now seen by PHOBOS and the other RHIC detectors at the nominal maximum energy of {radical}s = 200 GeV/A, suggesting that evidence for quark-gluon matter remains elusive.

  3. SIMULATION OF PARTICLE SPECTRA AT RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAHANA, D.E.; KAHANA, S.H.

    2001-01-01

    A purely hadronic simulation is performed of the recently reported data from PHOBOS at energies of √s = 56, 130 GeV using the relativistic heavy ion cascade LUCIFER which had previously given a good description of the NA49 inclusive spectra at √s = 17.2 GeV/A. The results compare well with these early measurements at RHIC and indeed successfully predict the increase in multiplicity now seen by PHOBOS and the other RHIC detectors at the nominal maximum energy of √s = 200 GeV/A, suggesting that evidence for quark-gluon matter remains elusive

  4. A prototype ionization profile monitor for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, R.; Cameron, P.; Ryan, W. [and others

    1997-07-01

    Transverse beam profiles in the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) will be measured with ionization profile monitors (IPM`s). Each IPM collects and measures the distribution of electrons in the beamline resulting from residual gas ionization during bunch passage. The electrons are swept transversely from the beamline and collected on strip anodes oriented parallel to the beam axis. At each bunch passage the charge pulses are amplified, integrated, and digitized for display as a profile histogram. A prototype detector was tested in the injection line during the RHIC Sextant Test. This paper describes the detector and gives results from the beam tests.

  5. Summary of the RHIC Retreat 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat,F.; Brennan, M.; Brown, K.; Fischer, W.; Montag, C.

    2008-08-01

    The main goal of the RHIC Retreat is to review last run's performance and prepare for the next. As always though we also discussed the longer term goals and plans for the facility to put the work in perspective and in the right priority. A straw-man plan for the facility was prepared for the DOE that assumes 30 cryoweek and running 2 species per year. The plan outlines RHIC operations for 2008-2012 and integrates well accelerator and detector upgrades to optimize the physics output with high luminosities. The plans includes guidance from the PAC and has been reviewed by DOE.

  6. QUADRUPOLE BEAM-BASED ALIGNMENT AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NIEDZIELA, J.; MONTAG, C.; SATOGATA, T.

    2005-05-16

    Successful implementation of a beam-based alignment algorithm, tailored to different types of quadrupoles at RHIC, provides significant benefits to machine operations for heavy ions and polarized protons. This algorithm was used to calibrate beam position monitor centers relative to interaction region quadrupoles to maximize aperture. This approach was also used to determine the optimal orbit through transition jump quadrupoles to minimize orbit changes during the transition jump for heavy ion acceleration. This paper provides background discussion and results from first measurements during the RHIC 2005 run.

  7. Insertion of helical Siberian snakes in RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luccio, A.; Pilat, F.

    1995-01-01

    Spin rotators and Siberian snakes for RHIC can be built using 4 helical magnets obtained, by twisting, from the cosine dipoles. The authors found that the fringe fields are important. In the calculations they have used a plausible model for the fringe. However, only magnetic measurements on the prototypes presently being built will allow a final optimization. The linear coupling at injection, ΔQ min -2 , is well within the range of the RHIC decoupling system. At storage, the coupling introduced by the devices (ΔQ min -4 ) is negligible

  8. RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montag,C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D' Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; D. Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2008-10-06

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

  9. Luminosity monitor topics for RHIC spin and AA, and pA interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, D.

    1998-01-01

    This is a note to define topics to be studied in more depth for the Luminosity monitoring for Spin Asymmetries. My numerical examples here are to stimulate discussion and should be taken with a grain of salt. The RHIC Spin experiments will require a very high degree of coordination between the experiments and the accelerator. For example see AGS/RHIC/SN 035. In this note we list some of the issues to be considered in monitoring the relative luminosity between various beam-beam spin combinations and beam-gas combinations. We give simplified numerical examples of the problems encountered in doing the luminosity monitoring to the 10 -4 level. It is hoped that this will provide a framework for serious study of these problems with simulations and other means. Many of the issues may also be relevant to pA and AA running where there may be sizable beam-gas backgrounds

  10. Capture from pair production as a beam loss mechanism for heavy ions at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinberg, B.; Belkacem, A.; Claytor, N.; Dinneen, T.; Gould, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Accelerator and Fusion Research Div.

    1997-05-01

    Electron capture from electron-positron pair production is predicted to be a major source of beam loss for the heaviest ions at RHIC. Achieving the highest luminosity thus requires an understanding of the capture process. The authors report measurements of this process at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s AGS using 10.8 GeV/nucleon Au{sup 79+} projectiles on Au targets. Capture from pair production is a process in which the very high electromagnetic field involved in the collision of two relativistic heavy ions results in the production of an electron-positron pair with the capture of the electron by one of the ions. There are many theoretical papers published on capture from pair production with discrepancies between predicted cross sections. The experimental results are compared to theory and to previous experiments at 1 GeV/nucleon. The implications of extrapolations to RHIC energies are presented.

  11. The new BNL partial wave analysis programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, J.P.; Weygand, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    Experiment E852 at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a meson spectroscopy experiment which took data at the Multi-Particle Spectrometer facility of the Alternating Gradient Syncrotron. Upgrades to the spectrometer's data acquisition and trigger electronics allowed over 900 million data events, of numerous topologies, to be recorded to tape in 1995 running alone. One of the primary goals of E852 is identification of states beyond the quark model, i.e., states with gluonic degrees of freedom. Identification of such states involves the measurement of a systems spin-parity. Such a measurement is usually done using Partial Wave Analysis. Programs to perform such analyses exist, in fact, one was written at BNL and used in previous experiments by some of this group. This program, however, was optimized for a particular final state, and modification to allow analysis of the broad range of final states in E852 would have been difficult. The authors therefore decided to write a new program, with an eye towards generality that would allow analysis of a large class of reactions

  12. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samios, Nicholas P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-01-24

    The twelfth evaluation of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) took place on November 6 – 8, 2012 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The members of the Scientific Review Committee (SRC), present at the meeting, were: Prof. Wit Busza, Prof. Miklos Gyulassy, Prof. Kenichi Imai, Prof. Richard Milner (Chair), Prof. Alfred Mueller, Prof. Charles Young Prescott, and Prof. Akira Ukawa. We are pleased that Dr. Hideto En’yo, the Director of the Nishina Institute of RIKEN, Japan, participated in this meeting both in informing the committee of the activities of the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator- Based Science and the role of RBRC and as an observer of this review. In order to illustrate the breadth and scope of the RBRC program, each member of the Center made a presentation on his/her research efforts. This encompassed three major areas of investigation: theoretical, experimental and computational physics. In addition, the committee met privately with the fellows and postdocs to ascertain their opinions and concerns. Although the main purpose of this review is a report to RIKEN management on the health, scientific value, management and future prospects of the Center, the RBRC management felt that a compendium of the scientific presentations are of sufficient quality and interest that they warrant a wider distribution. Therefore we have made this compilation and present it to the community for its information and enlightenment.

  13. BNL ALARA Center: ALARA Notes, No. 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W.; Beckman, M.C. [eds.] [and others

    1994-02-01

    This issue of the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Alara Notes includes the agenda for the Third International Workshop on ALARA and specific instructions on the use of the on-line fax-on-demand service provided by BNL. Other topics included in this issue are: (1) A discussion of low-level discharges from Canadian nuclear plants, (2) Safety issues at French nuclear plants, (3) Acoustic emission as a means of leak detection, (4) Replacement of steam generators at Doel-3, Beaznau, and North Anna-1, (5) Remote handling equipment at Bruce, (6) EPRI`s low level waste program, (7) Radiation protection during concrete repairs at Savannah River, (8) Reactor vessel stud removal/repair at Comanche Peak-1, (9) Rework of reactor coolant pump motors, (10) Restoration of service water at North Anna-1 and -2, (11) Steam generator tubing problems at Mihama-1, (12) Full system decontamination at Indian Point-2, (13) Chemical decontamination at Browns Ferry-2, and (14) Inspection methodolody in France and Japan.

  14. BNL ALARA Center: ALARA Notes, No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W.; Beckman, M.C.

    1994-02-01

    This issue of the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alara Notes includes the agenda for the Third International Workshop on ALARA and specific instructions on the use of the on-line fax-on-demand service provided by BNL. Other topics included in this issue are: (1) A discussion of low-level discharges from Canadian nuclear plants, (2) Safety issues at French nuclear plants, (3) Acoustic emission as a means of leak detection, (4) Replacement of steam generators at Doel-3, Beaznau, and North Anna-1, (5) Remote handling equipment at Bruce, (6) EPRI's low level waste program, (7) Radiation protection during concrete repairs at Savannah River, (8) Reactor vessel stud removal/repair at Comanche Peak-1, (9) Rework of reactor coolant pump motors, (10) Restoration of service water at North Anna-1 and -2, (11) Steam generator tubing problems at Mihama-1, (12) Full system decontamination at Indian Point-2, (13) Chemical decontamination at Browns Ferry-2, and (14) Inspection methodolody in France and Japan

  15. PHOBOS at RHIC: Some global observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Particle production in Au+Au collisions has been measured in the PHOBOS experiment at RHIC for a range of collision energies for a large span of pseudorapidities, || < 5.4. Three empirical observations have emerged from this data set which require theoretical examination. First, there is clear evidence of limiting ...

  16. Iron saturation control in RHIC dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.A.; Gupta, R.C.; Kahn, S.A.; Hahn, H.; Morgan, G.H.; Wanderer, P.J.; Willen, E.

    1991-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will require 360 dipoles of 80 mm bore. This paper discusses the field perturbations produced by the saturation of the yoke iron. Changes have been made to the yoke to reduce these perturbations, in particular, decapole -4 . Measurements and calculations for 6 series of dipole magnets are presented. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  17. FIRST POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ROSER, T.; AHRENS, L.; ALESSI, J.; BAI, M.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BROWN, K.A.; BUNCE, G.; CAMERON, P.; COURANT, E.D.; DREES, A.; FISCHER, W.; FLILLER, R. III; GLENN, W.; HUANG, H.; LUCCIO, A.U.; MACKAY, W.W.; MAKDISI, Y.; MONTAG, C.; PILAT, F.; PTITSYN, V.; SATOGATA, T.

    2002-01-01

    We successfully injected polarized protons in both RHIC rings and maintained polarization during acceleration up to 100 GeV per ring using two Siberian snakes in each ring. Each snake consists of four helical superconducting dipoles which rotate the polarization by 180 o about a horizontal axis. This is the first time that polarized protons have been accelerated to 100 GeV

  18. Polarized proton beam for eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ptitsyn, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roser, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    RHIC has provided polarized proton collisions from 31 GeV to 255 GeV in the past decade. To preserve polarization through numerous depolarizing resonances through the whole accelerator chain, harmonic orbit correction, partial snakes, horizontal tune jump system and full snakes have been used. In addition, close attentions have been paid to betatron tune control, orbit control and beam line alignment. The polarization of 60% at 255 GeV has been delivered to experiments with 1.8×1011 bunch intensity. For the eRHIC era, the beam brightness has to be maintained to reach the desired luminosity. Since we only have one hadron ring in the eRHIC era, existing spin rotator and snakes can be converted to six snake configuration for one hadron ring. With properly arranged six snakes, the polarization can be maintained at 70% at 250 GeV. This paper summarizes the effort and plan to reach high polarization with small emittance for eRHIC.

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP (VOLUME 70)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JACAK, B.; SHURYAK, E.; HALLMAN, T.; BASS, S.; DAVIDSON, R.

    2005-01-14

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was commissioned for heavy ion collisions and for polarized pp collisions in 2001. All principal components of the accelerator chain were operational by the 2003 RHIC run. Approximately 50 papers on RHIC experimental results have been published in refereed journals to date. This is a testament to the vast amount of exciting new information and the unprecedented analysis and publication rate from RHIC. A number of signals of creation of matter at extreme energy density, and of new physics in that matter, have been observed. The RHIC community has been heavily engaged in discussion about these signals, and about the appropriate level of proof for Quark Gluon Plasma discovery at the RHIC. In fact, such discussions were the subject of an earlier RBRC Workshop. One of the striking results from heavy ion collisions at RHIC is that the quark gluon plasma accessible appears to be strongly coupled. The properties of strongly coupled plasmas are of intense interest in the traditional Plasma Physics community, who have been developing tools to study such matter theoretically and experimentally. Despite the fact that one plasma interacts electromagnetically and the other through the strong interaction, there is tremendous commonality in the intellectual approach and even the theoretical and experimental tools. It is important to broaden the discussion of Quark Gluon Plasma discovery beyond possible signals of deconfinement to also encompass signals of plasma phenomena in heavy ion collisions. Thus it is imperative establish more direct contact among Nuclear, Plasma and Atomic physicists to share techniques and ideas. RHIC physicists will benefit from familiarity with typical plasma diagnostics and theoretical methods to study strongly coupled plasmas. Plasma and Atomic physicists may fmd new techniques parallel to the multi-particle correlations used in RHIC data analysis, and theoretical tools to study high energy density matter

  20. Measurements of phi meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D.R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M.J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielčík, Jaroslav; Bielčíková, Jana; Biritz, B.; Bland, L.C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bysterský, Michal; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M.C.D.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M.C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, Petr; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K.E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R.F.; Codrington, M.J.M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T.M.; Coserea, R. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L.C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; de Souza, R.D.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dunlop, J.C.; Mazumdar, M.R.D.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Gangaharan, D.R.; Garcia-Solis, E.J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y.N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Hofman, D.J.; Hollis, R.S.; Huang, H.Z.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, Pavel; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C.L.; Jones, P.G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitán, Jan; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kikola, D.P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S.R.; Knospe, A.G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kopytine, M.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kushpil, Vasilij; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Landgraf, J.M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednický, Richard; Lee, Ch.; Lee, J.H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M.J.; Li, N.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, F.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.J.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G.L.; Ma, Y.G.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O.I.; Mangotra, L.K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H.S.; Matulenko, Yu.A.; McShane, T.S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N.G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D.A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B.K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J.M.; Netrakanti, P.K.; Ng, M.J.; Nogach, L.V.; Nurushev, S.B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B.S.; Pal, S.K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S.Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S.C.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Potukuchi, B.V.K.S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N.K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R.L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H.G.; Roberts, J.B.; Rogachevskiy, O.V.; Romero, J.L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M.J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S.S.; Shi, X.H.; Sichtermann, E.P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R.N.; Skoby, M.J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H.M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T.D.S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A.A.P.; Suarez, M.C.; Subba, N.L.; Šumbera, Michal; Sun, X.M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T.J.M.; de Toledo, A. S.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A.H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J.H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A.R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M. V.; Trainor, T.A.; Tram, V.N.; Trattner, A.L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O.D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D.G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A.M.; Vanfossen, J.A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G.S.M.; Vasilevski, I.M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S.E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S.A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J.S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J.C.; Westfall, G.D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S.W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Tlustý, David; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q.H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, P.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.M.; Zhang, X.P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J.X.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 6 (2009), 064903/1-064903/20 ISSN 0556-2813 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : QUARK-GLUON-PLASMA * LARGE TRANSVERSE-MOMENTUM * NUCLEUS-NUCLEUS COLLISIONS Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.477, year: 2009

  1. Event Driven Automatic State Modification of BNL's Booster for NASA Space Radiation Laboratory Solor Particle Simulator

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Kevin A; Harvey, Margaret; Morris, John; Rusek, Adam; Tsoupas, Nicholaos

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. The NSRL makes use of heavy ions in the range of 0.05 to 3 GeV/n slow extracted from BNL's AGS Booster. NASA is interested in reproducing the energy spectrum from a solar flare in the space environment for a single ion species. To do this we have built and tested a set of software tools which allow the state of the Booster and the NSRL beam line to be changed automatically. In this report we will desribe the system and present results of beam tests.

  2. Target and orbit feedback simulations of a muSR beam line at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKay, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pile, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-07-28

    Well-polarized positive surface muons are a tool to measure the magnetic properties of materials since the precession rate of the spin can be determined from the observation of the positron directions when the muons decay. For a dc beam an ideal µSR flux for surface µ+ should be about 40 kHz/mm2. In this report we show how this flux could be achieved in a beam line using the AGS complex at BNL for a source of protons. We also determined that an orbit feedback system with a pair of thin silicon position monitors and kickers would miss the desired flux by at least an order of magnitude, even with perfect time resolution and no multiple scattering.

  3. Heavy Flavor Measurements at RHIC in the Near Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Nu

    2006-12-01

    We discuss the recent results on open charm measurements at RHIC. The heavy flavor upgrade program for both PHENIX and STAR experiments are briefly discussed. The completion of the program will yield important information on light flavor thermalization of the partonic matter created in high-energy nuclear collisions at RHIC. A new era of RHIC is ahead of us with the progress of the upgrade program.

  4. Adjusting the IP $\\beta$ Functions in RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Wittmer, W; Pilat, F; Ptitsyn, V; Van Zeijts, J

    2004-01-01

    The beta functions at the IP can be adjusted without perturbation of other optics functions via several approaches. In this paper we describe a scheme based on a vector knob, which assigns fixed values to the different tuning quadrupoles and scales them by a common multiplier. The values for the knob vector were calculated for a lattice without any errors using MADX. Previous studies for the LHC [1] have shown that this approach can meet the design goals. A specific feature of the RHIC lattice is the nested power supply system. To cope with the resulting problems a detailed response matrix analysis has been carried out and different sets of knobs were calculated and compared. The knobs were tested at RHIC during the 2004 run and preliminary results are discussed. Simultaneously a new approach to measure the beam sizes of both colliding beams at the IP, based on the tunability provided by the knobs, was developed and tested.

  5. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  6. Elliptic flow and incomplete equilibration at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bhalerao, R S; Borghini, N; Ollitrault, Jean Yves

    2005-01-01

    We argue that RHIC data, in particular those on the anisotropic flow coefficients v_2 and v_4, suggest that the matter produced in the early stages of nucleus-nucleus collisions is incompletely thermalized. We interpret the parameter (1/S)(dN/dy), where S is the transverse area of the collision zone and dN/dy the multiplicity density, as an indicator of the number of collisions per particle at the time when elliptic flow is established, and hence as a measure of the degree of equilibration. This number serves as a control parameter which can be varied experimentally by changing the system size, the centrality or the beam energy. We provide predictions for Cu-Cu collisions at RHIC as well as for Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC.

  7. First turn around strategy for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milutinovic, J.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present a strategy for achieving the so-called first turn around in RHIC. The strategy is based on the same method proposed to correct a distorted closed orbit in RHIC, i.e. on a generalization of the local three-bump method. They found out that the method is very effective in passing the beam through a non-ideal, insufficiently known, machine. The perturbed lattice was generated by the code PATRIS, which was also adapted to control the newly developed software. In ten distributions of errors the software was capable of passing the beam through in 2-3 injection attempts, at full sextupole strength. It was also determined that once the beam makes the first turn around and all the correctors are energized, it stays in the machine for at least several hundred turns

  8. Observations of Snake Resonance in RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lin, Fanglei; MacKay, William; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Tepikian, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Siberian snakes now become essential in the polarized proton acceleration. With proper configuration of Siberian snakes, the spin precession tune of the beam becomes $\\frac{1}{2}$ which avoids all the spin depolarizing resonance. However, the enhancement of the perturbations on the spin motion can still occur when the betatron tune is near some low order fractional numbers, called snake resonances, and the beam can be depolarized when passing through the resonance. The snake resonances have been confirmed in the spin tracking calculations, and observed in RHIC with polarized proton beam. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, RHIC provides us a perfect facility for snake resonance studies. This paper presents latest experimental results. New insights are also discussed.

  9. THE TWO STAGE CRYSTAL COLLIMATOR FOR RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FLILLER, R.P. III; DREES, A.; GASSNER, D.; HAMMONS, L.; MCINTYRE, G.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; BIRYUKOV, V.; CHESNOKOV, Y.; TEREKHOV, V.

    2001-01-01

    The use of a two stage crystal collimation system in the RHIC yellow ring is examined. The system includes a copper beam scraper and a bent silicon crystal. While scrapers were installed in both of the RHIC rings before the year 2000 run, the crystal is installed for the 2001 run in one ring only, forming a two stage collimation system there. We present simulations of the expected channeling through the bent silicon crystal for both protons and gold ions with various beam parameters. This gives a picture of the particle losses around the ring, and the expected channeling efficiency. These results are then used to optimize the beam parameters in the area of the crystal to obtain maximum channeling efficiency, minimize out-scattering in the secondary collimator, and reduce beam halo

  10. Conceptual design of a quadrupole magnet for eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berg, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    eRHIC is a proposed upgrade to the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) hadron facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, which would allow collisions of up to 21 GeV polarized electrons with a variety of species from the existing RHIC accelerator. eRHIC employs an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and an FFAG lattice for the arcs. The arcs require open-midplane quadrupole magnets of up to 30 T/m gradient of good field quality. In this paper we explore initial quadrupole magnet design concepts based on permanent magnetic material which allow to modify the gradient during operation.

  11. ANALYSIS OF AVAILABILITY AND RELIABILITY IN RHIC OPERATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PILAT, F.; INGRASSIA, P.; MICHNOFF, R.

    2006-01-01

    RHIC has been successfully operated for 5 years as a collider for different species, ranging from heavy ions including gold and copper, to polarized protons. We present a critical analysis of reliability data for RHIC that not only identifies the principal factors limiting availability but also evaluates critical choices at design times and assess their impact on present machine performance. RHIC availability data are typical when compared to similar high-energy colliders. The critical analysis of operations data is the basis for studies and plans to improve RHIC machine availability beyond the 50-60% typical of high-energy colliders

  12. Analysis of RHIC beam dump pre-fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Sandberg, J.; Tan, Y.

    2011-01-01

    It has been speculated that the beam may cause instability of the RHIC Beam Abort Kickers. In this study, we explore the available data of past beam operations, the device history of key modulator components, and the radiation patterns to examine the correlations. The RHIC beam abort kicker system was designed and built in the 90's. Over last decade, we have made many improvements to bring the RHIC beam abort kicker system to a stable operational state. However, the challenge continues. We present the analysis of the pre-fire, an unrequested discharge of kicker, issues which relates to the RHIC machine safety and operational stability.

  13. IBS suppression lattice in RHIC: theory and experimental verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedotov, A.V.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; Cupolo, J.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Hoff, L.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Louie, W.; Luo, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Montag, C.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    2008-01-01

    Intra-beam scattering (IBS) is the limiting factor of the luminosity lifetime for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation with heavy ions. Over the last few years the process of IBS was carefully studied in RHIC with dedicated IBS measurements and their comparison with the theoretical models. A new lattice was recently designed and implemented in RHIC to suppress transverse IBS growth, which lowered the average arc dispersion by about 20% [1]. This lattice became operational during RHIC Run-8. We review the IBS suppression mechanism, IBS measurements before and after the lattice change, and comparisons with predictions

  14. IBS suppression lattice in RHIC: theory and experimental verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotov,A.V.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; Cupolo, J.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Hoff, L.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Louie, W.; Luo, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Montag, C.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    2008-08-25

    Intra-beam scattering (IBS) is the limiting factor of the luminosity lifetime for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation with heavy ions. Over the last few years the process of IBS was carefully studied in RHIC with dedicated IBS measurements and their comparison with the theoretical models. A new lattice was recently designed and implemented in RHIC to suppress transverse IBS growth, which lowered the average arc dispersion by about 20% [1]. This lattice became operational during RHIC Run-8. We review the IBS suppression mechanism, IBS measurements before and after the lattice change, and comparisons with predictions.

  15. DESCRIPTION OF THE RHIC SEQUENCER SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOTTAVIO, T.; FRAK, B.; MORRIS, J.; SATOGATA, T.; VAN ZEIJTS, J.

    2001-01-01

    The movement of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) through its various states (eg. injection, acceleration, storage, collisions) is controlled by an application called the Sequencer. This program orchestrates most magnet and instrumentation systems and is responsible for the coordinated acquisition and saving of data from various systems. The Sequencer system, its software infrastructure, support programs, and the language used to drive it are discussed in this paper. Initial operational experience is also described

  16. MEASUREMENTS OF THE BETATRON FUNCTIONS IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trbojevic, D.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Zeijts, J. van

    2001-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides collisions of the fully stripped gold ions for four experiments. This report shows results from measurements of the betatron functions within the Interaction Regions (IR) as well as in the arcs in both ''blue'' and ''yellow'' rings. A single quadrupole excitation or the beam position monitors' RMS. values at injection are used to obtain the betatron amplitude function

  17. eRHIC ERL modeling in Zgoubi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brooks, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hao, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Jing, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ptitsyn, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trbojevic, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This Note discusses on-going work regarding the modeling of eRHIC ERL in the ray-tracing code Zgoubi. The various pieces of the recirculator puzzle, their optical properties and their assemblage into an operational input data file in are addressed. The Note reports in particular on preparatory stages toward extensive end-to-end 6D polarized electron bunch transport simulations, which yield methods, as well a series of preliminary qualitative outcomes, discussed as well.

  18. COMMISSIONING OF RHIC DEUTERON - GOLD COLLISIONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SATOGATA,T.AHRENS,L.BAI,M.BEEBE-WANG,J.

    2003-05-12

    Deuteron and gold beams have been accelerated to a collision energy of {radical}s = 200 GeV/u in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), providing the first asymmetric-species collisions of this complex. Necessary changes for this mode of operation include new ramping software and asymmetric crossing angle geometries. This paper reviews machine performance, problem encountered and their solutions, and accomplishments during the 16 weeks of ramp-up and operations.

  19. RHIC polarized proton performance in run-8.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montag,C.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Barton, D.; et al.

    2008-06-23

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Helical spin rotators at these two interaction regions were used to control the spin orientation of both beams at the collision points. Physics data were taken with different orientations of the beam polarization. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8.

  20. Building the RHIC tracking lattice model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Tepikian, S.

    2010-01-27

    In this note we outline the procedure to build a realistic lattice model for the RHIC beam-beam tracking simulation. We will install multipole field errors in the arc main dipoles, arc main quadrupols and interaction region magnets (DX, D0, and triplets) and introduce a residual closed orbit, tune ripples, and physical apertures in the tracking lattice model. Nonlinearities such as local IR multipoles, second order chromaticies and third order resonance driving terms are also corrected before tracking.

  1. Particle production at RHIC and LHC energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, A.; Gamal, E.; Shalaby, A. G.

    2015-07-01

    The production of pion, kaon and proton was measured in Pb-Pb collisions at nucleus-nucleus center-of-mass energy sNN = 2.76TeV by the ALICE experiment at Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The particle ratios of these species compared to the RHIC measurements are confronted to the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model and to simulations based on the event generators PYTHIA 6.4.21 and HIJING 1.36. It is found that the homogeneous particle-antiparticle ratios (same species) are fully reproducible by means of HRG and partly by PYTHIA 6.4.21 and HIJING 1.36. The mixed kaon-pion and proton-pion ratios measured at RHIC and LHC energies seem to be reproducible by the HRG model. On the other hand, the strange abundances are underestimated in both event generators. This might be originated to strangeness suppression in the event generators and/or possible strangeness enhancement in the experimental data. It is apparent that the values of kaon-pion ratios are not sensitive to the huge increase of sNN from 200 (RHIC) to 2760 GeV (LHC). We conclude that the ratios of produced particle at LHC seem not depending on the system size.

  2. RHIC spin flipper AC dipole controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oddo, P.; Bai, M.; Dawson, C.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.

    2011-03-28

    The RHIC Spin Flipper's five high-Q AC dipoles which are driven by a swept frequency waveform require precise control of phase and amplitude during the sweep. This control is achieved using FPGA based feedback controllers. Multiple feedback loops are used to and dynamically tune the magnets. The current implementation and results will be presented. Work on a new spin flipper for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) incorporating multiple dynamically tuned high-Q AC-dipoles has been developed for RHIC spin-physics experiments. A spin flipper is needed to cancel systematic errors by reversing the spin direction of the two colliding beams multiple times during a store. The spin flipper system consists of four DC-dipole magnets (spin rotators) and five AC-dipole magnets. Multiple AC-dipoles are needed to localize the driven coherent betatron oscillation inside the spin flipper. Operationally the AC-dipoles form two swept frequency bumps that minimize the effect of the AC-dipole dipoles outside of the spin flipper. Both AC bumps operate at the same frequency, but are phase shifted from each other. The AC-dipoles therefore require precise control over amplitude and phase making the implementation of the AC-dipole controller the central challenge.

  3. RHIC low-energy challenges and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satogata, T.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Jappe, W.; Lee, R.C.; MacKay, W.W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Michnoff, R.; Oerter, B.; Pozdeyev, E.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-01-01

    Future Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) runs, including a portion of FY10 heavy ion operations, will explore collisions at center of mass energies of 5-50 GeV/n (GeV/nucleon). Operations at these energies is motivated by the search for a possible QCD phase transition critical point. The lowest end of this energy range is nearly a factor of four below the nominal RHIC injection center of mass energy √s = 19.6 GeV/n. There are several operational challenges in the RHIC low-energy regime, including harmonic number changes, small longitudinal acceptance, lowered magnet field quality, nonlinear orbit control, and luminosity monitoring. We report on the experience with these challenges during beam tests with gold beams in March 2008. This includes first operations at √s = 9.18 GeV/n, first beam experience at √s = 5 GeV/n, and luminosity projections for near-term operations.

  4. RHIC low-energy challenges and plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satogata,T.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Jappe, W.; Lee, R.C.; MacKay, W.W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Michnoff, R.; Oerter, B.; Pozdeyev, E.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-06-08

    Future Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) runs, including a portion of FY10 heavy ion operations, will explore collisions at center of mass energies of 5-50 GeV/n (GeV/nucleon). Operations at these energies is motivated by the search for a possible QCD phase transition critical point. The lowest end of this energy range is nearly a factor of four below the nominal RHIC injection center of mass energy {radical}s = 19.6 GeV/n. There are several operational challenges in the RHIC low-energy regime, including harmonic number changes, small longitudinal acceptance, lowered magnet field quality, nonlinear orbit control, and luminosity monitoring. We report on the experience with these challenges during beam tests with gold beams in March 2008. This includes first operations at {radical}s = 9.18 GeV/n, first beam experience at {radical}s = 5 GeV/n, and luminosity projections for near-term operations.

  5. Heavy flavor in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and RHIC II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frawley, A D; Ullrich, T; Vogt, R

    2008-03-30

    In the initial years of operation, experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have identified a new form of matter formed in nuclei-nuclei collisions at energy densities more than 100 times that of a cold atomic nucleus. Measurements and comparison with relativistic hydrodynamic models indicate that the matter thermalizes in an unexpectedly short time, has an energy density at least 15 times larger than needed for color deconfinement, has a temperature about twice the critical temperature predicted by lattice QCD, and appears to exhibit collective motion with ideal hydrodynamic properties--a 'perfect liquid' that appears to flow with a near-zero viscosity to entropy ratio--lower than any previously observed fluid and perhaps close to a universal lower bound. However, a fundamental understanding of the medium seen in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC does not yet exist. The most important scientific challenge for the field in the next decade is the quantitative exploration of the new state of nuclear matter. That will require new data that will, in turn, require enhanced capabilities of the RHIC detectors and accelerator. In this report we discuss the scientific opportunities for an upgraded RHIC facility --RHIC II--in conjunction with improved capabilities of the two large RHIC detectors, PHENIX and STAR. We focus solely on heavy flavor probes. Their production rates are calculable using the well-established techniques of perturbative QCD and their sizable interactions with the hot QCD medium provide unique and sensitive measurements of its crucial properties making them one of the key diagnostic tools available to us.

  6. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: P- and CP-odd Effects in Hot and Dense Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, A.; Fukushima, K.; Kharzeev, D.; Warringa, H.; Voloshin, S.

    2010-04-26

    This volume contains the proceedings of the RBRC/CATHIE workshop on 'P- and CP-odd Effects in Hot and Dense Matter' held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on April 26-30, 2010. The workshop was triggered by the experimental observation of charge correlations in heavy ion collisions at RHIC, which were predicted to occur due to local parity violation (P- and CP-odd fluctuations) in hot and dense QCD matter. This experimental result excited a significant interest in the broad physics community, inspired a few alternative interpretations, and emphasized the need for a deeper understanding of the role of topology in QCD vacuum and in hot and dense quark-gluon matter. Topological effects in QCD are also closely related to a number of intriguing problems in condensed matter physics, cosmology and astrophysics. We therefore felt that a broad cross-disciplinary discussion of topological P- and CP-odd effects in various kinds of matter was urgently needed. Such a discussion became the subject of the workshop. Specific topics discussed at the workshop include the following: (1) The current experimental results on charge asymmetries at RHIC and the physical interpretations of the data; (2) Quantitative characterization of topological effects in QCD matter including both analytical (perturbative and non-perturbative using gauge/gravity duality) and numerical (lattice-QCD) calculations; (3) Topological effects in cosmology of the Early Universe (including baryogenesis and dark energy); (4) Topological effects in condensed matter physics (including graphene and superfiuids); and (5) Directions for the future experimental studies of P- and CP-odd effects at RHIC and elsewhere. We feel that the talks and intense discussions during the workshop were extremely useful, and resulted in new ideas in both theory and experiment. We hope that the workshop has contributed to the progress in understanding the role of topology in QCD and related fields. We thank all the speakers and

  7. Polarized H- source development at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessi, J.G.; Hershcovitch, A.; Kponou, A.; Niinikoski, T.; Sluyters, T.

    1986-01-01

    The AGS polarized H - source (PONI-1) now produces currents of 25-40 μA, and has operated reliably during polarized physics runs. A new polarized source, having as its goal mA's of H-vector, is now under development. An atomic hydrogen beam has been cooled to about 20 K with a forward flux of approx.10 19 atoms/s/sr. A superconducting solenoid having a calculated acceptance angle of 0.1 sr for the cold H 0 beam, is now being built. An ionizer for the resulting polarized H 0 beam based on resonant charge exchange of H 0 with D - , is being tested. 500 μA of H - have been produced by ionizing an unpolarized H 0 beam using this ionizer

  8. SNS RING STUDY AT THE AGS BOOSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZHANG, S.Y.; AHRENS, L.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; FEDOTOV, A.; GARDNER, C.; LEE, Y.Y.; LUCCIO, A.; MALITSKY, N.; ROSER, T.; WENG, W.T.; WEI, J.; ZENO, K.; REECE, K.; WANG, J.G.

    2000-01-01

    During the g-2 run at the BNL AGS in early 2000, a 200 MeV storage-ring-like magnetic cycle has been set-up and tuned at the Booster in preparing for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring study. In this article, we report the progress of the machine set-up, tuning, some preliminary studies, and the future plan

  9. Hadron production in Au-Au collisions at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun-Munzinger, P.; Magestro, D.; Redlich, K.; Wroclaw Univ.; Stachel, J.

    2001-05-01

    We present an analysis of particle production yields measured in central Au-Au collisions at RHIC in the framework of the statistical thermal model. We demonstrate that the model extrapolated from previous analyses at SPS and AGS energy is in good agreement with the available experimental data at √(s) = 130 GeV implying a high degree of chemical equilibration. Performing a χ 2 fit to the data, the range of thermal parameters at chemical freezeout is determined. At present, the best agreement of the model and the data is obtained with the baryon chemical potential μ B ≅ 51 ± 6 MeV and temperature T ≅ 175 ± 7 MeV. More ratios, such as multistrange baryon to meson, would be required to further constrain the chemical freezeout conditions. Extrapolating thermal parameters to higher energy, the predictions of the model for particle production in Au-Au reactions at √(s) = 200 GeV are also given. (orig.)

  10. Numerical spin tracking in a synchrotron computer code Spink: Examples (RHIC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luccio, A.

    1995-01-01

    In the course of acceleration of polarized protons in a synchrotron, many depolarizing resonances are encountered. They are classified in two categories: Intrinsic resonances that depend on the lattice structure of the ring and arise from the coupling of betatron oscillations with horizontal magnetic fields, and imperfection resonances caused by orbit distortions due to field errors. In general, the spectrum of resonances vs spin tune Gγ(G = 1.7928, the proton gyromagnetic anomaly, and y the proton relativistic energy ratio) for a given lattice tune ν, or vs ν for a given Gγ, contains a multitude of lines with various amplitudes or resonance strengths. The depolarization due to the resonance lines can be studied by numerically tracking protons with spin in a model accelerator. Tracking will allow one to check the strength of resonances, to study the effects of devices like Siberian Snakes, to find safe lattice tune regions where to operate, and finally to study in detail the operation of special devices such as Spin Flippers. A few computer codes exist that calculate resonance strengths E k and perform tracking, for proton and electron machines. Most relevant to our work for the AGS and RHIC machines are the programs Depol and Snake. Depol, calculates the E k 's by Fourier analysis. The input to Depol is the output of a machine model code, such as Synch or Mad, containing all details of the lattice. Snake, does the tracking, starting from a synthetic machine, that contains a certain number of periods, of FODO cells, of Siberian snakes, etc. We believed the complexities of machines like the AGS or RHIC could not be adequately represented by Snake. Then, we decided to write a new code, Spink, that combines some of the features of Depol and Snake. I.E., Spink reads a Mad output like Depol and tracks as Snake does. The structure of the code and examples for RHIC are described in the following

  11. STAR results from the first year at RHIC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thomas S Ullrich

    temperature at which inelastic collisions cease and the chemical content of the fire-ball is determined. ... rapidity yield is a constant over one unit of rapidity, the pt distributions are varying and thus the system is no longer ..... Acknowledgments. We wish to thank the RHIC Operations Group and the RHIC Computing Facility at.

  12. A Model of RHIC Using the Unified Accelerator Libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trahern, C. G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Malitsky, N. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The Unified Accelerator Library (UAL) is an object oriented and modular software environment for accelerator physics which comprises an accelerator object model for the description of the machine (SMF, for Standard Machine Format), a collection of Physics Libraries, and a Perl inte,face that provides a homo­geneous shell for integrating and managing these components. Currently available physics libraries include TEAPOT++, a collection of C++ physics modules conceptually derived from TEAPOT, and DNZLIB, a differential algebra package for map generation. This software environment has been used to build a flat model of RHIC which retains the hierarchical lat­tice description while assigning specific characteristics to individual elements, such as measured field har­monics. A first application of the model and of the simulation capabilities of UAL has been the study of RHIC stability in the presence of siberian snakes and spin rotators. The building blocks of RHIC snakes and rotators are helical dipoles, unconventional devices that can not be modeled by traditional accelerator phys­ics codes and have been implemented in UAL as Taylor maps. Section 2 describes the RHIC data stores, Section 3 the RHIC SMF format and Section 4 the RHIC spe­cific Perl interface (RHIC Shell). Section 5 explains how the RHIC SMF and UAL have been used to study the RHIC dynamic behavior and presents detuning and dynamic aperture results. If the reader is not familiar with the motivation and characteristics of UAL, we include in the Appendix an useful overview paper. An example of a complete set of Perl Scripts for RHIC simulation can also be found in the Appendix.

  13. RHIC spin physics: Proceedings. Volume 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    This proceedings compiles one-page summaries and five transparencies for each talk, with the intention that the speaker should include a web location for additional information in the summary. Also, email addresses are given with the participant list. The order follows the agenda: gluon, polarimetry, accelerator, W production and quark/antiquark polarization, parity violation searches, transversity, single transverse spin, small angle elastic scattering, and the final talk on ep collisions at RHIC. The authors begin the Proceedings with the full set of transparencies from Bob Jaffe`s colloquium on spin, by popular request.

  14. RHIC spin physics: Proceedings. Volume 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This proceedings compiles one-page summaries and five transparencies for each talk, with the intention that the speaker should include a web location for additional information in the summary. Also, email addresses are given with the participant list. The order follows the agenda: gluon, polarimetry, accelerator, W production and quark/antiquark polarization, parity violation searches, transversity, single transverse spin, small angle elastic scattering, and the final talk on ep collisions at RHIC. The authors begin the Proceedings with the full set of transparencies from Bob Jaffe's colloquium on spin, by popular request

  15. FEASIBILITY OF INCREASING THE ENERGY OF RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MACKAY, W.W.; JAIN, A.; LUCCIO, A.U.; PILAT, F.; ROSER, T.; TEPIKIAN, S.; TROBOJEVIC, D.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of increasing the energy of beams in RHIC by as much as 30% with a modest trade-off in luminosity. The arc dipoles and quadrupoles were designed with considerable margin. For higher energies (>100 GeV/nucleon) the minimum β* may be required to increase as the interaction region triplets saturate. The separator magnets (DX) have the least margin for increased field, so we consider three scenarios: allowing for a small crossing angle with the present DX magnets, upgrading the DX magnets to higher strength, and permitting a crossing angle of ∼1degree by removing the DX magnets altogether

  16. "Upgraded" physics at the LHC and RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llope, W. J. [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2017-09-03

    Closeout materials enclosed. This grant supported a postdoctoral scientist (S. Jowzaee) and the tuition for a graduate student (B. Erko), both working under the supervision of Prof. W.J. Llope at Wayne State University. Travel to a STAR Collaboration Meeting and the Quark Matter 2017 conference was also supported. The physics research concentrated on particle-identified two-particle correlations in the Beam Energy Scan data from the STAR experiment at RHIC. S. Jowzaee gave an oral presentation on this research at the Quark Matter 2017 conference.

  17. Collective flow measurements at RHIC energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esumi Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental results on collective flow measurements from relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC are presented and discussed to study high-temperature and high-density quark-nuclear matter, Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP especially focusing on bulk properties, such as freeze-out parameters, temperature, chemical potential, collective expansion, azimuthal event anisotropy measurements. Their relations to the various correlation and fluctuation studies are also discussed, including initial geometrical and E- and B-field conditions as well as possible collective flow evolution that could even be developed in small systems. Current results and understandings from the beam energy scan program (BES and future plans are discussed and reviewed.

  18. THE RHIC BEAM ABORT KICKER SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1999-01-01

    THE ENERGY STORED IN THE RHIC BEAM IS ABOUT 200 KJ PER RING AT DESIGN ENERGY AND INTENSITY. TO PREVENT QUENCHING OF THE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS OR MATERIAL DAMAGE, THE BEAM WILL BE SAFELY DISPOSED OF BY AN INTERNAL BEAM ABORT SYSTEM, WHICH INCLUDES THE KICKER MAGNETS, THE PULSED POWER SUPPLIES, AND THE DUMP ABSORBER. DISPOSAL OF HEAVY IONS, SUCH AS GOLD, IMPOSES DESIGN CONSTRAINTS MORE SEVERE THAN THOSE FOR PROTON BEAMS OF EQUAL INTENSITY. IN ORDER TO MINIMIZE THE THERMAL SHOCK IN THE CARBON-FIBER DUMP BLOCK, THE BUNCHES MUST BE LATERALLY DISPERSED

  19. Polarization response of RHIC electron lens lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. H. Ranjbar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Depolarization response for a system of two orthogonal snakes at irrational tunes is studied in depth using lattice independent spin integration. In particular we consider the effect of overlapping spin resonances in this system, to understand the impact of phase, tune, relative location and threshold strengths of the spin resonances. These results are benchmarked and compared to two dimensional direct tracking results for the RHIC e-lens lattice and the standard lattice. Finally we consider the effect of longitudinal motion via chromatic scans using direct six dimensional lattice tracking.

  20. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    An engineering plant analyzer has been developed at BNL for realistically and accurately simulating transients and severe abnormal events in BWR power plants. Simulations are being carried out routinely with high fidelity, high simulation speed, at low cost and with unsurpassed user convenience. The BNL Plant Analyzer is the only operating facility which (a) simulates more than two orders-of-magnitude faster than the CDC-7600 mainframe computer, (b) is accessible and fully operational in on-line interactive mode, remotely from anywhere in the US, from Europe or the Far East (Korea), via widely available IBM-PC compatible personal computers, standard modems and telephone lines, (c) simulates both slow and rapid transients seven times faster than real-time in direct access, and four times faster in remote access modes, (d) achieves high simulation speed without compromising fidelity, and (e) is available to remote access users at the low cost of $160 per hour.

  1. First results from RHIC-PHENIX

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, T K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S V; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Yu A; Botelho, S S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N L; Bucher, D; Büsching, H; Bunce, G M; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S K; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; Dávid, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Yu V; Chenawi, K E; En-Yo, H; Esumi, S C; Ewell, L A; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Zeev; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, Hans Åke; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Havano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B A; Khanzadeev, A V; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E P; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Bösing, C; Klinksiek, S A; Kochenda, L M; Kochetkov, D; Kochetkov, V; Köhler, D; Kohama, T; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R A; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Man'ko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martínez, G; Marx, M D; Massaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E A; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Muhlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P O; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V A; Oskarsson, A; Österman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, Thomas; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C H; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M E; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saitô, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiryak, Yu; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sørensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H A; Towell, R S; Tserruya, Itzhak; Tsuruoke, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjo, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; van Hecke, H; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vingradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A A; Vznuzdaev, E A; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2001-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment consists of a large detector system located at the newly commissioned Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The primary goal of the PHENIX experiment is to look for signatures of the QCD prediction of a deconfined high-energy-density phase of nuclear matter and the quark gluon plasma. PHENIX started taking data for Au+Au collisions at square root (s/sub NN/)=130 GeV in June 2000. The signals from the beam-beam counter (BBC) and zero degree calorimeter (ZDC) are used to determine the centrality of the collision. A Glauber model reproduces the ZDC spectrum reasonably well to determine the participants in a collision. The charged particle multiplicity distribution from the first PHENIX paper is compared with the other RHIC experiment and the CERN and SPS results. Transverse momentum of photons are measured in the electro-magnetic calorimeter (EMCal) and preliminary results an presented. Particle identification is made by a time-of-flight (TOF) detecto...

  2. CONTINUOUS ABORT GAP CLEANING AT RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DREES, A.; FLILLER, R.III.; FU, W.; MICHNOFF, R.

    2004-01-01

    Since the RHIC Au-Au run in the year 2001 the 200 MHz cavity system was used at storage and a 28 MHz system during injection and acceleration. The rebucketing procedure potentially causes a higher debunching rate of heavy ion beams in addition to amplifying debunching due to other mechanisms. At the end of a four hour store, debunched beam can easily account for more than 50% of the total beam intensity. This effect is even stronger with the achieved high intensities of the RHIC Au-Au run in 2004. A beam abort at the presence of a lot of debunched beam bears the risk of magnet quenching and experimental detector damage due to uncontrolled beam losses. Thus it is desirable to avoid any accumulation of debunched beam from the beginning of each store, in particular to anticipate cases of unscheduled beam aborts due to a system failure. A combination of a fast transverse kickers and the new 2-stage copper collimator system are used to clean the abort gap continuously throughout the store with a repetition rate of 1 Hz. This report gives. an overview of the new gap cleaning procedure and the achieved performance

  3. UP-GRADED RHIC INJECTION SYSTEM.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAHN,H.FISCHER,W.SEMERTZIDIS,Y.K.WARBURTON,D.S.

    2003-05-12

    The design of the RHIC injection systems anticipated the possibility of filling and operating the rings with a 120 bunch pattern, corresponding to 110 bunches after allowing for the abort gap. Beam measurements during the 2002 run confirmed the possibility, although at the expense of severe transverse emittance growth and thus not on an operational basis. An improvement program was initiated with the goal of reducing the kicker rise time from 110 to {approx}95 ns and of minimizing pulse timing jitter and drift. The major components of the injection system are 4 kicker magnets and Blmlein pulsers using thyratron switches. The kicker terminating resistor and operating voltage was increased to reduce the rise time. Timing has been stabilized by using commercial trigger units and extremely stable dc supplies for the thyratron reservoir. A fiber optical connection between control room and the thyratron trigger unit has been provided, thereby allowing the operator to adjust timing individually for each kicker unit. The changes were successfully implemented for use in the RHIC operation.

  4. High luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptitsyn, V.; Aschenauer, E.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M..; Calaga, R.; Chang, X.; Fedotov, A.; Gassner, D.; Hammons, L.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; He, P.; Hao, Y.; Jackson, W.; Jain, A.; Johnson, E.C.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luo, Y.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Parker, B.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Skaritka, J.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Webb, S.; Wu, Q.; Xu, W.; Pozdeyev, E.; Tsentalovich, E.

    2011-03-28

    We present the design of a future high-energy high-luminosity electron-hadron collider at RHIC called eRHIC. We plan on adding 20 (potentially 30) GeV energy recovery linacs to accelerate and to collide polarized and unpolarized electrons with hadrons in RHIC. The center-of-mass energy of eRHIC will range from 30 to 200 GeV. The luminosity exceeding 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved in eRHIC using the low-beta interaction region with a 10 mrad crab crossing. We report on the progress of important eRHIC R&D such as the high-current polarized electron source, the coherent electron cooling, ERL test facility and the compact magnets for recirculation passes. A natural staging scenario of step-by-step increases of the electron beam energy by building-up of eRHIC's SRF linacs is presented.

  5. Critical examination of RHIC paradigms - mostly high pT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.I.

    2009-01-01

    A critical examination of RHIC paradigms is presented. Topics include: search for a critical point with a low energy scan; the lack of understanding of radiative processes in a medium in QCD compared in detail to examples from QED; the reason why some physicists started to measure particles at large p T in the 1960's; a review of the discovery of hard-scattering in p-p collisions in the 1970's via single-inclusive and two-particle correlations and application of these techniques at RHIC. Several paradigms in both soft and hard physics which are popular at RHIC are discussed and challenged.

  6. Modeling RHIC using the standard machine formal accelerator description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilat, F.; Trahern, C.G.; Wei, J.

    1997-01-01

    The Standard Machine Format (SMF) is a structured description of accelerator lattices which supports both the hierarchy of beam lines and generic lattice objects as well as those deviations (field errors, alignment efforts, etc.) associated with each component of the as-installed machine. In this paper we discuss the use of SMF to describe the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as well as the ancillary data structures (such as field quality measurements) that are necessarily incorporated into the RHIC SMF model. Future applications of SMF are outlined, including its use in the RHIC operational environment

  7. Focusing and matching properties of the ATR transfer line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoupas, N.; Fischer, W.; Kewisch, J.; MacKay, W.W.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Tepikian, S.; Wei, J.

    1997-01-01

    The AGS to RHIC (AtR) beam transfer line has been constructed and will be used to transfer beam bunches from the AGS machine into the RHIC machine which is presently under construction at BNL. The original design of the AtR line has been modified. This article will present the optics of the various sections of the existing AtR beam line, as well as the matching capabilities of the AtR line to the RHIC machine

  8. Experience with IBS-suppression lattice in RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Luo, Y.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Ganetis, G.; Hoff, L.; Louie, W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Montag, C.; Pilat, F.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    2008-01-01

    An intra-beam scattering (IBS) is the limiting factor of the luminosity lifetime for RHIC operating with heavy ions. In order to suppress the IBS we designed and implemented new lattice with higher betatron tunes. This lattice had been developed during last three years and had been used for gold ions in yellow ring of the RHIC during d-Au part of the RHIC Run-8. The use of this lattice allowed both significant increases in the luminosity lifetime and the luminosity levels via reduction of beta-stars in the IPS. In this paper we report on the development, the tests and the performance of IBS-suppression lattice in RHIC, including the resulting increases in the peak and the average luminosity. We also report on our plans for future steps with the IBS suppression

  9. RHIC PERFORMANCE AND PLANS TOWARDS HIGHER LUMINOSITY AND HIGHER POLARIZATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SATOGATA,T.

    2004-07-05

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the first hadron accelerator and collider consisting of two independent rings, has completed its fourth year of operation since commissioning in 1999. RHIC is designed to provide luminosity over a wide range of beam energies and species, including heavy ions, polarized protons, and asymmetric beam collisions. RHIC has produced physics data at four experiments in runs that include gold-on-gold collisions at various beam energies (9.8, 31, 65, and 100 GeV/u), high-energy polarized proton-proton collisions (100 GeV), and deuteron-gold collisions (100 GeV/u). We review recent machine performance for high-luminosity gold-gold operations and polarized proton operations, including causes and solutions for known operational limits. Plans and progress for luminosity and polarization improvements, electron cooling, and the electron-ion collider eRHIC are discussed.

  10. The electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddo, M.E.; Bielick, E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses the following on the electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC: conceptual design; the physics of electromagnetic calorimetry in STAR; trigger capability; integration into STAR; and cost, schedule, manpower, and funding

  11. Experience with IBS-suppression lattice in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko,V.N.; Luo, Y.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Ganetis, G.; Hoff, L.; Louie, W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Montag, C.; Pilat, F.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    2008-06-23

    An intra-beam scattering (IBS) is the limiting factor of the luminosity lifetime for RHIC operating with heavy ions. In order to suppress the IBS we designed and implemented new lattice with higher betatron tunes. This lattice had been developed during last three years and had been used for gold ions in yellow ring of the RHIC during d-Au part of the RHIC Run-8. The use of this lattice allowed both significant increases in the luminosity lifetime and the luminosity levels via reduction of beta-stars in the IPS. In this paper we report on the development, the tests and the performance of IBS-suppression lattice in RHIC, including the resulting increases in the peak and the average luminosity. We also report on our plans for future steps with the IBS suppression.

  12. COUPLING MEASUREMENT AND CORRECTION AT RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PILAT, F.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; FISCHER, W.; PTITSYN, V.; SATOGATA, T.

    2002-01-01

    Coupling correction at RHIC has been operationally achieved through a two-step process: using local triplet skew quadrupoles to compensate coupling corn rolled low-beta triplet quadrupoles, and minimizing the tune separation and residual coupling with orthogonal global skew quadrupole families. An application has been developed for global correction that allows skew quadrupole tuning and tune display with a choice of different tune measurement techniques, including tune-meter, Schottky and phase lock loop (PLL). Coupling effects have been analyzed by using 1024-turn (TBT) information from the beam position monitor (BPM) system. These data allow the reconstruction of the off-diagonal terms of the transfer matrix, a measure of global coupling. At both injection and storage energies, coordination of tune meter kicks with TBT acquisition at 322 BPW's in each ring allows the measurement of local coupling at all BPM locations

  13. Results from the RHIC Beam Energy Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranenko, A.

    2017-12-01

    The first phase of the Beam Energy Scan (BES-I) program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is based on Au+Au collision data collected between 2010 and 2014 at center-of-mass energies = 7.7, 11.5, 14.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV. The BES-I program has four physics goals: search for the turning off of the signatures of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), the search for the possible first-order phase transition between hadronic gas and QGP, the search for the possible critical end point and the study of the transport properties of the strongly interacting matter as a function of the temperature T and baryon chemical potential μB. In this article, we briefly review and discuss the main results and their understanding from the BES-I program and future plans for the BES-II program (2019-2020).

  14. Physics at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuryak, E.V.

    1990-08-01

    This introductory talk contains a brief discussion of future experiments at RHIC related to physics of superdense matter. In particular, we consider the relation between space-time picture of the collision and spectra of the observed secondaries. We discuss where one should look for QGP signals and for possible manifestation of the phase transition. We pay more attention to a rather new topic: hadron modification in the gas phase, which is interesting by itself as a collective phenomenon, and also as a precursor indicating what happens with hadrons near the phase transition. We briefly review current understanding of the photon physics, dilepton production, charm and strangeness and J/ψ suppression. At the end we try to classify all possible experiments. 47 refs., 3 figs

  15. MEASUREMENT OF TRANSVERSE ECHOES IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISCHER, W.; SATOGATA, T.; TOMAS, R.

    2005-01-01

    Beam echoes are a very sensitive method to measure diffusion, and longitudinal echo measurements were performed in a number of machines. In RHIC, for the first time, a transverse beam echo was observed after applying a dipole kick followed by a quadrupole .kick. After application of the dipole kick, the dipole moment decohered completely due to lattice nonlinearities. When a quadrupole kick is applied at time τ after the dipole kick, the beam re-cohered at time 2τ thus showing an echo response. We describe the experimental setup and measurement results. In the measurements the dipole and quadrupole kick amplitudes, amplitude dependent tune shift, and the time between dipole and quadrupole kick were varied. In addition, measurements were taken with gold bunches of different intensities. These should exhibit different transverse diffusion rates due to intra-beam scattering

  16. RHIC 10 Hz global orbit feedback system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michnoff, R.; Arnold, L.; Carboni, L.; Cerniglia, P.; Curcio, A.; DeSanto, L.; Folz, C.; Ho, C.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.; Karl, R.; Luo, Y.; Liu, C.; MacKay, W.; Mahler, G.; Meng, W.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Olsen, R.; Piacentino, J.; Popken, P.; Przybylinski, R.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ritter, J.; Schoenfeld, R.; Thieberger, P.; Tuozzolo, J.; Weston, A.; White, J.; Ziminski, P.; Zimmerman, P.

    2011-01-01

    Vibrations of the cryogenic triplet magnets at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are suspected to be causing the horizontal beam perturbations observed at frequencies around 10 Hz. Several solutions to counteract the effect have been considered in the past, including a local beam feedback system at each of the two experimental areas, reinforcing the magnet base support assembly, and a mechanical servo feedback system. However, the local feedback system was insufficient because perturbation amplitudes outside the experimental areas were still problematic, and the mechanical solutions are very expensive. A global 10 Hz orbit feedback system consisting of 36 beam position monitors (BPMs) and 12 small dedicated dipole corrector magnets in each of the two 3.8 km circumference counter-rotating rings has been developed and commissioned in February 2011. A description of the system architecture and results with beam will be discussed.

  17. MEASURING LOCAL GRADIENT AND SKEW QUADRUPOLE ERRORS IN RHIC IRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARDONA, J.; PEGGS, S.; PILAT, R.; PTITSYN, V.

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of local linear errors at RHIC interaction regions using an ''action and phase'' analysis of difference orbits has already been presented [2]. This paper evaluates the accuracy of this technique using difference orbits that were taken when known gradient errors and skew quadrupole errors were intentionally introduced. It also presents action and phase analysis of simulated orbits when controlled errors are intentionally placed in a RHIC simulation model

  18. Proton spin structure study with PHENIX detector at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazilevsky, A.

    2000-01-01

    Acceleration of polarized protons in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will provide unique tool to study spin structure of the nucleon, covering the √s region from 50 GeV to 500 GeV with proton polarization of 70%. PHENIX, one of the major detector systems at RHIC, is going to investigate poorly known gluon and flavor identified sea quark polarization in the proton. Overview of the RHENIX spin program is presented and sensitivities of the measurements are discussed

  19. Tracking studies in eRHIC energy-recovery recirculator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brooks, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ptitsyn, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trbojevic, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-07-13

    Beam and polarization tracking studies in eRHIC energy recovery electron recirculator are presented, based on a very preliminary design of the FFAG lattice. These simulations provide examples of some of the beam and spin optics aspects of the linear FFAG lattice concept and its application in eRHIC, they provide code benchmarking for synchrotron radiation and spin diffusion in addition, and pave the way towards end-to-end 6-D(phasespace)+3D(spin) tracking simulations.

  20. Quadrupole Beam-Based Alignment in the RHIC Interaction Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Satogata, J. Ziegler

    2011-03-01

    Continued beam-based alignment (BBA) efforts have provided significant benefit to both heavy ion and polarized proton operations at RHIC. Recent studies demonstrated previously unknown systematic beam position monitor (BPM) offset errors and produced accurate measurements of individual BPM offsets in the experiment interaction regions. Here we describe the algorithm used to collect and analyze data during the 2010 and early 2011 RHIC runs and the results of these measurements.

  1. Polarization simulations in the RHIC run 15 lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Robert-Demolaize, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; White, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    RHIC polarized proton Run 15 uses a new acceleration ramp optics, compared to RHIC Run 13 and earlier runs, in relation with electron-lens beam-beam compensation developments. The new optics induces different strengths in the depolarizing snake resonance sequence, from injection to top energy. As a consequence, polarization transport along the new ramp has been investigated, based on spin tracking simulations. Sample results are reported and discussed.

  2. Thermal and prompt photons at RHIC and the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquet, Jean-François [Department of Physics & Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada); Shen, Chun [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada); Denicol, Gabriel [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada); Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Luzum, Matthew [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia-Spain (Spain); Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão Travessa R, no. 187, 05508-090, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo (Brazil); Schenke, Björn [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada)

    2016-12-15

    Thermal and prompt photon production in heavy ion collisions is evaluated and compared with measurements from both RHIC and the LHC. An event-by-event hydrodynamical model of heavy ion collisions that includes shear and bulk viscosities is used, along with up-to-date photon emission rates. Larger tension with measurements is observed at RHIC than at the LHC. The center-of-mass energy and centrality dependence of thermal and prompt photons is investigated.

  3. Proceedings of the symposium on RHIC detector R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makdisi, Y.; Stevens, A.J. [eds.

    1991-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Development of Analog Memories for RHIC Detector Front-end Electronic Systems; Monolithic Circuit Development for RHIC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Highly Integrated Electronics for the STAR TPC; Monolithic Readout Circuits for RHIC; New Methods for Trigger Electronics Development; Neurocomputing methods for Pattern Recognition in Nuclear Physics; The Development of a Silicon Multiplicity Detector System; The Vertex Detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration; Simulations of Silicon Vertex Tracker for STAR Experiment at RHIC; Calorimeter/Absorber Optimization for a RHIC Dimuon Experiment (RD-10 Project); Applications of the LAHET simulation Code to Relativistic Heavy Ion Detectors; Highly Segmented, High Resolution Time-of-Flight System; Research and Development on a Sub 100 Picosecond Time-of-Flight System Based on Silicon Avalance Diodes; Behavior of TPC`s in a High Particle Flux Environment; Generic R&D on Undoped Cesium Iodide and Lead Fluoride; and A Transition Radiation Detector for RHIC Featuring Accurate Tracking and dE/dx Particle Identification. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Fast ferrite tuner for the BNL synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivit, E.; Hanna, S.M.; Keane, J.

    1991-01-01

    A new type of ferrite tuner has been tested at the BNL. The ferrite tuner uses garnet slabs partially filling a stripline. One of the important features of the tuner is that the ferrite is perpendicularly biased for operation above FMR, thus reducing the magnetic losses. A unique design was adopted to achieve the efficient cooling. The principle of operation of the tuner as well as our preliminary results on tuning a 52 MHz cavity are reported. Optimized conditions under which we demonstrated linear tunability of 80 KHz are described. The tuner's losses and its effect on higher-order modes in the cavity are discussed. 2 refs., 8 figs

  5. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Quarkonium Production in Elementary and Heavy Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumitru, A.; Lourenco, C.; Petreczky, P.; Qiu, J., Ruan, L.

    2011-08-03

    Understanding the structure of the hadron is of fundamental importance in subatomic physics. Production of heavy quarkonia is arguably one of the most fascinating subjects in strong interaction physics. It offers unique perspectives into the formation of QCD bound states. Heavy quarkonia are among the most studied particles both theoretically and experimentally. They have been, and continue to be, the focus of measurements in all high energy colliders around the world. Because of their distinct multiple mass scales, heavy quarkonia were suggested as a probe of the hot quark-gluon matter produced in heavy-ion collisions; and their production has been one of the main subjects of the experimental heavy-ion programs at the SPS and RHIC. However, since the discovery of J/psi at Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory over 36 years ago, theorists still have not been able to fully understand the production mechanism of heavy quarkonia, although major progresses have been made in recent years. With this in mind, a two-week program on quarkonium production was organized at BNL on June 6-17, 2011. Many new experimental data from LHC and from RHIC were presented during the program, including results from the LHC heavy ion run. To analyze and correctly interpret these measurements, and in order to quantify properties of the hot matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, it is necessary to improve our theoretical understanding of quarkonium production. Therefore, a wide range of theoretical aspects on the production mechanism in the vacuum as well as in cold nuclear and hot quark-gluon medium were discussed during the program from the controlled calculations in QCD and its effective theories such as NRQCD to various models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. The scientific program was divided into three major scientific parts: basic production mechanism for heavy quarkonium in vacuum or in high energy elementary collisions; the

  6. EVENT DRIVEN AUTOMATIC STATE MODIFICATION OF BNL'S BOOSTER FOR NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY SOLAR PARTICLE SIMULATOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN, D.; BINELLO, S.; HARVEY, M.; MORRIS, J.; RUSEK, A.; TSOUPAS, N.

    2005-05-16

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. The NSRL makes use of heavy ions in the range of 0.05 to 3 GeV/n slow extracted from BNL's AGS Booster. NASA is interested in reproducing the energy spectrum from a solar flare in the space environment for a single ion species. To do this we have built and tested a set of software tools which allow the state of the Booster and the NSRL beam line to be changed automatically. In this report we will describe the system and present results of beam tests.

  7. RESULTS OF THE FIRST RUN OF THE NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY AT BNL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN,K.A.AHRENS,L.BRENNAN,J.M.ET. AL.

    2004-07-05

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. The results of commissioning of this new facility were reported in [l]. In this report we will describe the results of the first run. The NSRL is capable of making use of heavy ions in the range of 0.05 to 3 GeV/n slow extracted from BNL's AGS Booster. Many modes of operation were explored during the first run, demonstrating all the capabilities designed into the system. Heavy ion intensities from 100 particles per pulse up to 12 x 10{sup 9} particles per pulse were delivered to a large variety of experiments, providing a dose range up to 70 Gy/min over a 5 x 5 cm{sup 2} area. Results presented will include those related to the production of beams that are highly uniform in both the transverse and longitudinal planes of motion [2].

  8. Test results of BNL built 40-mm aperture, 17-m-long SSC collider dipole magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzminski, J.; Bush, T.; Coombes, R.; Devred, A.; DiMarco, J.; Goodzeit, C.; Puglisi, M.; Radusewicz, P.; Sanger, P.; Schermer, R.; Tompkins, J.C.; Wolf, Z.; Yu, Y.; Zheng, H. (Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States)); Ogitsu, T. (Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States) National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)); Anerella, M.; Cottingham, J.

    1991-06-01

    Eleven 17 m long, 40 mm aperture SSC R D superconducting collider dipole magnets, built at BNL, have been extensively tested at BNL and Fermilab during 1990--91. Quench performance of these magnets and details of their mechanical behavior are presented. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Test results of BNL built 40-mm aperture, 17-m-long SSC collider dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzminski, J.; Bush, T.; Coombes, R.; Devred, A.; DiMarco, J.; Goodzeit, C.; Puglisi, M.; Radusewicz, P.; Sanger, P.; Schermer, R.

    1992-01-01

    Eleven 17 m long, 40 mm aperture SSC R and D superconducting collider dipole magnets, built at BNL, have been extensively tested at BNL and Fermilab during 1990-91. In this paper quench performance of these magnets and details of their mechanical behavior are presented

  10. Test results of BNL built 40-mm aperture, 17-m-long SSC collider dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzminski, J.; Bush, T.; Coombes, R.; Devred, A.; DiMarco, J.; Goodzeit, C.; Puglisi, M.; Radusewicz, P.; Sanger, P.; Schermer, R.; Tompkins, J.C.; Wolf, Z.; Yu, Y.; Zheng, H.; Ogitsu, T.; Anerella, M.; Cottingham, J.; Ganetis, G.; Garber, M.; Gosh, A.; Greene, A.; Gupta, R.; Herrera, J.; Kahn, S.; Kelly, E.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Prodell, A.; Rehak, M.; Rohrer, E.P.; Sampson, W.; Shutt, R.; Thompson, P.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Bleadon, M.; Hanft, R.; Kuchnir, M.; Mantsch, P.; Mazur, P.O.; Orris, D.; Peterson, T.; Strait, J.; Royet, J.; Scanlan, R.; Taylor, C.

    1991-06-01

    Eleven 17 m long, 40 mm aperture SSC R ampersand D superconducting collider dipole magnets, built at BNL, have been extensively tested at BNL and Fermilab during 1990--91. Quench performance of these magnets and details of their mechanical behavior are presented. 7 refs., 5 figs

  11. Prospects for polarization at RHIC and SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1991-01-01

    In low to medium energy accelerators, betatron tune jumps and vertical orbit harmonic correction methods have been used to overcome the intrinsic and imperfection resonances. At high energy accelerators, snakes are needed to preserve polarization. We analyze the effects of snake resonances, snake imperfections overlapping resonances on the spin depolarization. We discuss also results of recent snake experiments at the IUCF Cooler Ring. The snake can overcome various kinds of spin depolarization resonances. These experiments pointed out further that partial snake can be used to cure the imperfection resonances in low to medium energy accelerators. We also examine various snake designs. A new generalized snake concept allows for two possible configurations. The compact configuration offers the advantages of shorter total snake length and smaller horizontal orbit displacement. The split snake configuration allows for dual functions of a snake and a 90 degree spin rotator at the mid-section of the snake, which provides helicity state collisions. The requirements for obtaining high luminosity polarized protons at high energy colliders, such as RHIC and SSC, are reviewed

  12. Particle production and spectra in E802 at BNL-AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videbaek, F.

    1991-01-01

    The production of π, K, and protons measured in the E802 spectrometer are studied for p+A and Si+A collisions. Systematic properties of particle spectra and rapidity density distributions are discussed in terms of centrality and reaction system. A detailed comparison of the data to the RQMD model, which employs the experimental acceptance and cuts are presented. 8 refs., 6 figs

  13. Upgrading the AGS polarized beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratner, L.G.

    1991-01-01

    Although present techniques for crossing depolarizing resonances in circular accelerators work, they are very time-consuming to implement and were only able to provide about a 40% polarized beam at 22 GeV in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). We propose to install a partial ''Siberian Snake'' solenoid in the AGS to eliminate the need to correct imperfection resonances and to make other modifications in our intrinsic resonance correctors. This will allow us to reach an energy of 25 GeV with 70% polarization and will enable the AGS to be an efficient injector of polarized protons into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), as well as being able to carry on a fixed-target program with minimum set-up time. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  14. Report of the stochastic cooling subgroup of the RHIC workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussard, D.; Claus, J.; DiMassa, G.; Marriner, J.; Milutinovic, J.; Shafer, R.

    1988-01-01

    We have considered the possibility of stochastic cooling of beams for the RHIC collider. Similar studies have been carried out previously for RHIC and other bunched beam proton machines. The major motivation for cooling at RHIC is to stabilize the growth from intrabeam scattering. We find that cooling rates of the order of 500 sec are theoretically possible for beams of gold ions with γ = 100 if a cooling bandwidth of 10 GHz is used. However, the amount of microwave power which is required is large for momentum cooling and probably not practical. Considerably less power is required for slower rates. We believe that cooling times of 5000 sec for momentum cooling and 1000 sec for betatron cooling might be possible. 5 refs

  15. Conceptual design of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider [RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    In August 1984 Brookhaven National Laboratory submitted a proposal for the construction of a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to the US Department of Energy. A Conceptual Design Report for the RHIC facility was completed in May 1986 after detailed reviews of the machine design, and of the requirements of the physics research program. Since that time an extensive R ampersand D program has been initiated and considerable work has been carried out to refine the design and specification of the major accelerator components, as well as the needs for research detectors, and to prepare the project for construction. This document is an update of the Conceptual Design Report, incorporating the results of work carried out since the beginning of Fiscal Year 1987 when a formal R ampersand D program for the RHIC project funded by DOE was initiated

  16. Opportunities for Drell-Yan Physics at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, E.; Bland, L.; Crawford, H.; Goto, Y.; Eyser, O.; Kang, Z.; Vossen, A.

    2011-05-24

    Drell-Yan (DY) physics gives the unique opportunity to study the parton structure of nucleons in an experimentally and theoretically clean way. With the availability of polarized proton-proton collisions and asymmetric d+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we have the basic (and unique in the world) tools to address several fundamental questions in QCD, including the expected gluon saturation at low partonic momenta and the universality of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions. A Drell-Yan program at RHIC is tied closely to the core physics questions of a possible future electron-ion collider, eRHIC. The more than 80 participants of this workshop focused on recent progress in these areas by both theory and experiment, trying to address imminent questions for the near and mid-term future.

  17. Spin tune dependence on closed orbit in RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ptitsyn, V.; Bai, M.; Roser, T.

    2010-01-01

    Polarized proton beams are accelerated in RHIC to 250 GeV energy with the help of Siberian Snakes. The pair of Siberian Snakes in each RHIC ring holds the design spin tune at 1/2 to avoid polarization loss during acceleration. However, in the presence of closed orbit errors, the actual spin tune can be shifted away from the exact 1/2 value. It leads to a corresponding shift of locations of higher-order ('snake') resonances and limits the available betatron tune space. The largest closed orbit effect on the spin tune comes from the horizontal orbit angle between the two snakes. During RHIC Run in 2009 dedicated measurements with polarized proton beams were taken to verify the dependence of the spin tune on the local orbits at the Snakes. The experimental results are presented along with the comparison with analytical predictions.

  18. Heavy quark production and elliptic flow at RHIC and LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uphoff, J.; Fochler, O.; Xu, Z.; Greiner, C.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate heavy quark production and space-time evolution in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC with the partonic transport model BAMPS. Heavy quarks, produced in primary hard parton scatterings during nucleon-nucleon collisions, are sampled using the Monte Carlo event generator PYTHIA, comparing various parton distribution functions. In a comprehensive study with different charm masses, K factors, and initial gluon conditions, secondary production via g+g→Q+Q-bar and the evolution of heavy quarks are examined within a fully dynamic BAMPS simulation for central heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. In addition, we estimate the chemical equilibration time from box calculations and compare it to the simulated charm fugacity at RHIC. Furthermore, we take a look at elliptic flow and energy loss of charm quarks. (author)

  19. Spin tune dependence on closed orbit in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptitsyn, V.; Bai, M.; Roser, T.

    2010-05-23

    Polarized proton beams are accelerated in RHIC to 250 GeV energy with the help of Siberian Snakes. The pair of Siberian Snakes in each RHIC ring holds the design spin tune at 1/2 to avoid polarization loss during acceleration. However, in the presence of closed orbit errors, the actual spin tune can be shifted away from the exact 1/2 value. It leads to a corresponding shift of locations of higher-order ('snake') resonances and limits the available betatron tune space. The largest closed orbit effect on the spin tune comes from the horizontal orbit angle between the two snakes. During RHIC Run in 2009 dedicated measurements with polarized proton beams were taken to verify the dependence of the spin tune on the local orbits at the Snakes. The experimental results are presented along with the comparison with analytical predictions.

  20. Modeling RHIC Using the Standard Machine Format Accelerator Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilat, F.; Trahern, C. G.; Wei, J.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.

    1997-05-01

    The Standard Machine Format (SMF)(N. Malitsky, R. Talman, et. al., A Proposed Flat Yet Hierarchical Accelerator Lattice Object Model), Particle Accel. 55, 313(1996). is a structured description of accelerator lattices which supports both the hierarchy of beam lines and generic lattice objects as well as the deviations (field errors, misalignments, etc.) associated with each distinct component which are necessary for accurate modeling of beam dynamics. In this paper we discuss the use of SMF to describe the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as well as the ancillary data structures (such as field quality measurements) that are necessarily incorporated into the RHIC SMF model. Future applications of SMF are outlined, including its use in the RHIC operational environment.

  1. PHYSICS OF THE 1 TERAFLOP RIKEN-BNL-COLUMBIA QCD PROJECT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAWHINNEY,R.

    1998-10-16

    A workshop was held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on the afternoon of October 16, i 998, as part of the first anniversary ceremony for the center. Titled ''Workshop on Physics of the 1 Teraflop RIKEN-BNL-Columbia QCD Project'', this meeting brought together the physicists from RIKEN-BNL, BNL and Columbia who are using the QCDSP (Quantum Chromodynamics on Digital Signal Processors) computer at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for studies of QCD. In addition, Akira Ukawa, a leader of the CP-PACS project at the University of Tsukuba in Japan, attended and gave a talk on the Aoki phase. There were also others in attendance who were interested in more general properties of the QCDSP computer. The QCDSP computer and lattice QCD had been presented during the morning ceremony by Shigemi Ohta of KEK and the RIKEN-BNL Research Center. This was followed by a tour of the QCDSP machine room and a formal unveiling of the computer to the attendees of the anniversary ceremony and the press. The rapid completion of construction of the QCDSP computer was made possible through many factors: (1) the existence of a complete design and working hardware at Columbia when the RIKEN-BNL center was being set up, (2) strong support for the project from RIKEN and the center and (3) aggressive involvement of members of the Computing and Communications Division at BNL. With this powerful new resource, the members of the RIKEN-BNL-Columbia, QCD project are looking forward to advances in our understanding of QCD.

  2. PHYSICS OF THE 1 TERAFLOP RIKEN-BNL-COLUMBIA QCD PROJECT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAWHINNEY,R.

    1998-10-16

    A workshop was held at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center on the afternoon of October 16, 1998, as part of the first anniversary ceremony for the center. Titled ''Workshop on Physics of the 1 Teraflop RIKEN-BNL-Columbia QCD Project'', this meeting brought together the physicists from RIKEN-BNL, BNL and Columbia who are using the QCDSP (Quantum Chromodynamics on Digital Signal Processors) computer at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center for studies of QCD. In addition, Akira Ukawa, a leader of the CP-PACS project at the University of Tsukuba in Japan, attended and gave a talk on the Aoki phase. There were also others in attendance who were interested in more general properties of the QCDSP computer. The QCDSP computer and lattice QCD had been presented during the morning ceremony by Shigemi Ohta of KEK and the RIKEN-BNL Research Center. This was followed by a tour of the QCDSP machine room and a formal unveiling of the computer to the attendees of the anniversary ceremony and the press. The rapid completion of construction of the QCDSP computer was made possible through many factors: (1) the existence of a complete design and working hardware at Columbia when the RIKEN-BNL center was being set up, (2) strong support for the project from RIKEN and the center and (3) aggressive involvement of members of the Computing and Communications Division at BNL. With this powerful new resource, the members of the RIKEN-BNL-Columbia, QCD project are looking forward to advances in our understanding of QCD.

  3. Modelling of the AGS using Zgoubi - Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meot F.; Ahrens, L.; Dutheil, Y.; Glenn, J.; Huang, H.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Tsoupas, N.

    2012-05-20

    This paper summarizes the progress achieved so far, and discusses various outcomes, regarding the development of a model of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at the RHIC collider. The model, based on stepwise ray-tracing methods, includes beam and polarization dynamics. This is an on-going work, and a follow-on of code developments and particle and spin dynamics simulations that have been subject to earlier publications at IPAC and PAC [1, 2, 3]. A companion paper [4] gives additional informations, regarding the use of the measured magnetic field maps of the AGS main magnets.

  4. Overview of magnetic nonlinear beam dynamics in the RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Y.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Bengtsson, J.; Calaga, R.; Fischer, W.; Jain, A.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Malitsky, N.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tomas, R.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we review our studies of nonlinear beam dynamics due to the nonlinear magnetic field errors in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Nonlinear magnetic field errors, including magnetic field errors in interaction regions (IRs), chromatic sextupoles, and sextupole components from arc main dipoles are discussed. Their effects on beam dynamics and beam dynamic aperture are evaluated. The online methods to measure and correct the IR nonlinear field errors, second order chromaticities, and horizontal third order resonance are presented. The overall strategy for nonlinear corrections in RHIC is discussed

  5. Status of the quadrupoles for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, P.A.; Cottingham, J.G.; Garber, M.; Ghosh, A.; Goodzeit, C.; Greene, A.; Herrera, J.; Kahn, S.; Kelly, E.; Morgan, G.

    1989-01-01

    The proposed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will require 408 regular arc quadrupoles. Two full size prototypes have been constructed and tested. The construction uses the single layer, collarless concept which has been successful in the RHIC dipoles. Both the magnets attained short sample current, which is 60% higher than the operating current. This corresponds to a gradient of 113 T/m with clear bore of 80 mm. The preliminary field measurements are in agreement with the calculations, with the exception of an unexpectedly large show sextupole. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Report on EBIS studies for a RHIC preinjector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe, E.; Hershcovitch, A.; Kponou, A.; Prelec, K.; Alessi, J.

    1995-01-01

    Bookhaven, an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) is now operational. This source is being used as a test bed to answer questions relevant to the eventual design of an EBIS-based heavy ion injector for RHIC. Such a source can easily produce ions such as Au 43+ but the challenge lies in reaching intensities of interest for RHIC (3 x 10 9 particles/pulse). The source studies are planned to address issues such as scaling of the electron beam to 10 A, possible onset (and control) of instabilities, ion injection, and parametric studies of output emittance

  7. Quench observation using quench antennas on RHIC IR quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogitsu, T.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ganetis, G.; Muratore, J.; Wanderer, P.

    1995-01-01

    Quench observation using quench antennas is now being performed routinely on RHIC dipole and quadrupole magnets. Recently, a quench antenna was used on a RHIC IR magnet which is heavily instrumented with voltage taps. It was confirmed that the signals detected in the antenna coils do not contradict the voltage tap signals. The antenna also detects a sign of mechanical disturbance which could be related to a training quench. This paper summarizes signals detected in the antenna and discusses possible causes of these signals

  8. Study of Lambda polarization at RHIC BES and LHC energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpenko Iurii

    2018-01-01

    gradient of four-temperature field. Based on this mechanism there have been several calculations in hydrodynamic and non-hydrodynamic models for non-central heavy ion collisions in the RHIC Beam Energy Scan energy range, showing that the amount of polarization of produced Λ hyperons ranges from few percents to few permille, and decreases with collision energy. We report on an extension of our existing calculation of global Λ polarization in UrQMD+vHLLE model to full RHIC and LHC energies, and discuss the component of polarization along the beam direction, which is the dominant one at high energies.

  9. MEASURED TRANSVERSE COUPLING IMPEDANCE OF RHIC INJECTION AND ABORT KICKERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAHN, H.; DAVINO, D.

    2001-01-01

    Concerns regarding possible transverse instabilities in RHIC and the SNS pointed to the need for measurements of the transverse coupling impedance of ring components. The impedance of the RHIC injection and abort kicker was measured using the conventional method based on the S 21 forward transmission coefficient. A commercial 450 Ω twin-wire Lecher line were used and the data was interpreted via the log-formula. All measurements, were performed in test stands fully representing operational conditions including pulsed power supplies and connecting cables. The measured values for the transverse coupling impedance in kick direction and perpendicular to it are comparable in magnitude, but differ from Handbook predictions

  10. Simulations of silicon vertex tracker for star experiment at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odyniec, G.; Cebra, D.; Christie, W.; Naudet, C.; Schroeder, L.; Wilson, W. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Liko, D. [Institut fur Hochenenergiephysik, Vienna, (Austria); Cramer, J.; Prindle, D.; Trainor, T. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States); Braithwaite, W. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The first computer simulations to optimize the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) designed for the STAR experiment at RHIC are presented. The physics goals and the expected complexity of the events at RHIC dictate the design of a tracking system for the STAR experiment. The proposed tracking system will consist of a silicon vertex tracker (SVT) to locate the primary interaction and secondary decay vertices and to improve the momentum resolution, and a time projection chamber (TPC), positioned inside a solenoidal magnet, for continuous tracking.

  11. Cold matter effects and quarkonium production at RHIC and LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dos Santos, G. S.; Mariotto, C. B. [Instituto de Matematica, Estatistica e Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Caixa Postal 474, CEP 96203-900, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Goncalves, V. P. [Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, CEP 96010-090, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    In this work we investigate two cold matter effects in J/{Psi} and {Upsilon} production in nuclear collisions at RHIC and LHC, namely the shadowing effect and nuclear absorption. We characterize these effects by estimating the rapidity dependence of some nuclear ratios in pA and AA collisions at RHIC and LHC, R{sub pA} = d{sigma}{sub pA}(J/{Psi},{Upsilon})/Ad{sigma}{sub pp}(J/{Psi},{Upsilon}) and R{sub AA} = d{sigma}{sub AA}(J/{Psi},{Upsilon})/A{sup 2}d{sigma}{sub pp}(J/{Psi},{Upsilon}).

  12. JEWEL predictions for Jet structure modifications at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Aditya; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Salur, Sevil

    2017-09-01

    RHIC is ideally suited to investigate transport and tomographic properties of the quark gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions using fully reconstructed jets as hard probes. In this poster, we present predictions for inclusive di-jet and jet structure observables sensitive to jet-medium interactions. This is accomplished by harnessing JEWEL, a Monte Carlo event generator for heavy ion collisions with its updated medium recoil information. With JEWEL's successful record of predictions at the LHC, studying its performance at RHIC energies can precipitate an improved understanding of the jet quenching phenomena.

  13. Beam-beam collisions and crossing angles in RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggs, S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper evaluates the strength of head on and parasitic beam-beam collisions in RHIC when the crossing angle is zero. A non-zero crossing angle is not required in normal operation with 120 bunches, thanks to the early separation of the two beams. The RHIC lattice is shown to easily accommodate even conservatively large crossing angles, for example in beam dynamics studies, or in future operational upgrades to as many as 360 bunches per ring. A modest loss in luminosity is incurred when gold ions collide at an angle after 10 hours of storage

  14. Overview of magnetic nonlinear beam dynamics in the RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo,Y.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Bengtsson, J.; Calaga, R.; Fischer, W.; Jain, A.; Pilat, f.; Ptitsyn, V.; Malitsky, N.; Robert-Demolaize, g.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tomas, R.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-05-04

    In this article we review our studies of nonlinear beam dynamics due to the nonlinear magnetic field errors in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Nonlinear magnetic field errors, including magnetic field errors in interaction regions (IRs), chromatic sextupoles, and sextupole components from arc main dipoles are discussed. Their effects on beam dynamics and beam dynamic aperture are evaluated. The online methods to measure and correct the IR nonlinear field errors, second order chromaticities, and horizontal third order resonance are presented. The overall strategy for nonlinear corrections in RHIC is discussed.

  15. BNL workshop on rare K decays and CP violation, August 25-27, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: rare and forbidden K decays; CP violation in the K system; the status of current experiments at BNL, CERN, FNAL, and KEK; and future experiments and facilities

  16. The chromatic correction in RHIC [Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Dell, G.F.; Hahn, H.; Parzen, G.

    1987-01-01

    The scheme for the correction of chromatic effects in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL is discussed. This scheme uses six families of sextupoles excited by four independent power supplies, and provides adequate control of linear and quadratic terms in the tune vs momentum dependence and reduces the variation of the betatron amplitude, vs momentum

  17. Hydrodynamic modelling for relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    antibaryon (B− ¯B) annihilations in the hadronic evolution play important roles for the baryon yields, reducing the ..... namic (MUSIC) simulations have nicely described the integrated and differential vn data with (η/s)RHIC = 0.12 for 200 ... MUSIC with (η/s)LHC = 0.2 for the selected centrality bins [6,32]. Although these calcu-.

  18. Nucleus–nucleus collisions at RHIC: A review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. November 2006 physics pp. 899–914. Nucleus–nucleus collisions at RHIC: A review. JEAN-YVES OLLITRAULT. Service de Physique Théorique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, .... advantage of the fact that the density of partons at small Bjorken x is high, ... Kostyuk et. al hep-ph/0305277 (SCM).

  19. A summary of studies of particle stability at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzen, G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes some studies of particle stability done at RHIC. The topics reported on include: Long-term tracking and the dynamic aperture; linear coupling effects and their correction; and tune spreads in the beam due to field multipoles in the magnets and their correction

  20. Jet quenching in QCD matter: from RHIC to LHC

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David

    2009-01-01

    The current experimental and theoretical status of hadron and jet production at large transverse momentum in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions is summarised. The most important RHIC results are compared to theoretical parton energy loss predictions providing direct information on the (thermo)dynamical properties of hot and dense QCD matter. Prospects for the LHC are also outlined.

  1. STAR results from the first year at RHIC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thomas S Ullrich

    Abstract. An overview of the latest results from the STAR experiment at RHIC is presented. Pre- liminary measurements of π K p Λ and Ξ, plus their respective anti-particles at pt. 2 GeV/c, where the majority of particle production occurs, allow us to probe the soft processes whilst the harder per- turbative regime can be ...

  2. Helical dipole magnets for polarized protons in RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syphers, M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.

    1997-01-01

    Superconducting helical dipole magnets will be used in the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to maintain polarization of proton beams and to perform localized spin rotations at the two major experimental detector regions. Requirements for the helical dipole system are discussed, and magnet prototype work is reported

  3. Observation of helium flow induced beam orbit oscillations at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montag, C.; Bonati, R.; Brennan, J.M.; Butler, J.; Cameron, P.; Ganetis, G.; He, P.; Hirzel, W.; Jia, L.X.; Koello, P.; Louie, W.; McIntyre, G.; Nicoletti, A.; Rank, J.; Roser, T.; Satogata, T.; Schmalzle, J.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Sondericker, J.; Tallerico, T.

    2006-01-01

    Horizontal beam orbit jitter at frequencies around 10 Hz has been observed at RHIC for several years. The distinct frequencies of this jitter have been found at superconducting low-beta quadrupole triplet magnets around the ring, where they coincide with mechanical vibration modes of the cold masses. Recently, we have identified liquid helium flow as the driving force of these oscillations

  4. Hydrodynamic modelling for relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    progress on hydrodynamic modelling, investigation on the flow data and the extraction of the QGP shear viscosity in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. 2. Hydrodynamic modelling – a short introduction. 2.1 Viscous hydrodynamics. Relativistic hydrodynamics is a macroscopic tool to simulate the QGP fireball ...

  5. Nucleus–nucleus collisions at RHIC: A review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    based on a consensus interpretation of experimental data by the four large detector groups, BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS and STAR [1]. In this talk, selected highlights from the RHIC programme are presented, with special emphasis on the most recent results, and on the developments which led to the press release.

  6. Jet Tomography versus Holography at RHIC and LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrieri G.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We compare pQCD based jet tomography to AdS/CFT based jet holography approach to address the heavy quark jet puzzle and discuss future tests at RHIC and LHC that could help decide which paradigm can provide the most consistent quantitative theory to explain modification of jet observabkles in high energy nuclear collisions.

  7. HIGH-CURRENT ERL-BASED ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEN-ZVI, I.

    2005-09-18

    The design of an electron cooler must take into account both electron beam dynamics issues as well as the electron cooling physics. Research towards high-energy electron cooling of RHIC is in its 3rd year at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The luminosity upgrade of RHIC calls for electron cooling of various stored ion beams, such as 100 GeV/A gold ions at collision energies. The necessary electron energy of 54 MeV is clearly out of reach for DC accelerator system of any kind. The high energy also necessitates a bunched beam, with a high electron bunch charge, low emittance and small energy spread. The Collider-Accelerator Department adopted the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) for generating the high-current, high-energy and high-quality electron beam. The RHIC electron cooler ERL will use four Superconducting RF (SRF) 5-cell cavities, designed to operate at ampere-class average currents with high bunch charges. The electron source will be a superconducting, 705.75 MHz laser-photocathode RF gun, followed up by a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). An R&D ERL is under construction to demonstrate the ERL at the unprecedented average current of 0.5 amperes. Beam dynamics performance and luminosity enhancement are described for the case of magnetized and non-magnetized electron cooling of RHIC.

  8. The AGS accelerator complex with the new fast extraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, M.; Bleser, E.J.; Glenn, J.W.; Lee, Y.Y.; Soukas, A.

    1995-01-01

    The delivery of a beam with characteristics appropriate for the g-2 muon storage ring and the filling of the RHIC heavy ion collider from the AGS main ring requires a new fast extracted beam (FEB) system. The new FEB system will be capable of performing both one-turn fast extraction and single bunch multiple extraction of either a heavy ion beam or a high intensity proton beam at a rate of 30 Hz up to 12 times per AGS cycle. The new system consists of a fast multi-pulsing kicker and an ejector septum magnet with local extraction orbit bumps

  9. Progress in BNL High-Temperature Hydrogen Combustion Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.; Curtiss, J.; Economos, C.; Jahelka, J.; Sato, K.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of the BNL High-Temperature Hydrogen Combustion Research Program are discussed. The experimental facilities are described and two sets of preliminary experiments are presented. Chemical reaction time experiments have been performed to determine the length of time reactive mixtures of interest can be kept at temperature before reaction in the absence of ignition sources consumes the reactants. Preliminary observations are presented for temperatures in the range 588K--700K. Detonation experiments are described in which detonation cell width is measured as a measure of mixture sensitivity to detonation. Preliminary experiments are described which are being carried out to establish data reproducibility with previous measurements in the literature and to test out and refine experimental methods. Intensive studies of hydrogen combustion phenomena were carried out during the 1980s. Much of this effort was driven by issues related to nuclear reactor safety. The ''high-speed'' combustion phenomena of flame acceleration, deflagration-to-detonation transition, direct initiation of detonation, detonation propagation, limits of detonation in tubes and channels, transmission of detonations from confined to unconfined geometry and other related phenomena were studied using a variety of gaseous fuel-oxidant systems, including hydrogen-steam-air systems of interest in reactor safety studies. Several reviews are available which document this work [Lee, 1989; Berman, 1986

  10. Progress in BNL High-Temperature Hydrogen Combustion Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.; Curtiss, J.; Economos, C.; Jahelka, J.; Sato, K.

    1992-12-31

    The objectives of the BNL High-Temperature Hydrogen Combustion Research Program are discussed. The experimental facilities are described and two sets of preliminary experiments are presented. Chemical reaction time experiments have been performed to determine the length of time reactive mixtures of interest can be kept at temperature before reaction in the absence of ignition sources consumes the reactants. Preliminary observations are presented for temperatures in the range 588K--700K. Detonation experiments are described in which detonation cell width is measured as a measure of mixture sensitivity to detonation. Preliminary experiments are described which are being carried out to establish data reproducibility with previous measurements in the literature and to test out and refine experimental methods. Intensive studies of hydrogen combustion phenomena were carried out during the 1980s. Much of this effort was driven by issues related to nuclear reactor safety. The ``high-speed`` combustion phenomena of flame acceleration, deflagration-to-detonation transition, direct initiation of detonation, detonation propagation, limits of detonation in tubes and channels, transmission of detonations from confined to unconfined geometry and other related phenomena were studied using a variety of gaseous fuel-oxidant systems, including hydrogen-steam-air systems of interest in reactor safety studies. Several reviews are available which document this work [Lee, 1989; Berman, 1986].

  11. Progress in BNL High-Temperature Hydrogen Combustion Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.; Curtiss, J.; Economos, C.; Jahelka, J.; Sato, K.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of the BNL High-Temperature Hydrogen Combustion Research Program are discussed. The experimental facilities are described and two sets of preliminary experiments are presented. Chemical reaction time experiments have been performed to determine the length of time reactive mixtures of interest can be kept at temperature before reaction in the absence of ignition sources consumes the reactants. Preliminary observations are presented for temperatures in the range 588K--700K. Detonation experiments are described in which detonation cell width is measured as a measure of mixture sensitivity to detonation. Preliminary experiments are described which are being carried out to establish data reproducibility with previous measurements in the literature and to test out and refine experimental methods. Intensive studies of hydrogen combustion phenomena were carried out during the 1980s. Much of this effort was driven by issues related to nuclear reactor safety. The high-speed'' combustion phenomena of flame acceleration, deflagration-to-detonation transition, direct initiation of detonation, detonation propagation, limits of detonation in tubes and channels, transmission of detonations from confined to unconfined geometry and other related phenomena were studied using a variety of gaseous fuel-oxidant systems, including hydrogen-steam-air systems of interest in reactor safety studies. Several reviews are available which document this work [Lee, 1989; Berman, 1986].

  12. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY

    1992-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users' facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high-power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high-gradient acceleration and state-of-the-art Free-Electron Lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps ND:YAG laser and a 500 mJ, 10 to 100 ps C0 2 laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various laser acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high-brightness electron beams. The ATF's experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the high-power laser will begin operation this year

  13. BWR stability analysis with the BNL Engineering Plant Analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1992-10-01

    March 9, 1989 instability at the LaSalle-2 Power Plant and more than ninety related BWR transients have been simulated on the BNL Engineering Plant Analyzer (EPA). Power peaks were found to be potentially seventeen times greater than the rated power, flow reversal occurs momentarily during large power oscillations, the fuel centerline temperature oscillates between 1,030 and 2,090 K, while the cladding temperature oscillates between 560 and 570 K. The Suppression Pool reaches its specified temperature limit either never or in as little as 4.3 minutes, depending on operator actions and transient scenario. Thermohydraulic oscillations occur at low core coolant flow (both Recirculation Pumps tripped), with sharp axial or redial fission power peaking and with partial loss of feedwater preheating while the feedwater is flow kept high to maintain coolant inventory in the vessel. Effects from BOP system were shown to influence reactor stability strongly through dosed-loop resonance feedback. High feedwater flow and low temperature destabilize the reactor. Low feedwater flow restabilizes the reactor, because of steam condensation and feedwater preheating in the downcomer, which reduces effectively the destabilizing core inlet subcooling. The EPA has been found to be capable of analyzing BWR stability '' shown to be effective for scoping calculations and for supporting accident management

  14. First Results from the DUV-FEL Upgrade at BNL

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xijie; Murphy, James; Pinayev, Igor; Rakowsky, George; Rose, James; Shaftan, Timur; Sheehy, Brian; Skaritka, John; Wu, Zilu; Yu Li Hua

    2005-01-01

    The DUV-FEL at BNL is the world’s only facility dedicated to laser-seeded FEL R&D and its applications. Tremendous progress was made in both HGHG FEL and its applications in the last couple years.*,** In response to the requests of many users to study chemical science at the facility, the DUV-FEL linac was upgraded from 200 to 300 MeV to enable the HGHG FEL to produce 100 uJ pulses of 100 nm light. This will establish the DUV FEL as a premier user facility for ultraviolet radiation and enable state-of-the-art gas phase photochemistry research. The upgraded facility will also make possible key R&D experiments such as higher harmonic HGHG (n>5) that would lay the groundwork for future X-ray FEL based on HGHG. The upgraded HGHG FEL will operate at the 4th harmonic with the seed laser at either 800 nm or 400nm. The increase of the electron beam energy will be accomplished by installing a 5th linac cavity and two 45 MW klystrons. New HGHG modulator and dispersion sections vacuum chambers w...

  15. BNL severe accident sequence experiments and analysis program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.; Ginsberg, T.; Tutu, N.K.

    1985-01-01

    Analyses of LWR degraded core accidents require mathematical characterization of two major sources of pressure and temperature loading on the reactor containment buildings: (1) steam generation from core debris-water thermal interactions and (2) molten core-concrete interactions. Experiments are in progress at BNL in support of analytical model development related to aspects of the above containment loading mechanisms. The work supports development and evaluation of the CORCON, MARCH, CONTAIN and MEDICI computer under development at other NRC-contractor laboratories. The thermal-hydraulic behavior of hot debris located within the reactor core region upon sudden introduction of cooling water is being investigated in a joint experimental and analytical program. This work supports development and evaluation of the SCDAP computer code being developed at EG and G to characterize in-vessel severe core damage accident sequences. Progress is described in the two areas of: 1) core debris thermal-hydraulic phenomenology and 2) heat transfer in core-concrete interactions

  16. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY

    1991-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users' facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high gradient acceleration and state of the art free electron lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 to 100 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps Nd:YAG laser and a 100 mJ, 10 ps CO 2 laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high brightness electron beams. The AFT's experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the High power laser will begin operation this year. 28 refs., 4 figs

  17. A model of polarized-beam AGS in the ray-tracing code Zgoubi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ahrens, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brown, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dutheil, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Glenn, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roser, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Shoefer, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-07-12

    A model of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, based on the AGS snapramps, has been developed in the stepwise ray-tracing code Zgoubi. It has been used over the past 5 years in a number of accelerator studies aimed at enhancing RHIC proton beam polarization. It is also used to study and optimize proton and Helion beam polarization in view of future RHIC and eRHIC programs. The AGS model in Zgoubi is operational on-line via three different applications, ’ZgoubiFromSnaprampCmd’, ’AgsZgoubiModel’ and ’AgsModelViewer’, with the latter two essentially interfaces to the former which is the actual model ’engine’. All three commands are available from the controls system application launcher in the AGS ’StartUp’ menu, or from eponymous commands on shell terminals. Main aspects of the model and of its operation are presented in this technical note, brief excerpts from various studies performed so far are given for illustration, means and methods entering in ZgoubiFromSnaprampCmd are developed further in appendix.

  18. OVERVIEW OF THE RHIC INSERTION REGION, SEXTUPOLE, AND SNAKE POWER SUPPLY SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRUNO, D.; ENG, W.; GANETIS, G.; LAMBIASE, R.F.; SANDBERG, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was commissioned in 1999 and 2000. RHIC requires power supplies to supply currents to highly inductive superconducting magnets. The RHIC Insertion Region (IR) contains many shunt power supplies to trim the current of different magnet elements in a large superconducting magnet circuit. There are a total of 237 Insertion Region power supplies in both RHIC rings. RHIC also requires sextupole power supplies. One sextupole power supply is connected across 12 sextupole magnets. There are a total of 24 sextupole power supplies in both rings. Snake magnets are also a part of the RHIC ring, and these snake magnets also require power supplies. There shall be a total of 24 snake power supplies in both rings. Power supply technology, connections, control systems and interfacing with the Quench Protection System will be presented

  19. RHIC BEAM ABORT KICKER POWER SUPPLY SYSTEM COMMISSIONING EXPERIENCE AND REMAINING ISSUES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZHANG, W.; AHRENS, L.A.; MI, J.; OERTER, B.; SANDERS, R.; SANDBERG, J.

    2001-01-01

    The RHIC Beam Abort Kicker Power Supply Systems commissioning experience and the remaining issues will be reported in this paper. The RHIC Blue Ring Beam Abort Kicker Power Supply System initial commissioning took place in June 1999. Its identical system in Yellow Ring was brought on line during Spring 2000. Each of the RHIC Beam Abort Kicker Power Supply Systems consists of five high voltage modulators and subsystems. These systems are critical devices for RHIC machine protection and environmental protection. They are required to be effective, reliable and operating with sufficient redundancy to safely abort the beam to its beam dump at the end of accumulation or at any time when they are commanded. To deflect 66 GeV ion beam to the beam absorbers, the RHIC Beam Abort Kicker Power Supply Systems were operated at 22 kV level. The RHIC 2000 commissioning run was very successful

  20. Reduction of beta* and increase of luminosity at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilat, F.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-01-01

    The reduction of β* beyond the 1m design value at RHIC has been consistently achieved over the last 6 years of RHIC operations, resulting in an increase of luminosity for different running modes and species. During the recent 2007-08 deuteron-gold run the reduction to 0.70 from the design 1m achieved a 30% increase in delivered luminosity. The key ingredients allowing the reduction have been the capability of efficiently developing ramps with tune and coupling feedback, orbit corrections on the ramp, and collimation, to minimize beam losses in the final focus triplets, the main aperture limitations for the collision optics. We will describe the operational strategy used to reduce the β*, at first squeezing the beam at store, to test feasibility, followed by the operationally preferred option of squeezing the beam during acceleration, and the resulting luminosity increase. We will conclude with future plans for the beta squeeze

  1. Upgrade of RHIC Vacuum Systems for High Luminosity Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Smart, Loralie; Todd, Robert J; Weiss, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    With increasing ion beam intensity during recent RHIC operations, pressure rises of several decades were observed at most room temperature sections and at a few cold sections. The pressure rises are associated with electron multi-pacting, electron stimulated desorption and beam ion induced desorption and have been one of the major intensity and luminosity limiting factors for RHIC. Improvement of the warm sections has been carried out in the last few years. Extensive in-situ bakes, additional UHV pumping, anti-grazing ridges and beam tube solenoids have been implemented. Several hundred meters of NEG coated beam pipes have been installed and activated. Vacuum monitoring and interlock were enhanced to reduce premature beam aborts. Preliminary measures, such as pumping before cool down to reduce monolayer condensates, were also taken to suppress the pressure rises in the cold sections. The effectiveness of these measures in reducing the pressure rises during machine studies and during physics runs are discussed...

  2. How can the odderon be detected at RHIC and LHC?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, R.F.; Gauron, P.; Nicolescu, B. [CNRS, Paris (France); Pierre et Marie Curie Univ., Paris (FR). Lab. de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies (LPNHE)

    2007-01-15

    The odderon remains an elusive object, 33 years after its invention. The odderon is now a fundamental object in QCD and it has to be found experimentally if QCD is right. In the present paper, we show how to find it at RHIC and LHC. The most spectacular signature of the odderon is the predicted difference between the differential cross-sections for proton-proton and antiproton-proton at high s and moderate t. This experiment can be done by using the STAR detector at RHIC and by combining these future data with the already present UA4/2 data. The odderon could also be found by the ATLAS experiment at LHC by performing a high-precision measurement of the real part of the hadron elastic scattering amplitude at small t. (orig.)

  3. Terascale Beam-Beam Simulations for Tevatron, RHIC and LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, J.

    2005-05-16

    In this paper, we report on recent advances in terascale simulations of the beam-beam interaction in Tevatron, RHIC and LHC.Computational methods for self consistent calculation of beam-beam forces are reviewed. New method for solving the two-dimensional Poisson equation with open boundary conditions is proposed and tested. This new spectral-finite difference method is a factor of four faster than the widely used FFT based Green function method for beam-beam interaction on axis. We also present applications to the study of antiproton losses during the injection stage at Tevatron, to the study of multiple bunch coherent beam-beam modes at RHIC, and to the study of beam-beam driven emittance growth at LHC.

  4. Terascale Beam-Beam Simulations for Tevatron, RHIC and LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang, J.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we report on recent advances in terascale simulations of the beam-beam interaction in Tevatron, RHIC and LHC.Computational methods for self consistent calculation of beam-beam forces are reviewed. New method for solving the two-dimensional Poisson equation with open boundary conditions is proposed and tested. This new spectral-finite difference method is a factor of four faster than the widely used FFT based Green function method for beam-beam interaction on axis. We also present applications to the study of antiproton losses during the injection stage at Tevatron, to the study of multiple bunch coherent beam-beam modes at RHIC, and to the study of beam-beam driven emittance growth at LHC

  5. Electromagnetic radiation from nuclear collisions at RHIC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Turbide, Simon; Frodermann, Evan; Heinz, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    The hot and dense strongly interacting matter created in collisions of heavy nuclei at RHIC energies is modeled with relativistic hydrodynamics, and the spectra of real and virtual photons produced at mid-rapidity in these events are calculated. Several different sources are considered, and their relative importance is compared. Specifically, we include jet fragmentation, jet-plasma interactions, the emission of radiation from the thermal medium and from primordial hard collisions. Our calculations consistently take into account jet energy loss, as evaluated in the AMY formalism. We obtain results for the spectra, the nuclear modification factor (R_AA), and the azimuthal anisotropy (v_2) that agree with the photon measurements performed by the PHENIX collaboration at RHIC.

  6. ADVANCEMENT OF THE RHIC BEAM ABORT KICKER SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZHANG, W.; AHRENS, L.; MI, J.; OERTER, B.; SANDBERG, J.; WARBURTON, D.

    2003-01-01

    As one of the most critical system for RHIC operation, the beam abort kicker system has to be highly available, reliable, and stable for the entire operating range. Along with the RHIC commission and operation, consistent efforts have been spend to cope with immediate issues as well as inherited design issues. Major design changes have been implemented to achieve the higher operating voltage, longer high voltage hold-off time, fast retriggering and redundant triggering, and improved system protection, etc. Recent system test has demonstrated for the first time that both blue ring and yellow ring beam abort systems have achieved more than 24 hours hold off time at desired operating voltage. In this paper, we report break down, thyratron reverse arcing, and to build a fast re-trigger system to reduce beam spreading in event of premature discharge

  7. High-pT hadron spectra at RHIC: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klay, Jennifer L

    2005-01-01

    Recent results on high transverse momentum (p T ) hadron production in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at the relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC) are reviewed. Comparison of the nuclear modification factors, R dAu (p T ) and R AA (p T ), demonstrates that the large suppression in central Au+Au collisions is due to strong final-state effects. Theoretical models which incorporate jet quenching via gluon bremsstrahlung in the dense partonic medium that is expected in central Au+Au collisions at ultra-relativistic energies are shown to reproduce the shape and magnitude of the observed suppression over the range of collision energies so far studied at RHIC

  8. Beta* and beta-waist measurement and control at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptitsyn,V.; Della Penna, A.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Malitsky, N.; Satogata, T.

    2009-05-04

    During the course of last RHIC runs the beta-functions at the collision points ({beta}*) have been reduced gradually to 0.7m. In order to maximize the collision luminosity and ensure the agreement of the actual machine optics with the design one, more precise measurements and control of {beta}* value and {beta}-waist location became necessary. The paper presents the results of the implementation of the technique applied in last two RHIC runs. The technique is based on well-known relation between the tune shift and the beta function and involves precise betatron tune measurements using BBQ system as well as specially developed knobs for {beta}-waist location control.

  9. Beta* and beta-waist measurement and control at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ptitsyn, V.; Della Penna, A.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Malitsky, N.; Satogata, T.

    2009-01-01

    During the course of last RHIC runs the beta-functions at the collision points (β*) have been reduced gradually to 0.7m. In order to maximize the collision luminosity and ensure the agreement of the actual machine optics with the design one, more precise measurements and control of β* value and β-waist location became necessary. The paper presents the results of the implementation of the technique applied in last two RHIC runs. The technique is based on well-known relation between the tune shift and the beta function and involves precise betatron tune measurements using BBQ system as well as specially developed knobs for β-waist location control

  10. Intra-beam Scattering Theory and RHIC Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Malitsky, N.; Parzen, G.; Qiang, J.

    2005-01-01

    Intra-beam scattering is the leading mechanism limiting the luminosity in heavy-ion storage rings like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The multiple Coulomb scattering among the charged particles causes transverse emittance growth and longitudinal beam de-bunching and beam loss, compromising machine performance during collision. Theoretically, the original theories developed by Piwinski, Bjorken, and Mtingwa only describe the rms beam size growth of an unbounded Gaussian distribution. Equations based on the Fokker-Planck approach are developed to further describe the beam density profile evolution and beam loss. During the 2004 RHIC heavy-ion operation, dedicated IBS experiments were performed to bench-mark the rms beam size growth, beam loss, and profile evolution both for a Gaussian-like and a longitudinal hollow beam. This paper summarizes the IBS theory and discusses the experimental bench-marking results

  11. Reduction of beta* and increase of luminosity at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat,F.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-05-04

    The reduction of {beta}* beyond the 1m design value at RHIC has been consistently achieved over the last 6 years of RHIC operations, resulting in an increase of luminosity for different running modes and species. During the recent 2007-08 deuteron-gold run the reduction to 0.70 from the design 1m achieved a 30% increase in delivered luminosity. The key ingredients allowing the reduction have been the capability of efficiently developing ramps with tune and coupling feedback, orbit corrections on the ramp, and collimation, to minimize beam losses in the final focus triplets, the main aperture limitations for the collision optics. We will describe the operational strategy used to reduce the {beta}*, at first squeezing the beam at store, to test feasibility, followed by the operationally preferred option of squeezing the beam during acceleration, and the resulting luminosity increase. We will conclude with future plans for the beta squeeze.

  12. Net-proton measurements at RHIC and the quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The net-proton dv1/dy is expected to provide contribution from protons associated with baryon number transport. Assuming antiproton directed flow as a proxy for the directed ... from Au+Au and p+p collisions at RHIC [22]. Plus, open squares and filled circles are for the efficiency-corrected results of 70–80% p+p and 0–5% ...

  13. QCD Predictions for Charm and Bottom Production at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cacciari, Matteo; Nason, Paolo; Vogt, Ramona

    2005-09-01

    We make up-to-date QCD predictions for open charm and bottom production at RHIC in nucleon-nucleon collisions at {radical}S = 200 GeV. We also calculate the electron spectrum resulting from heavy flavor decays to allow direct comparison to the data. A rigorous benchmark, including the theoretical uncertainties, is established against which nuclear collision data can be compared to obtain evidence for nuclear effects.

  14. RHIC susceptibility to variations in systematic magnetic harmonic errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell, G.F.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Wei, J.

    1994-01-01

    Results of a study to determine the sensitivity of tune to uncertainties of the systematic magnetic harmonic errors in the 8 cm dipoles of RHIC are reported. Tolerances specified to the manufacturer for tooling and fabrication can result in systematic harmonics different from the expected values. Limits on the range of systematic harmonics have been established from magnet calculations, and the impact on tune from such harmonics has been established

  15. NON-LINEAR MODELING OF THE RHIC INTERACTION REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TOMAS, R.; FISCHER, W.; JAIN, A.; LUO, Y.; PILAT, F.

    2004-01-01

    For RHIC's collision lattices the dominant sources of transverse non-linearities are located in the interaction regions. The field quality is available for most of the magnets in the interaction regions from the magnetic measurements, or from extrapolations of these measurements. We discuss the implementation of these measurements in the MADX models of the Blue and the Yellow rings and their impact on beam stability

  16. Dynamic performance of the RHIC acceleration RF system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirki, Werner [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-04-01

    The RHIC accelerating rf system operates at 26.7 MHz and has to provide as its name suggests the power and agility to accelerate the beams from injection up to the end energy and to hand them off to the storage rf system. This note discusses methods to simulate the dynamic behavior of the accelerating cavity system and gives results for the amplitude and phase transient in response to fast changes of the reference signal.

  17. Frequency choice of eRHIC SRF linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roser, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ptitsyn, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-01-05

    eRHIC is a FFAG lattice-based multipass ERL. The eRHIC SRF linac has been decided to change from 422 MHz 5-cell cavity to 647 MHz 5-cell cavity. There are several considerations affecting the frequency choice for a high-current multipass-ERL: the beam structure, bunch length, energy spread, beam-break-up (BBU) threshold, SRF loss considerations. Beyond the physics considerations, cost and complexity or risk is an important consideration for the frequency choice, especially when we are designing a machine to be built in a few years. Although there are some benefits of using a 422 MHz cavity for eRHIC ERL, however, there are some very critical drawbacks, including lack of facilities to fabricate a 422 MHz 5-cell cavity, very few facilities to process such a cavity and no existing facility to test the cavity anywhere. As the cavity size is big and its weight is large, it is difficult to handle it during fabrication, processing and testing, and no one has experience in this area. As the cavity size is large, the cryomodule becomes big as well. All of these considerations drive the risk of building eRHIC ERL with 422 MHz cavities to a very high level. Therefore, a decision was made to change the frequency of main linac to be 647 MHz 5-cell cavities. This note will compare these two linacs: 422MHz 5-cell cavity linac and 647Mz 5-cell cavity SRF linac, from both practical point of view and physics point of view.

  18. Monolithic circuit development for RHIC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alley, G.T.; Britton, C.L. Jr.; Kennedy, E.J.; Newport, D.F.; Wintenberg, A.L.; Young, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The work performed for RHIC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory during FY 91 is presented in this paper. The work includes preamplifier, analog memory, and analog-digital converter development for Dimuon Pad Readout, and evaluation and development of preamplifier-shapers for silicon strip readout. The approaches for implementation are considered as well as measured data for the various circuits that have been developed.

  19. FITTING HELICAL SNAKE AND ROTATOR FIELD STRENGTH MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RANJBAR, V.; LUCCIO, A.U.; MACKAY, W.W.; TSOUPAS, N.

    2001-01-01

    We examined recent multi-pole measurements for the helical snakes and rotators in RHIC to generate a full field map. Since multi-pole measurements yield real field values for B, field components we developed a unique technique to evaluate the full fields using a traditional finite element analysis software [1]. From these measurements we employed SNIG [2] to generate orbit and Spin plots. From orbit values we generated a transfer matrix for the first snake

  20. Open Heavy Flavor and Quarkonia Results at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouicer, Rachid

    2017-12-01

    RHIC experiments carry out a comprehensive physics program which studies open heavy flavor and quarkonium production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The discovery at RHIC of large high-pT suppression and flow of electrons from heavy quarks flavors have altered our view of the hot and dense matter formed in central Au + Au collisions at GeV. These results suggest a large energy loss and flow of heavy quarks in the hot, dense matter. In recent years, the RHIC experiments upgraded the detectors; (1) PHENIX Collaboration installed silicon vertex tracker (VTX) at mid-rapidity region and forward silicon vertex tracker (FVTX) at the forward rapidity region, and (2) STAR Collaboration installed the heavy flavor tracker (HFT) and the muon telescope detector (MTD) both at the mid-rapidity region. With these new upgrades, both experiments have collected large data samples. These new detectors enhance the capability of heavy flavor measurements via precision tracking. The PHENIX experiments established measurements of ψ(1S) and ψ(2S) production as a function of system size, p + p, p + Al, p + Au, and 3He + Au collisions at GeV. In p/3He + A collisions at forward rapidity, we observe no difference in the ψ(2S)/ψ(1S) ratio relative to p + p collisions. At backward rapidity, where the comoving particle density is higher, we find that the ψ(2S) is preferentially suppressed by a factor of two. STAR Collaboration presents the first J/ψ and ϒ measurements in the di-muon decay channel in Au + Au collisions at GeV at mid-rapidity at RHIC. We observe clear J/ψ RAA suppression and qualitatively well described by transport models simultaneously accounting for dissociation and regeneration processes.

  1. Net-proton measurements at RHIC and the quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-10-17

    Oct 17, 2014 ... Two measurements related to the proton and antiproton production near midrapidity in s N N = 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are discussed. At intermediate impact parameters, the net-proton midrapidity d v 1 ...

  2. Open Heavy Flavor and Quarkonia Results at RHIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouicer Rachid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available RHIC experiments carry out a comprehensive physics program which studies open heavy flavor and quarkonium production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The discovery at RHIC of large high-pT suppression and flow of electrons from heavy quarks flavors have altered our view of the hot and dense matter formed in central Au + Au collisions at SNN=200 GeV. These results suggest a large energy loss and flow of heavy quarks in the hot, dense matter. In recent years, the RHIC experiments upgraded the detectors; (1 PHENIX Collaboration installed silicon vertex tracker (VTX at mid-rapidity region and forward silicon vertex tracker (FVTX at the forward rapidity region, and (2 STAR Collaboration installed the heavy flavor tracker (HFT and the muon telescope detector (MTD both at the mid-rapidity region. With these new upgrades, both experiments have collected large data samples. These new detectors enhance the capability of heavy flavor measurements via precision tracking. The PHENIX experiments established measurements of ψ(1S and ψ(2S production as a function of system size, p + p, p + Al, p + Au, and 3He + Au collisions at SNN=200 GeV. In p/3He + A collisions at forward rapidity, we observe no difference in the ψ(2S/ψ(1S ratio relative to p + p collisions. At backward rapidity, where the comoving particle density is higher, we find that the ψ(2S is preferentially suppressed by a factor of two. STAR Collaboration presents the first J/ψ and ϒ measurements in the di-muon decay channel in Au + Au collisions at SNN=200 GeV at mid-rapidity at RHIC. We observe clear J/ψ RAA suppression and qualitatively well described by transport models simultaneously accounting for dissociation and regeneration processes.

  3. The BRAHMS experiment at RHIC goals and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videbaek, F.

    1998-01-01

    The BRAHMS experiment is designed to measure semi-inclusive spectra of charged hadron over a wide range of rapidity. It will yield information on particle production, both at central rapidity and in the baryon rich fragmentation region. Examples of measures for soft as well as for hard physics are presented. The present status of BRAHMS is discussed, as well as the plans for measurements in the first year of running at RHIC

  4. NON-LINEAR MODELING OF THE RHIC INTERACTION REGIONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TOMAS,R.FISCHER,W.JAIN,A.LUO,Y.PILAT,F.

    2004-07-05

    For RHIC's collision lattices the dominant sources of transverse non-linearities are located in the interaction regions. The field quality is available for most of the magnets in the interaction regions from the magnetic measurements, or from extrapolations of these measurements. We discuss the implementation of these measurements in the MADX models of the Blue and the Yellow rings and their impact on beam stability.

  5. Quadrupole beam-based alignment in the RHIC interaction regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, J.; Satogata, T.

    2011-03-28

    Continued beam-based alignment (BBA) efforts have provided significant benefit to both heavy ion and polarized proton operations at RHIC. Recent studies demonstrated previously unknown systematic beam position monitor (BPM) offset errors and produced accurate measurements of individual BPM offsets in the experiment interaction regions. Here we describe the algorithm used to collect and analyze data during the 2010 and early 2011 RHIC runs and the results of these measurements. BBA data has been collected over the past two runs for all three of the active experimental IRs at RHIC, updating results from the 2005 run which were taken with incorrectly installed offsets. The technique was successfully applied to expose a systematic misuse of the BPM survey offsets in the control system. This is likely to benefit polarized proton operations as polarization transmission through acceleration ramps depends on RMS orbit control in the arcs, but a quantitative understanding of its impact is still under active investigation. Data taking is ongoing as are refinements to the BBA technique aimed at reducing systematic errors and properly accounting for dispersive effects. Further development may focus on non-triplet BPMs such as those located near snakes, or arc quadrupoles that do not have individually shunted power supplies (a prerequisite for the current method) and as such, will require a modified procedure.

  6. Recent RHIC in-situ coating technology developments

    CERN Document Server

    Hershcovitch, A.; Brennan, J.M.; Chawla, A.; Fischer, W.; Liaw, C-J; Meng, W.; Todd, R.; Custer, A.; Erickson, M.; Jamshidi, N.; Kobrin, P.; Laping, R.; Poole, H.J.; Jimenez, J.M.; Neupert, H.; Taborelli, M.; Yin-Vallgren, C.; Sochugov, N.

    2013-04-22

    To rectify the problems of electron clouds observed in RHIC and unacceptable ohmic heating for superconducting magnets that can limit future machine upgrades, we started developing a robotic plasma deposition technique for $in-situ$ coating of the RHIC 316LN stainless steel cold bore tubes based on staged magnetrons mounted on a mobile mole for deposition of Cu followed by amorphous carbon (a-C) coating. The Cu coating reduces wall resistivity, while a-C has low SEY that suppresses electron cloud formation. Recent RF resistivity computations indicate that 10 {\\mu}m of Cu coating thickness is needed. But, Cu coatings thicker than 2 {\\mu}m can have grain structures that might have lower SEY like gold black. A 15-cm Cu cathode magnetron was designed and fabricated, after which, 30 cm long samples of RHIC cold bore tubes were coated with various OFHC copper thicknesses; room temperature RF resistivity measured. Rectangular stainless steel and SS discs were Cu coated. SEY of rectangular samples were measured at ro...

  7. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP (VOL. 71)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KHARZEEV, D.; STASTO, A.; TUCHIN, K.; VOGELSANG, W.

    2005-03-07

    The high energy limit of Quantum Chromodynamics is one of the most fascinating areas in the theory of strong interactions. Over a decade ago the HERA experiment at DESY in Hamburg provided strong evidence for the rise of the proton structure function at small values of the Bjorken variable x. This behavior can be explained as an increase of the gluon density of the proton with energy or correspondingly with smaller values of x. This increase can be attributed on the other hand to the large probability of gluon splitting in QCD. The natural framework for describing the gluon dynamics at small x is the Balitskii-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov formalism developed some 30 years ago. It predicts that the gluon density grows very fast with increasing energy, as a power with a large intercept. This increase has to be tamed in order to satisfy the unitarily bound. Over two decades ago, Gribov, Levin and Ryskin proposed the mechanism called the parton saturation, which slows down the fast rise of the gluon density. This formalism accounts for an additional gluon recombination apart from the pure gluon splitting. It leads to the very interesting non-linear modification of the evolution equations for the gluon distributions. Since then, much progress has been made in the theoretical formulation of the parton saturation. Currently the most complete theory for parton saturation is the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) with the corresponding renormalization group functional evolution equation, the JIMWLK equation, which describes the nonlinear evolution of the gluon density at small values of x and in the regime where gluon fields are strong. The simpler form of the JIMWLK equation, the Balitskii-Kovchegov (BK) equation has been successfully used to explain the experimental data on proton structure function. The models, which include the parton saturation, have been applied to explain the experimental data at Tevatron and RHIC. In the latter case the Color Glass Condensate can be thought of as

  8. Electric dipole moment planning with a resurrected BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron electron analog ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talman, Richard M.; Talman, John D.

    2015-07-01

    There has been much recent interest in directly measuring the electric dipole moments (EDM) of the proton and the electron, because of their possible importance in the present day observed matter/antimatter imbalance in the Universe. Such a measurement will require storing a polarized beam of "frozen spin" particles, 15 MeV electrons or 230 MeV protons, in an all-electric storage ring. Only one such relativistic electric accelerator has ever been built—the 10 MeV "electron analog" ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1954; it can also be referred to as the "AGS analog" ring to make clear it was a prototype for the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) proton ring under construction at that time at BNL. (Its purpose was to investigate nonlinear resonances as well as passage through "transition" with the newly invented alternating gradient proton ring design.) By chance this electron ring, long since dismantled and its engineering drawings disappeared, would have been appropriate both for measuring the electron EDM and to serve as an inexpensive prototype for the arguably more promising, but 10 times more expensive, proton EDM measurement. Today it is cheaper yet to "resurrect" the electron analog ring by simulating its performance computationally. This is one purpose for the present paper. Most existing accelerator simulation codes cannot be used for this purpose because they implicitly assume magnetic bending. The new ual/eteapot code, described in detail in an accompanying paper, has been developed for modeling storage ring performance, including spin evolution, in electric rings. Illustrating its use, comparing its predictions with the old observations, and describing new expectations concerning spin evolution and code performance, are other goals of the paper. To set up some of these calculations has required a kind of "archeological physics" to reconstitute the detailed electron analog lattice design from a 1991 retrospective report by Plotkin as well

  9. Electric dipole moment planning with a resurrected BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron electron analog ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Talman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There has been much recent interest in directly measuring the electric dipole moments (EDM of the proton and the electron, because of their possible importance in the present day observed matter/antimatter imbalance in the Universe. Such a measurement will require storing a polarized beam of “frozen spin” particles, 15 MeV electrons or 230 MeV protons, in an all-electric storage ring. Only one such relativistic electric accelerator has ever been built—the 10 MeV “electron analog” ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1954; it can also be referred to as the “AGS analog” ring to make clear it was a prototype for the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS proton ring under construction at that time at BNL. (Its purpose was to investigate nonlinear resonances as well as passage through “transition” with the newly invented alternating gradient proton ring design. By chance this electron ring, long since dismantled and its engineering drawings disappeared, would have been appropriate both for measuring the electron EDM and to serve as an inexpensive prototype for the arguably more promising, but 10 times more expensive, proton EDM measurement. Today it is cheaper yet to “resurrect” the electron analog ring by simulating its performance computationally. This is one purpose for the present paper. Most existing accelerator simulation codes cannot be used for this purpose because they implicitly assume magnetic bending. The new ual/eteapot code, described in detail in an accompanying paper, has been developed for modeling storage ring performance, including spin evolution, in electric rings. Illustrating its use, comparing its predictions with the old observations, and describing new expectations concerning spin evolution and code performance, are other goals of the paper. To set up some of these calculations has required a kind of “archeological physics” to reconstitute the detailed electron analog lattice design from a

  10. Advances in BNL's polarized ion source development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi, J.; DeVito, B.; Herschcovitch, A.; Kponou, A.; Meitzler, C.

    1988-01-01

    Polarized protons have been accelerated in the AGS to 22/yield/ GeV. The polarized source presently used produces 30-40 ..mu..A of /rvec char/H/sup -/ at 75-80% polarization, in 500 ..mu..s pulses, 0.5 Hz. This is three orders of magnitude lower in intensity than normal H/sup -/ operation, and higher intensities are desired. There is a program in the AGS department to develop a higher intensity source. This is a ground state atomic beam source with an atomic beam cooled to 6 K, spin selection and focusing via a superconducting solenoid (shown) or a sextupole system, and an ionizer for /rvec char/H/sup -/ production based on the charge exchange of /rvec char/H/degree/ with D/sup -/. Work is in progress on all three components, and will be described in this paper. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Detectors for relativistic heavy-ion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun-Munzinger, P.; Cleland, W.; Young, G.R.

    1989-04-01

    We present in some detail an overview of the detectors currently used in relativistic heavy-ion research at the BNL AGS and the CERN SPS. Following that, a detailed list of RandD projects is given, including specific areas of work which need to be addressed in preparation for further experiments at the AGS and SPS for the upcoming experiments at RHIC

  12. Direct photon production in heavy-ion reactions at SPS and RHIC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gluon plasma (QGP), a potential new state of matter where colored quarks and gluons are no longer ..... gas. TOT. A=197 s. 1/2. =200 GeV. RHIC photons. Figure 8. Predictions for thermal and hard photon production at RHIC as discussed in the text compared to estimates of the background of inclusive photons from neutral.

  13. The BNL polarized H- ion source development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kponou, A.; Alessi, J.; Hershcovitch, A.; DeVito, B.

    1992-01-01

    Polarized protons have been available for acceleration in the AGS for the high energy physics program since 1984. The polarized H - source, PONI-1, has routinely supplied a 0.4 Hz, 400 μsec pulse having a nominal intensity of 40 μA. Polarization is ∼80% out of the ion source. After PONI- 1 became operational, a program was initiated to develop a more intense source based on a cold ground state atomic beam source, followed by ionization of the polarized H degrees beam by D - charge exchange. Various phases of this work have been fully reported elsewhere, and only a summary is given here

  14. Comparison of the Window-Frame RHIC-abort kicker with C-type Kicker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoupas, N.; McMahan, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    The high intensity proton bunches (~2.5x10 11 p/bunch ) circulating in RHIC increase the temperature of the ferrite-made RHIC-abort-kickers above the Curie point; as a result, the kickers cannot provide the required field to abort the beam at the beam dump. A team of experts in the CAD department worked on modifying the design of the window-frame RHIC-abort kicker to minimize the hysteresis losses responsible for the increase of the ferrite's temperature. In this technical note we report some results from the study of two possible modifications of the window-frame RHIC-abort kicker, and we compare these results with those of a propose C-type RHIC-abort kicker. We also include an Appendix where we describe a method which may further reduce the hysteresis losses of the window-frame kicker.

  15. REALISTIC NON-LINEAR MODEL AND FIELD QUALITY ANALYSIS IN RHIC INTERACTION REGIONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEEBE-WANG,J.; JAIN, A.

    2007-06-25

    The existence of multipole components in the dipole and quadrupole magnets is one of the factors limiting the beam stability in the RHIC operations. So, a realistic non-linear model is crucial for understanding the beam behavior and to achieve the ultimate performance in RHIC. A procedure is developed to build a non-linear model using the available multipole component data obtained from measurements of RHIC magnets. We first discuss the measurements performed at different stages of manufacturing of the magnets in relation to their current state in RHIC. We then describe the procedure to implement these measurement data into tracking models, including the implementation of the multipole feed down effect due to the beam orbit offset from the magnet center. Finally, the field quality analysis in the RHIC interaction regions (IR) is presented.

  16. anti p and anti Λ production in Si+Au collisions at the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yuedong

    1996-01-01

    Anti p and anti Λ production in central Si + Au collisions has been measured by E589 at the BNL-AGS. Preliminary m perpendicular spectra are presented for anti p's and anti Λ's. The dn/dy distribution for anti p's is also presented. Based on the anti p and anti Λ measurements, anti Λ/anti p ratios are calculated in the rapidity range of 1.1-1.5

  17. Production of radioactivity in local soil at AGS [Alternating Gradient Synchrotron] fast neutrino beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollon, P.J.; Rohrig, N.; Hauptmann, M.G.; McIntyre, K.; Miltenberger, R.; Naidu, J.

    1989-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has constructed a new neutrino production target station at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). A study has been conducted in the vicinity of the old target area to determine the radiological consequences of operating this experimental facility. Results from all areas of the study are presented along with estimates of the potential environmental impact of the old and new facilities. 12 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Quarkonium production in relativistic nuclear collisions. Proceedings of Riken BNL Research Center Workshop,Volume 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharzeev, D.

    1999-01-01

    The RIKEN-BNL Workshop on Quarkonium Production in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions was held September 28--October 2, 1998, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Workshop brought together about 50 invited participants from around the world and a number of Brookhaven physicists from both particle and nuclear physics communities

  19. DT fusion neutron irradiation of ORNL magnesium oxide crystals and BNL--LASL superconductor wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLean, S.C.

    1978-01-01

    The DT fusion neutron irradiation of two ORNL magnesium oxide crystals and eleven BNL-LASL superconductor wires is described. The sample position and neutron dose record are given. The maximum neutron fluence on any sample was 2.16 x 10 16 neutrons/cm 2

  20. New result on K+ → π+ ν νbar from BNL E787

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redlinger, G.

    1999-01-01

    E787 at BNL has reported evidence for the rare decay K + → π + νbar ν, based on the observation of one candidate event. In this paper, we present the result of analyzing a new dataset of comparable sensitivity to the published result

  1. QUARKONIUM PRODUCTION IN RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KHARZEEV,D.

    1999-04-20

    The RIKEN-BNL Workshop on Quarkonium Production in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions was held September 28--October 2, 1998, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Workshop brought together about 50 invited participants from around the world and a number of Brookhaven physicists from both particle and nuclear physics communities.

  2. Multipacting-free quarter-wavelength choke joint design for BNL SRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Liaw, C. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tuozzolo, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Wang, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Weiss, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    The BNL SRF gun cavity operated well in CW mode up to 2 MV. However, its performance suffered due to multipacting in the quarter-wavelength choke joint. A new multipacting-free cathode stalk was designed and conditioned. This paper describes RF and thermal design of the new cathode stalk and its conditioning results.

  3. Open and hidden charm production at RHIC and LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R.

    2005-10-12

    We discuss aspects of open and hidden charm production in hadron-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. We first discuss the extraction of the total charm cross section in lower energy collisions and how it compares to next-to-leading order quantum chromodynamics calculations. We then describe calculations of the transverse momentum distributions and their agreement with the shape of the measured STAR transverse momentum distributions. We next explain how shadowing and moderate nuclear absorption can explain the PHENIX J/{psi} dAu/pp ratios.

  4. Design and test of the RHIC CMD10 abort kicker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Mi, J.; Meng, W.; Montag, C.; Pai, C.; Sandberg, J.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. E.; Zhang, W.

    2015-01-01

    In recent RHIC operational runs, planned and unplanned pre-fire triggered beam aborts have been observed that resulted in quenches of SC main ring magnets, indicating a weakened magnet kick strength due to beam-induced ferrite heating. An improvement program was initiated to reduce the longitudinal coupling impedance with changes to the ferrite material and the eddy-current strip geometry. Results of the impedance measurements and of magnet heating tests with CMD10 ferrite up to 190°C are reported. All 10 abort kickers in the tunnel have been modified and were provided with a cooling system for the RUN 15.

  5. Parton cascade description of nuclear collisions at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nara, Yasushi

    2000-01-01

    The baryon distribution is studied by using a parton cascade model which is based on pQCD incorporating hard partonic scattering and dynamical hadronization scheme. In order to study baryon distribution, baryonic cluster formation is newly implemented as well as hadronic higher resonance states from parton/beam cluster decay. The net baryon number and charged hadron distributions are calculated with different K-factors in which parameters are fixed by elementary pp-bar data at E c.m. =200 GeV. It is found that baryon stopping behavior at SPS and RHIC energies are not consequence of hard parton scattering but soft processes. (author)

  6. Energy Loss of Coasting Gold Ions and Deuterons in RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, N P; Brown, K; Burkhardt, H; Butler, J; Fischer, W; Harvey, M; Tepikian, S

    2008-01-01

    The total energy loss of coasting gold ion beams at two different energies and deuterons at one energy were measured at RHIC, corresponding to a gamma of 75.2, 107.4 and 108.7 respectively. We describe the experiment and observations and compare the measured total energy loss with expectations from ionization losses at the residual gas, the energy loss due to impedance and synchrotron radiation. We find that the measured energy losses are below what is expected from free space synchrotron radiation. We believe that this shows evidence for suppression of synchrotron radiation which is cut off at long wavelength by the presence of the conducting beam pipe.

  7. Analysis of failed ramps during the RHIC FY09 run

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-15

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a versatile accelerator that supports operation with polarized protons of up to 250 GeV and ions with up to 100 GeV/nucleon. During any running period, various operating scenarios with different particle species, beam energies or accelerator optics are commissioned. In this report the beam commissioning periods for establishing full energy beams (ramp development periods) from the FY09 run are summarized and, for the purpose of motivating further developments, we analyze the reasons for all failed ramps.

  8. arXiv Jet Production at RHIC and LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cunqueiro, Leticia

    Recent results on jet production in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and the LHC are discussed, with emphasis on inclusive jet yields and semi-inclusive hadron-triggered and vector boson-triggered recoil jet yields as well as their azimuthal angular correlations. I will also discuss the constraints that these observables impose on the opacity of the medium, the flavour dependence of energy loss, the interplay of perturbative and non perturbative effects and the change of the degrees of freedom of the medium with the resolution of the probe.

  9. BNL Building 650 lead decontamination and treatment feasibility study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.D.; Cowgill, M.G.; Milian, L.W.

    1995-10-01

    Lead has been used extensively at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for radiation shielding in numerous reactor, accelerator and other research programs. A large inventory of excess lead (estimated at 410,000 kg) in many shapes and sizes is currently being stored. Due to it's toxicity, lead and soluble lead compounds are considered hazardous waste by the Environmental Protection Agency. Through use at BNL, some of the lead has become radioactive, either by contamination of the surface or through activation by neutrons or deuterons. This study was conducted at BNL's Environmental and Waste Technology Center for the BNL Safety and Environmental Protection Division to evaluate feasibility of various treatment options for excess lead currently being stored. The objectives of this effort included investigating potential treatment methods by conducting a review of the literature, developing a means of screening lead waste to determine the radioactive characteristics, examining the feasibility of chemical and physical decontamination technologies, and demonstrating BNL polyethylene macro-encapsulation as a means of treating hazardous or mixed waste lead for disposal. A review and evaluation of the literature indicated that a number of physical and chemical methods are available for decontamination of lead. Many of these techniques have been applied for this purpose with varying degrees of success. Methods that apply mechanical techniques are more appropriate for lead bricks and sheet which contain large smooth surfaces amenable to physical abrasion. Lead wool, turnings, and small irregularly shaped pieces would be treated more effectively by chemical decontamination techniques. Either dry abrasion or wet chemical methods result in production of a secondary mixed waste stream that requires treatment prior to disposal

  10. OVERVIEW ON BNL ASSESSMENT OF SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODS FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED NPP STRUCTURES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    XU, J.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.; GRAVES, H.

    2007-01-01

    A study was performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under the sponsorship of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), to determine the applicability of established soil-structure interaction analysis methods and computer programs to deeply embedded and/or buried (DEB) nuclear power plant (NPP) structures. This paper provides an overview of the BNL study including a description and discussions of analyses performed to assess relative performance of various SSI analysis methods typically applied to NPP structures, as well as the importance of interface modeling for DEB structures. There are four main elements contained in the BNL study: (1) Review and evaluation of existing seismic design practice, (2) Assessment of simplified vs. detailed methods for SSI in-structure response spectrum analysis of DEB structures, (3) Assessment of methods for computing seismic induced earth pressures on DEB structures, and (4) Development of the criteria for benchmark problems which could be used for validating computer programs for computing seismic responses of DEB NPP structures. The BNL study concluded that the equivalent linear SSI methods, including both simplified and detailed approaches, can be extended to DEB structures and produce acceptable SSI response calculations, provided that the SSI response induced by the ground motion is very much within the linear regime or the non-linear effect is not anticipated to control the SSI response parameters. The BNL study also revealed that the response calculation is sensitive to the modeling assumptions made for the soil/structure interface and application of a particular material model for the soil

  11. Design and fabrication of the BNL radio frequency quadrupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie-Wilson, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory polarized H - injection program for the AGS will utilize a Radio Frequency Quadrupole for acceleration between the polarized source and the Alvarez Linac. Although operation will commence with a few μ amperes of H - current, it is anticipated that future polarized H - sources will have a considerably improved output. The RFQ will operate at 201.25 MHz and will be capable of handling a beam current of 0.02 amperes with a duty cycle of 0.25%. The resulting low average power has allowed novel solutions to the problems of vane alignment, rf current contacts, and removal of heat from the vanes. The cavity design philosophy will be discussed together with the thermodynamics of heat removal from the vane. Details of the fabrication will be presented with a status report

  12. RHIC GAMMA TRANSITION JUMP POWER SUPPLY PROTOTYPE TEST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MI, J.; GANETIS, G.; LOUIE, W.; BRUNO, D.; ZAPASEK, R.; SANDBERG, J.; ZHANG, W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the principle and test results of the prototype RHIC Gamma Transition Jump Power Supply. The jump power supply principle is introduced and illustrated along with diagrams in this paper. The prototype is built with Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBT) as current direction switch components. Optically coupled IGBT drivers are used for the jump control switch. The jump time among the power supplies is synchronized from 40 to 60 milliseconds to meet the RHIC beam transition-crossing requirement. The short jump time is needed to avoid particle loss and to preserve the initial bunch area during the transition, thus successfully transferring the ion beams from the acceleration RF system to storage system. There are a total of twenty four jump power supplies that will be used. They synchronously switch the direction of the magnets current while the beam is being accelerated through the transition to reach the top storage energy. Each power supply will energize a group of super conducting magnets, which consists of four magnets that are connected in series. At the end, test results are listed, accompanied with the dummy load current waveform and prototype power supply picture

  13. RAPIDE 0.0 RHIC Accelerator Physics Intrepid Development Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satogata, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Saltmarsh, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Peggs, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This document is a guide to the common environmental features of computing in (and around) the RHIC Accelerator Physics.sectio on the 'zoo' cluster of UNJX workstations, in RAPIDE, the RHIC Accelerator Physics Intrepid Development Environment It is hoped tliat later revisions of this document will approach a more professional 'style guide', beyond the convenient collection of pointers and hints presented here. RAP does two kinds of computing, "controls" and "general", addressed in sections 2 and 3 of this document For general computing, efficient system administration requires cooperation in using a common environment There is a much stronger need to define - and adhere to - a commonly agreed set of styles (or rules) in developing controls software. Right now, these rules have been set "de facto". Future improvements to the controls environment, particularly in response to the opinions of users, depends on broad knowledge of what the rules are. There are environmental issues that are basic to both controls and general computing, and that are so fundamental that they are (almost) unarguable. They are described immediately below, in the next section.

  14. On the image of AGS 3He2+ $\\vec{n}$0 in the blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This note addresses the transport of Helion spin $\\vec{n}$0 vector, from its periodic orientation in the AGS to RHIC Blue ring injection kicker, via the AGS extraction system and the AtR line. The goal is to investigate optimal injection energy into RHIC, in the matter of Helion spin matching, in the hypothesis of equal warm and cold snake strengths in the AGS. The study uses recently computed OPERA 3-D field maps of the AGS cold snake, including possibility of independent solenoid and helix settings (as discussed in Tech. Note C-A/AP/485), together with the machinery of the AGS and AtR models developed in the stepwise ray-tracing code Zgoubi. Computing tools and methods employed are discussed as well, in order to facilitate possible further checks or investigations. They are however similar to those used in an earlier study regarding the image in RHIC Blue and Yellow of AGS $\\vec{n}$0 via the AtR in the case of proton beam (Tech. Note C-A/AP/502), which can be referred to for additional details.

  15. THE COUPLING CORRECTION SYSTEM AT RHIC: RESULTS FOR THE RUN 2000 AND PLANS FOR 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilat, F.; Fischer, W.; Peggs, S.; Ptitsyn, V.; Tepikian, S.

    2001-01-01

    The RHIC coupling correction system has been commissioned during the Year 2000 run, which marked the successful first year of operation of the machine. The RHIC coupling correction system is described with particular emphasis on its flexibility, which allows using both global and local coupling compensation techniques. Coupling measurements and correction data are presented for the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings, together with the procedure used to reduce the minimum tune separation to 0.001, the typical resolution for tune measurements during run 2000. They further demonstrate how local coupling compensation in the interaction region substantially reduces the strength of the skew quadrupole families used for global coupling compensation

  16. MEASUREMENTS OF INTRA-BEAM SCATTERING GROWTH TIMES WITH GOLD BEAM BELOW TRANSITION IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISCHER, W.; BAI, M.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; CAMERON, P.; CONNOLLY, R.; LEHRACH, A.; PARZEN, G.; TEPIKIAN, S.; ZENO, K.; VAN ZEIJTS, J.

    2001-01-01

    While RHIC is filled with beam, bunches are stored for up to several minutes at the injection energy before acceleration starts. In gold operation, the RHIC injection energy is below transition. A bunch length increase, and correspondingly an increase in the longitudinal emittance, can lead to particle loss during transition crossing and rebucketing into the storage buckets. The longitudinal growth of gold beams in RHIC at injection is dominated by intra-beam scattering. Measurements of longitudinal growth times are presented and compared with computations

  17. RHIC PHYSICS: THE QUARK GLUON PLASMA AND THE COLOR GLASS CONDENSATE: 4 LECTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCLERRAN,L.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to provide an introduction to the physics issues which are being studied in the RHIC heavy ion program. These center around the production of new states of matter. The Quark Gluon Plasma is thermal matter which once existed in the big bang which may be made at RHIC. The Color Glass Condensate is a universal form of matter which controls the high energy limit of strong interactions. Both such forms of matter might be produced and probed at RHIC.

  18. Potential luminosity improvement for low-energy RHIC operation with electron cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotov,A.

    2009-06-08

    There is a strong interest in heavy-ion RHIC collisions in the energy range below the present RHIC injection energy, which is termed 'low-energy' operation. These collisions will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about the existence and location of a critical point on the QCD phase diagram. However, luminosity projections are relatively low for the lowest energy points of interest. Luminosity improvement can be provided with RHIC electron cooling at low beam energies. This report summarizes the expected luminosity improvements with electron cooling and various limitations.

  19. Interaction Region Design for the Electron-Ion Collider eRHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Montag, Christoph; Tepikian, Steven; Wang, Dong

    2005-01-01

    To facilitate the study of collisions between 10 GeV polarized electrons and 100 GeV/u heavy ions or 250 GeV polarized protons at high luminosities, adding a 10 GeV electron storage ring to the existing RHIC complex has been proposed. The interaction region of this electron-ion collider eRHIC has to provide the required low-beta focusing, while simultaneously accomodating the synchrotron radiation fan generated by beam separation close to the interaction point, which is particularly challenging. The latest design status of the eRHIC interaction region is presented.

  20. PRODEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP : HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING WITH QCDOC AND BLUEGENE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHRIST,N.; DAVENPORT,J.; DENG,Y.; GARA,A.; GLIMM,J.; MAWHINNEY,R.; MCFADDEN,E.; PESKIN,A.; PULLEYBLANK,W.

    2003-03-11

    Staff of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Columbia University, IBM and the RIKEN BNL Research Center organized a one-day workshop held on February 28, 2003 at Brookhaven to promote the following goals: (1) To explore areas other than QCD applications where the QCDOC and BlueGene/L machines can be applied to good advantage, (2) To identify areas where collaboration among the sponsoring institutions can be fruitful, and (3) To expose scientists to the emerging software architecture. This workshop grew out of an informal visit last fall by BNL staff to the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center that resulted in a continuing dialog among participants on issues common to these two related supercomputers. The workshop was divided into three sessions, addressing the hardware and software status of each system, prospective applications, and future directions.

  1. Report of the Review Committee on the BNL colliding beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Colliding Beam Accelerator (CBA) proposal by BNL for a pp collider of 400 GeV /times/ 400 GeV with a maximum luminosity /Brit pounds/ = 2 /times/ 10 33 was reviewed by a DOE team, including consultants, on April 11--15, 1983. No major flaws were found that would prevent, in principle, the proposed collider from reaching its design goals. BNL has made sufficient progress in their superconducting magnet RandD program that, although there is not yet a magnet of the CBA baseline design, the Committee believes the design can be achieved. However, to ensure prompt completion of the project, substantial RandD needs to be carried out in short order, particularly on the timely and cost-effective production of magnets, reliability of quench protection, and determination of cryogenic heat loads

  2. Helium release rates and ODH calculations from RHIC magnet cooling line failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-03-28

    A catastrophic failure of the magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, could discharge cold helium into the RHIC tunnel and cause an Oxygen Deficiency Hazard (ODH) problem. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the insulating vacuum volumes and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces are included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Results, including helium discharge rates, helium inventory loss, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the RHIC tunnel area, are reported. Good agreement had been achieved when comparing the simulation results, a RHIC sector depressurization test measurement, and some simple analytical calculations.

  3. The electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC. A Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beddo, M.E.; Bielick, E.; Dawson, J.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others; The STAR EMC Collaboration

    1993-09-22

    This report discusses the following on the electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC: conceptual design; the physics of electromagnetic calorimetry in STAR; trigger capability; integration into STAR; and cost, schedule, manpower, and funding.

  4. LINEAR AND NONLINEAR CORRECTIONS IN THE RHIC INTERACTION REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PILAT, F.; CAMERON, P.; PTITSYN, V.; KOUTCHOUK, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    A method has been developed to measure operationally the linear and non-linear effects of the interaction region triplets, that gives access to the multipole content through the action kick, by applying closed orbit bumps and analyzing tune and orbit shifts. This technique has been extensively tested and used during the RHIC operations in 2001. Measurements were taken at 3 different interaction regions and for different focusing at the interaction point. Non-linear effects up to the dodecapole have been measured as well as the effects of linear, sextupolar and octupolar corrections. An analysis package for the data processing has been developed that through a precise fit of the experimental tune shift data (measured by a phase lock loop technique to better than 10 -5 resolution) determines the multipole content of an IR triplet

  5. Noise estimation of beam position monitors at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, X. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Bai, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Lee, S. Y. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2014-02-10

    Beam position monitors (BPM) are used to record the average orbits and transverse turn-by-turn displacements of the beam centroid motion. The Relativistic Hadron Ion Collider (RHIC) has 160 BPMs for each plane in each of the Blue and Yellow rings: 72 dual-plane BPMs in the insertion regions (IR) and 176 single-plane modules in the arcs. Each BPM is able to acquire 1024 or 4096 consecutive turn-by-turn beam positions. Inevitably, there are broadband noisy signals in the turn-by-turn data due to BPM electronics as well as other sources. A detailed study of the BPM noise performance is critical for reliable optics measurement and beam dynamics analysis based on turn-by-turn data.

  6. Physics with the collider detectors at RHIC and the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.; Hallman, T.

    1995-01-01

    On January 8, 1995, over 180 participants gathered to hear the QM95 preconference workshop on 'Physics with the Collider Detectors at RHIC and the LHC'. The goal was to bring together the experimentalists from a wide community of hadron and heavy ion collider detector collaborations. The speakers were encouraged to present the current status of their detectors, with all the blemishes, and the audience was encouraged to share their successes and failures in approaching similar detector design issues. The presentations were excellent and the discussions were lively and stimulating. The editors hope that the reader will find these proceedings to be equally stimulating. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the energy database from articles in this report

  7. Jet quenching effects on the anisotropic flow at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, R.P.G. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, SP, 09210-170 (Brazil); Noronha, J. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Denicol, Gabriel S. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    In this article we investigate how the energy and momentum deposited by partonic dijets in the quark–gluon plasma may perturb the geometry-induced hydrodynamic expansion of the bulk nuclear matter created in heavy ion collisions at the RHIC. The coupling between the jets and the medium is done through a source term in the energy–momentum conservation equations for ideal hydrodynamics. We concentrate our attention at mid-rapidity and solve the equations event-by-event imposing boost-invariance. For p{sub T}≳1 GeV the anisotropic flow is found to be considerably enhanced, if the dijets deposit on average more than 12 GeV in the medium (or equivalently 6 GeV for each jet of the pair), which corresponds, in our model, to an average suppression greater than 65% of the initial jet transverse energy.

  8. Data acquisition for RHIC report of the working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atiya, M.; Gibbard, B.; Hackenburg, R.

    1988-01-01

    As experimental configurations for RHIC become better defined, the requirements for data acquisition for each of the evolving experiments becomes susceptible to detailed analysis. An earlier contribution made it clear that the scale of these experiments makes demands on data acquisition that are at least as severe as some of the large-scale collider experiments being mounted at Fermilab and LEP. In this report, we attempt to answer the following questions: what sort of performance is required by each of the experiments; is there a single architecture flexible enough to accommodate all of the proposed experiments; what are the costs associated with such a implementation; and how far in advance of beam does a data acquisition implementation need to be started? 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  9. SEARCH FOR A RELIABLE STORAGE ARCHITECTURE FOR RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BINELLO,S.; KATZ, R.A.; MORRIS, J.T.

    2007-10-15

    Software used to operate the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) resides on one operational RAID storage system. This storage system is also used to store data that reflects the status and recent history of accelerator operations. Failure of this system interrupts the operation of the accelerator as backup systems are brought online. In order to increase the reliability of this critical control system component, the storage system architecture has been upgraded to use Storage Area Network (SAN) technology and to introduce redundant components and redundant storage paths. This paper describes the evolution of the storage system, the contributions to reliability that each additional feature has provided, further improvements that are being considered, and real-life experience with the current system.

  10. Physics with the collider detectors at RHIC and the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.; Hallman, T. [eds.

    1995-07-15

    On January 8, 1995, over 180 participants gathered to hear the QM95 preconference workshop on `Physics with the Collider Detectors at RHIC and the LHC`. The goal was to bring together the experimentalists from a wide community of hadron and heavy ion collider detector collaborations. The speakers were encouraged to present the current status of their detectors, with all the blemishes, and the audience was encouraged to share their successes and failures in approaching similar detector design issues. The presentations were excellent and the discussions were lively and stimulating. The editors hope that the reader will find these proceedings to be equally stimulating. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the energy database from articles in this report.

  11. Real-World Sorting of RHIC Superconducting Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.; Gupta, R.; Harrison, M.; Jain, A.; Peggs, S.; Thompson, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Wanderer, P.

    1999-01-01

    During the seven-year construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), more than 1700 superconducting dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles, and multi-layer correctors have been constructed and installed. These magnets have been sorted at several production stages to optimize their performance and reliability. For arc magnets, priorities have bene put first on quench performance and operational risk minimization, second on field transfer function and other first-order quantities, and finally on nonlinear field errors which were painstakingly optimized at design. For Interaction-Region (IR) magnets, sorting is applied to select the best possible combination of magnets for the low-β interaction points (IP). This paper summarizes the history of this real-world sorting process

  12. Solution of the RHIC HBT puzzle with Gaussian initial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florkowski, W.; Broniowski, W.; Chojnacki, M.; Kisiel, A.

    2009-06-01

    It is argued that the consistent description of the transverse-momentum spectra, elliptic flow and the HBT radii in the relativistic heavy-ion collisions studied at the RHIC may be obtained within the hydrodynamic model if one uses the Gaussian profile for the initial energy density in the transverse plane. Moreover, we show that the results obtained in the scenario with an early start of hydrodynamics (at the proper time τ0 = 0.25 fm) are practically equivalent to the results obtained in the model where the hydrodynamics is preceded by the free-streaming stage of partons (in the proper time interval 0.25 fm Education, grants N202 153 32/4247 and N202 034 32/0918, and by the US NSF grant no PHY-0653432.

  13. B factory at RHIC [Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider]?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockyer, N.S.; Van Berg, R.; Newcomer, F.M.

    1988-01-01

    A dedicated B physics experiment located in the proposed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven (RHIC) is considered. The machine may operate in a p-p mode with a luminosity in excess of 10 32 cm/sup /minus/2/ sec/sup /minus/1/ at 250 /times/ 250 GeV. The estimated B/bar B/ cross section at these energies is about 10 μbarns and a run of 10 7 sec would produce roughly 10 10 B/bar B/ pairs. A comparison to similar ideas proposed for the Fermilab Tevatron Upgrade and the SSC are discussed. The most ambitious physics objective of such an experiment would be the study of CP nonconservation. Particular emphasis at this workshop was given to the self tagging mode B → K + π/sup /minus//. Experimental techniques developed during this experiment would be extremely useful for more ambitious projects anticipated at the SSC. 36 refs., 10 figs

  14. RESIDUAL-GAS-IONIZATION BEAM PROFILE MONITORS IN RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CONNOLLY, R.; MICHNOFF, R.; TEPIKIAN, S.

    2005-05-16

    Four ionization profile monitors (IPMs) in RHIC measure vertical and horizontal beam profiles in the two rings by measuring the distribution of electrons produced by beam ionization of residual gas. During the last three years both the collection accuracy and signal/noise ratio have been improved. An electron source is mounted across the beam pipe from the collector to monitor microchannel plate (MCP) aging and the signal electrons are gated to reduce MCP aging and to allow charge replenishment between single-turn measurements. Software changes permit simultaneous measurements of any number of individual bunches in the ring. This has been used to measure emittance growth rates on six bunches of varying intensities in a single store. Also the software supports FFT analysis of turn-by-turn profiles of a single bunch at injection to detect dipole and quadrupole oscillations.

  15. THE ERL HIGH-ENERGY COOLER FOR RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BEN-ZVI, I.

    2006-01-01

    Electron cooling [1] entered a new era with the July 2005 cooling of the Tevatron recycler ring [2] at Fermilab, using γ = 9.5. Considering that the cooling rate decreases as faster than γ 2 and the electron energy forces higher electron currents, new acceleration techniques, high-energy electron cooling presents special challenges to the accelerator scientists and engineers. For example, electron cooling of RHIC at collisions requires electron beam energy up to about 54 MeV at an average current of between 50 to 100 mA and a particularly bright electron beam. The accelerator chosen to generate this electron beam is a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) with a superconducting RF gun with a laser-photocathode

  16. HIGH LUMINOSITY RHIC INSERTIONS, 0.5M BETA AT IP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TEPIKIAN, S.; FISCHER, W.; MACKAY, W.; PILAT, F.; HUANG, H.; PTITSYN, V.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; VAN ZEIJTS, J.

    2003-01-01

    An increase in RHIC collision luminosity is possible by reducing the beam size at the interaction point (IP). They present a method for reducing the IP beta function, β*, from the design minimum of 1m to 0.5m. They demonstrate that this β* = 0.5m configuration is achievable with existing RHIC power supplies for 100 GeV protons. They discuss the correction of the higher order IR multi-poles and the second order chromaticity

  17. Re-visiting RHIC snakes: OPERA fields, n0 dance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gupta, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Robert-Demolaize, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-09-22

    In this Tech. Note RHIC snakes and stable spin direction $\\vector{n}$0(s) are re-visited, based on OPERA-computed field maps of the former. The numerical simulations so undertaken provide various outcomes regarding RHIC optics and spin dynamics, in relation with orbital and focusing effects resulting from the use of this realistic 3-D representation of the snakes.

  18. STATUS OF THE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT TOWARDS ELECTRON COOLING OF RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEN-ZVI,I.; OZAKI, T.; YOSHIDA, T.; NANKAWA, T.; KOZAI, N.; SAKAMOTO, F.; SUZUKI, Y.

    2007-06-25

    The physics interest in a luminosity upgrade of RHIC requires the development of a cooling-frontier facility. Detailed calculations were made of electron cooling of the stored RHIC beams. This has been followed by beam dynamics simulations to establish the feasibility of creating the necessary electron beam. The electron beam accelerator will be a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). An intensive experimental R&D program engages the various elements of the accelerator, as described by 24 contributions to the 2007 PAC.

  19. Numerical studies of Siberian snakes and spin rotators for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luccio, A.

    1995-01-01

    For the program of polarized protons in RHIC, two Siberian snakes and four spin rotators per ring will be used. The Snakes will produce a complete spin flip. Spin Rotators, in pairs, will rotate the spin from the vertical direction to the horizontal plane at a given insertion, and back to the vertical after the insertion. Snakes, 180 degrees apart and with their axis of spin precession at 90 degrees to each other, are an effective means to avoid depolarization of the proton beam in traversing resonances. Classical snakes and rotators are made with magnetic solenoids or with a sequence of magnetic dipoles with fields alternately directed in the radial and vertical direction. Another possibility is to use helical magnets, essentially twisted dipoles, in which the field, transverse the axis of the magnet, continuously rotates as the particles proceed along it. After some comparative studies, the authors decided to adopt for RHIC an elegant solution with four helical magnets both for the snakes and the rotators proposed by Shatunov and Ptitsin. In order to simplify the construction of the magnets and to minimize cost, four identical super conducting helical modules will be used for each device. Snakes will be built with four right-handed helices. Spin rotators with two right-handed and two left-handed helices. The maximum field will be limited to 4 Tesla. While small bore helical undulators have been built for free electron lasers, large super conducting helical magnets have not been built yet. In spite of this difficulty, this choice is dictated by some distinctive advantages of helical over more conventional transverse snakes/rotators: (i) the devices are modular, they can be built with arrangements of identical modules, (ii) the maximum orbit excursion in the magnet is smaller, (iii) orbit excursion is independent from the separation between adjacent magnets, (iv) they allow an easier control of the spin rotation and the orientation of the spin precession axis

  20. Modeling and Analysis of AGS (1998) Thermal Shock Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, J.R.; Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1999-11-14

    An overview is provided on modeling and analysis of thermal shock experiments conducted during 1998 with high-energy, short-pulse energy deposition in a mercury filled container in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The simulation framework utilized along with the results of simulations for pressure and strain profiles are presented. While the magnitude of penk strain predictions versus data are in reasonable agreement, the temporal variations were found to differ significantly in selected cases, indicating lack of modeling of certain physical phenomena or due to uncertainties in the experimental data gathering techniques. Key thermal-shock related issues and uncertainties are highlighted. Specific experiments conducted at BNL's AGS facility during 1998 (the subject of this paper) involved high-energy (24 GeV) proton energy deposition in the mercury target over a time frame of - 0.1s. The target consisted of an - 1 m. long cylindrical stainless steel shell with a hemispherical dome at the leading edge. It was filled with mercury at room temperature and pressure. Several optical strain gages were attached to the surface of the steel target. Figure 1 shows a schematic representation of the test vessel along with the main dimensions and positions of three optical strain gages at which meaningful data were obtained. As

  1. Production of radioactivity in local soil at AGS fast neutrino beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollon, P.J.; Hauptmann, M.G.; McIntyre, K.; Miltenberger, R.; Naidu, J.

    1984-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has recently decided to construct a new neutrino production target station at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). To determine the environmental impact of this addition, a study is being conducted in the vicinity of the old target area to determine the radiological consequences of operating this experimental facility. Typical BNL soil samples were placed at two locations near an operating target: at right angles to the target and behind thick shielding close to the direction of the incident beam. These samples were used to determine radionuclide production and leaching information. A core was taken from beneath the concrete floor of the old target area and a monitoring well was installed down-gradient of the facility. Preliminary results from all areas of the study are presented along with estimates of the potential environmental impact of the old and new facilities. 9 figures

  2. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP CIRCUM-PAN-PACIFIC RIKEN SYMPOSIUM ON HIGH ENERGY SPIN PHYSICS, VOLUME 25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KUMANO,S.; SHIBATA,T.A.; YAZAKI,K.

    2000-06-28

    The Circum-Pan-Pacific Riken Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics was held at Oukouchi Memorial Hall in Riken from November 3 through 6, 1999. It was held as a joint meeting of the 2nd Circum-Pan-Pacific Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics and the 3rd of the series of Riken Symposia related to the RHIC-SPIN. The 1st Circum-Pan-Pacific Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics was held at Kobe in 1996 and the RHIC-SPIN Riken Symposia had been held every two years since 1995. As Prof. Ozaki mentioned in his talk at the beginning of this meeting, the RHIC was ready for the first beam, physics experiments scheduled in 2000, and the RHIC-SPIN would start in 2001. It was therefore considered to be very timely for the researchers in the field of high energy spin physics to get together, clarifying the present status of the field and discussing interesting and important topics as well as experimental subjects to be pursued. It is especially important for the success of the RHIC-SPIN project that the researchers in the neighboring countries surrounding the Pacific are actively involved in it. This is why the above two series were joined in this. symposium. The subjects discussed in the symposium include: Hard processes probing spin-structure functions, polarization mechanisms in high energy reactions, lattice studies of polarized structure functions, theoretical models for the nucleon and its spin structure, RHIC and RHIC-SPIN projects, results and future projects of existing experimental facilities. Totally 73 scientists participated in the symposium, 27 from abroad and 46 from Japan. it consisted of 13 main sessions, with 33 invited and contributed talks, and 4 discussion sessions covering recent experimental and theoretical developments and important topics in high energy spin physics and closely related fields.

  3. DESIGN SAFETY FEATURES OF THE BNL HIGH-TEMPERATURE COMBUSTION FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GINSBERG,T.; CICCARELLI,G.; BOCCIO,J.

    2000-06-11

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) was used to perform hydrogen deflagration and detonation experiments at temperatures to 650 K. Safety features that were designed to ensure safe and reliable operation of the experimental program are described. Deflagration and detonation experiments have been conducted using mixtures of hydrogen, air, and steam. Detonation cell size measurements were made as a function of mixture composition and thermodynamic gas conditions. Deflagration-to-detonation transition experiments were also conducted. Results of the experimental program are presented, and implications with respect to hydrogen safety are discussed.

  4. Computer analysis, design and construction of the BNL Mk V magnetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie-Wilson, R.B.; Kovarik, V.J.

    1981-01-01

    As part of a program to develop a high energy neutral beam injector for fusion reactor applications, the BNL Neutral Beam Group is studying, among other options, a surface plasma source of the magnetron type. This source has been developed to the point at which a large compact model, known as the Mk V magnetron, has been designed and constructed. The source is designed to operate in the steady state mode and to produce 1-2A of H - (D - ) ions at 25 kV. Under these conditions, 18 KW of heat are removed from the source by the cooling system

  5. R&D Experiments at BNL to Address the Associated Issues in the Cascading HGHG Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Yu Li Hua

    2004-01-01

    We discuss several experiments that can be carried out at BNL's DUVFEL to address several issues associated with cascaded HGHG FELs. These include: Chirped Pulse Amplification (CPA); HGHG with seed shorter than electron bunch length; 8th harmonic HGHG (from 800nm to 100nm); Regenerative synchronization of seed pulse and electron bunch; Tuning of HGHG without changing seed, proposed by Timur Shaftan; Cascading using NISUS and VISA: from 400nm to 100nm to 50nm. These experiments may have important impact on the development of multi-stage cascaded HGHG FELs.

  6. ERL with non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient lattice for eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trbojevic, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berg, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brooks, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hao, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Litvinenko, V. N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ptitsyn, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roser, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Thieberger, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The proposed eRHIC electron-hadron collider uses a "non-scaling FFAG" (NS-FFAG) lattice to recirculate 16 turns of different energy through just two beam lines located in the RHIC tunnel. This paper presents lattices for these two FFAGs that are optimized for low magnet field and to minimize total synchrotron radiation across the energy range. The higher number of recirculations in the FFAG allows a shorter linac (1.322GeV) to be used, drastically reducing cost, while still achieving a 21.2 GeV maximum energy to collide with one of the existing RHIC hadron rings at up to 250GeV. eRHIC uses many cost-saving measures in addition to the FFAG: the linac operates in energy recovery mode, so the beams also decelerate via the same FFAG loops and energy is recovered from the interacted beam. All magnets will be constructed from NdFeB permanent magnet material, meaning chillers and large magnet power supplies are not needed. This paper also describes a small prototype ERL-FFAG accelerator that will test all of these technologies in combination to reduce technical risk for eRHIC.

  7. RHIC PERFORMANCE DURING THE FY10 200 GeV Au+Au HEAVY ION RUN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.; Bruno, D.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; de Maria, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, J.W.; Hao, Y.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Severino, F.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-01-01

    Since the last successful RHIC Au+Au run in 2007 (Run-7), the RHIC experiments have made numerous detector improvements and upgrades. In order to benefit from the enhanced detector capabilities and to increase the yield of rare events in the acquired heavy ion data a significant increase in luminosity is essential. In Run-7 RHIC achieved an average store luminosity of = 12 x 10 26 cm -2 s -1 by operating with 103 bunches (out of 111 possible), and by squeezing to β* = 0.85 m. This year, Run-10, we achieved = 20 x 10 26 cm -2 s -1 , which put us an order of magnitude above the RHIC design luminosity. To reach these luminosity levels we decreased β* to 0.75 m, operated with 111 bunches per ring, and reduced longitudinal and transverse emittances by means of bunched-beam stochastic cooling. In addition we introduced a lattice to suppress intra-beam scattering (IBS) in both RHIC rings, upgraded the RF control system, and separated transition crossing times in the two rings. We present an overview of the changes and the results of Run-10 performance.

  8. RHIC PERFORMANCE DURING THE FY10 200 GeV Au+Au HEAVY ION RUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.; Bruno, D.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; de Maria, R.; D’Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, J.W.; Hao, Y.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Severino, F.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    Since the last successful RHIC Au+Au run in 2007 (Run-7), the RHIC experiments have made numerous detector improvements and upgrades. In order to benefit from the enhanced detector capabilities and to increase the yield of rare events in the acquired heavy ion data a significant increase in luminosity is essential. In Run-7 RHIC achieved an average store luminosity of = 12 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} by operating with 103 bunches (out of 111 possible), and by squeezing to {beta}* = 0.85 m. This year, Run-10, we achieved = 20 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which put us an order of magnitude above the RHIC design luminosity. To reach these luminosity levels we decreased {beta}* to 0.75 m, operated with 111 bunches per ring, and reduced longitudinal and transverse emittances by means of bunched-beam stochastic cooling. In addition we introduced a lattice to suppress intra-beam scattering (IBS) in both RHIC rings, upgraded the RF control system, and separated transition crossing times in the two rings. We present an overview of the changes and the results of Run-10 performance.

  9. Cryogenic sub-system for the 56 MHz SRF storage cavity for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y.; Than, R.; Orfin, P.; Lederle, D.; Tallerico, T.; Masi L.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-03-28

    A 56 MHz Superconducting RF Storage Cavity is being constructed for the RHIC collider. This cavity is a quarter wave resonator that will be operated in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The cavity requires an extremely quiet environment to maintain its operating frequency. The cavity, besides being engineered for a mechanically quiet system, also requires a quiet cryogenic system. The helium is taken from RHIC's main helium supply header at 3.5 atm, 5.3K at a phase separator tank. The boil-off is sent back to the RHIC refrigeration system to recover the cooling. To acoustically separate the RHIC helium supply and return lines, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger condenses the helium vapor generated in the RF cavity bath. A system description and operating parameters are given about the cryogen delivery system. The 56 MHz superconducting storage RF cavity project is making progress. The cryogenic system design is in its final stage. The helium supply lines have been tapped into the RHIC helium distribution lines. The plate-and-fin heat exchanger design is near completion and specification will be sent out for bid soon. The cold helium vapor heating system design will start soon as well. A booster compressor specification is underway. The first phase separator and transfer line design work is near completion and will be sent out for bid soon.

  10. Magic Lenses for RHIC: Compensating Beam-beam Interaction (488th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yun [BNL Collider-Accelerator Department

    2013-07-17

    Scientists at Brookhaven Lab’s Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) smash atomic particles together to understand more about why the physical world works the way it does. Increasing rates of particle collisions, or luminosity, at RHIC is no small challenge, but the results—more data for better clues—are crucial for scientists trying answer big questions about the origins of matter and mass. When scientists at RHIC collide protons, they don’t hope for a head-on crash by focusing only two particles roaring toward each other from opposite directions. For all intents and purposes, that would be impossible. The scientists can smash protons because they significantly increase the likelihood of collisions by steering hundreds of billions clumped into bunches, which at RHIC are about 3.5 meters long and less than 1 millimeter tall. The particles of these bunches are all positively charged, so when they interact, they repel outwardly—think how magnets repel when their same poles are pushed together. Although this decreases the density of each bunch, reducing luminosity, scientists in Brookhaven Lab’s Collider-Accelerator Department (C-AD) have a solution. After more than seven years of development, the scientists have designed an electron-lens system that uses electrons’ negative charges to attract positively charged proton bunches and minimize their repelling tendencies. Combined with other upgrades to the RHIC accelerator complex, these lenses are important components in efforts towards the major task of doubling the luminosity for proton-proton collisions.

  11. An interactive beam line simulator module for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKay, W.W.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the interactive simulation engine, bl, designed for the RHIC project. The program tracks as output to shared memory the central orbit, Twiss and dispersion functions, as well as the 6 x 6 beam hyperellipsoid. Transfer matrices between elements are available via interactive requests. Using a 6-d model, optical elements are modeled with a linear transfer matrix and a vector. The vector allows simulation of misalignments, shifts in field strengths, and beam rigidity. Currently only a linear model is used for elements. In addition to the usual magnets, a foil element is included which can shift the beam's rigidity (resulting from a change of charge and energy loss), as well as increase the momentum spread and emittance. Running as a Glish client, bl can be interfaced to other programs, such as an orbit plotter and a power supply application to give a quick prediction of the beam orbit from actual operating currents in the accelerator. Various strengths and offsets may be changed by sending Glish events to bl

  12. $\\Lambda$ (1520) production at SPS and RHIC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Markert, C

    2002-01-01

    The recent preliminary results from central Au+Au collisions at square root s/sub NN/= 130 GeV from the STAR experiment at RHIC are presented and discussed along with the results on the Lambda (1520) production in central Pb+Pb and p+p collisions at square root s=17 Ge V from the NA49 experiment at the SPS. The Lambda (1520) is measured with the invariant mass reconstruction of the decay products in the hadronic channel (K/sup -/, p). The mean Lambda (1520) multiplicity scaled by the number of participants decreases from p+p to Pb+Pb collisions at the same energy of square root s=17 GeV. An upper limit estimate of the multiplicity from the first measurement at square root s/sub NN/=130 GeV shows the same trend. Comparisons with model predictions provide an indication of possible medium effects on the resonances and their decay daughters. (20 refs).

  13. Conceptual design report for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) will search for signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. The emphasis win be the correlation of many observables on an event-by-event basis. In the absence of definitive signatures for the QGP, it is imperative that such correlations be used to identify special events and possible signatures. This requires a flexible detection system that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The physics goals dictate the design of star and it's experiment. To meet the design criteria, tracking, momentum analysis, and particle identification of most of the charged particles at midrapidity are necessary. The tracking must operate in conditions at higher than the expected maximum charged particle multiplicities for central Au + Au collisions. Particle identification of pions/kaons for p < 0.7 GeV/c and kaons/protons for p < 1 GeV/c, as well as measurement of decay particles and reconstruction of secondary vertices will be possible. A two-track resolution of 2 cm at 2 m radial distance from, the interaction is expected. Momentum resolution of Δp/p ∼ 0.02 at p = 0.1 GeV/c is required to accomplish the physics, and,Δp/p of several percent at p = 10 GeV/c is sufficient to accurately measure the rapidly failing spectra at high Pt and particles from mini-jets and jets

  14. Introduction to fluid model for RHIC heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraya, Shin

    2007-01-01

    An introductory review of the fluid model which has been looked upon as the promising phenomenological model for the heavy ion scattering experiments at RHIC is presented here. Subjects are especially focused on the fundamental assumptions of the model and the decision process of the phenomenological parameters considering newcomers to hadron physics. Introduction of thermodynamical quantities, 1+1 dimension model, time-space evolution of fluid, correspondence of fluid to particles, initial condition, boundary condition and comparison of the equation of state of fluid model and that of hadron model are described. Limitation of fluid picture and the validity of the model are discussed finally. It is summarized that the present fluid model does not predict much about results in advance but gives interpretation after the event, nevertheless it reproduces much of the experimental results in natural form. It is expected that the parameter of the fluid model is to be used as the intermediate theory to relate experimental results with theory. (S. Funahashi)

  15. Conceptual design report for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The STAR Collaboration

    1992-06-15

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) will search for signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. The emphasis win be the correlation of many observables on an event-by-event basis. In the absence of definitive signatures for the QGP, it is imperative that such correlations be used to identify special events and possible signatures. This requires a flexible detection system that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The physics goals dictate the design of star and it`s experiment. To meet the design criteria, tracking, momentum analysis, and particle identification of most of the charged particles at midrapidity are necessary. The tracking must operate in conditions at higher than the expected maximum charged particle multiplicities for central Au + Au collisions. Particle identification of pions/kaons for p < 0.7 GeV/c and kaons/protons for p < 1 GeV/c, as well as measurement of decay particles and reconstruction of secondary vertices will be possible. A two-track resolution of 2 cm at 2 m radial distance from, the interaction is expected. Momentum resolution of {Delta}p/p {approximately} 0.02 at p = 0.1 GeV/c is required to accomplish the physics, and,{Delta}p/p of several percent at p = 10 GeV/c is sufficient to accurately measure the rapidly failing spectra at high Pt and particles from mini-jets and jets.

  16. New challenges for HEP computing: RHIC [Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider] and CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeVine, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    We will look at two facilities; RHIC and CEBF. CEBF is in the construction phase, RHIC is about to begin construction. For each of them, we examine the kinds of physics measurements that motivated their construction, and the implications of these experiments for computing. Emphasis will be on on-line requirements, driven by the data rates produced by these experiments

  17. NUMERICAL STUDIES OF THE FRICTION FORCE FOR THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEDOTOV,A.V.; BEN-ZVI,I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-05-16

    Accurate calculation of electron cooling times requires an accurate description of the dynamical friction force. The proposed RHIC cooler will require {approx}55 MeV electrons, which must be obtained from an RF linac, leading to very high transverse electron temperatures. A strong solenoid will be used to magnetize the electrons and suppress the transverse temperature, but the achievable magnetized cooling logarithm will not be large. In this paper, we explore the magnetized friction force for parameters of the RHIC cooler, using the VORPAL code [l]. VORPAL can simulate dynamical friction and diffusion coefficients directly from first principles [2]. Various aspects of the fiction force are addressed for the problem of high-energy electron cooling in the RHIC regime.

  18. Numerical Studies of the Friction Force for the RHIC Electron Cooler

    CERN Document Server

    Fedotov, Alexei V; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Bruhwiler, David L; Busby, Richard; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Schoessow, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Accurate calculation of electron cooling times requires an accurate description of the dynamical friction force. The proposed RHIC cooler will require ~55 MeV electrons, which must be obtained from an RF linac, leading to very high transverse electron temperatures. A strong solenoid will be used to magnetize the electrons and suppress the transverse temperature, but the achievable magnetized cooling logarithm will not be large. Available formulas for magnetized dynamical friction are derived in the logarithmic approximation, which is questionable in this regime. In this paper, we explore the magnetized friction force for parameters of the RHIC cooler, using the VORPAL code.* VORPAL can simulate dynamical friction and diffusion coefficients directly from first principles.** Various aspects of the friction force, such as dependence on magnetic field, scaling with ion charge number and others, are addressed for the problem of high-energy electron cooling in the RHIC regime.

  19. Status of the R&D Towards Electron Cooling of RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Favale; D. Holmes; J.J. Sredniawski; Hans Bluem; M.D. Cole; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; V.V. Parkhomchuk; V.B. Reva; J. Alduino; D.S. Barton; Dana Richard Beavis; I. Ben-Zvi; Michael Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; Andrew Burrill; Rama Calaga; P. Cameron; X. Chang; K.A. Drees; A.V. Fedotov; W. Fischer; G. Ganetis; D.M. Gassner; J.G. Grimes; Hartmut Hahn; L.R. Hammons; A. Hershcovitch; H.C. Hseuh; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; D.L. Lederle; Vladimir Litvinenko; C. Longo; W.W. MacKay; G.J. Mahler; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; B. Oerter; C. Pai; George Parzen; D. Pate; D. Phillips; S.R. Plate; Eduard Pozdeyev; Triveni Rao; J. Reich; Thomas Roser; A.G. Ruggiero; T. Russo; C. Schultheiss; Z. Segalov; J. Smedley; K. Smith; T. Tallerico; S. Tepikian; R. Than; R.J. Todd; Dejan Trbojevic; J.E. Tuozzolo; P. Wanderer; G. WANG; D. Weiss; Q. Wu; Kin Yip; A. Zaltsman; A. Burov; S. Nagaitsev; L.R. Prost; A.O. Sidorin; A.V. Smirnov; Yaroslav Derbenev; Peter Kneisel; John Mammosser; H. Phillips; Joseph Preble; Charles Reece; Robert Rimmer; Jeffrey Saunders; Mircea Stirbet; Haipeng Wang; A.V. Aleksandrov; D.L. Douglas; Y.W. Kang; D.T. Abell; G.I. Bell; David L. Bruhwiler; R. Busby; John R. Cary; D.A. Dimitrov; P. Messmer; Vahid Houston Ranjbar; D.S. Smithe; A.V. Sobol; P. Stoltz

    2007-08-01

    The physics interest in a luminosity upgrade of RHIC requires the development of a cooling-frontier facility. Detailed cooling calculations have been made to determine the efficacy of electron cooling of the stored RHIC beams. This has been followed by beam dynamics simulations to establish the feasibility of creating the necessary electron beam. Electron cooling of RHIC at collisions requires electron beam energy up to about 54 MeV at an average current of between 50 to 100 mA and a particularly bright electron beam. The accelerator chosen to generate this electron beam is a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) with a superconducting RF gun with a laser-photocathode. An intensive experimental R&D program engages the various elements of the accelerator: Photocathodes of novel design, superconducting RF electron gun of a particularly high current and low emittance, a very high-current ERL cavity and a demonstration ERL using these components.

  20. Design aspects of an electrostatic electron cooler for low-energy RHIC operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotov, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brodowski, J.; Chang, X.Y.; Gassner, D.; Hoff, L.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Oerter, B.; Pendzick, A.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Prost, L.; Shemyakin, A.

    2011-03-28

    Electron cooling was proposed to increase the luminosity of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon. The electron cooling system needed should be able to deliver an electron beam of adequate quality in a wide range of electron beam energies (0.9-5 MeV). An option of using an electrostatic accelerator to produce electrons for cooling heavy ions in RHIC was evaluated in detail. In this paper, we describe the requirements and options which were considered in the design of such a cooler for RHIC, as well as the associated challenges. The expected luminosity improvement and limitations with such an electron cooling system are also discussed.

  1. Operational experience with a near-integer working point at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montag, C.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; FischW; Luo, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Roser, T.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2008-01-01

    During the RHIC polarized proton run in N 2006 it became evident that the luminosity performance is limited by the beam-beam effect. With a working point between 213 and 7/10, and the necessity to mirror the tunes of the two RHIC rings at the diagonal, the beam with a horizontal tune closest to 213 showed poor lifetime. To overcome this limitation, a near-integer working point has been proposed. Tracking studies performed at both working points showed a larger dynamic aperture near the integer tune than above 2/3. In Run-8, this new working point was commissioned in one ring of RHIC, while the other ring was operated at the same working point as in Run-6. In this paper we report the commissioning process and operational experience with this new working point

  2. Operational experience with a near-integer working point at RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montag,C.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; FischW; Luo, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Roser, T.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2008-06-23

    During the RHIC polarized proton run in N 2006 it became evident that the luminosity performance is limited by the beam-beam effect. With a working point between 213 and 7/10, and the necessity to mirror the tunes of the two RHIC rings at the diagonal, the beam with a horizontal tune closest to 213 showed poor lifetime. To overcome this limitation, a near-integer working point has been proposed. Tracking studies performed at both working points showed a larger dynamic aperture near the integer tune than above 2/3. In Run-8, this new working point was commissioned in one ring of RHIC, while the other ring was operated at the same working point as in Run-6. In this paper we report the commissioning process and operational experience with this new working point.

  3. NUMERICAL STUDIES OF THE FRICTION FORCE FOR THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-01-01

    Accurate calculation of electron cooling times requires an accurate description of the dynamical friction force. The proposed RHIC cooler will require ∼55 MeV electrons, which must be obtained from an RF linac, leading to very high transverse electron temperatures. A strong solenoid will be used to magnetize the electrons and suppress the transverse temperature, but the achievable magnetized cooling logarithm will not be large. In this paper, we explore the magnetized friction force for parameters of the RHIC cooler, using the VORPAL code [l]. VORPAL can simulate dynamical friction and diffusion coefficients directly from first principles [2]. Various aspects of the fiction force are addressed for the problem of high-energy electron cooling in the RHIC regime

  4. Design aspects of an electrostatic electron cooler for low-energy RHIC operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedotov, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brodowski, J.; Chang, X.Y.; Gassner, D.; Hoff, L.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Oerter, B.; Pendzick, A.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Prost, L.; Shemyakin, A.

    2011-01-01

    Electron cooling was proposed to increase the luminosity of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon. The electron cooling system needed should be able to deliver an electron beam of adequate quality in a wide range of electron beam energies (0.9-5 MeV). An option of using an electrostatic accelerator to produce electrons for cooling heavy ions in RHIC was evaluated in detail. In this paper, we describe the requirements and options which were considered in the design of such a cooler for RHIC, as well as the associated challenges. The expected luminosity improvement and limitations with such an electron cooling system are also discussed.

  5. Spin dynamics modeling in the AGS based on a stepwise ray-tracing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutheil, Yann [Univ. of Grenoble (France)

    2006-08-07

    The AGS provides a polarized proton beam to RHIC. The beam is accelerated in the AGS from Gγ= 4.5 to Gγ = 45.5 and the polarization transmission is critical to the RHIC spin program. In the recent years, various systems were implemented to improve the AGS polarization transmission. These upgrades include the double partial snakes configuration and the tune jumps system. However, 100% polarization transmission through the AGS acceleration cycle is not yet reached. The current efficiency of the polarization transmission is estimated to be around 85% in typical running conditions. Understanding the sources of depolarization in the AGS is critical to improve the AGS polarized proton performances. The complexity of beam and spin dynamics, which is in part due to the specialized Siberian snake magnets, drove a strong interest for original methods of simulations. For that, the Zgoubi code, capable of direct particle and spin tracking through field maps, was here used to model the AGS. A model of the AGS using the Zgoubi code was developed and interfaced with the current system through a simple command: the AgsFromSnapRampCmd. Interfacing with the machine control system allows for fast modelization using actual machine parameters. Those developments allowed the model to realistically reproduce the optics of the AGS along the acceleration ramp. Additional developments on the Zgoubi code, as well as on post-processing and pre-processing tools, granted long term multiturn beam tracking capabilities: the tracking of realistic beams along the complete AGS acceleration cycle. Beam multiturn tracking simulations in the AGS, using realistic beam and machine parameters, provided a unique insight into the mechanisms behind the evolution of the beam emittance and polarization during the acceleration cycle. Post-processing softwares were developed to allow the representation of the relevant quantities from the Zgoubi simulations data. The Zgoubi simulations proved particularly

  6. CHALLENGES ENCOUNTERED DURING THE PROCESSING OF THE BNL ERL 5 CELL ACCELERATING CAVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURRILL,A.

    2007-06-25

    One of the key components for the Energy Recovery Linac being built by the Electron cooling group in the Collider Accelerator Department is the 5 cell accelerating cavity which is designed to accelerate 2 MeV electrons from the gun up to 15-20 MeV, allow them to make one pass through the ring and then decelerate them back down to 2 MeV prior to sending them to the dump. This cavity was designed by BNL and fabricated by AES in Medford, NY. Following fabrication it was sent to Thomas Jefferson Lab in VA for chemical processing, testing and assembly into a string assembly suitable for shipment back to BNL for integration into the ERL. The steps involved in this processing sequence will be reviewed and the deviations from processing of similar SRF cavities will be discussed. The lessons learned from this process are documented to help future projects where the scope is different from that normally encountered.

  7. Challenges Encountered during the Processing of the BNL ERL 5 Cell Accelerating Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Burrill; I. Ben-Zvi; R. Calaga; H. Hahn; V. Litvinenko; G. T. McIntyre; P. Kneisel; J. Mammosser; J. P. Preble; C. E. Reece; R. A. Rimmer; J. Saunders

    2007-08-01

    One of the key components for the Energy Recovery Linac being built by the Electron cooling group in the Collider Accelerator Department is the 5 cell accelerating cavity which is designed to accelerate 2 MeV electrons from the gun up to 15-20 MeV, allow them to make one pass through the ring and then decelerate them back down to 2 MeV prior to sending them to the dump. This cavity was designed by BNL and fabricated by AES in Medford, NY. Following fabrication it was sent to Thomas Jefferson Lab in VA for chemical processing, testing and assembly into a string assembly suitable for shipment back to BNL and integration into the ERL. The steps involved in this processing sequence will be reviewed and the deviations from processing of similar SRF cavities will be discussed. The lessons learned from this process are documented to help future projects where the scope is different from that normally encountered.

  8. BNL ALARA Center experience with an information exchange system on dose control at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.; Khan, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    The essential elements of an international information exchange system on dose control at nuclear power plants are summarized. Information was collected from literature abstracting services, by attending technical meetings, by circulating data collection forms, and through personal contacts. Data are assembled in various databases and periodically disseminated to several hundred interested participants through a variety of publications and at technical meetings. Immediate on-line access to the data is available to participants with modems, commercially available communications software, and a password that is provided by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center to authorized users of the system. Since January 1992, rapid access also has been provided to persons with fax machines. Some information is available for ''polling'' the BNL system at any time, and other data can be installed for polling on request. Most information disseminated to data has been through publications; however, new protocols, simplified by the ALARA Center staff, and the convenience of fax machines are likely to make the earlier availability of information through these mechanisms increasingly important

  9. POP Experiment of Laser Stripping via a Broad Stark State Using BNL 200MeV H- Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, I.; Mimashi, T.; Nakayama, H.; Suzuki, T.; Takayama, K.; Tawada, M.; Satoh, K.; Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Cameron, P.; Connoly, R.; Hershcovitch, A.; Lee, Y.Y.; LoDestro, V.; Ritter, J.; Wei, J.

    2005-01-01

    Present status of the project of the POP (proof of principle) experiment of laser stripping using BNL 200MeV H- is presented. First, the principle of the laser stripping via a broad Stark state and the role of the broad Stark state are introduced. Then, the scheme of the POP experiment using 200MeV H- is given. Then, the concrete plan of experimental setup in the REF beam line of the BNL 200MeV H- Linac and present status of construction are given

  10. A high performance DAC /DDS daughter module for the RHIC LLRF platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, T.; Harvey, M.; Narayan, G.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.S.; Yuan, S.

    2011-03-28

    The RHIC LLRF upgrade is a flexible, modular system. Output signals are generated by a custom designed XMC card with 4 high speed digital to analog (DAC) converters interfaced to a high performance field programmable gate array (FPGA). This paper discusses the hardware details of the XMC DAC board as well as the implementation of a low noise rf synthesizer with digital IQ modulation. This synthesizer also provides injection phase cogging and frequency hop rebucketing capabilities. A new modular RHIC LLRF system was recently designed and commissioned based on custom designed XMC cards. As part of that effort a high speed, four channel DAC board was designed. The board uses Maxim MAX5891 16 bit DACs with a maximum update rate of 600 Msps. Since this module is intended to be used for many different systems throughout the Collider Accelerator complex, it was designed to be as generic as possible. One major application of this DAC card is to implement digital synthesizers to provide drive signals to the various cavities at RHIC. Since RHIC is a storage ring with stores that typically last many hours, extremely low RF noise is a critical requirement. Synchrotron frequencies at RHIC range from a few hertz to several hundred hertz depending on the species and point in the acceleration cycle so close in phase noise is a major concern. The RHIC LLRF system uses the Update Link, a deterministic, high speed data link that broadcasts the revolution frequency and the synchronous phase angle. The digital synthesizers use this data to generate a properly phased analog drive signal. The synthesizers must also provide smooth phase shifts for cogging and support frequency shift rebucketing. One additional feature implemented in the FPGA is a digital waveform generator (WFG) that generates I and Q data pairs based on a user selected amplitude and phase profile as a function of time.

  11. The RF beam control system for the Brookhaven AGS synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The new 1.5 GeV Booster synchrotron completes the injector chain for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC. It enables the AGS to accelerate all heavy ions to 14 GeV/c for collider operation and also in the intensity of the AGS for fixed-target experiments by a factor of four. The ultra-high vacuum enables acceleration of partially stripped ions from the Tandem Van de Graaff to energies sufficient for complete stripping. For high intensities, it accelerates the 200 MeV linac beam in four batches of three bunches per AGS cycle. At 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per batch, it has the same space charge tune spread as the AGS at 200 MeV. This variety of applications means the Booster must accommodate a very wide range of particle masses and intensities. Since it operates in a Pulse-by-Pulse Modulation mode at 7.5 Hz, the computer controlled functions of time and magnetic field, and the 64 timing triggers of the beam control system take on unique values for each of four PPM users. Beams of {sup 197}Au{sup +33} ions and protons have been accelerated in the same PPM cycle.

  12. The RF beam control system for the Brookhaven AGS synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, J.M.

    1992-09-01

    The new 1.5 GeV Booster synchrotron completes the injector chain for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC. It enables the AGS to accelerate all heavy ions to 14 GeV/c for collider operation and also in the intensity of the AGS for fixed-target experiments by a factor of four. The ultra-high vacuum enables acceleration of partially stripped ions from the Tandem Van de Graaff to energies sufficient for complete stripping. For high intensities, it accelerates the 200 MeV linac beam in four batches of three bunches per AGS cycle. At 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per batch, it has the same space charge tune spread as the AGS at 200 MeV. This variety of applications means the Booster must accommodate a very wide range of particle masses and intensities. Since it operates in a Pulse-by-Pulse Modulation mode at 7.5 Hz, the computer controlled functions of time and magnetic field, and the 64 timing triggers of the beam control system take on unique values for each of four PPM users. Beams of {sup 197}Au{sup +33} ions and protons have been accelerated in the same PPM cycle.

  13. Measuring two-particle Bose-Einstein correlations with PHOBOS at sign RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betts, R.; Barton, D.; Carroll, A.

    1995-01-01

    We present results of a simulation of the measurement of two-particle Bose-Einstein correlations in central Au-Au collisions with the PHOBOS detector at RHIC. This measurement is expected to yield information on the relevant time and distance scales in these collisions. As the space-time scale is directly connected with the equation of state governing the evolution of the particle source, this information will be essential in understanding the physics of nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC energies. We demonstrate that the PHOBOS detector has sufficient resolution and acceptance to distinguish a variety of physics scenarios

  14. A simulation study of linear coupling effects and their correction in RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzen, G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a possible skew quadrupole correction system for linear coupling effects for the RHIC92 lattice. A simulation study has been done for this correction system. Results are given for the performance of the correction system and the required strength of the skew quadrupole corrections. The location of the correctors is discussed. For RHIC92, it appears possible to use the same 2 family correction system for all the likely choices of β*. The simulation study gives results for the residual tune splitting that remains after correction with a 2 family correction system. It also gives results for the beta functions before and after correction

  15. Conceptual design report for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-15

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) will search for signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. The emphasis win be the correlation of many observables on an event-by-event basis. In the absence of definitive signatures for the QGP, it is imperative that such correlations be used to identify special events and possible signatures. This requires a flexible detection system that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The physics goals dictate the design of star and it's experiment. To meet the design criteria, tracking, momentum analysis, and particle identification of most of the charged particles at midrapidity are necessary. The tracking must operate in conditions at higher than the expected maximum charged particle multiplicities for central Au + Au collisions. Particle identification of pions/kaons for p < 0.7 GeV/c and kaons/protons for p < 1 GeV/c, as well as measurement of decay particles and reconstruction of secondary vertices will be possible. A two-track resolution of 2 cm at 2 m radial distance from, the interaction is expected. Momentum resolution of {Delta}p/p {approximately} 0.02 at p = 0.1 GeV/c is required to accomplish the physics, and,{Delta}p/p of several percent at p = 10 GeV/c is sufficient to accurately measure the rapidly failing spectra at high Pt and particles from mini-jets and jets.

  16. Optimization of AGS Polarized Proton Operation with the Warm Helical Snake

    CERN Document Server

    Takano, Junpei; Bai, Mei; Brown, Kevin A; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Huang, Haixin; Luccio, Alfredo U; MacKay, William W; Okamura, Masahiro; Roser, Thomas; Tepikian, Steven; Tsoupas, Nicholaos

    2005-01-01

    A normal conducting helical dipole partial Siberian snake (Warm Snake) has been installed in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for overcoming all of imperfection depolarizing resonances and reducing the transverse coupling resonances caused by the solenoidal Siberian snake which had been operated in AGS before the last polarized run. The polarized proton beam has been accelerated successfully with the warm snake and the polarization at extraction of the AGS was increased to 50% as opposed to 40% with the solenoidal snake. The magnetic field and beam trajectory in the warm snake was calculated by using the OPERA-3D/TOSCA software. We present optimization of the warm snake with beam during RUN5.

  17. Overview and analysis of the 2016 Gold Run in the Booster and AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeno, K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Alternating Gradient Synchrotron

    2016-09-16

    Run 16 differed from preceding Au runs in that during most of it a 12:6:2 merge was employed in the AGS instead of an 8:4:2 merge. This was done to provide higher bunch intensities for RHIC. Since the approach to providing higher bunch intensities is, and has been, to merge more Booster bunches of the same intensity into one final bunch, detailing the longitudinal aspects of this setup seems quite relevant. So, aside from providing an overview of the Au portion of Run 16, this note also contains a series of emittance measurements in the Booster and AGS. Comparisons of these to similar measurements in previous runs are also made in hopes of gaining a better understanding of what factors contribute to the emittance of a bunch at AGS extraction. The note also tries to provide some context in which to understand the various merge schemes and describes a potential 8 to 1 type merge.

  18. Summary of construction details and test performance of recent series of 1.8 meter SSC dipoles at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodzeit, C.; Wanderer, P.

    1990-01-01

    Certain design features of the SSC dipole magnets are evaluated with 1.8-meter models built and tested at BNL. We report the results of recent tests of such magnets relating quench performance and field quality measurements to mechanical design and assembly features such as collar material, collared coil dimensions and fit with the yoke and coil prestress level. 9 figs., 5 tabs

  19. AGS-2000: Experiments for the 21. Century. Proceedings of the workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, May 13--17, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littenberg, L. [ed.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Sandweiss, J. [ed.] [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The AGS has a vital and interesting potential for new research. The reasons for this are a fortunate concomitance of the energy chosen for the AGS and the steady stream of technological advances which have both increased the intensity and flexibility of the AGS beams, and the capability of detectors to use these new beam parameters. The physics potentials of the future AGS program can be roughly divided into three broad areas. (1) fundamental elementary particle studies (based on rare kaon decays, rare muon processes and searches for new particles); (2) non-perturbative QCD; and (3) heavy ion physics. The overriding considerations for the operation of the AGS in the next decade must, of course, be the interest and potential of the scientific program. However, once that has been established, there are other aspects of the AGS program which deserve mention. Although experiments at the AGS are of increasing sophistication, they are smaller, less expensive, and more quickly executed than experiments at newer, larger facilities. Finally, the authors note that since the AGS must be maintained as a viable accelerator to serve as an injector to RHIC, the cost of an AGS fixed target experiment need be only the incremental cost of the experiment itself along with some modest additional operating costs. This means that AGS fixed target experiments are substantially cheaper than they would have been before the RHIC era. The remainder of this document contains brief summaries of the experiments considered by the working groups in the AGS-2000 Workshop. These summaries expand on points discussed here.

  20. AGS-2000: Experiments for the 21. Century. Proceedings of the workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, May 13--17, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littenberg, L.; Sandweiss, J.

    1996-01-01

    The AGS has a vital and interesting potential for new research. The reasons for this are a fortunate concomitance of the energy chosen for the AGS and the steady stream of technological advances which have both increased the intensity and flexibility of the AGS beams, and the capability of detectors to use these new beam parameters. The physics potentials of the future AGS program can be roughly divided into three broad areas. (1) fundamental elementary particle studies (based on rare kaon decays, rare muon processes and searches for new particles); (2) non-perturbative QCD; and (3) heavy ion physics. The overriding considerations for the operation of the AGS in the next decade must, of course, be the interest and potential of the scientific program. However, once that has been established, there are other aspects of the AGS program which deserve mention. Although experiments at the AGS are of increasing sophistication, they are smaller, less expensive, and more quickly executed than experiments at newer, larger facilities. Finally, the authors note that since the AGS must be maintained as a viable accelerator to serve as an injector to RHIC, the cost of an AGS fixed target experiment need be only the incremental cost of the experiment itself along with some modest additional operating costs. This means that AGS fixed target experiments are substantially cheaper than they would have been before the RHIC era. The remainder of this document contains brief summaries of the experiments considered by the working groups in the AGS-2000 Workshop. These summaries expand on points discussed here

  1. Analysis of one-and two-particle spectra at RHIC based on a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Physics Department, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan; RIKEN BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, USA; Department of Physics, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555, Japan; Tokuyama Women's College, Tokuyama, Yamaguchi 745-8511, Japan; IMC, Hiroshima University, ...

  2. Medium modification of strange hadronic resonances at SIS, RHIC and LHC energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolos, Laura

    2018-02-01

    The properties of strange pseudoscalar and vectors mesons as well as strange baryon resonances in dense matter are reviewed. Some open questions on the properties of strange hadrons in medium are addressed, such as the experimental signatures of inmedium effects coming from the hadronic phase on the final observables in heavy-ion collisions for the experimental conditions at SIS, RHIC and LHC energies.

  3. Laser ion source with long pulse width for RHIC-EBIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a new heavy ion-projector for RHIC and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory. Laser Ion Source (LIS) with solenoid can supply many kinds of ion from solid targets and is suitable for long pulse length with low current as ion provider for RHIC-EBIS. In order to understand a plasma behavior for fringe field of solenoid, we measure current, pulse width and total ion charges by a new ion probe. The experimental result indicates that the solenoid confines the laser ablation plasma transversely. Laser ion source needs long pulse length with limited current as primary ion provider for RHIC-EBIS. New ion probe can measure current distribution for the radial positions along z axis. The beam pulse length is not effected by magnetic field strength. However, the currents and charges decay with the distance from the end of solenoid. These results indicate that solenoid field has important role for plasma confinement not longitudinally but transversely and solenoid is able to have long pulse length with sufficient total ion charges. Moreover, the results are useful for a design of the extraction system for RHIC-EBIS.

  4. A simulation study of linear coupling effects and their correction in RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzen, G.

    1992-11-01

    This paper describes a possible skew quadrupole correction system for linear coupling for the RHIC92 lattice. A simulation study has been done for the correction system. Results are given for the performance of the correction system, and the required strength of the skew quadruple correctors. An important effect of linear coupling in RHIC is to shift the tune ν x ν y , sometimes called tune splitting. Most of this tune splitting can be corrected with a two family skew quadrupole correction system. For RHIC92, the same 2 family correction system will work for all likely choices of β*. This was not the case for the RHIC91 lattice where different families of correctors were needed for different β*. The tune splitting described above which is corrected with a 2 family correction system is driven primarily by the ν x - ν y harmonic of the skew quadrupole field given by the field multipole αl. There are several other effects of linear coupling present which are driven primarily by the ν x + ν y harmonics of the skew quadrupole field, αl. These include the following: (1) A higher order residual tune shift that remains after correction with the 2 family correction system. This tune shift is roughly quadratic in αl; (2) Possible large changes in the beta functions; (3) Possible increase in the beam size at injection due to the beta function distortion and the emittance distortion at injection

  5. Preliminary studies on a magneto-optical procedure for aligning RHIC magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.A.; Sikora, R.E.; Shea, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    Colloid dispersions of magnetite were used at SLAC and KEK to locate multipole magnet centers. The authors study here possible adaption of this method, to align RHIC magnets. A procedure for locating magnetic centers with respect to external fiducial markers, using electronic coordinate determination and digital TV image processing is described

  6. The new conceptual design of snakes and spin rotators in RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Courant, E.D.

    1990-01-01

    We discuss the generalized snake configurations, which offers either the advantages of shorter total snake length and smaller horizontal orbit displacement in the compact configuration or the dual functions of a snake and a 90 degree spin rotation for the helicity state. The generalized snake is then applied to the polarized proton collision in RHIC. The possible schemes of obtaining high luminosity are discussed

  7. The effect and correction of coupling generated by the RHIC triplet quadrupoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilat, F.; Peggs, S.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Wei, J.

    This study explores the possibility of operating the nominal RHIC coupling correction system in local decoupling mode, where a subset of skew quadrupoles are independently set by minimizing the coupling as locally measured by beam position monitors. The goal is to establish a correction procedure for the skew quadrupole errors in the interaction region triplets that does not rely on a priori knowledge of the individual errors. After a description of the present coupling correction scheme envisioned for RHIC, the basics of the local decoupling method will be briefly recalled in the context of its implementation in the TEAPOT simulation code as well as operationally. The method is then applied to the RHIC lattice: a series of simple tests establish that single triplet skew quadrupole errors can be corrected by local decoupling. More realistic correction schemes are then studied in order to correct distributed sources of skew quadrupole errors: the machine can be decoupled either by pure local decoupling or by a combination of global (minimum tune separation) and local decoupling. The different correction schemes are successively validated and evaluated by standard RHIC simulation runs with the complete set of errors and corrections. The different solutions and results are finally discussed together with their implications for the hardware.

  8. Chemical aspects of the commissioning and early operation of the BNL pond water treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, D.; Elder, G.B.

    1981-11-01

    An account is given of the chemical aspects of the work done in commissioning and setting-to-work the pond water treatment plant at BNL. The plant is designed to maintain the fuel pond within the specified chemical conditions for Magnox fuel storage. In normal operation the treatment requirements are met by anion exchange, i.e. the carbonate and other impurity anions in the pond water are replaced by hydroxide held on an anion exchange resin. This method is referred to as ''anion only''. In the commissioning tests the performance of the plant was substantiated by passing simulated pond water of the correct chemical composition through the plant and monitoring the water quality at the plant outlet. During the first phase of operation on the pond itself the plant was operated in non-standard fashion to convert the chemistry from the previous ''carbonate'' regime to the required conditions. (author)

  9. Parameters Optimization for a Novel Vacuum Laser Acceleration Test at BNL-ATF

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Lei; Zhou, Feng

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new VLA theory model which has revealed that the injection electrons with low energy and small incident angle relative to the laser beam are captured and significantly accelerated in a strong laser field. For the further step for verifying the novel-VLA mechanics, we propose to use the BNL-ATF Terawatt CO2 laser and a high-brightness electron beam to carry out a proof-of-principle beam experiment. Experiment setup including the laser injection optics and electron extraction system and beam diagnostics is presented. Extensive optimized simulation results with ATF practical parameters are also presented, which shows that even when the laser intensity is not very high, the net energy gain still can be seen obviously. This could be prospect for a new revolution of vacuum laser acceleration.

  10. A letter of intent for an experiment to study strong electromagnetic fields at RHIC via multiple electromagnetic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatyga, M.; Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) which is designed to study nonperturbative aspects of electrodynamics is outlined. Additional possibilities for new studies of electrodynamics via multiple electromagnetic processes are also described.

  11. Unusual dileptions at RHIC a field theoretic approach based on a non-equilibrium chiral phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, F. [Los Alamos National Labs., NM (United States)

    1997-09-22

    This paper contains viewgraphs on unusual dileptons at Brookhaven RHIC. A field theory approach is used based on a non-equilibrium chiral phase transformation utilizing the schroedinger and Heisenberg picture.

  12. Status of RHIC head-on beam-beam compensation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.; Anerella, M.; Beebe, E.; Bruno, D.; Gassner, D.M.; Gu, X.; Gupta, R.C.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.K.; Lambiase, R.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Montag, C.; Oerter, B.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.I.; Raparia, D.; Tan, Y.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, W.

    2011-03-28

    Two electron lenses are under construction for RHIC to partially compensate the head-on beam-beam effect in order to increase both the peak and average luminosities. The final design of the overall system is reported as well as the status of the component design, acquisition, and manufacturing. An overview of the RHIC head-on beam-beam compensation project is given in [1], and more details in [2]. With 2 head-on beam-beam interactions in IP6 and IP8, a third interaction with a low-energy electron beam is added near IP10 to partially compensate the the head-on beam-beam effect. Two electron lenses are under construction, one for each ring. Both will be located in a region common to both beams, but each lens will act only on one beam. With head-on beam-beam compensation up to a factor of two improvement in luminosity is expected together with a polarized source upgrade. The current RHIC polarized proton performance is documented in Ref. [4]. An electron lens (Fig. 1) consists of an DC electron gun, warm solenoids to focus the electron beam during transport, a superconducting main solenoid in which the interaction with the proton beam occurs, steering magnets, a collector, and instrumentation. The main developments in the last year are given below. The experimental program for polarized program at 100 GeV was expected to be finished by the time the electron lenses are commissioned. However, decadal plans by the RHIC experiments STAR and PHENIX show a continuing interest at both 100 GeV and 250 GeV, and a larger proton beam size has been accommodated in the design (Tab. 1). Over the last year beam and lattice parameters were optimized, and RHIC proton lattices are under development for optimized electron lens performance. The effect of the electron lens magnetic structure on the proton beam was evaluated, and found to be correctable. Experiments were done in RHIC and the Tevatron.

  13. Status of 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long SSC dipole magnet R ampersand D program at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devred, A.; Bush, T.; Coombes, R.; DiMarco, J.; Goodzeit, C.; Kuzminski, J.; Puglisi, M.; Radusewicz, P.; Sanger, P.; Schermer, R.; Spigo, G.; Tompkins, J.; Turner, J.; Wolf, Z.; Yu, Y.; Zheng, H.; Ogitsu, T.; Anarella, M.; Cottingham, J.; Ganetis, G; Garber, M.; Ghosh, A.; Greene, A.; Gupta, R.; Herrera, J.; Kahn, S.; Kelly, E.; Meade, A.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Prodell, A.; Rehak, M.; Rohrer, E.P.; Sampson, W.; Shutt, R.; Thompson, P.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Bleadon, M.; Hanft, R.; Kuchnir, M.; Mantsch, P.; Mazur, P.O.; Orris, D.; Peterson, T.; Strait, J.; Royet, J.; Scanlan, R.; Taylor, C.

    1991-06-01

    Over the last year-and-a-half, several 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long dipole magnet prototypes were built by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under contract with the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory. These prototypes are the last phase of a half-decade-long R ampersand D program, carried out in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of the SSC main ring dipole magnets. They also prepare the way of the 5-cm-aperture dipole magnet program to be started soon. In this paper, we analyze the mechanical behavior of the BNL prototypes during cool-down and excitation, and we attempt to relate this behavior to the magnet features. The data reveal that the mechanical behavior is sensitive to the vertical collar-yoke interference, and that the magnets exhibited somewhat erratic changes in coil end-loading during cool-down. 9 refs., 6 figs

  14. Status of 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long SSC dipole magnet R D program at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devred, A.; Bush, T.; Coombes, R.; DiMarco, J.; Goodzeit, C.; Kuzminski, J.; Puglisi, M.; Radusewicz, P.; Sanger, P.; Schermer, R.; Spigo, G.; Tompkins, J.; Turner, J.; Wolf, Z.; Yu, Y.; Zheng, H. (Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States)); Ogitsu, T. (Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States) National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)); Anarella,

    1991-06-01

    Over the last year-and-a-half, several 4-cm-aperture, 17-m-long dipole magnet prototypes were built by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under contract with the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory. These prototypes are the last phase of a half-decade-long R D program, carried out in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of the SSC main ring dipole magnets. They also prepare the way of the 5-cm-aperture dipole magnet program to be started soon. In this paper, we analyze the mechanical behavior of the BNL prototypes during cool-down and excitation, and we attempt to relate this behavior to the magnet features. The data reveal that the mechanical behavior is sensitive to the vertical collar-yoke interference, and that the magnets exhibited somewhat erratic changes in coil end-loading during cool-down. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Sulfur polymer stabilization/solidification (SPSS) treatment of mixed waste mercury recovered from environmental restoration activities at BNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.; Adams, J.; Milian, L.

    2001-01-01

    Over 1,140 yd 3 of radioactively contaminated soil containing toxic mercury (Hg) and several liters of mixed-waste elemental mercury were generated during a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Mixed Waste Focus Area (DOE MWFA) is sponsoring a comparison of several technologies that may be used to treat these wastes and similar wastes at BNL and other sites across the DOE complex. This report describes work conducted at BNL on the application and pilot-scale demonstration of the newly developed Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process for treatment of contaminated mixed-waste soils containing high concentrations (approximately 5,000 mg/L) of mercury and liquid elemental mercury. BNL's SPSS (patent pending) process chemically stabilizes the mercury to reduce vapor pressure and leachability and physically encapsulates the waste in a solid matrix to eliminate dispersion and provide long-term durability. Two 55-gallon drums of mixed-waste soil containing high concentrations of mercury and about 62 kg of radioactive contaminated elemental mercury were successfully treated. Waste loadings of 60 wt% soil were achieved without resulting in any increase in waste volume, while elemental mercury was solidified at a waste loading of 33 wt% mercury. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) analyses indicate the final waste form products pass current Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) allowable TCLP concentrations as well as the more stringent proposed Universal Treatment Standards. Mass balance measurements show that 99.7% of the mercury treated was successfully retained within the waste form, while only 0.3% was captured in the off gas system

  16. Sulfur polymer stabilization/solidification (SPSS) treatment of mixed waste mercury recovered from environmental restoration activities at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalb, P.; Adams, J.; Milian, L.

    2001-01-29

    Over 1,140 yd{sup 3} of radioactively contaminated soil containing toxic mercury (Hg) and several liters of mixed-waste elemental mercury were generated during a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Mixed Waste Focus Area (DOE MWFA) is sponsoring a comparison of several technologies that may be used to treat these wastes and similar wastes at BNL and other sites across the DOE complex. This report describes work conducted at BNL on the application and pilot-scale demonstration of the newly developed Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process for treatment of contaminated mixed-waste soils containing high concentrations ({approximately} 5,000 mg/L) of mercury and liquid elemental mercury. BNL's SPSS (patent pending) process chemically stabilizes the mercury to reduce vapor pressure and leachability and physically encapsulates the waste in a solid matrix to eliminate dispersion and provide long-term durability. Two 55-gallon drums of mixed-waste soil containing high concentrations of mercury and about 62 kg of radioactive contaminated elemental mercury were successfully treated. Waste loadings of 60 wt% soil were achieved without resulting in any increase in waste volume, while elemental mercury was solidified at a waste loading of 33 wt% mercury. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) analyses indicate the final waste form products pass current Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) allowable TCLP concentrations as well as the more stringent proposed Universal Treatment Standards. Mass balance measurements show that 99.7% of the mercury treated was successfully retained within the waste form, while only 0.3% was captured in the off gas system.

  17. AGS experiments -- 1991, 1992, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depken, J.C.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains: (1) FY 1993 AGS schedule as run; (2) FY 1994--95 AGS schedule; (3) AGS experiments ≥ FY 1993 (as of 30 March 1994); (4) AGS beams 1993; (5) AGS experimental area FY 1991 physics program; (6) AGS experimental area FY 1992 physics program; (7) AGS experimental area FY 1993 physics program; (8) AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program (planned); (9) a listing of experiments by number; (10) two-page summaries of each experiment; (11) listing of publications of AGS experiments; and (12) listing of AGS experiments

  18. AGS experiments - 1994, 1995, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depken, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains the following information on the Brookhaven AGS Accelerator complex: FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; FY 1997 AGS schedule (working copy); AGS beams 1997; AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program (in progress); a listing of experiments by number; two-phage summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and listing of AGS experimenters begins here.

  19. AGS experiments - 1994, 1995, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depken, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains the following information on the Brookhaven AGS Accelerator complex: FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; FY 1997 AGS schedule (working copy); AGS beams 1997; AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program (in progress); a listing of experiments by number; two-phage summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and listing of AGS experimenters begins here

  20. Conversion of the BNL 200 MeV Linac to H- and polarized H- acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witkover, R.L.; Alessi, J.; Barton, D.; Kponou, A.; Makdisi, Y.; McNerney, A.

    1984-01-01

    Planning for the conversion of the AGS Linac to H - acceleration was begun in 1979; installation was completed in 1983. Discussion of this work and of the operational experience will be presented. The AGS Polarized Beam Project was begun in 1980. The design of the new H - polarized source, the low Energy Beam Transport line (LEBT), and Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) will be described. Current status and future plans will be presented. 14 references, 5 figures

  1. OBSERVATION OF STRONG - STRONG AND OTHER BEAM - BEAM EFFECTS IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISCHER, W.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; CAMERON, P.; CONNOLLY, R.; MONTAG, C.; PEGGS, S.; PILAT, F.; PTITSYN, V.; TEPIKIAN, S.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; VAN ZEIJTS, J.

    2003-01-01

    RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. For the first time, coherent beam-beam modes were observed in a bunched beam hadron collider. Other beam-beam effects in RHIC were observed in operation and in dedicated experiments with gold ions, deuterons and protons. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. During ramps unequal radio frequencies in the two rings cause the crossing points to move longitudinally. Thus bunches experience beam-beam interactions only in intervals and the tunes are modulated. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made so far

  2. Operations and Performance of RHIC as a Cu-Cu Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Bai, Mei; Barton, Donald; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Harvey, Margaret; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Lee, Roger C; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Russo, Thomas; Sandberg, Jon; Satogata, Todd; Schultheiss, Carl; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Zaltsman, Alex; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y; Zhang, Wu

    2005-01-01

    The 5th year of RHIC operations, started in November 2004 and expected to last till June 2005, consists of a physics run with Cu-Cu collisions at 100 GeV/u followed by one with polarized protons at 100 GeV. We will address here overall performance of the RHIC complex used for the first time as a Cu-Cu collider, and compare it with previous operational experience with Au, PP and asymmetric d-Au collisions. We will also discuss operational improvements, such as a ?* squeeze to 85cm in the high luminosity interaction regions from the design value of 1m, system improvements and machine performance limitations, such as vacuum pressure rise, intra-beam scattering, and beam beam interaction.

  3. The ERL-based Design of Electron-Hadron Collider eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptitsyn, Vadim [et al.

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments of the ERL-based design of future high-luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC focused on balancing technological risks present in the design versus the design cost. As a result a lower risk design has been adopted at moderate cost increase. The modifications include a change of the main linac RF frequency, reduced number of SRF cavity types and modified electron spin transport using a spin rotator. A luminosity-staged approach is being explored with a Nominal design ($L \\sim 10^{33} {\\rm cm}^2 {\\rm s}^{-1}$) that employs reduced electron current and could possibly be based on classical electron cooling, and then with the Ultimate design ($L \\gt 10^{34} {\\rm cm}^{-2} {\\rm s}^{-1}$) that uses higher electron current and an innovative cooling technique (CeC). The paper describes the recent design modifications, and presents the full status of the eRHIC ERL-based design.

  4. Excitation functions of parameters in Erlang distribution, Schwinger mechanism, and Tsallis statistics in RHIC BES program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Li-Na; Liu, Fu-Hu; Lacey, Roy A.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results of the transverse-momentum distributions of φ mesons and Ω hyperons produced in gold-gold (Au-Au) collisions with different centrality intervals, measured by the STAR Collaboration at different energies (7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV) in the beam energy scan (BES) program at the relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC), are approximately described by the single Erlang distribution and the two-component Schwinger mechanism. Moreover, the STAR experimental transverse-momentum distributions of negatively charged particles, produced in Au-Au collisions at RHIC BES energies, are approximately described by the two-component Erlang distribution and the single Tsallis statistics. The excitation functions of free parameters are obtained from the fit to the experimental data. A weak softest point in the string tension in Ω hyperon spectra is observed at 7.7 GeV. (orig.)

  5. Photoproduction at collider energies: from RHIC and HERA to the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Baltz, A; Brodsky, S J; D'Enterria, D G; Dreyer, U; Engel, R; Frankfurt, L; Gorbunov, Y; Guzey, V; Hamilton, A; Klasen, M; Klein, S R; Kowalski, H; Levonian, S; Lourenço, C; Machado, M V T; Nachtmann, O; Nagy, Z; Nystrand, J; Piotrzkowski, K; Ramalhete, P; Savin, A; Scapparone, E; Schicker, R; Silvermyr, D; Strikman, M I; Valkárová, A; Vogt, R; Yilmaz, M; Enterria, David d'

    2007-01-01

    We present the mini-proceedings of the workshop on "Photoproduction at collider energies: from RHIC and HERA to the LHC" held at the European Centre for Theoretical Studies in Nuclear Physics and Related Areas (ECT*, Trento) from January 15 to 19, 2007. The workshop gathered both theorists and experimentalists to discuss the current status of investigations of high-energy photon-induced processes at different colliders (HERA, RHIC, and Tevatron) as well as preparations for extension of these studies at the LHC. The main physics topics covered were: (i) small-$x$ QCD in photoproduction studies with protons and in electromagnetic (aka. ultraperipheral) nucleus-nucleus collisions, (ii) hard diffraction physics at hadron colliders, and (iii) photon-photon collisions at very high energies: electroweak and beyond the Standard Model processes. These mini-proceedings consist of an introduction and short summaries of the talks presented at the meeting.

  6. Development of High Voltage Power Supply Controls for the STAR Experiment at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Samuel; Fujita, Jiro

    2017-09-01

    The STAR (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC) experiment at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) at Brookhaven National Laboratory studies the collisions of various ion species. The large number of channels to be controlled and monitored require an experiment-wide control system for efficient operation. Additionally, the radiation levels require that the user interfaces of the system are located outside the experimental hall. Each sub-detector system at STAR is controlled by software input/output controllers (IOCs). Aging high voltages systems at STAR are being replaced or are having their software updated to run on new processors. The outdated high voltage controls systems occasionally malfunction or require frequent rebooting of the remote hardware. This project aims to design and implement more effective controls software for the Beam-Beam Counter and the Zero Degree Calorimeter high voltage systems in order to mitigate this problem. This work will also be applicable to other subsystems with similar hardware issues.

  7. Excitation functions of parameters in Erlang distribution, Schwinger mechanism, and Tsallis statistics in RHIC BES program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Li-Na; Liu, Fu-Hu [Shanxi University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi (China); Lacey, Roy A. [Stony Brook University, Departments of Chemistry and Physics, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Experimental results of the transverse-momentum distributions of φ mesons and Ω hyperons produced in gold-gold (Au-Au) collisions with different centrality intervals, measured by the STAR Collaboration at different energies (7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV) in the beam energy scan (BES) program at the relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC), are approximately described by the single Erlang distribution and the two-component Schwinger mechanism. Moreover, the STAR experimental transverse-momentum distributions of negatively charged particles, produced in Au-Au collisions at RHIC BES energies, are approximately described by the two-component Erlang distribution and the single Tsallis statistics. The excitation functions of free parameters are obtained from the fit to the experimental data. A weak softest point in the string tension in Ω hyperon spectra is observed at 7.7 GeV. (orig.)

  8. Review on Recent Results from RHIC Polarized Collider; Unexpected Forward Neutron Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Itaru

    The polarized proton-proton collider at RHIC provides an unique opportunity to study the spin structure of the proton. The latest highlights from both transverse and longitudinal RHIC spin program are introduced in this document. For the transverse program, two asymmetry measurements are discussed here which are distinguished by the production mechanism either soft (diffractive) or hard perturbative QCD natures depending on the rapidity region of the hadron production. The former is the very forwardneutron asymmetry measurements which showed unexpectedly drastic dependence on the atomic mass. The latter is the forward pion production whose origin of the large asymmetry has been under debate for theoretical understanding over two decades. For longitudinal program, the latest highlights from the measurements on the gluon and the sea quark spin components of the proton spin are discussed.

  9. The dipole corrector magnets for the RHIC fast global orbit feedback system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thieberger, P.; Arnold, L.; Folz, C.; Hulsart, R.; Jain, A.; Karl, R.; Mahler, G.; Meng, W.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ritter, J.; Smart, L.; Tuozzolo, J.; White, J.

    2011-01-01

    The recently completed RHIC fast global orbit feedback system uses 24 small 'window-frame' horizontal dipole correctors. Space limitations dictated a very compact design. The magnetic design and modelling of these laminated yoke magnets is described as well as the mechanical implementation, coil winding, vacuum impregnation, etc. Test procedures to determine the field quality and frequency response are described. The results of these measurements are presented and discussed. A small fringe field from each magnet, overlapping the opposite RHIC ring, is compensated by a correction winding placed on the opposite ring's magnet and connected in series with the main winding of the first one. Results from measurements of this compensation scheme are shown and discussed.

  10. Detecting the anti-hypertriton and anti-helium-4 from the RHIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yu-Gang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress on the dectection of antimatter particles at RHIC is briefly reviewed. The observations of the anti-hypertriton (H¯⊼3${}_ \\mathbin{\\buildrel\\relbar \\over{\\smash{\\scriptstyle\\wedge}\\vphantom{_x}}} ^3\\overline {\\rm{H}} $and anti-helium-4 nuclei ( (4He¯, or α¯$\\left( {^4\\overline {{\\rm{He}}} ,\\,{\\rm{or}}\\,\\overline {\\rm{\\alpha }} } \\right$, or ᾱ from the RHIC-STAR Collaboration are highlighted. In addition, preliminary lifetime measurement of H¯Λ3${}_\\Lambda ^3\\overline {\\rm{H}} $ and energy dependence of strangeness population factor are presented. The mechanism of light antinuclei production is also discussed.

  11. MEASUREMENT AND CORRECTION OF THIRD RESONANCE DRIVING TERM IN THE RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LUO,Y.; BAI, M.; BENGTSSON, J.; CALAGA, R.; FISCHER, W.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    To further improve the luminosity in polarized proton operation of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, correction of the horizontal two-third resonance at store is desirable. The long-lasting coherent beam oscillations, produced by the AC dipole, are used to measure 3Q,'s resonance driving term h{sub 30000} through the analysis of turn-by-turn beam position data with the algorithm outlined by J. Bengtsson. The resonance driving term h30000 can be compensated with the 12 arc chromatic sextupole families. In this article, we will review the technique of h{sub 30000} resonance driving term's measurement and correction with AC dipole excitation in the RHIC, followed by the preliminary beam experiment results from the RHIC 2006 polarized proton run.

  12. OPERATIONS AND PERFORMANCE OF RHIC AS A CU-CU COLLIDER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PILAT, R.; AHRENS, L.; BAI, M.; BARTON, D.S.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The 5th year of RHIC operations, started in November 2004 and expected to last till June 2005, consists of a physics run with Cu-Cu collisions at 100 GeV/u followed by one with polarized protons (pp) at 100 GeV [l]. We will address here the overall performance of the RHIC complex used for the first time as a Cu-Cu collider, and compare it with previous operational experience with Au, PP and asymmetric d-Au collisions. We will also discuss operational improvements, such as a {beta}* squeeze to 85cm in the high luminosity interaction regions from the design value of 1m, system improvements, machine performance and limitations, and address reliability and uptime issues.

  13. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop entitled Hydrodynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions and QCD Equation of State (Volume 88)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsch,F.; Kharzeev, D.; Molnar, K.; Petreczky, P.; Teaney, D.

    2008-04-21

    The interpretation of relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies with thermal concepts is largely based on the relative success of ideal (nondissipative) hydrodynamics. This approach can describe basic observables at RHIC, such as particle spectra and momentum anisotropies, fairly well. On the other hand, recent theoretical efforts indicate that dissipation can play a significant role. Ideally viscous hydrodynamic simulations would extract, if not only the equation of state, but also transport coefficients from RHIC data. There has been a lot of progress with solving relativistic viscous hydrodynamics. There are already large uncertainties in ideal hydrodynamics calculations, e.g., uncertainties associated with initial conditions, freezeout, and the simplified equations of state typically utilized. One of the most sensitive observables to the equation of state is the baryon momentum anisotropy, which is also affected by freezeout assumptions. Up-to-date results from lattice quantum chromodynamics on the transition temperature and equation of state with realistic quark masses are currently available. However, these have not yet been incorporated into the hydrodynamic calculations. Therefore, the RBRC workshop 'Hydrodynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions and QCD Equation of State' aimed at getting a better understanding of the theoretical frameworks for dissipation and near-equilibrium dynamics in heavy-ion collisions. The topics discussed during the workshop included techniques to solve the dynamical equations and examine the role of initial conditions and decoupling, as well as the role of the equation of state and transport coefficients in current simulations.

  14. K*0(892 and ϕ(1020 resonance production at RHIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Lokesh

    2015-01-01

    The K*0(892 and ϕ(1020 resonance production at mid-rapidity (|y| <0.5, measured in high energy (Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au and p + p collisions at RHIC with the STAR experiment, reconstructed by their hadronic decay in Kπ and KK, respectively, are discussed. Mesons’ spectra, yields, mean transverse momentum 〈pT〉, nuclear modification factor, and azimuthal anisotropy are discussed as a function of centrality and collision energy.

  15. Open and hidden charm production in dA collisions at RHIC andLHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R.

    2005-03-04

    We discuss aspects of open and hidden charm production in deuterium-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. We describe calculations of the total c{bar c} cross section and the charm quark transverse momentum distributions. We next explain how shadowing and moderate nuclear absorption can explain the PHENIX J/{psi} dAu/pp ratios and predict the combined effect of shadowing and absorption in 6.2 TeV d+Pb collisions.

  16. A bunch to bucket phase detector for the RHIC LLRF upgrade platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.S.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Narayan, G.; Polizzo, S.; Severino, F.

    2011-03-28

    As part of the overall development effort for the RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform [1,2,3], a generic four channel 16 bit Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) daughter module was developed to provide high speed, wide dynamic range digitizing and processing of signals from DC to several hundred megahertz. The first operational use of this card was to implement the bunch to bucket phase detector for the RHIC LLRF beam control feedback loops. This paper will describe the design and performance features of this daughter module as a bunch to bucket phase detector, and also provide an overview of its place within the overall LLRF platform architecture as a high performance digitizer and signal processing module suitable to a variety of applications. In modern digital control and signal processing systems, ADCs provide the interface between the analog and digital signal domains. Once digitized, signals are then typically processed using algorithms implemented in field programmable gate array (FPGA) logic, general purpose processors (GPPs), digital signal processors (DSPs) or a combination of these. For the recently developed and commissioned RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform, we've developed a four channel ADC daughter module based on the Linear Technology LTC2209 16 bit, 160 MSPS ADC and the Xilinx V5FX70T FPGA. The module is designed to be relatively generic in application, and with minimal analog filtering on board, is capable of processing signals from DC to 500 MHz or more. The module's first application was to implement the bunch to bucket phase detector (BTB-PD) for the RHIC LLRF system. The same module also provides DC digitizing of analog processed BPM signals used by the LLRF system for radial feedback.

  17. A first look at Au·Au collisions at RHIC energies using the PHOBOS ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A first look at Au·Au collisions at RHIC energies using the PHOBOS detector. BIRGER BACK1, for the PHOBOS Collaboration. M D Baker2, D S Barton2, R R Betts6, R Bindel7, A Budzanowski3, W Busza4,. A Carroll2, J Corbo2, M P Decowski4, E Garcia6, N George1, K Gulbrandsen4, S Gushue2,. C Halliwell6, J Hamblen8, ...

  18. RHIC Performance as a 100 GeV Polarized Proton Collider in Run-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hahn, H.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Menga, P.M.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Pozdeyev, E.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-01-01

    During the second half of Run-9, the Relativisitc Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided polarized proton collisions at two interaction points. The spin orientation of both beams at these collision points was controlled by helical spin rotators, and physics data were taken with different orientations of the beam polarization. Recent developments and improvements will be presented, as well as luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-9.

  19. Crystal-based approach to beam collimation in RHIC and SNS

    OpenAIRE

    Biryukov, V. M.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Drees, A.; Malitsky, N.; Trbojevic, D.

    2001-01-01

    Bent crystal serving as a scraper of the beam collimation system can channel halo particles directly into the absorber. By means of computer simulations, we analyse the capabilities of crystal technique for the beam cleaning process. Two applications are considered: the crystal collimator now being installed into RHIC for cleaning of the fully stripped gold ions, and a similar system being developed for the Accumulator Ring of the Spallation Neutron Source.

  20. RHIC Performance as a 100 GeV Polarized Proton Collider in Run-9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; DOttavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hahn, H.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Menga, P.M.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Pozdeyev, E.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    During the second half of Run-9, the Relativisitc Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided polarized proton collisions at two interaction points. The spin orientation of both beams at these collision points was controlled by helical spin rotators, and physics data were taken with different orientations of the beam polarization. Recent developments and improvements will be presented, as well as luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-9.